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Sample records for natural coolants part

  1. Natural circulation in reactor coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Reactor coolant system (RCS) natural circulation in a PWR is the buoyancy-driven coolant circulation between the core and the upper-plenum region (in-vessel circulation) with or without a countercurrent flow in the hot leg piping between the vessel and steam generators (ex-vessel circulation). This kind of multidimensional bouyancy-driven flow circulation serves as a means of transferring the heat from the core to the structures in the upper plenum, hot legs, and possibly steam generators. As a result, the RCS piping and other pressure boundaries may be heated to high temperatures at which the structural integrity is challenged. RCS natural circulation is likely to occur during the core uncovery period of the TMLB' accident in a PWR when the vessel upper plenum and hot leg are already drained and filled with steam and possibly other gaseous species. RCS natural circulation is being studied for the Surry plant during the TMLB' accident in which station blackout coincides with the loss of auxiliary feedwater and no operator actions. The effects of the multidimensional RCS natural circulation during the TMLB' accident are discussed

  2. Coolant rate distribution in horizontal steam generator under natural circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blagovechtchenski, A.; Leontieva, V.; Mitrioukhin, A.

    1997-01-01

    In the presentation the major factors determining the conditions of NCC (Natural Coolant Circulation) in the primary circuit and in particular conditions of coolant rate distribution on the horizontal tubes of PGV-1000 in NPP with VVER-1000 under NCC are considered

  3. Coolant rate distribution in horizontal steam generator under natural circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagovechtchenski, A.; Leontieva, V.; Mitrioukhin, A. [St. Petersburg State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    In the presentation the major factors determining the conditions of NCC (Natural Coolant Circulation) in the primary circuit and in particular conditions of coolant rate distribution on the horizontal tubes of PGV-1000 in NPP with VVER-1000 under NCC are considered. 5 refs.

  4. Coolant rate distribution in horizontal steam generator under natural circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagovechtchenski, A; Leontieva, V; Mitrioukhin, A [St. Petersburg State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    In the presentation the major factors determining the conditions of NCC (Natural Coolant Circulation) in the primary circuit and in particular conditions of coolant rate distribution on the horizontal tubes of PGV-1000 in NPP with VVER-1000 under NCC are considered. 5 refs.

  5. Natural convection heat transfer characteristics of the molten metal pool with solidification by boiling coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jae Seon; Suh, Kune Yull; Chung, Chang Hyun; Park, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents results of experimental studies on the heat transfer and solidifcation of the molten metal pool with overlying coolant with boiling. The metal pool is heated from the bottom surface and coolant is injected onto the molten metal pool. As a result, the crust, which is a solidified layer, may form at the top of the molten metal pool. Heat transfer is accomplished by a conjugate mechanism, which consists of the natural convection of the molten metal pool, the conduction in the crust layer and the convective boiling heat transfer in the coolant. This work examines the crust formation and the heat transfer rate on the molten metal pool with boiling coolant. The simulant molten pool material is tin (Sn) with the melting temperature of 232 .deg. C. Demineralized water is used as the working coolant. The crust layer thickness was ostensibly varied by the heated bottom surface temperature of the test section, but not much affected by the coolant injection rate. The correlation between the Nusselt number and the Rayleight number in the molten metal pool region of this study is compared against the crust formation experiment without coolant boiling and the literature correlations. The present experimental results are higher than those from the experiment without coolant boiling, but show general agreement with the Eckert correlation, with some deviations in the high and low ends of the Rayleigh number. This discrepancy is currently attributed to concurrent rapid boiling of the coolant on top of the metal layer

  6. Natural convection heat transfer characteristics of the molten metal pool with solidification by boiling coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Seon; Suh, Kune Yull; Chung, Chang Hyun [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paark, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents results of experimental studies on the heat transfer and solidification of the molten metal pool with overlying coolant with boiling. The metal pool is heated from the bottom surface and coolant is injected onto the molten metal pool. Ad a result, the crust, which is a solidified layer, may form at the top of the molten metal pool. Heat transfer is accomplished by a conjugate mechanism, which consists of the natural convection of the molten metal pool, the conduction in the crust layer and the convective boiling heat transfer in the coolant. This work examines the crust formation and the heat transfer rate on the molten metal pool with boiling coolant. The simulant molten pool material is tin (Sn) with the melting temperature of 232 deg C. Demineralized water is used as the working coolant. The crust layer thickness was ostensibly varied by the heated bottom surface temperature of the test section, but not much affected by the coolant injection rate. The correlation between the Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool region of this study is compared against the crust formation experiment without coolant boiling and the literature correlations. The present experimental results are higher than those from the experiment without coolant boiling, but show general agreement with the Eckert correlation, with some deviations in the high and low ends of the Rayleigh number. This discrepancy is currently attributed to concurrent rapid boiling of the coolant on top of the metal layer. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  7. Natural convection heat transfer characteristics of the molten metal pool with solidification by boiling coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Seon; Suh, Kune Yull; Chung, Chang Hyun [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paark, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents results of experimental studies on the heat transfer and solidification of the molten metal pool with overlying coolant with boiling. The metal pool is heated from the bottom surface and coolant is injected onto the molten metal pool. Ad a result, the crust, which is a solidified layer, may form at the top of the molten metal pool. Heat transfer is accomplished by a conjugate mechanism, which consists of the natural convection of the molten metal pool, the conduction in the crust layer and the convective boiling heat transfer in the coolant. This work examines the crust formation and the heat transfer rate on the molten metal pool with boiling coolant. The simulant molten pool material is tin (Sn) with the melting temperature of 232 deg C. Demineralized water is used as the working coolant. The crust layer thickness was ostensibly varied by the heated bottom surface temperature of the test section, but not much affected by the coolant injection rate. The correlation between the Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool region of this study is compared against the crust formation experiment without coolant boiling and the literature correlations. The present experimental results are higher than those from the experiment without coolant boiling, but show general agreement with the Eckert correlation, with some deviations in the high and low ends of the Rayleigh number. This discrepancy is currently attributed to concurrent rapid boiling of the coolant on top of the metal layer. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  8. Development of natural convection heat transfer correlation for liquid metal with overlying boiling coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jae Seon; Suh, Kune Y.; Chung, Chang Hyun; Park, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik

    1999-01-01

    Experimental study was performed to investigate the natural convection heat transfer characteristics and the crust formation of the molten metal pool concurrent with forced convective boiling of the overlying coolant. Tests were performed under the condition of the bottom surface heating in the test section and the forced convection of the coolant being injected onto the molten metal pool. The constant temperature and constant heater input power conditions were adopted for the bottom heating. Test results showed that the temperature distribution and crust layer thickness in the metal layer are appreciably affected by the heated bottom surface temperature of the test section, but not much by the coolant injection rate. The relationship between the Nu number and Ra number in the molten metal pool region is determined and compared with the correlations in the literature, and the experiment without coolant boiling. A new correlation on the relationship between the Nu number and Ra number in the molten metal pool with crust formation is developed from the experimental data

  9. A potential of boiling water power reactors with a natural circulation of a coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmachkin, V.S.; Sokolov, I.N.

    1998-01-01

    The use of the natural circulation of coolant in the boiling water reactors simplifies a reactor control and facilities the service of the equipment components. The moderated core power loads allows the long fuel burnup, good control ability and large water stock set up the enhancement of safety level. That is considered to be very important for isolated regions or small countries. In the paper a high safety level and effectiveness of BWRs with natural circulation are reviewed. The limitations of flow stability and protection measures are being discussed. Some recent efforts in designing of such reactors are described.(author)

  10. Preliminary evaluation of the stress analysis reports for Angra I reactor coolant loop - part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, S.V.G.; Andrade, J.E.L. de

    1980-03-01

    A methodology that will allow CNEN to approve the stress analysis reports of the components of the Brazilian nuclear power plants, was developed. The reactor coolant loop (RCL)of Angra I was checkd. This is the first part of the complete report and consists of the approval of the design documents, the approval of the equipment support models and the aproval of the steam generator dynamic model. The second part of this work is under way now and should contain the approval of the RCL stress and fatigue analysis according to ASME code section III. As shown in section 7 it appears necessary additional information from Westinghouse about the design of the RCL. (Author) [pt

  11. Optimisation of the flow path in a conceptual pool type reactor under natural circulation with lead coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, R.; Anglart, H.

    2014-01-01

    This contribution investigates the effects of a bypass flow blocking bottom plate and the influence of the heat transfer between the hot and cold leg in a small pool type reactor cooled through natural convection with lead coolant. The computations are carried out using 3D computational fluid dynamics, where small-detail parts, such as the core and heat exchangers are modeled using a porous media approach. The introduction of full conjugate heat transfer shows that the heat transfer between the hot and cold leg can deteriorate flow in the cold leg and lead to recirculation zones. These zones become even more pronounced with the introduction of a bottom plate, which on the other hand also increases the flow through the core and lowers the maximum temperature in the core by approximately 150 K. Based on the results, redesign suggestions for the bottom plate and the internal wall are made. (author)

  12. Integral nuclear power reactor with natural coolant circulation. Investigation of passive RHR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samoilov, O.B.; Kuul, V.S.; Malamud, V.A.; Tarasov, G.I.

    1996-01-01

    The development of a small power (up to 240 MWe) integral PWR for nuclear co-generation power plants has been carried out. The distinctive features of this advanced reactor are: primary circuit arrangement in a single pressure vessel; natural coolant circulation; passive safety systems with self-activated control devices; use of a second (guard) vessel housing the reactor; favourable conditions for the most severe accident management. A passive steam condensing channel has been developed which is activated by the direct action of the primary circuit pressure without an automatic controlling action or manual intervention for emergency cooling of an integral reactor with an in-built pressurizer. In an emergency situation as pressure rises in the reactor a self-activated device blows out non-condensable gases from the condenser tube bundle and returns them in the steam-condensing mode of the operation with the returing primary coolant condensate into the reactor. The thermo-physical test facility is constructed and the experimental development of the steam-condensing channels is performed aiming at the verification of mathematical models for these channels operation in integral reactors both at loss-of-heat removal and LOCA accidents. (orig.)

  13. The chemistry of the X-7 (organic) loop coolant part I, May 1960 to April 1965

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smee, J.L.

    1966-01-01

    The report describes in detail the X-7 coolant chemistry from the start of loop operation in May 1960 to April 1965. During this period the coolant was Santowax OM containing a nominal 30% high boilers or high molecular weight decomposition products. During the first few months of operation it became apparent that there wa.s a serious problem in the fouling of fuel element heat transfer surfaces. This was overcome by continuous purification of the coolant by Attapulgus clay and filters. Since clay purification has been in use, the fouling rate has been less than 0.2 μg.cm -2 .h -1 (10 μm per year), the target value for successful operation of an organic cooled power reactor. Control of the fouling promoter chlorine has been accomplished by completely excluding it from the vicinity of the loop. Any which does get into the coolant is removed by a bed of Mg ribbon and Pd pellets. Since such a bed has been in use, the Cl content of the coolant has been less than 3 ppm. Also given in this report are: (a) a brief history of the loop since its inception in 1959. (b) the effect of the clay column on the coolant chemistry. (c) a complete description of the current purification, degas and make-up circuits, (d) a summary of the coolant chemistry during all fuel irradiations. (author)

  14. Correlation development of natural convection heat transfer in consideration of aspect ratio change and coolant boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, L. J.; Cho, Y. L.; Kang, K. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, H. D.; Cho, J. S.; Jung, C. H.

    1999-01-01

    A new correlation on natural convection heat transfer with crust formation in the molten metal pool has been developed in consideration of coolant boiling effect and of aspect ratio change by an increase in crust thickness. Two test results of the convection cooling case, natural and forced convection cooling cases, and of the boiling case were used in the present study. The experimental results have shown that the Nusselt number of the case with boiling condition in the molten metal pool is greater than that of the case with non-boiling condition at the same Rayleigh number. Even though the Rayleigh number rapidly decreases due to an increase of the crust thickness, the Nusselt number does not rapidly decrease because of the aspect ratio effect. From the experimental results, the new correlation between the Nusselt number and Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool with the crust formation has been developed as Nu 0.051(Ra) 1/3 (AR) . 0 .2441 (Φ) 0.025 using Globe and Dropkin correlation

  15. Numerical Simulation of Non-Rotating and Rotating Coolant Channel Flow Fields. Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, David L.

    2000-01-01

    Future generations of ultra high bypass-ratio jet engines will require far higher pressure ratios and operating temperatures than those of current engines. For the foreseeable future, engine materials will not be able to withstand the high temperatures without some form of cooling. In particular the turbine blades, which are under high thermal as well as mechanical loads, must be cooled. Cooling of turbine blades is achieved by bleeding air from the compressor stage of the engine through complicated internal passages in the turbine blades (internal cooling, including jet-impingement cooling) and by bleeding small amounts of air into the boundary layer of the external flow through small discrete holes on the surface of the blade (film cooling and transpiration cooling). The cooling must be done using a minimum amount of air or any increases in efficiency gained through higher operating temperature will be lost due to added load on the compressor stage. Turbine cooling schemes have traditionally been based on extensive empirical data bases, quasi-one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, and trial and error. With improved capabilities of CFD, these traditional methods can be augmented by full three-dimensional simulations of the coolant flow to predict in detail the heat transfer and metal temperatures. Several aspects of turbine coolant flows make such application of CFD difficult, thus a highly effective CFD methodology must be used. First, high resolution of the flow field is required to attain the needed accuracy for heat transfer predictions, making highly efficient flow solvers essential for such computations. Second, the geometries of the flow passages are complicated but must be modeled accurately in order to capture all important details of the flow. This makes grid generation and grid quality important issues. Finally, since coolant flows are turbulent and separated the effects of turbulence must be modeled with a low Reynolds number

  16. The challenge of modeling fuel–coolant interaction: Part I – Premixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meignen, Renaud, E-mail: renaud.meignen@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN/PSN-RES/SAG, BP 3, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Picchi, Stephane; Lamome, Julien [Communication and Systèmes, 22 avenue Galilée, 92350 Le Plessis Robinson (France); Raverdy, Bruno [IRSN/PSN-RES/SAG, BP3, 92362 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France); Escobar, Sebastian Castrillon [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN/PSN-RES/SAG, BP 3, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Nicaise, Gregory [IRSN/PSN-RES/SAG, BP3, 92362 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We present the status modeling of the fuel–coolant interaction premixing stage in the computer code MC3D. • We also propose a general state of the art, highlighting recent improvements in understanding and modeling, remaining difficulties, controversies and needs. • We highlight the need for improving the understanding of the melt fragmentation and oxidation. • The verification basis is presented. - Abstract: Fuel–coolant interaction is a complex mixing process that can occur during the course of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant involving core melting and relocation. Under certain circumstances, a steam explosion might develop during the mixing of the melt and the water and induce a loss of integrity of the containment. Even in the absence of an explosion, studying the mixing phenomenon is also of high interest due to its strong impact on the progression of the accident (debris bed formation, hydrogen production). This article is the first of two aiming at presenting both a status of research and understanding of fuel–coolant interaction and the main characteristics of the model developed in the 3-dimensional computer code MC3D. It is devoted to the premixing phase whereas the second is related to the explosion phase. A special attention is given to major difficulties, uncertainties and needs for further improvements in knowledge and modeling. We discuss more particularly the major phenomena that are melt fragmentation and film boiling heat transfer and the challenges related to modeling melt solidification and oxidation. Some highlights related to the code verification are finally given.

  17. Detonation waves in melt-coolant interaction. Part 2. Applied analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolev, N.I.; Hulin, H.

    2001-01-01

    Making use of the detonation theory presented in part 1 for melt-water interaction, detonation solutions for different melt-water pairs at different conditions are compared to each other. Discussion is provided on the existence of detonation solutions for water droplet - melt droplet - gas systems. The conclusion is made that even if such solution can be realized in the nature, which is highly questionable, the resulting detonation pressures will be below 200 bar. This is an important result for judging the risk of the melt-water disperse mixtures in nuclear safety analysis. In addition, the detonation pressures for alumna-continuous water systems have been found to be stronger then those for urania-continuous water systems, in agreement with the experimental observations and seems to give finally the searched for a long time explanation why alumna-water systems detonate much more violent than urania-water systems. (orig.) [de

  18. The light water integral reactor with natural circulation of the coolant at supercritical pressure B-500 SKDI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silin, V.A.; Voznesensky, V.A.; Afrov, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    Pressure increase in the primary circuit over the critical value gives a possibility to construct the B-500SKDI (500 MWe) lightwater integral reactor with natural circulation of the coolant in the vessel with a diameter less than 5 m. The given reactor has a high safety level, simple operability, its specific capital cost and fuel expenditure being lower as compared to a conventional PWR. The development of the reactor is carried out taking into consideration verified technical decisions of current NPPs on the basis of Russian LWR technology. (orig.)

  19. Noise analysis and mimic experiments for loose part accident in the primary coolant loop of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiuzhou; Cheng Tingxiang; Zhang Bin

    1994-01-01

    The basic principle of loose part monitoring is to detect and measure the structure transfer sound generated by impacting of metal loose part with accelerators and to identify and diagnose by the micro-processor. This paper introduces the theoretical base of loose part monitoring, the location and mass estimation of loose part, and three mimic experiment applying noise analysis techniques. It provides some useful preparations for the development of loose part monitoring system

  20. On natural circulation in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors and pebble bed reactors for different flow regimes and various coolant gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melesed'Hospital, G.

    1983-01-01

    The use of CO 2 or N 2 (heavy gas) instead of helium during natural circulation leads to improved performance in both High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) and in Pebble Bed Reactors (PBR). For instance, the coolant temperature rise corresponding to a coolant pressure level and a rate of afterheat removal could be only 18% with CO 2 as compared to He, for laminar flow in HTGR; this value would be 40% in PBR. There is less difference between HTGR and PBR for turbulent flows; CO 2 is found to be always better than N 2 . These types of results derived from relationships between coolant properties, coolant flow, temperature rise, pressure, afterheat levels and core geometry, are obtained for HTGR and PBR for various flow regimes, both within the core and in the primary loop

  1. Mechanical and Radiological Characterization of Different parts of an Irradiation Coolant Channel Tube from Atucha I Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piquin, Ruben

    2001-01-01

    The widespread replacement of reactor internals has generated a substantial volume of active material. It is essential to work with these components at least in a partial way before the next planned stop, which will take place during the second semester of the year 2002. Due to the fact that the reactor internals pool and the storage pool for irradiated nuclear fuel have limited capacities, it has been proposed to compact an experimental shift of 50 irradiated coolant channels, that are currently placed in storage pools. Basically the processed waste will be put in baskets at the bottom pools.The alternative choice proposes to divide an irradiation coolant channel tube into different parts: stainless steel section, zircaloy-4 section and stainless steel section with hardened zones with cobalt alloys named Estelite-6. The person in charge has already planned the constructive and operative solutions but the mechanical characterization of the different parts of the channel tube is necessary in order to dimension the compaction tool needed for the semi-industrial installation.In the present special report, two well-differentiated actions will be described. The necessary compacted strength of the irradiation coolant channel tube will be estimated for the stainless steel section and the zircaloy-4 section starting from experiment with unirradiated material and considering effects of radiation damage and hydrides on the ductility.These results will be used to design the necessary compacted tools for the semi-industrial installation. The necessary equipment for the radiological characterization of the different material sections already specified will be described and the most important emitting particles of radiation that could be detected will be mentioned. Also the decontamination process to use including the radiological characterization of every stage of the process will be described in order to establish the decontamination factor. Finally the most important

  2. Verification of computer code for calculation of coolant radiolysis in the VVER reactor core with regard for boiling in its upper part

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, O.P.; Kabakchi, S.A. [OKB Gidropress, Podolsk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    Code Bora for WWER coolant radiolysis calculation considering single jets boiling in the reactor core top part is developed on the basis of computer codes MOPABA-H2 (radiolysis of aqueous solutions) and SteamRad (radiolysis of vapor). Physico-chemical processes taking place in boiling core coolant are complex and diversified. Still, for the solution of certain problems their simulation can be simplified. The approach of reasonable simplification was used for development of code Bora: mathematical model assumed is purposed for simulation of phenomena only in the area of interest; the number of simulated chemical reactions and particles shall be reasonably minimum; complexity of interphase mass transfer calculation procedure shall be adequate to actually available accuracy of modeling. The analysis of new experimental initial yields of water radiolysis products data and kinetic parameters of elementary chemical reactions with their participation has been carried out. Some changes have been introduced in the mechanism of liquid water and aqueous solutions of ammonia radiolysis have been significantly revised on the basis of this analysis. Examples of the calculations provided for code Bora verification are presented. Despite of very simple simulation of interphase mass transfer, Bora allows to obtain average chemical composition of two-phase coolant at BWR core outlet with the accuracy sufficient for engineering calculations. The report also presents the results of two-phase coolant chemical composition test calculation for reactor core top part coolant boiling in pressurized water reactor. (author)

  3. Natural gas conversion. Part VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesia, E.; Spivey, J.J.; Fleisch, T.H.

    2001-01-01

    This volume contains peer-reviewed manuscripts describing the scientific and technological advances presented at the 6th Natural Gas Conversion Symposium held in Alaska in June 2001. This symposium continues the tradition of excellence and the status as the premier technical meeting in this area established by previous meetings. The 6th Natural Gas Conversion Symposium is conducted under the overall direction of the Organizing Committee. The Program Committee was responsible for the review, selection, editing of most of the manuscripts included in this volume. A standing International Advisory Board has ensured the effective long-term planning and the continuity and technical excellence of these meetings. The titles of the contributions are: Impact of syngas generation technology selection on a GTL FPSO; Methane conversion via microwave plasma initiated by a metal initiator; Mechanism of carbon deposit/removal in methane dry reforming on supported metal catalysts; Catalyst-assisted oxidative dehydrogenation of light paraffins in short contact time reactors; Catalytic dehydrogenation of propane over a PtSn/SiO 2 catalyst with oxygen addition: selective oxidation of H2 in the presence of hydrocarbons; Hydroconversion of a mixture of long chain n-paraffins to middle distillate: effect of the operating parameters and products properties; Decomposition/reformation processes and CH4 combustion activity of PdO over Al2O3 supported catalysts for gas turbine applications; Lurgi's mega-methanol technology opens the door for a new era in down-stream applications;Expanding markets for GTL fuels and specialty products; Some critical issues in the analysis of partial oxidation reactions in monolith reactors

  4. Coolant stratification and its thermohydrodynamic specificity under natural circulation in horizontal steam generator collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagovechtchenski, A.; Leontieva, V.; Mitriukhin, A. [Saint-Petersburg Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The experiments and the test facilities for the study of the stratification phenomenon in the hot plenum of reactor and the upper parts of the steam generator collectors in a nuclear power plant are described. The aim of the experiments was to define the conditions of the stratification initiation, to study the temperature field in the upper part, the definition of the characteristics in the stratification layer, and also to study the factors which cause the intensity of the stagnant volume cooling.

  5. Coolant stratification and its thermohydrodynamic specificity under natural circulation in horizontal steam generator collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagovechtchenski, A; Leontieva, V; Mitriukhin, A [Saint-Petersburg Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    The experiments and the test facilities for the study of the stratification phenomenon in the hot plenum of reactor and the upper parts of the steam generator collectors in a nuclear power plant are described. The aim of the experiments was to define the conditions of the stratification initiation, to study the temperature field in the upper part, the definition of the characteristics in the stratification layer, and also to study the factors which cause the intensity of the stagnant volume cooling.

  6. Power distribution transformers using natural ester fluids as dielectric and coolant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Iván Silva-Ortega

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Researches related to the use of Natural Ester Fluids as a refrigerant of power transformers have been developed in other countries with successful results. In Colombia there is no a procedure to control the use of these esters in electrical apparatus, so the current implementations are regulated by NTC 1465 standards for mineral esters. This new proposal involves the composition and the most relevant properties (the ignition resistance, impact on the lifetime of the insulating papers and the impact on the environment, which makes the application of natural esters fluids advantageous not only to preserve the environment but also to get a better performance of power transformers.

  7. Analysis of a Natural Circulation in the Reactor Coolant System Following a High Pressure Severe Accident at APR1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Chul; Cho, Yong Jin; Park, Jae Hong; Cho, Song Won

    2011-01-01

    Under a high temperature and pressure condition during a severe accident, hot leg pipes or steam generator tubes could fail due to creep rupture following natural circulation in the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) unless depressurization of the system is performed at a proper time. Natural circulation in the RCS can be a multi-dimensional circulation in the reactor vessel, a partial loop circulation of two-phase flow from the core up to steam generators (SGs), or circulation in the total loop. It can delay the reactor vessel failure time by removing heat from the reactor core. This natural phenomenon can be hardly simulated with a single flow path model for the hot spots of the RCS, since it cannot deal with the counter-current flow. Thus it may estimate accident progression faster than reality, which may cause troubles for optimized implementation of severe accident management strategies. An earlier damage in the RCS other than the reactor pressure vessel may make subsequent behaviors of hydrogen or fission products in the containment quite different from the single reactor vessel failure. Therefore, a RCS model which treats natural circulation is needed to evaluate the RCS response and the safety depressurization strategy in a best-estimate way. The aim of this study is to develop a detailed model which allows natural circulation between the reactor vessel and steam generators through hot legs, based on the existing APR1400 RCS model. The station blackout sequence was selected to be the representative high-pressure scenario. Sensitivity study on the effect of node configuration of the upper plenum and addition of cross flow paths from the upper plenum to the hot legs were carried out. This model is described herein and representative calculation results are presented

  8. Blade-to-coolant heat-transfer results and operating data from a natural-convection water-cooled single-stage turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaguila, Anthony J; Freche, John C

    1951-01-01

    Blade-to-coolant heat-transfer data and operating data were obtained with a natural-convection water-cooled turbine over range of turbine speeds and inlet-gas temperatures. The convective coefficients were correlated by the general relation for natural-convection heat transfer. The turbine data were displaced from a theoretical equation for natural convection heat transfer in the turbulent region and from natural-convection data obtained with vertical cylinders and plates; possible disruption of natural convection circulation within the blade coolant passages was thus indicated. Comparison of non dimensional temperature-ratio parameters for the blade leading edge, midchord, and trailing edge indicated that the blade cooling effectiveness is greatest at the midchord and least at the trailing edge.

  9. The study of capability natural uranium as fuel cycle input for long life gas cooled fast reactors with helium as coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ariani, Menik, E-mail: menikariani@gmail.com; Satya, Octavianus Cakra; Monado, Fiber [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sriwijaya University, jl Palembang-Prabumulih km 32 Indralaya OganIlir, South of Sumatera (Indonesia); Su’ud, Zaki [Nuclear and Biophysics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, jlGanesha 10, Bandung (Indonesia); Sekimoto, Hiroshi [CRINES, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-11N1-17 Ookayama, Meguro-Ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-03-11

    The objective of the present research is to assess the feasibility design of small long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with helium as coolant. GCFR included in the Generation-IV reactor systems are being developed to provide sustainable energy resources that meet future energy demand in a reliable, safe, and proliferation-resistant manner. This reactor can be operated without enrichment and reprocessing forever, once it starts. To obtain the capability of consuming natural uranium as fuel cycle input modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was adopted in this system with different core design. This study has compared the core with three designs of core reactors with the same thermal power 600 MWth. The fuel composition each design was arranged by divided core into several parts of equal volume axially i.e. 6, 8 and 10 parts related to material burn-up history. The fresh natural uranium is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region 2 and the region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all regions, i.e. shifted the core of the region (i) into region (i+1) region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. The calculation results shows that for the burn-up strategy on “Region-8” and “Region-10” core designs, after the reactors start-up the operation furthermore they only needs natural uranium supply to the next life operation until one period of refueling (10 years).

  10. Changing nature of equipment and parts qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucci, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Ideally, the original supplier of a piece of nuclear safety-related equipment has performed a qualification program and will continue to support that equipment throughout the lifetime of the nuclear power plants in which in equipment is installed. The supplier's nuclear quality assurance program will be maintained and he will continue to offer all necessary replacement parts. These parts will be identical to the original parts, certified to the original purchase order requirements, and the parts will be offered at competitive prices. Due to the changing nature of the nuclear plant equipment market, however, one or more of those ideal features are frequently unavailable when safety-related replacement equipment or parts are required. Thus, the process of equipment and parts qualification has had to adjust in order to ensure obtaining qualified replacements when needed. This paper presents some new directions taken in the qualification of replacement equipment and parts to meet changes in the marketplace

  11. Optimal estimate of the coolant flow in the assemblies of a BWR of natural circulation in real time; Estimacion optima del flujo de refrigerante en los ensambles de un BWR de circulacion natural en tiempo real

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle H, J.; Morales S, J. B. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Division de Estudios de Posgrado, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Col. Progreso, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: julfi_jg@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    The present work exposes the design and the implementation of an advanced controller that allows estimating the coolant flow in the fuel assemblies of a BWR reactor of natural circulation in real time. To be able to reduce the penalizations that are established in the calculations of the operation limits due to the magnitude of the uncertainties in the coolant flows of a natural circulation reactor, is the objective of this research. In this work the construction of the optimal controller that allows estimating the coolant flows in a fuel channels group of the reactor is shown, as well as the operation of this applied to a reduced order model that simulates the dynamics of a natural circulation reactor. The controller design required of an estimator of the valuation variables not directly of the plant and of the estimates use of the local distributions of the coolant flow. The controller construction of the estimator was based mathematically in the filter Kalman whose algorithm allows to be carried out an advanced control of the system. To prove the estimator operation was development a simplified model that reproduces the basic dynamics of the flowing coolant in the reactor, which works as observer of the system, this model is coupled by means of the estimator controller to a detail model of the plant. The results are presented by means of graphics of the interest variables and the estimate flow, and they are documented in the chart that is presented at the end of this article. (Author)

  12. Development of fast-burn combustion with elevated coolant temperatures for natural gas engines. Final report, May 1985-May 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruch, K.L.; Dennis, J.W.

    1990-09-01

    The overall objective of the work was to improve the state of the art in the gas fired spark ignited engine for use in a cogeneration system. Four characteristics were enhanced for cogeneration, namely, Low Pressure Gas Induction, Improved Shaft Thermal Efficiency, Low NOx Emissions, and Increased Jacket Coolant Temperature. Using Taguchi methods and statistical design of experiment methodologies, an engine design evolved that exhibited: The ability to run satisfactorily on supply gas pressure as low as 1.5 psig (goal: 1 psig); A brake specific fuel consumption as low as 6950 Btu/hp-hr (36.6% thermal efficiency) at 2 gm/hp-hr NOx (goal: 7000 acceptable, 6800 excellent with NOx no more than 2 gm/hp-hr); A jacket water coolant system (with oil cooler on the same circuit) temperature of 225 F (goal); and The ability to burn gas with Methane Number as low as 67 (goal).

  13. MABEL-2D: a code to analyse cladding deformation in a loss-of-coolant accident. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowring, R.W.

    1985-08-01

    The MABEL series of codes is being developed at Harwell to predict the extent of cladding deformation (ballooning) in pressurized water reactor fuel rods during a loss of coolant accident. MABEL - 2D is an updated version of MABEL - 2C. These are user notes for MABEL - 2D (which is described in a separate report AEEW - R1979). They describe the input data specification; the use of the restart facility; debug printing and quick-running sample problems. The input data are divided into rod data, thermal hydraulic data and creep data. There is an input data flow chart. The main appendix gives the detailed input data specification. (U.K.)

  14. ISP 33. OECD/NEA/CSNI International Standard Problem n. 33. Pactel natural circulation stepwise coolant inventory reduction experiment. Comparison report. Volume 1 + 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purhonen, H.; Kouhia, J.; Holmstrom, H.

    1994-12-01

    This is the comparison report of the CSNI ISP n.33, which is based on a natural circulation experiment with various coolant inventories conducted in Pactel facility (Finland), a 1/305 volumetrically scaled, full-height simulator of a Russian type VVER-440 pressurized water reactor. It presents all submitted blind calculational results from different countries, using various codes (Athlet, Cathare2, etc.) and compares them with the experimental data. The Pactel facility and the ISP 33 experiment are described, and the summaries of the participants, the computer codes and the nodalizations used for the blind calculations are presented

  15. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 1 – Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, Kerry J., E-mail: howe@unm.edu [University of New Mexico, 210 University Blvd., Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Mitchell, Lana, E-mail: lmitchell@alionscience.com [University of New Mexico, 210 University Blvd., Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Kim, Seung-Jun, E-mail: skim@lanl.gov [University of New Mexico, 210 University Blvd., Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Blandford, Edward D., E-mail: edb@unm.edu [University of New Mexico, 210 University Blvd., Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Kee, Ernest J., E-mail: erniekee@gmail.com [South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company, P.O. Box 270, Wadsworth, TX 77483 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Trisodium phosphate (TSP) causes aluminum corrosion to cease after 24 h of exposure. • Chloride, iron, and copper have a minimal effect on the rate of aluminum corrosion when TSP is present. • Zinc can reduce the rate of aluminum corrosion when TSP is present. • Aluminum occasionally precipitates at concentrations lower than the calculated solubility for Al(OH){sub 3}. • Corrosion and solubility equations can be used to calculate the solids generated during a LOCA. - Abstract: Bench experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum from metallic aluminum surfaces under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident at a nuclear power generating facility. The experiments showed that TSP is capable of passivating the aluminum surface and preventing continued corrosion after about 24 h at the conditions tested. A correlation that describes the rate of corrosion including the passivation effect was developed from the bench experiments and validated with a separate set of experiments from a different test system. The saturation concentration of aluminum was shown to be well described by the solubility of amorphous aluminum hydroxide for the majority of cases, but instances have been observed when aluminum precipitates at concentrations lower than the calculated aluminum hydroxide solubility. Based on the experimental data and previous literature, an equation was developed to calculate the saturation concentration of aluminum as a function of pH and temperature under conditions representative of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in a TSP-buffered pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment. The corrosion equation and precipitation equation can be used in concert with each other to calculate the quantity of solids that would form as a function of time during a LOCA if the temperature and pH profiles were known.

  16. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 1 – Aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, Kerry J.; Mitchell, Lana; Kim, Seung-Jun; Blandford, Edward D.; Kee, Ernest J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Trisodium phosphate (TSP) causes aluminum corrosion to cease after 24 h of exposure. • Chloride, iron, and copper have a minimal effect on the rate of aluminum corrosion when TSP is present. • Zinc can reduce the rate of aluminum corrosion when TSP is present. • Aluminum occasionally precipitates at concentrations lower than the calculated solubility for Al(OH) 3 . • Corrosion and solubility equations can be used to calculate the solids generated during a LOCA. - Abstract: Bench experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum from metallic aluminum surfaces under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident at a nuclear power generating facility. The experiments showed that TSP is capable of passivating the aluminum surface and preventing continued corrosion after about 24 h at the conditions tested. A correlation that describes the rate of corrosion including the passivation effect was developed from the bench experiments and validated with a separate set of experiments from a different test system. The saturation concentration of aluminum was shown to be well described by the solubility of amorphous aluminum hydroxide for the majority of cases, but instances have been observed when aluminum precipitates at concentrations lower than the calculated aluminum hydroxide solubility. Based on the experimental data and previous literature, an equation was developed to calculate the saturation concentration of aluminum as a function of pH and temperature under conditions representative of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) in a TSP-buffered pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment. The corrosion equation and precipitation equation can be used in concert with each other to calculate the quantity of solids that would form as a function of time during a LOCA if the temperature and pH profiles were known

  17. Study on safety analysis of VVER-1200/V491 in scenario of Loss of Coolant Accidents along with partly failure of ECCS using RELAP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang Minh Giang; Ha Thi Anh Dao; Hoang Tan Hung; Bui Thi Hoa; Nguyen Thi Tu Oanh; Dinh Anh Tuan; Pham Tuan Nam

    2017-01-01

    The advanced VVER-1200/V491 reactor designed with passive safety systems to deal with design extension conditions is primarily selected as priority candidate for Ninh Thuan 1 nuclear power plant project. So that, in order to enhance competence of nuclear safety and toward participation on review Safety Analysis Report (SAR) of Ninh Thuan nuclear Power project the study on safety analysis of VVER-1200/V491 in scenario of Loss of Coolant Accidents along with partly failure of ECCS is implemented. As requirement of the study, the input deck file of VVER-1200/V491 for RELAP5 and analysis report for some special case of LOCAs along with partly failure of ECCS are issued. (author)

  18. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 2 – Zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, David; LaBrier, Daniel; Ali, Amir; Blandford, Edward D.; Howe, Kerry J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Zinc release is limited to less than 1 mg/L in TSP-buffered solution under a variety of conditions (pH, temperature, zinc source). • Zinc release in high-temperature non-TSP-buffered environment is approximately 25 mg/L. • Long-term zinc release is controlled by passivation (without TSP) and zinc solubility (with TSP). • Precipitation and solubility of zinc phosphate limit the release of zinc. - Abstract: Bench experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of zinc from metallic zinc-bearing surfaces under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) at a nuclear power generating facility. The experiments showed that in non-buffered (acidic) environments, measurable quantities of zinc are released from zinc-bearing surfaces. Precipitation and solubility of phosphate-based corrosion products, such as zinc phosphate, limit the release of zinc from zinc-bearing surfaces. These experiments have found that under a variety of conditions, including variations of temperature, pH, and across different zinc-bearing surfaces, the release of zinc into solution is limited to <1 mg/L when phosphate is present. When phosphate is not present, zinc release is instead bounded by a markedly higher saturation limit which is a strong function of the solution temperature.

  19. Coolant inlet device for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Hiroshi; Abe, Yasuhiro; Iwabuchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Kenji.

    1969-01-01

    Herein disclosed is a coolant inlet device for liquid-metal cooled reactors which employs a coolant distributor serving also as a supporting means for the reactor core. The distributor is mounted within the reactor vessel so as to slide horizontally on supporting lugs, and is further slidably connected via a junction pipe to a coolant inlet conduit protruding through the floor of the vessel. The distributor is adapted to uniformly disperse the highly pressured coolant over the reactor core so as to reduce the stresses sustained by the reactor vessel as well as the supporting lugs. Moreover, the slidable nature of the distributor allows thermal shock and excessive coolant pressures to be prevented or alleviated, factors which posed major difficulties in conventional coolant inlet devices. (Owens, K. J.)

  20. Natural gas cooling: Part of the solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews and compares the efficiencies and performance of a number of gas cooling systems with a comparable electric cooling system. The results show that gas cooling systems compare favorably with the electric equivalents, offering a new dimension to air conditioning and refrigeration systems. The paper goes on to compare the air quality benefits of natural gas to coal or oil-burning fuel systems which are used to generate the electricity for the electric cooling systems. Finally, the paper discusses the regulatory bias that the author feels exists towards the use of natural gas and the need for modification in the existing regulations to provide a 'level-playing field' for the gas cooling industry

  1. Coolant leakage detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takao.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To surely detect the coolant leakage at a time when the leakage amount is still low in the intra-reactor inlet pipeway of FBR type reactor. Constitution: Outside of the intra-reactor inlet piping for introducing coolants at low temperature into a reactor core, an outer closure pipe is furnished. The upper end of the outer closure pipe opens above the liquid level of the coolants in the reactor, and a thermocouple is inserted to the opening of the upper end. In such a structure, if the coolants in the in-reactor piping should leak to the outer closure pipe, coolants over-flows from the opening thereof, at which the thermocouple detects the temperature of the coolants at a low temperature, thereby enabling to detect the leakage of the coolants at a time when it is still low. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. Mechanical and Radiological Characterization of Different parts of an Irradiation Coolant Channel Tube from Atucha I Nuclear Plant; Caracterizacion Mecanica y Radiologica de Partes de Canales Refrigerantes Irradiados Extraidos del Reactor de la Central Nuclear Atucha I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piquin, Ruben [Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    The widespread replacement of reactor internals has generated a substantial volume of active material. It is essential to work with these components at least in a partial way before the next planned stop, which will take place during the second semester of the year 2002. Due to the fact that the reactor internals pool and the storage pool for irradiated nuclear fuel have limited capacities, it has been proposed to compact an experimental shift of 50 irradiated coolant channels, that are currently placed in storage pools. Basically the processed waste will be put in baskets at the bottom pools.The alternative choice proposes to divide an irradiation coolant channel tube into different parts: stainless steel section, zircaloy-4 section and stainless steel section with hardened zones with cobalt alloys named Estelite-6. The person in charge has already planned the constructive and operative solutions but the mechanical characterization of the different parts of the channel tube is necessary in order to dimension the compaction tool needed for the semi-industrial installation.In the present special report, two well-differentiated actions will be described. The necessary compacted strength of the irradiation coolant channel tube will be estimated for the stainless steel section and the zircaloy-4 section starting from experiment with unirradiated material and considering effects of radiation damage and hydrides on the ductility.These results will be used to design the necessary compacted tools for the semi-industrial installation. The necessary equipment for the radiological characterization of the different material sections already specified will be described and the most important emitting particles of radiation that could be detected will be mentioned. Also the decontamination process to use including the radiological characterization of every stage of the process will be described in order to establish the decontamination factor. Finally the most important

  3. HANARO secondary coolant management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seon Duk.

    1998-02-01

    In this report, the basic theory for management of water quality, environmental factors influencing to the coolant, chemicals and its usage for quality control of coolant are mentioned, and water balance including the loss rate by evaporation (34.3 m 3 /hr), discharge rate (12.665 m 3 /hr), concentration ratio and feed rate (54.1 m 3 /hr) are calculated at 20 MW operation. Also, the analysis data of HANSU Limited for HANARO secondary coolant (feed water and circulating coolant) - turbidity, pH, conductivity, M-alkalinity, Ca-hardness, chloride ion, total iron ion, phosphoric ion and conversion rate are reviewed. It is confirmed that the feed water has good quality and the circulating coolant has been maintained within the control specification in general, but some items exceeded the control specification occasionally. Therefore it is judged that more regular discharge of coolant is needed. (author). 6 refs., 17 tabs., 18 figs

  4. Organic coolant in Winnipeg riverbed sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, J.E.; Acres, O.E.

    1979-03-01

    Between January and May 1977 a prolonged leak of organic coolant occurred from the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment's nuclear reactor, and a minimum of 1450 kg of coolant entered the Winnipeg River and was deposited on the riverbed. The level of radioactivity associated with this coolant was low, contributing less than 0.2 μGy (0.02 mrad) a year to the natural background gamma radiation field from the riverbed. The concentration of coolant in the water samples never exceeded 0.02 mg/L, the lower limit of detection. The mortality of crayfish, held in cages where the riverbed was covered with the largest deposits of coolant, was not significantly different from that in the control cages upstream of the outfall. No evidence of fish kill was found. (author)

  5. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to coolant channels for pressurised water and boiling water reactors and the arrangement described aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel rods and the coolant. Baffle means extending axially within the channel are provided and disposed relative to the fuel rods so as to restrict flow oscillations occurring within the coolant from being propagated transversely to the axis of the channel. (UK)

  6. Coolant channel module CCM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeld, Alois

    2007-01-01

    A complete and detailed description of the theoretical background of an '(1D) thermal-hydraulic drift-flux based mixture-fluid' coolant channel model and its resulting module CCM will be presented. The objective of this module is to simulate as universally as possible the steady state and transient behaviour of the key characteristic parameters of a single- or two-phase fluid flowing within any type of heated or non-heated coolant channel. Due to the possibility that different flow regimes can appear along any channel, such a 'basic (BC)' 1D channel is assumed to be subdivided into a number of corresponding sub-channels (SC-s). Each SC can belong to only two types of flow regime, an SC with just a single-phase fluid, containing exclusively either sub-cooled water or superheated steam, or an SC with a two-phase mixture flow. After an appropriate nodalisation of such a BC (and therefore also its SC-s) a 'modified finite volume method' has been applied for the spatial discretisation of the partial differential equations (PDE-s) which represent the basic conservation equations of thermal-hydraulics. Special attention had to be given to the possibility of variable SC entrance or outlet positions (which describe boiling boundaries or mixture levels) and thus the fact that an SC can even disappear or be created anew. The procedure yields for each SC type (and thus the entire BC), a set of non-linear ordinary 1st order differential equations (ODE-s). To link the resulting mean nodal with the nodal boundary function values, both of which are present in the discretised differential equations, a special quadratic polygon approximation procedure (PAX) had to be constructed. Together with the very thoroughly tested packages for drift-flux, heat transfer and single- and two-phase friction factors this procedure represents the central part of the here presented 'Separate-Region' approach, a theoretical model which provides the basis to the very effective working code package CCM

  7. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.H.

    1995-01-01

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C 4 F 10 and C 4 F 8 , were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C 4 F 10 mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C 4 F 10 weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd

  8. The sodium coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    2004-01-01

    The sodium is the best appropriate coolant for the fast neutrons reactors technology. Thus the fast neutrons reactors development is intimately bound to the sodium technology. This document presents the sodium as a coolant point of view: atomic structure and characteristics, sodium impacts on the fast neutron reactors technology, chemical properties of the sodium and the consequences, quality control in a nuclear reactor, sodium treatment. (A.L.B.)

  9. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reactor coolant channel is described that is suitable for sub-cooled reactors as in pressurised water reactors as well as for bulk boiling, as in boiling water reactors and steam generating nuclear reactors. The arrangement aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel elements and the coolant. Full constructional details are given. See also other similar patents by the author. (U.K.)

  10. Extended Life Coolant Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 06-06-2016 2. REPORT TYPE Interim Report 3. DATES COVERED ... Corrosion Testing of Traditional and Extended Life Coolants 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Hansen, Gregory A. T...providing vehicle specific coolants. Several laboratory corrosion tests were performed according to ASTM D1384 and D2570, but with a 2.5x extended time

  11. Research on coolant radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Jei Won; Kim, W. H.; Park, Y. J.; Im, J. K.; Jung, Y. J.; Jee, K. Y.; Choi, K. C.

    2004-04-01

    The final objective of this study is to develop the technology on the reduction of radioactive material formed in reactor coolant circuit. The contents of this study are composed of the simulation of primary cooling system, chemistry measurement technology in the high-temperature high-pressure environments, and coolant chemistry control technology. The main results are as follows; High-temperature and high-pressure loop system was designed and fabricated, which is to inducing CRUD growth condition on the surface of cladding. The high-temperature pH measurement system was established with YSZ sensing electrode and Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The performance of pH electrode was confirmed in the temperature range 200∼280 .deg. C. Coolant chemistry control technologies such as the neutron irradiation technique of boric acid solution, the evaluation on high-temperature electrochemical behavior of coolant, and the measurement of physicochemical properties of micro-particles were developed. The results of this study can be useful for the understanding of chemical phenomena occurred in reactor coolant and for the study on the reduction of radioactive material in primary coolant, which will be carried out in the next research stage

  12. Condition monitoring of main coolant pumps, Dhruva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, V.; Satheesh, C.; Acharya, V.N.; Tikku, A.C.; Mishra, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Dhruva is a 100 MW research reactor with natural uranium fuel, heavy water as moderator and primary coolant. Three Centrifugal pumps circulate the primary coolant across the core and the heat exchangers. Each pump is coupled to a flywheel (FW) assembly in order to meet operational safety requirements. All the 3 main coolant pump (MCP) sets are required to operate during operation of the reactor. The pump-sets are in operation since the year 1984 and have logged more than 1,00,000 hrs. Frequent breakdowns of its FW bearings were experienced during initial years of operation. Condition monitoring of these pumps, largely on vibration based parameters, was initiated on regular basis. Break-downs of main coolant pumps reduced considerably due to the fair accurate predictions of incipient break-downs and timely maintenance efforts. An effort is made in this paper to share the experience

  13. Selection of nuclear reactor coolant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Lisheng; Wang Bairong

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear material is nuclear material or materials used in nuclear industry, the general term, it is the material basis for the construction of nuclear power, but also a leader in nuclear energy development, the two interdependent and mutually reinforcing. At the same time, nuclear materials research, development and application of the depth and breadth of science and technology reflects a nation and the level of the nuclear power industry. Coolant also known as heat-carrier agent, is an important part of the heart nuclear reactor, its role is to secure as much as possible to the economic output in the form fission energy to heat the reactor to be used: the same time cooling the core, is controlled by the various structural components allowable temperature. This paper described the definition of nuclear reactor coolant and characteristics, and then addressed the requirements of the coolant material, and finally were introduced several useful properties of the coolant and chemical control. (authors)

  14. Theoretical Calculations of the Effect on Lattice Parameters of Emptying the Coolant Channels in a D{sub 2}O- Moderated and Cooled Natural Uranium Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissglas, P [The Swedish State Power Board, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1960-11-15

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate theoretically the effect of coolant boiling and subsequent void formation in a pressurized D{sub 2}O moderated and cooled reactor. The fuel rods were arranged in a cluster geometry and clad in Zr-2. The coolant was separated from the moderator by a Zr-2 shroud. In this geometry the following problems have been given special attention: l) calculation of the effective resonance integral, 2) thermal disadvantage factors, 3) fast fission effects, 4) leakage effects, 5) changes in epithermal absorption. No account has up to now been taken of the variation of these effects with position in the reactor and burnup. Some comparisons of the theoretical methods and measurements have been attempted. It is concluded that at the present time it is not possible to calculate the void coefficient with any accuracy but it may be possible to give an upper limit from theoretical consideration.

  15. Coolant leakage detecting device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Katsunori; Ishihara, Yoshinao.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention judges an amount of leakage of primary coolants of a PWR power plant at high speed. Namely, a mass of coolants contained in a pressurizer, a volume controlling tank and loop regions is obtained based on a preset relational formula and signals of each of process amount, summed up to determine the total mass of coolants for every period of time. The amount of leakage for every period of time is calculated by a formula of Karman's filter based on the total mass of the primary coolants for every predetermined period of time, and displays it on CRT. The Karman's filter is formed on every formula for several kinds of states formed based on the preset amount of the leakage, to calculate forecasting values for every mass of coolants. An adaptable probability for every preset leakage amount is determined based on the difference between the forecast value and the observed value and the scattering thereof. The adaptable probability is compared with a predetermined threshold value, which is displayed on the CRT. This device enables earlier detection of leakage and identification of minute leakage amount as compared with the prior device. (I.S.)

  16. Reactor coolant cleanup device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Noboru.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to introduce reactor water at high temperature and high pressure as it is, as well as effectively adsorb to eliminate cobalt in reactor water. Constitution: The coolant cleanup device comprises a vessel main body inserted to coolant pipeway circuits in a water cooled reactor power plant and filters contained within the vessel main body. The filters are prepared by coating and baking powder of metal oxides such as manganese ferrite having a function capable of adsorbing cobalt in the coolants onto the surface of supports made of metals or ceramics resistant to strong acids and alkalies in the form of three-dimensional network structure, for example, zircaloy-2, SUS 303 and the zirconia (baking) to form a basic filter elements. The basic filter elements are charged in plurality to the vessel main body. (Kawaiami, Y.)

  17. Natural gas quality for the future. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klooster, J.; Metselaar, E.; Warringa, G.; Levinsky, H.B.; Van Rij, M.L.D.

    2011-03-01

    By request of various market parties (suppliers and users of natural gas), the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation (ELI) took a leading role in anticipating the future changes in gas quality. To integrate anticipated gases in the Dutch gas supply, measures will be required that can prevent the undesired effects on safety and effectiveness as mentioned in Part 1 of this study; at the same time the possible impact of these measures on security of supply must be minimized. [nl

  18. Coolant system decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstine, L.D.; James, D.B.; Melaika, E.A.; Peterson, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution is described. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution. (author)

  19. Research on Coolant Radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Yeong Keong; Kim, W. H.; Yeon, J. W.; Jung, Y. J.; Choi, K. C.; Choi, K. S.; Park, Y. J.; Cho, Y. H.

    2007-06-01

    The final objective of this study is to develop a method for reducing radioactive materials formed in the reactor coolant circuit. This second stage research was categorized into the following three subgroups: the development of the estimation technique of microscopic chemical variation at high temperatures and pressures, the fundamental study on the thermodynamics at high temperatures and pressures, and the study on the deposition of metal oxides and the determination of the main factors responsible for the growth of CRUD. First, in the development of the estimation technique of microscopic chemical change at high temperatures and pressures, the technique for measuring coolant chemistry such as pH, conductivity and Eh was developed to be appropriate for the high temperature and pressure condition. The coolant chemistry measuring system including the self-devised high temperature pH sensor can be applied to the field of nuclear reactor and contribute on a large scale in the automation of the coolant chemistry control and the establishment of the real-time on-line measuring technique. Secondly, the dissociation constant of water and the solubility of metal oxides were measured in the fundamental study on the thermodynamics at high temperatures and pressures. Finally, in the study on the deposition of metal oxides and the determination of the main factors responsible for the growth of CRUD, the careful investigation of the deposition phenomena of micro particles on the cladding surface showed that subcooled boiling and the dissolved hydrogen are the main factors responsible for the growth of CRUD. In addition, the basis was provided for the construction of a new particle behavior model in the reactor coolant circuit

  20. Iron crud supply device to reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Takao.

    1993-01-01

    In a device for supplying iron cruds into reactor coolants in a BWR type power plant, a system in which feed water containing iron cruds is supplied to the reactor coolants after once passing through an ion exchange resin is disposed. As a result, iron cruds having characteristics similar with those of naturally occurring iron cruds in the plant are obtained and they react with ionic radioactivity, to form composite oxides. Then, iron cruds having high performance of being secured to the surface of a fuel cladding tube can be supplied to the reactor coolants, thereby enabling to greatly reduce the density of reactor water ionic radioactivity. In its turn, dose rate on the surface of pipelines can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce operators' radiation exposure dose in the plant. Further, contamination of a condensate desalting device due to iron cruds can be prevented, and further, the density of the iron cruds supplied can easily be controlled. (N.H.)

  1. Reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, W.; Richter, G.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement is proposed concerning the easier disengagement of the coupling at the reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor transporting a pressurized coolant. According to the invention the disengaging coupling consists of two parts separated by screws. At least one of the screws contains a propellent charge ananged within a bore and provided with a speed-dependent ignition device in such a way that by separation of the screws at overspeeds the coupling is disengaged. The sub-claims are concerned with the kind of ignition ot the propellent charge. (UWI) [de

  2. Compartmentalized safety coolant injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    A safety coolant injection system for nuclear reactors wherein a core reflood tank is provided to afford more reliable reflooding of the reactor core in the event of a break in one of the reactor coolant supply loops. Each reactor coolant supply loop is arranged in a separate compartment in the containment structure to contain and control the flow of spilled coolant so as to permit its use during emergency core cooling procedures. A spillway allows spilled coolant in the compartment to pass into the emergency water storage tank from where it can be pumped back to the reactor vessel. (author)

  3. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 4 – Integrated chemical effects testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Amir; LaBrier, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States); Blandford, Edward, E-mail: edb@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States); Howe, Kerry [Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Integrated test explored the material release of a postulated large break LOCA. • Aluminum concentration was very low (<0.1 mg/L) throughout the test duration. • Zinc concentration was low (<1 mg/L) in TSP-buffered system. • Calcium release showed two distinguished release zones: prompt and meta-stable. • Copper and iron has no distinguishable concentration up to first 24 h of testing. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of an integrated chemical effects experiment executed under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) at the Vogtle nuclear power plant, operated by the Southern Nuclear Operating Company (SNOC). This test was conducted for closure of a series of bench scale experiments conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum (Howe et al., 2015) and zinc (Pease et al., 2015) from metallic surfaces, and calcium from NUKON fiberglass insulation (Olson et al., 2015) . The integrated test was performed in the Corrosion/Chemical Head Loss Experimental (CHLE) facility with representative amounts of zinc, aluminum, carbon steel, copper, NUKON fiberglass, and latent debris. The test was conducted using borated TSP-buffered solution under a post-LOCA prototypical temperature profile lasting for 30 days. The results presented in this article demonstrate trends for zinc, aluminum, and calcium release that are consistent with separate bench scale testing and previous integrated tests under TSP conditions. The release rate and maximum concentrations of the released materials were slightly different than the separate effect testing as a result of different experimental conditions (temperature, surface area-to-water volume ratio) and/or the presence of other metals and chemicals in the integrated test. Samples of metal coupons and fiberglass were selected for analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy

  4. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 4 – Integrated chemical effects testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Amir; LaBrier, Daniel; Blandford, Edward; Howe, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Integrated test explored the material release of a postulated large break LOCA. • Aluminum concentration was very low (<0.1 mg/L) throughout the test duration. • Zinc concentration was low (<1 mg/L) in TSP-buffered system. • Calcium release showed two distinguished release zones: prompt and meta-stable. • Copper and iron has no distinguishable concentration up to first 24 h of testing. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of an integrated chemical effects experiment executed under conditions representative of the containment pool following a postulated loss of coolant accident (LOCA) at the Vogtle nuclear power plant, operated by the Southern Nuclear Operating Company (SNOC). This test was conducted for closure of a series of bench scale experiments conducted to investigate the effect of the presence of trisodium phosphate (TSP) on the corrosion and release of aluminum (Howe et al., 2015) and zinc (Pease et al., 2015) from metallic surfaces, and calcium from NUKON fiberglass insulation (Olson et al., 2015) . The integrated test was performed in the Corrosion/Chemical Head Loss Experimental (CHLE) facility with representative amounts of zinc, aluminum, carbon steel, copper, NUKON fiberglass, and latent debris. The test was conducted using borated TSP-buffered solution under a post-LOCA prototypical temperature profile lasting for 30 days. The results presented in this article demonstrate trends for zinc, aluminum, and calcium release that are consistent with separate bench scale testing and previous integrated tests under TSP conditions. The release rate and maximum concentrations of the released materials were slightly different than the separate effect testing as a result of different experimental conditions (temperature, surface area-to-water volume ratio) and/or the presence of other metals and chemicals in the integrated test. Samples of metal coupons and fiberglass were selected for analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy

  5. The insufficient part of abiogenesis theory - natural selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploompuu, Tõnu

    2016-04-01

    Abiogenesis has already been studied for a whole century. There have been studies on the synthesis of precursors of biopolymers, concentration processes and polymerization pathways, sites of initiation of life. Autoreplication has been explained. Protocells have been constructed from abiogenic membranes. But one essential aspect for life - the natural selection - has been marginalized in these investigations. Despite the convincing use of natural selection in biology for one and half century, it has not been used sufficiently in the models of the beginning of life. Pictorially - Darwin's pond model is used without darwinism. This generates an unnecessary interruption on the path for understanding the process. Natural selection is essential in abiogenesis, in the genesis of biological information system. A selection of more collaborative autoreplicate biopolymers and the depolymerisation of others was required. Only natural selection was able to combine biopolymer molecules for life. The primary natural selection can operate only in an environment with variable physical and chemical conditions. The selective agent must constantly fluctuate during a long time span and a large area. Formation of the simplest complex of life needs homeostasis. The best sites for constant fluctuations are littoral areas of oceans. Two very constant fluctuations - waves and tides - occur there. The best conditions for the origin of life were exactly in the end of the Late Heavy Bombardment at temperature nealy 100° C. Earth's surface was then protected against the UV destruction by a thick cloud cover. High evaporation at the hotter parts of shore rocks increased the concentration of the primordial soup and there was excellent selective power by routine water level fluctuations. Because of the water level fluctuations salty ocean water and fresh water from continuous downpours alternated at the littoral zones. In low temperatures the formation of life would be hindered by UV

  6. Corrosion and solubility in a TSP-buffered chemical environment following a loss of coolant accident: Part 3—Calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Sterling; Ali, Amir; LaBrier, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States); Blandford, Edward D, E-mail: edb@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States); Howe, Kerry [Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Mexico (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Calcium leaching from NUKON fiberglass in borated TSP-buffered solution is independent of the level of fiberglass destruction. • The initial calcium release rate and the maximum calcium concentration increases with increased fiber concentration. • The calcium release in solution has a repeatable pattern of four distinct regions (prompt release, metastable, autocatalytic drop, and stable region) for all experiments. • Magnesium plays a significant role in initiating calcium precipitation in TSP-buffered environment. • Head loss through multi-constituents debris beds was found to increase progressively in all calcium concentration regions. - Abstract: Calcium that leaches from damaged or destroyed NUKON fiberglass in containment post a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) could lead to the formation of chemical precipitates. These precipitates could be filtered through the accumulated fibrous debris on the sump screen and compromising the emergency core cooling system (ECCS) sump pump performance. Reduced-scale leaching experiments were conducted on three solution inventory scales—bench (0.5 L), vertical column (31.5 L), and tank (1136 L) using three different flow conditions, and fiberglass concentrations (1.18–8 g/L) to investigate calcium release from NUKON fiber. All experiments were conducted in simulated post-LOCA water chemistry. (∼220 mM boric acid with ∼5.8 mM trisodium phosphate (TSP) buffer). Prior to the leaching tests, a preliminary experiment was carried out on the bench scale to determine the effect of the fiber preparation (unaltered and blended) method on calcium leaching. Results indicate that the extent of fiberglass destruction does not affect the amount of calcium released from fiberglass. Long-term calcium leach testing at constant temperature (80 °C) in borated TSP-buffered solution had repeatable behavior on all solution scales for different fiberglass concentrations. The calcium-leaching pattern can be divided into

  7. Membrane reforming in converting natural gas to hydrogen (part one)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barba, D; Giacobbe, F; De Cesaris, A [Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Materials, University of L' Aquila (Italy); Farace, A; Iaquaniello, G; Pipino, A [TECHNIP-KTI S.p.a., Rome (Italy)

    2008-07-15

    Membrane reforming reactors (MRR) could play a key role in converting natural gas into hydrogen. The major advantage of MRR architecture is the possibility to shift the chemical equilibrium toward the right-hand side of the reaction, improving hydrogen production and allowing, the same time high methane conversion at relatively low temperatures such as 650 C. Such a low operating temperature makes it possible to locate the MRR downstream of a gas turbine, achieving an efficient hybrid system (power+hydrogen) with a significant reduction in energy consumption (around 10%). This paper discusses the whole innovative architecture where conventional tubular reforming is integrated with hydrogen permeable palladium membrane separators. The fundamental concepts are analyzed and integrated into a process scheme; the structural effects of variables design such as reactor temperature outlet, S/C ratio and recycle ratio throughout pinch and sensitivity analysis are described, and a comparison of the process economics with conventional hydrogen technology is presented at the end of the second part of this paper. The production of highly reliable, defect-free and reproducible, Pd-alloy membranes for selective hydrogen separation is a key issue in the proposed hybrid architecture. (author)

  8. Dual coolant blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malang, S.; Schleisiek, K.

    1994-11-01

    A self-cooled liquid metal breeder blanket with helium-cooled first wall ('Dual Coolant Blanket Concept') for a fusion DEMO reactor is described. This is one of the four blanket concepts under development in the frame of the European fusion technology program with the aim to select in 1995 the two most promising ones for further development. Described are the design of the blankets including the ancillary loop system and the results of the theoretical and experimental work in the fields of neutronics, magnetohydrodynamics, thermohydraulics, mechanical stresses, compatibility and purification of lead-lithium, tritium control, safety, reliability, and electrically insulating coatings. The remaining open questions and the required R and D programme are identified. (orig.) [de

  9. Evaluation of primary coolant leaks and assessment of detection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassette, P.; Giroux, C.; Roche, H.; Seveon, J.J.

    1984-11-01

    A review of French PWR situation concerning primary coolant leaks is presented, including a description of operating technical specifications, of the collecting system of primary coolant leakage into the containment and of the detection methods. It is mainly based on a compilation over three years, 1981 to 1983, of almost all occurred leaks, their natures, causes, consequences and methods used for their detection. By analysing these data it is possible to evaluate the efficiency of the primary coolant leak detection system and the problems raised by the compliance with the criteria defined in the operating technical specifications

  10. Evaluation of primary coolant leaks and assessment of detection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassette, P.; Giroux, C.; Roche, H.; Seveon, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the French PWR situation concerning primary coolant leaks is presented, including a description of operating technical specifications, of the collecting system of primary coolant leakage into the containment and of the detection methods. It is mainly based on a compilation over three years, 1981 to 1983, of almost all actual leaks, their natures, causes, consequences and methods used for their detection. By analysing these data it is possible to evaluate the efficiency of the primary coolant leak detection system and the problems raised by compliance with the criteria defined in the operating technical specifications

  11. Low-activation lead coolant for advanced small modular NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorasanov, G.L.; Ivanov, A.P.; Blokhin, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is in studying perspectives of a new heavy liquid metal coolant for a small fast reactor (FR) concept. To reduce the post irradiation activity of the coolant the using of lead isotope, Pb-206, instead of natural lead, Pb-nat, is offered. In this case the accumulation of such hazardous radionuclides, as Po-210, Bi-208, Bi-207, essentially decreases. The interval of the lead-206 coolant cost which does not exceed 20% of the overall FR cost is estimated. The possibility of lead-206 obtaining for FR needs with the centrifugal separation technique is pointed out. (author)

  12. Secondary coolant purification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiteler, F.Z.; Donohue, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    The present invention combines the attributes of volatile chemical addition, continuous blowdown, and full flow condensate demineralization. During normal plant operation (defined as no primary to secondary leakage) condensate from the condenser is pumped through a full flow condensate demineralizer system by the condensate pumps. Volatile chemical additions are made. Dissolved and suspended solids are removed in the condensate polishers by ion exchange and/or filtration. At the same time a continuous blowdown of approximately 1 percent of the main steaming rate of the steam generators is maintained. Radiation detectors monitor the secondary coolant. If these monitors indicate no primary to secondary leakage, the blowdown is cooled and returned directly to the condensate pump discharge. If one of the radiation monitors should indicate a primary to secondary leak, when the temperature of the effluent exiting from the blowdown heat exchanger is compatible with the resin specifications of the ion exchangers, the bypass valve causes the blowdown flow to pass through the blowdown ion exchangers

  13. Recovery studies for plutonium machining oil coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, J.D.; Baldwin, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    Lathe coolant oil, contaminated with plutonium and having a carbon tetrachloride diluent, is generated in plutonium machining areas at Rocky Flats. A research program was initiated to determine the nature of plutonium in this mixture of oil and carbon tetrachloride. Appropriate methods then could be developed to remove the plutonium and to recycle the oil and carbon tetrachloride. Studies showed that the mixtures of spent oil and carbon tetrachloride contained particulate plutonium and plutonium species that are soluble in water or in oil and carbon tetrachloride. The particulate plutonium was removed by filtration; the nonfilterable plutonium was removed by adsorption on various materials. Laboratory-scale tests indicated the lathe-coolant oil mixture could be separated by distilling the carbon tetrachloride to yield recyclable products

  14. Liquid metal coolant disposal from UKAEA reactors at Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.R.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the United Kingdom's Fast Reactor Development programme two reactors were built and operated at Dounreay in the North of Scotland. DFR (Dounreay Fast Reactor) was operated from 1959-1977 and PFR (Prototype Fast Reactor) was operated from 1974-1994. Both reactors are currently undergoing Stage 1 Decommissioning and are installing plant to dispose of the bulk coolant (DFR ∼ 60 tonne; PFR ∼ 1500 tonne). The coolant (NaK) remaining at DFR is mainly in the primary circuit which contains in excess of 500 TBq of Cs137. Disposal of 40 tonnes of secondary coolant has already been carried out. The paper will describe the processes used to dispose of this secondary circuit coolant and how it is intended the remaining primary circuit coolant will be handled. The programme to process the primary coolant will also be described which involves the conversion of the liquid metal to caustic and its decontamination. No PFR coolant Na has been disposed off to date. The paper will describe the current decommissioning programme activities relating to liquid metal disposal and treatment describing the materials to be disposed of and the issue of decontamination of the effluents. (author)

  15. Design of automotive engine coolant hoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrishikesh D BACHCHHAV

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we are present the performance of engine coolant hoses (radiator hoses used in passenger cars by checking various physical behaviours such as hose leakage, hose burst, hose collapse or any mechanical damage as studied-thru design guidelines, CFD analysis and product validation testing and also check pressure drop of the hoses when engine will be running. The design term is more likely used for technical part modelling using CAD tool. Later on, we will focus on the transformation of the part design to process design. The process design term is more likely used for "tooling design" for manufacturing of the product using CAD Tool. Then inlet hose carries coolant from engine to radiator inlet tank, then coolant circulated in radiator and passed through radiator outlet tank to water pump of engine with the help of outlet hose. After that …nding any leakage, Burst, damage or collapse of hose and pressure drop of the hose with the help of design checklist, CFD Analysis and product validation testing.

  16. Definition of parameters for a test section for the analysis of natural convection and coolant loss in the AP1000 nuclear reactor by similarity laws and fractional scaling analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadiz, Luis Felipe S.; Bezerra, Mario Augusto [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Lima, Fernando Roberto A., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PB), Recife, PB (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The present work develops and analyzes the main parameters of a test section for natural convection in case of a failure of the pumping system as much as the loss of coolant in refrigeration accidents. For this realization, a combination of laws of basic similarity and an innovative scale methodology, known as Fractional Scaling Analysis (FSA), was developed. The depressurizing is analyzed when a rupture occurs in one of the primary system piping of the AP1000 nuclear reactor. This reactor is developed by Westinghouse Electric Co., which is a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) with an electric power equal to 1000MW. Such a reactor is provided with a passive safety system that promotes considerable improvements in the safety, reliability, protection and reduction of costs of a nuclear power plant. The FSA is based on two concepts: fractional scale and hierarchy. It is used to provide experimental data that generate quantitative evaluation criteria as well as operational parameters in thermal and hydraulic processes of nuclear power plants. The results were analyzed with the use of computational codes. (author)

  17. Decontamination of main coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roofthooft, R.

    1988-01-01

    Last year a number of main coolant pumps in Belgian nuclear power plants were decontaminated. A new method has been developed to reduce the time taken for decontamination and the volume of waste to be treated. The method comprises two phases: Oxidation with permanganate in nitric acid and dissolution in oxalic acid. The decontamination of main coolant pumps can now be achieved in less than one day. The decontamination factors attained range between 15 and 150. (orig.) [de

  18. Magnetic properties of natural pyrrhotite Part I: Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The grain-size dependence of the initial susceptibility (X 1~),saturation magnetization (.1,), saturation remanence (J~),coercive force (He), remanent coercive force (Hcr) and remanent acquisition coercive force (Hcr’), is reported for four natural pyrrhotites in a grain-size range from 250

  19. Dynamic Analysis of Coolant Channel and Its Internals of Indian 540 MWe PHWR Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rama Rao

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The horizontal coolant channel is one of the important parts of primary heat transport system in PHWR type of reactors. There are in all 392 channels in the core of Indian 540 MWe reactor. Each channel houses 13 natural uranium fuel bundles and shielding and sealing plugs one each on either side of the channel. The heavy water coolant flows through the coolant channel and carries the nuclear heat to outside the core for steam generation and power production in the turbo-generator. India has commissioned one 540 MWe PHWR reactor in September 2005 and another similar unit will be going into operation very shortly. For a complete dynamic study of the channel and its internals under the influence of high coolant flow, experimental and modeling studies have been carried out. A good correlation has been achieved between the results of experimental and analytical models. The operating life of a typical coolant channel typically ranges from 10 to 15 full-power years. Towards the end of its operating life, its health monitoring becomes an important activity. Vibration diagnosis plays an important role as a tool for life management of coolant. Through the study of dynamic characteristics of the coolant channel under simulated loading condition, an attempt has been made to develop a diagnostics to monitor the health of the coolant channel over its operating life. A study has been also carried out to characterize the fuel vibration under different flow condition.

  20. Nematicidal natural products from the aerial parts of Buddleja crispa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Nighat; Akhter, Musarrat; Khan, Rashid Ali; Afza, Nighat; Tareen, Rasool Bakh; Malik, Abdul

    2010-05-01

    Studies on the aerial parts of Buddleja crispa yielded 13 known compounds, nonyl benzoate, hexyl p-hydroxy-cinnamate, ginipin, gardiol, 1-heptacosanol, steroidal galactoside (22 R)-stigmasta-7,9 (11)-dien-22 beta-ol-3beta-O-beta-D-galactopyranoside, 3-methoxy benzoic acid, beta-sitosterol and ursolic acid. Besides this two iridoid galactosides buddlejosides A, buddlejosides B and a benzofuran-type sesquiterpene buddlejone have been isolated from the ETOAC fraction of B. crispa. Together with the above compounds, methyl benzoate (1) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy benzoic acid (2) were also isolated. Compound 2 (C(8)H(8)O(4)) was identified by comparison of its data with those reported earlier, which was originally isolated from Onosma hispidum, and this is the first report of its isolation from this species. For compounds 1 and 2, the total alcoholic soluble extract, methanol soluble, chloroform soluble, ethyl acetate soluble and petroleum ether soluble extract of the aerial parts of B. crispa were screened for nematicidal activity against nematodes of freshly hatched second-stage juveniles of Meloidogyne incognita (root-knot nematode), exhibiting 92%, 40%, 88%, 83%, 82% and 50% mortality, respectively, of eloids M. incognita at 0.5% concentration. Compound 1 was more potent than the nematicide Azadirachta indica at the same concentration. Negative results were obtained for the nematicidal activity of petroleum ether extract of B. crispa leaves.

  1. Reactor coolant pump transportation incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noce, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on an incident, which occurred on August 27, 1991, in which a Reactor Coolant Pump motor en route from Surry Power Station to Westinghouse repair facilities struck the overpass at the junction of Interstate 64 and Jefferson Avenue in Newport News, Virginia. The transport container that housed the reactor coolant pump motor failed to clear the overpass. The force of the impact dislodged the container and motor from the truck bed, and it landed on the acceleration land and road shoulder. Upon impact, the container broke open and exposed the reactor coolant pump motor. Incidental radioactively contaminated water that remained in the motor coolers drained onto the road, contaminating the aggregate as well as the underlying gravel

  2. Sodium as a reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesar, S.B.G.

    1989-01-01

    This work is related to the use of sodium as a reactor coolant, to the advantages and problems related to its use, its mechanical, thermophysics, eletronical, magnetic and nuclear properties. It is mainly a bibliographic review, with the aim of gathering the necessary information to persons initiating in the study of sodium and also as reference source. (author) [pt

  3. Vertical reactor coolant pump instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    The investigation conducted at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant to determine and correct increasing vibrations in the vertical reactor coolant pumps is described. Diagnostic procedures to determine the vibration causes and evaluate the corractive measures taken are also described

  4. The effect of coolant quantity on local fuel–coolant interactions in a molten pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Songbai; Matsuba, Ken-ichi; Isozaki, Mikio; Kamiyama, Kenji; Suzuki, Tohru; Tobita, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate local fuel–coolant interactions in a molten pool. • As water volume increases, limited pressurization and mechanical energy observed. • Only a part of water is evaporated and responsible for the pressurization. - Abstract: Studies on local fuel–coolant interactions (FCI) in a molten pool are important for severe accident analyses of sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). Motivated by providing some evidence for understanding this interaction, in this study several experimental tests, with comparatively larger difference in coolant volumes, were conducted by delivering a given quantity of water into a simulated molten fuel pool (formed with a low-melting-point alloy). Interaction characteristics including the pressure-buildup as well as mechanical energy release and its conversion efficiency are evaluated and compared. It is found that as water quantity increases, a limited pressure-buildup and the resultant mechanical energy release are observable. The performed analyses also suggest that only a part of water is probably vaporized during local FCIs and responsible for the pressurization and mechanical energy release, especially for those cases with much larger water volumes

  5. Physical model and calculation code for fuel coolant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldammer, H.; Kottowski, H.

    1976-01-01

    A physical model is proposed to describe fuel coolant interactions in shock-tube geometry. According to the experimental results, an interaction model which divides each cycle into three phases is proposed. The first phase is the fuel-coolant-contact, the second one is the ejection and recently of the coolant, and the third phase is the impact and fragmentation. Physical background of these phases are illustrated in the first part of this paper. Mathematical expressions of the model are exposed in the second part. A principal feature of the computational method is the consistent application of the fourier-equation throughout the whole interaction process. The results of some calculations, performed for different conditions are compiled in attached figures. (Aoki, K.)

  6. Nuclear reactor coolant and cover gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.A.; Redding, A.H.; Tower, S.N.

    1976-01-01

    A core cooling system is disclosed for a nuclear reactor of the type utilizing a liquid coolant with a cover gas above free surfaces of the coolant. The disclosed system provides for a large inventory of reactor coolant and a balanced low pressure cover gas arrangement. A flow restricting device disposed within a reactor vessel achieves a pressure of the cover gas in the reactor vessel lower than the pressure of the reactor coolant in the vessel. The low gas pressure is maintained over all free surfaces of the coolant in the cooling system including a coolant reservoir tank. Reactor coolant stored in the reservoir tank allows for the large reactor coolant inventory provided by the invention

  7. Coolant monitoring systems for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzhnov, A.M.; Morozov, V.V.; Tsypin, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    The ways of improving information capacity of existing monitoring systems and the necessity of designing new ones for coolant monitoring are reviewed. A wide research program on development of coolant monitoring systems in PWR reactors is analyzed. The possible applications of in-core and out-of-core detectors for coolant monitoring are demonstrated

  8. Specificities of reactor coolant pumps units with lead and lead-bismuth coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beznosov, A.V.; Anotonenkov, M.A.; Bokov, P.A.; Baranova, V.S.; Kustov, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis results of impact of lead and lead-bismuth coolants specific properties on the coolants flow features in flow channels of the main and auxiliary circulating pumps are presented. Impossibility of cavitation initiation in flow channels of vane pumps pumping lead and lead-bismuth coolants was demonstrated. The experimental research results of discontinuity of heavy liquid metal coolant column were presented and conditions of gas cavitation initiation in coolant flow were discussed. Invalidity of traditional calculation methods of water and sodium coolants circulation pumps calculations for lead and lead-bismuth coolants circulation pumps was substantiated [ru

  9. Juridical consequences of liberalization. Part 2. Natural Gas Law and reorganization of the gas utility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Rijke, M.; Kuipers, D.P.; Koster, W.; Geertsma, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    The liberalization of the natural gas market in Europe has all kinds of juridical aspects. Not only with respect to new legislation (Natural Gas Law and Mining Law), but also changes in juridical structures of natural gas companies, caused by privatization or splitting up in a mains management company and a distribution company. In a series of articles lawyers of the Energy Working Group of Houthoff Buruma in The Hague, Netherlands, discuss the developments at the natural gas market. In this first part, attention will be paid to actual developments with respect to the new Natural Gas Law and the Mining Law in the Netherlands

  10. Trace organics in AGR coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.; Green, L.O.; Johnson, P.A.V.

    1980-01-01

    Several analytical techniques have been employed in previous studies of the stable organic compounds arising from the radiolysis of methane/carbon monoxide/carbon dioxide coolants. The majority of this early information was collected from the Windscale AGR prototype. Analyses were also carried out on the liquors obtained from the WAGR humidryers. Three classes of compound were found in the liquors; aliphatic acids in the aqueous phase and methyl ketones and aromatic hydrocarbons in the oily phase. Acetic acid was found to be the predominant carboxylic acid. This paper outlines the major findings from a recent analytical survey of coolants taken over a wide range of dose rate, pressure, temperature and composition, from materials testing reactor facilities, WAGR and CAGR. (author)

  11. Reactor coolant pump shaft seal behavior during blackout conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mings, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has classified the problem of reactor coolant pump seal failures as an unresolved safety issue. This decision was made in large part due to experimental results obtained from a research program developed to study shaft seal performance during station blackout and reported in this paper. Testing and analysis indicated a potential for pump seal failure under postulated blackout conditions leading to a loss of primary coolant with a concomitant danger of core uncovery. The work to date has not answered all the concerns regarding shaft seal failure but it has helped scope the problem and focus future research needed to completely resolve this issue

  12. LWR and HTGR coolant dynamics: the containment of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Gherson, P.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.; Hu, K.; Iyer, K.; Viskanta, R.; Lommers, L.

    1983-07-01

    This is the final report of a project containing three major tasks. Task I deals with the fundamental aspects of energetic fuel/coolant interactions (steam explosions) as they pertain to LWR core melt accidents. Task II deals with the applied aspects of LWR core melt accident sequences and mechanisms important to containment response, and includes consideration of energetic fuel/coolant interaction events, as well as non-explosive ones, corium material disposition and eventual coolability, and containment pressurization phenomena. Finally, Task III is concerned with HTGR loss of forced circulation accidents. This report is organized into three major parts corresponding to these three tasks respectively

  13. The rhetorical strategy of William Paley's Natural theology (1802): part 1, William Paley's Natural theology in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Niall

    2010-03-01

    This article reconstructs the historical and philosophical contexts of William Paley's Natural theology (1802). In the wake of the French Revolution, widely believed to be the embodiment of an atheistic political credo, the refutation of the transmutational biological theories of Buffon and Erasmus Darwin was naturally high on Paley's agenda. But he was also responding to challenges arising from his own moral philosophy, principally the psychological quandary of how men were to be kept in mind of the Creator. It is argued here that Natural theology was the culmination of a complex rhetorical scheme for instilling religious impressions that would increase both the virtue and happiness of mankind. Philosophy formed an integral part of this strategy, but it did not comprise the whole of it. Equally vital were those purely rhetorical aspects of the discourse which, according to Paley, were more concerned with creating 'impression'. This facet of his writing is explored in part one of this two-part article. Turning to the argumentative side of the scheme, part two examines Paley's responses to David Hume and Erasmus Darwin in the light of the wider strategy of inculcation at work throughout all his writings.

  14. Coolant clean-up and recycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takao.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the service life of mechanical seals in a shaft sealing device, eliminate leakages and improve the safety by providing a recycle pump for feeding coolants to a coolant clean-up device upon reactor shut-down and adapting the pump treat only low temperature and low pressure coolants. Constitution: The system is adapted to partially take out coolants from the pipeways of a recycling pump upon normal operation and feed them to a clean-up device. Upon reactor shut-down, the recycle pump is stopped and coolants are extracted by the recycle pump for shut-down into the clean-up device. Since the coolants are not fed to the clean-up device by the recycle pump during normal operation as conducted so far, high temperature and high pressure coolants are not directly fed to the recycle pump, thereby enabling to avoid mechanical problems in the pump. (Kamimura, M.)

  15. Thorium Fuel Utilization Analysis on Small Long Life Reactor for Different Coolant Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permana, Sidik

    2017-07-01

    A small power reactor and long operation which can be deployed for less population and remote area has been proposed by the IAEA as a small and medium reactor (SMR) program. Beside uranium utilization, it can be used also thorium fuel resources for SMR as a part of optimalization of nuclear fuel as a “partner” fuel with uranium fuel. A small long-life reactor based on thorium fuel cycle for several reactor coolant types and several power output has been evaluated in the present study for 10 years period of reactor operation. Several key parameters are used to evaluate its effect to the reactor performances such as reactor criticality, excess reactivity, reactor burnup achievement and power density profile. Water-cooled types give higher criticality than liquid metal coolants. Liquid metal coolant for fast reactor system gives less criticality especially at beginning of cycle (BOC), which shows liquid metal coolant system obtains almost stable criticality condition. Liquid metal coolants are relatively less excess reactivity to maintain longer reactor operation than water coolants. In addition, liquid metal coolant gives higher achievable burnup than water coolant types as well as higher power density for liquid metal coolants.

  16. Zero waste machine coolant management strategy at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, B.; Algarra, F.; Wilburn, D.

    1998-01-01

    Machine coolants are used in machining equipment including lathes, grinders, saws and drills. The purpose of coolants is to wash away machinery debris in the form of metal fines, lubricate, and disperse heat between the part and the machine tool. An effective coolant prolongs tool life and protects against part rejection, commonly due to scoring or scorching. Traditionally, coolants have a very short effective life in the machine, often times being disposed of as frequently as once per week. The cause of coolant degradation is primarily due to the effects of bacteria, which thrive in the organic rich coolant environment. Bacteria in this environment reproduce at a logarithmic rate, destroying the coolant desirable aspects and causing potential worker health risks associated with the use of biocides to control the bacteria. The strategy described in this paper has effectively controlled bacterial activity without the use of biocides, avoided disposal of a hazardous waste, and has extended coolant life indefinitely. The Machine Coolant Management Strategy employed a combination of filtration, heavy lubricating oil removal, and aeration, which maintained the coolant peak performance without the use of biocides. In FY96, the Laboratory generated and disposed of 19,880 kg of coolants from 9 separate sites at a cost of $145K. The single largest generator was the main machine shop producing an average 14,000 kg annually. However, in FY97, the waste generation for the main machine shop dropped to 4,000 kg after the implementation of the zero waste strategy. It is expected that this value will be further reduced in FY98

  17. Experimental interaction of magma and “dirty” coolants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, C. Ian; White, James D. L.; Zimanowski, Bernd; Büttner, Ralf; Sonder, Ingo; Schmid, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    The presence of water at volcanic vents can have dramatic effects on fragmentation and eruption dynamics, but little is known about how the presence of particulate matter in external water will further alter eruptions. Volcanic edifices are inherently “dirty” places, where particulate matter of multiple origins and grainsizes typically abounds. We present the results of experiments designed to simulate non-explosive interactions between molten basalt and various “coolants,” ranging from homogeneous suspensions of 0 to 30 mass% bentonite clay in pure water, to heterogeneous and/or stratified suspensions including bentonite, sand, synthetic glass beads and/or naturally-sorted pumice. Four types of data are used to characterise the interactions: (1) visual/video observations; (2) grainsize and morphology of resulting particles; (3) heat-transfer data from a network of eight thermocouples; and (4) acoustic data from three force sensors. In homogeneous coolants with ~20% sediment, heat transfer is by forced convection and conduction, and thermal granulation is less efficient, resulting in fewer blocky particles, larger grainsizes, and weaker acoustic signals. Many particles are droplet-shaped or/and “vesicular,” containing bubbles filled with coolant. Both of these particle types indicate significant hydrodynamic magma-coolant mingling, and many of them are rewelded into compound particles. The addition of coarse material to heterogeneous suspensions further slows heat transfer thus reducing thermal granulation, and variable interlocking of large particles prevents efficient hydrodynamic mingling. This results primarily in rewelded melt piles and inefficient distribution of melt and heat throughout the coolant volume. Our results indicate that even modest concentrations of sediment in water will significantly limit heat transfer during non-explosive magma-water interactions. At high concentrations, the dramatic reduction in cooling efficiency and increase in

  18. Organic coolant for ARIES-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.; Sviatoslavsky, I.; Sawan, M.; Gierszewski, P.; Hollies, R.; Sharafat, S.; Herring, S.

    1991-04-01

    ARIES-III is a D-He 3 reactor design study. It is found that the organic coolant is well suited for the D-He 3 reactor. This paper discusses the unique features of the D-He 3 reactor, and the reason that the organic coolant is compatible with those features. The problems associated with the organic coolant are also discussed. 8 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Physical properties of organic coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debbage, A.G.; Garton, D.A.; Kinneir, J.H.

    1963-03-01

    Density, viscosity, specific heat, vapour pressure and calorific value were measured within the temperature range 100 - 400 deg C for mixtures of Santowax R with pyrolytic high boiler and Santowax R with O.M.R.E. radiolytic high boiler; in addition measurements were made on Santowax OM, X-7 standard, X-7 loop coolant and O.M.R.E. coolant supplied by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. The accuracy of the measurements made were density (± 1/4%), viscosity (± 2%), specific heat (± 2%), vapour pressure (± 2%) and calorific value (± 1/2%). Thermal conductivity was calculated from an improved form of the Smiths equation with an accuracy within ± 6%. Equations fitted to the vapour pressure results were used to provide data outside the experimental range for burnout correlation purposes. The general effect of high boiler content on the specific heat and calorific values was small. The differences in physical property values for corresponding values of either pyrolytic or radiolytic high boiler were small for density (0.3%) and specific heat (2%), but quite large for viscosity (70%) with the pyrolytic high boiler mixture giving the higher value. The chemical analysis of all materials was based on gas chromatography and the relationship between this and an earlier distillation method established. (author)

  20. Cleaning of aluminum after machining with coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roop, B.

    1992-01-01

    An x-ray photoemission spectroscopic study was undertaken to compare the cleaning of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) aluminum extrusion storage ring vacuum chambers after machining with and without water soluble coolants. While there was significant contamination left by the coolants, the cleaning process was capable of removing the residue. The variation of the surface and near surface composition of samples machined either dry or with coolants was negligible after cleaning. The use of such coolants in the machining process is therefore recommended

  1. Technical findings related to Generic Issue 23: Reactor coolant pump seal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruger, C.J.; Luckas, W.J. Jr.

    1989-03-01

    Reactor coolant pumps contain mechanical seals to limit the leakage of pressurized coolant from the reactor coolant system to the containment. These seals have the potential to leak, and a few have degraded and even failed resulting in a small break loss of coolant accident (LOCA). As a result, ''Reactor Coolant Pump Seal Failure,'' Generic Issue 23 was established. This report summarizes the findings of a technical investigation generated as part of the program to resolve this issue. These technical findings address the various fact-finding issue tasks developed for the action plan associated with the generic issue, namely background information on seal failure, evaluation of seal cooling, and mechanical- and maintenance-induced failure mechanisms. 46 refs., 15 figs., 14 tabs

  2. Coolant clean-up system in the primary coolant circuit for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Michio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the quality of coolants at a prescribed level by distillating coolants in the primary coolant circuit for a BWR type reactor to remove impurities therefrom, taking out the condensates from the top of the distillation column and extracting impurities in a concentrated state from the bottom. Constitution: Coolant water for cooling the core is recycled by a recycling pump by way of a recycling pipeway in a reactor. The coolants extracted from an extraction pipeway connected to the recycling pipeway are fed into a distillation column, where distillation is taken place. Impurities in the coolants, that is, in-core corrosion products, fission products generated in the reactor core, etc. are separated by the distillation, concentrated and solidified in the bottom of the distillation column. While on the other hand, condensates removed with the impurities, that is, coolants cleaned-up are recycled to the coolant water for cooling the reactor core. (Moriyama, K.)

  3. Design and fabrication of magnetic coolant filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashanth, B. N.

    2017-07-01

    Now a day's use of coolants in industry has become dominant because of high production demands. Coolants not only help in speeding up the production but also provide many advantages in the metal working operation. As the consumption of coolants is very high a system is badly in need, so as to recirculate the used coolant. Also the amount of hazardous waste generated by industrial plants has become an increasingly costly problem for the manufactures and an additional stress on the environment. Since the purchase and disposal of the spent cutting fluids is becoming increasingly expensive, fluid recycling is a viable option for minimizing the cost. Separation of metallic chips from the coolants by using magnetic coolant separation has proven a good management and maintenance of the cutting fluid. By removing the metallic chips, the coolant life is greatly extended, increases the machining quality and reduces downtime. Above being the case, a magnetic coolant filter is developed which utilizes high energy permanent magnets to develop a dense magnetic field along a narrow flow path into which the contaminated coolant is directed. The ferromagnetic particles captured and aligned by the dense magnetic field, from the efficient filter medium. This enables the unit to remove ferromagnetic particles from the coolant. Magnetic coolant filters use the principle of magnetic separation to purify the used coolant. The developed magnetic coolant separation has the capability of purifying 40 litres per minute of coolant with the size of the contaminants ranging from 1 µm to 30 µm. The filter will be helpful in saving the production cost as the cost associated with the proposed design is well justified by the cost savings in production. The magnetic field produced by permanent magnets will be throughout the area underneath the reservoir. This produces magnetic field 30mm above the coolant reservoir. Very fine particles are arrested without slip. The magnetic material used will not

  4. Upgradation of design features of primary coolant pumps of Indian 220 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.S.; Mhetre, S.G.; Manna, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    Evolution in the design features of Primary Coolant Pump (PCP) had started in fifties for catering to stringent specification requirements of reactor coolant systems of larger capacity reactors of various kinds. Primary coolant pumps of PWR and PHWR are employed for circulating radioactive, pressurized hot water in a circuit consisting of reactor (heat source) and steam generator (heat sink). As primary coolant pump capacity decides the station capacity, larger capacity primary coolant pumps have been evolved. Since primary coolant pump pressure containing parts are part of Primary Heat Transport system envelope, the parts are designed, manufactured, inspected and tested in accordance with the applicable system guidelines. Flywheel is mounted on the motor shaft for increasing mass moment of inertia of pump motor rotor to meet the coast down requirements of reactor cooling system under Class-IV electrical power supply failure. Due to limited accessibility of the PCP (PCP installed in shut down accessible area), quick maintenance, condition monitoring, reliable shaft seal system/bearing system aspects have been of great concern to reactor owners and pump manufacturers. In this paper upgradation of design features of RAPS, MAPS and NAPS primary coolant pumps have been covered. (author). 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. Development of natural gas in the French-speaking part of Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defago, E.

    1992-01-01

    Natural gas has known a rapid development in the French-speaking part of Switzerland and this trend is still continuing. Natural gas represents 13% of the overall energy consumption, which lies significantly above the Swiss average and, in the year 2000, it should reach about 20%. In order to meet the expected growth of consumption, Gaznat has already contracted, under long term agreements, large quantities of natural gas from diversified sources. Underground storage capacities in nearby France have been considerably increased and new gas-pipelines are being built. These pipelines will enable to double the supply capacity of the French-speaking part of Switzerland within the next three years. (orig.) [de

  6. Analyses of natural resources in 10 CFR Part 60 as related to inadvertent human intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miklas, M.P.; Lefevre, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the intent of the regulatory language of the portions of 10 CFR Part 60 which deal with considerations of the natural resources of a proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive wastes as they relate to inadvertent human intrusion. Four Potentially Adverse Conditions (PAC) the requirements of 10 CFR 60.21(c)(13) are shown to be related to natural resources. Groundwater is identified as a natural resource known to be present at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. For economic considerations of natural resources, the open-quotes foreseeable futureclose quotes is thought to be no more than 50 years. Two of the topics addressed by the PACs, subsurface mining and drilling at a proposed repository site, are pre-site-characterization activities which must be evaluated in the context of repository performance criteria set by the US EPA standard, 40 CFR Part 191. An alternative US DOE compliance demonstration to another PAC, 10 CFR 60.122(c)(17), might be to use an open-quotes explorationist perspectiveclose quotes of natural resource assessment. The Commission intends for DOE to evaluate the likelihood and consequence of inadvertent human intrusion into a geologic repository as a result of exploration or exploitation of natural resources within or near a proposed high-level radioactive waste geologic repository

  7. Reactor having coolant recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Tadashi; Karatsuka, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Hajime.

    1991-01-01

    In a coolant recycling pump for an LMFBR type reactor, vertical grooves are formed to a static portion which surrounds a pump shaft as far as the lower end thereof. Sodium mists present in an annular gap of the pump shaft form a rotational flow, lose its centrifugal force at the grooved portion and are collected positively to the grooved portion. Further, since the rotational flow in the grooved channel is in a state of a cavity flow, the pressure is released in the grooved portion and a secondary eddy current is formed thereby providing a depressurized state. Accordingly, by a synergestic effect of the centrifugal force and the cavity flow, sodium mists can be recovered completely. (T.M.)

  8. Tritium transport modeling at system level for the EUROfusion dual coolant lithium-lead breeding blanket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgorri, F. R.; Moreno, C.; Carella, E.; Rapisarda, D.; Fernández-Berceruelo, I.; Palermo, I.; Ibarra, A.

    2017-11-01

    The dual coolant lithium lead (DCLL) breeding blanket is one of the four breeder blanket concepts under consideration within the framework of EUROfusion consortium activities. The aim of this work is to develop a model that can dynamically track tritium concentrations and fluxes along each part of the DCLL blanket and the ancillary systems associated to it at any time. Because of tritium nature, the phenomena of diffusion, dissociation, recombination and solubilisation have been modeled in order to describe the interaction between the lead-lithium channels, the structural material, the flow channel inserts and the helium channels that are present in the breeding blanket. Results have been obtained for a pulsed generation scenario for DEMO. The tritium inventory in different parts of the blanket, the permeation rates from the breeder to the secondary coolant and the amount of tritium extracted from the lead-lithium loop have been computed. Results present an oscillating behavior around mean values. The obtained average permeation rate from the liquid metal to the helium is 1.66 mg h-1 while the mean tritium inventory in the whole system is 417 mg. Besides the reference case results, parametric studies of the lead-lithium mass flow rate, the tritium extraction efficiency and the tritium solubility in lead-lithium have been performed showing the reaction of the system to the variation of these parameters.

  9. Mathematical model of the reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozuh, M.

    1989-01-01

    The mathematical model of reactor coolant pump is described in this paper. It is based on correlations for centrifugal reactor coolant pumps. This code is one of the elements needed for the simulation of the whole NPP primary system. In subroutine developed according to this model we tried in every possible detail to incorporate plant specific data for Krsko NPP. (author)

  10. Experience in vibro-acoustic control of primary coolant circuit aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedov, V.K.; Adamenkov, K.A.

    1977-01-01

    Fundamental principles and possibilities of vibro-acoustic control of the primary coolant circuit in nuclear power plants for detecting failures (slack parts, penetration of foreign bodies, crack formation, etc.) are presented. As a result of pressure and flow rate fluctuations such failures give rise to characteristic changes in apmplitude and frequency of vibration and technological noise from the different aggregates with respect to a 'calibration' spectrum taken in the intact state. Nature and location of the failures may be determined by statistical analysis of the signals recorded from pressure and acceleration gauges. Certain parts of the primary circuit are controlled, especially the main circulation pumps. Additionally, neutron noise has been measured in order to control the core insertions. The method is illustrated by means of measurements performed in the units 1 to 4 of the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant during start-up operation and continuous operation. (author)

  11. Experience in vibro-acoustic control of primary coolant circuit aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedov, V K; Adamenkov, K A [Nuclear power plant Novo-Voronesh (USSR)

    1977-10-01

    Fundamental principles and possibilities of vibro-acoustic control of the primary coolant circuit in nuclear power plants for detecting failures (slack parts, penetration of foreign bodies, crack formation, etc.) are presented. As a result of pressure and flow rate fluctuations such failures give rise to characteristic changes in apmplitude and frequency of vibration and technological noise from the different aggregates with respect to a 'calibration' spectrum taken in the intact state. Nature and location of the failures may be determined by statistical analysis of the signals recorded from pressure and acceleration gauges. Certain parts of the primary circuit are controlled, especially the main circulation pumps. Additionally, neutron noise has been measured in order to control the core insertions. The method is illustrated by means of measurements performed in the units 1 to 4 of the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant during start-up operation and continuous operation.

  12. Primary coolant circuits in FBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutani, Masushiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the requirement of a pump for the forcive circulation of primary coolants and avoid the manufacturing difficulty of equipments. Constitution: In primary coolant circuits of an LMFBR type reactor having a recycling path forming a closed loop between a reactor core and a heat exchanger, coolants recycled through the recycling path are made of a magnetic fluid comprising liquid sodium incorporated with fine magnetic powder, and an electromagnet is disposed to the downstream of the heat exchanger. In the above-mentioned structure, since the magnetic fluid as the primary coolants losses its magnetic property when heated in the reactor core but recovers the property at a lower temperature after the completion of the heat exchange, the magnetic fluid can forcively be flown through the recycling path under the effect of the electromagnet disposed to the down stream of the heat exchanger to thereby forcively recycle the primary coolants. (Kawakami, Y.)

  13. Breakup of jet and drops during premixing phase of fuel coolant interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraldsson, Haraldur Oskar

    2000-05-01

    During the course of a hypothetical severe accident in a light water reactor, molten liquid may be introduced into a volatile coolant, which, under certain conditions, results in explosive interactions. Such fuel-coolant interactions (FCI) are characterised by an initial pre-mixing phase during which the molten liquid, metallic or oxidic in nature, undergoes a breakup (fragmentation) process which significantly increase the area available for melt-coolant contact, and thus energy transfer. Although substantial progress in the understanding of phenomenology of the FCI events has been achieved in recent years, there remain uncertainties in describing the primary and secondary breakup processes. The focus of this work is on the melt jet and drop breakup during the premixing phase of FCI. The objectives are to gain insight into the premixing phase of the FCI phenomena, to determine what fraction of the melt fragments and determine the size distribution. The approach is to perform experiments with various simulant materials, at different scales, different conditions and with variation of controlling parameters affecting jet and drop breakup processes. The analysis approach is to investigate processes at different level of detail and complexity to understand the physics, to rationalise experimental results and to develop and validate models. In the first chapter a brief introduction and review of the status of the FCI phenomena is performed. A review of previous and current experimental projects is performed. The status of the experimental projects and major findings are outlined. The first part of the second chapter deals with experimental investigation of jet breakup. Two series of experiments were performed with low and high temperature jets. The low temperature experiments employed cerrobend-70 as jet liquid. A systematic investigation of thermal hydraulic conditions and melt physical properties on the jet fragmentation and particle debris characteristics was

  14. Breakup of jet and drops during premixing phase of fuel coolant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haraldsson, Haraldur Oskar

    2000-05-01

    During the course of a hypothetical severe accident in a light water reactor, molten liquid may be introduced into a volatile coolant, which, under certain conditions, results in explosive interactions. Such fuel-coolant interactions (FCI) are characterised by an initial pre-mixing phase during which the molten liquid, metallic or oxidic in nature, undergoes a breakup (fragmentation) process which significantly increase the area available for melt-coolant contact, and thus energy transfer. Although substantial progress in the understanding of phenomenology of the FCI events has been achieved in recent years, there remain uncertainties in describing the primary and secondary breakup processes. The focus of this work is on the melt jet and drop breakup during the premixing phase of FCI. The objectives are to gain insight into the premixing phase of the FCI phenomena, to determine what fraction of the melt fragments and determine the size distribution. The approach is to perform experiments with various simulant materials, at different scales, different conditions and with variation of controlling parameters affecting jet and drop breakup processes. The analysis approach is to investigate processes at different level of detail and complexity to understand the physics, to rationalise experimental results and to develop and validate models. In the first chapter a brief introduction and review of the status of the FCI phenomena is performed. A review of previous and current experimental projects is performed. The status of the experimental projects and major findings are outlined. The first part of the second chapter deals with experimental investigation of jet breakup. Two series of experiments were performed with low and high temperature jets. The low temperature experiments employed cerrobend-70 as jet liquid. A systematic investigation of thermal hydraulic conditions and melt physical properties on the jet fragmentation and particle debris characteristics was

  15. Core performance of equilibrium fast reactors for different coolant materials and fuel types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Akihiko; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Parametric studies with several coolant and fuel materials in the equilibrium state are performed for fast reactors in which natural uranium is fed and all of the actinides are confined. Sodium, sodium-potassium, lead, lead-bismuth and helium coolant materials, and oxide, nitride and metal fuels are employed to compare the neutronic characteristics in the equilibrium state. As to the criticality performance, sodium-potassium shows the best performance among the liquid metal coolants and the metallic fuel indicates the best performance

  16. Responses to Small Break Loss of Coolant Accidents for SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Kyoo Hwan; Kim, Hee C.; Chang, Moon H.; Zee, Sung Q.; Kim, Si-Hwan; Lee, Un-Chul

    2004-01-01

    The SMART NSSS adopts the design characteristics of containing most of the primary circuit components, such as the reactor core, main coolant pumps (MCPs), steam generators (SGs), and N 2 gas pressurizer (PZR) in a single leak-tight Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) with a relatively large ratio of the primary coolant inventory to the core power compared to the conventional loop-type PWR. Due to these design characteristics, the SMART can fundamentally eliminate the possibility of Large Break Loss of Coolant Accidents (LBLOCAs), improve the natural circulation capability, and assure a sufficient time to mitigate the possibility of core uncover. Also, SMART adopts inherent safety improving features and passive engineered safety systems such as the substantially large negative moderator temperature coefficients, passive residual heat removal system, emergency core cooling system, and a steel-made leak-tight Safeguard Vessel (SV) housing the RPV. This paper presents the results of the safety analyses using a MARS/SMR code for the instantaneous guillotine ruptures of the major pipelines penetrating the RPV. The analysis results, employing conservative initial/boundary conditions and assumptions, show that the safety systems of the SMART basic design adequately remove the core decay heat without causing core uncover for all the cases of the Small Break Loss of Coolant Accidents (SBLOCAs). The sensitivity study results with variable SV conditions show that the reduced SV net free volume can shorten the time for reaching the thermal and mechanical equilibrium condition between the RPV and SV. Under these boundary conditions, the primary system inventory loss can be minimized and the core remains covered for a longer period of time without any makeup of the coolant. (authors)

  17. Developments on the European energy market. Part 1. Natural gas supply. Extra import covers growing natural gas demand in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Gelder, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    This first part of a series on developments in the European gas market features the growth in gas supply. 35% of the gas demand must be covered from sources outside Europe. For the future additional imports are required from countries such as the Russian Federation, Algeria and Nigeria. Over the next few years the artificial link between ga and oil prices will disappear, bringing the gas price to a structurally lower level. It will be of crucial importance that gas suppliers will not be able to form cartels to keep prices high. All competing projects will curb price increases on the European market, but will definitely result in more freedom of choice for European natural gas consumers

  18. Preliminary results of natural radioactivity measurements in the southern part of Ethiopia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollel Tiruneh, Getachew; Wodaje Kebede, Worku

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the first results of natural radioactivity measurements in the Southern part of Ethiopia (Bale Zone-Oromiya Regional State). The preliminary results indicate that radiation levels in the mining areas of Kallido Mountain are elevated compared with those in the town of Negele Borena (background area). Both external gamma radiation and alpha surface contamination levels are significantly elevated above local background levels

  19. Natural Arsenic Pollution and Hydrochemistry of Drinking Water of an Urban Part of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Mosaferi; Mohammad Shakerkhatibi; Saeid Dastgiri; Mohammad Asghari Jafar-abadi; Alireza Khataee; Samira Sheykholeslami

    2014-01-01

    Natural contamination of surface and groundwater resources with arsenic is a worldwide problem. The present study aimed to investigate and report on the quality of drinking water resources with special focus on arsenic presence in an urban part of Iran. Arsenic concentrations were measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). In both surface and groundwater samples, arsenic concentrations ranged from 6 - 61 µg/L with an average value of 39 ± 20 µg/L. Concentration of ar...

  20. Preliminary results of natural radioactivity measurements in the southern part of Ethiopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollel Tiruneh, Getachew [Ethiopian Radiation Protection Authority, PO Box 20486 code 1000, Addis-Ababa (Ethiopia)], E-mail: gwollel@yahoo.com; Wodaje Kebede, Worku [Ethiopian Radiation Protection Authority, PO Box 20486 code 1000, Addis-Ababa (Ethiopia)

    2008-11-15

    The paper presents the first results of natural radioactivity measurements in the Southern part of Ethiopia (Bale Zone-Oromiya Regional State). The preliminary results indicate that radiation levels in the mining areas of Kallido Mountain are elevated compared with those in the town of Negele Borena (background area). Both external gamma radiation and alpha surface contamination levels are significantly elevated above local background levels.

  1. Evaluation method of iodine re-evolution from an in-containment water pool after a loss of coolant accident, Part II: Evaluation of pH and iodine re-evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Jeong, Ji Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • It is required to evaluate re-evolved iodine from sump water after LOCA. • Transport of iodine and chemicals influencing pH were analyzed using CFD. • Chemical conditions of the iodine-rich region suppress iodine re-evolution. • The current evaluation method for I 2 re-evolution is excessively conservative. - Abstract: Radioactive iodine that is released during a postulated loss of coolant accident is dissolved into the containment spray water and transported into the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST). The re-evolution of iodine from the water is a safety concern. In this study, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses are conducted in order to analyze the transport of chemical species including iodine in the IRWST and to calculate the amount of iodine that re-evolves from the IRWST water. The CFD analyses demonstrate that the pH of water is high where the iodine concentration is high. Considering that the creation rate of molecular iodine declines as the pH increases, it can be understood that the iodine re-evolution is not so strong in practical situations because the chemical conditions of the iodine-rich region suppress the re-evolution of the iodine. In addition, four different methods for evaluating the amount of re-evolved iodine are examined. The amount of re-evolved iodine calculated using the total-volume-average values, which are currently used for safety analyses, appear to be significantly higher than those determined using other methods. The amount of re-evolved iodine estimated using a realistic method with a conservative assumption of volatilization appears to be approximately one thousandth of that evaluated using the current method. This implies that the current method is very conservative.

  2. Coolant cleanup method in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Masayoshi; Nishimura, Shigeoki; Takahashi, Sankichi; Izumi, Kenkichi; Motojima, Kenji.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose : To effectively adsorb to remove low molecular weight organic substances from iron exchange resins for use in the removal of various radioactive nucleides contained in reactor coolants. Method : Reactor coolants are recycled by a main recyling pump in a nuclear reactor and a portion of the coolants is cooled and, thereafter, purified in a coolant desalter. While on the other hand, high pressure steams generated from the reactor are passed through a turbine, cooled in a condensator, eliminated with claddings or the likes by the passage through a filtration desalter using powderous ion exchange resins and then further passed through a desalter (filled with granular ion exchange resins). For instance, an adsorption and removing device for organic substances (resulted through the decomposition of ion exchange resins) precoated with activated carbon powder or filled with granular activated carbon is disposed at the downstream for each of the desalters. In this way, the organic substances in the coolants are eliminated to prevent the reduction in the desalting performance of the ion exchange resins caused by the formation of complexes between organic substances and cobalt in the coolants, etc. In this way, the coolant cleanup performance is increased and the amount of wasted ion exchange resins can be decreased. (Horiuchi, T.)

  3. Experiments on simulation of coolant mixing in fuel assembly head and core exit channel of WWER-440 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzar, L.L; Oleksyuk, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' has performed coolant mixing investigation in a head of a full-size simulator of WWER-440 fuel assembly. The experiments were focused on obtaining the data important for investigating the trends in temperature difference between the value registered by a ICIS thermocouple and the value of average temperature. The completed experiments ensure representative of configuration simulation by reproducing every construction peculiar feature of flow part of fuel assembly in the domain between the lower spacing grid and thermocouple location, and also by slightly modified fuel assembly regular elements (or analogues thereof). For the purpose of effectiveness of coolant mixing assessment within the head cross section of FA simulator, we measured coolant temperature distribution both in the place where coolant flow leaves the rod bundle simulator (in 39 data points along the cross section) and in the cross section location of regular ICIS thermocouple simulator (30 data points). The testing was conducted with pressure of (90 - 95) bar, mass coolant flow rates up to 2000 kg/(m 2 .s), temperature of coolant heating in 'hot' parts of the bundle up to 35.. and differences between coolant temperature extremes measured in rod bundle simulator outlet up to 20... Temperature fields were registered in 63 conditions that differ in coolant flow and inlet coolant temperature, electrical heating rate of FA simulator, and radial coolant distribution. In certain registered conditions we simulated coolant leakage to the space between the fuel assemblies. The received test data may be important both for investigation of dependencies between the coolant temperature in regular thermocouple location or average outlet temperature in assembly head, and for validation of CFD codes or subchannel codes (Authors)

  4. Assessment of Loss-of-Coolant Effect on Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won Young; Park, Joo Hwan; Kim, Bong Ghi

    2009-01-01

    A CANDU reactor is a heavy-water-moderated, natural uranium fuelled reactor with a pressure tube. The reactor contains a horizontal cylindrical vessel (calandria) and each pressure tube is isolated from the heavy-water moderator in a calandria. This allows the moderator system to be operated of a high-pressure and of a high-temperature coolant in pressure tube. This causes the pressurized liquid coolant in the channel to void and therefore give rise to a reactivity transient in the event of a break or fault in the coolant circuit. In particular, all CANDU reactors are well known to have a positive void reactivity coefficient and thus this phenomenon may lead to a positive feedback, which can cause a large power pulse. We assess the loss-of-coolant effect by coolant void reactivity versus fuel burnup, four factor parameters for fresh fuel and equilibrium fuel, reactivity change due to the change of coolant density and reactivity change in the case of half- and full-core coolant

  5. Continuous surveillance of reactor coolant circuit integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Continuous surveillance is important to assuring the integrity of a reactor coolant circuit. It can give pre-warning of structural degradation and indicate where off-line inspection should be focussed. These proceedings describe the state of development of several techniques which may be used. These involve measuring structural vibration, core neutron noise, acoustic emission from cracks, coolant leakage, or operating parameters such as coolant temperature and pressure. Twenty three papers have been abstracted and indexed separately for inclusion in the data base

  6. Loss-of-coolant accident analyses of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, N.C.J.; Yoder, G.L.; Wendel, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    Currently in the conceptual design stage, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) will operate at a high heat flux, a high mass flux, an a high degree of coolant subcooling. Loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) analyses using RELAP5 have been performed as part of an early evaluation of ANSR safety issues. This paper discusses the RELAP5 ANSR conceptual design system model and preliminary LOCA simulation results. Some previous studies were conducted for the preconceptual design. 12 refs., 7 figs

  7. Fuel cladding interaction with water coolant in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    Water coolant chemistry and corrosion processes are important factors in reliable operation of NPP's, as at elevated temperatures water is aggressive towards structural materials. Water regimes for commercial Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors were developed and proved to be satisfactory. Nevertheless, studies of operation experience continue and an amount of new Research and Development work is being conducted for further improvements of technology and better understanding of the physicochemical nature of those processes. In this report information is presented on the IAEA programme on fuel element cladding interaction with water coolant. Some results of this survey and recommendations made by the group of consultants who participated in this work are given as well as recommendations for continuation of this study. Separate abstracts were prepared for 6 papers of this report

  8. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications.

  9. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications

  10. Work related to increasing the exploitation and experimental possibilities of the RA reactor, 05. Independent CO2 loop for cooling the samples irradiated in the RA vertical experimental channels (I-IV), Part II, IZ-240-0379-1963, Vol. II Head of the low temperature RA reactor coolant loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavicevic, M.

    1963-07-01

    The objective of the project was to design the head of the CO 2 coolant loop for cooling the materials during irradiation in the RA reactor. Six heads of coolant loops will be placed in the RA reactor, two in the region of heavy water in the experimental channels VEK-6 and four in the graphite reflector in the channels VEK-G. maximum generated heat in the heads of the coolant loop is 10500 kcal/h and minimum generated heat is 1500 kcal/h. The loops are cooled by CO 2 gas, coolant flow is 420 kg/h, and the pressure is 4.5 atu. There is a need to design and construct the secondary coolant loop for the low temperature coolant loop. This volume includes technical specifications of the secondary CO 2 loop with instructions for construction and testing; needed calculations; specification of materials; cost estimation for materials, equipment and construction; and graphical documentation [sr

  11. Sound velocity in the coolant of boiling nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskuryakov, K.N.; Parshin, D.A.; Novikov, K.S.; Galivec, E.Yu.

    2009-01-01

    To prevent resonant interaction between acoustic resonance and natural frequencies of FE, FA and RI oscillations, it is necessary to determine the value of EACPO. Based on results of calculations of EACPO and natural frequencies of FR, FA and RI oscillations values, it would be possible to reveal the dynamical loadings on metal that are dangerous for the initiation of cracking process in the early stage of negative condition appearance. To calculate EACPO it is necessary to know the Speed Velocity in Coolant. Now we do not have any data about real values of such important parameter as pressure pulsations propagation velocity in two phase environments, especially in conditions with variations of steam content along the length of FR, with taking into account the type of local resistances, flow geometry etc. While areas of resonant interaction of the single-phase liquid coolant with equipment and internals vibrations are estimated well enough, similar estimations in the conditions of presence of a gas and steam phase in the liquid coolant are inconvenient till now. Paper presents results of calculation of velocity of pressure pulsations distribution in two-phase flow formed in core of RBMK-1000 reactors. Feature of the developed techniques is that not only thermodynamic factors and effect of a speed difference between water and steam in a two phase flow but also geometrical features of core, local resistance, non heterogeneity in the two phase environment and power level of a reactor are considered. Obtained results evidence noticeable decreasing of velocity propagation of pressure pulsations in the presence of steam actions in the liquids. Such estimations for real RC of boiling nuclear reactors with steam-liquid coolant are obtained for the first time. (author)

  12. Numerical model simulation of atmospheric coolant plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, P.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of humid atmospheric coolants on the atmosphere is simulated by means of a three-dimensional numerical model. The atmosphere is defined by its natural vertical profiles of horizontal velocity, temperature, pressure and relative humidity. Effluent discharge is characterised by its vertical velocity and the temperature of air satured with water vapour. The subject of investigation is the area in the vicinity of the point of discharge, with due allowance for the wake effect of the tower and buildings and, where application, wind veer with altitude. The model equations express the conservation relationships for mometum, energy, total mass and water mass, for an incompressible fluid behaving in accordance with the Boussinesq assumptions. Condensation is represented by a simple thermodynamic model, and turbulent fluxes are simulated by introduction of turbulent viscosity and diffusivity data based on in-situ and experimental water model measurements. The three-dimensional problem expressed in terms of the primitive variables (u, v, w, p) is governed by an elliptic equation system which is solved numerically by application of an explicit time-marching algorithm in order to predict the steady-flow velocity distribution, temperature, water vapour concentration and the liquid-water concentration defining the visible plume. Windstill conditions are simulated by a program processing the elliptic equations in an axisymmetrical revolution coordinate system. The calculated visible plumes are compared with plumes observed on site with a view to validate the models [fr

  13. Coolant processing device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizawa, Hideo; Funakoshi, Toshio; Izumoji, Yoshiaki

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce an entire facility cost by concentrating and isolating tritium accumulated in coolants, removing the tritium out of the system, and returning hydrogen gas generated at a reactor accident to a recombiner in a closed loop by the switching of a valve. Constitution: Coolant from a reactor cooling system processed by a chemical volume control system facility (CVCS) and coolant drain from various devices processed by a liquid waste disposing system facility (LWDS) are fed to a tritium isolating facility, in which they are isolated into concentrated tritium water and dilute tritium water. The concentrated tritium water is removed out of the system and stored. The dilute tritium water is reused as supply water for coolant. If an accident occurs to cause hydrogen to be generated, a closed loop is formed between the containment vessel and the recombiner, the hydrogen is recombined with oxygen in the air of the closed loop to be thus returned to water. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. Fatigue management considering LWR coolant environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Heung Bae; Jin, Tae eun

    2000-01-01

    Design fatigue curve for structural material in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code do not explicitly address the effects of reactor coolant environments on fatigue life. Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments has been a concern ever since the early 1970's. And, recent fatigue test data indicate a significant decrease in fatigue lives of carbon steels, low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels in LWR coolant environments. For these reasons, fatigue of major components has been identified as a technical issue remaining to be resolved for life management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. In the present paper, results of recent investigations by many organizations are reviewed to provide technical justification to support the development of utility approach regarding the management of fatigue considering LWR coolant environments for the purpose of life management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. (author)

  15. Standardized sampling system for reactor coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Munson, L.F.; Nelson, J.L.; McDowell, R.L.; Jankowski, M.W.

    1982-09-01

    A three-pronged approach was developed to reach the objectives of acceptable coolant sampling, assessment of occupational exposure from corrosion products, and model development for the transport and buildup of corrosion products. Emphasis is on sampler design

  16. Design of Reactor Coolant Pump Seal Online Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ah, Sang Ha; Chang, Soon Heung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Song Kyu [Korea Power Engineering Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    As a part of a Department of Korea Power Engineering Co., (KOPEC) Project, Statistical Quality Control techniques have been applied to many aspects of industrial engineering. An application to nuclear power plant maintenance and control is also presented that can greatly improve plant safety. As a demonstration of such an approach, a specific system is analyzed: the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) and the fouling resistance of heat exchanger. This research uses Shewart X-bar, R charts, Cumulative Sum charts (CUSUM), and Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) to analyze the process for the state of statistical control. And the Control Chart Analyzer (CCA) has been made to support these analyses that can make a decision of error in process. The analysis shows that statistical process control methods can be applied as an early warning system capable of identifying significant equipment problems well in advance of traditional control room alarm indicators. Such a system would provide operators with enough time to respond to possible emergency situations and thus improve plant safety and reliability. RCP circulates reactor coolant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. RCP seals are in the pressure part of reactor coolant system, so if it breaks, it can cause small break LOCA. And they are running on high pressure, and high temperature, so they can be easily broken. Since the reactor coolant pumps operate within the containment building, physical access to the pumps occurs only during refueling outages. Engineers depend on process variables transmitted to the control room and through the station's data historian to assess the pumps' condition during normal operation.

  17. Design of Reactor Coolant Pump Seal Online Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ah, Sang Ha; Chang, Soon Heung; Lee, Song Kyu

    2008-01-01

    As a part of a Department of Korea Power Engineering Co., (KOPEC) Project, Statistical Quality Control techniques have been applied to many aspects of industrial engineering. An application to nuclear power plant maintenance and control is also presented that can greatly improve plant safety. As a demonstration of such an approach, a specific system is analyzed: the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) and the fouling resistance of heat exchanger. This research uses Shewart X-bar, R charts, Cumulative Sum charts (CUSUM), and Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) to analyze the process for the state of statistical control. And the Control Chart Analyzer (CCA) has been made to support these analyses that can make a decision of error in process. The analysis shows that statistical process control methods can be applied as an early warning system capable of identifying significant equipment problems well in advance of traditional control room alarm indicators. Such a system would provide operators with enough time to respond to possible emergency situations and thus improve plant safety and reliability. RCP circulates reactor coolant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. RCP seals are in the pressure part of reactor coolant system, so if it breaks, it can cause small break LOCA. And they are running on high pressure, and high temperature, so they can be easily broken. Since the reactor coolant pumps operate within the containment building, physical access to the pumps occurs only during refueling outages. Engineers depend on process variables transmitted to the control room and through the station's data historian to assess the pumps' condition during normal operation

  18. Multilingual natural language generation as part of a medical terminology server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J C; Solomon, W D; Michel, P A; Juge, C; Baud, R H; Rector, A L; Scherrer, J R

    1995-01-01

    Re-usable and sharable, and therefore language-independent concept models are of increasing importance in the medical domain. The GALEN project (Generalized Architecture for Languages Encyclopedias and Nomenclatures in Medicine) aims at developing language-independent concept representation systems as the foundations for the next generation of multilingual coding systems. For use within clinical applications, the content of the model has to be mapped to natural language. A so-called Multilingual Information Module (MM) establishes the link between the language-independent concept model and different natural languages. This text generation software must be versatile enough to cope at the same time with different languages and with different parts of a compositional model. It has to meet, on the one hand, the properties of the language as used in the medical domain and, on the other hand, the specific characteristics of the underlying model and its representation formalism. We propose a semantic-oriented approach to natural language generation that is based on linguistic annotations to a concept model. This approach is realized as an integral part of a Terminology Server, built around the concept model and offering different terminological services for clinical applications.

  19. The Creativity of Natural Selection? Part I: Darwin, Darwinism, and the Mutationists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, John

    2016-12-01

    This is the first of a two-part essay on the history of debates concerning the creativity of natural selection, from Darwin through the evolutionary synthesis and up to the present. Here I focus on the mid-late nineteenth century to the early twentieth, with special emphasis on early Darwinism and its critics, the self-styled "mutationists." The second part focuses on the evolutionary synthesis and some of its critics, especially the "neutralists" and "neo-mutationists." Like Stephen Gould, I consider the creativity of natural selection to be a key component of what has traditionally counted as "Darwinism." I argue that the creativity of natural selection is best understood in terms of (1) selection initiating evolutionary change, and (2) selection being responsible for the presence of the variation it acts upon, for example by directing the course of variation. I consider the respects in which both of these claims sound non-Darwinian, even though they have long been understood by supporters and critics alike to be virtually constitutive of Darwinism.

  20. Reactor coolant pump seals: improving their performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pothier, N.E.; Metcalfe, R.

    1986-06-01

    Large CANDU plants are benefitting from transient-resistant four-year reliable reactor coolant pump seal lifetimes, a direct result of AECL's 20-year comprehensive seal improvement program involving R and D staff, manufacturers, and plant designers and operators. An overview of this program is presented, which covers seal modification design, testing, post-service examination, specialized maintenance and quality control. The relevancy of this technology to Light Water Reactor Coolant Pump Seals is also discussed

  1. Coolant clean up system in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Fumio; Iwami, Hiroshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the amount of main steams and improve the plant heat efficiency by the use of condensated water as coolants for not-regenerative heat exchangers in a coolant clean up system of a nuclear reactor. Constitution: In a coolant clean up system of a nuclear reactor, a portion of condensates is transferred to the shell of a non-regenerative heat exchanger by way of a condensate pump for non-regenerative heat exchanger through a branched pipeway provided to the outlet of a condensate desalter for using the condensates as the coolants for the shell of the heat exchanger and the condensates are then returned to the inlet of a feedwater heater after the heat exchange. The branched flow rate of the condensates is controlled by the flow rate control valve mounted in the pipeway. Condensates passed through the heat exchanger and the condensates not passed through the heat exchanger are mixed and heated in a heater and then fed to the nuclear reactor. In a case where no feedwater is necessary to the nuclear reactor such as upon shutdown of the reactor, the condensates are returned by way of feedwater bypass pipeway to the condensator. By the use of the condensates as the coolants for the heat exchanger, the main steam loss can be decreased and the thermal load for the auxiliary coolant facility can be reduced. (Kawakami, Y.)

  2. 18 CFR Appendix A to Part 380 - Minimum Filing Requirements for Environmental Reports Under the Natural Gas Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Requirements for Environmental Reports Under the Natural Gas Act A Appendix A to Part 380 Conservation of Power... Filing Requirements for Environmental Reports Under the Natural Gas Act Environmental Reports Under the Natural Gas Act. Resource Report 1—General Project Description 1. Provide a detailed description and...

  3. The operating reliability of the reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grancy, W.

    1996-01-01

    There is a strong tendency among operating companies and manufacturers of nuclear power stations to further increase safety and operating availability of the plant and of its components. This applies also and particularly to reactor coolant pumps for the primary circuit of nuclear power stations of the type PWR. For 3 decades, ANDRITZ has developed and built such pumps and has attached great importance to the design of the complete pump rotor and of its essential surrounding elements, such as bearing and shaft seal. Apart from questions connected with design functioning of the pump there is one question of top priority: the operating reliability of the reactor coolant pump. The pump rotor (together with the rotor of the drive motor) is the only component within the primary system that permanently rotates at high speed during operation of the reactor plant. Many questions concerning design and configuration of such components cannot be answered purely theoretically, or they can only be answered partly. Therefore comprehensive development work and testing was necessary to increase the operating reliability of the pump rotor itself and of its surrounding elements. This contribution describes the current status of development and, as a focal point, discusses shaft sealing solutions elaborated so far. In this connection also a sealing system will be presented which aims for the first time at using a two-stage mechanical seal in reactor coolant pumps

  4. A open-quotes zero wasteclose quotes coolant management strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennicott, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    In June of 1992 the Waste Minimization Program at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) began a study to determine the best methods of managing water-based industrial metalworking fluids in the plant's Tool Manufacturing Shop. The shop was faced with the challenge of managing fluids that could no longer be disposed of in the traditional manner, through the plant's liquid process waste drains, due to a problem they, were having causing in the Liquid Waste Operations Evaporator. The study's goal was to reduce the waste coolants being generated and to reduce worker exposure to a serious health risk. Results of this study and those of a subsequent study to determine relative compatibilities of various coolants and metals, led to the application of a open-quotes zero wasteclose quotes machine coolant management program. This program is currently saving the generation of 10,000 gallons of liquid waste annually, has eliminated worker exposure to harmful bacteria and biocides, and should result in extended machine tool life, increased product quality, fewer rejected parts, and decreases labor costs

  5. Modeling natural emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model – Part 2: Modifications for simulating natural emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Mueller

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model version 4.6 has been revised with regard to the representation of chlorine (HCl, ClNO2 and sulfur (dimethylsulfide, or DMS, and H2S, and evaluated against observations and earlier published models. Chemistry parameterizations were based on published reaction kinetic data and a recently developed cloud chemistry model that includes heterogeneous reactions of organic sulfur compounds. Evaluation of the revised model was conducted using a recently enhanced data base of natural emissions that includes ocean and continental sources of DMS, H2S, chlorinated gases and lightning NOx for the continental United States and surrounding regions. Results using 2002 meteorology and emissions indicated that most simulated "natural" (plus background chemical and aerosol species exhibit the expected seasonal variations at the surface. Ozone exhibits a winter and early spring maximum consistent with ozone data and an earlier published model. Ozone distributions reflect the influences of atmospheric dynamics and pollutant background levels imposed on the CMAQ simulation by boundary conditions derived from a global model. A series of model experiments reveals that the consideration of gas-phase organic sulfur chemistry leads to sulfate aerosol increases over most of the continental United States. Cloud chemistry parameterization changes result in widespread decreases in SO2 across the modeling domain and both increases and decreases in sulfate. Most cloud-mediated sulfate increases occurred mainly over the Pacific Ocean (up to about 0.1 μg m−3 but also over and downwind from the Gulf of Mexico (including parts of the eastern US. Geographic variations in simulated SO2 and sulfate are due to the link between DMS/H2S and their byproduct SO2, the heterogeneity of cloud cover and precipitation (precipitating clouds act as

  6. Work related to increasing the exploitation and experimental possibilities of the RA reactor, 05. Independent CO2 loop for cooling the samples irradiated in the RA vertical experimental channels (IIV), Part I, IZ-240-o379-1963, Vol. I, Head of the low temperature RA reactor coolant loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavicevic, M.

    1963-07-01

    The objective of the project was to design the head of the CO 2 coolant loop for cooling the materials during irradiation in the RA reactor. Six heads of coolant loops will be placed in the RA reactor, two in the region of heavy water in the experimental channels VEK-6 and four in the graphite reflector in the channels VEK-G. Materials for irradiation are metallurgy and chemical samples. In addition to the project objectives, this volume includes technical specifications of the coolant loop head, thermal calculations, calculations of mechanical stress, antireactivity and activation of the construction materials, cost estimation, scheme of the coolant loop head, diagrams of CO 2 gas temperature, thermal neutron flux distribution, design specifications of two proposed solutions for head of low temperature coolant loop [sr

  7. LWR primary coolant pipe rupture test rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitoshi, Shyoji

    1978-01-01

    The rupture test rig for primary coolant pipes is constructed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to verify the reliability of the primary coolant pipes for both PWRs and BWRs. The planned test items consisted of reaction force test, restraint test, whip test, jet test and continuous release test. A pressure vessel of about 4 m 3 volume, a circulating pump, a pressurizer, a heater, an air cooler and the related instrumentation and control system are included in this test rig. The coolant test condition is 160 kg/cm 2 g, 325 deg C for PWR test, and 70 kg/cm 2 g, saturated water and steam for BWR test, 100 ton of test load for the ruptured pipe bore of 8B Schedule 160, and 20 lit/min. discharge during 20 h for continuous release of coolant. The maximum pit internal pressure was estimated for various pipe diameters and time under the PWR and BWR conditions. The spark rupturing device was adopted for the rupture mechanics in this test rig. The computer PANAFACOM U-300 is used for the data processing. This test rig is expected to operate in 1978 effectively for the improvement of reliability of LWR primary coolant pipes. (Nakai, Y.)

  8. Coolant material effect on the heat transfer rates of the molten metal pool with solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jae Seon; Suh, Kune Y.; Chung, Chang Hyun; Park, Rae Joon; Kim, Sang Baik

    1998-01-01

    Experimental studies on heat transfer and solidification of the molten metal pool with overlying coolant with boiling were performed. The simulant molten pool material is tin (Sn) with the melting temperature of 232 degree C. Demineralized water and R113 are used as the working coolant. This work examines the crust formation and the heat transfer characteristics of the molten metal pool immersed in the boiling coolant. The Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool region of this study are compared between the water coolant case and the R113 coolant case. The experimental results for the water coolant are higher than those for R113. Also, the empirical relationship of the Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number is compared with the literature correlations measured from mercury. The present experimental results are higher than the literature correlations. It is believed that this discrepancy is caused by the effect of the heat loss to the environment on the natural convection heat transfer in the molten pool

  9. Comparison of thermohydraulic characteristics in the use of various coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu; Suda, Kazunori; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2000-11-01

    Numerical calculations were carried out for a free surface sloshing, a thermal stratification, a thermal striping, and a natural convection as key phenomena of in-vessel thermohydraulics in future fast reactor systems with various fluids as coolants. This numerical work was initiated based on a recognition that the fundamental characteristics of the phenomena have been unsolved quantitatively in the use of various coolants. From the analysis for the phenomena, the following results were obtained. [Free Surface Sloshing phenomena] (1) There is no remarkable difference between liquid sodium and liquid Pb-Bi in characteristics of internal flows and free surface characteristics based on Fr number. (2) The AQUA-VOF code has a potential enough to evaluate gas entrainment behavior from the free surface including the internal flow characteristics. [Thermal Stratification Phenomena] (1) On-set position of thermal entrainment process due to dynamic vortex flows was moved to downstream direction with decreasing of Ri number. On the other hand, the position in the case of CO 2 gas was shifted to upstream side with decreasing of Ri number. (2) Destruction speed of the thermal stratification interface was dependent on thermal diffusivity as fluid properties. Therefore it was concluded that an elimination method is necessary for the interface generated in CO 2 gas. [Thermal Striping Phenomena] (1) Large amplitudes of fluid temperature fluctuations was reached to down stream area in the use of CO 2 gas, due to larger fluid viscosity and smaller thermal diffusivity, compared with liquid sodium and liquid Pb-Bi cases. (2) To simulate thermal striping conditions such as amplitude and frequency of the fluid temperature fluctuations, it is necessary for coincidences of Re number for the amplitude and of velocity value for the frequency, in various coolants. [Natural Convection Phynomlena] (1) Fundamental behavior of the natural convection in various coolant follows buoyant jet

  10. Partial Discharge Measurements in HV Rotating Machines in Dependence on Pressure of Coolant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kršňák

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the pressure of the coolant used in high voltage rotating machines on partial discharges occurring in stator insulation is discussed in this paper. The first part deals with a theoretical analysis of the topic. The second part deals with the results obtained on a real generator in industrial conditions. Finally, theoretical assumptions and obtained results are compared.

  11. Nuclear reactor of pressurized liquid coolant type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, D.

    1976-01-01

    The reactor comprises a vertical concrete pressure vessel, a bell-housing having an open lower end and disposed coaxially with the interior of the pressure vessel so as to delimit therewith a space filled with gas under pressure for the thermal insulation of the internal vessel wall, a pressurizing device for putting the coolant under pressure within the bell-housing and comprising a volume of control gas in contact with a large free surface of coolant in order that an appreciable variation in volume of liquid displaced within the coolant circuit inside the bell-housing should correspond to a small variation in pressure of the control gas. 9 claims, 3 drawing figures

  12. ENVIRONMENTALLY REDUCING OF COOLANTS IN METAL CUTTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veijo KAUPPINEN

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Strained environment is a global problem. In metal industries the use of coolant has become more problematic in terms of both employee health and environmental pollution. It is said that the use of coolant forms approximately 8 - 16 % of the total production costs.The traditional methods that use coolants are now obviously becoming obsolete. Hence, it is clear that using a dry cutting system has great implications for resource preservation and waste reduction. For this purpose, a new cooling system is designed for dry cutting. This paper presents the new eco-friendly cooling innovation and the benefits gained by using this method. The new cooling system relies on a unit for ionising ejected air. In order to compare the performance of using this system, cutting experiments were carried out. A series of tests were performed on a horizontal turning machine and on a horizontal machining centre.

  13. Limits to fuel/coolant mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.; Moses, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor explosion process involves the mixing of fuel with coolant prior to the explosion. A number of analysts have identified limits to the amount of fuel/coolant mixing that could occur within the reactor vessel following a core melt accident. Past models are reviewed and a sim plified approach is suggested to estimate the upper limit on the amount of fuel/coolant mixing pos sible. The approach uses concepts first advanced by Fauske in a different way. The results indicat that water depth is an important parameter as well as the mixing length scale D /SUB mix/ , and for large values of D /SUB mix/ the fuel mass mixed is limited to <7% of the core mass

  14. Main coolant pump testing at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartlen, R.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes Ontario Hydro Research Division's experience with a computerized data acquisition and analysis system for monitoring mechanical vibration in reactor coolant pumps. The topics covered include bench-marking of the computer system and the coolant pumps, signatures of normal and malfunctioning pumps, analysis of data collected by the monitoring system, simulation of faults, and concerns that have been expressed about data interpretation, sensor types and locations, alarm/shutdown limits and confirmation of nondestructive examination testing. This presentation consists of overheads only

  15. Comparative design study of FR plants with various coolants. 1. Studies on Na coolant FR, Pb-Bi coolant FR, gas coolant FR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konomura, Mamoru; Shimakawa, Yoshio; Hori, Toru; Kawasaki, Nobuchika; Enuma, Yasuhiro; Kida, Masanori; Kasai, Shigeo; Ichimiya, Masakazu

    2001-01-01

    In Phase I of the Feasibility Studies on the Commercialized Fast Reactor (FR) Cycle System, plant designs on FR were performed with various coolants. This report describes the plant designs on FR with sodium, lead-bismuth, CO 2 gas and He gas coolants. A construction cost of 0.2 million yen/kWe was set up as a design goal. The result is as follows: The sodium reactor has a capability to obtain the goal, and lead-bismuth and gas reactors may satisfy the goal with further improvements. (author)

  16. On-Line Coolant Chemistry Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LM Bachman

    2006-01-01

    Impurities in the gas coolant of the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) can provide valuable indications of problems in the reactor and an overall view of system health. By monitoring the types and amounts of these impurities, much can be implied regarding the status of the reactor plant. However, a preliminary understanding of the expected impurities is important before evaluating prospective detection and monitoring systems. Currently, a spectroscopy system is judged to hold the greatest promise for monitoring the impurities of interest in the coolant because it minimizes the number of entry and exit points to the plant and provides the ability to detect impurities down to the 1 ppm level

  17. Leak detection device for reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Koichiro.

    1990-01-01

    In a light water cooled reactor, if reactor coolants are leaked from pipelines in a pipeline chamber, activated products (N-16) are diffused together to an atmosphere in the pipeline chamber. N-16 is sucked from an extracting tube which is always sucking the atmosphere in the pipeline chamber to a sucking blower. Then, β-rays released from N-16 are monitored by a radiation monitor in a measuring chamber which is radiation-shielded from the pipeline chamber. Accordingly, since the radiation monitor can detect even slight leakage, the slight leakage of reactor coolants in the pipelines can be detected at an early stage. (I.N.)

  18. Contents of natural and anthropological radionuclides in uncultivated soils in the eastern part of Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, P.; Georgieva, D.; Yaneva, B.

    2006-01-01

    Bulgaria is a country which is located in the Eastern part of Europe. The lay shape of Bulgaria is very various, regarding to the lay shape, rock types and some human activities it defines content of radionuclides in uncultivated soils. Natural radionuclides in these soils are: U 238, Ra 226, Th 232 and K 40. The main anthropological source of radionuclides in these soils is Cs 137. There are no normative documents about limit concentrations of these radionuclides in uncultivated soils. So the actual concentrations are compared with some background concentrations, as a result from a lot of studies in the past. Valuation of natural and anthropological radionuclides is made by determination of their special activity in soil samples from the 0 - 20 cm layer by using the nondestructive gamma spectro metrological analysis. Specific activity of U 238 is defined by its daughter product - Th 234, specific activity of Ra 226 by Pb 214 and Bi 214, of Th 232 by Ac 228 and Pb 212, and specific activity of K-40 and Cs 137 by gamma spectro metrological analysis. In the last years there was made a systematic and valuation of concentrations of these radionuclides. There were examined more than 500 samples each year in the investigated area. Concentrations for U 238 vary from 4 to 64 Bq/kg, for Ra 226 from 7 to 54 Bq/kg, for Th 232 from 12 to 67 Bq/kg, for K 40 from 72 to 1106 Bq/kg. For Cs 137, the concentrations vary from 2 to 234 Bq/kg. During this analysis there were no indices of natural radionuclides above the limit concentrations - background concentrations typical for the different regions

  19. Evaluation method of iodine re-evolution from an in-containment water pool after a loss of coolant accident, Part I: pH estimation of a solution with various chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Jeong, Ji Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • It is required to evaluate re-evolved iodine from sump water after LOCA. • pH evaluation based on Gibbs free energy minimization. • Program was developed to evaluate chemical equilibrium and pH solutions. • Predictions are in good agreement with experimental data. - Abstract: Radioactive iodine, which is released into the atmosphere of the containment building, is absorbed into the containment spray water and dissolved to be ionized. This iodine-rich water is then transported to the in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) in APR1400 nuclear power plants. When the pH of the water is below 7, the dissolved iodine converts to molecular iodine and re-evolves from the water and returns to the atmosphere. A series of studies have been conducted in order to evaluate the iodine re-evolution from the IRWST. This study consists of two parts: the pH evaluation method and the evaluation of the iodine re-evolution. This paper presents the first part, i.e. the pH evaluation method. The equilibrium concentrations of various chemicals in a solution are determined at the minimum Gibbs’ free energy. This method is useful for complex reactant problems rather than equilibrium constants method because the latter method requires numerous equilibrium constants and there might be missing equilibrium constants associated with the solution. The calculated pH values of solutions are compared with the experimental measurements in order to validate this method and the thermodynamic data of the chemicals incorporated into the program. The estimated values for solutions are in good agreement with the experimental measurements within a difference of less than 3.3%.

  20. Operation modes research of liquefied natural gas storages as a part of the ground complexes equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Korolev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG in the space-rocket equipment is motivated by some advantages. That is why a lot of tests and works are actively carried out now on rocket engines using liquefied natural gas.To provide the engine tests and subsequent rocket complex operation a creation of LNG storages is demanded as a part of ground processing equipment and support for their safe operation conditions.One of LNG danger factor is its low boiling temperature, and also changing the condition, density and LNG boiling temperature at storage due to evaporation of light component, namely methane. At refill of the storages having fuel remains with a new LNG portion these factors can lead to formation of the stratified macro-layers and cause a mode of the intensive mixing that is called "rollover", with almost instant evaporation of LNG big mass and sharp pressure boost, capable to result in the storage distraction with catastrophic effects.The work objectives are formulated such as a technique development for forecasting of the LNG parameters in operating storages including the rollover mode, a comparison of calculated results of the LNG parameters with the experimental data, and a definition of possible recommendations for safe operation of LNG storages as a part of the ground complexes equipment.The paper reviews 12 publications concerning the issues and proceeding processes at operation of LNG storages, including the rollover mode.To verify the reliability of process simulation results in the LNG, represented in models by the binary methane-ethane mixture the calculated values have been compared with the experimental data for a LNG storage mode in the reservoir of a ground test complex.The reliability of developed models of the heat-mass-exchange processes in stratified on density and temperature in LNG storage with emergence of conditions for the rollover mode has been verified by comparing the settlement characteristics to the published

  1. Reactor Coolant Pump Motor Maintenance Experience in Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, J.; Besirevic, A.; Boljat, Z.

    2016-01-01

    After thirty years of service as well as maintenance in Krsko NPP both original Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) motors are remanufactured by original vendor Westinghouse and a new one was purchased. Design function of the RCP motor is to drive Reactor Coolant Pump and for coast-down feature during Design Basis Accident. This paper will give a view on maintenance issues of RCP motor during the thirty years of service and maintenance in Krsko NPP to be kept functionally operational. During the processes of remanufacturing inspection and disassembly it was made possible to get a deeper perspective in the motor condition and the wear or fatigue of the motor parts. Parameters like bearing & winding temperature, absolute and relative vibration greatly affect motor operation if not kept inside design margins. Rotational speed causes heat generation at the bearings which is then associated with oil temperatures and as a consequence bearing temperatures. That is why the most critical parts of the motor are the components of upper and lower bearing assembly. The condition of motor stator and rotor assembly technical characteristics shall be explained with respect to influence of demanding environmental conditions that the motor is exposed. Assessment shall be made how does the wear of critical RCP motor parts can influence reliable performance of the motor if not maintained in proper way. Information on upgrades that were done on RCP motor shall be shared: Oil Spillage Protection System (OSPS), Stator upgrades, Dynamic Port, etc. (author).

  2. 28 CFR Appendix C to Part 61 - Immigration and Naturalization Service Procedures Relating to the Implementation of the National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Immigration and Naturalization Service... ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Pt. 61, App. C Appendix C to Part 61—Immigration and Naturalization Service Procedures..., construction, and maintenance of new and existing INS facilities. All activities concerning the Immigration and...

  3. Coolant cleanup system for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Araki, Hidefumi.

    1993-01-01

    The cleanup system of the present invention removes impurity ions and floating materials accumulated in a reactor during evaporation of coolants in the nuclear reactor. That is, coolants pass pipelines from a pressure vessel using pressure difference between a high pressure in the pressure vessel and a low pressure at the upstream of a condensate filtration/desalting device of a condensate/feed water system as a driving source, during which cations and floating materials are removed in a high temperature filtration/desalting device and coolants flow into the condensate/feedwater system. Impurities containing anions are removed here by the condensates filtration/desalting device. Then, they return to the pressure vessel while pressurized and heated by a condensate pump, a feed water pump and a feed water heater. At least pumps, a heat exchanger for heating, a filtration/desalting device for removing anions and pipelines connecting them used exclusively for the coolant cleanup system are no more necessary. (I.S.)

  4. Fission product release into the primary coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apperson, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    The analytic evaluation of steady state primary coolant activity is discussed. The reported calculations account for temperature dependent fuel failure in two particle types and arbitrary radioactive decay chains. A matrix operator technique implemented in the SUVIUS code is used to solve the simultaneous equations. Results are compared with General Atomic Company's published results

  5. Analysis of Coolant Options for Advanced Metal Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Can, Levent

    2006-01-01

    .... The overall focus of this study is the build up of induced radioactivity in the coolant of metal cooled reactors as well as the evaluation of other physical and chemical properties of such coolants...

  6. The energy sector abroad. Part 12. The Czech Republic. Spider in the European natural gas web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holwerda, B.

    1998-01-01

    The natural gas industry in the Czech Republic is one of the oldest in Europe. In the past, natural gas has played a modest role in the Czech energy supply: coal and town gas from coal and lignite were the major energy sources. However, more and more use is made of natural gas, imported from Russia (Gazprom) and Norway. Besides, the Czech natural gas distribution, transportation and storage system occupies a key position in the Central-European natural gas network

  7. The Culture That Constrains: Experience of "Nature" as Part of a Wilderness Adventure Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haluza-DeLay, Randolph

    1999-01-01

    A study examined experiences of nature among eight adolescents during a 12-day wilderness trip. The trip generated feelings of good will toward nature but no increase in environmentally responsible behaviors. Group norms emphasized social interaction and constrained attention to nature. Outdoor educators should consciously plan for transfer of…

  8. Deposition of hematite particles on alumina seal faceplates of nuclear reactor coolant pumps: Laboratory experiments and industrial feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Lefèvre, Grégory; Živković, Ljiljana S.; Jaubertie, Anne

    2012-01-01

    In the primary circuit of pressurized water reactors (PWR), the dynamic sealing system in reactor coolant pumps is ensured by mechanical seals whose ceramic parts are in contact with the cooling solution. During the stretch-out phase in reactor operation, characterized by low boric acid concentration, the leak-off flow has been observed to abnormally evolve in industrial plants. The deposition of hematite particles, originating from corrosion, on alumina seals of coolant pumps is suspec...

  9. Consideration of hot channel factors in design for providing operating margins on coolant channel outlet temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, V.K.; Surendar, C.; Bapat, C.N.

    1994-01-01

    The Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (IPHWR) are horizontal pressure tube reactors using natural uranium oxide fuel in the form of short (495 mm) clusters. The fuel clusters in the Zr-Nb pressure tubes are cooled by high pressure, high temperature and subcooled circulating heavy water. Coolant flow distribution to individual channels is designed to match the power distribution so as to obtain uniform coolant outlet temperature. However, during operation, the coolant outlet temperature in individual channels deviate from their nominal value due to: tolerances in process design; effects of grid frequency on the pump speed; deviation in channel powers from the nominal values due to on-power fuelling and movement of reactivity devices, and so on. Thus an operating margin, between the highest permissible and nominal coolant outlet temperatures, is required taking into account various hot channel factors that contribute to higher coolant outlet temperatures. The paper discusses the methodology adopted to assess various hot channel factors which would provide optimum operating margins while ensuring sub-cooling. (author)

  10. Transient heat transfer phenomena of the liquid metal layer cooled by overlying R113 coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, J. S.; Seo, K. R.; Jung, C. H.; Park, R. J.; Kim, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    To understand the fundamental relationship of the natural convection heat transfer in the molten metal pool and the boiling mechanism of the overlying coolant, experiments were performed for the transient heat transfer of the liquid metal pool with overlying R113 coolant with boiling. The simulant molten pool material is tin (Sn) with the melting temperature of 232 deg C. The metal pool is heated from the bottom surface and the coolant is injected onto the molten metal pool. Tests were conducted by changing the bottom surface boundary condition. The bottom heating condition was varied from 8kW to 14kW. As a result the boiling mechanism of the R113 coolant is changed from the nuclear boiling to film boiling. The Nusselt number and the Rayleigh number in the molten metal pool region obtained as functions of time. Analysis was made for the relationship between the heat flux and the temperature difference of the metal layer surface temperature and the boiling coolant bulk temperature

  11. Natural Arsenic Pollution and Hydrochemistry of Drinking Water of an Urban Part of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mosaferi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural contamination of surface and groundwater resources with arsenic is a worldwide problem. The present study aimed to investigate and report on the quality of drinking water resources with special focus on arsenic presence in an urban part of Iran. Arsenic concentrations were measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS. In both surface and groundwater samples, arsenic concentrations ranged from 6 - 61 µg/L with an average value of 39 ± 20 µg/L. Concentration of arsenic, which was up to six times greater than guideline values (10 µg/L indicates the presence of arsenic bearing materials in the geological structure of the region. It was found that the quality of treated surface water produced by the water treatment facility was good in respect to arsenic (9 µg/L and solid content (EC = µs/cm. However, in drinking water samples of wells, total solids (mean EC = 1580 ± 150 µs/cm, total hardness (mean = 479 + 94 mg/L as CaCO3 and arsenic (mean = 42 + 16 µg/L were significantly higher. Correspondingly, there was a significant correlation between arsenic concentration and EC, Na+, K+ and Cl- values. The type of water in most of groundwater samples (70% was determined as HCO3-Na+. Considering the population of the city and probable health effects due to exposure to arsenic through drinking water, comprehensive measures as well as application of arsenic removal processes in water treatment facilities and replacement of contaminated wells with safe wells are required.

  12. Revised Mark 22 coolant temperature coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Coolant temperature coefficients for the Mark 22 charge published previously are non-conservative because of the neglect of a significant mechanism which has a positive contribution to reactivity. Even after correcting for this effect, dynamic tests made on a Mark VIB charge in the early 60's suggest the results are still non-conservative. This memorandum takes both of these sources of information into account in making a best estimate of the prompt (coolant plus metal) temperature coefficient. Although no safety issues arise from this work (the overall temperature coefficient still strongly contributes to reactor stability), it is obviously desirable to use best estimates for prompt coefficients in limits and other calculations

  13. Freeform Deposition Method for Coolant Channel Closeout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradl, Paul R. (Inventor); Reynolds, David Christopher (Inventor); Walker, Bryant H. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A method is provided for fabricating a coolant channel closeout jacket on a structure having coolant channels formed in an outer surface thereof. A line of tangency relative to the outer surface is defined for each point on the outer surface. Linear rows of a metal feedstock are directed towards and deposited on the outer surface of the structure as a beam of weld energy is directed to the metal feedstock so-deposited. A first angle between the metal feedstock so-directed and the line of tangency is maintained in a range of 20-90.degree.. The beam is directed towards a portion of the linear rows such that less than 30% of the cross-sectional area of the beam impinges on a currently-deposited one of the linear rows. A second angle between the beam and the line of tangency is maintained in a range of 5-65 degrees.

  14. CAREM-25: considerations about primary coolant chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chocron, Mauricio; Iglesias, Alberto M.; Raffo Calderon, Maria C.; Villegas, Marina

    2000-01-01

    World operating experience, in conjunction with basic studies has been modifying chemistry specifications for the primary coolant of water cooled nuclear reactors along with the reactor type and structural materials involved in the design. For the reactor CAREM-25, the following sources of information have been used: 1) Experience gained by the Chemistry Department of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA, Argentina); 2) Participation of the Chemistry Department (CNEA) in international cooperation projects; 3) Guidelines given by EPRI, Siemens-KWU, AECL, etc. Given the main objectives: materials integrity, low radiation levels and personnel safety, which are in turn a balance between the lowest corrosion and activity transport achievable and considering that the CAREM-25 is a pressurized vessel integrated reactor, a group of guidelines for the chemistry and additives for the primary coolant have been given in the present work. (author)

  15. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the 13 N content in the containment atmosphere. 13 N is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process Hl+016/yields/ 13 N+ 4 He. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium 13 N concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m/sup -3/ and 7 kBq m/sup -3/ for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge(Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. 8 refs

  16. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the N13 content in the containment atmosphere. N13 is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process Hl+016/yields/Nl3+He4. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium N13 concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m/sup -3/ and 7 kBq m/sup -3/ for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge(Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. 8 refs

  17. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1979-08-01

    The present paper deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the N13 content in the containment atmosphere. N13 is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process H1+016 → N13+He4. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium N13 concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m -3 and 7 kBq m -3 for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge (Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. (Auth.)

  18. Reactor coolant pump seal leakage monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, D.M.; Spencer, J.W.; Morris, D.J.; James, W.; Shugars, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    Problems with reactor coolant pump seals have historically accounted for a large percentage of unscheduled outages. Studies performed for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have shown that the replacement of coolant pump seals has been one of the leading causes of nuclear plant unavailability over the last ten years. Failures of coolant pump seals can lead to primary coolant leakage rates of 200-500 gallons per minute into the reactor building. Airborne activity and high surface contamination levels following these failures require a major cleanup effort and increases the time and personnel exposure required to refurbish the pump seals. One of the problems in assessing seal integrity is the inability to accurately measure seal leakage. Because seal leakage flow is normally very small, it cannot be sensed directly with normal flow instrumentation, but must be inferred from several other temperature and flow measurements. In operating plants the leakage rate has been quantified with a tipping-bucket gauge, a device which indicates when one quart of water has been accumulated. The tipping-bucket gauge has been used for most rainfall-intensity monitoring. The need for a more accurate and less expensive gauge has been addressed. They have developed a drop-counter precipitation sensor has been developed and optimized. The applicability of the drop-counter device to the problem of measuring seal leakage is being investigated. If a review of system specification and known drop-counter performance indicates that this method is feasible for measuring seal leak rates, a drop-counter gauge will be fabricated and tested in the laboratory. If laboratory tests are successful the gauge will be demonstrated in a pump test loop at Ontario Hydro and evaluated under simulated plant conditions. 3 references, 2 figures

  19. Enhancing resistance to burnout via coolant chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, J. P.; Dinh, T. N.; Theofanous, T. G. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Boiling Crisis (BC) on horizontal, upwards-facing copper and steel surfaces under the influence of various coolant chemistries relevant to reactor containment waters is considered. In addition to Boric Acid (BA) and TriSodium Phosphate (TSP), pure De-Ionized Water (DIW) and Tap Water (TW) are included in experiments carried out in the BETA facility. The results are related to a companion paper on the large scale ULPU facility.

  20. Transient Temperature Distribution in a Reactor Core with Cylindrical Fuel Rods and Compressible Coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, H

    1968-04-15

    Applying linearization and Laplace transformation the transient temperature distribution and weighted temperatures in fuel, canning and coolant are calculated analytically in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry for constant material properties in fuel and canning. The model to be presented includes previous models as special cases and has the following novel features: compressibility of the coolant is accounted for. The material properties of the coolant are variable. All quantities determining the temperature field are taken into account. It is shown that the solution for fuel and canning temperature may be given by the aid of 4 basic transfer functions depending on only two variables. These functions are calculated for all relevant rod geometries and material constants. The integrals involved in transfer functions determining coolant temperatures are solved for the most part generally by application of coordinate and Laplace transformation. The model was originally developed for use in steam cooled fast reactor analysis where the coolant temperature rise and compressibility are considerable. It may be applied to other fast or thermal systems after suitable simplifications.

  1. Coolant void effect investigation - case of a na-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glinatsis, G.; Gugiu, D.

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of the last EURATOM-FP7 Program, a large sized Sodium-cooled FR (SFR) has been studied. Mixed carbides fuel (U, Pu)C has been adopted for the backup core solution and important work has been also performed in order to obtain an ''optimised'' backup configuration ''close'' to the reference one, which is fueled by mixed oxides fuel (U, Pu)Ox. The peculiarity of both core designs (the reference configuration and the optimised backup configuration) is the adoption of a 60 cm Plenum zone in the upper part of each fuel assembly (FA), that is filled by coolant, in order to mitigate (when emptied) the core positive coolant void effect. This paper presents some results of a detailed study of the coolant void effect for the above SFR with mixed carbides core. Many aspects, like geometric heterogeneity, the burnup state, the operating conditions, etc., have been taken into consideration in order to obtain information about the ''propagation'' and the behaviour of the coolant void effect itself. The performed study investigates also the coolant void effect consequences on some reactivity coefficients, which are important for a safe behaviour of the reactor. The investigation consisted in the steady state simulations of the reactor on different operating conditions in Monte Carlo approach. (authors)

  2. Minimizing secondary coolant blowdown in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y. C.; Woo, J. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Cho, Y. G.; Lim, N. Y.

    2000-01-01

    There is about 80m 3 /h loss of the secondary cooling water by evaporation, windage and blowdown during the operation of HANARO, 30MW research reactor. The evaporation and the windage is necessary loss to maintain the performance of cooling tower, but the blowdown is artificial lose to get rid of the foreign material and to maintain the quality of the secondary cooling water. Therefore, minimizing the blowdown loss was studied. It was confirmed, through the relation of the number of cycle and the loss rate of secondary coolant, that the number of cycle is saturated to 12 without blowdown because of the windage loss. When the secondary coolant is treated by high Ca-hardness treatment program (the number of cycle > 10) to maintain the number of cycle around 12 without blowdown, only the turbidity exceeds the limit. By adding filtering system it was confirmed, through the relation of turbidity and filtering rate of secondary cooling water, that the turbidity is reduced below the limit (5 deg.) by 2% of filtering rate without blowdown. And it was verified, through the performance test of back-flow filtering unit, that this unit gets rid of foreign material up to 95% of the back-flow and that the water can be reused as coolant. Therefore, the secondary cooling water can be treated by the high Ca-hardness program and filter system without blowdown

  3. Reactor coolant pumps for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harand, E.; Richter, G.; Tschoepel, G.

    1975-01-01

    A brake for the pump rotor of a main coolant pump or a shutoff member on the pump are provided in order to prevent excess speeds of the pump rotor. Such excess speeds may occur in PWR type reactors with water at a pressure below, e.g., 150 bars if there is leakage from a coolant line associated with the main coolant pump. As a brake, a centrifugal brake depending upon the pump speed or a brake ring arranged on the pump housing and acting on the pump rotor, which ring would be activated by pressure differentials in the pump, may be used. If the pressure differences between suction and pressure sockets are very small, a controlled hydraulic increase of the pressure force on the brake may also be provided. Furthermore, a turbine brake may be provided. A slide which is automatically movable in closing position along the pump rotor axis is used as a shutoff element. It is of cylindrical configuration and is arranged concentrically with the rotor axis. (DG) [de

  4. Analysis of thermo-hydraulic behavior of coolant during discharge of pressurized high-temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Sobajima, Makoto; Sasaki, Shinobu; Onishi, Nobuaki; Shiba, Masayoshi

    1978-01-01

    The present report describes results of the analysis of the LOFT semiscale experiment No. 1011 using remodeled RELAP-3 code, performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to simulate a postulated loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor. It was clarified through the analysis that coolant behavior during blowdown was influenced variously by the system components in the primary loop, comparing with coolant discharge from a pressure vessel. Good agreement was obtained between experimental and analytical results when phase separation was assumed in upper plenum and downcomer, since experimental data indicated existence of liquid level in those parts. It was also found that the use of the Wilson's equation to calculate bubble rise velocity and the use of discharge coefficient as the function of fluid quality at break location to calculate discharge flow rate resulted in good agreement with experimental data. (auth.)

  5. Management of large scale coolant channel replacement programme for Indian PHWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, V.K.; Chadda, S.K.; Arya, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Coolant channel assemblies form most important core components of pressurised heavy water reactors. Zirconium alloy pressure tube which form part of coolant channel assemblies are subjected to environment of high neutron flux, high pressure and temperature. Under those operating environmental conditions, the pressure tubes material undergoes degradation of metallurgical and mechanical properties in addition to dimensional changes. The coolant channels are subjected to an in-service inspection (ISI) programme for monitoring the health particularly of the pressure tubes. The en-mass replacement of pressure tubes is needed after most of the pressure tubes show unacceptable conditions for an assured safe and reliable operation. An overview of various issues pertaining to this aspect is presented. (author). 4 figs

  6. Reactor coolant purification system circulation pumps (CUW pumps)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, Toshiaki

    1979-01-01

    Coolant purification equipments for BWRs have been improved, and the high pressure purifying system has become the main type. The quantity of purifying treatment also changed to 2% of the flow rate of reactor feed water. As for the circulation pumps, canned motor pumps are adopted recently, and the improvements of reliability and safety are attempted. The impurities carried in by reactor feed water and the corrosion products generated in reactors and auxiliary equipments are activated by neutron irradiation or affect heat transfer adversely, adhering to fuel claddings are core structures. Therefore, a part of reactor coolant is led to the purification equipments, and returned to reactors after the impurities are eliminated perfectly. At the time of starting and stopping reactors, excess reactor water and the contaminated water from reactors are transferred to main condenser hot wells or waste treatment systems. Thus the prescribed water quality is maintained. The operational modes of and the requirements for the CUW pumps, the construction and the features of the canned motor type CUW pumps are explained. Recently, a pump operated for 11 months without any maintenance has been disassembled and inspected, but the wear of bearings has not been observed, and the high reliability of the pump has been proved. (Kako, I.)

  7. CANDU with supercritical water coolant: conceptual design features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinks, N.

    1997-01-01

    An advanced CANDU reactor, with supercritical water as coolant, has many attractive design features. The pressure exceeds 22 MPa but coolant temperatures in excess of 370 degrees C can be reached without encountering the two-phase region with its associated fuel-dry-out and flow-instability problems. Increased coolant temperature leads to increased plant thermodynamic efficiency reducing unit energy cost through reduced specific capital cost and reduced fueling cost. Increased coolant temperature leads to reduced void reactivity via reduced coolant in-core density. Light water becomes a coolant option. To preserve neutron economy, an advanced fuel channel is needed and is described below. A supercritical-water-cooled CANDU can evolve as fuel capabilities evolve to withstand increasing coolant temperatures. (author)

  8. Calculation and analysis of neutron and radiation characteristics of lead coolants with isotopic tailoring for future nuclear power facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blokhin, A.I.; Ivanov, A.P.; Korobeinikov, V.V.; Lunev, V.P.; Manokhin, V.N.; Khorasanov, G.L. [SSC RF A. I. Leypunsky Institute for Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation)

    2000-03-01

    A new type of safe fast reactor with lead coolant was proposed in Russia. The use of coolants with low moderating properties is one of the ways to get a hard neutron spectrum and an increase in the burning of Np-237, Am-243 and other miner actinides(MA) fissionable preferentially in the fast reactor. The stable lead isotope, Pb-208, is proposed as the one of such coolants. The neutron inelastic scattering cross-section of Pb-208 is 3.0-3.5 times less than the one of other lead isotopes. Calculation of the MA transmutation rates in the standard BN-type fast reactor with different coolants is performed by Monte-Carlo method using Code MMKFK. Six various models are simulated for the fast reactor blanket with different kinds of fuel and coolant. The fast reactor with natural-lead coolant practically does not differ from the reactor with sodium coolant relative to MA incineration. The use of Pb-208 as a coolant in the fast reactor results in increasing incineration of MA from 18 to 26% in comparison with a usual fast reactor. Calculation of induced radioactivity was performed using the FISPACT-3 inventory code, also. The results include total induced radioactivity and dose rate for initial material composition and selected long-lived radionuclides. The calculations show that the coolant consisting of lead isotope, Pb-206, or Pb-207, can be considered as the low-activation one because it does not practically contain long-lived toxic radionuclides. (M. Suetake)

  9. Development of Coolant Radioactivity Interpretation Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kiyoung; Jung, Youngsuk; Kim, Kyounghyun; Kim, Jangwook

    2013-01-01

    In Korea, the coolant radioactivity analysis has been performed by using the computer codes of foreign companies such as CADE (Westinghouse), IODYNE and CESIUM (ABB-CE). However, these computer codes are too conservative and have involved considerable errors. Furthermore, since these codes are DOS-based program, their easy operability is not satisfactory. Therefore it is required development of an enhanced analysis algorithm applying an analytical method reflecting the change of operational environments of domestic nuclear power plants and a fuel failure evaluation software considering user' conveniences. We have developed a nuclear fuel failure evaluation code able to estimate the number of failed fuel rods and the burn-up of failed fuels during nuclear power plant operation cycle. A Coolant Radio-activity Interpretation Code (CRIC) for LWR has been developed as the output of the project 'Development of Fuel Reliability Enhanced Technique' organized by Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP). The CRIC is Windows based-software able to evaluate the number of failed fuel rods and the burn-up of failed fuel region by analyzing coolant radioactivity of LWR in operation. The CRIC is based on the model of fission products release commonly known as 'three region model' (pellet region, gap region, and coolant region), and we are verifying the CRIC results based on the cases of domestic fuel failures. CRIC users are able to estimate the number of failed fuel rods, burn-up and regions of failed fuel considered enrichment and power distribution of fuel region by using operational cycle data, coolant activity data, fuel loading pattern, Cs-134/Cs-137 ratio according to burn-up and U-235 enrichment provided in the code. Due to development of the CRIC, it is secured own unique fuel failure evaluation code. And, it is expected to have the following significant meaning. This is that the code reflecting a proprietary technique for quantitatively

  10. natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Gómez Macías

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de óxido de magnesio comercial se preparó una suspensión acuosa, la cual se secó y calcinó para conferirle estabilidad térmica. El material, tanto fresco como usado, se caracterizó mediante DRX, área superficial BET y SEM-EPMA. El catalizador mostró una matriz de MgO tipo periclasa con CaO en la superficie. Las pruebas de actividad catalítica se efectuaron en lecho fijo empacado con partículas obtenidas mediante prensado, trituración y clasificación del material. El flujo de reactivos consistió en mezclas gas natural-aire por debajo del límite inferior de inflamabilidad. Para diferentes flujos y temperaturas de entrada de la mezcla reactiva, se midieron las concentraciones de CH4, CO2 y CO en los gases de combustión con un analizador de gases tipo infrarrojo no dispersivo (NDIR. Para alcanzar conversión total de metano se requirió aumentar la temperatura de entrada al lecho a medida que se incrementó el flujo de gases reaccionantes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten desarrollar un sistema de combustión catalítica de bajo costo con un material térmicamente estable, que promueva la alta eficiencia en la combustión de gas natural y elimine los problemas de estabilidad, seguridad y de impacto ambiental negativo inherentes a los procesos de combustión térmica convencional.

  11. Rendering of surface-geometries at job-generation level for camouflaging the layered nature of Additively Manufactured parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, D. B.; Hansen, H. N.; Nielsen, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    The layered nature of Additive Manufactured parts, specifically those given from the Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) process, exhibit a distinct surface definition. The origin of this is from the 2.5D deposition scheme, which leaves the seam between the individual layers clearly visible.[1...

  12. Predicting the ultimate potential of natural gas SOFC power cycles with CO2 capture : Part B: Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campanari, Stefano; Mastropasqua, Luca; Gazzani, Matteo; Chiesa, Paolo; Romano, Matteo C.

    2016-01-01

    An important advantage of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) as future systems for large scale power generation is the possibility of being efficiently integrated with processes for CO2 capture. Focusing on natural gas power generation, Part A of this work assessed the performances of advanced

  13. A system for the discharge of gas bubbles from the coolant flow of a nuclear reactor cooled by forced circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markfort, D.; Kaiser, A.; Dohmen, A.

    1975-01-01

    In a reactor cooled by forced circulation the gas bubbles carried along with the coolant flow are separated before entering the reactor core or forced away into the external zones. For this purpose the coolant is radially guided into a plenum below the core and deflected to a tangential direction by means of flow guide elements. The flow runs spirally downwards. On the bubbles, during their dwell time in this channel, the buoyant force and a force towards the axis of symmetry of the tank are exerted. The major part of the coolant is directed into a radial direction by means of a guiding apparatus in the lower section of the channel and guided through a chimney in the plenum to the center of the reactor core. This inner chimney is enclosed by an outer chimney for the core edge zones through which coolant with a small share of bubbles is taken away. (RW) [de

  14. Fuel-coolant interactions: preliminary experiments on the effect of gases dissolved in the 'coolant'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asher, R.C.; Davies, D.; Jones, P.G.

    1976-12-01

    A simple apparatus has been used to study fuel-coolant interactions under reasonably well controlled conditions. Preliminary experiments have used water as the 'coolant' and molten tin at 800 0 C as the 'fuel' and have investigated how the violence of the interaction is affected by dissolving gases (oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide) in the water. It was found that saturating the water with carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide completely suppresses the violent interaction. Experiments in which the concentrations of these gases were varied showed that a certain critical concentration was needed; below this concentration the dissolved gas has no significant effect but above it the suppression is

  15. Condensing heat transfer following a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krotiuk, W.J.; Rubin, M.B.

    1978-01-01

    A new method for calculating the steam mass condensation energy removal rates on cold surfaces in contact with an air-steam mixture has been developed. This method is based on the principles of mass diffusion of steam from an area of high concentration to the condensing surface, which is an area of low steam concentration. This new method of calculating mass condensation has been programmed into the CONTEMPT-LT Mod 26 computer code, which calculates the pressure and temperature transients inside a light water reactor containment following a loss-of-coolant accident. The condensing heat transfer coefficient predicted by the mass diffusion method is compared to existing semi-empirical correlations and to the experimental results of the Carolinas Virginia Tube Reactor Containment natural decay test. Closer agreement with test results is shown in the calculation of containment pressure, temperature, and heat sink surface temperature using the mass diffusion condensation method than when using any existing semi-empirical correlation

  16. Simulation of IVR-ERVC and estimation method of coolant inflow to the cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyunjin; Namgung, Ihn [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In this study, the temperature distribution outside of RV wall and evaporation rate due to heat from core will be investigated. Using the universal analysis program ANSYS Fluent, the natural convection in the cavity for IVR-ERVC conditions were modelled and performed for heat transfer analysis. The aim of this study is to calculate the appropriate coolant flow so that coolant level in the cavity can be maintained at prescribed level and vessel wall temperature distribution, including RV outside wall temperature are also investigated. Reactor vessel and cavity in case of ex-vessel cooling for severe accident condition were modeled with and without insulators. The heat load into reactor vessel from corium inside of reactor lower head were obtained from MELCORE analysis and used as input B.C of CFD analysis. The Temperature gradient of reactor outer surface and evaporation rate of cooling eater was obtained from the analysis. These results can be used for further analysis of reactor vessel creep behavior and the estimate the coolant flow rate into the reactor cavity.. and The result can be used to verify the natural convection phenomena in the cavity and also to set the design parameters of cavity and coolant flow rate. The vessel outer surface temperature gradient can be also used to more accurate investigation of vessel creep behavior during severe accident condition, The result can also be used set up a strategy for severe accident managements.

  17. Coolant Void Reactivity Analysis of CANDU Lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Su; Lee, Hyun Suk; Tak, Tae Woo; Lee, Deok Jung [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Models of CANDU-6 and ACR-700 fuel lattices were constructed for a single bundle and 2 by 2 checkerboard to understand the physics related to CVR. Also, a familiar four factor formula was used to predict the specific contributions to reactivity change in order to achieve an understanding of the physics issues related to the CVR. At the same time, because the situation of coolant voiding should bring about a change of neutron behavior, the spectral changes and neutron current were also analyzed. The models of the CANDU- 6 and ACR-700 fuel lattices were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP6 using the ENDF/B-VII.0 continuous energy cross section library based on the specification from AECL. The CANDU fuel lattice was searched through sensitivity studies of each design parameter such as fuel enrichment, fuel pitch, and types of burnable absorber for obtaining better behavior in terms of CVR. Unlike the single channel coolant voiding, the ACR-700 bundle has a positive reactivity change upon 2x2 checkerboard coolant voiding. Because of the new path for neutron moderation, the neutrons from the voided channel move to the no-void channel where they lose energy and come back to the voided channel as thermal neutrons. This phenomenon causes the positive CVR when checkerboard voiding occurs. The sensitivity study revealed the effects of the moderator to fuel volume ratio, fuel enrichment, and burnable absorber on the CVR. A fuel bundle with low moderator to fuel volume ratio and high fuel enrichment can help achieve negative CVR.

  18. EDF PWRs primary coolant purification strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gressier, Frederic; Mascarenhas, Darren; Taunier, Stephane; Le-Calvar, Marc; Bretelle, Jean-Luc; Ranchoux, Gilles

    2012-09-01

    In order to achieve a good physico-chemical quality of the primary coolant fluid, the primary water is continuously treated by the Chemical and Volume Control System (CVCS). This system is composed of a treatment chain containing filters and ion-exchange resins. In the EDF design, an upstream filter is placed before the resin so as to prevent it from being saturated with insoluble particles. Then, the fluid passes through several resin beds (up to 3 depending on the configuration) and again through a downstream filter that prevents resin fines dissemination into the reactor coolant. Much work has been conducted in the last 5 years on the homogenisation of products and usage on French EDF NPP primary coolant treatment, while taking into account the compromise between source term reduction, liquid and solid waste, and buying and disposal costs. Two national markets have been created, and two operational documents for chemists on site have been published: a filtration guideline and an ion-exchange resin guideline. Both documents give general information about the products used, how are they characterized and selected for national market (technical requirements, standards and tests), how they should be used and what are the change-out criteria. They are also periodically updated based on feedback from sites. The positive impact on resin and filter lifetime (extension of some, limitation of others), homogenisation of products and usage will be presented. Moreover, EDF is constantly in the process of improving the current purification methods, as well as researching the use of existing and novel technologies. In this field, recent experiments on short loading of resin during reactor shutdown has been tested on site with success. In addition, work is done on silica free filters, filter consumption and filter chemical release. An overview of these optimization methods will be given. (authors)

  19. Bandwidth of reactor internals vibration resonance with coolant pressure oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskuryakov, K.N.; Novikov, K.S.; Galivec, E.Yu.

    2009-01-01

    In a few decades a significant increase in a part of an electricity development on the NPP will require NPP to be operated in non full capacity modes and increase in operation time in transitive modes. Operating in such conditions as compared to the operation on a constant mode will lead to the increase in cyclic dynamical loading. In water cooled water moderated reactors these loading are realized as low-cyclic and high-cyclic loadings. High-cyclic loadings increases are caused by a raised vibration in non stationary modes of operation. It is known, that in some modes of a non full capacity reactor high-cyclic dynamic loadings can increase. It is obvious, that the development of management technologies is necessary for the life time management operation. In the context of this problem one of the main tasks are revealing and the prevention of the conditions of the occurrence of the operation leading to the resonant interaction of the coolant fluctuations and the equipment, reactor vessel (RV), fuel assemblies (FA) and reactor internals (RI) vibration. To prevent the appearance of the conditions for resonance interaction between the fluid flow and the equipments, it is necessary to provide the different frequencies for the self oscillations in the separated elements of the circulating system and also in the parts of the system formed by the comprising of these elements. While solving these problems it is necessary to have a theoretical and settlement substantiation of an oscillation frequency band of coolant outside of which there is no resonant interaction. The presented work is devoted to finding the solution of this problem. There are results of theoretical an estimation of width of such band as well as the examples of a preliminary quantitative estimation of Q - factors of coolant acoustic oscillatory circuit formed by the equipment of the NPP. The accordance of results had been calculated with had been measured are satisfied for practical purposes. These

  20. Small break LOCA [loss of coolant accident] mitigation for Bellefonte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayless, P.D.; Dobbe, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Several 5-cm (2-in.) diameter cold leg break loss coolant accidents for the Bellefonte nuclear plant were analyzed as part of the Severe Accident Sequence Analysis Program. The transients assumed various system failures, and included the S 2 D sequence. Operator actions to mitigate the S 2 D transient were also investigated. The transients were analyzed until either core damage began or long-term decay heat removal was established. The S 2 D sequence was analyzed into the core damage phase of the transient. The analyses showed that the flow from one high pressure injection pump was necessary and sufficient to prevent core damage in the absence of operator actions. Operator actions were also able to prevent core damage for the S 2 D sequence

  1. Reactor coolant pump seal response to loss of cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, T.; Metcalfe, R.; Burchett, P.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a test done to determine the performance of a reactor coolant pump seal for a water cooled nuclear reactor under loss of all cooling conditions. Under these conditions, seal faces can lose their liquid lubricating film and elastomers can rapidly degrade. Temperatures in the seal-cartridge tester reached 230 o C in three hours, at which time the tester was stopped and the temperature increased to 265 o C for a further five hours before cooling was restored. Seal leakage was 'normal' throughout the test. Parts sustained minor damage with no effect on seal integrity. Plant operators were shown to have ample margin beyond their 15 minute allowable reaction time. (author)

  2. Coolant degassing device for PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Takezawa, Kazuaki; Minemoto, Masaki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently decrease the rare gas concentration in primary coolants, as well as shorten the degassing time required for the periodical inspection in the waste gas processing system of a PWR type reactor. Constitution: Usual degassing method by supplying hydrogen or nitrogen to a volume control tank is replaced with a method of utilizing a degassing tower (method of flowing down processing liquid into the filled tower from above while uprising streams from the bottom of the tower thereby degassing the gases dissolved in the liquid into the steams). The degassing tower is combined with a hydrogen separator or hydrogen recombiner to constitute a waste gas processing system. (Ikeda, J.)

  3. Microstructural characterization of primary coolant pipe steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.K.; Bentley, J.

    1986-01-01

    Atom probe field-ion microscopy, analytical electron microscopy, and optical microscopy have been used to investigate the changes that occur in the microstructure of cast CF 8 primary coolant pipe stainless steel after long term thermal aging. The cast duplex microstructure consisted of austenite with 15% delta-ferrite. Investigation of the aged material revealed that the ferrite spinodally decomposed into a fine scaled network of α and α'. A fine G-phase precipitate was also observed in the ferrite. The observed degradation in mechanical properties is probably a consequence of the spinodal decomposition in the ferrite

  4. Calorimetric and reactor coolant system flow uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, L.; McLean, T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for the quantification of errors associated with the determination of a feedwater flow, secondary power, and Reactor Coolant System (RCS) flow used at the Trojan Nuclear Plant to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. The sources of error in Plant indications and process measurement are identified and tracked, using examples, through the mathematical processes necessary to calculate the uncertainty in the RCS flow measurement. An error of approximately 1.4 percent is calculated for secondary power. This error results, along with the consideration of other errors, in an uncertainty of approximately 3 percent in the RCS flow determination

  5. Investigation of coolant thermal mixing within 28-element CANDU fuel bundles using the ASSERT-PV thermal hydraulics code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lightston, M.F.; Rock, R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the thermal mixing of single-phase coolant in 28-element CANDU fuel bundles under steady-state conditions. The study, which is based on simulations performed using the ASSERT-PV thermal hydraulic code, consists of two main parts. In the first part the various physical mechanisms that contribute to coolant mixing are identified and their impact is isolated via ASSERT-PV simulations. The second part is concerned with development of a preliminary model suitable for use in the fuel and fuel channel code FACTAR to predict the thermal mixing that occurs between flow annuli. (author)

  6. The nature of delusion: psychologically explicable? psychologically inexplicable? philosophically explicable? Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, J; Musalek, M

    2016-03-01

    The first part of this article dealt with the extant formulations of delusion, psychiatric and psychological, suggestions which, respectively, regard delusion as psychologically inexplicable or explicable. All this was subjected to critique. This second part puts forward informed philosophical thesis whereby delusion can be explained within the philosophical movement known as phenomenology and, in particular, Max Scheler's version of this. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1995 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall-Griswold, J.A.; Petrosky, C.E. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    1996-12-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring trends in juvenile spring and summer chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and steelhead trout, O. mykiss, populations in the Salmon, Clearwater, and lower Snake River drainages for the past 12 years. This work is the result of a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric power plants on the Columbia River. Project 91-73, Idaho Natural Production Monitoring, consists of two subprojects: General Monitoring and Intensive Monitoring. This report updates and summarizes data through 1995 for the General Parr Monitoring (GPM) database to document status and trends of classes of wild and natural chinook salmon and steelhead trout populations. A total of 281 stream sections were sampled in 1995 to monitor trends in spring and summer chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead trout O. mykiss parr populations in Idaho. Percent carrying capacity and density estimates were summarized for 1985--1995 by different classes of fish: wild A-run steelhead trout, wild B-run steelhead trout, natural A-run steelhead trout, natural B-run steelhead trout, wild spring and summer chinook salmon, and natural spring and summer chinook salmon. The 1995 data were also summarized by subbasins as defined in Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s 1992--1996 Anadromous Fish Management Plan.

  8. Idaho habitat/natural production monitoring: Part 1. Annual report 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall-Griswold, J.A.; Petrosky, C.E.

    1996-11-01

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring trends in juvenile spring and summer chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and steelhead trout, O. mykiss, populations in the Salmon, Clearwater, and lower Snake River drainages for the past 12 years. This work is the result of a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric power plants on the Columbia River. Project 91-73, Idaho Natural Production Monitoring, consists of two subprojects: General Monitoring and Intensive Monitoring. This report updates and summarizes data through 1995 for the General Parr Monitoring (GPM) database to document status and trends of classes of wild and natural chinook salmon and steelhead trout populations. A total of 281 stream sections were sampled in 1995 to monitor trends in spring and summer chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead trout O. mykiss parr populations in Idaho. Percent carrying capacity and density estimates were summarized for 1985--1995 by different classes of fish: wild A-run steelhead trout, wild B-run steelhead trout, natural A-run steelhead trout, natural B-run steelhead trout, wild spring and summer chinook salmon, and natural spring and summer chinook salmon. The 1995 data were also summarized by subbasins as defined in Idaho Department of Fish and Game's 1992--1996 Anadromous Fish Management Plan

  9. Multirods burst tests under loss-of-coolant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, S.; Uetsuka, H.; Furuta, T.

    1983-01-01

    In order to know the upper limit of coolant flow area restriction in a fuel assembly under loss-of-coolant accidents in LWRs, burst tests of fuel bundles were performed. Each bundle consisted of 49 rods(7x7 rods), and bursts were conducted in flowing steam. In some cases, 4 rods were replaced by control rods with guide tubes in a bundle. After the burst, the ballooning behavior of each rod and the degree of coolant flow area restriction in the bundle were measured. Ballooning behavior of rods and degree of coolant flow channel restriction in bundles with control rods were not different from those without control rods. The upper limit of coolant flow channel restriction under loss-of-coolant conditions was estimated to be about 80%. (author)

  10. Reactor auxiliary cooling facility and coolant supplying method therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1996-06-07

    A reactor auxiliary cooling facility of the present invention comprises a coolant recycling line for recycling coolants by way of a reactor auxiliary coolant pump and a cooling load, a gravitational surge tank for supplying coolants to the coolant recycling line and a supplemental water supplying line for supplying a supply the supplemental water to the tank. Then, a pressurization-type supply water surge tank is disposed for operating the coolant recycling line upon performing an initial system performance test in parallel with the gravitational surge tank. With such a constitution, the period of time required from the start of the installation of reactor auxiliary cooling facilities to the completion of the system performance test can be shortened at a reduced cost without enlarging the scale of the facility. (T.M.)

  11. Reactor auxiliary cooling facility and coolant supplying method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro.

    1996-01-01

    A reactor auxiliary cooling facility of the present invention comprises a coolant recycling line for recycling coolants by way of a reactor auxiliary coolant pump and a cooling load, a gravitational surge tank for supplying coolants to the coolant recycling line and a supplemental water supplying line for supplying a supply the supplemental water to the tank. Then, a pressurization-type supply water surge tank is disposed for operating the coolant recycling line upon performing an initial system performance test in parallel with the gravitational surge tank. With such a constitution, the period of time required from the start of the installation of reactor auxiliary cooling facilities to the completion of the system performance test can be shortened at a reduced cost without enlarging the scale of the facility. (T.M.)

  12. Evaluation of natural gas supply options for south east and central Europe. Part 1: Indicator definitions and single indicator analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afgan, Naim H.; Carvalho, Maria G.; Pilavachi, Petros A.; Martins, Nelson

    2007-01-01

    The need for diversification of energy sources is an immanent goal in long term energy strategy. In particular, this is of great importance for the natural gas supply. In this respect, evaluation and assessment of potential natural gas resources and their relation to consumers is of great importance. The natural gas supply in Europe is one of the main issues of European energy strategy to be followed in the future. In particular, the natural gas supply in the southeast countries is important. This paper provides a framework for understanding how much natural gas is available for use in south east and central Europe as well as the links to the recent supply of natural gas and its transport. The analysis is focused on evaluation of the potential routes for natural gas supply to the south east and central European countries. The potential options included in this analysis are the Yamal Route; Nabucco Route; West Balkan Route; LNG NEUM Route and Gas by Wire Route. In this analysis, attention is focused on the following indicators for assessment of potential options: environmental indicator; NG cost indicator; NG transport and royalty indicator; investment indicator; and NG demand indicator. The first part of this paper is devoted to the definition of the indicators and to single indicator analysis. (author)

  13. The energy sector abroad. Part 5. Norwegian energy sector large exporter of natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Gelder, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Some facts about the Norwegian natural gas and oil industry are presented. In 1995 the industries took 12.5% of GNP and no less than 47.6% of export revenues. The use of natural gas in Norway is low. In 1996 Norway exported 37.9 billion m 3 of natural gas. It is planned to double that volume within the next 10 years. Therefore, a strategic alliance between two major foreign competitors (Gasunie in the Netherlands and Gazprom in the Russian Federation) was not met with enthusiasm. The three most important companies in the Norwegian oil and gas industry are Statoil, Norsk Hydro, and Saga Petroleum. Overall turnover of the sector in 1994 was 40.6 billion Dutch guilders. Some 17,500 people are directly employed by the sector. 5 ills., 5 tabs

  14. The energy sector abroad. Part 17. Italy. ENI dominates the Italian natural gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Gelder, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    For more than 25 years the Netherlands and Russia have supplied Italy with natural gas. Consequently, Italy was the first importer that did not receive natural gas from a neighbouring country, but from sources located more than a thousand kilometers away. These gas import pipelines, among other things, made it possible for Italy to grow into one of the largest gas countries in Europe. Today, natural gas accounts for well over a quarter of primary energy consumption and it is expected to reach a 37% peak by the year 2010. Since the 1950s, almost the entire oil and gas industry is owned by the state-owned holding company ENI ('Ente Nazionale Idrocarburi'). Although privatisation has gained momentum, it seems as if this holding will continue to dominate the gas market in the short term, because, in addition to large-scale import, ENI also controls the logistical elements, transmission and storage

  15. Effect of parameter variation of reactor coolant pump on loss of coolant accident consequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Gaojian; Huang Daishun; Gao Yingxian; He Xiaoqiang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the analyses were carried out on Ling'ao nuclear power station phase II to study the consequence of the loss of coolant accident when the homologous characteristic curves and free volumes of the reactor coolant pump changed. Two different pumps used in the analysis were 100D (employed on Ling'ao nuclear power station phase II) and ANDRITZ. The thermal characteristics in the large break LOCA accident were analyzed using CATHRE GB and CONPATE4, and the reactor coolant system hydraulics load during blow-clown phase of LOCA accident was analyzed using ATHIS and FORCET. The calculated results show that the homologous characteristic curves have great effect on the thermal characteristics of reactor core during the reflood phase of the large break LOCA accident. The maximum cladding surface temperatures are quite different when the pump's homologous characteristic curves change. On the other hand, the pump's free volume changing results in the variation of the LOCA rarefaction wave propagation, and therefore, the reactor coolant system hydraulic load in LOCA accident would be different. (authors)

  16. Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1994 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall-Griswold, Judy A.; Leitzinger, Eric J.; Petrosky, C.E. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID

    1995-11-01

    A total of 333 stream sections were sampled in 1994 to monitor in chinook salmon and steelhead trout parr populations in Idaho. Percent carry capacity and density estimates were summarized by different classes of fish: wild A-run steelhead trout, wild B-run steelhead trout, natural A-run steelhead trout, natural B-run steelhead trout, wild spring and summer chinook salmon. These data were also summarized by cells and subbasins as defined in Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s 1992-1996 Anadromous Fish Management Plan.

  17. Component analysis of cultivated ginseng, cultivated wild ginseng, and natural wild ginseng by structural parts using HPLC method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ju,Han

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The aim of this experiments is to provide an objective differentiation of ginseng, Korean and Chinese cultivated wild ginseng, and natural wild ginseng through components analysis of different parts of ginseng. Methods : Comparative analyses of ginsenoside-, ginsenoside-, and ginsenosides and from the root, stem, and leaves of ginseng, Korean and Chinese cultivated wild ginseng, and natural wild ginseng were conducted using HPLC. Results : 1. For content comparison of leaves, ginseng showed highest content of ginsenoside than other samples. Natural wild ginseng showed relatively high content of ginsenosides and than other samples. 2. For content comparison of the stem, ginseng and 10 years old Chinese cultivated wild ginseng didn't contain ginsenoside . Natural wild ginseng showed higher content of ginsenosides and than other samples. 3. For content comparison of the root, ginsenoside was found only in 5 and 10 years old Korean cultivated wild ginseng. 4. Distribution of contents by the parts of ginseng was similar in ginseng and Chinese cultivated wild ginseng. Conclusions : Above experiment data can be an important indicator for the identification of ginseng, Korean and Chinese cultivated wild ginseng, and natural wild ginseng.

  18. CFD analyses of coolant channel flowfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagley, Jennifer A.; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    The flowfield characteristics in rocket engine coolant channels are analyzed by means of a numerical model. The channels are characterized by large length to diameter ratios, high Reynolds numbers, and asymmetrical heating. At representative flow conditions, the channel length is approximately twice the hydraulic entrance length so that fully developed conditions would be reached for a constant property fluid. For the supercritical hydrogen that is used as the coolant, the strong property variations create significant secondary flows in the cross-plane which have a major influence on the flow and the resulting heat transfer. Comparison of constant and variable property solutions show substantial differences. In addition, the property variations prevent fully developed flow. The density variation accelerates the fluid in the channels increasing the pressure drop without an accompanying increase in heat flux. Analyses of the inlet configuration suggest that side entry from a manifold can affect the development of the velocity profile because of vortices generated as the flow enters the channel. Current work is focused on studying the effects of channel bifurcation on the flow field and the heat transfer characteristics.

  19. Efficiency of water coolant for DEMO divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetzer, Renate; Igitkhanov, Yuri; Bazylev, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, water-cooled divertor concepts have been developed for limited incident fluxes without taking into account transient power loadings. In this paper we analyzed the efficiency of water as a coolant for the particular PFC tungsten monoblock shield with a cooling tube made from Cu alloy (Cu OFHC) as a laminate adjacent to W and a low activation martensitic steel (Eurofer) as inner tube contacting the coolant. Thermal analysis is carried out by using the code MEMOS, which simulates W armour damage under the repetitive ELM heat loads. We consider cooling conditions which allow one to keep relatively high material temperatures (in the range 300–600 °C) thus minimizing Eurofer embrittlement under neutron irradiation. Expected DEMO I and DEMO II heat loads including type I ELMs are found to cause melting of the W surface during unmitigated ELMs. By mitigation of the ELMs melting of W is avoided. DEMO I operation under these conditions is save for cooling at water pressure 15.5 MPa and temperature 325 °C, while for DEMO II with mitigated ELMs the critical heat flux is exceeded and safe operation is not provided.

  20. Chemistry of liquid metal coolants and sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnanasekaran, T.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid sodium is the coolant of choice for the current generation fast breeder reactors. When sodium contains low levels of dissolved non-metallic impurities, it is highly compatible with structural steels. When the dissolved oxygen level is high, corrosion and mass transfer in sodium-steel circuits are enhanced and this involves formation of NaxMyOz type of species (M = alloying components in steels). Experience has shown that this enhancement of corrosion in a sodium circuit with all austenitic steel structural materials would not be encountered if oxygen level in sodium is below ~ 5ppm. For understanding this observation, a complete knowledge on the phase diagrams of Na-M-O systems and the thermochemical data of all relevant NaxMyOz compounds is essential. This presentation would highlight the work carried out at IGCAR on the chemistry of liquid sodium and heavy liquid metal coolants. Work carried out on various sensors for their use in these liquid metal circuits would be described and their current status would be discussed

  1. Efficiency of water coolant for DEMO divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetzer, Renate, E-mail: renate.fetzer@kit.edu; Igitkhanov, Yuri; Bazylev, Boris

    2015-10-15

    Up to now, water-cooled divertor concepts have been developed for limited incident fluxes without taking into account transient power loadings. In this paper we analyzed the efficiency of water as a coolant for the particular PFC tungsten monoblock shield with a cooling tube made from Cu alloy (Cu OFHC) as a laminate adjacent to W and a low activation martensitic steel (Eurofer) as inner tube contacting the coolant. Thermal analysis is carried out by using the code MEMOS, which simulates W armour damage under the repetitive ELM heat loads. We consider cooling conditions which allow one to keep relatively high material temperatures (in the range 300–600 °C) thus minimizing Eurofer embrittlement under neutron irradiation. Expected DEMO I and DEMO II heat loads including type I ELMs are found to cause melting of the W surface during unmitigated ELMs. By mitigation of the ELMs melting of W is avoided. DEMO I operation under these conditions is save for cooling at water pressure 15.5 MPa and temperature 325 °C, while for DEMO II with mitigated ELMs the critical heat flux is exceeded and safe operation is not provided.

  2. Requirements of coolants in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abass, O. A. M.

    2014-11-01

    This study discussed the purposes and types of coolants in nuclear reactors to generate electricity. The major systems and components associated with nuclear reactors are cooling system. There are two major cooling systems utilized to convert the heat generated in the fuel into electrical power. The primary system transfers the heat from the fuel to the steam generator, where the secondary system begins. The steam formed in the steam generator is transferred by the secondary system to the main turbine generator, where it s converted into electricity after passing through the low pressure turbine. There are various coolants used in nuclear reactors-light water, heavy water and liquid metal. The two major types of water-cooled reactors are pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR) but pressurized water reactors are more in the world. Also discusses this study the reactors and impact of the major nuclear accidents, in the April 1986 disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine was the product operators, and in the March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan was the product of earthquake of magnitude 9.0, the accidents caused the largest uncontrolled radioactive release into the environment.(Author)

  3. Research and Development in Natural Language Understanding as Part of the Strategic Computing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    facilities. BBN is developing a series of increasingly sophisticated natural language understanding systems which will serve as an integrated interface...Haas, A.R. A Syntactic Theory of Belief and Action. Artificial Intelligence. 1986. Forthcoming. [6] Hinrichs, E. Temporale Anaphora im Englischen

  4. social tariff of the natural gas. Part of the receivers and the lessors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Since the fifteen of August 2008, low resources customers can buy their natural gas at a special social cost. This document presents the content of this derogation and the corresponding administrative procedures. A particular attention is given to the case of the group housing. (A.L.B.)

  5. Natural radioactivity of drinking water in the southern and middle parts of Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.; Yassine, T.

    1998-01-01

    Water samples from 48 sites, covering the major water sources in the southern and middle parts of Syria, were collected twice and analyzed for 222 sup Rn, 226 sup Rn, 210 sup Po, and total uranium. the results obtained were generally low and comparable with those found for other countries. the highest values were found in regions around the phosphate mines in the middle part of Syria with 113 kBq m - 1 for 222 sup Rn, 350 Bq m - 1 for 226 sup Ra, 8 Bq m - 1 for 210 sup Po, and 350 Bq m - 1 for total uranium. (author). 1 Fig., 2 Tabs., 12 Refs

  6. In-Service Inspection system for coolant channels of Indian PHWRS - evolution and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, R.K.; Singh, M.

    2006-01-01

    In-Service Inspection (ISI) is the most important of all periodic monitoring and surveillance activities for assuring the structural integrity of coolant channels in the life extension and management of pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR-CANDU). Indian PHWRs (220 MWe) are characterized by consists by 306 coolant channels in each unit. These channels have to be inspected for various parameters over the operating life of the reactor. ISI of coolant channels necessitated the indigenous development of an inspection system called BARCIS (BARC Channel Inspection System) at Bhabha Atomic Research Center. BARCIS consists of mainly three parts; drive and control unit, special sealing plug and an inspection head carrying various NDT sensors. Five such systems have been built and deployed at various power plants. The paper deals with the development of the BARCIS system for meeting the ISI requirements of coolant channels, development cycle of this system from its conception to evolution to the present state, challenges, data generated and experience gained (ISI of nearly 900 coolant channels has been completed). Prior to BARCIS, pressure tube gauging equipment for pre-service inspection of coolant tubes was developed in 1980. Moreover a tool for ISI of coolant channels in dry condition was developed in 1990. The paper also describes evolution of various contingency procedures and devices developed over the last one decade. Future plans taking into account technological advancement, changes in the scope of inspection due to design and operating experiences and plant layout will also be covered. The paper describes the efforts put in to develop drive and control mechanism to suit the different vault layouts. The drive mechanism is responsible for linear and rotary movement of the inspection head to carry out 100% volumetric inspection. Special emphasis has been laid on the safety devices required during the inspection activity. Special measures for heavy water retention in

  7. Upper internals of PWR with coolant flow separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevereau, G.; Heuze, A.

    1989-01-01

    The upper internals for a PWR has a collecting volume for the coolant merging from the core and an apparatus for separating the flow of coolant. This apparatus has a guide for the control rods, a lower plate perforated to allow the coolant through from the core, an upper plate also perforated to allow the coolant through to the collecting volume and a peripheral binding ring joining the two plates. Each guide comprises an envelope without holes and joined perceptibly tight to the plates [fr

  8. Coolant make-up device for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    In a coolant make-up device, an opening of a pressure equalizing pipeline in a pressure vessel is disposed in coolants above a reactor core and below a usual fluctuation range of a reactor vessel water level. Further, a float check valve is disposed to the pressure equalizing pipeline for preventing coolants in the pressure vessel flowing into the pipeline. If the water level in the pressure vessel is lowered than the setting position for the float check valve, the float drops by its own weight to open the opening of the pressure equalizing pipeline. Then, steams in the pressure vessel are flown into the pipeline, to equalize the pressure between a coolant storage tank and the pressure vessel of the reactor. Coolants in the coolant storage tank is injected to the pressure vessel by way of the water injection pipeline due to the difference of the pressure head between the water level in the coolants storage tank and the water level in the pressure vessel. If the coolants are lowered than the setting position for the float check value, the float check valve does not close unless the water level is recovered to the setting position for the float valve and, accordingly, the coolant make-up is continued. (N.H.)

  9. The amount of natural radionuclides in the individual parts of environment in the locality Jahodna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipakova, A.; Vrabel, V.

    2008-01-01

    In this study we have investigated and evaluated the amount of K-40, Ra-226, Th-232, U-238 as well as total alpha and beta activity in individual parts of environment, i.e. soil, plant, water and sediment. The locality Jahodna was a studied one. This is a perspective source of uranium ore in the Slovak Republic. (authors)

  10. On the road to a free energy market. Part 4. Little comfort for bound natural gas consumers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koevoet, H.

    2001-01-01

    The liberalization of the energy market is near. In two years the second group of large-scale energy consumers (60,000 customers) in the Netherlands can choose their own energy supplier. In this fourth part of a series of articles on the energy market attention is paid to the position of the small-scale consumers, the last group that will be free to choose their natural gas supplier

  11. Binary PVA bio-nanocomposites containing cellulose nanocrystals extracted from different natural sources: part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunati, E; Puglia, D; Luzi, F; Santulli, C; Kenny, J M; Torre, L

    2013-09-12

    PVA bio-nanocomposites reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) extracted from commercial microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and from two types of natural fibres, Phormium tenax and Flax of the Belinka variety, were produced by solvent casting in water. Morphological, thermal, mechanical and transparency properties were studied while the respective efficiency of the extraction process of CNC from the three sources was evaluated. The effect of CNC types and content on PVA properties and water absorption capacity were also evaluated. Natural fibres offered higher levels of extraction efficiency when compared with MCC hydrolysis yield. Thermal analysis proved that CNC promotes the crystallization of the PVA matrix, while improving its plastic response. It was also clarified that all PVA/CNC systems remain transparent due to CNC dispersion at the nanoscale, while being all saturated after the first 18-24h of water absorption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Forced freedom. Part 6. The large-scale consumer. Natural gas trade laborious en unclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kop, L.

    2001-01-01

    Many organisations are busy taking care of their natural gas purchase. Data are compiled, profiles studied, and possibilities for peak shaving examined. Because of the unknown subject, many companies consult specialised advisers. All in all a lot of work, the more so while much is still unclear. One good advice is to ask the VEMW, a Dutch association for the industrial users of energy, environment and water. VEMW has insight into market prices and related conditions

  13. Nanostructural Organization of Naturally Occurring Composites—Part I: Silica-Collagen-Based Biocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Ehrlich

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass sponges, as examples of natural biocomposites, inspire investigations aiming at both a better understanding of biomineralization mechanisms and novel developments in the synthesis of nanostructured biomimetic materials. Different representatives of marine glass sponges of the class Hexactinellida (Porifera are remarkable because of their highly flexible basal anchoring spicules. Therefore, investigations of the biochemical compositions and the micro- and nanostructure of the spicules as examples of naturally structured biomaterials are of fundamental scientific relevance. Here we present a detailed study of the structural and biochemical properties of the basal spicules of the marine glass sponge Monorhaphis chuni. The results show unambiguously that in this glass sponge a fibrillar protein of collagenous nature is the template for the silica mineralization in all silica-containing structural layers of the spicule. The structural similarity and homology of collagens derived from M. chuni spicules to other sponge and vertebrate collagens have been confirmed by us using FTIR, amino acid analysis and mass spectrometric sequencing techniques. We suggest that nanomorphology of silica formed on proteinous structures could be determined as an example of biodirected epitaxial nanodistribution of amorphous silica phase on oriented fibrillar collagen templates. Finally, the present work includes a discussion relating to silica-collagen-based hybrid materials for practical applications as biomaterials.

  14. Simulation of the SPE-4 small-break loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cebull, P.; Hassan, Y.A.

    1993-01-01

    A small-break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA) conducted at the PMK-2 integral test facility was analyzed using RELAP5/MOD3. 1. The experiment simulated a 7.4% break in the cold leg of a VVER-440/213-type nuclear power plant as part of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Fourth Standard Problem Exercise (SPE-4). The VVER design differs from pressurized water reactors (PWRS) of western origin, primarily in its use of horizontal steam generators, hot- and cold-leg loop seals, and safety injection tanks. Because of these differences, it will exhibit somewhat different transient behavior than most PWRS. The PMK-2 test facility, located at the KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute (AEKI), is a scale model of the Paks nuclear power plant in Hungary with scaling factors of 1:2070 in power and volume and 1:1 in elevation. Primarily used to study SBLOCAs and natural circulation behavior of VVER reactors, it has been used in three previous SPEs

  15. 14C Behaviour in PWR coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, Howard; Dickinson Shirley; Garbett, Keith

    2012-09-01

    Although 14 C is produced in relatively small amounts in PWR coolant, it is important to know its fate, for example whether it is released by gaseous discharge, removed by absorption on ion exchange (IX) resins or deposited on the fuel pin surfaces. 14 C can exist in a range of possible chemical forms: inorganic carbon compounds (probably mainly CO 2 ), elemental carbon, and organic compounds such as hydrocarbons. This paper presents results from a preliminary survey of the possible reactions of 14 C in PWR coolant. The main conclusions of the study are: - A combination of thermal and radiolytic reactions controls the chemistry of 14 C in reactor coolant. A simple chemical kinetic model predicts that CH 3 OH would be the initial product from radiolytic reactions of 14 C following its formation from 17 O. CH 3 OH is predicted to arise as a result of reactions of OH . with CH 4 and CH 3 , and it persists because there is no known radiation chemical reduction mechanism. - Thermodynamic considerations show that CH 3 OH can be thermally reduced to CH 4 in PWR conditions, although formation of CO 2 from small organics is the most thermodynamically favourable outcome. Such reactions could be catalysed on active nickel surfaces in the primary circuit. - Limited plant data would suggest that CH 4 is the dominant form in PWR and CO 2 in BWR. This implies that radiation chemistry may be important in determining the speciation. - Addition of acetate does not affect the amount of 14 C formed, but the addition of large amounts of stable carbon would lead to a large range of additional products, some of which would be expected to deposit on fuel pin surfaces as high molecular weight hydrocarbons. However, the subsequent thermal decomposition reactions of these products are not known. - Acetate addition may represent a small input of 12 C compared with organic material released from CVCS resins, although the importance of this may depend on whether that is predominantly soluble

  16. Fatigue cycles evaluation of 500 MWe PHWR coolant channel sealdisc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, D.S.; Vaze, K.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Gupta, K.S.; Bhambra, H.S.

    1998-07-01

    At each end of coolant channel there is one sealing plug assembly. The sealdisc is a part of sealing plug assembly. The sealdisc is used to avoid leakage of heavy water. The importance of sealdisc can be understood by the fact that there are 784 sealdiscs in one 500 MWe PHWR unit. During the life time of reactor the sealdisc will be subjected to cyclic loads due to reactor startup, shutdown, power setback and also due to refuelling operations. Excessive reversal of stresses may lead to fatigue failure. The sealdisc failure may cause loss of coolant accidents. Since sealdisc is safety class 1 component, it has to be qualified according to ASME Section III Division 1 NB. For cyclic loads, the fatigue analysis is essential to assess the allowable number of cycles and also to check the total usage factor due to different cyclic loads. To evaluate the allowable fatigue cycles, the analysis is carried out using finite element method. The present report deals with the fatigue cycles evaluation of 500 MWe PHWR sealdisc. The finite element model having eight noded axisymmetric elements is used for the analysis. The various loads considered in the analysis are mechanical loads arising due to refuelling operations and number of temperature-pressure transients. During refuelling, the sealdisc is removed and reinstalled back by use of fuelling machine ram which applies load at centre as well as at rocker point of sealdisc. The stress analysis is carried out for each stage of loading during refuelling and fatigue cycles are evaluated. For temperature transient, decoupled thermal analysis is carried out. At various instants of time, the stresses are computed using temperatures calculated in thermal analysis. The pressure variation is also considered along with temperature variation. The fatigue cycles are evaluated for each transient using maximum alternating stress intensities. The usage factors are calculated for various temperature/pressure transients and refuelling loads

  17. Study of natural convection characteristics in a narrow annular gap in (Part 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narahara, Nobuyuki; Uotani, Masaki; Kinoshita, Izumi

    1986-01-01

    To clarify the characteristics of natural convection in a narrow annular gap at the roof-slab penetrations in pool-type LMFBR, preliminary and visualization experiments were carried out. The results are summarized as follows. (1) In the preliminary experiment having the upper and bottom closed annular space nondimensional circumferential temperature difference increases with gap width decreasing, and decreses with Rayleigh number increasing at the range of rayleigh number 10 10 to 10 11 . (2) In the visualization experiment, which consists the upper and bottom closed annular space type apparatus and the upper-closed bottom-open type apparatus, flow pattern and its effect at temperature distribution are clarified. (author)

  18. Activation measurements for thermal neutrons. Part G. Natural 36Cl production in mineral samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolte, Eckehart; Huber, Thomas; Lazarev, Vitali; Ruehm, Werner; Kato, Kazuo; Schultz, Ludolf

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, a method was developed to calculate the contribution of natural in situ production of 36 Cl in mineral samples to the 36 Cl signal induced by the neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb. Parameters used in the calculations include local erosion rates, lithospheric depth, and elemental composition for each investigated sample. It has been shown that the calculations agree within their uncertainties with 36 Cl values measured by means of accelerator mass spectrometry, in granite samples from quarries with known locations. Both calculations and measurements suggest typical 36 Cl/Cl ratios of about 10 -13 in mineral samples. (J.P.N.)

  19. The application of release models to the interpretation of rare gas coolant activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, C.

    1985-01-01

    Much research is carried out into the release of fission products from UO 2 fuel and from failed pins. A significant application of this data is to define models of release which can be used to interpret measured coolant activities of rare gas isotopes. Such interpretation is necessary to extract operationally relevant parameters, such as the number and size of failures in the core and the 131 I that might be released during depressurization faults. The latter figure forms part of the safety case for all operating CAGRs. This paper describes and justifies the models which are used in the ANAGRAM program to interpret CAGR coolant activities, highlighting any remaining uncertainties. The various methods by which the program can extract relevant information from the measurements are outlined, and examples are given of the analysis of coolant data. These analyses point to a generally well understood picture of fission gas release from low temperature failures. Areas of higher temperature release are identified where further research would be beneficial to coolant activity analysis. (author)

  20. Radionuclide buildup in BWR [boiling water reactor] reactor coolant recirculation piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duce, S.W.; Marley, A.W.; Freeman, A.L.

    1989-12-01

    Since the spring of 1985, thermoluminescent dosimeter, dose rate, and gamma spectral data have been acquired on the contamination of boiling water reactor primary coolant recirculation systems as part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission funded study. Data have been gathered for twelve facilities by taking direct measurements and/or obtaining plant and vendor data. The project titled, ''Effectiveness and Safety Aspects of Selected Decontamination Processes'' (October 1983) initially reviewed the application of chemical decontamination processes on primary coolant recirculation system piping. Recontamination of the system following pipe replacement or chemical decontamination was studied as a second thrust of this program. During the course of this study, recontamination measurements were made at eight different commercial boiling water reactors. At four of the reactors the primary coolant recirculation system piping was chemically decontaminated. At the other four the piping was replaced. Vendor data were obtained from two boiling water reactors that had replaced the primary coolant recirculation system piping. Contamination measurements were made at two newly operating boiling water reactors. This report discusses the results of these measurements as they apply to contamination and recontamination of boiling water reactor recirculation piping. 16 refs., 29 figs., 9 tabs

  1. High-temperature process heat reactor with solid coolant and radiant heat exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, A.M.; Bulkin, Yu.M.; Vasil'ev, S.I.

    1984-01-01

    The high temperature graphite reactor with the solid coolant in which heat transfer is realized by radiant heat exchange is described. Neutron-physical and thermal-technological features of the reactor are considered. The reactor vessel is made of sheet carbon steel in the form of a sealed rectangular annular box. The moderator is a set of graphite blocks mounted as rows of arched laying Between the moderator rows the solid coolant annular layings made of graphite blocks with high temperature nuclear fuel in the form of coated microparticles are placed. The coolant layings are mounted onto ring movable platforms, the continuous rotation of which is realizod by special electric drives. Each part of the graphite coolant laying consecutively passes through the reactor core neutron cut-off zones and technological zone. In the core the graphite is heated up to the temperature of 1350 deg C sufficient for effective radiant heat transfer. In the neutron cut-off zone the chain reaction and further graphite heating are stopped. In the technological zone the graphite transfers the accumulated heat to the walls of technological channels in which the working medium moves. The described reactor is supposed to be used in nuclear-chemical complex for ammonia production by the method of methane steam catalytic conversion

  2. Evaluation of natural phenomena hazards as part of safety assessments for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kot, C.A.; Hsieh, B.J.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Shin, Y.W.

    1995-02-01

    The continued operation of existing US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and laboratories requires a safety reassessment based on current criteria and guidelines. This also includes evaluations for the effects of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH), for which these facilities may not have been designed. The NPH evaluations follow the requirements of DOE Order 5480.28, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation (1993) which establishes NPH Performance Categories (PCs) for DOE facilities and associated target probabilistic performance goals. These goals are expressed as the mean annual probability of exceedance of acceptable behavior for structures, systems and components (SSCs) subjected to NPH effects. The assignment of an NPH Performance Category is based on the overall hazard categorization (low, moderate, high) of a facility and on the function of an SSC under evaluation (DOE-STD-1021, 1992). Detailed guidance for the NPH analysis and evaluation criteria are also provided (DOE-STD-1020, 1994). These analyses can be very resource intensive, and may not be necessary for the evaluation of all SSCs in existing facilities, in particular for low hazard category facilities. An approach relying heavily on screening inspections, engineering judgment and use of NPH experience data (S. J. Eder et al., 1993), can minimize the analytical effort, give reasonable estimates of the NPH susceptibilities, and yield adequate information for an overall safety evaluation of the facility. In the following sections this approach is described in more detail and is illustrated by an application to a nuclear laboratory complex

  3. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, T; Grunwald, G

    1998-10-01

    The behavior of PWRs during cold water or boron dilution transients is strongly influenced by the distribution of coolant temperature and boron concentration at the core inlet. This distribution is the needed input to 3-dimensional neutron kinetics to calculate the power distribution in the core. It mainly depends on how the plugs of cold or unborated water formed in a single loop are mixed in the downcomer and in the lower plenum. To simulate such mixture phenomena requires the application of 3-dimensional CFD (computational fluid dynamics) codes. The results of the simulation have to be validated against mixture experiments at scaled facilities. Therefore, in the framework of a research project funded by BMBF, the institute creates a 1:5 mixture facility representing first the geometry of a German pressurized water reactor and later the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) geometry. The calculations are based on the CFD Code CFX-4. (orig.)

  4. Slow coolant phaseout could worsen warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, April

    2018-03-01

    In the summer of 2016, temperatures in Phalodi, an old caravan town on a dry plain in northwestern India, reached a blistering 51°C—a record high during a heat wave that claimed more than 1600 lives across the country. Wider access to air conditioning (AC) could have prevented many deaths—but only 8% of India's 249 million households have AC. As the nation's economy booms, that figure could rise to 50% by 2050. And that presents a dilemma: As India expands access to a life-saving technology, it must comply with international mandates—the most recent imposed just last fall—to eliminate coolants that harm stratospheric ozone or warm the atmosphere.

  5. Automated surveillance of reactor coolant pump performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, K.C.; Singer, R.M.; Humenik, K.E.

    1992-01-01

    An artificial intelligence based expert system has been developed for continuous surveillance and diagnosis of centrifugal-type reactor coolant pump (RCP) performance and operability. The expert system continuously monitors digitized signals from a variety of physical variables (speed, vibration level, motor power, discharge pressure) associated with RCP performance for annunciation of the incipience or onset of off-normal operation. The system employs an extremely sensitive pattern-recognition technique, the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) for rapid identification of pump operability degradation. The sequential statistical analysis of the signal noise has been shown to provide the theoretically shortest sampling time to detect disturbances and thus has the potential of providing incipient fault detection information to operators sufficiently early to avoid forced plant shutdowns. The sensitivity and response time of the expert system are analyzed in this paper using monte carlo simulation techniques

  6. Power module assemblies with staggered coolant channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Nicholas Hayden; Mann, Brooks S; Korich, Mark D

    2013-07-16

    A manifold is provided for supporting a power module assembly with a plurality of power modules. The manifold includes a first manifold section. The first face of the first manifold section is configured to receive the first power module, and the second face of the first manifold section defines a first cavity with a first baseplate thermally coupled to the first power module. The first face of the second manifold section is configured to receive the second power module, and the second face of the second manifold section defines a second cavity with a second baseplate thermally coupled to the second power module. The second face of the first manifold section and the second face of the second manifold section are coupled together such that the first cavity and the second cavity form a coolant channel. The first cavity is at least partially staggered with respect to second cavity.

  7. Reactor coolant flow measurements at Point Lepreau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenciaglia, G.; Gurevich, Y.; Liu, G.

    1996-01-01

    The CROSSFLOW ultrasonic flow measurement system manufactured by AMAG is fully proven as reliable and accurate when applied to large piping in defined geometries for such applications as feedwater flows measurement. Its application to direct reactor coolant flow (RCF) measurements - both individual channel flows and bulk flows such as pump suction flow - has been well established through recent work by AMAG at Point Lepreau, with application to other reactor types (eg. PWR) imminent. At Point Lepreau, Measurements have been demonstrated at full power; improvements to consistently meet ±1% accuracy are in progress. The development and recent customization of CROSSFLOW to RCF measurement at Point Lepreau are described in this paper; typical measurement results are included. (author)

  8. Reactor coolant system and containment aqueous chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    Fission products released from fuel during reactor accidents can be subject to a variety of environments that will affect their ultimate behavior. In the reactor coolant system (RCS), for example, neutral or reducing steam conditions, radiation, and surfaces could all have an effect on fission product retention and chemistry. Furthermore, if water is encountered in the RCS, the high temperature aqueous chemistry of fission products must be assessed to determine the quantity and chemical form of fission products released to the containment building. In the containment building, aqueous chemistry will determine the longer-term release of volatile fission products to the containment atmosphere. Over the past few years, the principles of physical chemistry have been rigorously applied to the various chemical conditions described above. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge and discusses the future directions of chemistry research relating to the behavior of fission products in the RCS and containment

  9. Channel type reactors with supercritical water coolant. Russian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Y.N.; Gabaraev, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    Transition to coolant of supercritical parameters allows for principle engineering-andeconomic characteristics of light-water nuclear power reactors to be substantially enhanced. Russian experience in development of channel-type reactors with supercritical water coolant has demonstrated advantages and practical feasibility of such reactors. (author)

  10. Automatic coolant flow control device for a nuclear reactor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Ernest

    1986-01-01

    A device which controls coolant flow through a nuclear reactor assembly comprises a baffle means at the exit end of said assembly having a plurality of orifices, and a bimetallic member in operative relation to the baffle means such that at increased temperatures said bimetallic member deforms to unblock some of said orifices and allow increased coolant flow therethrough.

  11. Fuel coolant interaction experiment by direct electrical heating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tsuneo; Hirano, Kenmei

    1979-01-01

    In the PCM (Power Cooling Mismatch) experiments, the FCI (Fuel Coolant Interaction) test is one of necessary tests in order to predict various phenomena that occur during PCM in the core. A direct electrical heating method is used for the FCI tests for fuel pellet temperature of over 1000 0 C. Therefore, preheating is required before initiating the direct electrical heating. The fuel pin used in the FCI tests is typical LWR fuel element, which is surrounded by coolant water. It is undersirable to heat up the coolant water during preheating of the fuel pin. Therefore, a zirconia (ZrO 2 ) pellet which is similar to a UO 2 pellet in physical and chemical properties is used. Electric property (electric conductivity) of ZrO 2 is particularly suitable for direct electrical heating as in the case of UO 2 . In this experiment, ZrO 2 pellet (melting point 2500 0 C) melting was achieved by use of both preheating and direct electrical heating. Temperature changes of coolant and fuel surface, as well as the pressure change of coolant water, were measured. The molten fuel interacted with the coolant and generated shock waves. A portion of this molten fuel fragmented into small particles during this interaction. The peak pressure of the observed shock wave was about 35 bars. The damaged fuel pin was photographed after disassembly. This report shows the measured coolant pressure changes and the coolant temperature changes, as well as photographs of damaged fuel pin and fuel fragments. (author)

  12. Consequences in a long time of the forced loss of coolant in a pool type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The fuel and pool water temperatures are calculated as a function of time using unidimensional models of heat conduction and momentum conservation, to simulate the natural convection flow of the coolant. The reactor building pressure due to the pool water evaporation is calculated using a homogeneous model with thermal equilibrium. The heat loss from the three main components of the building volume (liquid water, air, and steam) to solid surfaces such as the building walls are taking into account. (Author) [pt

  13. Main-coolant-pump shaft-seal guidelines. Volume 3. Specification guidelines. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fair, C.E.; Greer, A.O.

    1983-03-01

    This report presents a set of guidelines and criteria to aid in the generation of procurement specifications for Main Coolant Pump Shaft Seals. The noted guidelines are developed from EPRI sponsored nuclear power plant seal operating experience studies, a review of pump and shaft seal literature and discussions with pump and seal designers. This report is preliminary in nature and could be expanded and finalized subsequent to completion of further design, test and evaluation efforts

  14. Epistemic uncertainties and natural hazard risk assessment - Part 1: A review of the issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beven, K. J.; Aspinall, W. P.; Bates, P. D.; Borgomeo, E.; Goda, K.; Hall, J. W.; Page, T.; Phillips, J. C.; Rougier, J. T.; Simpson, M.; Stephenson, D. B.; Smith, P. J.; Wagener, T.; Watson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Uncertainties in natural hazard risk assessment are generally dominated by the sources arising from lack of knowledge or understanding of the processes involved. There is a lack of knowledge about frequencies, process representations, parameters, present and future boundary conditions, consequences and impacts, and the meaning of observations in evaluating simulation models. These are the epistemic uncertainties that can be difficult to constrain, especially in terms of event or scenario probabilities, even as elicited probabilities rationalized on the basis of expert judgements. This paper reviews the issues raised by trying to quantify the effects of epistemic uncertainties. Such scientific uncertainties might have significant influence on decisions that are made for risk management, so it is important to communicate the meaning of an uncertainty estimate and to provide an audit trail of the assumptions on which it is based. Some suggestions for good practice in doing so are made.

  15. Membrane reforming in converting natural gas to hydrogen: Production costs, Part II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iaquaniello, G; Cosenza, S [Technip-KTI S.p.A., via Castello della Magliana 75, Rome (Italy); Giacobbe, F; Morico, B; Farace, A [Processi Innovativi s.r.l., L' Aquila (Italy)

    2008-11-15

    This paper evaluates the production costs of a hybrid system based on a new membrane reforming MRR concept to convert natural gas to hydrogen and electricity. Membrane reforming with hydrogen-selective, palladium-silver membranes pushes the chemical equilibrium and allows higher methane conversions at lower temperature such as 650 C. The new MRR concept formed of a series of modules is put forward herein. Each module is made up of a reforming step and an external membrane separation unit. The estimates, based on utilities costs of a typical Italian refinery (end of 2006), show that the production costs for the hybrid system are 30% less than conventional tubular steam reforming technology, and 13% less than a gas-fired cogeneration plant coupled with a conventional H{sub 2} plant. (author)

  16. New types of contracts. Part 2. The natural gas spot market. Many options, many constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Gelder, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    In two articles, new types of contracts such as swaps, futures and spot contracts are surveyed. How far has the Dutch liberalised market developed in this field? This article focuses on the spot market for gas, whilst in the previous issue attention was paid to the electricity market. Bilateral spot contracts have been used in the Netherlands for years and years. The only gas exchange in Europe, the International Petroleum Exchange (IPE), was established in London, UK, at the end of 1994. This is a screen exchange, just like the APX (Amsterdam Power Exchange), where natural gas traders can enter into various types of contracts. An organised gas exchange has as yet not been established on the continent. The most suitable candidate is Zeebrugge in Belgium, where all the large players are represented. To do so, however, more transparency is required on the transmission market so that supply and demand can find each other quickly at standard conditions

  17. Uranium concentrations in natural waters, South Park, Colorado. [Part of National Uranium Resource Evaluation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R.R. Jr.; Aamodt, P.L.

    1976-08-01

    During the summer of 1975, 464 water samples from 149 locations in South Park, Colorado, were taken for the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in order to test the field sampling and analytical methodologies proposed for the NURE Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance for uranium in the Rocky Mountain states and Alaska. The study showed, in the South Park area, that the analytical results do not vary significantly between samples which were untreated, filtered and acidified, filtered only, or acidified only. Furthermore, the analytical methods of fluorometry and delayed-neutron counting, as developed at the LASL for the reconnaissance work, provide fast, adequately precise, and complementary procedures for analyzing a broad range of uranium in natural waters. The data generated using this methodology does appear to identify uraniferous areas, and when applied using sound geochemical, geological, and hydrological principles, should prove a valuable tool in reconnaissance surveying to delineate new districts or areas of interest for uranium exploration.

  18. Virtues of Giambologna from Grimaldi Chapel Archaeometric Characterisation Part II: `Artistic' and Natural Patinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiorno, Valeria; Grosso, Pamela; Piccardo, Paolo; Magnani, Lauro G.; Carnasciali, Maria M.

    2016-08-01

    The scientific investigation on metal artwork is meant to expand the knowledge regarding the technical skills developed by artists in sculpture manufacturing. Moreover, all the gathered data support the speculation about the motivations behind the choices of certain material or a specific casting and/or finishing method (e.g., aesthetic, economic or technical reasons, or both) and give fundamental information for planning adequate restoration interventions. The subject of this study is the Virtues sculptural group made at the end of the XVI century by Giambologna to decorate the Grimaldi Chapel in the church of San Francesco di Castelletto (Genoa, Italy). Six life-size statues depicting Charity, Justice, Hope, Fortitude, Faith, and Temperance (i.e., the artwork discussed in this article); seven bas-reliefs; and six winged representations of putti are what remains of the original monumental project. Different micro-invasive analytical techniques (scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, SEM-EDS; micro-Raman Spectroscopy, μRS; gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, GC-MS) were applied to determine the chemical nature and the state of conservation of the "artistic" and natural patinas visible on the Virtues surfaces. Some patination tests were performed taking into account the collected analytical data and the indications provided by the scientific literature and the historical documents. The combination of the results obtained through the scientific investigations and the experimental work allowed for supposing the materials and the patination technique selected by the artist to adorn the sculptures and providing indications for the correct conservation of the six sculptures.

  19. Stress Analysis of Fuel Rod under Axial Coolant Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hai Lan; Lee, Young Shin; Lee, Hyun Seung [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Num Kyu; Jeon, Kyung Rok [Kerea Nuclear Fuel., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    A pressurized water reactor(PWR) fuel assembly, is a typical bundle structure, which uses light water as a coolant in most commercial nuclear power plants. Fuel rods that have a very slender and long clad are supported by fuel assembly which consists of several spacer grids. A coolant is a fluid which flows through device to prevent its overheating, transferring the heat produced by the device to other devices that use or dissipate it. But at the same time, the coolant flow will bring out the fluid induced vibration(FIV) of fuel rods and even damaged the fuel rod. This study has been conducted to investigate the flow characteristics and nuclear reactor fuel rod stress under effect of coolant. Fluid structure interaction(FSI) analysis on nuclear reactor fuel rod was performed. Fluid analysis of the coolant which flow along the axial direction and structural analysis under effect of flow velocity were carried out under different output flow velocity conditions

  20. Method of charging instruments into liquid metal coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To alleviate the thermal shock of a reactor charging machine when charging the machine into liquid metal coolant after the machine is preheated in cover gas. Method: When a reactor fueling machine reaches at the lowermost portion the position immediately above liquid metal coolant surface level, the machine is stopped moving down. The reactor fueling machine is heated at the lowermost portion by thermal radiation from the surface of the liquid metal coolant. After the machine is thus preheated in cover gas, it is again steadily moved down by a winch and charged into the liquid metal coolant. Therefore, the thermal shock of the machine becomes low when charging the machine into the liquid metal coolant to eliminate the damage and deformation at the machine. (Yoshihara, H.)

  1. Stress Analysis of Fuel Rod under Axial Coolant Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hai Lan; Lee, Young Shin; Lee, Hyun Seung; Park, Num Kyu; Jeon, Kyung Rok

    2010-01-01

    A pressurized water reactor(PWR) fuel assembly, is a typical bundle structure, which uses light water as a coolant in most commercial nuclear power plants. Fuel rods that have a very slender and long clad are supported by fuel assembly which consists of several spacer grids. A coolant is a fluid which flows through device to prevent its overheating, transferring the heat produced by the device to other devices that use or dissipate it. But at the same time, the coolant flow will bring out the fluid induced vibration(FIV) of fuel rods and even damaged the fuel rod. This study has been conducted to investigate the flow characteristics and nuclear reactor fuel rod stress under effect of coolant. Fluid structure interaction(FSI) analysis on nuclear reactor fuel rod was performed. Fluid analysis of the coolant which flow along the axial direction and structural analysis under effect of flow velocity were carried out under different output flow velocity conditions

  2. Device for preventing coolant in a reactor from being lost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent all of coolant from being lost from the core at the time of failure in rupture of pipe in a recirculation system to cool the core with the coolant remained within the reactor. Structure: A valve, which will be closed when a water level of the coolant within the core is in a level less than a predetermined level, is provided on a recirculating water outlet nozzle in a pressure vessel to thereby prevent the coolant from being lost when the pipe is broken, thus cooling the core by means of reduced-pressure boiling of coolant remained within the core and boiling due to heat, and restraining core reactivity by means of void produced at that time. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Natural radioactivity of drinking water on the southern and middle parts of Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.; Yassine, T.

    1998-05-01

    Water samples from 48 sites, covering the major drinking water sources in the southern and middle parts of Syria were collected twice and analyzed for 222 Rn, 226 Ra, 210 Po and total uranium. Also all samples were analyzed for major cations and anions, physical properties and Hardness. The results obtained were generally low and comparable with those found for other countries. The highest values were found in regions around the phosphate mines in the middle par of Syria with 113 Kb.m -3 for 222 Rn, 350 Bq.m -3 for 226 Ra, 8 Bq.m -3 for 210 Po and 350 Bq.m -3 for total uranium. (author). 6 tabs

  4. Evidence of Some Natural Products with Antigenotoxic Effects. Part 1: Fruits and Polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Vega, Jeannett Alejandra; Morales-González, José Antonio; Sánchez-Gutiérrez, Manuel; Betanzos-Cabrera, Gabriel; Sosa-Delgado, Sara M.; Sumaya-Martínez, María Teresa; Morales-González, Ángel; Paniagua-Pérez, Rogelio; Madrigal-Bujaidar, Eduardo; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide. The agents capable of causing damage to genetic material are known as genotoxins and, according to their mode of action, are classified into mutagens, carcinogens or teratogens. Genotoxins are involved in the pathogenesis of several chronic degenerative diseases including hepatic, neurodegenerative and cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, arthritis, cancer, chronic inflammation and ageing. In recent decades, researchers have found novel bioactive phytocompounds able to counteract the effects of physical and chemical mutagens. Several studies have shown potential antigenotoxicity in a variety of fruits. In this review (Part 1), we present an overview of research conducted on some fruits (grapefruit, cranberries, pomegranate, guava, pineapple, and mango) which are frequently consumed by humans, as well as the analysis of some phytochemicals extracted from fruits and yeasts which have demonstrated antigenotoxic capacity in various tests, including the Ames assay, sister chromatid exchange, chromosomal aberrations, micronucleus and comet assay. PMID:28157162

  5. Implementation of Bourbaki's Elements of Mathematics in Coq: Part Two, From Natural Numbers to Real Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Grimm

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes  a formalization of the first book of the series ``Elements  of Mathematics'' by Nicolas Bourbaki, using the Coq proof assistant. In a first paper published in this journal, we presented the axioms and basic constructions (corresponding to a part of the first two chapters of book I, theory of sets. We discuss here the set of integers (third chapter of  book I, theory of set, the sets Z and Q (first chapter of book II, Algebra and the set of real numbers (Chapter 4 of  book III, General topology. We start with a comparison of the Bourbaki  approach, the Coq standard library, and the Ssreflect library, then present our implementation.

  6. The use of Zeolite into the controlling of Lithium concentration in the PWR primary water coolant (I) : the influences of Ca, Mg and Boric Acid concentration into the exchanges capacity of Ammonium Zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumijanto; Siti-Amini

    1996-01-01

    In this first part of research, the influences of calsium, magnesium and boric acid concentrations to the zeolite uptake of lithium in the PWR primary water coolant have been studied. The ammonium form of zeolite was found by modification of the natural zeolite which was originated from Bayah. The results showed that the boric acid concentration in the normal condition of PWR operation absolutely did not affects the lithium uptake. The Li uptake efficiency was influenced by the presence of Ca and Mg ions in order to the presence of cations competition which was dominated by Ca ion

  7. The Natural Time Course of Membrane Alterations During Peritoneal Dialysis Is Partly Altered by Peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esch, Sadie; Struijk, Dirk G; Krediet, Raymond T

    2016-01-01

    ♦ The quality of the peritoneal membrane can deteriorate over time. Exposure to glucose-based dialysis solutions is the most likely culprit. Because peritonitis is a common complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD), distinguishing between the effect of glucose exposure and a possible additive effect of peritonitis is difficult. The aim of the present study was to compare the time-course of peritoneal transport characteristics in patients without a single episode of peritonitis-representing the natural course-and in patients who experienced 1 or more episodes of peritonitis during long-term follow-up. ♦ This prospective, single-center cohort study enrolled incident adult PD patients who started PD during 1990-2010. A standard peritoneal permeability analysis was performed in the first year of PD treatment and was repeated every year. The results in patients without a single episode of peritonitis ("no-peritonitis group") were compared with the results obtained in patients who experienced 1 or more peritonitis episodes ("peritonitis group") during a follow-up of 4 years. ♦ The 124 patients analyzed included 54 in the no-peritonitis group and 70 in the peritonitis group. The time-course of small-solute transport was different in the groups, with the peritonitis group showing an earlier and more pronounced increase in the mass transfer area coefficient for creatinine (p = 0.07) and in glucose absorption (p = 0.048). In the no-peritonitis group, the net ultrafiltration rate (NUFR) and the transcapillary ultrafiltration rate (TCUFR) both showed a steep increase from the 1st to the 2nd year of PD that was absent in the peritonitis group. Both groups showed a decrease in the NUFR after year 3. A decrease in the TCUFR occurred only in the peritonitis group. That decrease was already present after the year 1 in patients with severe peritonitis. The time-course of free water transport showed a continuous increase in the patients without peritonitis, but a decrease in the

  8. Determination of the in-containment source term for a Large-Break Loss of Coolant Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    This is the report of a project that focused on one of the most important design basis accidents: the Large Break Loss Of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA) (for pressurised water reactors). The first step in the calculation of the radiological consequences of this accident is the determination of the source term inside the containment. This work deals with this part of the calculation of the LBLOCA radiological consequences for which a previous benchmark (1988) has shown wide variations in the licensing practices adopted by European countries. The calculation of this source term may naturally be split in several steps (see chapter II), corresponding to several physical stages in the release of fission products: fraction of core failure, release from the damaged fuel, airborne part of the release and the release into the reactor coolant system and the sumps, chemical behaviour of iodine in the aqueous and gas phases, natural and spray removal in the containment atmosphere. A chapter is devoted to each of these topics. In addition, two other chapters deal with the basic assumptions to define the accidental sequence and the nuclides to be considered when computing doses associated with the LBLOCA. The report describes where there is agreement between the partner organisations and where there are still differences in approach. For example, there is agreement concerning the percentage of failed fuel which could be used in future licensing assessments (however this subject is still under discussion in France, a lower value is thinkable). For existing plants, AVN (Belgium) wishes to keep the initial licensing assumptions. For the release from damaged fuel, there is not complete agreement: AVN (Belgium) wishes to maintain its present approach. IPSN (France), GRS (Germany) and NNC (UK) prefer to use their own methodologies that result in slightly different values to the proposed values for a common position. There are presently no recommendations of the release of fuel particulates

  9. LNG (liquefied natural gas): A necessary part in China's future energy infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Wensheng; Gu, Anzhong [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, Na [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2010-11-15

    This paper presents an overview of the LNG industry in China, covering LNG plants, receiving terminals, transportation, and applications. Small and medium scale LNG plants with different liquefaction processes have already been built or are being built. China's first two LNG receiving terminals have been put into operation in Guangdong and Fujian, another one is being built in Shanghai, and more are being planned. China is now able to manufacture LNG road tanks and containers. The construction of the first two LNG carriers has been completed. LNG satellite stations have been built, and LNG vehicles have been manufactured. LNG related regulations and standards are being established. The prospects of LNG in China are also discussed in this paper. Interesting topics such as small-scale liquefiers, LNG cold energy utilization, coal bed methane liquefaction, LNG plant on board (FPSO - floating production, storage, and off-loading), and LNG price are introduced and analyzed. To meet the increasing demand for natural gas, China needs to build about 10 large LNG receiving terminals, and to import LNG at the level of more than 20 bcm (billion cubic metre) per year by 2020. (author)

  10. LNG (liquefied natural gas): A necessary part in China's future energy infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wensheng; Gu, Anzhong; Zhang, Na

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the LNG industry in China, covering LNG plants, receiving terminals, transportation, and applications. Small and medium scale LNG plants with different liquefaction processes have already been built or are being built. China's first two LNG receiving terminals have been put into operation in Guangdong and Fujian, another one is being built in Shanghai, and more are being planned. China is now able to manufacture LNG road tanks and containers. The construction of the first two LNG carriers has been completed. LNG satellite stations have been built, and LNG vehicles have been manufactured. LNG related regulations and standards are being established. The prospects of LNG in China are also discussed in this paper. Interesting topics such as small-scale liquefiers, LNG cold energy utilization, coal bed methane liquefaction, LNG plant on board (FPSO - floating production, storage, and off-loading), and LNG price are introduced and analyzed. To meet the increasing demand for natural gas, China needs to build about 10 large LNG receiving terminals, and to import LNG at the level of more than 20 bcm (billion cubic metre) per year by 2020. (author)

  11. Medicinal herbs as part of the development of sustainable tourism in Nature park 'Stara Planina'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratknić Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of the concept of sustainable exploitation of medicinal plant resources facilitates the development of tourism offering and the related activities that would enhance the development of rural areas in this region. When managed in a sustainable manner, tourism can bring many advantages to protected areas, tourism industry and a local community. By using high-resolution satellite images and application of GIS technology, a method is developed for monitoring periodic changes in eco-systems. The collected data enable design of models that incorporate in themselves dynamics of changes taking place in natural ecosystems. By means of periodic imaging of characteristic areas, the spatial representation of eco-systems will be monitored, along with the changes in their composition and structure, which may seriously endanger the development of tourism potential in the region. The integral approach to the management of medicinal herb resources in the region of Mt. Stara Planina, based on the results of this study, necessitates the integration of these results with the results of the studies investigating views and needs of the local population, whose quality of life depends on sustainability of the process of collection and valorization of this resource.

  12. Natural Rate of Education as the Factor of Stability of Political Regime. Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Владимир Геннадьевич Иванов

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The given article contains hypothesis about the increasing level of influence of the system of tertiary education on stability of political regime in many modern countries. In order to reveal the mechanism of such influence the author proposes the concept natural rate of education which reflects optimal balance between labor market and educational system from the perspective of avoidance and tackling of social protests and instability. The author supposes that the stabilizing function of the system of tertiary education is caused by its role of the specific regulator of labor market and its capability to involve millions of young males, providing them long-term occupation. Under the state policy this stabilizing function may be enormously exaggerated and even reach the point of extremum and become counterproductive. The article contains interdisciplinary approach, being on junction of political science and economics. The author uses selected methodological foundations of theory of human capital and introduces the following notions: educational pyramid, educational bubble, educational scissors and others.

  13. Research on loss of coolant accident of pressurized-water reactor based on PSO algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jie; Guo Lifeng; Peng Qiao

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the diagnosis performance of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), based on Back Propagation (BP) algorithm study, a fault diagnosis network is established based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm in this paper. The PSO algorithm is used to train the weights and the thresholds of neural network, which can conquer part convergence problem of BP algorithm. The test results show that the diagnosis network has higher accuracy of LOCA. (authors)

  14. Hard alloys testing-machine for values of PWR primary coolant circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campan, J.L.; Sauze, A.

    1980-01-01

    Testing of valve parts or material used in valve fabrication and particularly seizing conditions in friction of plane surfaces coated with hard alloys of the type stellite. The testing equipment called Marguerite is composed of a hot pressurized water loop in conditions similar to PWR primary coolant circuits (320 0 C, 150 bars) and a testing-machine with measuring instruments. Testing conditions and samples are described [fr

  15. Automatic welding processes for reactor coolant pipes used in PWR type nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, T.; Nakamura, A.; Nagura, Y.; Sakamoto, N.

    1979-01-01

    The authors developed automatic welding processes (submerged arc welding process and TIG welding process) for application to the welding of reactor coolant pipes which constitute the most important part of the PWR type nuclear power plant. Submerged arc welding process is suitable for flat position welding in which pipes can be rotated, while TIG welding process is suitable for all position welding. This paper gives an outline of the two processes and the results of tests performed using these processes. (author)

  16. Evaluation of alternate secondary (and tertiary) coolants for the molten-salt breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelmers, A.D.; Baes, C.F.; Bettis, E.S.; Brynestad, J.; Cantor, S.; Engel, J.R.; Grimes, W.R.; McCoy, H.E.; Meyer, A.S.

    1976-04-01

    The three most promising coolant selections for an MSBR have been identified and evaluated in detail from the many coolants considered for application either as a secondary coolant in 1000-MW(e) MSBR configurations using only one coolant, or as secondary and tertiary coolants in an MSBR dual coolant configuration employing two different coolants. These are, as single secondary coolants: (1) a ternary sodium--lithium--beryllium fluoride melt; (2) the sodium fluoroborate--sodium fluoride eutectic melt, the present reference design secondary coolant. In the case of the dual coolant configuration, the preferred system is molten lithium--beryllium fluoride (Li 2 BeF 4 ) as the secondary coolant and helium gas as the tertiary coolant

  17. Organic Rankine Cycle for Residual Heat to Power Conversion in Natural Gas Compressor Station. Part I: Modelling and Optimisation Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaczykowski, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    Basic organic Rankine cycle (ORC), and two variants of regenerative ORC have been considered for the recovery of exhaust heat from natural gas compressor station. The modelling framework for ORC systems has been presented and the optimisation of the systems was carried out with turbine power output as the variable to be maximized. The determination of ORC system design parameters was accomplished by means of the genetic algorithm. The study was aimed at estimating the thermodynamic potential of different ORC configurations with several working fluids employed. The first part of this paper describes the ORC equipment models which are employed to build a NLP formulation to tackle design problems representative for waste energy recovery on gas turbines driving natural gas pipeline compressors.

  18. Chimera grids in the simulation of three-dimensional flowfields in turbine-blade-coolant passages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, M. A.; Rimlinger, M. J.; Shih, T. I.-P.; Civinskas, K. C.

    1993-01-01

    When computing flows inside geometrically complex turbine-blade coolant passages, the structure of the grid system used can affect significantly the overall time and cost required to obtain solutions. This paper addresses this issue while evaluating and developing computational tools for the design and analysis of coolant-passages, and is divided into two parts. In the first part, the various types of structured and unstructured grids are compared in relation to their ability to provide solutions in a timely and cost-effective manner. This comparison shows that the overlapping structured grids, known as Chimera grids, can rival and in some instances exceed the cost-effectiveness of unstructured grids in terms of both the man hours needed to generate grids and the amount of computer memory and CPU time needed to obtain solutions. In the second part, a computational tool utilizing Chimera grids was used to compute the flow and heat transfer in two different turbine-blade coolant passages that contain baffles and numerous pin fins. These computations showed the versatility and flexibility offered by Chimera grids.

  19. Natural radioactivity levels in granitic plutons and groundwaters in Southeast part of Eskisehir, Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oerguen, Y. [Faculty of Mines, Istanbul Technical University (ITU), Ayazaga Kampusu, 34469 Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: orgun@itu.edu.tr; Altinsoy, N. [Institute of Energy, Istanbul Technical University (ITU), Ayazaga Kampusu, 34469 Istanbul (Turkey); Gueltekin, A.H. [Faculty of Mines, Istanbul Technical University (ITU), Ayazaga Kampusu, 34469 Istanbul (Turkey); Karahan, G. [Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center, P.O. Box 1, Atatuerk Airport, 34149 Istanbul (Turkey); Celebi, N. [Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center, P.O. Box 1, Atatuerk Airport, 34149 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-08-01

    The present work investigated the radioactivity level of the granitoid plutons and its effect on the groundwaters in the southeast part of Eskisehir. Fourteen granitic samples from the Kaymaz and Sivrihisar plutons and 11 groundwater samples from the near vicinity of the pluton were analyzed. The activity concentrations measured for {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th ranged from 43.59{+-}2 to 651.80{+-}24 Bq/kg, and 51.16{+-}3 to 351.94{+-}13 Bq/kg, respectively. The activity concentrations obtained for {sup 40}K varied from 418.50{+-}17 to 1618.03{+-}66 Bq/kg. The absorbed dose rates in air outdoors ranged from 87.14 to 531.81 nGy/h. All the results obtained from the Kaymaz pluton are higher than those from the Sivrihisar. The U (ave. 16.6 ppm) and Th (ave. 49.9 ppm) values of the Kaymaz pluton are higher than the average concentrations of the magmatic rocks of granitic composition. These results are consistent with high dose rates of the pluton. The gross-{alpha} activities in the groundwater samples ranged from 0.009 to 1.64 Bq/l and the gross-{beta} activities from 0.006 to 0.89 Bq/l. The highest gross-{alpha} value was found in the sample taken from near the Kaymaz pluton. The concentrations of {sup 222}Rn varied from 0.060 to 0.557 Bq/l.

  20. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 3 OF 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Joel [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  1. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells PART 2 OF 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Joel [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industrydriven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  2. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehne, T.; Grunwald, G.; Rohde, U.

    1998-10-01

    For the analysis of boron dilution transients and main steam like break scenarios the modelling of the coolant mixing inside the reactor vessel is important. The reactivity insertion due to overcooling or deboration depends strongly on the coolant temperature and boron concentration. The three-dimensional flow distribution in the downcomer and the lower plenum of PWR's was calculated with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (CFX-4). Calculations were performed for the PWR's of SIEMENS KWU, Westinghouse and VVER-440 / V-230 type. The following important factors were identified: exact representation of the cold leg inlet region (bend radii etc.), extension of the downcomer below the inlet region at the PWR Konvoi, obstruction of the flow by the outlet nozzles penetrating the downcomer, etc. The k-ε turbulence model was used. Construction elements like perforated plates in the lower plenum have large influence on the velocity field. It is impossible to model all the orifices in the perforated plates. A porous region model was used to simulate perforated plates and the core. The porous medium is added with additional body forces to simulate the pressure drop through perforated plates in the VVER-440. For the PWR Konvoi the whole core was modelled with porous media parameters. The velocity fields of the PWR Konvoi calculated for the case of operation of all four main circulation pumps show a good agreement with experimental results. The CFD-calculation especially confirms the back flow areas below the inlet nozzles. The downcomer flow of the Russian VVER-440 has no recirculation areas under normal operation conditions. By CFD calculations for the downcomer and the lower plenum an analytical mixing model used in the reactor dynamic code DYN3D was verified. The measurements, the analytical model and the CFD-calculations provided very well agreeing results particularly for the inlet region. The difficulties of analytical solutions and the uncertainties of turbulence

  3. Triboengineering problems of lead coolant in innovative fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beznosov, A.V.; Novozhilova, O.O.; Shumilkov, A.I.; Lvov, A.V.; Bokova, T.A.; Makhov, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Models of experimental sites for research of processes tribology in heavy liquid metal coolant. -- Highlights: • The contact a pair of heavy liquid metal coolant for reactors on fast neutrons. • The hydrostatic bearings main circulation pumps. • Oxide coating and degree of wear of friction surfaces in heavy liquid metal coolant. -- Abstract: So far, there are plenty of works dedicated to studying the phenomenon of friction. However, there are none dedicated to functioning of contact pairs in heavy liquid-metal coolants for fast neutron, reactor installations (Kogaev and Drozdov, 1991; Modern Tribology, 2008; Drozdov et al., 1986). At the Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University, such research is conducted in respect to friction, bearings of main circulating pumps, interaction of sheaths of neutron absorber rods with their covers, of the reactor control and safety system, refueling systems, and interaction of coolant flows with, channel borders. As a result of experimental studies, the characteristic of friction pairs in the heavy, liquid metal coolant shows the presence dependences of oxide film on structural materials of the wear. The inapplicability of existing calculation methods for assessing the performance of the bearing nodes, in the heavy liquid metal coolant is shown

  4. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate buffer concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. The remediation steps include changes in the coolant chemistry specification, development of a suite of new antimicrobial additives, and development of devices for the removal of nickel and phosphate ions from the coolant. This paper presents an overview of the anomalies, their known and suspected system effects, their causes, and the actions being taken to remediate the coolant.

  5. Device for preventing coolant outflow in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Mochizuki, Keiichi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent outflow of coolant from a reactor vessel even in an occurrence of leaking trouble at a low position in a primary cooling system or the like in the reactor vessel. Structure: An inlet at the foremost end of a coolant inlet pipe inserted into a reactor vessel is arranged at a level lower than a core, and a check valve is positioned at a level higher than the core in a rising portion of the inlet. In normal condition, the check valve is pushed up by discharge pressure of a main circulating pump and remains closed, and hence, producing no flow loss of coolant, sodium. However, when a trouble such as rupture occurs at the lower position in the primary cooling system, the attractive force for allowing the coolant to back-flow outside the reactor vessel and the load force of the coolant within the reactor vessel cause the check valve to actuate, as a consequence of which a liquid level of the coolant downwardly moves to the position of the check valve to intake the cover gases into a gas intake, thereby cutting off a flow passage of the coolant to stop outflow thereof. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Development of lead-bismuth coolant technology for nuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamata, Kin-ya; Kitano, Teruaki; Ono, Mikinori

    2004-01-01

    Liquid lead-bismuth is a promising material as a future fast reactor coolant or an intensive neutron source material for accelerator driven transmutation system (ADS). To develop nuclear plants and their installations using lead-bismuth coolant for practical use, both coolant technologies, inhabitation process of steels and quality control of coolant, and total operation system for liquid lead-bismuth plants are required. Based on the experience of liquid metal coolant, Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co., Ltd. (MES) has completed the liquid lead-bismuth forced circulation loop and has acquired various engineering data on main components including economizer. As a result of tis operation, MES has developed key technologies of lead-bismuth coolant such as controlling of oxygen content in lead-bismuth and a purification of lead-bismuth coolant. MES participated in the national project, ''The Development of Accelerator Driven Transmutation System'', together with JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) and started corrosion test for beam window of ADS. (author)

  7. Studying the processes relating to oxidation of organic substances contained in the coolant of thermal and nuclear power stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodyrev, B. N.; Krichevtsov, A. L.; Sokolyuk, A. A.

    2010-07-01

    A radical-chain mechanism governing thermal-oxidation destruction of organic substances contained in the coolant of thermal and nuclear power stations is considered. Hypotheses on the chemical nature of antioxidation properties of amines are presented. Theoretical conjectures about the fundamental processes through which protective amine films are formed on the surface of metals are suggested.

  8. The 10B(n,α)7Li reaction in PWR coolants: calculations of the effect on coolant pH and on decreases in 10B isotopic fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polley, M.V.

    1988-07-01

    Boron is used as a chemical shim in PWRs for reactivity control and is added in the form of boric acid to the primary coolant. The 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction leads to a continuous increase in 7 Li in the primary coolant and to a continuous decrease in 10 B the isotope of boron responsible for control of reactivity. The rate of increase in coolant pH due to 7 Li production is calculated for the Sizewell 'B' PWR to enable judgements to be made on the frequency of sampling and removal of lithium required to maintain the pH of the primary coolant within the desired limits. Calculations are contrasted for the cases of natural boron and 100% 10 B chemical shims, for both a normal cycle and an extended 18 month cycle. Calculations of 10 B depletion over 30 years of operation as a function of the quantity of boron discharged to waste are also presented. 10 B isotopic fractions are calculated for the reactor coolant (RC), boric acid tanks (BATs) and refuelling water storage tank (RWST) assuming rapid mixing of BAT and RC boron for tritium control and other reasons. Such predictions enable assessments of the reactor physics implications of 10 B consumption to be made. (author)

  9. Power supplyer for reactor coolant recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, Hiroshi; Okinaka, Yo.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a variable voltage/variable frequency static power source (static power source) used as a power source for a coolants recycling pump motor of a nuclear power plant. That is, during lower power operation such as start up or shutdown in which stoppage of the power source gives less effect to a reactor core, power is supplied from a power system, a main power generator connected thereto or a high voltage bus in the plant or a common high voltage bus to the static power source. However, during rated power operation, power is supplied from the output of an axially power generator connected with a main power generator having an extremely great inertia moment to the static power device. With such a constitution, the static power device is not stopped by the lowering of the voltage due to a thunderbolt falling accident or the like to a power-distribution line suddenly occurred in the power system. Accordingly, reactor core flowrate is free from rapid decrease caused by the reduction of rotation speed of the recycling pump. Accordingly, disadvantgages upon operation control in the reactor core is not caused. (I.S.)

  10. Characterization of reactor coolant by XRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legreid, G.; Beverskog, B. [OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway)

    2002-07-01

    The analyzes of membrane filters is of utmost importance in characterizing the coolant chemistry in nuclear power plants. Traditional analyzes of filters includes oxidative digestion followed by instrumental analyzes. XRF (X-ray Fluorescence spectrometry) can analyze without digestion of the filters. The method is much faster and demands only a cutting step as sample preparation. By use of XRF the analytical laboratory at the Halden Reactor Project will get increased capacity, which makes it possible to analyze more samples and improve the characterization of the water. The method has shown to give more stable results than other methods in use, and has proved to have good precision. New calibration methods have been developed and tested successfully against other methods. A round robin test, attending seven laboratories from nuclear power plants, was initiated by the Halden Project to verify the instrument. The test of standard cation exchange filters showed that conventional filter digestion results in too low values. The XRF methodology shows very good agreement with the standard values. The round robin test for particle filters could not confirm that filter digestion results in too low values. This was mainly due to lack of standard particle filters and large scatter in the reported data. (author)

  11. Characterization of reactor coolant by XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legreid, G.; Beverskog, B.

    2002-01-01

    The analyzes of membrane filters is of utmost importance in characterizing the coolant chemistry in nuclear power plants. Traditional analyzes of filters includes oxidative digestion followed by instrumental analyzes. XRF (X-ray Fluorescence spectrometry) can analyze without digestion of the filters. The method is much faster and demands only a cutting step as sample preparation. By use of XRF the analytical laboratory at the Halden Reactor Project will get increased capacity, which makes it possible to analyze more samples and improve the characterization of the water. The method has shown to give more stable results than other methods in use, and has proved to have good precision. New calibration methods have been developed and tested successfully against other methods. A round robin test, attending seven laboratories from nuclear power plants, was initiated by the Halden Project to verify the instrument. The test of standard cation exchange filters showed that conventional filter digestion results in too low values. The XRF methodology shows very good agreement with the standard values. The round robin test for particle filters could not confirm that filter digestion results in too low values. This was mainly due to lack of standard particle filters and large scatter in the reported data. (author)

  12. Speed control device for coolant recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageyama, Takao.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention intends to increase a margin relative of the oscillations of neutron fluxes when the temperature of feedwater is lowered in a compulsory recycling type BWR reactor. That is, when the operation point represented by a reactor thermal power and a reactor core inlet flow rate is in a state approximate to an oscillation limit of the reactor power, the device of the present invention controls the recycling pump speed in the increasing direction depending on the lowering range of the feedwater temperature from a stationary state. With such a constitution, even if the reactor power is in the operation region near the oscillation limit in the BWR type reactor and a feedwater heating loss is caused, the speed of the coolant recycling pump is increased by 10% at the maximum depending on the extent of the reduction of the feedwater temperature, so that the oscillation of the reactor power can be prevented from lasting for a long period of time even if a reactivity external disturbance should occur in the reactor. (I.S.)

  13. Reactor coolant pump monitoring and diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, R.M.; Gross, K.C.; Walsh, M.; Humenik, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    In order to reliably and safely operate a nuclear power plant, it is necessary to continuously monitor the performance of numerous subsystems to confirm that the plant state is within its prescribed limits. An important function of a properly designed monitoring system is the detection of incipient faults in all subsystems (with the avoidance of false alarms) coupled with an information system that provides the operators with fault diagnosis, prognosis of fault progression and recommended (either automatic or prescriptive) corrective action. In this paper, such a system is described that has been applied to reactor coolant pumps. This system includes a sensitive pattern-recognition technique based upon the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) that detects incipient faults from validated signals, an expert system embodying knowledge bases on pump and sensor performance, extensive hypertext files containing operating and emergency procedures as well as pump and sensor information and a graphical interface providing the operator with easily perceived information on the location and character of the fault as well as recommended corrective action. This system is in the prototype stage and is currently being validated utilizing data from a liquid-metal cooled fast reactor (EBR-II). 3 refs., 4 figs

  14. Reactor Coolant Temperature Measurement using Ultrasonic Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, JaeCheon [KEPCO International Nuclear graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, YongSun; Bechue, Nicholas [Krohne Messtechnik GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    In NPP, the primary piping temperature is detected by four redundant RTDs (Resistance Temperature Detectors) installed 90 degrees apart on the RCS (Reactor Coolant System) piping circumferentially. Such outputs however, if applied to I and C systems would not give balanced results. The discrepancy can be explained by either thermal stratification or improper arrangement of thermo-wells and RTDs. This phenomenon has become more pronounced in the hot-leg piping than in the cold-leg. Normally, the temperature difference among channels is in the range of 1°F in Korean nuclear power Plants. Consequently, a more accurate pipe average temperate measurement technique is required. Ultrasonic methods can be used to measure average temperatures with relatively higher accuracy than RTDs because the sound wave propagation in the RCS pipe is proportional to the average temperature around pipe area. The inaccuracy of RCS temperature measurement worsens the safety margin for both DNBR and LPD. The possibility of this discrepancy has been reported with thermal stratification effect. Proposed RCS temperature measurement system based on ultrasonic technology offers a countermeasure to cope with thermal stratification effect on hot-leg piping that has been an unresolved issue in NPPs. By introducing ultrasonic technology, the average internal piping temperature can be measured with high accuracy. The inaccuracy can be decreased less than ±1℉ by this method.

  15. Alternative protections for loss of coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estevez, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    One way to mitigate a small loss of coolant accident (LOCA) is by depressurizing the primary system, in order to turn the accident into a sequence where water is fed to a low pressure system. It can be achieved by two different ways: by incorporating a valve system (ADS - Automatic Depressurization System) to the design, which helps to diminish the pressure, obtaining a bigger LOCA, or by extracting heat from the system. Our analysis is centered in integrated reactors. The first characterization performed was on CAREM reactor. The idea was then to observe its behavior with LOCAs for different thermal power relations, water volume and rupture area. A simple depressurization model is presented, which enables us to find the parameter relationships which characterize this process, from which some particular cases will arise. ADS implementation is then analyzed, giving the criteria for the triggering time. A study on its reliability and the probability of a spurious opening is made, taking into account independent and dependent failures. An analysis on heat extraction as alternative for depressurizing is also made. Finally, the different reasons to choose between ADS or heat extraction as alternative are given, and the meaning of the parameters found are discussed. An alternative to classify LOCAs, instead of the traditional classification, by fracture size, is suggested. (author)

  16. Method of decontaminating primary coolant circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Sumi, Masao.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate hard contaminated layers as well as soft contaminated layers without injuring substrate materials, upon decontamination of radiation contaminated portions in equipments and pipeways constituting primary coolant circuits. Constitution: High pressure water from a high pressure pump is jetted out from the nozzle of a spray gun to the radiation contaminated portions in equipments, for example, to the surface of water chamber in a vapor evaporator. High pressure pure water or aqueous boric acid is jetted out from the periphery and boric oxide particles (of about 1 - 100 μ particle size) are jetted out from the center of the nozzle of the spray gun. The particles (blasting material) jetted out together with the high pressure water impinge on the contaminated surfaces to remove the contaminated layers. Upon impingement, the high pressure water acts as the shock absorber for the blasting material and, after the impingement, it flows down to the bottom of the water chamber, and the blasting material is dissolved in the high pressure water. (Horiuchi, T.)

  17. Steam as turbine blade coolant: Experimental data generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmsen, B.; Engeda, A.; Lloyd, J.R. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Steam as a coolant is a possible option to cool blades in high temperature gas turbines. However, to quantify steam as a coolant, there exists practically no experimental data. This work deals with an attempt to generate such data and with the design of an experimental setup used for the purpose. Initially, in order to guide the direction of experiments, a preliminary theoretical and empirical prediction of the expected experimental data is performed and is presented here. This initial analysis also compares the coolant properties of steam and air.

  18. Evaluation of filtration and distillation methods for recycling automotive coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, P.M.; Gavaskar, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    Government regulations and high waste disposal cost of spent automotive coolant have driven the vehicle maintenance industry to explore on-site recycling. The USEPA in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) and the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) evaluated two commercially available technologies that have potential for reducing the volume of spent automotive coolant. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of the recycled coolant, the pollution prevention potential, and the economic feasibility of the technologies

  19. Fast instrumentation for loss of coolant accident (LOCA) experimental studies pertaining to nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkat Raj, V.; Sreenivas Rao, G.; Belokar, D.G.; Dolas, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    The loss of coolant accident (LOCA) which involves a breach in the pressure boundary of the primary coolant system (PCS) is one of the postulated accident conditions against which the safety of the reactor system is to be ensured. Mathematical models have been developed to analyse this kind of transients. However, because of the extremely complicated nature of the phenomena involved, it is necessary to validate the analytical models with appropriate experimental data. Many parameters are to be measured during the experiments, out of which temperature, pressure, void fraction and two-phase mass flow rate are the most important parameters. Since the phenomenon is very fast, special fast response instruments are required. This paper deals with the considerations that govern the selection of appropriate instruments and the development of suitable instruments for transient two-phase flow and void fraction measurements. The requirements of the associated fast data acquisition system are also discussed. (author). 4 figs

  20. Effect of membrane and through-wall bending stresses on fatigue crack growth behavior and coolant leakage velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Yeon-Sik

    2003-11-01

    This study clarified the effect of a membrane and a through-wall bending stresses on fatigue crack growth behavior and coolant leakage velocity due to irregularity of crack surface. Each stress component relates to fatigue crack growth behavior directly in general and thus the wild-used K I solutions are anticipated to give good evaluation results on it. Meanwhile, it is necessary to notify that surface irregularity for coolant leakage assessment is made by stress history in nature. Surface irregularity is known to be largely classified into the following two aspects: surface roughness due to continuous crack opening and closure behavior and surface turnover due to cyclic bending stress dominance. Therefore, the deterministic parameters on resistance of coolant leakage by surface irregularity are considered to be not only stress history but crack opening behavior. (author)

  1. Thermodynamic analyses of hydrogen production from sub-quality natural gas. Part I: Pyrolysis and autothermal pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali

    Sub-quality natural gas (SQNG) is defined as natural gas whose composition exceeds pipeline specifications of nitrogen, carbon dioxide (CO 2) and/or hydrogen sulfide (H 2S). Approximately one-third of the U.S. natural gas resource is sub-quality gas [1]. Due to the high cost of removing H 2S from hydrocarbons using current processing technologies, SQNG wells are often capped and the gas remains in the ground. We propose and analyze a two-step hydrogen production scheme using SQNG as feedstock. The first step of the process involves hydrocarbon processing (via steam-methane reformation, autothermal steam-methane reformation, pyrolysis and autothermal pyrolysis) in the presence of H 2S. Our analyses reveal that H 2S existing in SQNG is stable and can be considered as an inert gas. No sulfur dioxide (SO 2) and/or sulfur trioxide (SO 3) is formed from the introduction of oxygen to SQNG. In the second step, after the separation of hydrogen from the main stream, un-reacted H 2S is used to reform the remaining methane, generating more hydrogen and carbon disulfide (CS 2). Thermodynamic analyses on SQNG feedstock containing up to 10% (v/v) H 2S have shown that no H 2S separation is required in this process. The Part I of this paper includes only thermodynamic analyses for SQNG pyrolysis and autothermal pyrolysis.

  2. Safety and environmental impact of the dual coolant blanket concept. SEAL subtask 6.2, final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleefeldt, K.; Dammel, F.; Gabel, K.; Jordan, T.; Schmuck, I.

    1996-03-01

    The European Union has been engaged since 1989 in a programme to develop tritium breeding blankets for application in a fusion power reactor. There are four concepts under development, namely two of the solid breeder type and two of the liquid breeder type. At the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe one blanket concept of each line has been pursued so far with the so-called dual coolant type representing the liquid breeder line. In the dual coolant concept the breeder material (Pb-17Li) is circulated to external heat exchangers to carry away the bulk of the generated heat and to extract the tritium. Additionally, the heavily loaded first wall is cooled by high pressure helium gas. The safety and environmental impact of the dual coolant blanket concept has been assessed as part of the blanket concept selection excercise, a European concerted action, aiming at selecting the two most promising concepts for futher development. The topics investigated are: (a) Blanket materials and toxic materials inventory, (b) energy sources for mobilisation, (c) fault tolerance, (d) tritium and activation products release, and (e) waste generation and management. No insurmountable safety problems have been identified for the dual coolant blanket. The results of the assessment are described in this report. The information collected is also intended to serve as input to the EU 'Safety and Environmental Assessment of Fusion longterm Programme' (SEAL). The unresolved issues pertaining to the dual coolant blanket which would need further investigations in future programmes are outlined herein. (orig.) [de

  3. Application of liquid chromatography techniques to the measurement of soluble transition metals in PWR primary coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amey, M.D.H.; Brown, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    Two chromatographic techniques have been developed, and evaluated for the on-line analysis of soluble transition metals, particularly cobalt, in PWR primary coolant. Automatic operation and control, together with data processing and storage has been achieved by interfacing a Dionex ion chromatograph to a microprocessor control system. An absolute detection limit of 0.1 ng cobalt has been obtained which, with on-line sample preconcentration (100 ml), has enabled measurements to be made down to part-per-trillion levels (0.001 ppb). Application of the techniques to PWR coolant analysis was demonstrated by a programme of work on the Half Megawatt Loop at Winfrith. During this work some aspects of the behaviour of soluble metal species have been studied in both de-oxygenated and hydrogenated conditions. The effects of changes in coolant chemistry, operating temperature, and sample line flowrates on circulating impurity levels are reported, together with the dramatic effects observed when part of the circuit pipework was replaced with new stainless steel tubing. (author)

  4. Estimation of the mechanical behavior of irradiated coolant channels at a nuclear plant for its decomissing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piquin, Ruben; Zanni, Pablo

    2003-01-01

    The widespread replacement of reactor internals generates a substantial volume of active material.It is essential to work with these components at least in a partial way before the next planned stop.Due to the fact that the reactor internals pool and the storage pools for irradiated nuclear fuel have limited capacities, it has been proposed to compact an experimental shift of 50 irradiated coolant channels, that are currently placed in storage pools.Basically the processed waste will be put in baskets at the bottom of the storage pools.The alternative choice proposes to divide an irradiation coolant channel tube into different parts: stainless steel section, zircaloy-4 section and stainless steel section with hardened zones with cobalt alloys named Estelite-6.Having planned the constructive and operative solutions, the mechanical characterization of the different parts of the channel tube remains to be done.In the present paper, the necessary compacted strength of the irradiation coolant channel tube will be estimated for the stainless steel section and for the zircaloy-4 section, starting from experiment with unirradiated material and considering effects of radiation damage and hydrides on the ductility.These results will be used to design the necessary compacted tools for the semi-industrial installation

  5. Thermal-hydraulic analysis and design improvement for coolant channel of ITER shield block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Ling; Li Huaqi; Zheng Jiantao; Yi Jingwei; Kang Weishan; Chen Jiming

    2013-01-01

    As an important part for ITER, shield block is used to shield the neutron heat. The structure design of shield block, especially the inner coolant channel design will influence its cooling effect and safety significantly. In this study, the thermal-hydraulic analysis for shield block has been performed by the computational fluid dynamics software, some optimization suggestions have been proposed and thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the improved model has been analyzed again. The analysis results for improved model show that pressure drop through flow path near the inlet and outlet region of the shield block has been reduced, and the total pressure drop in cooling path has been reduced too; the uniformity of the mass flowrate distribution and the velocity distribution have been improved in main cooling branches; the local highest temperature of solid domain reduced considerably, which could avoid thermal stress becoming too large because of coolant effect unevenly. (authors)

  6. Analysis of radiation exposure during creep adjustment to the coolant channels at Madras Atomic Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varadhan, R.S.; Venkataramana, K.; Kannan, R.K.; Sreekumaran Nair, B.; Chudalayandi, K.

    1994-01-01

    In pressurised heavy water reactors the coolant channels made of zircaloy-2 undergo creep deformation used intense neutron irradiation in the reactor core. In order to measure and provide for the changes in the dimensions, base line data of internal diameters, sag and length of the 306 coolant channels are measured as pre service inspection (PSI) before the reactor is loaded with fuel prior to criticality. Subsequently as part of in service inspection (ISI), axial creep of every channel is measured in every annual shutdown of the reactor and creep adjustment is done on those channels where creep expansion margin for the next one year operation is low. A study was carried out to assess the radiological impact of the job at Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS). Various measures adopted for reducing the individual and collective doses on the job are discussed in this report. (author). 3 refs., 2 tabs

  7. ESBWR long term containment response to loss of coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamgir, M. D.; Marquino, W.; Diaz-Quiroz, J.; Tucker, L.

    2010-01-01

    ESBWR is a 4500 MWt generation III+ natural circulation reactor with an array of robust passive safety systems to keep the reactor safe during postulated transients and accidents. With the submittal of the latest revision of the Design Control Document (DCD) to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ESBWR is nearing the completion of the US certification process. This paper focuses on the bounding licensing analysis of the long-term (30-day) response of the ESBWR containment to limiting Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) performed with the TRACG code. It is shown that using only passive systems available during the first 72 hours after the limiting Main Steam Line Break LOCA, the predicted peak containment pressure in the ESBWR containment remain well below the design limits with good margin. After 72 hours of LOCA initiation, PCCS Vent Fans (non-safety system) become available that remove non-condensable gases from, and further enhance the effectiveness of, PCCS heat exchangers to reduce the containment pressure and temperature to values substantially below the design limits. During the post- 72 hour period, the beneficial effects of the Vent Fan operation, combined with the available operator action to refill of PCCS pools, continue to maintain the containment pressure to about 30% below the design limit at 30 days after a limiting ESBWR LOCA. (authors)

  8. On a specific feature of heat transfer to organic coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kafengauz, N.L.; Gladkikh, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer to organic coolants, which is accompanied by solid carbon deposit formation, is experimentally studied. Polished and rough steel tubes with 3 mm outside diameter and 0.5 mm wall thickness, heated by electric current, were used as fuel elements. Results of experiments with kerosene T-1 are presented under the following regime parameters: pressure - 45 b; flow rate - 3.75 m/s; temperature - 25-40 deg C; fuel element temperature - 400-900 deg C. In experiments on fuel elements with natural roughness deposit formation caused a smooth increase of the wall temperature. In fuel elements with polished surface, deposit formation caused during the first minutes the reduction of the wall temperature and after that it increased. Intensity of solid deposit formation in fuel elements with polished and rough surface was the same. Similar results were observed not only in experiments with kerosene T-1, but with other organic fluids as well: with toluene, n-heptane, diisopropylcyclohexane etc. The results obtained can be explained in the following way. Solid deposits on a smooth surface create roughness which improves heat exchange and reduces, respectively, the heating surface temperature. But deposits possess weak heat conductivity and create additional thermal resistance, which aggravates heat exchange. Interaction of these two factors causes the complicated time dependence of wall temperature

  9. Liquid metal cooled nuclear power plant with direct heat transfer from the primary coolant to the working medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, G.

    1974-01-01

    The cooling systems of the sodium-cooled reactor are entirely inside a containment. The heat transfer from the primary to the secondary coolant - i.e. water - is done in heat exchangers with three-layer tubes. As there is no component cooling heat exchanger, it is advantageous that the layers that are in touch with the primary coolant form part of the wall of the containment. An emergency cooling system inside the containment is also made of three-layer tubes. The tubes of the primary loops have the shape of loops, helices, and spirals surrounding the reactor tank or a biological shield. Between the tubes and the safety wall there are maintenance areas which are accessible from the outside. The three-layer construction prevents a reaction of leaked-out or evaporated sodium with the secondary coolant. (DG) [de

  10. Identification of novel human dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors of natural origin (Part II: in silico prediction in antidiabetic extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Guasch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural extracts play an important role in traditional medicines for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and are also an essential resource for new drug discovery. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV inhibitors are potential candidates for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and the effectiveness of certain antidiabetic extracts of natural origin could be, at least partially, explained by the inhibition of DPP-IV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an initial set of 29,779 natural products that are annotated with their natural source and an experimentally validated virtual screening procedure previously developed in our lab (Guasch et al.; 2012 [1], we have predicted 12 potential DPP-IV inhibitors from 12 different plant extracts that are known to have antidiabetic activity. Seven of these molecules are identical or similar to molecules with described antidiabetic activity (although their role as DPP-IV inhibitors has not been suggested as an explanation for their bioactivity. Therefore, it is plausible that these 12 molecules could be responsible, at least in part, for the antidiabetic activity of these extracts through their inhibitory effect on DPP-IV. In addition, we also identified as potential DPP-IV inhibitors 6 molecules from 6 different plants with no described antidiabetic activity but that share the same genus as plants with known antidiabetic properties. Moreover, none of the 18 molecules that we predicted as DPP-IV inhibitors exhibits chemical similarity with a group of 2,342 known DPP-IV inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study identified 18 potential DPP-IV inhibitors in 18 different plant extracts (12 of these plants have known antidiabetic properties, whereas, for the remaining 6, antidiabetic activity has been reported for other plant species from the same genus. Moreover, none of the 18 molecules exhibits chemical similarity with a large group of known DPP-IV inhibitors.

  11. Advances in Forecasting and Prevention of Resonances Between Coolant Acoustical Oscillations and Fuel Rod Vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proskuryakov, Konstantin Nicolaevich [NPP, NPEI, 14, Krasnokazarmennaya str. Moscow, 111250 (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    To prevent the appearance of the conditions for resonance interaction between the fluid flow and the reactor internals (RI), fuel rod (FR ) and fuel assemblies (FA) it is necessary to de-tune Eigen frequency of coolant pressure oscillations (EFCPO) and natural frequency of mechanical element's oscillations and also of the system which is formed by the comprising of these elements. Other words it is necessary to de-tune acoustic resonance frequency and natural frequencies of RI, FR and FA. While solving these problems it is necessary to have a theoretical and settlement substantiation of an oscillation frequency band of the coolant outside of which there is no resonant interaction with structure vibrations. The presented work is devoted to finding the solution of this problem. There are results of an estimation of width of such band as well as the examples of a preliminary quantitative estimation of Q - factors of coolant acoustic oscillatory circuit formed by the equipment of the NPP. Abnormal growth of intensity of pressure pulsations in a mode with definite value of reactor capacity have been found out by measurements on VVER - 1000 reactor. This phenomenon has been found out casually and its original reason had not been identified. Paper shows that disappearance of this effect could be reached by realizing outlet of EFCPO from so-called, pass bands of frequencies (PBF). PBF is located symmetrical on both parties from frequency of own oscillations of FA. Methods, algorithms of calculations and quantitative estimations are developed for EFCPO, Q and PBF in various modes of operation NPP with VVER-1000. Results of calculations allow specifying area of resonant interaction EFCPO with vibrations of FR, FA and a basket of reactor core. For practical realization of the received results it is offered to make corresponding additions to the design documentation and maintenance instructions of the equipment of the NPP with VVER-1000. The improvement of these documents

  12. A Design Study for Standard Nanofluid Coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, In Cheol; Heo, Gyun Young

    2007-01-01

    The experimental data for nanofluids in thermal-fluid systems have shown that the new fluids promise to become advanced heat transfer fluids in terms of thermal performance. While enhancing thermal characteristics, the solid-liquid mixtures present an unavoidable disadvantage in terms of pumping cost for economic operation of thermal-fluid systems. In addition, there is a lack of agreement between experimental data provided in the literature. We can find that this issue of nanofluids resembles that of designing new materials. Many nanofluids researchers tend to view the nanofluid field as a highly coupled 'tetrahedro' whose four vertices (performance, properties, structure, and processes) are interconnected to each other. The present design study has a big merit to systemize the nanofluid work and to reduce a lot of trial-error efforts. The present work found that there would be no comprehensible design strategy in developing nanofluids. In this work, the Axiomatic Design (AD) theory is applied to standardize the design of nanofluids in order to bring its practical use forward. According to the Independence Axiom of the AD theory, the excessive couplings between the functional requirements and the parameters of a nanofluid system prevent from meeting the functional goals of the entire system. At a parametric level, the design of a nanofluid system is inherently coupled due to the characteristics of thermal-fluid system; the design parameters physically affect each other sharing sub-level parameters for nanoparticles with making a feedback loop. Even though parts of the nanofluids are naturally coupled, it is possible to reduce and/or eliminate the degree of coupling by help of AD principles. From the perspective of AD, this implies that we are able to ascertain which nanofluid system is better one in the light of functional achievement

  13. Improving Coolant Effectiveness through Drill Design Optimization in Gundrilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, K. S.; Tnay, G. L.; Rahman, M.

    2018-05-01

    Effective coolant application is essential to prevent thermo-mechanical failures of gun drills. This paper presents a novel study that enhances coolant effectiveness in evacuating chips from the cutting zone using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) method. Drag coefficients and transport behaviour over a wide range of Reynold numbers were first established through a series of vertical drop tests. With these, a CFD model was then developed and calibrated with a set of horizontal drilling tests. Using this CFD model, critical drill geometries that lead to poor chip evacuation including the nose grind contour, coolant hole configuration and shoulder dub-off angle in commercial gun drills are identified. From this study, a new design that consists a 20° inner edge, 15° outer edge, 0° shoulder dub-off and kidney-shaped coolant channel is proposed and experimentally proven to be more superior than all other commercial designs.

  14. Transient behaviour of main coolant pump in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delja, A.

    1986-01-01

    A basic concept of PWR reactor coolant pump thermo-hydraulic modelling in transient and accident operational condition is presented. The reactor coolant pump is a component of the nuclear steam supply system which forces the coolant through the reactor and steam generator, maintaining design heat transfer condition. The pump operating conditions have strong influence on the flow and thermal behaviour of NSSS, both in the stationary and nonstationary conditions. A mathematical model of the reactor coolant pump is formed by using dimensionless homologous relations in the four-quadrant regimes: normal pump, turbine, dissipation and reversed flow. Since in some operational regimes flow of mixture, liquid and steam may occur, the model has additional correction members for two-phase homologous relations. Modular concept has been used in developing computer program. The verification is performed on the simulation loss of offsite power transient and obtained results are presented. (author)

  15. Transient two-phase performance of LOFT reactor coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.H.; Modro, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    Performance characteristics of Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor coolant pumps under transient two-phase flow conditions were obtained based on the analysis of two large and small break loss-of-coolant experiments conducted at the LOFT facility. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of the transient two-phase flow effects on the LOFT reactor coolant pump performance during the first quadrant operation. The measured pump characteristics are presented as functions of pump void fraction which was determined based on the measured density. The calculated pump characteristics such as pump head, torque (or hydraulic torque), and efficiency are also determined as functions of pump void fractions. The importance of accurate modeling of the reactor coolant pump performance under two-phase conditions is addressed. The analytical pump model, currently used in most reactor analysis codes to predict transient two-phase pump behavior, is assessed

  16. Flow rate control systems for coolants for BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yoko; Kato, Naoyoshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To increase spontaneous recycling flow rate of coolants in BWR type reactors when the water level in the reactor decreases, by communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum. Constitution: An opening is provided to the back plate disposed at the lower end of a reactor core shroud for communicating a downcomer with a lower plenum, and an ON-OFF valve actuated by an operation rod is provided to the opening. When abnormal water level or pressure in the reactor is detected by a level metal or pressure meter, the operation rod is driven to open the ON-OFF valve, whereby coolants fed from a jet pump partially flows through the opening to increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants. This can increase the spontaneous recycling flow rate of the coolants upon spontaneous recycling operation, thereby maintaining the reactor safety and the fuel soundness. (Moriyama, K.)

  17. Integrated main coolant pumps for pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, R.

    1975-01-01

    The efficiency of an integrated main coolant pump for PWR's is increased. For this purpose, the pump is installed eccentric relative to the vertical axis of the U-type steam generator in the three-section HP chamber in such a way that its impeller wheel and the shell of the latter penetrate into the outlet chamber. The axis of the pump lies in the vertical plane of symmetry of the outlet chamber of the steam generator. The suction tube is arranged in the outlet chamber. To allow it to be installed, it is manufactured out of several parts. The diffusor tube, which is also made of several components, is attached to the horizontal separation plate between the outlet chamber and the pressure chamber so as to penetrate into it. To improve the outflow conditions at the diffusor tube, a plowshare-shaped baffle shield is installed between the diffusor tube and the HP chamber. Moreover, in order to improve the outflow conditions from the pump and from the pressure chamber, the outflow opening of the pressure chamber is put into the cylindrical shell of the HP chamber. In this way, the tensioning anchor is located between the pump and the outlet opening. (DG/RF) [de

  18. Simulation of a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    An essential component of nuclear safety activities is the analysis of postulated accidents which are taken as a design basis for a facility. This analysis is usually carried out by using complex computer codes to simulate the behaviour of the plant and to calculate vital plant parameters, which are then compared with the design limits. Since these simulations cannot be verified at the plant itself, computer codes must be validated by comparing the results of calculations with experimental data obtained in test facilities. With this objective in mind, the Central Research Institute for Physics (CRIP) of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences designed and constructed the PMK-NVH (Paks Model Circuit) test facility, a scaled down model of the WWER-440 Paks nuclear power plant. Hungary with the aim of strengthening the international co-operation on nuclear safety, made the PMK-NVH facility available to the IAEA to conduct a standard problem exercise. In this exercise, experimental data from the simulation of a 7.4% break loss of coolant accident were compared with analytical predictions of the behaviour of the facility calculated with computer codes. This document presents a complete overview of the Standard Problem Exercise, including description of the facility, the experiment, the codes and models used by the participants and a detailed intercomparison of calculated and experimental results. It is recognized that code assessment is a long process which involves many inter-related steps, therefore, no general conclusion on optimum code or best model was reached. However, the exercise was recognized as an important contributor to code validation

  19. Fusion-reactor blanket and coolant material compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppson, D.W.; Keough, R.F.

    1981-01-01

    Fusion reactor blanket and coolant compatibility tests are being conducted to aid in the selection and design of safe blanket and coolant systems for future fusion reactors. Results of scoping compatibility tests to date are reported for blanket material and water interactions at near operating temperatures. These tests indicate the quantitative hydrogen release, the maximum temperature and pressures produced and the rates of interactions for selected blanket materials

  20. Review on research of small break loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bo Jinhai; Wang Fei

    1998-01-01

    The Small Break Loss of Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) and its research art-of -work are reviewed. A typical SBLOCA process in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and the influence of break size, break location and reactor coolant pump on the process are described. The existing papers are classified in two categories: experimental and numerical modeling, with the primary experimental apparatuses in the world listed and the research works on SBLOCA summarized

  1. Comparative analysis of coolants for FBR of future nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshinsky, G.I.; Grigoryev, O.G.; Pylchenkov, E.H.; Skorikov, D.E.; Komkova, O.I.

    2001-01-01

    Selection of a fast reactor (FR) coolant for future nuclear reactors is a complex task that has not a single solution. Safety requirements are expected to grow in the future. The requirements to FR are reconsidered. Gradual transition from the FR as a builder up of plutonium to the FR as an economically effective energy source, is taking place. Among all types of coolants viable for FR, LMC (light molten salt coolants) cover the most complete range of requirements to advanced reactors and have a complete database. Sodium and lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) are selected because there is a complete package of technologies for their handling. Heavy liquid metal coolant (HLMC), being at a disadvantage of heat transfer rate in relation to sodium, make it possible to give the inherent safety properties to the reactor and, as a result, to simplify essentially the reactor design and its safety systems. This results in capital and costs reduction. Neutronic characteristics of HLMC cooled reactors make possible to transmute their own minor actinides (MA) safely, and LBC cooled reactors are able to transmute LWR'MA with high safety characteristics. Basing on the comparison carried out, it can be concluded, that both LBC and sodium are perspective coolants for future FR

  2. Comparative analysis of coolants for FBR of future nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshinsky, G.I.; Grigoryev, O.G.; Pylchenkov, E.H.; Skorikov, D.E.; Komkova, O.I. [State Scientific Center of Russian Federation, Institute for Physics and Power Engineering named after Academician A.I. Leipusky, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    Selection of a fast reactor (FR) coolant for future nuclear reactors is a complex task that has not a single solution. Safety requirements are expected to grow in the future. The requirements to FR are reconsidered. Gradual transition from the FR as a builder up of plutonium to the FR as an economically effective energy source, is taking place. Among all types of coolants viable for FR, LMC (light molten salt coolants) cover the most complete range of requirements to advanced reactors and have a complete database. Sodium and lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) are selected because there is a complete package of technologies for their handling. Heavy liquid metal coolant (HLMC), being at a disadvantage of heat transfer rate in relation to sodium, make it possible to give the inherent safety properties to the reactor and, as a result, to simplify essentially the reactor design and its safety systems. This results in capital and costs reduction. Neutronic characteristics of HLMC cooled reactors make possible to transmute their own minor actinides (MA) safely, and LBC cooled reactors are able to transmute LWR'MA with high safety characteristics. Basing on the comparison carried out, it can be concluded, that both LBC and sodium are perspective coolants for future FR.

  3. Earth, Wind and Fire. Natural air conditioning. Part 2. Research results; Earth, Wind and Fire. Natuurlijke airconditioning. Deel 2. Onderzoeksresultaten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronsema, B. [Afdeling Architectural Engineering en Technology, Faculteit Bouwkunde, Technische Universiteit Delft TUD, Delft (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    The Earth, Wind and Fire concept transforms a building into a 'climate machine' which is powered by the natural forces and energy of the sun, wind, the mass of the earth and gravity. This second part provides a brief overview of the research. The full results are included in the thesis of the author [Dutch] Het Earth, Wind en Fire-concept voor natuurlijke airconditioning biedt meer zekerheid voor het realiseren van energieneutrale kantoorgebouwen dan mogelijk zou zijn door verbetering van bestaande technieken. Het concept maakt gebruik van de omgevingsenergie van aardmassa, wind en zon. In deel 1 worden de onderzoeksdoelen en -methoden van dit concept besproken. Dit deel 2 geeft een kort overzicht van de onderzoeksresultaten. De volledige resultaten van de basale en gedetailleerde modellen, de simulaties, de metingen in de fysieke modellen en het validatieproces zijn opgenomen in het proefschrift van de auteur.

  4. Natural environments, ancestral diets, and microbial ecology: is there a modern "paleo-deficit disorder"? Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Alan C; Katzman, Martin A; Balanzá-Martínez, Vicent

    2015-01-31

    Famed microbiologist René J. Dubos (1901-1982) was an early pioneer in the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) construct. In the 1960s, he conducted groundbreaking experimental research concerning the ways in which early-life experience with nutrition, microbiota, stress, and other environmental variables could influence later-life health outcomes. He also wrote extensively on potential health consequences of a progressive loss of contact with natural environments (now referred to as green or blue space), arguing that Paleolithic experiences have created needs, particularly in the mental realm, that might not be met in the context of rapid global urbanization. He posited that humans would certainly adapt to modern urban landscapes and high technology, but there might be a toll to be paid in the form of higher psychological distress (symptoms of anxiety and depression) and diminished quality of life. In particular, there might be an erosion of humanness, exemplified by declines in altruism/empathy. Here in the first of a two-part review, we examine contemporary research related to natural environments and question to what extent Dubos might have been correct in some of his 50-year-old assertions.

  5. Evaluation of natural gas supply options for Southeast and Central Europe: Part 2. Multi-criteria assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afgan, Naim H.; Carvalho, Maria G.; Pilavachi, Petros A.; Martins, Nelson

    2008-01-01

    Decision making methods are used as a tool for the selection of alternatives to be evaluated on the basis of several criteria. Evaluation of the potential routes for natural gas supply to the Southeast and Central European countries is studied using single and multi-criteria evaluation. The potential options included in this analysis are the: Yamal Route; Nabucco Route; West Balkan Route; LNG Neum Route; and Gas by Wire Route. In part 1, the paper was devoted to the definition of the indicators and to single indicator analysis. In part 2, the analysis is based on multi-criteria evaluation, which comprises the possibility to assess the options under predefined constraints amongst indicators. The paper also describes different methods used for multi-criteria evaluation. This analysis focuses on cases with different priorities defined among individual weighting coefficients with the others having the same value. It was shown that all options under specific constraints can be qualified as promising in the decision making process. It is also concluded that favourite indicator constraints may exaggerate some options

  6. Predicting the ultimate potential of natural gas SOFC power cycles with CO2 capture - Part B: Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanari, Stefano; Mastropasqua, Luca; Gazzani, Matteo; Chiesa, Paolo; Romano, Matteo C.

    2016-09-01

    An important advantage of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) as future systems for large scale power generation is the possibility of being efficiently integrated with processes for CO2 capture. Focusing on natural gas power generation, Part A of this work assessed the performances of advanced pressurised and atmospheric plant configurations (SOFC + GT and SOFC + ST, with fuel cell integration within a gas turbine or a steam turbine cycle) without CO2 separation. This Part B paper investigates such kind of power cycles when applied to CO2 capture, proposing two ultra-high efficiency plant configurations based on advanced intermediate-temperature SOFCs with internal reforming and low temperature CO2 separation process. The power plants are simulated at the 100 MW scale with a set of realistic assumptions about FC performances, main components and auxiliaries, and show the capability of exceeding 70% LHV efficiency with high CO2 capture (above 80%) and a low specific primary energy consumption for the CO2 avoided (1.1-2.4 MJ kg-1). Detailed results are presented in terms of energy and material balances, and a sensitivity analysis of plant performance is developed vs. FC voltage and fuel utilisation to investigate possible long-term improvements. Options for further improvement of the CO2 capture efficiency are also addressed.

  7. Predicting the ultimate potential of natural gas SOFC power cycles with CO2 capture - Part A: Methodology and reference cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanari, Stefano; Mastropasqua, Luca; Gazzani, Matteo; Chiesa, Paolo; Romano, Matteo C.

    2016-08-01

    Driven by the search for the highest theoretical efficiency, in the latest years several studies investigated the integration of high temperature fuel cells in natural gas fired power plants, where fuel cells are integrated with simple or modified Brayton cycles and/or with additional bottoming cycles, and CO2 can be separated via chemical or physical separation, oxy-combustion and cryogenic methods. Focusing on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) and following a comprehensive review and analysis of possible plant configurations, this work investigates their theoretical potential efficiency and proposes two ultra-high efficiency plant configurations based on advanced intermediate-temperature SOFCs integrated with a steam turbine or gas turbine cycle. The SOFC works at atmospheric or pressurized conditions and the resulting power plant exceeds 78% LHV efficiency without CO2 capture (as discussed in part A of the work) and 70% LHV efficiency with substantial CO2 capture (part B). The power plants are simulated at the 100 MW scale with a complete set of realistic assumptions about fuel cell (FC) performance, plant components and auxiliaries, presenting detailed energy and material balances together with a second law analysis.

  8. Experimental distribution of coolant in the IPR-R1 Triga nuclear reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Tecnologia de Reatores; Palma, Daniel A.P., E-mail: dapalma@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN/RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria A.F.; Reis, Patricia A.L., E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.b, E-mail: dora@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    The IPR-R1 is a typical TRIGA Mark I light-water and open pool type reactor. The core has an annular configuration of six rings and is cooled by natural circulation. The core coolant channels extend from the bottom grid plate to the top grid plate. The cooling water flows through the holes in the bottom grid plate, passes through the lower unheated region of the element, flows upwards through the active region, passes through the upper unheated region, and finally leaves the channel through the differential area between a triangular spacer block on the top of the fuel element and a round hole in the grid. Direct measurement of the flow rate in a coolant channel is difficult because of the bulky size and low accuracy of flow meters. The flow rate through the channel may be determined indirectly from the heat balance across the channel using measurements of the water inlet and outlet temperatures. This paper presents the experiments performed in the IPR-R1 reactor to monitoring some thermo-hydraulic parameters in the core coolant channels, such as: the radial and axial temperature profile, temperature, velocity, mass flow rate, mass flux and Reynolds's number. Some results were compared with theoretical predictions, as it was expected the variables follow the power distribution (or neutron flux) in the core. (author)

  9. Experimental distribution of coolant in the IPR-R1 Triga nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, Amir Z.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria A.F.; Reis, Patricia A.L.

    2011-01-01

    The IPR-R1 is a typical TRIGA Mark I light-water and open pool type reactor. The core has an annular configuration of six rings and is cooled by natural circulation. The core coolant channels extend from the bottom grid plate to the top grid plate. The cooling water flows through the holes in the bottom grid plate, passes through the lower unheated region of the element, flows upwards through the active region, passes through the upper unheated region, and finally leaves the channel through the differential area between a triangular spacer block on the top of the fuel element and a round hole in the grid. Direct measurement of the flow rate in a coolant channel is difficult because of the bulky size and low accuracy of flow meters. The flow rate through the channel may be determined indirectly from the heat balance across the channel using measurements of the water inlet and outlet temperatures. This paper presents the experiments performed in the IPR-R1 reactor to monitoring some thermo-hydraulic parameters in the core coolant channels, such as: the radial and axial temperature profile, temperature, velocity, mass flow rate, mass flux and Reynolds's number. Some results were compared with theoretical predictions, as it was expected the variables follow the power distribution (or neutron flux) in the core. (author)

  10. The problem of mechanical compatibility of natural building stones in restoration of monuments. Part I: Composite specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourkoulis, Stavros K.; Ninis, Nikolaos L.

    2011-12-01

    The mechanical compatibility of natural building stones used in the restoration of ancient monuments as substitutes of the authentic material is studied in this short two-paper series. Attention is focused on the porous oolitic limestone of Kenchreae used in the erection of the monuments at the Epidaurean Asklepieion. In Part I experimental results are presented concerning the mechanical properties and constants of both the authentic (ancient and freshly quarried) material and the various stones proposed so far as possible substitutes. It is concluded that only the Kenchreae stone satisfactorily simulates the behaviour of the material used by ancient Greeks. The other types of stones have a substantially different character and their incorporation in the restoration should be treated with caution. In an effort to quantify the influence of the substitute stone on the authentic one, a series of experiments were carried out using composite specimens made from equal parts of authentic and substitute material with various inclination angles of the adhesion plane with respect to the load. It was concluded that the mechanical properties of the composite specimen are strongly affected by this angle and the dependence is not monotonous. In addition, strong strain discontinuities are recorded in the vicinity of the adhesion plane, which are responsible for the initiation of cracking in either of the two materials. It was pointed out that in some cases the incompatibility causes violation of the basic restoration principle concerning the protection of the ancient material. In this context certain geometrical configurations of the boundaries of the specimens are examined in Part II as a possible means of modifying the mechanical behaviour of the substitute stones, in order to make them as compatible as possible with the authentic material.

  11. Simulation of steam explosion in stratified melt-coolant configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, Matjaž; Centrih, Vasilij; Uršič, Mitja

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Strong steam explosions may develop spontaneously in stratified configurations. • Considerable melt-coolant premixed layer formed in subcooled water with hot melts. • Analysis with MC3D code provided insight into stratified steam explosion phenomenon. • Up to 25% of poured melt was mixed with water and available for steam explosion. • Better instrumented experiments needed to determine dominant mixing process. - Abstract: A steam explosion is an energetic fuel coolant interaction process, which may occur during a severe reactor accident when the molten core comes into contact with the coolant water. In nuclear reactor safety analyses steam explosions are primarily considered in melt jet-coolant pool configurations where sufficiently deep coolant pool conditions provide complete jet breakup and efficient premixture formation. Stratified melt-coolant configurations, i.e. a molten melt layer below a coolant layer, were up to now believed as being unable to generate strong explosive interactions. Based on the hypothesis that there are no interfacial instabilities in a stratified configuration it was assumed that the amount of melt in the premixture is insufficient to produce strong explosions. However, the recently performed experiments in the PULiMS and SES (KTH, Sweden) facilities with oxidic corium simulants revealed that strong steam explosions may develop spontaneously also in stratified melt-coolant configurations, where with high temperature melts and subcooled water conditions a considerable melt-coolant premixed layer is formed. In the article, the performed study of steam explosions in a stratified melt-coolant configuration in PULiMS like conditions is presented. The goal of this analytical work is to supplement the experimental activities within the PULiMS research program by addressing the key questions, especially regarding the explosivity of the formed premixed layer and the mechanisms responsible for the melt-water mixing. To

  12. A {open_quotes}zero waste{close_quotes} coolant management strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennicott, M.A.

    1994-04-01

    In June of 1992 the Waste Minimization Program at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) began a study to determine the best methods of managing water-based industrial metalworking fluids in the plant`s Tool Manufacturing Shop. The shop was faced with the challenge of managing fluids that could no longer be disposed of in the traditional manner, through the plant`s liquid process waste drains, due to a problem they, were having causing in the Liquid Waste Operations Evaporator. The study`s goal was to reduce the waste coolants being generated and to reduce worker exposure to a serious health risk. Results of this study and those of a subsequent study to determine relative compatibilities of various coolants and metals, led to the application of a {open_quotes}zero waste{close_quotes} machine coolant management program. This program is currently saving the generation of 10,000 gallons of liquid waste annually, has eliminated worker exposure to harmful bacteria and biocides, and should result in extended machine tool life, increased product quality, fewer rejected parts, and decreases labor costs.

  13. An Investigation into Water Chemistry in Primary Coolant Circuit of an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Bing-Jhen; Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Wang, Mei-Ya; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2012-09-01

    To ensure operation safety, an optimization on the coolant chemistry in the primary coolant circuit of a nuclear reactor is essential no matter what type or generation the reactor belongs to. For a better understanding toward the water chemistry in an advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR), such as the one being constructed in the northern part of Taiwan, and for a safer operation of this ABWR, we conducted a proactive, thorough water chemistry analysis prior to the completion of this reactor in this study. A numerical simulation model for water chemistry analyses in ABWRs has been developed, based upon the core technology we established in the past. This core technology for water chemistry modeling is basically an integration of water radiolysis, thermal-hydraulics, and reactor physics. The model, by the name of DEMACE - ABWR, is an improved version of the original DEMACE model and was used for radiolysis and water chemistry prediction in the Longmen ABWR in Taiwan. Predicted results pertinent to the water chemistry variation and the corrosion behavior of structure materials in the primary coolant circuit of this ABWR under rated-power operation were reported in this paper. (authors)

  14. Measurement of sulphur-35 in the coolant gas of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandalls, F.J.

    1978-03-01

    Sulphur is an important element in some food chains and the release of radioactive sulphur to the environment must be closely controlled if the chemical form is such that it is available or potentially available for entering food chains. The presence of sulphur-35 in the coolant gas of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor warranted a study to assess the quantity and chemical form of the radioactive sulphur in order to estimate the magnitude of the potential environmental hazard which might arise from the release of coolant gas from Civil Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors. A combination of gas chromatographic and radiochemical analyses revealed carbonyl sulphide to be the only sulphur-35 compound present in the coolant gas of the Windscale Reactor. The concentration of carbonyl sulphide was found to lie in the range 40 to 100 x 10 -9 parts by volume and the sulphur-35 specific activity was about 20 mCi per gramme. The analytical techniques are described in detail. The sulphur-35 appears to be derived from the sulphur and chlorine impurities in the graphite. A method for the preparation of carbonyl sulphide labelled with sulphur-35 is described. (author)

  15. Reducing forces during drilling brittle hard materials by using ultrasonic and variation of coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopf, C.; Rascher, R.

    2016-11-01

    The process of ultrasonic machining is especially used for brittle hard materials as the additional ultrasonic vibration of the tool at high frequencies and low amplitudes acts like a hammer on the surface. With this technology it is possible to drill holes with lower forces, therefor the machining can be done faster and the worktime is much less than conventionally. A three-axis dynamometer was used to measure the forces, which act between the tool and the sample part. A focus is set on the sharpness of the tool. The results of a test series are based on the Sauer Ultrasonic Grinding Centre. On the same machine it is possible to drill holes in the conventional way. Additional to the ultasonic Input the type an concentration of coolant is important for the Drilling-force. In the test there were three different coolant and three different concentrations tested. The combination of ultrasonic vibration and the right coolant and concentration is the best way to reduce the Forces. Another positive effect is, that lower drilling-forces produce smaller chipping on the edge of the hole. The way to reduce the forces and chipping is the main issue of this paper.

  16. Design of the coolant system for the Large Coil Test Facility pulse coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridgman, C.; Ryan, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    The pulse coils will be a part of the Large Coil Test Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, which is designed to test six large tokamak-type superconducting coils. The pulse coil set consists of two resistive coaxial solenoid coils, mounted so that their magnetic axis is perpendicular to the toroidal field lines of the test coil. The pulse coils provide transient vertical fields at test coil locations to simulate the pulsed vertical fields present in tokamak devices. The pulse coils are designed to be pulsed for 30 s every 150 s, which results in a Joule heating of 116 kW per coil. In order to provide this capability, the pulse coil coolant system is required to deliver 6.3 L/s (100 gpm) of subcooled liquid nitrogen at 10-atm absolute pressure. The coolant system can also cool down each pulse coil from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. This paper provides details of the pumping and heat exchange equipment designed for the coolant system and of the associated instrumentation and controls

  17. Apparatus for controlling coolant level in a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor which has a thermal liner spaced inwardly of the pressure vessel and includes means for passing bypass coolant through the annulus between the thermal liner and the pressure vessel to insulate the pressure vessel from hot outlet coolant includes control ports in the thermal liner a short distance below the normal operating coolant level in the reactor and an overflow nozzle in the pressure vessel below the control ports connected to an overflow line including a portion at an elevation such that overflow coolant flow is established when the coolant level in the reactor is above the top of the coolant ports. When no makeup coolant is added, bypass flow is inwardly through the control ports and there is no overflow; when makeup coolant is being added, coolant flow through the overflow line will maintain the coolant level.

  18. Apparatus for controlling coolant level in a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    A liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor which has a thermal liner spaced inwardly of the pressure vessel and includes means for passing bypass coolant through the annulus between the thermal liner and the pressure vessel to insulate the pressure vessel from hot outlet coolant includes control ports in the thermal liner a short distance below the normal operating coolant level in the reactor and an overflow nozzle in the pressure vessel below the control ports connected to an overflow line including a portion at an elevation such that overflow coolant flow is established when the coolant level in the reactor is above the top of the coolant ports. When no makeup coolant is added, bypass flow is inwardly through the control ports and there is no overflow; when makeup coolant is being added, coolant flow through the overflow line will maintain the coolant level

  19. Influence of coolant pH on corrosion of 6061 aluminum under reactor heat transfer conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawel, S.J.; Felde, D.K.; Pawel, R.E.

    1995-10-01

    To support the design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), an experimental program was conducted wherein aluminum alloy specimens were exposed at high heat fluxes to high-velocity aqueous coolants in a corrosion test loop. The aluminum alloys selected for exposure were candidate fuel cladding materials, and the loop system was constructed to emulate the primary coolant system for the proposed ANS reactor. One major result of this program has been the generation of an experimental database defining oxide film growth on 6061 aluminum alloy cladding. Additionally, a data correlation was developed from the database to permit the prediction of film growth for any reasonable thermal-hydraulic excursion. This capability was utilized effectively during the conceptual design stages of the reactor. During the course of this research, it became clear that the kinetics of film growth on the aluminum alloy specimens were sensitively dependent on the chemistry of the aqueous coolant and that relatively small deviations from the intended pH 5 operational level resulted in unexpectedly large changes in the corrosion behavior. Examination of the kinetic influences and the details of the film morphology suggested that a mechanism involving mass transport from other parts of the test loop was involved. Such a mechanism would also be expected to be active in the operating reactor. This report emphasizes the results of experiments that best illustrate the influence of the nonthermal-hydraulic parameters on film growth and presents data to show that comparatively small variations in pH near 5.0 invoke a sensitive response. Simply, for operation in the temperature and heat flux range appropriate for the ANS studies, coolant pH levels from 4.5 to 4.9 produced significantly less film growth than those from pH 5.1 to 6. A mechanism for this behavior based on the concept of treating the entire loop as an active corrosion system is presented

  20. Passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with backup coolant flow path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsbedt, A.; Boardman, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    A dual passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactors is described, comprising the combination of: a reactor vessel for containing a pool of liquid metal coolant with a core of heat generating fissionable fuel substantially submerged therein, a side wall of the reactor vessel forming an innermost first partition; a containment vessel substantially surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation having a side wall forming a second partition; a first baffle cylinder substantially encircling the containment vessel in spaced apart relation having an encircling wall forming a third partition; a guard vessel substantially surrounding the containment vessel and first baffle cylinder in spaced apart relation having a side wall forming a forth partition; a sliding seal at the top of the guard vessel edge to isolate the dual cooling system air streams; a second baffle cylinder substantially encircling the guard vessel in spaced part relationship having an encircling wan forming a fifth partition; a concrete silo substantially surrounding the guard vessel and the second baffle cylinder in spaced apart relation providing a sixth partition; a first fluid coolant circulating flow course open to the ambient atmosphere for circulating air coolant comprising at lent one down comer duct having an opening to the atmosphere in an upper area thereof and making fluid communication with the space between the guard vessel and the first baffle cylinder and at least one riser duct having an opening to the atmosphere in the upper area thereof and making fluid communication with the space between the first baffle cylinder and the containment vessel whereby cooling fluid air can flow from the atmosphere down through the down comer duct and space between the forth and third partitions and up through the space between the third and second partition and the riser duct then out into the atmosphere; and a second fluid coolant circulating flow

  1. Correlation between Ni base alloys surface conditioning and cation release mitigation in primary coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauzel, M.; Guillodo, M.; Foucault, M. [AREVA NP SAS, Technical Centre, Le Creusot (France); Engler, N.; Chahma, F.; Brun, C. [AREVA NP SAS, Chemistry and Radiochemistry Group, Paris La Defense (France)

    2010-07-01

    The mastering of the reactor coolant system radioactive contamination is a real stake of performance for operating plants and new builds. The reduction of activated corrosion products deposited on RCS surfaces allows minimizing the global dose integrated by workers which supports the ALARA approach. Moreover, the contamination mastering limits the volumic activities in the primary coolant and thus optimizes the reactor shutdown duration and environment releases. The main contamination sources on PWR are due to Co-60 and Co-58 nuclides which come respectively Co-59 and Ni-58, naturally present in alloys used in the RCS. Co is naturally present as an impurity in alloys or as the main component of hardfacing materials (Stellites™). Ni is released mainly by SG tubes which represent the most important surface of the RCS. PWR steam generators (SG), due to the huge wetted surface are the main source of corrosion products release in the primary coolant circuit. As corrosion products may be transported throughout the whole circuit, activated in the core, and redeposited all over circuit surfaces, resulting in an increase of activity buildup, it is of primary importance to gain a better understanding of phenomenon leading to corrosion product release from SG tubes before setting up mitigation measures. Previous studies have shown that SG tubing made of the same material had different release rates. To find the origin of these discrepancies, investigations have been performed on tubes at the as-received state and after exposure to a nominal primary chemistry in titanium recirculating loop. These investigations highlighted the existence of a correlation between the inner surface metallurgical properties and the release of corrosion products in primary coolant. Oxide films formed in nominal primary chemistry are always protective, their morphology and their composition depending strongly on the geometrical, metallurgical and physico-chemical state of the surface on which they

  2. Pressurizing Behavior on Ingress of Coolant into Pebble Bed of Blanket of Fusion DEMO Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daigo Tsuru; Mikio Enoeda; Masato Akiba

    2006-01-01

    Solid breeder blankets are being developed as candidate blankets for the Fusion DEMO reactor in Japan. JAEA is performing the development of the water cooled and helium cooled solid breeder blankets. The blanket utilizes ceramic breeder pebbles and multiplier pebbles beds cooled by high pressure water or high pressure helium in the cooling tubes placed in the blanket box structure. In the development of the blanket, it is very important to incorporate the safety technology as well as the performance improvement on tritium production and energy conversion. In the safety design and technology, coolant ingress in the blanket box structure is one of the most important events as the initiators. Especially the thermal hydraulics in the pebble bed in the case of the high pressure coolant ingress is very important to evaluate the pressure propagation and coolant flow behavior. This paper presents the preliminary results of the pressure loss characteristics by the coolant ingress in the pebble bed. Experiments have been performed by using alumina pebble bed (4 litter maximum volume of the pebble bed) and nitrogen gas to simulate the helium coolant ingress into breeder and multiplier pebble beds. Reservoir tank of 10 liter is filled with 1.0 MPa nitrogen. The nitrogen gas is released at the bottom part of the alumina pebble bed whose upper part is open to the atmosphere. The pressure change in the pebble bed is measured to identify the pressure loss. The measured values are compared with the predicted values by Ergun's equation, which is the correlation equation on pressure loss of the flow through porous medium. By the results of the experiments with no constraint on the alumina pebble bed, it was clarified that the measured value agreed in the lower flow rate. However, in the higher flow rate where the pressure loss is high, the measured value is about half of the predicted value. The differences between the measured values and the predicted values will be discussed from

  3. Study of core characteristics on fuel and coolant type. Results of F/S phase-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikegami, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Sasaki, Makoto; Mizuno, Tomoyasu; Yamadate, Megumi; Takaki, Naoyuki; Kurosawa, Norifumi; Sakashita, Yoshiaki; Naganuma, Masayuki

    2001-03-01

    The phase-I of the Feasibility Study of Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems (F/S) were started from July, 1999 and terminated at the end of FY2000 in order to executed examination about technology alternatives of various commercialized fast reactor (FR) recycle concepts, in response to the JNC middle long term enterprise plan. In the phase-I of this F/S, a number of conceptual candidates have been selected from the following 5 viewpoints: a) ensuring safety, b) economic competitiveness to future LWRs, c) efficient utilization of resources, d) reduction of environmental burden, e) enhancement of nuclear non-proliferation. As for this study from the above viewpoints, core characteristics of many kinds of reactors have been investigated, analyzed and examined a core / a fuel characteristic in the combinations of fuel and coolant types and power output scales. Based on these results, R and D plans of the phase-II to be performed have been proposed, and a database to select candidate reactor concepts has been prepared. The conclusions have been obtained in the phase-I are as follows: (1) Evaluation of a fuel form in every each coolant was compared. A promising fuel form was extracted as follows: an oxide and a metal fuel for sodium coolant cores, a metal and a nitride fuel for heavy metal coolant cores, an oxide and a nitride fuel for carbon dioxide coolant cores and a nitride fuel for He gas coolant cores. (2) As the general idea that performance of a core nucleus can be compatible with re-criticality evasion in sodium coolant large-sized oxide fuel cores, a axial blanket particle elimination radial heterogeneous core is one influential candidate. (3) In case of Pb-Bi coolant nature circulation medium size core with an oxide fuel, it is difficult to simultaneously achieve higher discharged burn-up and higher breeding ratio according to the viewpoints of the phase-I. (4) Core characteristics of a carbon dioxide coolant core shows to be almost equivalent to that of

  4. Primary coolant recycling device for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru; Tokiwai, Moriyasu

    1998-01-01

    A primary coolants (liquid sodium) recycling device comprises a plurality of recycling pumps. The recycling pumps are operated while using, as a power source, electric power generated by a thermoelectric power generation system by utilizing heat stored in the coolants. The thermoelectric power generation system comprises a thermo-electric conversion module, heat collecting heat pipes as a high temperature side heat conduction means and heat dissipating pipes as a low temperature side heat conduction means. The heat of coolants is transferred to the surface of the high temperature side of each thermo-electric conversion elements of the thermal power generation system by the heat collecting heat pipes. The heat on the low temperature side of each of the thermo-electric conversion elements is removed by the heat dissipating pipes. Accordingly, temperature difference is caused between both surfaces of the thermo-electric conversion elements. Even upon loss of a main power source due to stoppage of electricity, electric power is generated by utilizing heat of coolants, so that the recycling pumps circulate coolants to cool a reactor core continuously. (I.N.)

  5. Analyses of Decrease in Reactor Coolant Flow Rate in SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Rae; Bae, Kyoo Hwan; Choi, Suhn

    2011-01-01

    SMART is a small integral reactor, which is under development at KAERI to get the standard design approval by the end of 2011. SMART works like a pressurized light-water reactor in principle though it is more compact than large commercial reactors. SMART houses major components such as steam generators, a pressurizer, and reactor coolant pumps inside the reactor pressure vessel. Due to its compact design, SMART adopts a canned-motor type reactor coolant pump which has much smaller rotational inertia than the ones used in commercial reactors. As a consequence, the reactor coolant pump has very short coastdown time and reactor coolant flow rate decreases more severely compared to commercial reactors. The transients initiated by reduction of reactor coolant flow rate have been analyzed to ensure that SMART can be safely shutdown on such transients. The design basis events in this category are complete loss of flow, single pump locked rotor with loss of offsite power, and single pump shaft break with loss of offsite power

  6. Full reactor coolant system chemical decontamination qualification programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Corrosion and wear products are found throughout the reactor coolant system (RCS), or primary loop, of a PWR power plant. These products circulate with the primary coolant through the reactor where they may become activated. An oxide layer including these activated products forms on the surfaces of the RCS (including the fuel elements). The amount of radioactivity deposited on the different surface varies and depends primarily on the corrosion rate of the materials concerned, the amount of cobalt in the coolant and the chemistry of the coolant. The oxide layer, commonly called crud, on the surfaces of nuclear plant systems leads to personnel radiation exposure. The level of the radiation fields from the crud increases with time from initial plant startup and typically levels off after 4 to 6 cycles of plant operation. Thereafter, significant personnel radiation exposure may be incurred whenever major maintenance is performed. Personnel exposure is highest during refueling outages when routine maintenance on major plant components, such as steam generators and reactor coolant pumps, is performed. Administrative controls are established at nuclear plants to minimize the exposure incurred by an individual and the plant workers as a whole.

  7. The installation welding of pressure water reactor coolant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Feng

    2010-01-01

    Large pressure water reactor nuclear power plants are constructing in our country. There are three symmetry standard loops in reactor coolant system. Each loop possesses a steam generator and a primary poop, in which one of the loops is equipped with a pressurizer. These components are connected with reactor pressure vessel by installation welding of the coolant piping. The integrity of reactor coolant pressure boundary is the second barrier to protect the radioactive substance from release to outside, so the safe operation of nuclear power plant is closely related to the quality of coolant piping installation welding. The heavy tube with super low carbon content austenitic stainless steel is selected for coolant piping. This kind of material has good welding behavior, but the poor thermal conductivity, the big liner expansion coefficient and the big welding deformation will cause bigger welding stress. To reduce the welding deformation, to control the dimension precision, to reduce the residual stress and to ensure the welding quality the installation sequence should be properly designed and the welding technology should be properly controlled. (authors)

  8. Analysis of accidental loss of pool coolant due to leakage in a PWR SFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yapei; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui; Qiu, Suizheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Accidental loss of pool coolant due to leakage in a PWR SFP was studied using MAAP5. • The effect of emergency ventilation on the accident progression was investigated. • The effect of emergency injection on the accident progression was discussed. - Abstract: A large loss of pool coolant/water accident may be caused by extreme accidents such as the pool wall or bottom floor punctures due to a large aircraft strike. The safety of SFP under this circumstance is very important. Large amounts of radioactive materials would be easily released into the environment if a severe accident happened in the SFP, because the spent fuel pool (SFP) in a PWR nuclear power station (NPS) is often located in the fuel handing building outside the reactor containment. To gain insight into the loss of pool coolant accident progression for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) SFP, a computational model was established by using the Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP5). Important factors such as Zr oxidation by air, air natural circulation and thermal radiation were considered for partial and complete drainage accidents without mitigation measures. The calculation indicated that even if the residual water level was in the active fuel region, there was a chance to effectively remove the decay heat through axial heat conduction (if the pool cooling system failed) or steam cooling (if the pool cooling system was working). For sensitivity study, the effects of emergency ventilation and water injection on the accident progression were analyzed. The analysis showed that for the current configuration of high-density storage racks, it was difficult to cool the spent fuels by air natural circulation. Enlarging the space between the adjacent assemblies was a way of increasing air natural circulation flow rate and maintaining the coolability of SFP. Water injection to the bottom of the SFP helped to recover water inventory, quenching the high temperature assemblies to prevent

  9. Simulation of coolant mixing in pressure vessel reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehne, T.

    2003-06-01

    The work was aimed at the experimental investigation and numerical simulation of coolant mixing in the downcomer and the lower plenum of PWRs. Generally, the coolant mixing is of relevance for two classes of accident scenarios - boron dilution and cold water transients. For the investigation of the relevant mixing phenomena, the Rossendorf test facility ROCOM has been designed. ROCOM is a 1:5 scaled Plexiglas trademark model of the PWR Konvoi allowing conductivity measurements by wire mesh sensors and velocity measurements by the LDA technique. The CFD calculations were carried out with the CFD-code CFX-4. For the design of the facility, calculations were performed to analyze the scaling of the model. It was found, that the scaling of 1:5 to the prototype meets both: physical and economical demands. Flow measurements and the corresponding CFD calculations in the ROCOM downcomer under steady state conditions showed a Re number independency at nominal flow rates. The flow field is dominated by recirculation areas below the inlet nozzles. Transient flow measurements with high performance LDA-technique showed in agreement with CFX-4 results, that in the case of the start up of a pump after a laminar stage large vortices dominate the flow. In the case of stationary mixing, the maximum value of the averaged mixing scalar at the core inlet was found in the sector below the inlet nozzle, where the tracer was injected. At the start-up case of one pump due to a strong impulse driven flow at the inlet nozzle the horizontal part of the flow dominates in the downcomer. The injection is distributed into two main jets, the maximum of the tracer concentration at the core inlet appears at the opposite part of the loop where the tracer was injected. Additionally, the stationary three-dimensional flow distribution in the downcomer and the lower plenum of a VVER-440/V-230 reactor was calculated with CFX-4. The comparison with experimental data and an analytical mixing model showed a

  10. Natural gas quality for the future. Part 1. Technical/economical inventory of consequences of natural gas quality variations for final consumers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levinsky, H.B.; Van Rij, M.L.D.

    2011-01-01

    By request of various market parties (suppliers and users of natural gas), the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation (ELI) took a leading role in anticipating the future changes in gas quality. ELI requested an inventory of the consequences of variations in natural gas quality for end users. [nl

  11. Natural environments, ancestral diets, and microbial ecology: is there a modern "paleo-deficit disorder"? Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Alan C; Katzman, Martin A; Balanzá-Martínez, Vicent

    2015-03-10

    Famed microbiologist René J. Dubos (1901-1982) was an early pioneer in the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) construct. In the 1960s, he conducted groundbreaking research concerning the ways in which early-life experience with nutrition, microbiota, stress, and other environmental variables could influence later-life health outcomes. He recognized the co-evolutionary relationship between microbiota and the human host. Almost 2 decades before the hygiene hypothesis, he suggested that children in developed nations were becoming too sanitized (vs. our ancestral past) and that scientists should determine whether the childhood environment should be "dirtied up in a controlled manner." He also argued that oft-celebrated growth chart increases via changes in the global food supply and dietary patterns should not be equated to quality of life and mental health. Here in the second part of our review, we reflect the words of Dubos off contemporary research findings in the areas of diet, the gut-brain-axis (microbiota and anxiety and depression) and microbial ecology. Finally, we argue, as Dubos did 40 years ago, that researchers should more closely examine the relevancy of silo-sequestered, reductionist findings in the larger picture of human quality of life. In the context of global climate change and the epidemiological transition, an allergy epidemic and psychosocial stress, our review suggests that discussions of natural environments, urbanization, biodiversity, microbiota, nutrition, and mental health, are often one in the same.

  12. Thermodynamic analyses of hydrogen production from sub-quality natural gas. Part II: Steam reforming and autothermal steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali

    Part I of this paper analyzed sub-quality natural gas (SQNG) pyrolysis and autothermal pyrolysis. Production of hydrogen via direct thermolysis of SQNGs produces only 2 mol of hydrogen and 1 mol of carbon per mole of methane (CH 4). Steam reforming of SQNG (SRSQNG) could become a more effective approach because the processes produce two more moles of hydrogen via water splitting. A Gibbs reactor unit operation in the AspenPlus™ chemical process simulator was employed to accomplish equilibrium calculations for the SQNG + H 2O and SQNG + H 2O + O 2 systems. The results indicate that water and oxygen inlet flow rates do not significantly affect the decomposition of hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) at temperatures lower than 1000 °C. The major co-product of the processes is carbonyl sulfide (COS) while sulfur dimer (S 2) and carbon disulfide (CS 2) are minor by-products within this temperature range. At higher temperatures (>1300 °C), CS 2 and S 2 become major co-products. No sulfur dioxide (SO 2) or sulfur trioxide (SO 3) is formed during either SRSQNG or autothermal SRSQNG processes, indicating that no environmentally harmful acidic gases are generated.

  13. Using hydrogeology to identify the source of groundwater to Montezuma Well, a natural spring in central Arizona: part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond H.; DeWitt, Ed H.; Arnold, L. Rick

    2012-01-01

    Montezuma Well is a natural spring located within a “sinkhole” in the desert environment of the Verde Valley in Central Arizona. It is managed by the National Park Service as part of Montezuma Castle National Monument. Because of increasing development of groundwater in the area, this research was undertaken to better understand the sources of groundwater to Montezuma Well. The use of well logs and geophysics provides details on the geology in the area around Montezuma Well. This includes characterizing the extent and position of a basalt dike that intruded a deep fracture zone. This low permeability barrier forces groundwater to the surface at the Montezuma Well “pool” with sufficient velocity to entrain sand-sized particles from underlying bedrock. Permeable fractures along and above the basalt dike provide conduits that carry deep sourced carbon dioxide to the surface, which can dissolve carbonate minerals along the transport path in response to the added carbon dioxide. At the ground surface, CO2 degasses, depositing travertine. Geologic cross sections, rock geochemistry, and semi-quantitative groundwater flow modeling provide a hydrogeologic framework that indicates groundwater flow through a karstic limestone at depth (Redwall Limestone) as the most significant source of groundwater to Montezuma Well. Additional groundwater flow from the overlying formations (Verde Formation and Permian Sandstones) is a possibility, but significant flow from these units is not indicated.

  14. Failures of the thermal barriers of 900 MWe reactor coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrouty, P.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the anomalies encountered in the thermal barriers of the reactor coolant pumps in French 900 MWe PWR power stations. In addition to this specific problem, it demonstrates how the fortuitous discovery of a fault during a sampling test enables faults of a generic nature to be revealed in components which were not subject to periodic inspection, the failure of which could seriously affect safety. This example demonstrates the risk represented by deterioration in areas which are not examined periodically and for which there are no preceding signs which would make early detection of deterioration possible. (author)

  15. Failures of the thermal barriers of 900 MWe reactor coolant pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyrouty, P.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the anomalies encountered in the thermal barriers of the reactor coolant pumps in French 900 MWe PWR power stations. In addition to this specific problem, it demonstrates how the fortuitous discovery of a fault during a sampling test enabled faults of a generic nature to be revealed in components which were not subject to periodic inspection, the failure of which could seriously affect safety. This example demonstrates the risk which can be associated with the deterioration in areas which are not examined periodically and for which there are no preceding signs which would make early detection of deterioration possible.

  16. Failures of the thermal barriers of 900 MWe reactor coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyrouty, P.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the anomalies encountered in the thermal barriers of the reactor coolant pumps in French 900 MWe PWR power stations. In addition to this specific problem, it demonstrates how the fortuitous discovery of a fault during a sampling test enabled faults of a generic nature to be revealed in components which were not subject to periodic inspection, the failure of which could seriously affect safety. This example demonstrates the risk which can be associated with the deterioration in areas which are not examined periodically and for which there are no preceding signs which would make early detection of deterioration possible

  17. Influence of coolant motion on structure of hardened steel element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kulawik

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Presented paper is focused on volumetric hardening process using liquid low melting point metal as a coolant. Effect of convective motion of the coolant on material structure after hardening is investigated. Comparison with results obtained for model neglecting motion of liquid is executed. Mathematical and numerical model based on Finite Element Metod is described. Characteristic Based Split (CBS method is used to uncouple velocities and pressure and finally to solve Navier-Stokes equation. Petrov-Galerkin formulation is employed to stabilize convective term in heat transport equation. Phase transformations model is created on the basis of Johnson-Mehl and Avrami laws. Continuous cooling diagram (CTPc for C45 steel is exploited in presented model of phase transformations. Temporary temperatures, phases participation, thermal and structural strains in hardening element and coolant velocities are shown and discussed.

  18. Actively controlling coolant-cooled cold plate configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Parida, Pritish R.

    2015-07-28

    A method is provided to facilitate active control of thermal and fluid dynamic performance of a coolant-cooled cold plate. The method includes: monitoring a variable associated with at least one of the coolant-cooled cold plate or one or more electronic components being cooled by the cold plate; and dynamically varying, based on the monitored variable, a physical configuration of the cold plate. By dynamically varying the physical configuration, the thermal and fluid dynamic performance of the cold plate are adjusted to, for example, optimally cool the one or more electronic components, and at the same time, reduce cooling power consumption used in cooling the electronic component(s). The physical configuration can be adjusted by providing one or more adjustable plates within the coolant-cooled cold plate, the positioning of which may be adjusted based on the monitored variable.

  19. Sloshing of coolant in a seismically isolated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.S.; Guildys, J.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    During a seismic event, the liquid coolant inside the reactor vessel has sloshing motion which is a low-frequency phenomenon. In a reactor system incorporated with seismic isolation, the isolation frequency usually is also very low. There is concern on the potential amplification of sloshing motion of the liquid coolant. This study investigates the effects of seismic isolation on the sloshing of liquid coolant inside the reactor vessel of a liquid metal cooled reactor. Based on a synthetic ground motion whose response spectra envelop those specified by the NRC Regulator Guide 1.60, it is found that the maximum sloshing wave height increases from 18 in. to almost 30 in. when the system is seismically isolated. Since higher sloshing wave may introduce severe impact forces and thermal shocks to the reactor closure and other components within the reactor vessel, adequate design considerations should be made either to suppress the wave height or to reduce the effects caused by high waves

  20. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, T.; Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y.

    1997-01-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years

  1. Design and development of remotely operated coolant channel cutting machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suthar, R.L.; Sinha, A.K.; Srikrishnamurty, G.

    1994-01-01

    One of the coolant tubes of Narora Atomic Power Station (NAPS) reactor needs to be removed. To remove a coolant tube, four cutting operations, (liner tube cutting, end-fitting cutting, machining of seal weld of bellow ring and finally coolant tube cutting) are required to be carried out. A remotely operated cutting machine to carry out all these operations has been designed and developed by Central Workshops. This machine is able to cut at the exact location because of numerically controlled axial and radial travel of tool. Only by changing the tool head and tool holder, same machine can be used for various types of cutting/machining operations. This report details the design, manufacture, assembly and testing work done on the machine. (author). 4 figs

  2. Radioactivity analysis of KAMINI reactor coolant from regulatory perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, T.K.; Sulthan, Bajeer; Sarangapani, R.; Jose, M.T.; Venkatraman, B.; Thilagam, L.

    2016-01-01

    KAMINI (a 30kWt) research reactor is operated for neutron radiography of fuel subassemblies and pyro devices and activation analysis of various samples. The reactor is fueled by 233 U and DM water is used as the coolant. During reactor operation, fission product noble gasses (FPNGs) such as 85m Kr, 87 Kr, 88 Kr, 135 Xe, 135m Xe and 138 Xe are detected in the coolant water. In order to detect clad failure, the water is sampled during reactor operation at regular intervals as per the technical specifications. In the present work, analysis of measured activities in coolant samples collected during reactor operation at 25 kWt are presented and compared with computed values obtained using ORIGEN (Isotope Generation) code

  3. Method of eliminating cruds in the primary coolants of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Takaaki.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate cruds in the primary coolants by using rind of onions or peanuts. Method: Since cruds contained in the reactor primary coolants increase the radioactive exposure to reactor operators, they have been intended to remove by ion exchange resins. In this invention, rind of onions or peanuts are crushed into an adequate particle size and packed into an absorption column instead of ion exchange resins into which primary coolants are circulated. The powderous onions or peanuts rind contain glucoside such as cosmosiin and has an effect of cationic exchanger, they satisfactorily catch heavy metals such as Fe and Cu. They have an excellent filtering effect even under a high pH condition and are excellent in economical point of view. They can be decrease the volume of the absorption column, reduce their devolume after use through corrosion and easily subjected to waste procession through oxidizing combustion in liquid. (Nakamoto, H.)

  4. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T. [Kansai Electric Power Company, Osaka (Japan); Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1997-04-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years.

  5. Coolant circuit water chemistry of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilky, Peter; Doma, Arpad

    1985-01-01

    The numerous advantages of the proper selection of water chemistry parameters including low corrosion rate of the structural materials, hence the low-level activity build-up, depositions, radiation doses were emphasized. Major characteristics of water chemistry applied to the primary coolant of pressurized water reactors including neutral, slightly basic and strong basic ones are discussed. Boric acid is widely used to control reactivity. Primary coolant water chemistry of WWER type reactors which is based on the addition of ammonia and potassium hydroxide to boric acid is compared with that of other reactors. The demineralization of the total condensate of the steam turbines became a general trend in the water chemistry of the secondary coolant circuits. (V.N.)

  6. LOFT advanced densitometer for nuclear loss-of-coolant experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.O.; Lassahn, G.D.; Wood, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    A ''nuclear hardened'' gamma densitometer, a device which uses radiation attenuation to measure fluid density in the presence of a background radiation field, is described. Data from the nuclear hardened gamma densitometer are acquired by time sampling the coolant fluid piping and fluid attenuated source energy spectrum. The data are used to calculate transient coolant fluid cross sectional average density to analyze transient mass flow and other thermal-hydraulic characteristics during the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) loss-of-coolant experiments. The nuclear hardened gamma densitometer uses a pulse height analysis or energy discrimination, pulse counting technique which makes separation of the gamma radiation source signal from the reactor generated gamma radiation background noise signal possible by processing discrete pulses which retain their pulse amplitude information

  7. The KULTURisk Regional Risk Assessment methodology for water-related natural hazards - Part 1: Physical-environmental assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, P.; Gallina, V.; Torresan, S.; Zabeo, A.; Semenzin, E.; Critto, A.; Marcomini, A.

    2014-07-01

    KR-RRA methodology is based on the concept of risk being function of hazard, exposure and vulnerability. It integrates the outputs of various hydrodynamics models (hazard) with sito-specific bio-geophysical and socio-economic indicators (e.g. slope, land cover, population density, economic activities) to develop tailored risk indexes and GIS-based maps for each of the selected targets (i.e. people, buildings, infrastructures, agriculture, natural and semi-natural systems, cultural heritages) in the considered region, by comparing the baseline scenario with alternative scenarios, where different structural and/or non-structural mitigation measures are planned. As demonstrated in the companion paper (Part 2, Ronco et al., 2014), risk maps, along with related statistics, allow to identify and prioritize relative hotspots and targets which are more likely to be affected by flood and support the development of relevant and strategic adaptation and prevention measures to minimizing flood impacts. Moreover, the outputs of the RRA methodology can be used for the economic evaluation of different damages (e.g. tangible costs, intangible costs) and for the social assessment considering the benefits of the human dimension of vulnerability (i.e. adaptive and coping capacity).

  8. On line monitoring of temperatures of coolant channels by thermal imaging in a laboratory set-up fabricated for the detection of leakage of coolants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, S; Ghosh, J K [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Radiometallurgy Div.; Patel, R J [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Refuelling Technology Division

    1994-12-31

    Leakage from coolant channels in Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) increases the temperatures of the faulty channels. Measurement of temperatures of the coolant channels is, therefore, one way to detect the leaking channel. Thermal imaging technique offers a unique means for this detection providing a fast, non-contact, on-line measurement. An experiment was carried out for the detection of leakage of coolants through the seal plugs of the coolant channels in PHWR using an experimental setup under the simulated conditions of temperature and pressure of the coolant channels inside the reactor and using an infrared imaging system. The experimental details and the observations have been presented. 7 figs.

  9. On line monitoring of temperatures of coolant channels by thermal imaging in a laboratory set-up fabricated for the detection of leakage of coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.; Ghosh, J.K.; Patel, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Leakage from coolant channels in Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) increases the temperatures of the faulty channels. Measurement of temperatures of the coolant channels is, therefore, one way to detect the leaking channel. Thermal imaging technique offers a unique means for this detection providing a fast, non-contact, on-line measurement. An experiment was carried out for the detection of leakage of coolants through the seal plugs of the coolant channels in PHWR using an experimental setup under the simulated conditions of temperature and pressure of the coolant channels inside the reactor and using an infrared imaging system. The experimental details and the observations have been presented. 7 figs

  10. Analysis of a small break loss-of-coolant accident of pressurized water reactor by APROS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Falahi, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland); Haennine, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Porkholm, K. [IVO International, Ltd., Vantaa (Finland)

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the capability of APROS (Advanced PROcess Simulator) code to simulate the real plant thermal-hydraulic transient of a Small Break Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (SBLOCA) of Loss-Of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The LOFT is a scaled model of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). This work is a part of a larger validation of the APROS thermal-hydraulic models. The results of SBLOCA transient calculated by APROS showed a reasonable agreement with the measured data.

  11. Integrated Fuel-Coolant Interaction (IFCI 6.0) code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, F.J.; Young, M.F.

    1994-04-01

    The integrated Fuel-Coolant interaction (IFCI) computer code is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) problem at large scale using a two-dimensional, four-field hydrodynamic framework and physically based models. IFCI will be capable of treating all major FCI processes in an integrated manner. This document is a product of the effort to generate a stand-alone version of IFCI, IFCI 6.0. The User's Manual describes in detail the hydrodynamic method and physical models used in IFCI 6.0. Appendix A is an input manual, provided for the creation of working decks

  12. Effects of different rod spacers (helical types) on coolant crossmixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, A.V.; Sviridenko, E.Ya.; Matyukhin, N.M.; Rymkevich, K.S.; Ushakov, P.A.

    1981-11-01

    The results of investigations (electromagnetic measuring method) on coolant cross mixing in rod clusters with spiral wire spacers with different winding directions, with alternating unfinned and finned rods (case 'fin to rod'), as well as in rod clusters with much space between the rods, (case 'fin to fin') are reported. The local fluid dynamics parameters (distribution of the transversal and longitudinal velocity component) that define the physical processes of the coolant exchange in the rod clusters with helical spacers are explained. The investigation results for different helical spacer types are compared with each other. (orig.) [de

  13. The 1994 loss of coolant incident at Pickering NGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlebois, P R; Clarke, T R; Goodman, R M; McEwan, W F [Ontario Hydro, Pickering, ON (Canada). Pickering Generating Station; Cuttler, J M [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    Fracture of the rubber diaphragm in a liquid relief valve initiated events leading to a loss of coolant in Unit 2, on December 10. The valve failed open, filling the bleed condenser. The reactor shut itself down. When pressure recovered, two spring-loaded safety relief valves opened and one of them chattered. The shock and pulsations cracked the inlet pipe to the chattering valve, and the subsequent loss of coolant triggered the emergency core cooling system. The incident was terminated by operator action. No abnormal radioactivity was released. The four reactor units of Pickering A remained shut down until the corrective actions were completed in April/May 1995. (author). 4 figs.

  14. Knock-limited performance of several internal coolants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellman, Donald R; Evvard, John C

    1945-01-01

    The effect of internal cooling on the knock-limited performance of an-f-28 fuel was investigated in a CFR engine, and the following internal coolants were used: (1) water, (2), methyl alcohol-water mixture, (3) ammonia-methyl alcohol-water mixture, (4) monomethylamine-water mixture, (5) dimethylamine-water mixture, and (6) trimethylamine-water mixture. Tests were run at inlet-air temperatures of 150 degrees and 250 degrees F. to indicate the temperature sensitivity of the internal-coolant solutions.

  15. Impedance calculations for power cables to primary coolant pump motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegerhorst, K.B.

    1977-01-01

    The LOFT primary system motor generator sets are located in Room B-239 and are connected to the primary coolant pumps by means of a power cable. The calculated average impedance of this cable is 0.005323 ohms per unit resistance and 0.006025 ohms per unit reactance based on 369.6 kVA and 480 volts. The report was written to show the development of power cable parameters that are to be used in the SICLOPS (Simulation of LOFT Reactor Coolant Loop Pumping System) digital computer program as written in LTR 1142-16 and also used in the pump coastdowns for the FSAR Analysis

  16. Steam generator for a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, H.J.; Berger, W.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a steam generator which has a vertical cylindrical housing having a steam output outlet, a horizontal tube sheet closing the lower end of this housing, and an inverted U-shaped tube bundle inside of the housing and having vertical inlet and outlet legs with their ends mounted in the tube sheet. Beneath the tube sheet there are inlet and outlet manifolds for the respective ends of the tube bundle so that pressurized-water coolant from a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor can be circulated through the tube bundle

  17. Probabilistic analyses of failure in reactor coolant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    LLNL is performing probabilistic reliability analyses of PWR and BWR reactor coolant piping for the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Specifically, LLNL is estimating the probability of a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) in the reactor coolant loop piping in PWR plants, and in the main stream, feedwater, and recirculation piping of BWR plants. In estimating the probability of DEGB, LLNL considers two causes of pipe break: pipe fracture due to the growth of cracks at welded joints (direct DEGB), and pipe rupture indirectly caused by the seismically-induced failure of critical supports or equipment (indirect DEGB)

  18. Sensitivity calculation of the coolant temperature regarding the thermohydraulic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade Lima, F.R. de; Silva, F.C. da; Thome Filho, Z.D.; Alvim, A.C.M.; Oliveira Barroso, A.C. de.

    1985-01-01

    It's studied the application of the Generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) in the sensitivity calculation of thermalhydraulic problems, aiming at verifying the viability of the extension of the method. For this, the axial distribution, transient, of the coolant temperature in a PWR channel are considered. Perturbation expressions are developed using the GPT formalism, and a computer code (Tempera) is written, to calculate the channel temperature distribution and the associated importance function, as well as the effect of the thermalhydraulic parameters variations in the coolant temperature (sensitivity calculation). The results are compared with those from the direct calculation. (E.G.) [pt

  19. Control rod drive mechanism stator loss of coolant test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besel, L.; Ibatuan, R.

    1977-04-01

    This report documents the stator loss of coolant test conducted at HEDL on the lead unit Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) in February, 1977. The purpose of the test was to demonstrate scram capability of the CRDM with an uncooled stator and to obtain a time versus temperature curve of an uncooled stator under power. Brief descriptions of the test, hardware used, and results obtained are presented in the report. The test demonstrated that the CRDM could be successfully scrammed with no anomalies in both the two-phase and three-phase stator winding hold conditions after the respective equilibrium stator temperatures had been obtained with no stator coolant

  20. Compensation of equipment housing elements of reactor units with heavy liquid metal coolant vessel temperature deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedevich, V.; Ahmetshin, M.; Mendes, D.; Kaveshnikov, S.; Vinogradov, A.

    2015-01-01

    In Russia a lot of different versions of fast reactors (FRs) are investigated and one of these is FR cooled by liquid lead and liquid lead-bismuth alloy. In this poster we are interested by FR with concrete vessel; its components are placed in cavities inside the vessel, and connected by a channel system. During the installation the equipment components are placed in several equipment housings. Between these housings there are cavities with coolant. The alignment of the housings should be provided. It can be broken by irregular concrete vessel heating during FR starting or other transition regimes. Our goal is to suggest a list of designing steps to compensate temperature deformations of equipment housing elements. A simplified model of equipment housing was suggested. It consists of two cylinders - tunnels in the concrete vessel, separated by a cavity filled by coolant and inert gas. The bottom part was considered as heated to 420 C. degrees while in the top part temperature decreased to 45 C. degrees (on the concrete surface). According to this data, results show that temperature gradient leads to a concrete layer dislocation of about 12.5 mm, which can lead to damage and breaking alignment. We propose the following solution to compensate for temperature deformation: -) to chisel out part of the upper top of the insulating concrete; -) to install an adequate misalignment of equipment housing elements preliminary; and -) to use a torsion system like a piston-type device for providing additional strength in order to compensate deformation and vibrations

  1. Improving performance of natural language processing part-of-speech tagging on clinical narratives through domain adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Jeffrey P; Daumé, Hal; Duvall, Scott L; Chapman, Wendy W; Harkema, Henk; Haug, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) tasks are commonly decomposed into subtasks, chained together to form processing pipelines. The residual error produced in these subtasks propagates, adversely affecting the end objectives. Limited availability of annotated clinical data remains a barrier to reaching state-of-the-art operating characteristics using statistically based NLP tools in the clinical domain. Here we explore the unique linguistic constructions of clinical texts and demonstrate the loss in operating characteristics when out-of-the-box part-of-speech (POS) tagging tools are applied to the clinical domain. We test a domain adaptation approach integrating a novel lexical-generation probability rule used in a transformation-based learner to boost POS performance on clinical narratives. Two target corpora from independent healthcare institutions were constructed from high frequency clinical narratives. Four leading POS taggers with their out-of-the-box models trained from general English and biomedical abstracts were evaluated against these clinical corpora. A high performing domain adaptation method, Easy Adapt, was compared to our newly proposed method ClinAdapt. The evaluated POS taggers drop in accuracy by 8.5-15% when tested on clinical narratives. The highest performing tagger reports an accuracy of 88.6%. Domain adaptation with Easy Adapt reports accuracies of 88.3-91.0% on clinical texts. ClinAdapt reports 93.2-93.9%. ClinAdapt successfully boosts POS tagging performance through domain adaptation requiring a modest amount of annotated clinical data. Improving the performance of critical NLP subtasks is expected to reduce pipeline error propagation leading to better overall results on complex processing tasks.

  2. Defensive strategies in Geranium sylvaticum, Part 2: Roles of water-soluble tannins, flavonoids and phenolic acids against natural enemies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuominen, Anu

    2013-11-01

    Geranium sylvaticum is a common herbaceous plant in Fennoscandia, which has a unique phenolic composition. Ellagitannins, proanthocyanidins, galloylglucoses, gallotannins, galloyl quinic acids and flavonoids possess variable distribution in its different organs. These phenolic compounds are thought to have an important role in plant-herbivore interactions. The aim of this study was to quantify these different water-soluble phenolic compounds and measure the biological activity of the eight organs of G. sylvaticum. Compounds were characterized and quantified using HPLC-DAD/MS, in addition, total proanthocyanidins were determined by BuOH-HCl assay and total phenolics by the Folin-Ciocalteau method. Two in vitro biological activity measurements were used: the prooxidant activity was measured by the browning assay and antioxidant activity by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay. Organ extracts were fractionated using column chromatography on Sephadex LH-20 and the activities of fractions was similarly measured to evaluate which polyphenol groups contributed the most to the biological activity of each organ. The data on the activity of fractions were examined by multivariate data analysis. The water-soluble extracts of leaves and pistils, which contained over 30% of the dry weight as ellagitannins, showed the highest pro-oxidant activity among the organ extracts. Fraction analysis revealed that flavonoids and galloyl quinic acids also exhibited high pro-oxidant activity. In contrast, the most antioxidant active organ extracts were those of the main roots and hairy roots that contained high amounts of proanthocyanidins in addition to ellagitannins. Analysis of the fractions showed that especially ellagitannins and galloyl quinic acids have high antioxidant activity. We conclude that G. sylvaticum allocates a significant amount of tannins in those plant parts that are important to the fitness of the plant and susceptible to natural enemies, i

  3. Enriched boric acid as an optimized neutron absorber in the EPR primary coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosse, Christelle; Jolivel, Fabienne; Berger, Martial

    2012-09-01

    This paper focuses on one of the most important EPR PWR reactor design optimizations, through primary coolant conditioning by enriched boric acid (EBA). On PWRs throughout the world, boric acid has already been implemented in primary coolant and associated auxiliary systems for criticality control, due to its high Boron 10 neutron absorption cross section. Boric acid also allows primary coolant pH 300C control in combination with lithium hydroxide in many PWRs. The boric acid employed in the majority of existing PWRs is the 'natural' one, with a typical isotopic atomic abundance in Boron 10 about 19.8 at.%. However, EPR requirements for neutron management are more important, due to its fully optimized design compared to older PWRs. From the boron point of view, it means that criticality could be controlled either by increased 'natural' Boron concentrations or by using EBA. Comparatively to 'natural' boric acid, EBA allows for: - the use of smaller storage volumes for an identical total Boron concentration, or lower total Boron concentration if the tank volumes are kept identical. The latter also reduces the risks of boric acid crystallization, in spite of increased neutron-absorbing properties - the application of an evolutionary chemistry operating regime called Advanced pH Control, making it possible to maintain a constant pH 300C value at 7.2 in the primary coolant at nominal conditions throughout entire cycles. This optimized stability of pH 300C will contribute to reduce the consequences of contamination of the reactor coolant system by corrosion products, and consequently, all related issues - the reduction of borated liquid wastes, thanks to maximal recycling resulting from EPR design. The increased design costs associated with EBA are consequently compensated by a reduced total consumption of this chemical. Therefore, the basic design choice for the EPR is the use of EBA. For the Flamanville 3 EPR, according to the above

  4. Coolant flow monitoring in a PWR core using noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostic, Lj.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental investigations of the neutron and temperature noise field have been performed in the 1350 MW PWR nuclear power plant. Evaluation in the low frequency range, where both feedback effects and different thermohydraulics phenomena are dominant, succeeded in measuring the coolant velocity. This is important for determination and localization of essential deviations and possible anomalies. (author)

  5. SMART core power control method by coolant temperature variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chung Chan; Cho, Byung Oh

    2001-08-01

    SMART is a soluble boron-free integral type pressurized water reactor. Its moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) is strongly negative throughout the cycle. The purpose of this report is how to utilize the primary coolant temperature as a second reactivity control system using the strong negative MTC. The reactivity components associated with reactor power change are Doppler reactivity due to fuel temperature change, moderator temperature reactivity and xenon reactivity. Doppler reactivity and moderator temperature reactivity take effects almost as soon as reactor power changes. On the other hand, xenon reactivity change takes more than several hours to reach an equilibrium state. Therefore, coolant temperature at equilibrium state is chosen as the reference temperature. The power dependent reference temperature line is limited above 50% power not to affect adversely in reactor safety. To compensate transient xenon reactivity, coolant temperature operating range is expanded. The suggested coolant temperature operation range requires minimum control rod motion for 50% power change. For smaller power changes such as 25% power change, it is not necessary to move control rods to assure that fuel design limits are not exceeded

  6. Nanofluid as coolant for grinding process: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananathan, J.; Samykano, M.; Sudhakar, K.; Subramaniam, S. R.; Selavamani, S. K.; Manoj Kumar, Nallapaneni; Keng, Ngui Wai; Kadirgama, K.; Hamzah, W. A. W.; Harun, W. S. W.

    2018-04-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress and applications of nanoparticles in lubricants as a coolant (cutting fluid) for grinding process. The role of grinding machining in manufacturing and the importance of lubrication fluids during material removal are discussed. In grinding process, coolants are used to improve the surface finish, wheel wear, flush the chips and to reduce the work-piece thermal deformation. The conventional cooling technique, i.e., flood cooling delivers a large amount of fluid and mist which hazardous to the environment and humans. Industries are actively looking for possible ways to reduce the volume of coolants used in metal removing operations due to the economical and ecological impacts. Thus as an alternative, an advanced cooling technique known as Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) has been introduced to the enhance the surface finish, minimize the cost, to reduce the environmental impacts and to reduce the metal cutting fluid consumptions. Nanofluid is a new-fangled class of fluids engineered by dispersing nanometre-size solid particles into base fluids such as water, lubrication oils to further improve the properties of the lubricant or coolant. In addition to advanced cooling technique review, this paper also reviews the application of various nanoparticles and their performance in grinding operations. The performance of nanoparticles related to the cutting forces, surface finish, tool wear, and temperature at the cutting zone are briefly reviewed. The study reveals that the excellent properties of the nanofluid can be beneficial in cooling and lubricating application in the manufacturing process.

  7. Numerical experimentation on convective coolant flow in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Numerical experiments on one dimensional convective coolant flow during steady state operation of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-I) were performed to determine the thermal hydraulic parameters of temperature, density and flow rate. The computational domain was the reactor vessel, including the reactor core.

  8. Reactor coolant and associated systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Safety Guide outlines the design requirements for the reactor coolant and associated systems (RCAS) and the features required in order to achieve their safety functions. It covers design considerations for various reactor types and encompasses the safety aspects of the functions of the RCAS both during normal operation and following postulated initiating events, and to some extent also for decommissioning

  9. Using the coolant temperature noise for measuring the flow rate in the RBMK technological channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selivanov, V.M.; Karlov, N.P.; Martynov, A.D.; Prostyakov, V.V.; Lysikov, B.V.; Kuznetsov, B.A.; Pallagi, D.; Khorani, Sh.; Khargitai, T.; Tezher, Sh.

    1983-01-01

    The problems are considered connected with the possibility of using thermometric correlation method to measure the coolant flow rate in the RBMK reactor technological channels. The main attention is paid to the study of the physical nature of the coolant temperature pulsations and to estimation of the effect of parameters of the primary thermaelectrical converter (TEC) on the results of measurements. In the process of reactor inspections made using the thermometric correlation flowmeter of a special design, the temperature noise distribution in the points of flow rate measurement is studied, the noise intensity and physical nature are determined, as well as the effect of different TEC parameters (TEC inertia and base distance between them) on the measurement accuracy. On the basis of the analysis of the effect on the results of the TEC thermal inertia measured value divergence, tausub(α) and transport time, tau sub(T), a conclusion is made on the necessity of choosing the base distance between TEC with tausub(T)>tausub(d)

  10. Coolant controls of a PEM fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jong-Woo; Choe, Song-Yul

    When operating the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack, temperatures in the stack continuously change as the load current varies. The temperature directly affects the rate of chemical reactions and transport of water and reactants. Elevated temperature increases the mobility of water vapor, which reduces the ohmic over-potential in the membrane and eases removal of water produced. Adversely, the high temperature might impose thermal stress on the membrane and cathode catalyst and cause degradation. Conversely, excessive supply of coolants lowers the temperature in the stack and reduces the rate of the chemical reactions and water activity. Corresponding parasitic power dissipated at the electrical coolant pump increases and overall efficiency of the power system drops. Therefore, proper design of a control for the coolant flow plays an important role in ensuring highly reliable and efficient operations of the fuel cell system. Herein, we propose a new temperature control strategy based on a thermal circuit. The proposed thermal circuit consists of a bypass valve, a radiator with a fan, a reservoir and a coolant pump, while a blower and inlet and outlet manifolds are components of the air supply system. Classic proportional and integral (PI) controllers and a state feedback control for the thermal circuit were used in the design. In addition, the heat source term, which is dependent upon the load current, was feed-forwarded to the closed loop and the temperature effects on the air flow rate were minimized. The dynamics and performance of the designed controllers were evaluated and analyzed by computer simulations using developed dynamic fuel cell system models, where a multi-step current and an experimental current profile measured at the federal urban driving schedule (FUDS) were applied. The results show that the proposed control strategy cannot only suppress a temperature rise in the catalyst layer and prevent oxygen starvation, but also reduce the

  11. Organic coolants and their applications to fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierszewski, P.; Hollies, B.

    1986-08-01

    Organic coolants offer a unique set of characteristics for fusion applications. Their advantages include high-temperature (670 K or 400 degrees C) but low-pressure (2 MPa) operation, limited reactivity with lithium and lithium-lead, reduced corrosion and activation, good heat-transfer capabilities, no magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects, and an operating temperature range that extends to room temperature. The major disadvantages are decomposition and flammability. However, organic coolants have been extensively studied in Canada, including nineteen years with an operating 60-MW organic-cooled reactor. Proper attention to design and coolant chemistry controlled these potential problems to acceptable levels. This experience provides an extensive data base for design under fusion conditions. The organic fluid characteristics are described in sufficient detail to allow fusion system designers to evaluate organic coolants for specific applications. To illustrate and assess the potential applications, analyses are presented for organic-cooled blankets, first walls, high heat flux components and thermal power cycles. Designs are identified that take advantage of organic coolant features, yet have fluid decomposition related costs that are a small fraction of the overall cost of electricity. For example, organic-cooled first walls make lithium/ferritic steel blankets possible in high-field, high-surface-heat-flux tokamaks, and organic-cooled limiters (up to about 8 MW/m 2 surface heating) are a safer alternative to water cooling for liquid metal blanket concept. Organics can also be used in intermediate heat exchanger loops to provide efficient heat transfer with low reactivity and a large tritium barrier. 55 refs

  12. Fuel-Coolant Interactions: Visualization and Mixing Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewen, Eric P.; Bonazza, Riccardo; Corradini, Michael L.; Johannesen, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic X-ray imaging of fuel-coolant interactions (FCI), including quantitative measurement of fuel-coolant volume fractions and length scales, has been accomplished with a novel imaging system at the Nuclear Safety Research Center at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The imaging system consists of visible-light high-speed digital video, low-energy X-ray digital imaging, and high-energy X-ray digital imaging subsystems. The data provide information concerning the melt jet velocity, melt jet configuration, melt volume fractions, void fractions, and spatial and temporal quantification of premixing length scales for a model fuel-coolant system of molten lead poured into a water pool (fuel temperatures 500 to 1000 K; jet diameters 10 to 30 mm; coolant temperatures 20 to 90 deg. C). Overall results indicate that the FCI has three general regions of behavior, with the high fuel-coolant temperature region similar to what might be expected under severe accident conditions. It was observed that the melt jet leading edge has the highest void fraction and readily fragments into discrete masses, which then subsequently subdivide into smaller masses of length scales <10 mm. The intact jet penetrates <3 to 5 jet length/jet diameter before this breakup occurs into discrete masses, which continue to subdivide. Hydrodynamic instabilities can be visually identified at the leading edge and along the jet column with an interfacial region that consists of melt, vapor, and water. This interface region was observed to grow in size as the water pool temperature was increased, indicating mixing enhancement by boiling processes

  13. Coolant voiding analysis following SGTR for an HLMC reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.; Spencer, B.W.; Sienicki, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Concepts are under development at Argonne National Laboratory for a small, modular, proliferation-resistant nuclear power steam supply system. Of primary interest here is the simplified system design, featuring steam generators that are directly immersed in the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant of the primary system. To support the safety case for this design approach, model development and analysis of transient coolant voiding during a postulated guillotine-type steam generator tube rupture event has been carried out. For the current design, the blowdown will occur from the steam generator shell into the ruptured 12.7-mm-inside-diameter tube through which the LBE coolant passes. The steam will expand biaxially in the tube, with a portion of the flow vented upward to eventually expand into the cover-gas region, while the balance of the flow is vented downward as a jet into the surrounding downward-flowing LBE. Coolant freezing is not an issue in this case because of high feedwater temperature in relation to the freezing point of the LBE. The specific objectives of the current work are to (a) determine the penetration behavior of the steam jet into the lower cold-leg region, (b) characterize the resultant void behavior in terms of coherent bubble versus breakup into a size distribution of small bubbles, and (c) characterize the motion of the bubbles with regard to rise to the cover-gas region (via the liner-to-coolant vessel gap) versus downward transport with the flowing LBE and subsequent upflow through the core to the cover-gas region

  14. "Piedra Dorada": a natural stone as an intrinsic part of two World Heritage Cities in Andalusia (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Rafael; Sánchez-Valverde, Josefina; Baltuille, José Manuel

    2013-04-01

    "Piedra Dorada" was used to construct some of the most important heritage buildings in the cities of Úbeda and Baeza, in Jaén (Spain). UNESCO declared these cities World Heritage Cities in 2003. Although there are some Iberian or Roman ruins in which is already possible to see the use of this stone, it is from the XVI century when "Piedra Dorada" is extensively used in the construction of the main historical buildings. Some of well-known monuments are Vázquez de Molina Palace or chain Palace (XVI), San Salvador Church (Sacred Chapel of El Salvador) (XVI) o the Royal Colegiata of Santa María la Mayor de los Reales Alcázares (XVI) in Úbeda or the Justice House-The House of the Corregidor (XVI), the Saint Cathedral of the Natividad de Nuestra Señora (XVI) or Jabalquinto Palace (XV), in Baeza, among many others. "Piedra Dorada" includes several varieties with similar mineralogical and chemical characteristics, called "Piedra Viva" or "Jabaluna", more cemented and used mainly with structural purposes (ashlars, columns, etc) and "Piedra Franca", less cemented and used mainly with decorative purposes (façades, statues, etc). From a geological point of view, "Piedra Dorada" is a medium to fine grain size bioclastic calcarenite, part of the upper Miocene-Pliocene deposits of the Guadalquivir Basin (Post Orogenic Neogene Basins of the Betic Chains). It is made up of quartz (8% to 29%), calcite and/or dolomite (34% to 80%), and some feldspar. The intergranular calcite cement proportion varies between 7% and 33%. Physical and mechanical properties are highly variable depending on the variety. "Piedra Viva" has an open porosity of 5,2%, bulk density of 2,63 g/cm3, water absorption at atmospheric pressure between 1,5-2,7 %, compressive strength (dry) between 20,1-18,0 MPa, flexural resistance (dry) between 87,3-77,0 MPa and salt crystallization loss of mass of 2,5%. "Piedra Franca" has an open porosity of 24,3%, bulk density of 2,00 g/cm3, water absorption at atmospheric

  15. Improvements of primary coolant shutdown chemistry and reactor coolant system cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudard, G.; Gilles, B.; Mesnage, F.; Cattant, F.

    2002-01-01

    In the framework of a radiation exposure management program entitled >, EDF aims at decreasing the mass dosimetry of nuclear power plants workers. So, the annual dose per unit, which has improved from 2.44 m.Sv in 1991 to 1.08 in 2000, should target 0.8 mSv in the year 2005 term in order to meet the results of the best nuclear operators. One of the guidelines for irradiation source term reduction is the optimization of operation parameters, including reactor coolant system (RCS) chemistry in operation, RCS shutdown chemistry and RCS cleanup improvement. This paper presents the EDF strategy for the shutdown and start up RCS chemistry optimization. All the shutdown modes have been reviewed and for each of them, the chemical specifications will be fine tuned. A survey of some US PWRs shutdown practices has been conducted for an acid and reducing shutdown chemistry implementation test at one EDF unit. This survey shows that deviating from the EPRI recommended practice for acid and reducing shutdown chemistry is possible and that critical path impact can be minimized. The paper also presents some investigations about soluble and insoluble species behavior and characterization; the study focuses here on 110m Ag, 122 Sb, 124 Sb and iodine contamination. Concerning RCS cleanup improvement, the paper presents two studies. The first one highlights some limited design modifications that are either underway or planned, for an increased flow rate during the most critical periods of the shutdown. The second one focuses on the strategy EDF envisions for filters and resins selection criteria. Matching the study on contaminants behavior with the study of filters and resins selection criteria should allow improving the cleanup efficiency. (authors)

  16. Experimental approach to investigate the dynamics of mixing coolant flow in complex geometry using PIV and PLIF techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutli Ezddin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate experimentally the increase of mixing phenomenon in a coolant flow in order to improve the heat transfer, the economical operation and the structural integrity of Light Water Reactors-Pressurized Water Reactors (LWRs-PWRs. Thus the parameters related to the heat transfer process in the system will be investigated. Data from a set of experiments, obtained by using high precision measurement techniques, Particle Image Velocimetry and Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PIV and PLIF, respectively are to improve the basic understanding of turbulent mixing phenomenon and to provide data for CFD code validation. The coolant mixing phenomenon in the head part of a fuel assembly which includes spacer grids has been investigated (the fuel simulator has half-length of a VVER 440 reactor fuel. The two-dimensional velocity vector and temperature fields in the area of interest are obtained by PIV and PLIF technique, respectively. The measurements of the turbulent flow in the regular tube channel around the thermocouple proved that there is rotation and asymmetry in the coolant flow caused by the mixing grid and the geometrical asymmetry of the fuel bundle. Both PIV and PLIF results showed that at the level of the core exit thermocouple the coolant is homogeneous. The discrepancies that could exist between the outlet average temperature of the coolant and the temperature at in-core thermocouple were clarified. Results of the applied techniques showed that both of them can be used as good provider for data base and to validate CFD results.

  17. Modular Porous Plate Sublimator /MPPS/ requires only water supply for coolant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbun, R. J.

    1966-01-01

    Modular porous plate sublimators, provided for each location where heat must be dissipated, conserve the battery power of a space vehicle by eliminating the coolant pump. The sublimator requires only a water supply for coolant.

  18. Performance investigation of an automotive car radiator operated with nanofluid-based coolants (nanofluid as a coolant in a radiator)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, K.Y.; Saidur, R.; Kazi, S.N.; Mamun, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    Water and ethylene glycol as conventional coolants have been widely used in an automotive car radiator for many years. These heat transfer fluids offer low thermal conductivity. With the advancement of nanotechnology, the new generation of heat transfer fluids called, 'nanofluids' have been developed and researchers found that these fluids offer higher thermal conductivity compared to that of conventional coolants. This study focused on the application of ethylene glycol based copper nanofluids in an automotive cooling system. Relevant input data, nanofluid properties and empirical correlations were obtained from literatures to investigate the heat transfer enhancement of an automotive car radiator operated with nanofluid-based coolants. It was observed that, overall heat transfer coefficient and heat transfer rate in engine cooling system increased with the usage of nanofluids (with ethylene glycol the basefluid) compared to ethylene glycol (i.e. basefluid) alone. It is observed that, about 3.8% of heat transfer enhancement could be achieved with the addition of 2% copper particles in a basefluid at the Reynolds number of 6000 and 5000 for air and coolant respectively. In addition, the reduction of air frontal area was estimated.

  19. Loss-of-coolant accident analysis of the Savannah River new production reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maloney, K.J.; Pryor, R.J.

    1990-11-01

    This document contains the loss-of-coolant accident analysis of the representative design for the Savannah River heavy water new production reactor. Included in this document are descriptions of the primary system, reactor vessel, and loss-of-coolant accident computer input models, the results of the cold leg and hot leg loss-of-coolant accident analyses, and the results of sensitivity calculations for the cold leg loss-of-coolant accident. 5 refs., 50 figs., 4 tabs

  20. A passively-safe fusion reactor blanket with helium coolant and steel structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosswait, Kenneth Mitchell [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Helium is attractive for use as a fusion blanket coolant for a number of reasons. It is neutronically and chemically inert, nonmagnetic, and will not change phase during any off-normal or accident condition. A significant disadvantage of helium, however, is its low density and volumetric heat capacity. This disadvantage manifests itself most clearly during undercooling accident conditions such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or a loss of flow accident (LOFA). This thesis describes a new helium-cooled tritium breeding blanket concept which performs significantly better during such accidents than current designs. The proposed blanket uses reduced-activation ferritic steel as a structural material and is designed for neutron wall loads exceeding 4 MW/m{sup 2}. The proposed geometry is based on the nested-shell concept developed by Wong, but some novel features are used to reduce the severity of the first wall temperature excursion. These features include the following: (1) A ``beryllium-joint`` concept is introduced, which allows solid beryllium slabs to be used as a thermal conduction path from the first wall to the cooler portions of the blanket. The joint concept allows for significant swelling of the beryllium (10 percent or more) without developing large stresses in the blanket structure. (2) Natural circulation of the coolant in the water-cooled shield is used to maintain shield temperatures below 100 degrees C, thus maintaining a heat sink close to the blanket during the accident. This ensures the long-term passive safety of the blanket.

  1. Coolant mixing in the LMFBR outlet plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.B.; Golay, M.W.

    1977-06-01

    Small scale experiments involving water flows are used to provide mean flow and turbulence field data for LMFBR outlet plenum flows. Measurements are performed at Reynolds Number (Re) values of 33000 and 70000 in a 1/15-scale FFTF geometry and at Re = 35000 in a 3/80-scale CRBR geometry. The experimental behavior is predicted using two different turbulence model computer programs, TEACH-T and VARR-II. It is found that the qualitative nature of the flow field within the plenum depends strongly upon the distribution of the mean inlet velocity field, upon the degree of inlet turbulence, and upon the turbulence momentum exchange model used in the calculations. It is found in the FFTF geometry that the TEACH-T predictions are better than that of VARR-II, and in the CRBR geometry neither code provides a good prediction of the observed behavior. From the sensitivity analysis, it is found that the production and dissipation of turbulence are the dominant terms in the transport equations for turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent energy dissipation rate, and the diffusion terms are relatively small. From the same study a new set of empirical constants for the turbulence model is evolved for the prediction of plenum flows

  2. Coolant cleanup system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Atsushi; Usui, Naoshi; Yamamoto, Michiyoshi; Osumi, Katsumi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the electric conductivity of reactor water lower and to minimize the heat loss in the cleanup system by providing a low temperature cleanup system and a high temperature cleanup system together. Constitution: A low temperature cleanup system using ion exchange resins as filter aids and a high temperature cleanup system using inorganic ion exchange materials as filter aids are provided in combination. A part of the reactor water in a reactor pressure vessel is passed through a conductivity meter, one portion of which flows into the high temperature cleanup system having no heat exchanger and filled with inorganic ion exchange materials by way of a first flow rate control valve and the other portion of which flows into the low temperature cleanup system having heat exchangers and filled with the ion exchange materials by way of a second control valve. The first control valve is adjusted so as to flow, for example, about more than 15% of the feedwater flow rate to the high temperature cleanup system and the second control valve is adjusted with its valve opening degree depending on the indication of the conductivity meter so as to flow about 2 - 7 % of the feedwater flow rate into the low temperature cleanup system, to thereby control the electric conductivity to between 0.055 - 0.3 μS/cm. (Moriyama, K.)

  3. A comparative neutronic analysis of KALIMER breeder core using Na or Pb-Bi coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, J. W.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, Y. I.

    2000-01-01

    A comparative neutronic study has been conducted on KALIMER breeder core according to the replacement of sodium coolant by Pb-Bi coolant. Since the atomic weight of Pb and Bi is about 9 times heavier than that of Na, the energy loss by neutron colliding with Pb-Bi nucleus will be very small. Therefore, the reactor with Pb-Bi coolant will have a harder neutron spectrum than that with Na coolant. Consequently, the breeding ratio and burnup reactivity swing is expected to be enhanced. In addition, when Pb-Bi coolant is voided, a negative coolant void coefficient can be obtained by the net effects of smaller spectrum hardening and large neutron leakage. As a result, the breeding ratio was increased from 1.18 to 1.23 and burnup reactivity swing was reduced from 631 pcm to 150 pcm. When the coolant in the whole region of active core is voided, the coolant void coefficient was found to be -539 and -264 pcm at BOEC and EOEC, respectively. In the local voided case, the smaller coolant void coefficient was obtained than that of Na coolant. Accordingly, the use of Pb-Bi coolant in KALIMER gives an advantage of higher breeding ratio, smaller burnup reactivity swing and negative coolant void coefficient without any significant degradation of nuclear performance

  4. Method and apparatus for suppressing water-solid overpressurization of coolant in nuclear reactor power apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aanstad, O.J.; Sklencar, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    A reactor-coolant relief valve is opened for increase in mass influx if the rate of change of coolant pressure exceeds a setpoint during a predetermined interval, if, during this interval, the coolant temperature is less than a setpoint and if the level of the fluid in the pressurizer is above a predetermined setpoint (water-solid state). (author)

  5. Development of small, fast reactor core designs using lead-based coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahalan, J. E.; Hill, R. N.; Khalil, H. S.; Wade, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    A variety of small (100 MWe) fast reactor core designs are developed, these include compact configurations, long-lived (15-year fuel lifetime) cores, and derated, natural circulation designs. Trade studies are described which identify key core design issues for lead-based coolant systems. Performance parameters and reactivity feedback coefficients are compared for lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and sodium-cooled cores of consistent design. The results of these studies indicate that the superior neutron reflection capability of lead alloys reduces the enrichment and burnup swing compared to conventional sodium-cooled systems; however, the discharge fluence is significantly increased. The size requirement for long-lived systems is constrained by reactivity loss considerations, not fuel burnup or fluence limits. The derated lead-alloy cooled natural circulation cores require a core volume roughly eight times greater than conventional compact systems. In general, reactivity coefficients important for passive safety performance are less favorable for the larger, derated configurations

  6. Experiments on natural circulation during PWR severe accidents and their analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.; Stewart, W.A.; Sha, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Buoyancy-induced natural circulation flows will occur during the early-part of PWR high pressure accident scenarios. These flows affect several key parameters; in particular, the course of such accidents will most probably change due to local failures occurring in the primary coolant system (CS) before substantial core degradation. Natural circulation flow patterns were measured in a one-seventh scale PWR PCS facility at Westinghouse RandD laboratories. The measured flow and temperature distributions are report in this paper. The experiments were analyzed with the COMMIX code and good agreement was obtained between data and calculations. 10 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  7. A Preliminary Study of Banana Stem Juice as a Plant-Based Coagulant for Treatment of Spent Coolant Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habsah Alwi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of banana stem juice as a natural coagulant for treatment of spent coolant wastewater was investigated . Three main parameters were studied, namely, chemical oxygen demand (COD, suspended solids (SSs, and turbidity of effluent. Coagulation experiments using jar test were performed with a flocculation system where the effects of spent coolant wastewater pH as well as banana stem juice dosage on coagulation effectiveness were examined. The highest recorded COD, SS, and turbidity removal percentages by banana stem juice were 80.1%, 88.6%, and 98.5%, respectively, observed for effluent at pH 7 using 90 mL dosage. The inulin concentration in the banana stem was examined to be 1.22016 mg/mL. It could be concluded that banana stem juice showed tremendous potential as a natural coagulant for water treatment purposes and could be applied in the pretreatment stage of Malaysian spent coolant wastewater prior to secondary treatment.

  8. Vision system for precision alignment of coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, S.; Rao, Y.V.; Valli Kumar; Joshi, D.G.; Chadda, V.K.; Nigam, R.K.; Kayal, J.N.; Panwar, S.; Sinha, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a vision system which has been developed for precision alignment of Coolant Channel Replacement Machine (CCRM) with respect to the front face of the coolant channel under repair/replacement. It has provisions for automatic as well as semi-automatic alignment. A special lighting scheme has been developed for providing illumination to the front face of the channel opening. This facilitates automatic segmentation of the digitized image. The segmented image is analysed to obtain the centre of the front face of the channel opening and thus the extent of misalignment i.e. offset of the camera with respect to the front face of the channel opening. The offset information is then communicated to the PLC to generate an output signal to drive the DC servo motors for precise positioning of the co-ordinate table. 2 refs., 5 figs

  9. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of nuclear reactor primary coolant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffell, B.F. Jr.; Macek, R.W.; Thompson, T.R.; Lippert, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    The ADINA computer code is utilized to perform mechanical response analysis of pressurized reactor primary coolant systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) loadings. Specifically, three plant analyses are performed utilizing the geometric and material nonlinear analysis capabilities of ADINA. Each reactor system finite element model represents the reactor vessel and internals, piping, major components, and component supports in a single coupled model. Material and geometric nonlinear capabilities of the beam and truss elements are employed in the formulation of each finite element model. Loadings applied to each plant for LOCA dynamic analysis include steady-state pressure, dead weight, strain energy release, transient piping hydraulic forces, and reactor vessel cavity pressurization. Representative results are presented with some suggestions for consideration in future ADINA code development

  10. N13 - based reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Marbaeck, L.; Sandell, S.; Svansson, L.

    1980-05-01

    A system for the monitoring of leakage of coolant from the reactor coolant pressure boundary and auxiliary systems to the reactor containment, based on the detection of the N13 content in the atmosphere, has been tested. N13 is produced from the oxyegen of the reactor water via the recoil photon nuclear process H1 + 016 + He4. The generation of N13 is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. In the US AEC regulatory guide 1.45 has a leakage increase of 4 liter/ min been suggested as the response limit. The experiments carried out in Ringhals indicate, that with the accomplishment of minor improvements in the installation, a 4 liter/min leakage to the containment will give rise to a signal with a random error range of +- 0.25 liter/min, 99.7 % confidence level. (author)

  11. Rapid thermal transient in a reactor coolant channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherubini, A.

    1986-01-01

    This report deals with the problem of one-dimensional thermo-fluid-dynamics in a reactor coolant channel, with the aim of determining the evolution in time of the coolant (H*L2O), in one-and/or two-phase regimes, subjected to a great and rapid increase in heat flux (accident conditions). To this aim, the following are set out: a) the physical model used; b) the equations inherent in the above model; c) the numerical methods employed to solve them by means of a computer programme called CABO (CAnale BOllente). Next a typical problem of rapid thermal transient resolved by CABO is reported. The results obtained, expressed in form of graphs, are fully discussed. Finally comments on possible developments of CABO follow

  12. Coolant Chemistry Control: Oxygen Mass Transport in Lead Bismuth Eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisenburger, A.; Mueller, G.; Bruzzese, C.; Glass, A.

    2015-01-01

    In lead-bismuth cooled transmutation systems, oxygen, dissolved in the coolant at defined quantities, is required for stable long-term operation by assuring the formation of protective oxide scales on structural steel surfaces. Extracted oxygen must be permanently delivered to the system and distributed in the entire core. Therefore, coolant chemistry control involves detailed knowledge on oxygen mass transport. Beside the different flow regimes a core might have stagnant areas at which oxygen delivery can only be realised by diffusion. The difference between oxygen transport in flow paths and in stagnant zones is one of the targets of such experiments. To investigate oxygen mass transport in flowing and stagnant conditions, a dedicated facility was designed based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD also was applied to define the position of oxygen sensors and ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry transducers for flow measurements. This contribution will present the test facility, design relevant CFD calculations and results of first tests performed. (authors)

  13. Health physics aspects of processing EBR-I coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, L.L.; Thalgott, J.O.; Poston, J.W. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The sodium-potassium reactor coolant removed from the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One after a partial reactor core meltdown had been stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory for 40 years. The State of Idaho considered this waste the most hazardous waste stored in the state and required its processing. The reactor coolant was processed in three phases. The first phase converted the alkali metal into a liquid sodium-potassium hydroxide. The second phase converted this caustic to a liquid sodium-potassium carbonate. The third phase solidified the sodium-potassium carbonate into a form acceptable for land disposal. Health physics aspects and dose received during each phase of the processing are discussed

  14. Qualification test of a main coolant pump for SMART pilot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Jin; Yoon, Eui Soo; Oh, Hyong Woo

    2006-01-01

    SMART Pilot is a multipurpose small capacity integral type reactor. Main Coolant Pump (MCP) of SMART Pilot is a canned-motor-type axial pump to circulate the primary coolant between nuclear fuel and steam generator in the primary system. The reactor is designed to operate under condition of 310 .deg. C and 14.7 MPa. Thus MCP has to be tested under same operating condition as reactor design condition to verify its performance and safety. In present work, a test apparatus to simulate real operating situations of the reactor has been designed and constructed to test MCP. And then functional tests, performance tests, and endurance tests have been carried out upon a prototype MCP. Canned motor characteristics, homologous head/torque curves, coast-down curves, NPSH curves and life-time performance variations were obtained from the qualification test as well as hydraulic performance characteristics of MCP

  15. Pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, H.; Schroder, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor steam generator having a vertical housing for the steam generating water and containing an upstanding heat exchanger to which the pressurized-water coolant passes and which is radially surrounded by a guide jacket supporting a water separator on its top. By thermosiphon action the steam generating water flows upward through and around the heat exchanger within the guide chamber to the latter's top from which it flows radially outwardly and downwardly through a down draft space formed between the outside of the jacket and the housing. The water separator discharges separated water downwardly. The housing has a feedwater inlet opening adjacent to the lower portion of the heat exchanger, providing preheating of the introduced feedwater. This preheated feedwater is conveyed by a duct upwardly to a location where it mixes with the water discharged from the water separator

  16. Device for preventing leakage of coolant in nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yukio; Sekiguchi, Mamoru; Yoshida, Hideo.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent leakage of coolant from between lower tie plate and channel box without causing deformation of the channel box and also without the possibility of disturbing the installation and removal of the box by the provision of a thin plate provided with leakage holes for the lower tie plate. Structure: Static water pressure within the lower tie plate is adapted to act upon the bear side of a flat plate for leakage prevention through leakage holes formed in the tie plate, thus urging the flat plate against the channel box inner surface. Meanwhile, static water pressure having been led through the leakage holes in the flat plate is adapted to press the flat plate in the vertical direction, thus urging the flat plate against the channel box inner surface and thereby preventing leakage of the coolant through a gap between the channel box and lower tie plate. (Yoshino, Y.)

  17. IEA-R1 renewed primary coolant piping system stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fainer, Gerson; Faloppa, Altair A.; Oliveira, Carlos A. de; Mattar Neto, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    A partial replacement of the IEA-R1 piping system was conducted in 2014. The aim of this work is to perform the stress analysis of the renewed primary piping system of the IEA-R1, taking into account the as built conditions and the pipe modifications. The nuclear research reactor IEA-R1 is a pool type reactor designed by Babcox-Willcox, which is operated by IPEN since 1957. The primary coolant system is responsible for removing the residual heat of the Reactor core. As a part of the life management, a regular inspection detected some degradation in the primary piping system. In consequence, part of the piping system was replaced. The partial renewing of the primary piping system did not imply in major piping layout modifications. However, the stress condition of the piping systems had to be reanalyzed. The structural stress analysis of the primary piping systems is now presented and the final results are discussed. (author)

  18. Calculation of coolant temperature sensitivity related to thermohydraulic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.C. da; Andrade Lima, F.R. de

    1985-01-01

    It is verified the viability to apply the generalized Perturbation Theory (GPT) in the calculation of sensitivity for thermal-hydraulic problems. It was developed the TEMPERA code in FORTRAN-IV to transient calculations in the axial temperature distribution in a channel of PWR reactor and the associated importance function, as well as effects of variations of thermalhydraulic parameters in the coolant temperature. The results are compared with one which were obtained by direct calculation. (M.C.K.) [pt

  19. Application of damage function analysis to reactor coolant circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, D.D.

    2002-01-01

    The application of deterministic models for simulating stress corrosion cracking phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor primary coolant circuits is described. The first generation code, DAMAGE-PREDICTOR, has been used to model the radiolysis of the coolant, to estimate the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), and to calculate the crack growth rate (CGR) at fixed state points during reactor operation in about a dozen plants worldwide. This code has been validated in ''double-blind'' comparisons between the calculated and measured hydrogen concentration, oxygen concentration, and ECP in the recirculation system of the Leibstadt BWR in Switzerland, as well as through less formal comparisons with data from other plants. Second generation codes have now been developed, including REMAIN for simulating BWRs with internal coolant pumps and the ALERT series for modeling reactors with external pumps. One of this series, ALERT, yields the integrated damage function (IDF), which is the crack length versus time, on a component-by-component basis for a specified future operating scenario. This code therefore allows one to explore proposed future operating protocols, with the objective of identifying those that are most cost-effective and which minimizes the risk of failure of components in the coolant circuit by stress corrosion cracking. The application of this code is illustrated by exploring the benefits of partial hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for an actual reactor, in which hydrogen is added to the feedwater over only limited periods during operation. The simulations show that the benefits, in terms of reduction in the IDFs for various components, are sensitive to when HWC was initiated in the plant life and to the length of time over which it is applied. (author)

  20. Application of damage function analysis to reactor coolant circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, D.D. [Center for Electrochemical Science and Technology, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The application of deterministic models for simulating stress corrosion cracking phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor primary coolant circuits is described. The first generation code, DAMAGE-PREDICTOR, has been used to model the radiolysis of the coolant, to estimate the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP), and to calculate the crack growth rate (CGR) at fixed state points during reactor operation in about a dozen plants worldwide. This code has been validated in ''double-blind'' comparisons between the calculated and measured hydrogen concentration, oxygen concentration, and ECP in the recirculation system of the Leibstadt BWR in Switzerland, as well as through less formal comparisons with data from other plants. Second generation codes have now been developed, including REMAIN for simulating BWRs with internal coolant pumps and the ALERT series for modeling reactors with external pumps. One of this series, ALERT, yields the integrated damage function (IDF), which is the crack length versus time, on a component-by-component basis for a specified future operating scenario. This code therefore allows one to explore proposed future operating protocols, with the objective of identifying those that are most cost-effective and which minimizes the risk of failure of components in the coolant circuit by stress corrosion cracking. The application of this code is illustrated by exploring the benefits of partial hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for an actual reactor, in which hydrogen is added to the feedwater over only limited periods during operation. The simulations show that the benefits, in terms of reduction in the IDFs for various components, are sensitive to when HWC was initiated in the plant life and to the length of time over which it is applied. (author)

  1. Structural integrity analysis of reactor coolant pump flywheel(I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Jin

    1986-01-01

    A reactor coolant pump flywheel is an important machine element to provide the necessary rotational inertia in the event of loss of power to the pumps. This paper attempts to assess the influence of keyways on flywheel stresses and fracture behaviour in detail. The finite element method was used to determine stresses near keyways, including residual stresses, and to establish stress intensity factors for keyway cracks for use in fracture mechanics assessments. (Author)

  2. Evaluation of organic moderator/coolants for fusion breeder blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, J.B.

    1980-03-01

    Organic coolants have several attractive features for fusion breeder blanket design. Their apparent compatibility with lithium and their ideal physical and nuclear properties allows straight-forward, high performance designs. Radiolytic damage can be reduced to about the same order as comparable fission systems by using multiplier/stripper blanket designs. Tritium recovery from the organic should be straightforward, but additional data is needed to make a better assessment of the economics of the process

  3. Detection of coolant void in lead-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolniewicz, Peter; Håkansson, Ane; Jansson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We model the ALFRED LFR using different Monte-Carlo codes. • We study the impact on coolant void on the fission cross section in fission chambers. • We develop a methodology to detect coolant void. • We study the impact of detector fissile coating burn-up. • We conclude that the developed methodology may be an attractive complement to LFR monitoring. - Abstract: Previous work (Wolniewicz et al., 2013) has indicated that using fission chambers coated with 242 Pu and 235 U, respectively, can provide the means of detecting changes in the neutron flux that are connected to coolant density changes in a small lead-cooled fast reactor. Such density changes may be due to leakages of gas into the coolant, which, over time, may coalesce to large bubbles implying a high risk of causing severe damage of the core. By using the ratio of the information provided by the two types of detectors a quantity is obtained that is sensitive to these density changes and, to the first order approximation, independent of the power level of the reactor. In this work we continue the investigation of this proposed methodology by applying it to the Advanced LFR European Demonstrator (ALFRED) and using realistic modelling of the neutron detectors. The results show that the methodology may be used to detect density changes indicating the initial stages of a coalescence process that may result in a large bubble. Also, it is shown that under certain circumstances, large bubbles passing through the core could be detected with this methodology

  4. Trends and experiences in reactor coolant pump motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the requirements and features of these motors is given as background along with a discussion of trends and experiences. Included are a discussion of thrust bearings and a review of safety related requirements and design features. Primary coolant pump motors are vertical induction motors for pumps that circulate huge quantities of water through the reactor core to carry the heat generated there to steam generator heat exchangers. 4 refs

  5. The analysis of coolant-velocity distribution in plat-typed fuel element using CFD method for RSG-GAS research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Subekti; Darwis Isnaini; Endiah Puji Hastuti

    2013-01-01

    The measurement experiment for coolant-velocity distribution in the subchannel of fuel element of RSG-GAS research reactor is difficult to be carried out due to too narrow channel and subchannel placed inside the fuel element. Hence, the calculation is required to predict the coolant-velocity distribution inside subchannel to confirm that the handle presence does not ruin the velocity distribution into every subchannel. This calculation utilizes CFD method, which respect to 3-dimension interior. Moreover, the calculation of coolant-velocity distribution inside subchannel was not ever carried out. The research object is to investigate the distribution of coolant-velocity in plat-typed fuel element using 3-dimension CFD method for RSG-GAS research reactor. This research is required as a part of the development of thermalhydraulic design of fuel element for innovative research reactor as well. The modeling uses ½ model in Gambit software and calculation uses turbulence equation in FLUENT 6.3 software. Calculation result of 3D coolant-velocity in subchannel using CFD method is lower about 4.06 % than 1D calculation result due to 1D calculation obeys handle availability. (author)

  6. Thermal hydraulic performance of naturally aspirated control rod housing assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiger, G.T.; Randolph, H.W.; Paik, I.K.; Foti, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    Savannah River Site reactors are comprised of heat generating fuel/target assemblies, control rods which regulate reactor power, and heavy water which acts as the coolant and as a moderator. The fuel/target assemblies are cooled by the downflow of heavy water while the control rods are cooled via upflow. Five control rods are grouped with two safety rods in seven-channel assemblies called septifoils. Under normal operating conditions, the reactor power level, radial shape flux and axial power flux are regulated by the positioning of the control rods. The control rods are solid rods of a lithium-aluminum alloy with an thin aluminum outer sheath. Lithium is a good absorber of neutrons and, thus control rod temperatures rise with reactor power. At conditions of sufficiently high reactor power and degraded coolant flow, the control rods could heat sufficiently to cause a metallurigical failure of the sheath leading to molten material coming in contact with water and the possibility of a steam explosion. An accident has been postulated as part of the analysis involving the safety upgrade of Savannah River Site reactors in which the housing is not seated on the pin. Coolant from the upflow pin would not be directed into the housing but, into the moderator space surrounding the housing. Only naturally aspirated cooling due to buoyancy effects would be available to cool the control rods and the coolant mass flow rate would drop significantly from its nominal value. In this study, the mechanisms and limits of cooling heated rods housed in an unseated septifoil are addressed. Experiments were conducted on a shortened, prototypic housing with electrically heated rods to gain an understanding of the phenomena governing the cooling in such a case and develop data which can be used to evaluate predictive models. These experiments are described, their results discussed, and the predictions of current models is presented

  7. Towards Compatible and Interderivable Semantic Specifications for the Scheme Programming Language, Part I: Denotational Semantics, Natural Semantics, and Abstract Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    We derive two big-step abstract machines, a natural semantics, and the valuation function of a denotational semantics based on the small-step abstract machine for Core Scheme presented by Clinger at PLDI'98. Starting from a functional implementation of this small-step abstract machine, (1) we fuse...... its transition function with its driver loop, obtaining the functional implementation of a big-step abstract machine; (2) we adjust this big-step abstract machine so that it is in defunctionalized form, obtaining the functional implementation of a second big-step abstract machine; (3) we...... refunctionalize this adjusted abstract machine, obtaining the functional implementation of a natural semantics in continuation style; and (4) we closure-unconvert this natural semantics, obtaining a compositional continuation-passing evaluation function which we identify as the functional implementation...

  8. Modeling natural emissions in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model - Part 1: Building an emissions data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. N.; Mueller, S. F.

    2010-01-01

    A natural emissions inventory for the continental United States and surrounding territories is needed in order to use the US Environmental Protection Agency Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model for simulating natural air quality. The CMAQ air modeling system (including the Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) emissions processing system) currently estimates volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from biogenic sources, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from soils, ammonia from animals, several types of particulate and reactive gas emissions from fires, as well as windblown dust and sea salt emissions. However, there are several emission categories that are not commonly treated by the standard CMAQ Model system. Most notable among these are nitrogen oxide emissions from lightning, reduced sulfur emissions from oceans, geothermal features and other continental sources, and reactive chlorine gas emissions linked with sea salt chloride. A review of past emissions modeling work and existing global emissions data bases provides information and data necessary for preparing a more complete natural emissions data base for CMAQ applications. A model-ready natural emissions data base is developed to complement the anthropogenic emissions inventory used by the VISTAS Regional Planning Organization in its work analyzing regional haze based on the year 2002. This new data base covers a modeling domain that includes the continental United States plus large portions of Canada, Mexico and surrounding oceans. Comparing July 2002 source data reveals that natural emissions account for 16% of total gaseous sulfur (sulfur dioxide, dimethylsulfide and hydrogen sulfide), 44% of total NOx, 80% of reactive carbonaceous gases (VOCs and carbon monoxide), 28% of ammonia, 96% of total chlorine (hydrochloric acid, nitryl chloride and sea salt chloride), and 84% of fine particles (i.e., those smaller than 2.5 μm in size) released into the atmosphere. The seasonality and

  9. Process and kinetics of the fundamental radiation-electrochemical reactions in the primary coolant loop of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozomara-Maic, S.

    1987-06-01

    In spite of the rather broad title of this report, its major part is devoted to the corrosion problems at the RA reactor, i.e. causes and consequences of the reactor shutdown in 1979 and 1982. Some problems of reactor chemistry are pointed out because they are significant for future reactor operation. The final conclusion of this report is that corrosion processes in the primary coolant circuit of the nuclear reactor are specific and that radiation effects cannot be excluded when processes and reaction kinetics are investigated. Knowledge about the kinetics of all the chemical reactions occurring in the primary coolant loop are of crucial significance for safe and economical reactor operation [sr

  10. Method of injecting iron ion into reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kazuyuki; Sawa, Toshio; Nishino, Yoshitaka; Adachi, Tetsuro; Osumi, Katsumi.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To form iron ions stably and inject them into nuclear reactor coolants with no substantial degradation of the severe water quality conditions for reactor coolants. Method: Iron ions are formed by spontaneous corrosion of iron type materials and electroconductivity is increased with the iron ions. Then, the liquids are introduced into an electrolysis vessel using iron type material as electrodes and, thereafter, incorporation of newly added ions other than the iron ions are prevented by supplying electric current. Further, by retaining the iron type material in the packing vessel by the magnetic force therein, only the iron ions are flow out substantially from the packing vessel while preventing the discharge of iron type materials per se or solid corrosion products and then introduced into the electrolysis vessel. Powdery or granular pure iron or carbon steel is used as the iron type material. Thus, iron ions and hydroxides thereof can be injected into coolants by using reactor water at low electroconductivity and incapable of electrolysis. (Kamimura, M.)

  11. Coolant Design System for Liquid Propellant Aerospike Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Miranda; Branam, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Liquid propellant rocket engines burn at incredibly high temperatures making it difficult to design an effective coolant system. These particular engines prove to be extremely useful by powering the rocket with a variable thrust that is ideal for space travel. When combined with aerospike engine nozzles, which provide maximum thrust efficiency, this class of rockets offers a promising future for rocketry. In order to troubleshoot the problems that high combustion chamber temperatures pose, this research took a computational approach to heat analysis. Chambers milled into the combustion chamber walls, lined by a copper cover, were tested for their efficiency in cooling the hot copper wall. Various aspect ratios and coolants were explored for the maximum wall temperature by developing our own MATLAB code. The code uses a nodal temperature analysis with conduction and convection equations and assumes no internal heat generation. This heat transfer research will show oxygen is a better coolant than water, and higher aspect ratios are less efficient at cooling. This project funded by NSF REU Grant 1358991.

  12. On-line real time gamma analysis of primary coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalechstein, W.; Kupca, S.; Lipsett, J.J.

    1985-10-01

    The evolution of failed fuel monitoring at CANDU power stations is briefly summarized and the design of the latest system for failed fuel detection at a multi-unit power station is described. At each reactor, the system employs a germanium spectrometer combined with a novel spectrum analyzer that simultaneously accumulates the gamma-ray spectrum of the coolant and provides the control room with the concentration of radioisotope activity in the coolant for the gaseous fission products Xe-133, Xe-135, Kr-88 and I-131 in real time and with statistical precision independent of count rate. A gross gamma monitor is included to provide independent information on the level of radioactivity in the coolant and extend the measurement range at very high count rates. A central computer system archives spectra received from all four spectrum analyzers and provides both the activity concentrations and the release rates of specified isotopes. Compared with previous systems the current design offers improvements in that the activity concentrations are updated much more frequently, improved tools are provided for long term surveillance of the heat transport system and the monitor is more reliable and less costly

  13. Labelling Of Coolant Flow Anomaly Using Fractal Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djainal, Djen Djen

    1996-01-01

    This research deals with the instrumentation of the detection and characterization of vertical two-phase flow coolant. This type of work is particularly intended to find alternative method for the detection and identification of noise in vertical two-phase flow in a nuclear reactor environment. Various new methods have been introduced in the past few years, an attempt to developed an objective indicator off low patterns. One of new method is Fractal analysis which can complement conventional methods in the description of highly irregular fluctuations. In the present work, Fractal analysis was applied to analyze simulated boiling coolant signal. This simulated signals were built by sum random elements in small subchannels of the coolant channel. Two modes are defined and both are characterized by their void fractions. In the case of uni modal -PDF signals, the difference between these modes is relatively small. On other hand, bimodal -PDF signals have relative large range. In this research, Fractal dimension can indicate the characters of that signals simulation

  14. Design criteria of primary coolant chemistry in SMART-P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Seon; Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Seong Hoon; Yoon, Ju Hyeon; Zee, Sung Qunn

    2005-01-01

    SMART-P differs significantly from commercially designed PWRs. Materials inventories used in SMART-P differ from that at PWRs. All surfaces of the primary circuit with the primary coolant are either made from or plated with stainless steel. The material of steam generator (SG) is also different from that of the standard material of the commercially operating PWRs: titanium alloy for the steam generator tubes. Also, SMART-P primary coolant technology differs from that in PWRs: ammonia is used as a pH raising agent and hydrogen formed due to radiolytic processes is kept in specific range by ammonia dosing. Nevertheless, main objectives of the SMART-P primary coolant are the same as at PWRs: to assure primary system pressure boundary integrity, fuel cladding integrity and to minimize out-of-core radiation buildup. The objective of this work is to introduce the design criteria for the primary water chemistry for SMART-P from the viewpoint of the system characteristics and the chemical design concept

  15. Radiolytic reactions in the coolant of helium cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingey, G.L.; Morgan, W.C.

    1975-01-01

    The success of helium cooled reactors is dependent upon the ability to prevent significant reaction between the coolant and the other components in the reactor primary circuit. Since the thermal reaction of graphite with oxidizing gases is rapid at temperatures of interest, the thermal reactions are limited primarily by the concentration of impurity gases in the helium coolant. On the other hand, the rates of radiolytic reactions in helium are shown to be independent of reactive gas concentration until that concentration reaches a very low level. Calculated steady-state concentrations of reactive species in the reactor coolant and core burnoff rates are presented for current U. S. designed, helium cooled reactors. Since precise base data are not currently available for radiolytic rates of some reactions and thermal reaction rate data are often variable, the accuracy of the predicted gas composition is being compared with the actual gas compositions measured during startup tests of the Fort Saint Vrain high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The current status of these confirmatory tests is discussed. 12 references

  16. Sodium coolant of fast reactors: Experience and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, F.A.; Volchkov, L.G.; Drobyshev, A.V.; Nikulin, M.P.; Kochetkov, L.A.; Alexeev, V.V.

    1997-01-01

    In present report the following subjects are considered: state of the coolant and sodium systems under normal operating condition as well as under decommissioning, disclosing of sodium circuits and liquidation of its consequences, cleaning from sodium and decontamination under repairing works of equipment and circuits. Cleaning of coolant and sodium systems under normal operating conditions and under accident contamination. Cleaning of the equipment under repairing works and during decommissioning from sodium and products of its interaction with water and air. Treatment of sodium waste, taking into account a possibility of sodium fires. It is shown that the state of coolant, cover gas, surfaces of constructive materials which are in contact with them, cleaning systems, formed during installation operation require development of specific technologies. Developed technologies ensured safety operation of sodium cooled installations as in normal operating conditions so in abnormal situations. R and D activities in this field and experience gained provided a solid base for coping with problems arising during decommissioning. Prospective research problems are emphasized where the future efforts should be concentrated in order to improve characteristics of sodium cooled reactors and to make their decommissioning optimal and safe. (author)

  17. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M. [Kansai Electric Power Company, Osaka (Japan); Urabe, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago (Japan)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  18. Feasibility study on the type of KALIMER coolant circulation pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, H. Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Lee, Y. B.; Hwang, J. S.; Choi, S. K.

    1997-07-01

    The characteristics of mechanical pump and electromagnetic (EM) pump for liquid sodium coolant in a liquid metal reactor are compared and analysed as a design concept of KALIMER coolant pumps. The type of coolant circulation pump affects the selection of reactor type, economics, and reliability of reactor. Though the mechanical pump has much application experience and give satisfaction to the reliability of developed reactor type, the possibility of development is limited and its large weight and volume have a negative effect on the design of the economical liquid metal reactor. The large scale electromagnetic pump has not been verified yet, but it is expected to be demonstrated in time. Because the size of EM pump is small relative to the mechanical pump, the compact reactor design is possible. Therefore the selection of EM pump can be one of the methods to improve the economics. Since the shape of EM pump can be varied according to the arrangement of electromagnet coils, a new or unique reactor type can be developed easily in the process of KALIMER development. In the view point of economic LMR development, it is desirable to adopt the electromagnetic pump. (author). 50 refs., 11 tabs., 24 figs

  19. Grain size control method for the nozzles of AP1000 primary coolant pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shenglong [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Sun, Yanhui [Collaborative Innovation Center of Steel Technology, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Yang, Bin, E-mail: byang@ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Steel Technology, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Mingxian [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Design a new forging technology for AP1000 primary coolant pipe. • Method combining FEM and scale-down experiments is adopted. • The grain size and distribution in simulation and experiment are consistent. • Get optimal forging parameters for production guiding. - Abstract: AP1000 primary coolant pipe is made of 316LN austenitic stainless steel. It is a large special-shaped pipe manufactured by integral forging technology. Owing to non-uniform temperature and deformation during forging, coarse grains often occur in the boss sections of the pipe especially in the nozzles’ parts. In the present study, a new forging technology was proposed to control the grain size. The finite element method was used to optimize the forging speed and friction coefficient, then the scale-down experiments were performed for comparison. The forging speed is suggested to be less than 20 mm/s, and effective lubricants should be used to decrease the friction coefficient. The errors of the grain size between the experiment and simulation are less than 20%.

  20. Grain size control method for the nozzles of AP1000 primary coolant pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shenglong; Sun, Yanhui; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Mingxian

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Design a new forging technology for AP1000 primary coolant pipe. • Method combining FEM and scale-down experiments is adopted. • The grain size and distribution in simulation and experiment are consistent. • Get optimal forging parameters for production guiding. - Abstract: AP1000 primary coolant pipe is made of 316LN austenitic stainless steel. It is a large special-shaped pipe manufactured by integral forging technology. Owing to non-uniform temperature and deformation during forging, coarse grains often occur in the boss sections of the pipe especially in the nozzles’ parts. In the present study, a new forging technology was proposed to control the grain size. The finite element method was used to optimize the forging speed and friction coefficient, then the scale-down experiments were performed for comparison. The forging speed is suggested to be less than 20 mm/s, and effective lubricants should be used to decrease the friction coefficient. The errors of the grain size between the experiment and simulation are less than 20%.

  1. AGING MANAGMENT OF REACTOR COOLANT SYSTEM MECHANICAL COMPONENTS FOR LICENSE RENEWAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SUBUDHI, M.; MORANTE, R.; LEE, A.D.

    2002-01-01

    The reactor coolant system (RCS) mechanical components that require an aging management review for license renewal include the primary loop piping and associated connections to other support systems, reactor vessel, reactor vessel internals, pressurizer. steam generators, reactor coolant pumps, and all other inter-connected piping, pipe fittings, valves, and bolting. All major RCS components are located inside the reactor building. Based on the evaluation findings of recently submitted license renewal applications for pressurized water reactors, this paper presents the plant programs and/or activities proposed by the applicants to manage the effects of aging. These programs and/or activities provide reasonable assurance that the intended function(s) of these mechanical components will be maintained for the period of extended operation. The license renewal application includes identification of RCS subcomponents that are within the scope of license renewal and are vulnerable to age-related degradation when exposed to environmental and operational conditions. determination of the effects of aging on their intended safety functions. and implementation of the aging management programs and/or activities including both current and new programs. Industry-wide operating experience, including generic communication by the NRC, is part of the aging management review for the RCS components. In addition, this paper discusses time-limited aging analyses associated with neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel beltline region and thermal fatigue

  2. Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant: variation in test intervals for high-pressure coolant injection (HPCI) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christie, R.F.; Stetkar, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The change in availability of the high-pressure coolant injection system (HPCIS) due to a change in pump and valve test interval from monthly to quarterly was analyzed. This analysis started by using the HPCIS base line evaluation produced as part of the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant (BFN) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). The base line evaluation showed that the dominant contributors to the unavailability of the HPCI system are hardware failures and the resultant downtime for unscheduled maintenance. The effect of changing the pump and valve test interval from monthly to quarterly was analyzed by considering the system unavailability due to hardware failures, the unavailability due to testing, and the unavailability due to human errors that potentially could occur during testing. The magnitude of the changes in unavailability affected by the change in test interval are discussed. The analysis showed a small increase in the availability of the HPCIS to respond to loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) and a small decrease in the availability of the HPCIS to respond to transients which require HPCIS actuation. In summary, the increase in test interval from monthly to quarterly does not significantly impact the overall HPCIS availability

  3. Design of coolant distribution system (CDS) for ITER PF AC/DC converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Bin [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Song, Zhiquan, E-mail: zhquansong@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Fu, Peng; Xu, Xuesong; Li, Chuan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wang, Min; Dong, Lin [China International Nuclear Fusion Energy Program Execution Center, Beijing 100862 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • System process and arrangement has been proposed to meet the multiple requirements from the converter system. • Thermal hydraulic analysis model has been developed to size and predict the system operation behavior. • Prototype test has been performed to validate the proposed design methodology. - Abstract: The Poloidal Field (PF) converter unit, playing an essential role in the plasma shape and position control in vertical and horizontal direction, which is an important part of ITER power supply system. As an important subsystem of the converter unit, the coolant distribution system has the function to distribute the cooling water from ITER component cooling water system (CCWS) to its main components at the required flow rate, pressure and temperature. This paper presents the thermal hydraulic design of coolant distribution system for the ITER PF converter unit. Different operational requirements of the PF converter unit regarding flow rate, temperature and pressure have been analyzed to design the system process and arrangement. A thermal-hydraulic analysis model has been built to size the system and predict the flow rate and temperature distribution of the system under the normal operation. Based on the system thermal-hydraulic analysis results, the system pressure profile has been plotted to evaluate the pressure behavior along each client flow path. A CDS prototype for the ITER PF converter has been constructed and some experiments have been performed on it. A good agreement of the flow distribution and temperature behavior between the simulated and test results validate the proposed design methodology.

  4. RETRAN code analysis of Tsuruga-2 plant chemical volume control system (CVCS) reactor coolant leakage incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    In the Chemical Volume Control System (CVCS) reactor primary coolant leakage incident, which occurred in Tsuruga-2 (4-loop PWR, 3,423 MWt, 1,160 MWe) on July 12, 1999, it took about 14 hours before the leakage isolation. The delayed leakage isolation and a large amount of leakage have become a social concern. Effective procedure modification was studied. Three betterments were proposed based on a qualitative analysis to reduce the pressure and temperature of the primary loop as fast as possible by the current plant facilities while maintaining enough subcooling of the primary loop. I analyzed the incident with RETRAN code in order to quantitatively evaluate the leakage reduction when these betterments are adopted. This paper is very new because it created a typical analysis method for PWR plant behavior during plant shutdown procedure which conventional RETRAN transient analyses rarely dealt with. Also the event time is very long. To carry out this analysis successfully, I devised new models such as an Residual Heat Removal System (RHR) model etc. and simplified parts of the conventional model. Based on the analysis results, I confirmed that leakage can be reduced by about 30% by adopting these betterments. Then the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) modified the operational procedure for reactor primary coolant leakage events adopting these betterments. (author)

  5. Reactor coolant pump service life evaluation for current life cycle optimization and license renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroshuk, B.W.; Berto, D.S.; Robles, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that as part of the plant life cycle management and license renewal program, Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BG and E) has completed a service life evaluation of their reactor coolant pumps, funded jointly by EPRI and performed by ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Power. Two of the goals of the BG and E plant life cycle management and license renewal program, and of this current evaluation, are to identify actions which would optimize current plant operation, and ensure that license renewal remains a viable option. The reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) at BG and E's Calvert Cliffs Units 1 and 2 are Byron Jackson pumps with a diffuser and a single suction. This pump design is also used in many other nuclear plants. The RCP service life evaluation assessed the effect of all plausible age-related degradation mechanisms (ARDMs) on the RCP components. Cyclic fatigue and thermal embrittlement were two ARDMs identified as having a high potential to limit the service life of the pump case. The pump case is a primary pressure boundary component. Hence, ensuring its continued structural integrity is important

  6. Unraveling the mystery of natural rubber biosynthesis. Part II. Composition and growth of in vitro natural rubber using high-resolution size exclusion chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Cheng Ching K. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States); Barkakaty, Balaka [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Puskas, Judit E. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States); Xie, Wenshuang [The Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States); Cornish, Katrina [The Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States); Peruch, Federic [Univ. of Bordeaux, Pessac Cedex (France); Deffieux, Alain [Univ. of Bordeaux, Pessac Cedex (France)

    2014-09-01

    The superior properties of natural rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene [NR]) are a function of its structure and composition, properties that still remain a mystery and that are irreplaceable by any synthetic rubber. NR from guayule (Parthenium argentatum) has been gaining special interest for its hypoallergenic properties while maintaining superior mechanical properties that are commonly associated with the Brazilian rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis), the most common source of NR. Techniques exist to isolate washed rubber particles (WRPs) that contain enzymatically active rubber transferase, to study NR biosynthesis, and previous work on the in vitroNRgrowth in Hevea has demonstrated the presence of around 50wt%of a low molecular weight ([MW], Mn <10 000 g/mol) fraction. Structural and compositional analyses of this low MW fraction in Hevea are challenging due to the high protein content. Here, we discuss the analysis and composition of guayule latex and WRPs using high-resolution Size Exclusion Chromatography. We also discuss the composition of the soluble fraction of inactive guayule latex using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry.

  7. Analysis of molten fuel-coolant interaction during a reactivity-initiated accident experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a reactivity-initiated accident experiment, designated RIA-ST-4, are discussed and analyzed with regard to molten fuel-coolant interaction (MFCI). In this experiment, extensive amounts of molten UO 2 fuel and zircaloy cladding were produced and fragmented upon mixing with the coolant. Coolant pressurization up to 35 MPa and coolant overheating in excess of 940 K occurred after fuel rod failure. The initial coolant conditions were similar to those in boiling water reactors during a hot startup (that is, coolant pressure of 6.45 MPa, coolant temperature of 538 K, and coolant flow rate of 85 cm 3 /s). It is concluded that the high coolant pressure recorded in the RIA-ST-4 experiment was caused by an energetic MFCI and was not due to gas release from the test rod at failure, Zr/water reaction, or to UO 2 fuel vapor pressure. The high coolant temperature indicated the presence of superheated steam, which may have formed during the expansion of the working fluid back to the initial coolant pressure; yet, the thermal-to-mechanical energy conversion ratio is estimated to be only 0.3%

  8. Towards Compatible and Interderivable Semantic Specifications for the Scheme Programming Language, Part I: Denotational Semantics, Natural Semantics, and Abstract Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    We derive two big-step abstract machines, a natural semantics, and the valuation function of a denotational semantics based on the small-step abstract machine for Core Scheme presented by Clinger at PLDI'98. Starting from a functional implementation of this small-step abstract machine, (1) we fus...

  9. Analysis of actual status of works on technology of heavy liquid metal coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynov, P.N.; Askhadullin, R.Sh.; Orlov, Yu.I.; Storozhenko, A.N.

    2014-01-01

    Principle duties in heavy liquid metal coolant technology (HLMC) are provision of the purity of coolant and surfaces of circulation loop for maintenance of design thermohydraulic characteristics, prevention of structural materials corrosion and erosion during long service life and present-day safety precautions on different stages of reactor facility operation. For this reason, current HLMC (Pb-Bi, Pb) technology must include coolant pre-operation and charging; monitoring and regulating of coolant oxygen potential; hydrogen purification of coolant and surfaces of circulation loop from lead oxides-based slags; coolant filtration; reactor cover gas purification from coolant aerosols. The current topical problem is personnel training on the questions of HLMC technology [ru

  10. Feeding and purge systems of coolant primary circuit and coolant secondary circuit control of the I sup(123) target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, G.L. de.

    1986-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Service of IEN (Brazilian-CNEN) detected three faults in sup(123)I target cooling system during operation process for producing sup(123)I: a) non hermetic vessel containing contaminated water from primary coolant circuit; possibility of increasing radioactivity in the vessel due to accumulation of contaminators in cooling water and; situation in region used for personnels to arrange and adjust equipments in nuclear physics area, to carried out maintenance of cyclotron and target coupling in irradiation room. The primary circuit was changed by secondary circuit for target coolant circulating through coil of tank, which receive weater from secondary circuit. This solution solved the three problems simultaneously. (M.C.K.)

  11. Membrane technology for treating of waste nanofluids coolant: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohruni, Amrifan Saladin; Yuliwati, Erna; Sharif, Safian; Ismail, Ahmad Fauzi

    2017-09-01

    The treatment of cutting fluids wastes concerns a big number of industries, especially from the machining operations to foster environmental sustainability. Discharging cutting fluids, waste through separation technique could protect the environment and also human health in general. Several methods for the separation emulsified oils or oily wastewater have been proposed as three common methods, namely chemical, physicochemical and mechanical and membrane technology application. Membranes are used into separate and concentrate the pollutants in oily wastewater through its perm-selectivity. Meanwhile, the desire to compensate for the shortcomings of the cutting fluid media in a metal cutting operation led to introduce the using of nanofluids (NFs) in the minimum quantity lubricant (MQL) technique. NFs are prepared based on nanofluids technology by dispersing nanoparticles (NPs) in liquids. These fluids have potentially played to enhance the performance of traditional heat transfer fluids. Few researchers have studied investigation of the physical-chemical, thermo-physical and heat transfer characteristics of NFs for heat transfer applications. The use of minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) technique by NFs application is developed in many metal cutting operations. MQL did not only serve as a better alternative to flood cooling during machining operation and also increases better-finished surface, reduces impact loads on the environment and fosters environmental sustainability. Waste coolant filtration from cutting tools using membrane was treated by the pretreated process, coagulation technique and membrane filtration. Nanomaterials are also applied to modify the membrane structure and morphology. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) is the better choice in coolant wastewater treatment due to its hydrophobicity. Using of polyamide nanofiltration membranes BM-20D and UF-PS-100-100, 000, it resulted in the increase of permeability of waste coolant filtration. Titanium dioxide

  12. A Review of Fragmentation Models Relative to Molten UO2 Breakup when Quenched in Sodium Coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronenberg, A.W.; Grolmes, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    An important aspect of the fuel-coolant interaction problem relative to liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) safety analysis is the fragmentation of molten oxide fuel during contact with liquid sodium coolant. A proper description of the kinetics of such an event requires an understanding of the breakup process and an estimate of the size and dispersion of such finely divided fuel in coolant. In recent years, considerable interest has centered on the problem of determining the nature of such fragmentation. In this paper, both analytic and experimental studies pertaining to such breakup are reviewed in light of recent developments in the understanding of heat transfer and solidification phenomena during quenching of UO 2 in sodium. A more extensive review of this subject can be found in Ref. 1. In conclusion: As discussed, a number of models have been proposed in an attempt to understand the nature of the UO 2 fragmentation process. The four principle mechanisms considered likely to cause such fragmentation (impact forces, boiling, violent gas release, and shell solidification) have been developed to the point where comparative analysis is possible. In addition, recent developments in the understanding of the physics of oxide fuel behavior in sodium coolant (boiling regime criteria, vapor nucleation theories, and prediction of solidification kinetics enable us to asses whether or not the various model assumptions are realistic. In view of this knowledge the following conclusions are made. For the case of hydrodynamic influence on fragmentation, it can be said that although the disruptive forces of impact and viscous drag may contribute to breakup, their effects are not controlling with respect to high temperature materials, including UO 2 -sodium. With respect to the vapor bubble growth and collapse mechanism it was shown that for sodium quenching, where coolant contact may, be expected (as opposed to water), the thermodynamic work potential of the bubble is

  13. Experience in organization of soil science–biogeographical part of educational natural science practical work of students-geographers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлія Прасул

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the experience of practical field training of students- geographers, defines its role in training geographers, looks at the ways of rational organization of soil science, biogeographic section of natural science educational practices in terms of training at high school stationary practice grounds. The educational natural science practice of the 1st year-students-geographers of V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University takes place on the educational and scientific geographical grounds «Gaidary» in Zmiiv district, Kharkiv region. The location of the base allows to explore a typical structure of the Siversky Donets river valley, select a variety of elements and components to form an understanding in students of both the knowledge of the individual components of nature, and the processes of natural complexes functioning as a whole, to introduce the elements of environmental knowledge and factors of anthropogenic impact on the environment. The soil-biogeographical section of practical work focuses on acquiring skills of field research methods of soil and ecological communities by the students; planning of the routes, taking into account the conditions and landscape features of the territory; cameral treatment of the data and samples collected in the field; identification of cause-and-effect relationships of soil and vegetation development. Landscape diversity of the territory in the area of practice allows to study the soil and vegetation within the natural systems of the watershed, its slopes, gullies and gully areas of the floodplain, the first floodplain terrace during 5-6 days of soil-biogeographic section of the practical work through the daily radial routes. During the practice traditional classical techniques of field studies of soils and ecological communities (primarily tab and a description of soil profiles and geo-botanical areas are combined with new, present-day approaches (use of GPS-navigators, GIS

  14. Chloride-induced corrosion of steel in cracked concrete – Part I: Experimental studies under accelerated and natural marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otieno, M.; Beushausen, H.; Alexander, M.

    2016-01-01

    Parallel corrosion experiments were carried out for 2¼ years by exposing one half of 210 beam specimens (120 × 130 × 375 mm long) to accelerated laboratory corrosion (cyclic wetting and drying) while the other half underwent natural corrosion in a marine tidal zone. Experimental variables were crack width w cr (0, incipient crack, 0.4, 0.7 mm), cover c (20, 40 mm), binder type (PC, PC/GGBS, PC/FA) and w/b ratio (0.40, 0.55). Results show that corrosion rate (i corr ) was affected by the experimental variables in the following manner: i corr increased with increase in crack width, and decreased with increase in concrete quality and cover depth. The results also show that the corrosion performance of concretes in the field under natural corrosion cannot be inferred from its performance in the laboratory under accelerated corrosion. Other factors such as corrosion process should be taken into account.

  15. Linear titration plot for the determination of boron in the primary coolant of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midgley, D.; Gatford, C.

    1992-01-01

    A linear titration plot method has been devised for the determination of boron as boric acid in partly neutralized solution, such as occurs in the primary coolant of pressurized water reactors. The total boron and the alkali in the sample are determined simultaneously. Although it is not essential to add mannitol in this method, it is more accurate when the solution is saturated with mannitol. Comparisons are made with other modes of titration: Gran plots, first and second differential potentiometric titrations and indicator titrations. None of these gives the total boron directly in partly neutralized solutions. (author)

  16. Identification of novel human dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitors of natural origin (part I: virtual screening and activity assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Guasch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been great interest in determining whether natural products show biological activity toward protein targets of pharmacological relevance. One target of particular interest is DPP-IV whose most important substrates are incretins that, among other beneficial effects, stimulates insulin biosynthesis and secretion. Incretins have very short half-lives because of their rapid degradation by DPP-IV and, therefore, inhibiting this enzyme improves glucose homeostasis. As a result, DPP-IV inhibitors are of considerable interest to the pharmaceutical industry. The main goals of this study were (a to develop a virtual screening process to identify potential DPP-IV inhibitors of natural origin; (b to evaluate the reliability of our virtual-screening protocol by experimentally testing the in vitro activity of selected natural-product hits; and (c to use the most active hit for predicting derivatives with higher binding affinities for the DPP-IV binding site. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We predicted that 446 out of the 89,165 molecules present in the natural products subset of the ZINC database would inhibit DPP-IV with good ADMET properties. Notably, when these 446 molecules were merged with 2,342 known DPP-IV inhibitors and the resulting set was classified into 50 clusters according to chemical similarity, there were 12 clusters that contained only natural products for which no DPP-IV inhibitory activity has been previously reported. Nine molecules from 7 of these 12 clusters were then selected for in vitro activity testing and 7 out of the 9 molecules were shown to inhibit DPP-IV (where the remaining two molecules could not be solubilized, preventing the evaluation of their DPP-IV inhibitory activity. Then, the hit with the highest activity was used as a lead compound in the prediction of more potent derivatives. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have demonstrated that our virtual-screening protocol was successful in identifying novel

  17. Methodological guide for the acceptance of waste with a natural radioactivity in the classified elimination facilities. Part 1: methodological guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazala, Ch.; Cessac, B.; Gay, D.

    2006-01-01

    This document is part of the thought implemented by the Direction of pollution prevention and risk (D.P.P.R.) from the Department of Ecology and Sustainable Development as part of a working group on means for detecting radioactivity at the entrance of waste storage centers (said gantries group). The D.P.P.R. has entrusted the implementation to the I.R.S.N.. The completion of the guide was conducted under the supervision of a steering committee composed of representatives of industrial producers of this control type, operators of storage centers, associations for environmental protection, experts and administration. The content and structure of the guide and the accompanying sheets result of discussions within the Steering Committee between D.P.P.R. and I.R.S.N.. (N.C.)

  18. Thermal response of core and central-cavity components of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor in the absence of forced convection coolant flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whaley, R.L.; Sanders, J.P.

    1976-09-01

    A means of determining the thermal responses of the core and the components of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor after loss of forced coolant flow is discussed. A computer program, using a finite-difference technique, is presented together with a solution of the confined natural convection. The results obtained are reasonable and demonstrate that the computer program adequately represents the confined natural convection

  19. Analysis of an Advanced Test Reactor Small-Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident with an Engineered Safety Feature to Automatically Trip the Primary Coolant Pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polkinghorne, Steven T.; Davis, Cliff B.; McCracken, Richard T.

    2000-01-01

    A new engineered safety feature that automatically trips the primary coolant pumps following a low-pressure reactor scram was recently installed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The purpose of this engineered safety feature is to prevent the ATR's surge tank, which contains compressed air, from emptying during a small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA). If the surge tank were to empty, the air introduced into the primary coolant loop could potentially cause the performance of the primary and/or emergency coolant pumps to degrade, thereby reducing core thermal margins. Safety analysis performed with the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic code and the SINDA thermal analyzer shows that adequate thermal margins are maintained during an SBLOCA with the new engineered safety feature installed. The analysis also shows that the surge tank will not empty during an SBLOCA even if one of the primary coolant pumps fails to trip

  20. Lactancia artificial o natural? 1ª parte: Influencia sobre la calidad de la canal de los cabritos

    OpenAIRE

    Panea, B.; Ripoll, G.; Sañudo, C.; Horcada, A.; Teixeira, A.; Alcalde, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    En las razas caprinas de aptitud lechera, el cabrito es considerado en muchas ocasiones como un subproducto, por lo que frecuentemente se separa de la madre y se alimenta con leche artificial. Este manejo posibilita la utilización de la leche en la fabricaci6n de quesos con un elevado valor añadido, reduce los costes de alimentaci6n y permite obtener buenos crecimientos. Sin embargo, algunos ganaderos prefieren alimentar a los cabritos con leche natural porque creen que e...

  1. The Features of Naturalization of Invasive Fraction of Flora in the Voronezh Region and in Some Regions of the European Part of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimirov D.R.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is about naturalization features of invasive fraction of flora in Voronezh and some other regions of the European part of Russia. The summary table represents all invasive and potentially invasive plants of the European part of Russia with their level of naturalization (or invasive status. Invasive fraction of flora in the Voronezh region numbers 120 plants. All of them are on different stages of naturalization process in an anthropogenic areal. Invasive plants represent by agriophyts – 41 (34,1 % species, epecophyts – 75 (62,5 % species and colonophyts-epecophyts – 4 (3,4 % species. Totally there are 201 species of invasive and potentially invasive plants spread within European part of Russia (Northern-West Russia, Ivanovo, Kaluga, Tver, and Voronezh regions. They formed the “black list” of European Russia. 10 species are common to all invasive fractions. These are Acer negundo, Amelanchier x spicata, Aster x salignus, Echinocystis lobata, Elodea canadensis, Heracleum sosnowskyi, Impatiens glandulifera, Impatiens parviflora, Juncus tenuis and Lupinus polyphyllus. The analysis of the general list of invasive fractions of European Russia shows that 120 species of the list are invasive or potentially invasive in the Voronezh region (100 and 20 species in accordance, adventives naturalized species – 31, native species – 19, archaeophyts – 2, apophyts – 4. 26 species from the list were not found in the Voronezh region. Apparently, the region is a transit area for many invasive plants, which migrate from South to North, from East to West etc. Not only its natural and climatic potential, but also high level of transformation of local landscapes enabled immigrant-plants to naturalize within the bounds of the region. Furthermore, for many years the Voronezh region was the center of introduction of alien plants. Many of those became a part of invasion fraction of regional flora. In recent decades green building took place of

  2. Loss of coolant analysis for CIRENE-LATINA heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiantore, B.; Dubbini, M.; Proto, G.

    1978-01-01

    CIRENE is a heavy-water moderated, boiling water cooled pressure tube reactor. Fuel is natural uranium. A variety of breaks in the primary coolant system have been postulated for the analysis of the CIRENE Latina Plant (now under construction) such as double-end break of inlet header, downcomer, steam line and inlet feeders. The basic tool for analysis is the TILT-N Code which has been purposely developed for simulating the nuclear, thermal and hydrodynamic behaviour of the CIRENE core and associated heat transport system. An extensive full-scale test programme has been carried out by CNEN and CISE which fully confirms the adequacy of the model. The main results of the analysis show that maximum temperatures are far from those leading to significant fuel damage and that adequate core cooling is provided over the whole transient. (author)

  3. Validation of advanced NSSS simulator model for loss-of-coolant accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, S.P.; Chang, S.K.; Huang, H.C. [Nuclear Training Branch, Northeast Utilities, Waterford, CT (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The replacement of the NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) model on the Millstone 2 full-scope simulator has significantly increased its fidelity to simulate adverse conditions in the RCS. The new simulator NSSS model is a real-time derivative of the Nuclear Plant Analyzer by ABB. The thermal-hydraulic model is a five-equation, non-homogeneous model for water, steam, and non-condensible gases. The neutronic model is a three-dimensional nodal diffusion model. In order to certify the new NSSS model for operator training, an extensive validation effort has been performed by benchmarking the model performance against RELAP5/MOD2. This paper presents the validation results for the cases of small-and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA). Detailed comparisons in the phenomena of reflux-condensation, phase separation, and two-phase natural circulation are discussed.

  4. Loss of coolant accident analysis (thermal hydraulic analysis) - Japanese industries experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okabe, K.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of LOCA analysis in Japanese industry is presented. The BASH-M code, developed for large scale LOCA reflooding analysis, is given as an example of verification and improvement of US computer programs are given. The code's application to the operational safety analysis concerns the following main areas: 1D drift flux model base computer program CANAC; CANAC-based advanced training simulator; emergency operating procedures. The author considers also the code application to the following new PWR safety design concepts: use of steam generators for decay heat removal at LOCA conditions; use of horizontal type steam generator for maintaining two-phase natural circulation under the reactor coolant system submerged. 9 figs

  5. Plant-Derived Antimalarial Agents: New Leads and Efficient Phytomedicines. Part II. Non-Alkaloidal Natural Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaíde Braga de Oliveira

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is still the most destructive and dangerous parasitic infection in many tropical and subtropical countries. The burden of this disease is getting worse, mainly due to the increasing resistance of Plasmodium falciparum against the widely available antimalarial drugs. There is an urgent need for new, more affordable and accessible antimalarial agents possessing original modes of action. Natural products have played a dominant role in the discovery of leads for the development of drugs to treat human diseases, and this fact anticipates that new antimalarial leads may certainly emerge from tropical plant sources. This present review covers most of the recently-published non-alkaloidal natural compounds from plants with antiplasmodial and antimalarial properties, belonging to the classes of terpenes, limonoids, flavonoids, chromones, xanthones, anthraquinones, miscellaneous and related compounds, besides the majority of papers describing antiplasmodial crude extracts published in the last five years not reviewed before. In addition, some perspectives and remarks on the development of new drugs and phytomedicines for malaria are succinctly discussed.

  6. Cultural variation is part of human nature : Literary universals, context-sensitivity, and "shakespeare in the bush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Michelle Scalise

    2003-12-01

    In 1966, Laura Bohannan wrote her classic essay challenging the supposition that great literary works speak to universal human concerns and conditions and, by extension, that human nature is the same everywhere. Her evidence: the Tiv of West Africa interpret Hamlet differently from Westerners. While Bohannan's essay implies that cognitive universality and cultural variation are mutually exclusive phenomena, adaptationist theory suggests otherwise. Adaptive problems ("the human condition") and cognitive adaptations ("human nature") are constant across cultures. What differs between cultures is habitat: owing to environmental variation, the means and information relevant to solving adaptive problems differ from place to place. Thus, we find differences between cultures not because human minds differ in design but largely because human habitats differ in resources and history. On this view, we would expect world literature to express both human universals and cultural particularities. Specifically, we should expect to find literary universality at the macro level (e.g., adaptive problems, cognitive adaptations) and literary variation at the micro level (e.g., local solutions to adaptive problems).

  7. Oral tactile sensibility recorded in overdenture wearers with implants or natural roots: a comparative study. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mericske-Stern, R

    1994-01-01

    The capacity of dentate subjects to discriminate the thickness of objects placed between the teeth seems to depend on receptors in the periodontal ligament and muscles. The compensatory mechanism of ankylotic implants for the function of missing periodontal ligaments is not yet known. To investigate this question in overdenture wearers, 26 patients with ITI implants and 20 patients with natural roots were selected. According to the experimental protocol, the discriminatory ability was recorded with 10 steel foils (thickness ranging from 10 to 100 microns) placed between the premolars. Each thickness was tested 10 times and the test subjects were required to distinguish whether foil was positioned between the teeth. A maximum of 100 correct or 100 incorrect answers was possible. The average number of incorrect answers was significantly higher in test subjects with implants. The 50% limit (ie, the tested thickness recorded with at least 5 wrong answers) was established, but no statistically significant difference was found. In both groups, the critical tactile threshold of perceived thickness was 30 to 40 microns, with 2 being the average number of incorrect assessments. When comparing the minimal thickness, which was recorded without incorrect assessment, a significantly lower threshold was observed on patients with natural roots. Thus, active tactile sensibility appears to depend on the receptors in the periodontal ligament. However, wearing of removable prostheses is a modifying factor and may influence the oral tactile sensibility for both groups.

  8. Evaluation of a coolant injection into the in-vessel with a RCS depressurization by using SCDAP/RELAP5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae-Joon, Park; Sang-Baik, Kim; Hee-Dong, Kim

    2007-01-01

    As part of the evaluations of a severe accident management strategy, a coolant injection in the vessel with a reactor coolant system (RCS) depressurization has been evaluated by using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code. Two high pressure sequences of a small break loss of coolant accident (LOCA) without safety injection (SI) and a total loss of feed water (LOFW) accident have been analyzed in optimized power reactor OPR-1000. The SCDAP/RELAP5 results have shown that only one train operation of a high pressure safety injection at 30,000 seconds with a RCS depressurization by using one condenser dump valve at 6 minutes after an entrance of the severe accident management guidance prevents a reactor vessel failure for the small break LOCA without SI. In this case, only train operation of the low pressure safety injection (LPSI) without the high pressure safety injection (HPSI) does not prevent a reactor vessel failure. Only one train operation of the HPSI at 20,208 seconds with a RCS depressurization by using two safety depressurization system valves at 40 minutes after an initial opening of the safety relief valve prevents a reactor vessel failure for the total LOFW. (authors)

  9. Removal of ammonia nitrogen from leachate of Muribeca municipal solid waste landfill, Pernambuco, Brazil, using natural zeolite as part of a biochemical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Cecilia Maria M S; Alves, Maria Cristina M; Campos, Juacyara C; Silva, Fabrícia Maria S; Jucá, José Fernando T; Lins, Eduardo Antonio M

    2015-01-01

    The inadequate disposal of leachate is one of the key factors in the environmental impact of urban solid waste landfills in Brazil. Among the compounds present in the leachates from Brazilian landfills, ammonia nitrogen is notable for its high concentrations. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficiency of a permeable reactive barrier filled with a natural zeolite, which is part of a biochemical system for the tertiary treatment of the leachate from Muribeca Municipal Solid Waste Landfill in Pernambuco, Brazil, to reduce its ammonia nitrogen concentration. This investigation initially consisted of kinetic studies and batch equilibrium tests on the natural zeolite to construct the sorption isotherms, which showed a high sorption capacity, with an average of 12.4 mg NH4+.L(-1), a value close to the sorption rates found for the aqueous ammonium chloride solution. A permeable reactive barrier consisting of natural zeolite, as simulated by the column test, was efficient in removing the ammonia nitrogen present in the leachate pretreated with calcium hydroxide. Nevertheless, the regenerated zeolite did not satisfactorily maintain the sorption properties of the natural zeolite, and an analysis of their cation-exchange properties showed a reduced capacity of 54 meq per 100 g for the regenerated zeolite compared to 150 meq per 100 g for the natural zeolite.

  10. Nature of short-period microtremors on the cliff-like ground. Part 4; Gakechi kinbo no tanshuki bido. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiguma, T; Yoshiike, T [Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan). School of Science and Engineering

    1996-10-01

    Microtremors were measured on the cliff-like ground with a height about 10 m, to examine the vibration characteristics. Test field-1 near Akabane, Kita-ku, Tokyo is located in a part of Musashino plateau covered with Kanto loam on its surface, and has relatively sound ground. Test field-2 at Machida is located in the western part of Tama hills, and also has Kanto loam on its surface. For the cliff-like ground with inclined angle 70{degree} at Akabane, remarkably predominant frequency 3.2 Hz was observed for the microtremors in the direction perpendicular to the cliff surface. However, this predominant vibration did not become larger due to the damping effects of the reinforcement walls near the end of cliff and the large trees on the cliff. Influence of the cliff-like ground was scarcely observed in the microtremors spectrum in both the directions parallel and vertical to the cliff-surface. From the observation of microtremors with short period on the cliff-like ground with inclined angle around 32{degree} at Machida, influence of cliff-like ground was not observed in the microtremors spectrum in all of the vibrating directions perpendicular, parallel and vertical to the cliff surface. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Numerical FEM Analyses of primary coolant system at NPP Temelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junek, L.; Slovacek, M.; Ruzek, L.; Moulis, P.

    2003-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to inform about the beginning and first steps of implementation of an aging management system at the Temelin NPP. The aging management system is important not only for achieving the current safety level but also for reaching operational reliability of a production unit equipment above the life time assumed by the original design, typically over 40 years. A method to locate the most prominent degradation regions is described. A global shell model of the primary coolant system including all loops and their components - reactor pressure vessel (RPV), steam generator (SG), main coolant pump (MCP), pressurizer, feed water and steam pipelines system is presented. The results of stress-strain analysis on the measured service parameters base are given. Validation of the results is very important and the method to compare the service measurement data with the numerical results is described. The global/local approach is mentioned and discussed. The effects of the complete global system on the individual components under monitoring are transformed into more accurate local spatial models. The local spatial models are used to analyze the gradual lifetime exhaustion of a facility during its service operation. Two spatial local models are presented, viz. feed water nozzle of SG and main coolant piping system T-brunch. The results of analysis of the local spatial models are processed by the neural network computing method, which is also described. The actual gradual damage of the material of the components under monitoring can be obtained based on the analyses performed and on the results from the neural network in combination with the knowledge of the real material characteristics. The procedures applied are included in the DIALIFE diagnostic system

  12. Performance Investigation of Automobile Radiator Operated with ZnFe2O4 Nano Fluid based Coolant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cooling system of an Automobile plays an important role in its performance, consists of two main parts, known as radiator and fan. Improving thermal efficiency of engine leads to increase the engine's performance, decline the fuel consumption and decrease the pollution emissions. Water and ethylene glycol as conventional coolants have been widely used in radiators of an automotive industry for many years. These heat transfer fluids offer low thermal conductivity. With the advancement of nanotechnology, the new generation of heat transfer fluids called, “nanofluids” have been developed and researchers found that these fluids offer higher thermal conductivity compared to that of conventional coolants. This study focused on the preparation of Zinc based nanofluids (ZnFe2O4 using chemical co-precipitation method and its application in an automotive cooling system along with mixture of ethylene glycol and water (50:50. Relevant input data, nanofluids properties and empirical correlations were obtained from literatures to investigate the heat transfer enhancement of an automotive car radiator operated with nano fluid-based coolants. It was observed that, overall heat transfer coefficient and heat transfer rate in engine cooling system increased with the usage of nanofluids (with ethylene glycol the base-fluid compared to ethylene glycol (i.e. base-fluid alone. It is observed that, about 78% of heat transfer enhancement could be achieved with the addition of 1% ZnFe2O4 particles in a base fluid at the Reynolds number of 84.4x103 and 39.5x103 for air and coolant respectively

  13. Assessment of natural radioactivity levels due to 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in the soil samples from eastern part of Gulbarga, Karnataka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh, S.; Avinash, P.R.; Kerur, B.R.; Anilkumar, S.

    2014-01-01

    The natural radiation dose received by the public mainly arises from the cosmic radiation (galactic and solar) and from terrestrial sources. Terrestrial radiation levels in the environment are due to radiations from natural radioactive elements preset in various environmental materials. Naturally occurring radionuclides are the major contributors to the total effective dose of ionizing radiation received by the population. The gamma rays from natural radionuclides like 226 Ra, 232T h and 40 K are the most significant for environmental dose, due to its wide range and penetrating power. The occurrence and concentration of these radionuclides depend mainly on the local geological formation and geochemical composition of earth. Two adjoining talukas, Sedam and Chincholi selected for the present study lies in the eastern part of Gulbarga district of North-East Karnataka covers the area with range 17.12° - 17.51° N latitude and 77.08° - 77.85° E longitude as shown in the paper. The soil types in the study region are mainly black soil. The area is surrounded by the plane surface and small hills in certain directions which have an abundant resource of the shale and limestone, which are highly deformed in nature. The study area is popular for industries like cement production and granite mining, utilizing natural resources in large scale. It will be of interest to examine the variation of environmental radiation dose rates due to various activities in the study area. Large number surface soil samples have been collected from the study region for the assessment of effective dose from 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K. The data generated in this study region will act as a baseline data for natural background radiation and is essential for future assessments, comparison and radiological mapping of the study area

  14. Analysis of multi-dimensional and countercurrent effects in a BWR loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Dix, G.E.; Alamgir, M.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of parallel enclosed channels in a BWR provides opportunities for multiple flow regimes in co-current and countercurrent flow under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. To address and understand these phenomena, an integrated experimental and analytical study has been conducted. The primary experimental facility was the Steam Sector Test Facility (SSTF) which simulated a full scale 30deg sector of a BWR/6 reactor vessel. Both steady-state separate effects tests and integral transients with vessel blowdown and refill were performed. The present of multi-dimensional and parallel channel effects was found to be very beneficial to BWR LOCA performance. The best estimate TRAC-BWR computer code was extended as part of this study by incorporation of a phenomenological upper plenum mixing model. TRAC-BWR was applied to the analysis of these full scale experiments. Excellent predictions of phenomena and experimental trends were achieved. (orig.)

  15. Analysis of multidimensional and countercurrent effects in a BWR loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Dix, G.E.; Alamgir, M.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of parallel enclosed channels in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides opportunities for multiple flow regimes in cocurrent and countercurrent flow under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. To address and understand these phenomena, an integrated experimental and analytical study has been conducted. The primary experimental facility was the steam sector test facility (SSFT), which simulated a full scale 30deg sector of a BWR/6 reactor vessel. Both steady-state separate effects tests an integral transients with vessel vlowdown and refill were performed. The presence of multidimensional and parallel-channel effects was found to be very beneficial to BWR LOCA performance. The best estimate TRAC-BWR computer code was extended as part of this study by incorporation of a phenomenological upper plenum mixing model. TRAC-BWR was applied to the analysis of these full scale experiments. Excellent predictions of phenomena and experimental trends were achieved. (orig.)

  16. Analytical study on coolant temperature of several leak flows in the experimental VHTr core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumizawa, Motoh; Arai, Taketoshi; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki

    1982-08-01

    This report describes heat transfer analysis of several leak flows which bypass main coolant flow path in the experimental VHTR core. The analysis contains the leak flow at permanent reflectors, replaceable reflectors and gaps between fuel columns. The summary of the results are as follows: (1) the temperature of the leak flow gas increases up to the surface temperature of permanent reflectors, (2) the gas temperature at replaceable reflectors increases at least 40 0 C in case of the worst analytical condition, (3) the gas temperature increases remarkably with decreasing equivalent diameter which is changed by the angle of bevel edge of the reflector, (4) while the gas temperature is low at the upper part of the fuel element, the temperature increases rapidly when it flow down along the gap of the fuel columns. (author)

  17. Safety Analysis of the US Dual Coolant Liquid Lead-Lithium ITER Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, Brad; Reyes, Susana; Sawan, Mohamed; Wong, Clement

    2006-07-01

    The US is proposing a prototype of a dual coolant liquid lead-lithium (DCLL) DEMO blanket concept for testing in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) as an ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM). Because safety considerations are an integral part of the design process to ensure that this TBM does not adversely impact the safety of ITER, a safety assessment has been conducted for this TBM and its ancillary systems as requested by the ITER project. Four events were selected by the ITER International Team (IT) to address specific reactor safety concerns, such as VV pressurization, confinement building pressure build-up, TBM decay heat removal capability, tritium and activation products release from the TBM system, and hydrogen and heat production from chemical reactions. This paper summarizes the results of this safety assessment conducted with the MELCOR computer code.

  18. System approach in the investigation of coolant parametrical oscillations in passive safety injection systems (PSIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskouriakov, K.N.

    2001-01-01

    The use of thermal-hydraulic computer codes is an important part of the work programme for activities in the field of nuclear power plants (NPP) Safety Research as it will enable to define better the test configuration and parameter range extensions and to extrapolate the results of the small scale experiments towards full scale reactor applications. The CATHARE2, RELAP5, the WCOBRA/TRAC, and APROS codes are the estimate thermal hydraulic codes for the evaluation of large and small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). The relatively good agreement experimental data with the calculations have been presented. There was shown also some big mistakes in predicting distribution of flow when two phase are present. Model of parametrical oscillation (P.O.) worked out gives explanation for flow oscillations and indicates that the phenomenon of P.O. appears under certain combination of thermal-hydraulic parameters and structure of heat-removal system. (orig.)

  19. Development of manufacturing technology and fabrication of prototype for main coolant pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Koon Seok; Han, C.K.; Chei, J.M.; Chung, K.S.; Youn, M.H.; Shin, S.A.; Choi, D.J.; Kim, H.C. [HALLA Industrial Co., Ltd., Pusan (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    This study presents the development of the manufacturing technology for the Main Coolant Pump of the SMART. This report contains the followings; (1) Select axial type pump for the MCP (2) MCP is drived by squirrel-cage induction motor that consisted canned motor type. (3) MCP shaft has three horizontal and one vertical support bearings. (4) Design of several part of the MCP (5) Manufacturing of the performance test motor (6) Design and manufacturing of the speed sensor (7) Procedures for three-axial and five-axial M.C.T., Tig welding and Electron Beam Welding were developed. (8) Conceptional design of the MCP test facility for the performance test under operating conditions. (9) Results of standard weld test specimens according to the ASME section IX. (author). 21 refs., 35 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Quantitative assessment of consequences of natural events for the performance of waste disposal isolation system: Part (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, Hiroo

    1999-12-01

    This year, first, regarding to the volcanism, seismicity and faulting, and uplift and erosion scenarios, in addition to the evaluation of those scenarios are variant cases carried out last year, variant cases where directly impacted repository could be also treated have been studied and evaluated. Secondly, based on a series of discussions in these years, a comprehensive study was made to evaluate the complex effect caused by combining natural events such as volcanism, seismicity and faulting, uplift and erosion, and climate change as well as human activity, where discussions have been made on which combined scenario was more important and how to set the analysis framework. Finally, in order to discuss alternatives such as non-groundwater scenario and/or non-geological disposal strategy, long-term storage scenario was considered to be compared with geological disposal scenario. (author)

  1. Weather Impacts on Natural, Social and Economic Systems (WISE). Part I. Sectoral Analysis of Climate Impacts in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeotti, M.; Goria, A.; Spantidaki, E.; Mombrini, P.

    2004-02-01

    This paper focuses on the results of the research work carried out by Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM) within the WISE project. This project aims at investigating the effects and the impacts of extreme weather events, particularly very warm summers, mild winters and storms, on the socio-economic systems of European countries. The output consists of a series of empirical studies, both of quantitative and qualitative descriptive nature. The work of FEEM in the WISE project covers the quantitative analysis of the impacts of climate extremes on the socio-economic system in Italy and the analysis of individuals' perception of climate extremes based on results from individuals' surveys. In this paper is presented the statistical modelling of the impact of weather, through quantitative analysis of activity time series. In particular, the core sectors analysed include fires, health, energy use, tourism and agriculture

  2. Fuel-coolant interaction-phenomena under prompt burst conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, H.; Young, M.F.; Reil, K.O.

    1979-01-01

    The Prompt Burst Energetics (PBE) experiments conducted at Sandia Laboratories are a series of in-pile tests with fresh uranium oxide or uranium carbide fuel pins in stagnant sodium. Fuel-coolant-interactions in PBE-9S (oxide/sodium system) and PBE-SG2 (carbide/sodium) have been analyzed with the MURTI parametric FCI code. The purpose is to gain insight into possible FCI scenarios in the experiments and sensitivity of results to input parameters. Results are in approximate agreement for the second (triggered) event in PBE-9S (32 MPa peak) and the initial interaction in PBE-SG2

  3. Modelling transient energy release from molten fuel coolant interaction debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, D.F.

    1984-05-01

    A simple model of transient energy release in a Molten Fuel Coolant Interaction is presented. A distributed heat transfer model is used to examine the effect of heat transfer coefficient, time available for rapid energy heat transfer and particle size on transient energy release. The debris is assumed to have an Upper Limit Lognormal distribution. Model predictions are compared with results from the SUW series of experiments which used thermite-generated uranium dioxide molybdenum melts released below the surface of a pool of water. Uncertainties in the physical principles involved in the calculation of energy transfer rates are discussed. (author)

  4. In-operation diagnostic system for reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Mitsunobu; Hasegawa, Ichiro; Kitahara, Hiromichi; Shimamura, Kazuo; Yasuda, Chiaki; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Kida, Yasuo.

    1996-01-01

    A reactor coolant pump (RCP) is one of the most important rotating machines in the primary loop nuclear power plants. To improve the reliability and of nuclear power plants, a new diagnostic system that enables early detection of RCP faults has been developed. This system is based on continuous monitoring of vibration and other process data. Vibration is an important indicator of mechanical faults providing information on physical phenomena such as changes in dynamic characteristics and excitation forces changes that signal failure or incipient failure. This new system features comparative vibration analysis and simulation to anticipate equipment failure. (author)

  5. PUMP: analog-hybrid reactor coolant hydraulic transient model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandia, M.R.

    1976-03-01

    The PUMP hybrid computer code simulates flow and pressure distribution; it is used to determine real time response to starting and tripping all combinations of PWR reactor coolant pumps in a closed, pressurized, four-pump, two-loop primary system. The simulation includes the description of flow, pressure, speed, and torque relationships derived through pump affinity laws and from vendor-supplied pump zone maps to describe pump dynamic characteristics. The program affords great flexibility in the type of transients that can be simulated

  6. Graphite beds for coolant filtration at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heathcock, R.E.; Lacy, C.S.

    1978-01-01

    High temperature filtration will be provided for new Ontario Hydro CANDU heat transport systems. Filtration has been shown to effectively reduce the concentration of circulating corrosion products in our heat transport systems, hence, minimizing the processes of activity transport. This paper will present one option we have for this application; Deep Bed Granular Graphite Filters. The filter system is described by discussing pertinent aspects of its development programme. The compatibility of the filter and the heat transport coolant are demonstrated by results from loop tests, both out- and in-reactor, and by subsequent results from a large filter installation in the NPD NGS heat transport system. (author)

  7. Effects contributing to positive coolant void reactivity in CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitlock, J.J.; Garland, W.J.; Milgram, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The lattice cell code WIMS-AECL (Ref. 3) is used to model a typical CANDU lattice cell, using nominal geometric bucklings, the PIJ option, and 69-group Winfrith library. The effect of cell voiding is modeled as a 100% instantaneous removal of coolant from the lattice. This is conservative because of the neglect of time dependence and partial core voiding, considered more plausible in CANDU. Results are grouped into three spectral groups: fast neutrons (0.821 to 10 MeV), epithermal neutrons (0.625 eV to 0.821 MeV), and thermal neutrons (<0.625 eV)

  8. COPDIRC - calculation of particle deposition in reactor coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeks, M.W.

    1982-06-01

    A description is given of a computer code COPDIRC intended for the calculation of the deposition of particulate onto smooth perfectly sticky surfaces in a gas cooled reactor coolant. The deposition is assumed to be limited by transport in the boundary layer adjacent to the depositing surface. This implies that the deposition velocity normalised with respect to the local friction velocity, is an almost universal function of the normalised particle relaxation time. Deposition is assumed similar to deposition in an equivalent smooth perfectly absorbing pipe. The deposition is calculated using 2 models. (author)

  9. Use of flow models to analyse loss of coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinet, Bernard

    1978-01-01

    This article summarises current work on developing the use of flow models to analyse loss-of-coolant accident in pressurized-water plants. This work is being done jointly, in the context of the LOCA Technical Committee, by the CEA, EDF and FRAMATOME. The construction of the flow model is very closely based on some theoretical studies of the two-fluid model. The laws of transfer at the interface and at the wall are tested experimentally. The representativity of the model then has to be checked in experiments involving several elementary physical phenomena [fr

  10. Time-dependent coolant velocity measurements in an operating BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebbesmeyer, D.; Crowe, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A method to measure time-dependent fluid velocities in BWR-bundle elements by noise analysis of the incore-neutron-detector signals is shown. Two application examples of the new method are given. The time behaviour of the fluid velocity in the bundle element during a scheduled power excursion of the plant. The change of power was performed by changing the coolant flow through the core The apparent change of the fluid velocity due to thermal elongation of the helix-drive of the TIP-system. A simplified mathematical model was derived for this elongation to use as a reference to check the validity of the new method. (author)

  11. Definition of loss-of-coolant accident radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    Meaningful qualification testing of nuclear reactor components requires a knowledge of the radiation fields expected in a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The overall objective of this program is to define the LOCA source terms and compare these with the output of various simulators employed for radiation qualification testing. The basis for comparison will be the energy deposition in a model reactor component. The results of the calculations are presented and some interpretation of the results given. The energy release rates and spectra were validated by comparison with other calculations using different codes since experimental data appropriate to these calculations do not exist

  12. Calculational advance in the modeling of fuel-coolant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohl, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    A new technique is applied to numerically simulate a fuel-coolant interaction. The technique is based on the ability to calculate separate space- and time-dependent velocities for each of the participating components. In the limiting case of a vapor explosion, this framework allows calculation of the pre-mixing phase of film boiling and interpenetration of the working fluid by hot liquid, which is required for extrapolating from experiments to a reactor hypothetical accident. Qualitative results are compared favorably to published experimental data where an iron-alumina mixture was poured into water. Differing results are predicted with LMFBR materials

  13. Water vapor as a perspective coolant for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalafati, D.D.; Petrov, S.I.

    1978-01-01

    Based on analysis of foreign projects of nuclear power plants with steam-cooled fast reactors, it is shown that low breeding ratio and large doubling time were caused by using nickel alloys, high vapor pressure and small volume heat release. The possibility is shown of obtaining doubling time in the necessary limits of T 2 =10-12 years when the above reasons for steam-cooled reactors are eliminated. Favourable combination of thermophysical and thermodynamic properties of water vapor makes it perspective coolant for power fast reactors

  14. Burnup dependence of coolant void reactivity for ACR-1000 cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Tellier, R.; Marleau, G.; Hebert, A.; Roubstov, D.; Altiparmakov, D.; Irish, D.

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Candu Reactor (ACR-1000) is light water cooled, fueled with enriched uranium and has a smaller lattice pitch than the Candu-6. As a result, the neutronic behavior of the ACR-1000 cell is expected to be somewhat different from that of the Candu-6 leading to a negative coolant void reactivity (CVR). Here we evaluate the CVR for the ACR-1000 cell using the lattice code DRAGON and compare our results with those obtained using the code WIMS-AECL. The differences observed between these two codes for the burnup dependence of the CVR is mainly explained in terms of the specific cell leakage model used by both codes. (authors)

  15. Some observations on simulated molten debris-coolant layer dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.; Klein, J.; Klages, J.; Schwarz, E.; Sanborn, Y.

    1983-04-01

    Experiments are being performed to investigate high temperature liquid-liquid film boiling between a pool of liquid metal and an overlying coolant pool of R-11 or water. Film boiling has been observed to be stable for R-11; however, considerable liquid-liquid contact has been observed with water well beyond the minimum film boiling temperature. Unstable liquid-liquid film boiling of water has been observed to escalate into dispersive, non-energetic vapor explosions when the interface contact temperature exceeded the spontaneous nucleation temperature. Other parametric trends in the data are discussed

  16. Loss of coolant accident at boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez G, R.

    1975-01-01

    A revision is made with regard to the methods of thermohydraulic analysis which are used at present in order to determine the efficiency of the safety systems against loss of coolant at boiling water reactors. The object is to establish a program of work in the INEN so that the personnel in charge of the safety of the nuclear plants in Mexico, be able to make in a near future, independent valuations of the safety systems which mitigate the consequences of the above mentioned accident. (author)

  17. Void fraction calculation in a channel containing boiling coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norelli, F.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of void fraction calculation was studied for a channel containing boiling coolant, when a slip ratio correlation is used. Use of fitting (e.g. polinomial or rational algebraic) for slip ratio correlation and the characteristic method are proposed in this work. In this way we are reduced to some elementary quadrature problem. Another problem discussed in the present work concerns what we must consider as ''initial condition'' in any initial value problem, in order to take into account different error distributions in steady state and in successive time-dependent calculations

  18. DETERMINATION OF THE 129I IN PRIMARY COOLANT OF PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KE CHON CHOI

    2013-02-01

    In this report, the effect of the boron content in a pressurized-water reactor primary coolant on the separation process of 129I was examined, as was the effect of 3H on the measurement of the activity of iodine. As a result, no influence of the boron content and of the simultaneous 3H presence was found with activity concentrations of 3H lower than 50 Bq/mL, and with a boron concentration of less than 2,000 μg/mL.

  19. Reactor coolant pump shaft seal stability during station blackout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, D.B.; Hill, R.C.; Wensel, R.G.

    1987-05-01

    Results are presented from an investigation into the behavior of Reactor Coolant Pump shaft seals during a potential station blackout (loss of all ac power) at a nuclear power plant. The investigation assumes loss of cooling to the seals and focuses on the effect of high temperature on polymer seals located in the shaft seal assemblies, and the identification of parameters having the most influence on overall hydraulic seal performance. Predicted seal failure thresholds are presented for a range of station blackout conditions and shaft seal geometries

  20. Reactor coolant pump shaft seal stability during station blackout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, D B; Hill, R C; Wensel, R G

    1987-05-01

    Results are presented from an investigation into the behavior of Reactor Coolant Pump shaft seals during a potential station blackout (loss of all ac power) at a nuclear power plant. The investigation assumes loss of cooling to the seals and focuses on the effect of high temperature on polymer seals located in the shaft seal assemblies, and the identification of parameters having the most influence on overall hydraulic seal performance. Predicted seal failure thresholds are presented for a range of station blackout conditions and shaft seal geometries.