WorldWideScience

Sample records for natural carbon cycle

  1. The Carbon Cycle: Teaching Youth about Natural Resource Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, William A.

    2015-01-01

    The carbon cycle was used as a conceptual construct for organizing the curriculum for a youth summer camp on natural resource use and sustainability. Several studies have indicated the importance of non-traditional youth education settings for science education and understanding responsible natural resource use. The Sixth Grade Forestry Tour, a…

  2. Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Archer; Bruce Buffett

    2011-12-31

    We produced a two-dimensional geological time- and basin-scale model of the sedimentary margin in passive and active settings, for the simulation of the deep sedimentary methane cycle including hydrate formation. Simulation of geochemical data required development of parameterizations for bubble transport in the sediment column, and for the impact of the heterogeneity in the sediment pore fluid flow field, which represent new directions in modeling methane hydrates. The model is somewhat less sensitive to changes in ocean temperature than our previous 1-D model, due to the different methane transport mechanisms in the two codes (pore fluid flow vs. bubble migration). The model is very sensitive to reasonable changes in organic carbon deposition through geologic time, and to details of how the bubbles migrate, in particular how efficiently they are trapped as they rise through undersaturated or oxidizing chemical conditions and the hydrate stability zone. The active margin configuration reproduces the elevated hydrate saturations observed in accretionary wedges such as the Cascadia Margin, but predicts a decrease in the methane inventory per meter of coastline relative to a comparable passive margin case, and a decrease in the hydrate inventory with an increase in the plate subduction rate.

  3. Capturing and sequestering carbon by enhancing the natural carbon cycle: Prelimary identification of basic science needs and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, S.M.

    1997-07-01

    This document summarizes proceedings and conclusions of a US DOE workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to identify the underlying research needed to answer the following questions: (1) Can the natural carbon cycle be used to aid in stabilizing or decreasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} by: (a) Increasing carbon capture; (b) Preventing carbon from returning to the atmosphere through intermediate (<100 years) to long-term sequestration (> 100 years)?; and (2) What kind of ecosystem management practices could be used to achieve this? Three working groups were formed to discuss the terrestrial biosphere, oceans, and methane. Basic research needs identified included fundamental understanding of carbon cycling and storage in soils, influence of climate change and anthropogenic emissions on the carbon cycle, and carbon capture and sequestration in oceans. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Urbanization and the carbon cycle: Current capabilities and research outlook from the natural sciences perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutyra, Lucy R.; Duren, Riley; Gurney, Kevin R.; Grimm, Nancy; Kort, Eric A.; Larson, Elisabeth; Shrestha, Gyami

    2014-10-01

    This paper explores the urban carbon cycle from the natural sciences perspective, identifying key knowledge gaps and priority areas for future research. The combination of large, concentrated carbon fluxes and rapid change makes cities key elements of the carbon cycle and offers the potential for them to serve as "first responders" for climate action. Estimates of urban-scale carbon fluxes are significantly more uncertain than at larger spatial scales, in part because past studies have mostly avoided local/urban scales where the mix of anthropogenic and natural fluxes is complex and difficult to observationally isolate. To develop effective emission reduction policies, we need to understand emission sources and how they may be changing. Such improved quantification and understanding of underlying processes at the urban scale will not only provide policy-relevant information and improve the understanding of urban dynamics and future scenarios, but will also translate into better global-scale anthropogenic flux estimates, and advance our understanding of carbon cycle and climate feedbacks across multiple scales. Understanding the relationship between urbanization and urban carbon flows requires intellectual integration with research communities beyond the natural sciences. Cities can serve as interdisciplinary process laboratories that are sufficiently constrained in both spatial and governance scale to support truly integrated research by the natural sciences, social sciences, and engineering. A thoughtfully crafted science research agenda that is grounded in sustained, dense observations relevant to estimating urban carbon fluxes and their controlling processes and is focused on a statistically significant sample of cities will advance our understanding of the carbon cycle.

  5. A Natural Light/Dark Cycle Regulation of Carbon-Nitrogen Metabolism and Gene Expression in Rice Shoots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haixing; Liang, Zhijun; Ding, Guangda; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen; Cai, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Light and temperature are two particularly important environmental cues for plant survival. Carbon and nitrogen are two essential macronutrients required for plant growth and development, and cellular carbon and nitrogen metabolism must be tightly coordinated. In order to understand how the natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism in rice plants, we analyzed the photosynthesis, key carbon-nitrogen metabolites, and enzyme activities, and differentially expressed genes and miRNAs involved in the carbon and nitrogen metabolic pathway in rice shoots at the following times: 2:00, 6:00, 10:00, 14:00, 18:00, and 22:00. Our results indicated that more CO2 was fixed into carbohydrates by a high net photosynthetic rate, respiratory rate, and stomatal conductance in the daytime. Although high levels of the nitrate reductase activity, free ammonium and carbohydrates were exhibited in the daytime, the protein synthesis was not significantly facilitated by the light and temperature. In mRNA sequencing, the carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related differentially expressed genes were obtained, which could be divided into eight groups: photosynthesis, TCA cycle, sugar transport, sugar metabolism, nitrogen transport, nitrogen reduction, amino acid metabolism, and nitrogen regulation. Additionally, a total of 78,306 alternative splicing events have been identified, which primarily belong to alternative 5' donor sites, alternative 3' acceptor sites, intron retention, and exon skipping. In sRNA sequencing, four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs (osa-miR1440b, osa-miR2876-5p, osa-miR1877 and osa-miR5799) were determined to be regulated by natural light/dark cycle. The expression level analysis showed that the four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs negatively regulated their target genes. These results may provide a good strategy to study how natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism to ensure plant growth and

  6. The cost of carbon capture and storage for natural gas combined cycle power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Edward S; Zhai, Haibo

    2012-03-20

    This paper examines the cost of CO(2) capture and storage (CCS) for natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants. Existing studies employ a broad range of assumptions and lack a consistent costing method. This study takes a more systematic approach to analyze plants with an amine-based postcombustion CCS system with 90% CO(2) capture. We employ sensitivity analyses together with a probabilistic analysis to quantify costs for plants with and without CCS under uncertainty or variability in key parameters. Results for new baseload plants indicate a likely increase in levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of $20-32/MWh (constant 2007$) or $22-40/MWh in current dollars. A risk premium for plants with CCS increases these ranges to $23-39/MWh and $25-46/MWh, respectively. Based on current cost estimates, our analysis further shows that a policy to encourage CCS at new NGCC plants via an emission tax or carbon price requires (at 95% confidence) a price of at least $125/t CO(2) to ensure NGCC-CCS is cheaper than a plant without CCS. Higher costs are found for nonbaseload plants and CCS retrofits.

  7. Chemical sensing and imaging in microfluidic pore network structures relevant to natural carbon cycling and industrial carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grate, Jay W.; Zhang, Changyong; Wilkins, Michael J.; Warner, Marvin G.; Anheier, Norman C.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Oostrom, Martinus

    2013-06-11

    Energy and climate change represent significant factors in global security. Atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, while global in scope, are influenced by pore-scale phenomena in the subsurface. We are developing tools to visualize and investigate processes in pore network microfluidic structures with transparent covers as representations of normally-opaque porous media. In situ fluorescent oxygen sensing methods and fluorescent cellulosic materials are being used to investigate processes related to terrestrial carbon cycling involving cellulytic respiring microorganisms. These structures also enable visualization of water displacement from pore spaces by hydrophobic fluids, including carbon dioxide, in studies related to carbon sequestration.

  8. Mirador - Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Earth Science data access made simple. This Focus Area deals with the cycling of carbon in reservoirs and ecosystems as it changes naturally, is changed by humans,...

  9. A natural light/dark cycle regulation of carbon-nitrogen metabolism and gene expression in rice shoots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixing Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Light and temperature are two particularly important environmental cues for plant survival. Carbon and nitrogen are two essential macronutrients required for plant growth and development, and cellular carbon and nitrogen metabolism must be tightly coordinated. In order to understand how the natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism in rice plants, we analyzed the photosynthesis, key carbon-nitrogen metabolites and enzyme activities, and differentially expressed genes and miRNAs involved in the carbon and nitrogen metabolic pathway in rice shoots at the following times: 2:00, 6:00, 10:00, 14:00, 18:00 and 22:00. Our results indicated that more CO2 was fixed into carbohydrates by a high net photosynthetic rate, respiratory rate and stomatal conductance in the daytime. Although high levels of the nitrate reductase activity, free ammonium and carbohydrates were exhibited in the daytime, the protein synthesis was not significantly facilitated by the light and temperature. In mRNA sequencing, the carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related differentially expressed genes were obtained, which could be divided into eight groups: photosynthesis, TCA cycle, sugar transport, sugar metabolism, nitrogen transport, nitrogen reduction, amino acid metabolism and nitrogen regulation. Additionally, a total of 78,306 alternative splicing events have been identified, which primarily belong to alternative 5' donor sites, alternative 3' acceptor sites, intron retention and exon skipping. In sRNA sequencing, four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs (osa-miR1440b, osa-miR2876-5p, osa-miR1877 and osa-miR5799 were determined to be regulated by natural light/dark cycle. The expression level analysis showed that the four carbon and nitrogen metabolism-related miRNAs negatively regulated their target genes. These results may provide a good strategy to study how natural light/dark cycle regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism to ensure plant

  10. Animating the Carbon Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the biogeochemical processes reg- ulating carbon cycling is central to mitigating atmospheric CO2 emissions. The role of living organisms has been accounted for, but the focus has traditionally been on contributions of plants and microbes. We develop the case that fully ‘‘animating’’ the carbon cycle requires broader consideration of the functional role of animals in mediating biogeochemical processes and quanti- fication of their effects on carbon storage and exchange among ter...

  11. Development of a dynamic simulator for a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with post-combustion carbon capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liese, E.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    The AVESTAR Center located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and West Virginia University is a world-class research and training environment dedicated to using dynamic process simulation as a tool for advancing the safe, efficient and reliable operation of clean energy plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The AVESTAR Center was launched with a high-fidelity dynamic simulator for an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion carbon capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator offers full-scope Operator Training Simulator (OTS) Human Machine Interface (HMI) graphics for realistic, real-time control room operation and is integrated with a 3D virtual Immersive Training Simulator (ITS), thus allowing joint control room and field operator training. The IGCC OTS/ITS solution combines a “gasification with CO{sub 2} capture” process simulator with a “combined cycle” power simulator into a single high-performance dynamic simulation framework. This presentation will describe progress on the development of a natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) dynamic simulator based on the syngas-fired combined cycle portion of AVESTAR’s IGCC dynamic simulator. The 574 MW gross NGCC power plant design consisting of two advanced F-class gas turbines, two heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), and a steam turbine in a multi-shaft 2x2x1 configuration will be reviewed. Plans for integrating a post-combustion carbon capture system will also be discussed.

  12. Diagnosing phosphorus limitations in natural terrestrial ecosystems in carbon cycle models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Peng, Shushi; Goll, Daniel S.; Ciais, Philippe; Guenet, Bertrand; Guimberteau, Matthieu; Hinsinger, Philippe; Janssens, Ivan A.; Peñuelas, Josep; Piao, Shilong; Poulter, Benjamin; Violette, Aurélie; Yang, Xiaojuan; Yin, Yi; Zeng, Hui

    2017-07-01

    Most of the Earth System Models (ESMs) project increases in net primary productivity (NPP) and terrestrial carbon (C) storage during the 21st century. Despite empirical evidence that limited availability of phosphorus (P) may limit the response of NPP to increasing atmospheric CO2, none of the ESMs used in the previous Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment accounted for P limitation. We diagnosed from ESM simulations the amount of P need to support increases in carbon uptake by natural ecosystems using two approaches: the demand derived from (1) changes in C stocks and (2) changes in NPP. The C stock-based additional P demand was estimated to range between -31 and 193 Tg P and between -89 and 262 Tg P for Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 2.6 and RCP8.5, respectively, with negative values indicating a P surplus. The NPP-based demand, which takes ecosystem P recycling into account, results in a significantly higher P demand of 648-1606 Tg P for RCP2.6 and 924-2110 Tg P for RCP8.5. We found that the P demand is sensitive to the turnover of P in decomposing plant material, explaining the large differences between the NPP-based demand and C stock-based demand. The discrepancy between diagnosed P demand and actual P availability (potential P deficit) depends mainly on the assumptions about availability of the different soil P forms. Overall, future P limitation strongly depends on both soil P availability and P recycling on ecosystem scale.

  13. The carbon dioxide cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, P.B.; Hansen, G.B.; Titus, T.N.

    2005-01-01

    The seasonal CO2 cycle on Mars refers to the exchange of carbon dioxide between dry ice in the seasonal polar caps and gaseous carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This review focuses on breakthroughs in understanding the process involving seasonal carbon dioxide phase changes that have occurred as a result of observations by Mars Global Surveyor. ?? 2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Natural Ocean Carbon Cycle Sensitivity to Parameterizations of the Recycling in a Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanou, A.; Romanski, J.; Gregg, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivities of the oceanic biological pump within the GISS (Goddard Institute for Space Studies ) climate modeling system are explored here. Results are presented from twin control simulations of the air-sea CO2 gas exchange using two different ocean models coupled to the same atmosphere. The two ocean models (Russell ocean model and Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model, HYCOM) use different vertical coordinate systems, and therefore different representations of column physics. Both variants of the GISS climate model are coupled to the same ocean biogeochemistry module (the NASA Ocean Biogeochemistry Model, NOBM), which computes prognostic distributions for biotic and abiotic fields that influence the air-sea flux of CO2 and the deep ocean carbon transport and storage. In particular, the model differences due to remineralization rate changes are compared to differences attributed to physical processes modeled differently in the two ocean models such as ventilation, mixing, eddy stirring and vertical advection. GISSEH(GISSER) is found to underestimate mixed layer depth compared to observations by about 55% (10 %) in the Southern Ocean and overestimate it by about 17% (underestimate by 2%) in the northern high latitudes. Everywhere else in the global ocean, the two models underestimate the surface mixing by about 12-34 %, which prevents deep nutrients from reaching the surface and promoting primary production there. Consequently, carbon export is reduced because of reduced production at the surface. Furthermore, carbon export is particularly sensitive to remineralization rate changes in the frontal regions of the subtropical gyres and at the Equator and this sensitivity in the model is much higher than the sensitivity to physical processes such as vertical mixing, vertical advection and mesoscale eddy transport. At depth, GISSER, which has a significant warm bias, remineralizes nutrients and carbon faster thereby producing more nutrients and carbon at depth, which

  15. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Ryu, Youngryel; Keenan, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    A growing literature is reporting on how the terrestrial carbon cycle is experiencing year-to-year variability because of climate anomalies and trends caused by global change. As CO 2 concentration records in the atmosphere exceed 50 years and as satellite records reach over 30 years in length, we are becoming better able to address carbon cycle variability and trends. Here we review how variable the carbon cycle is, how large the trends in its gross and net fluxes are, and how well the signal can be separated from noise. We explore mechanisms that explain year-to-year variability and trends by deconstructing the global carbon budget. The CO 2 concentration record is detecting a significant increase in the seasonal amplitude between 1958 and now. Inferential methods provide a variety of explanations for this result, but a conclusive attribution remains elusive. Scientists have reported that this trend is a consequence of the greening of the biosphere, stronger northern latitude photosynthesis, more photosynthesis by semi-arid ecosystems, agriculture and the green revolution, tropical temperature anomalies, or increased winter respiration. At the global scale, variability in the terrestrial carbon cycle can be due to changes in constituent fluxes, gross primary productivity, plant respiration and heterotrophic (microbial) respiration, and losses due to fire, land use change, soil erosion, or harvesting. It remains controversial whether or not there is a significant trend in global primary productivity (due to rising CO 2, temperature, nitrogen deposition, changing land use, and preponderance of wet and dry regions). The degree to which year-to-year variability in temperature and precipitation anomalies affect global primary productivity also remains uncertain. For perspective, interannual variability in global gross primary productivity is relatively small (on the order of 2 Pg-C y -1) with respect to a large and uncertain background (123 +/- 4 Pg-C y -1), and

  16. Natural ocean carbon cycle sensitivity to parameterizations of the recycling in a climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Romanou

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivities of the oceanic biological pump within the GISS climate modeling system are explored here. Results are presented from twin control simulations of the air-sea CO2 gas exchange using two different ocean models coupled to the same atmosphere. The two ocean models (Russell ocean model and Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model, HYCOM use different vertical coordinate systems, and therefore different representations of column physics. Both variants of the GISS climate model are coupled to the same ocean biogeochemistry module (the NASA Ocean Biogeochemistry Model, NOBM which computes prognostic distributions for biotic and abiotic fields that influence the air-sea flux of CO2 and the deep ocean carbon transport and storage. In particular, the model differences due to remineralization rate changes are compared to differences attributed to physical processes modeled differently in the two ocean models such as ventilation, mixing, eddy stirring and vertical advection. The Southern Ocean emerges as a key region where the CO2 flux is as sensitive to biological parameterizations as it is to physical parameterizations. Mixing in the Southern Ocean is shown to be a~good indicator of the magnitude of the biological pump efficiency regardless of physical model choice.

  17. Modelling of plant-soil carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling in semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jessica; Quinton, John; Rowe, Ed; Tipping, Ed

    2013-04-01

    In recent centuries pools and fluxes of C, N and P in natural and semi-natural UK ecosystems have been transformed by atmospheric pollution leading to: acidification; eutrophication of surface waters; loss of biodiversity; and increased greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, climate change now threatens to perturb these systems further. Understanding in this field is vital in determining the consequences of artificial nutrient enrichment and land use and climate change, and mitigating against their effects. The N14CP model has been recently developed to assess the temporal responses of soil C, N and P pools to nutrient enrichment in semi-natural ecosystems, and explore the connections between these nutrients. It is a dynamic, mechanistic model, driven by: climate; CO2, N (fixation and pollutant deposition), and P (weathering and atmospheric deposition) inputs; and plant cover type. It explicitly links C, N, and P in both plants and soils, using plant element stoichiometry as the primary constraint. Net primary production, and plant/soil element pools, are calculated over time, and output fluxes of dissolved organic and inorganic, and gaseous, forms of C, N, and P produced. Radiocarbon data are used to constrain Soil Organic Matter (SOM) turnover. The SOM is represented as three pools, undergoing first-order decomposition reactions with turn-over rates ranging from 2 to 1000 years. The N14CP modelling methodology is discussed and its calibration and verification using observations from 200 northern European sites presented. Whilst the primary period of interest with respect to nutrient enrichment is from the industrial revolution onwards, plant-soil C, N and P are simulated at these sites for a period spanning from the start of the Holocene (to provide a spin-up period) to the present day. Clearly, during this time span land cover and usage will have changed at these sites, and histories of these changes are used as an input to the model. The influence of these land

  18. The Pyrogenic Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Michael I.; Wynn, Jonathan G.; Saiz, Gustavo; Wurster, Christopher M.; McBeath, Anna

    2015-05-01

    Pyrogenic carbon (PyC; includes soot, char, black carbon, and biochar) is produced by the incomplete combustion of organic matter accompanying biomass burning and fossil fuel consumption. PyC is pervasive in the environment, distributed throughout the atmosphere as well as soils, sediments, and water in both the marine and terrestrial environment. The physicochemical characteristics of PyC are complex and highly variable, dependent on the organic precursor and the conditions of formation. A component of PyC is highly recalcitrant and persists in the environment for millennia. However, it is now clear that a significant proportion of PyC undergoes transformation, translocation, and remineralization by a range of biotic and abiotic processes on comparatively short timescales. Here we synthesize current knowledge of the production, stocks, and fluxes of PyC as well as the physical and chemical processes through which it interacts as a dynamic component of the global carbon cycle.

  19. Climate and the Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Jim

    2017-04-01

    Climate and the Carbon Cycle EOS3a Science in tomorrow's classroom Students, like too much of the American public, are largely unaware or apathetic to the changes in world climate and the impact that these changes have for life on Earth. A study conducted by Michigan State University and published in 2011 by Science Daily titled 'What carbon cycle? College students lack scientific literacy, study finds'. This study relates how 'most college students in the United States do not grasp the scientific basis of the carbon cycle - an essential skill in understanding the causes and consequences of climate change.' The study authors call for a new approach to teaching about climate. What if teachers better understood vital components of Earth's climate system and were able to impart his understanding to their students? What if students based their responses to the information taught not on emotion, but on a deeper understanding of the forces driving climate change, their analysis of the scientific evidence and in the context of earth system science? As a Middle School science teacher, I have been given the opportunity to use a new curriculum within TERC's EarthLabs collection, Climate and the Carbon Cycle, to awaken those brains and assist my students in making personal lifestyle choices based on what they had learned. In addition, with support from TERC and The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics I joined others to begin training other teachers on how to implement this curriculum in their classrooms to expose their students to our changing climate. Through my poster, I will give you (1) a glimpse into the challenges faced by today's science teachers in communicating the complicated, but ever-deepening understanding of the linkages between natural and human-driven factors on climate; (2) introduce you to a new module in the EarthLabs curriculum designed to expose teachers and students to global scientific climate data and instrumentation; and (3) illustrate how

  20. Influence of the binder nature on the performance and cycle life of activated carbon electrodes in electrolytes containing Li-salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hai Yen; Wohlfahrt-Mehrens, Margret; Dsoke, Sonia

    2017-02-01

    In the current work, the influence of the binder nature on the mechanical and electrochemical stability of activated carbon (AC) electrodes in LiPF6/EC/DMC is shown. Different binders employing water-based preparation route, i.e. poly(acrylic acid), sodium polyacrylate and sodium alginate, are evaluated and compared with the fluorinated binders (i.e. polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE and polyvinylidene difluoride, PVDF). Results obtained during the investigation show that the rheological behavior of the slurry as well as the electrode porosity can be significantly affected by choice of binder. More precisely, slurries containing AC and alginate can experience the stress relaxation test without breaking down the polymer network due to the multiple bonds between AC surface and the carboxylic group of the pyranose ring of α-L-guluronic acid of the sodium alginate. Moreover, the AC-Alginate electrodes can sustain up to 20 000 cycles (∼902 h) at I = 1.39 A g-1 in LiPF6 without a great increase in total equivalent series resistance (ESR) (ESRAC - Alginate ,20000th cycle = 4 × ESR1st cycle ,while ESRAC - PVDF ,20000th cycle = 6.5 × ESR1st cycle) . The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis on the aged electrodes shows that AC-Alginate can offer sufficient accessible porosity for extended charge/discharge cycles.

  1. Drought and ecosystem carbon cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molen, van der M.K.; Dolman, A.J.; Ciais, P.; Eglin, T.; Gobron, N.; Law, B.E.; Meir, P.; Peters, W.; Philips, O.L.; Hurk, van den B.J.J.M.; Jeu, M.; Kruijt, B.; Teuling, A.J.; Werf, van der G.R.; Wang, G.

    2011-01-01

    Drought as an intermittent disturbance of the water cycle interacts with the carbon cycle differently than the ‘gradual’ climate change. During drought plants respond physiologically and structurally to prevent excessive water loss according to species-specific water use strategies. This has consequ

  2. Global Carbon Cycle of the Precambrian Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiewióra, Justyna

    The carbon isotopic composition of distinct Archaean geological records provides information about the global carbon cycle and emergence of life on early Earth. We utilized carbon isotopic records of Greenlandic carbonatites, diamonds, graphites, marbles, metacarbonates and ultramafic rocks...... to investigate carbon fluxes between Precambrian Earth’s mantle and crust and to trace the evolution of life in the Eoarchaean oceans. The world’s desire for diamonds gives us a unique opportunity to obtain insight into the nature of metasomatic fluids affecting the subcratonic lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath...

  3. Closing carbon cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, Martin

    2001-01-01

    Fossil fuels are used as raw materials for the manufacture of synthetic organic materials, e.g. plastics, fibres, synthetic rubber, paints, solvents, fertilisers, surfactants, lubricants and bitumen. Since fossil carbon is embodied in these products they may be particularly relevant to climate ch

  4. Carbon cycling in terrestrial environments: Chapter 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Huntington, Thomas G.; Osher, Laurie J.; Wassenaar, Leonard I; Trumbore, Susan E.; Amundson, Ronald; Harden, Jennifer W.; McKnight, Diane M.; Schiff, Sherry L.; Aiken, George R.; Lyons, W. Berry; Aravena, Ramon O.; Baron, Jill S.

    1998-01-01

    This chapter reviews a number of applications of isotopic techniques for the investigation of carbon cycling processes. Carbon dioxide (C02) is an important greenhouse gas. Its concentration in the atmosphere has increased from an estimated 270 ppm at the beginning of the industrial revolution to ∼ 360 ppm at present. Climatic conditions and atmospheric C02 concentration also influence isotopic discrimination during photosynthesis. Natural and anthropogenically induced variations in the carbon isotopic abundance can be exploited to investigate carbon transformations between pools on various time scales. It also discusses one of the isotopes of carbon, the 14C, that is produced in the atmosphere by interactions of cosmic-ray produced neutrons with stable isotopes of nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), and carbon (C), and has a natural abundance in the atmosphere of ∼1 atom 14 C per 1012 atoms 12C. The most important factor affecting the measured 14C ages of soil organic matter is the rate of organic carbon cycling in soils. Differences in the dynamics of soil carbon among different soils or soil horizons will result in different soil organic 14C signatures. As a result, the deviation of the measured 14C age from the true age could differ significantly among different soils or soil horizons.

  5. Carbon cycle makeover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Kump, Lee R.

    2013-01-01

    remaining in sediments after respiration leave a residual of oxygen in the atmosphere. The source of oxygen to the atmosphere represented by organic matter burial is balanced by oxygen sinks associated with rock weathering and chemical reaction with volcanic gases. This is the long-term carbon and oxygen......In 1845, the French chemist and mining engineer Jacques-Joseph Ebelman figured out why Earth's atmosphere contains oxygen (1). Oxygen is produced by plants during photosynthesis, but almost all of this oxygen is used again in respiration. Ebelman reasoned that small amounts of organic matter...

  6. Investigating microbial cycling of recalcitrant organic matter in marine sediments using natural isotope respirometry in a novel, carbon-free bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, N.; Beaupre, S. R.; Pearson, A.

    2016-02-01

    Marine sediments harbor complex microbial communities that play a key role in the cycling of carbon and nutrients. Reactions initiated by microbial enzymes at the molecular scale drive the rate and extent of organic matter degradation to CO2 and CH4. Organic matter is comprised of multiple carbon pools with different intrinsic turnover times. It is hypothesized that microbes will degrade younger pools with more labile compounds, while older pools with refractory compounds will remain unutilized. However, many studies have shown that microbes are capable of respiring older, refractory pools of organic matter in a number of environments. In order to better understand microbial carbon cycling and the fate of recalcitrant organic matter, we constructed a novel bioreactor system to measure carbon isotopes during microbial degradation of complex organic matter. This system enables us to measure the natural isotopic signature (δ13C and Δ14C ) of microbially-respired CO2, thereby allowing us to determine the age of the organic matter that is being respired. We investigated microbial carbon utilization in sediments from Falmouth, MA and observed a pattern of successive microbial respiration such that several peaks appear over the course of a 7-day incubation. Δ14C signatures of CO2 fractions collected during incubation ranged from -185 to +70‰ with the majority of CO2 appearing to be modern. This indicates that the microbial community is primarily are respiring labile organic matter from fast cycling pools. Interestingly, the observation of multiple peaks with similar Δ14C signatures suggests that organic matter is degraded in a step-wise manner by a succession of microbial taxa. Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes will identify these successions of bacteria (and archaea), while enzymatic analyses may help determine the metabolic pathways that correspond to each peak. Our study will provide a molecular-level framework for organic matter degradation and provide

  7. Global Carbon Cycle of the Precambrian Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiewióra, Justyna

    to investigate carbon fluxes between Precambrian Earth’s mantle and crust and to trace the evolution of life in the Eoarchaean oceans. The world’s desire for diamonds gives us a unique opportunity to obtain insight into the nature of metasomatic fluids affecting the subcratonic lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath...... derived from surface water. Partitioning of carbon between 13C-rich oxidized and 13C-poor reduced species indicates that life in the early ocean had to be well evolved before 3.8 Ga. Therefore, the Isua ultramafic rocks may be considered as an indirect biomarker for ancient life.......The carbon isotopic composition of distinct Archaean geological records provides information about the global carbon cycle and emergence of life on early Earth. We utilized carbon isotopic records of Greenlandic carbonatites, diamonds, graphites, marbles, metacarbonates and ultramafic rocks...

  8. Interactions between land use change and carbon cycle feedbacks: Land Use and Carbon Cycle Feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahowald, Natalie M. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Randerson, James T. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lindsay, Keith [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Munoz, Ernesto [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Doney, Scott C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Inst., Woods Hole, MA (United States); Lawrence, Peter [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Schlunegger, Sarah [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Ward, Daniel S. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Lawrence, David [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Hoffman, Forrest M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-23

    We explore the role of human land use and land cover change (LULCC) in modifying the terrestrial carbon budget in simulations forced by Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5, extended to year 2300 by using the Community Earth System Model, . Overall, conversion of land (e.g., from forest to croplands via deforestation) results in a model-estimated, cumulative carbon loss of 490 Pg C between 1850 and 2300, larger than the 230 Pg C loss of carbon caused by climate change over this same interval. The LULCC carbon loss is a combination of a direct loss at the time of conversion and an indirect loss from the reduction of potential terrestrial carbon sinks. Approximately 40% of the carbon loss associated with LULCC in the simulations arises from direct human modification of the land surface; the remaining 60% is an indirect consequence of the loss of potential natural carbon sinks. Because of the multicentury carbon cycle legacy of current land use decisions, a globally averaged amplification factor of 2.6 must be applied to 2015 land use carbon losses to adjust for indirect effects. This estimate is 30% higher when considering the carbon cycle evolution after 2100. Most of the terrestrial uptake of anthropogenic carbon in the model occurs from the influence of rising atmospheric CO2 on photosynthesis in trees, and thus, model-projected carbon feedbacks are especially sensitive to deforestation.

  9. Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Cycle Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, D.; Chaoka, S.; Kumar, P.; Quijano, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Second generation bioenergy crops, such as miscanthus (Miscantus × giganteus) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), are regarded as clean energy sources, and are an attractive option to mitigate the human-induced climate change. However, the global climate change and the expansion of perennial grass bioenergy crops have the power to alter the biogeochemical cycles in soil, especially, soil carbon storages, over long time scales. In order to develop a predictive understanding, this study develops a coupled hydrological-soil nutrient model to simulate soil carbon responses under different climate scenarios such as: (i) current weather condition, (ii) decreased precipitation by -15%, and (iii) increased temperature up to +3C for four different crops, namely miscanthus, switchgrass, maize, and natural prairie. We use Precision Agricultural Landscape Modeling System (PALMS), version 5.4.0, to capture biophysical and hydrological components coupled with a multilayer carbon and ¬nitrogen cycle model. We apply the model at daily time scale to the Energy Biosciences Institute study site, located in the University of Illinois Research Farms, in Urbana, Illinois. The atmospheric forcing used to run the model was generated stochastically from parameters obtained using available data recorded in Bondville Ameriflux Site. The model simulations are validated with observations of drainage and nitrate and ammonium concentrations recorded in drain tiles during 2011. The results of this study show (1) total soil carbon storage of miscanthus accumulates most noticeably due to the significant amount of aboveground plant carbon, and a relatively high carbon to nitrogen ratio and lignin content, which reduce the litter decomposition rate. Also, (2) the decreased precipitation contributes to the enhancement of total soil carbon storage and soil nitrogen concentration because of the reduced microbial biomass pool. However, (3) an opposite effect on the cycle is introduced by the increased

  10. Carbon Stock and Carbon Cycle of Wetland Ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhangquan; ZENG; Canming; ZHANG; Jiao; LI; Nan; YANG; Xihao; LI; Yandong; NIU; Zijian; WU

    2014-01-01

    Wetland ecosystem is an essential ecosystem in the world. Its organic carbon stock and carbon cycle are important basis of global carbon cycle researches and also major contents of global climate change researches. Researches have shown that wetland protection and restoration can promote carbon accumulation and reduce emission of greenhouse gases. This paper discussed influence of carbon stock and carbon balance of wetland ecosystem and emission of greenhouse gases,as well as the relationship between wetland and global climate changes. Finally,it made prospect on researches about carbon cycle of Dongting Lake.

  11. Material Flows and Carbon Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrell, E.

    2003-12-01

    The industrial sector emits almost 43 percent of the global anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions to produce materials and products. Furthermore, energy is used to move materials and products and process the waste. Hence, a large amount of energy is consumed and CO2 is emitted to sustain our materials system. Until recently, studies investigating mitigation options focused on changes in the energy system. For industrial processes most studies evaluate how the current materials system can be maintained producing fewer greenhouse gas emissions. Three elements of a strategy to improve the long-term materials productivity are the reduction of dissipative uses of non-biodegradable materials, secondly, the re-design of products to use less material or design for re-use or recycling, and thirdly, develop more efficient technologies for material conversion and recycling. This will reduce or eliminate the need to extract virgin materials from the environment, and reduce CO2 emissions from the energy-intensive production processes. To assess measures to reduce materials consumption, fossil fuels consumption and CO2 emissions, detailed understanding of the material system is needed. The lifecycle of materials has to be investigated including all branches of industry with all the inputs and outputs. We start with a discussion of materials and the carbon cycle focusing on the contribution of materials to anthropogenic carbon flows. We discuss CO2 emissions from energy use in materials extraction and production, fossil (e.g. plastics) and biomass carbon (e.g. lumber, paper) used as feedstock of materials, and mineral sources (e.g. cement). We discuss opportunities to reduce CO2 emissions by improving the efficiency with which society uses materials through product design, material substitution, product reuse and material recycling.

  12. The Role of Carbon Cycle Observations and Knowledge in Carbon Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilling, Lisa; Doney, Scott; Edmonds, James A.; Gurney, Kevin R.; Harriss, Robert; Schimel, David; Stephens, Britton; Stokes, Gerald M.

    2003-08-14

    Agriculture and industrial development have led to inadvertent changes in the natural carbon cycle. As a consequence, concentrations of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases have increased in the atmosphere, leading to potential changes in climate. The current challenge facing society is to develop options for future management of the carbon cycle. A variety of approaches has been suggested: direct reduction of emissions, deliberate manipulation of the natural carbon cycle to enhance sequestration, and capture and isolation of carbon from fossil fuel use. Policy development to date has laid out some of the general principles to which carbon management should adhere. These can be summarized as: how much carbon is stored, by what means, and for how long. To successfully manage carbon for climate purposes requires increased understanding of carbon cycle dynamics and improvement to the scientific capabilities available for measurement as well as policy needs. Specific needs for scientific information to underpin carbon cycle management decisions are not yet broadly known. A stronger dialogue between decision makers and scientists must be developed to foster improved application of scientific knowledge to decisions. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge of the carbon cycle and measurement capabilities, with an emphasis on the continental-scale, and its relevance to carbon sequestration goals.

  13. Authigenic Carbonate and the History of the Global Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Daniel P.; Higgins, John. A.; Macdonald, Francis A.; Johnston, David T.

    2013-02-01

    We present a framework for interpreting the carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary rocks, which in turn requires a fundamental reinterpretation of the carbon cycle and redox budgets over Earth's history. We propose that authigenic carbonate, produced in sediment pore fluids during early diagenesis, has played a major role in the carbon cycle in the past. This sink constitutes a minor component of the carbon isotope mass balance under the modern, high levels of atmospheric oxygen but was much larger in times of low atmospheric O2 or widespread marine anoxia. Waxing and waning of a global authigenic carbonate sink helps to explain extreme carbon isotope variations in the Proterozoic, Paleozoic, and Triassic.

  14. Biogeochemical Cycles of Carbon and Sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The elements carbon (C) and sulfur (S) interact with each other across a network of elemental reservoirs that are interconnected by an array of physical, chemical and biological processes. These networks are termed the biogeochemical C and S cycles. The compounds of C are highly important, not only as organic matter, but also as atmospheric greenhouse gases, pH buffers in seawater, oxidation-reduction buffers virtually everywhere, and key magmatic constituents affecting plutonism and volcanism. The element S assumes important roles as an oxidation-reduction partner with C and Fe in biological systems, as a key constituent in magmas and volcanic gases, and as a major influence upon pH in certain environments. This presentation describes the modern biogeochemical C and S cycles. Measurements are described whereby stable isotopes can help to infer the nature and quantitative significance of biological and geological processes involved in the C and S cycles. This lecture also summarizes the geological and climatologic aspects of the ancient C and S cycles, as well as the planetary and extraterrestrial processes that influenced their evolution over millions to billions of years.

  15. Biogeochemical Cycles of Carbon and Sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMarais, David J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The elements carbon (C) and sulfur (S) interact with each other across a network of elemental reservoirs that are interconnected by an array of physical, chemical and biological processes. These networks are termed the biogeochemical C and S cycles. The compounds of C are highly important, not only as organic matter, but also as atmospheric greenhouse gases, pH buffers in seawater, oxidation-reduction buffers virtually everywhere, and key magmatic constituents affecting plutonism and volcanism. The element S assumes important roles as an oxidation-reduction partner with C and Fe in biological systems, as a key constituent in magmas and volcanic gases, and as a major influence upon pH in certain environments. This presentation describes the modern biogeochemical C and S cycles. Measurements are described whereby stable isotopes can help to infer the nature and quantitative significance of biological and geological processes involved in the C and S cycles. This lecture also summarizes the geological and climatologic aspects of the ancient C and S cycles, as well as the planetary and extraterrestrial processes that influenced their evolution over millions to billions of years.

  16. Nature and Origin of Variations in Late-Glacial and Holocene Atmospheric CARBON-14 as Revealed by Global Carbon Cycle Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braziunas, Thomas Frank

    1990-01-01

    }, F + Q, K _{rm z} + Q) incorporates "feedback" effects which depend on the instantaneous marine ^{14}C profile and atmosphere/surface ocean ^{14}C disparity. Spectral analyses of the 9600-yr tree-ring Q history generally produce power at or near harmonics of a 420-yr cycle. Century-scale Q periodicities may reflect harmonic or nonsinusoidal solar processes. Residual ^ {14}C production and bi-decadal sunspot numbers from AD 1700 to 1840 define a preliminary history of relative sunspot numbers back to 7730 BC. "Fine-tuned" Q periodicities are used to forecast future solar behavior.

  17. The fundamentals. The carbon cycle; Les fondamentaux. Le cycle du carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jupin, H. [Universite de Perpignan, 66 (France)

    1996-12-31

    This book considers the main characteristics of the carbon cycle. After speaking about the fundamental notions of the matter cycles and flow, the carbon cycle processes (photosynthesis and respiration) are briefly tackled. The analysis of the carbon cycle in the terrestrial and aquatic environment allows to show up the interactions with the water, the sulfur and the nitrogen cycles. In the last part the author takes stock on many controversial questions: interactions between the carbon cycle and the climatic change, consequences of the human utilization of fossil fuels. (A.L.B.) 7 refs.

  18. Carbon cycle in advanced coal chemical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Qun; Li, Wenying; Feng, Jie; Xie, Kechang

    2015-08-07

    This review summarizes how the carbon cycle occurs and how to reduce CO2 emissions in highly efficient carbon utilization from the most abundant carbon source, coal. Nowadays, more and more attention has been paid to CO2 emissions and its myriad of sources. Much research has been undertaken on fossil energy and renewable energy and current existing problems, challenges and opportunities in controlling and reducing CO2 emission with technologies of CO2 capture, utilization, and storage. The coal chemical industry is a crucial area in the (CO2 value chain) Carbon Cycle. The realization of clean and effective conversion of coal resources, improving the utilization and efficiency of resources, whilst reducing CO2 emissions is a key area for further development and investigation by the coal chemical industry. Under a weak carbon mitigation policy, the value and price of products from coal conversion are suggested in the carbon cycle.

  19. Human energy use and the carbon cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.L. [National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    This paper discusses the close connection between human energy use and the Carbon Cycle. The movement of Carbon from the atmosphere to organic (living) matter and then back to atmosphere is called the Carbon Cycle and can be considered the basic infrastructure for life itself. In the process, some of the organic matter becomes trapped in the earth and in the oceans; some of what is trapped becomes, over millions of years, Carbon-based fuels known as 'fossil fuels'. This paper concludes that climate change is primarily an energy problem, not a pollution problem, and discusses various options and technologies to lower energy consumption.

  20. Determination of microbial carbon sources and cycling during remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon impacted soil using natural abundance (14)C analysis of PLFA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Benjamin R; Greenberg, Bruce M; Slater, Gregory F

    2010-04-01

    In a petroleum impacted land-farm soil in Sarnia, Ontario, compound-specific natural abundance radiocarbon analysis identified biodegradation by the soil microbial community as a major pathway for hydrocarbon removal in a novel remediation system. During remediation of contaminated soils by a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria enhanced phytoremediation system (PEPS), the measured Delta(14)C of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarkers ranged from -793 per thousand to -897 per thousand, directly demonstrating microbial uptake and utilization of petroleum hydrocarbons (Delta(14)C(PHC) = -1000 per thousand). Isotopic mass balance indicated that more than 80% of microbial PLFA carbon was derived from petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) and a maximum of 20% was obtained from metabolism of more modern carbon sources. These PLFA from the contaminated soils were the most (14)C-depleted biomarkers ever measured for an in situ environmental system, and this study demonstrated that the microbial community in this soil was subsisting primarily on petroleum hydrocarbons. In contrast, the microbial community in a nearby uncontaminated control soil maintained a more modern Delta(14)C signature than total organic carbon (Delta(14)C(PLFA) = +36 per thousand to -147 per thousand, Delta(14)C(TOC) = -148 per thousand), indicating preferential consumption of the most modern plant-derived fraction of soil organic carbon. Measurements of delta(13)C and Delta(14)C of soil CO(2) additionally demonstrated that mineralization of PHC contributed to soil CO(2) at the contaminated site. The CO(2) in the uncontaminated control soil exhibited substantially more modern Delta(14)C values, and lower soil CO(2) concentrations than the contaminated soils, suggesting increased rates of soil respiration in the contaminated soils. In combination, these results demonstrated that biodegradation in the soil microbial community was a primary pathway of petroleum hydrocarbon removal in the PEPS system. This study

  1. Africa and the global carbon cycle

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Williams, CA

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The African continent has a large and growing role in the global carbon cycle, with potentially important climate change implications. However, the sparse observation network in and around the African continent means that Africa is one...

  2. Natural materials for carbon capture.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M. (National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA); Romanov, Vyacheslav N. (National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA); Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2010-11-01

    Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, carbon dioxide. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating carbon dioxide in the interlayer of layered clays but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation.

  3. Hyperdominance in Amazonian forest carbon cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fauset, S.; Arets, E.J.M.M.; Steege, ter H.; Pena Claros, M.; Poorter, L.; Levis, C.; Toledo, M.

    2015-01-01

    While Amazonian forests are extraordinarily diverse, the abundance of trees is skewed strongly towards relatively few ‘hyperdominant’ species. In addition to their diversity, Amazonian trees are a key component of the global carbon cycle, assimilating and storing more carbon than any other ecosystem

  4. Interglacials, Milankovitch Cycles, and Carbon Dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, Gerald E

    2010-01-01

    The existing understanding of interglacial periods is that they are initiated by Milankovitch cycles enhanced by rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. During interglacials, global temperature is also believed to be primarily controlled by carbon dioxide concentrations, modulated by internal processes such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the North Atlantic Oscillation. Recent work challenges the fundamental basis of these conceptions.

  5. Recuperative supercritical carbon dioxide cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Sprouse, Kenneth M; Subbaraman, Ganesan; O'Connor, George M; Johnson, Gregory A

    2014-11-18

    A power plant includes a closed loop, supercritical carbon dioxide system (CLS-CO.sub.2 system). The CLS-CO.sub.2 system includes a turbine-generator and a high temperature recuperator (HTR) that is arranged to receive expanded carbon dioxide from the turbine-generator. The HTR includes a plurality of heat exchangers that define respective heat exchange areas. At least two of the heat exchangers have different heat exchange areas.

  6. Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

    OpenAIRE

    Ping, C. L.; J. D. Jastrow; Jorgenson, M. T.; G. J. Michaelson; Y. L. Shur

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of soils in the permafrost region has advanced immensely in recent decades, despite the remoteness and inaccessibility of most of the region and the sampling limitations posed by the severe environment. These efforts significantly increased estimates of the amount of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils and improved understanding of how pedogenic processes unique to permafrost environments built enormous organic carbon stocks during the Quaternary. This...

  7. Cycling of black carbon in the ocean

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a byproduct of combustion from wildfires and fossil fuels and is a slow-cycling component of the carbon cycle. Whether BC accumulates and ages on millennial timescales in the world oceans has remained unknown. Here, we quantified dissolved BC (DBC) in marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) isolated by solid phase extraction (SPE) at several sites in the world ocean. We find that DBC in the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic oceans ranges from 1.4 to 2.6 μM in the surface and is ...

  8. Cycling of black carbon in the ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Coppola, Alysha I; Druffel, Ellen R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a byproduct of combustion from wildfires and fossil fuels and is a slow-cycling component of the carbon cycle. Whether BC accumulates and ages on millennial timescales in the world oceans has remained unknown. Here, we quantified dissolved BC (DBC) in marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) isolated by solid phase extraction (SPE) at several sites in the world ocean. We find that DBC in the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic oceans ranges from 1.4 to 2.6 μM in the surface and is ...

  9. Nature's third cycle a story of sunspots

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhuri, Arnab Rai

    2015-01-01

    The cycle of day and night and the cycle of seasons are two familiar natural cycles around which many human activities are organized. But is there a third natural cycle of importance for us humans? On 13 March 1989, six million people in Canada went without electricity for many hours: a large explosion on the sun was discovered as the cause of this blackout. Such explosions occur above sunspots, dark features on the surface of the Sun that have been observed through telescopes since the time of Galileo. The number of sunspots has been found to wax and wane over a period of 11 years. Although this cycle was discovered less than two centuries ago, it is becoming increasingly important for us as human society becomes more dependent on technology. For nearly a century after its discovery, the cause of the sunspot cycle remained completely shrouded in mystery. The 1908 discovery of strong magnetic fields in sunspots made it clear that the 11-year cycle is the magnetic cycle of the sun. It is only during the last ...

  10. Chemical Oceanography and the Marine Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Steven; Hedges, John

    The principles of chemical oceanography provide insight into the processes regulating the marine carbon cycle. The text offers a background in chemical oceanography and a description of how chemical elements in seawater and ocean sediments are used as tracers of physical, biological, chemical and geological processes in the ocean. The first seven chapters present basic topics of thermodynamics, isotope systematics and carbonate chemistry, and explain the influence of life on ocean chemistry and how it has evolved in the recent (glacial-interglacial) past. This is followed by topics essential to understanding the carbon cycle, including organic geochemistry, air-sea gas exchange, diffusion and reaction kinetics, the marine and atmosphere carbon cycle and diagenesis in marine sediments. Figures are available to download from www.cambridge.org/9780521833134. Ideal as a textbook for upper-level undergraduates and graduates in oceanography, environmental chemistry, geochemistry and earth science and a valuable reference for researchers in oceanography.

  11. Atmospheric carbon dioxide and the global carbon cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trabalka, J R [ed.

    1985-12-01

    This state-of-the-art volume presents discussions on the global cycle of carbon, the dynamic balance among global atmospheric CO2 sources and sinks. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (ACR)

  12. Anthropogenic chemical carbon cycle for a sustainable future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, George A; Prakash, G K Surya; Goeppert, Alain

    2011-08-24

    Nature's photosynthesis uses the sun's energy with chlorophyll in plants as a catalyst to recycle carbon dioxide and water into new plant life. Only given sufficient geological time, millions of years, can new fossil fuels be formed naturally. The burning of our diminishing fossil fuel reserves is accompanied by large anthropogenic CO(2) release, which is outpacing nature's CO(2) recycling capability, causing significant environmental harm. To supplement the natural carbon cycle, we have proposed and developed a feasible anthropogenic chemical recycling of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide is captured by absorption technologies from any natural or industrial source, from human activities, or even from the air itself. It can then be converted by feasible chemical transformations into fuels such as methanol, dimethyl ether, and varied products including synthetic hydrocarbons and even proteins for animal feed, thus supplementing our food chain. This concept of broad scope and framework is the basis of what we call the Methanol Economy. The needed renewable starting materials, water and CO(2), are available anywhere on Earth. The required energy for the synthetic carbon cycle can come from any alternative energy source such as solar, wind, geothermal, and even hopefully safe nuclear energy. The anthropogenic carbon dioxide cycle offers a way of assuring a sustainable future for humankind when fossil fuels become scarce. While biosources can play a limited role in supplementing future energy needs, they increasingly interfere with the essentials of the food chain. We have previously reviewed aspects of the chemical recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether. In the present Perspective, we extend the discussion of the innovative and feasible anthropogenic carbon cycle, which can be the basis of progressively liberating humankind from its dependence on diminishing fossil fuel reserves while also controlling harmful CO(2) emissions to the atmosphere. We also

  13. Evolution of Sustainable Carbon Cycling Processes in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuang Yahui; Zhang Hongxun; Wang Xiaoke; Fang Jinyun

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the surveys on carbon inventories and initiatives on sustainable carbon cycling taken by RCEES. The first part of this report deals with the concept of sustainable carbon cycling, the historical evolution of carbon cycling processes in China, carbon pool enhancement, value addition, carbon sequestration and carbon balance.The second part covers the modeling of carbon dynamics, emission inventories of various carboncontaining greenhouse gases and their potential abatement measures.

  14. Modelling the carbon and nitrogen cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas A Varotsos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The issues of air pollution are inextricably linked to the mechanisms underlying the physicochemical functioning of the biosphere which together with the atmosphere, the cryosphere, the lithosphere, and the hydrosphere constitute the climate system. We herewith present a review of the achievements and unresolved problems concerning the modeling of the biochemical cycles of basic chemicals of the climate system, such as carbon and nitrogen. Although the achievements in this area can roughly describe the carbon and nitrogen cycles, serious problems still remain associated with the accuracy and precision of the processes and assessments employed in the relevant modeling.

  15. Implications of carbon dust emission for terrestrail carbon cycling and carbon accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion preferentially removes the finest carbon- and nutrient-rich soil fractions, and consequently its role may be significant within terrestrial carbon (C) cycles. However, the impacts of wind erosion on soil organic carbon (SOC) redistribution are not considered in most carbon cycle models,...

  16. Subsurface Carbon Cycling Below the Root Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, J.; Dong, W.; Kim, Y.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.; Williams, K. H.; Long, P. E.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon in the subsurface below the root zone is an important yet poorly understood link in the terrestrial C cycle, interfacing between overlying soil and downstream aquatic systems. Thus, the nature and behavior of C in the vadose zone and groundwater, particularly the dynamics of mobile dissolved and suspended aqueous species, need to be understood for predicting C cycling and responses to climate change. This study is designed to understand the C balance (influxes, effluxes, and sequestration) and mechanisms controlling subsurface organic and inorganic C transport and transformation. Our initial investigations are being conducted at the Rifle Site floodplain along the Colorado River, in Colorado (USA). Within this floodplain, sediment samples were collected and sampling/monitoring instruments were installed down to 7 m depth at three sites. Pore water and gas samplers at 0.5 m depth intervals within the ~3.5 m deep vadose zone, and multilevel aquifer samplers have yielded depth- and time-resolved profiles of dissolved and suspended organic and inorganic C, and CO2 for over 1.5 years. Analyses conducted to determine seasonally and vertically resolved geochemical profiles show that dissolved organic matter (DOM) characteristics vary among three distinct hydrobiogeochemical zones; the vadose zone, capillary fringe, and saturated zone. The concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) are many times higher in the vadose zone and the capillary fringe than in groundwater, and vary seasonally. The DOM speciation, aqueous geochemistry, solid phase analyses, and d13C isotope data show the importance of both biotic and abiotic C transformations during transport through the vertical gradients of moisture and temperature. In addition to DOM, suspended organic C and bacteria have been collected from samplers within the capillary fringe. Based on the field-based findings, long-term laboratory column experiments are being conducted under simulated field moisture

  17. Africa and the global carbon cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denning A Scott

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The African continent has a large and growing role in the global carbon cycle, with potentially important climate change implications. However, the sparse observation network in and around the African continent means that Africa is one of the weakest links in our understanding of the global carbon cycle. Here, we combine data from regional and global inventories as well as forward and inverse model analyses to appraise what is known about Africa's continental-scale carbon dynamics. With low fossil emissions and productivity that largely compensates respiration, land conversion is Africa's primary net carbon release, much of it through burning of forests. Savanna fire emissions, though large, represent a short-term source that is offset by ensuing regrowth. While current data suggest a near zero decadal-scale carbon balance, interannual climate fluctuations (especially drought induce sizeable variability in net ecosystem productivity and savanna fire emissions such that Africa is a major source of interannual variability in global atmospheric CO2. Considering the continent's sizeable carbon stocks, their seemingly high vulnerability to anticipated climate and land use change, as well as growing populations and industrialization, Africa's carbon emissions and their interannual variability are likely to undergo substantial increases through the 21st century.

  18. The carbon cycle in oceans; Le cycle du carbone dans les oceans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dandonneau, Y. [Paris-6 Univ., CNRS, ORSTOM, 75 (France). Laboratoire d`Oceanographie Dynamique et de Climatologie

    1998-10-01

    Because of his activity, the human being increases the carbon dioxide emission and the greenhouse effect resulting. To forecast the consequences resulting from this increase, the scientists have to assess the ocean capacity to stock the carbon. This paper deals with the carbon dioxide emissions and with the possible methods to evaluate the carbon content on the various step of the cycle. (A.L.B.)

  19. Zooplankton and the Ocean Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Deborah K.; Landry, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Marine zooplankton comprise a phylogenetically and functionally diverse assemblage of protistan and metazoan consumers that occupy multiple trophic levels in pelagic food webs. Within this complex network, carbon flows via alternative zooplankton pathways drive temporal and spatial variability in production-grazing coupling, nutrient cycling, export, and transfer efficiency to higher trophic levels. We explore current knowledge of the processing of zooplankton food ingestion by absorption, egestion, respiration, excretion, and growth (production) processes. On a global scale, carbon fluxes are reasonably constrained by the grazing impact of microzooplankton and the respiratory requirements of mesozooplankton but are sensitive to uncertainties in trophic structure. The relative importance, combined magnitude, and efficiency of export mechanisms (mucous feeding webs, fecal pellets, molts, carcasses, and vertical migrations) likewise reflect regional variability in community structure. Climate change is expected to broadly alter carbon cycling by zooplankton and to have direct impacts on key species.

  20. Understanding Oscillations of the Geological Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachan, A.; Payne, J.; Saltzman, M.; Thomas, E.; Kump, L. R.

    2015-12-01

    The geological cycling of carbon ties together the sedimentary reservoirs with Earth's biosphere and climate. Perturbations to this coupled system are recorded in the carbon isotopic composition of marine limestones (δ13Ccarb). In the past decade numerous intervals of large-amplitude oscillations in δ13Ccarbhave been identified, with a variety of explanations proposed for individual events. Yet, when data spanning the past ~1 Ga are viewed as a whole, it is clear that large-scale oscillations are a common feature of the carbon isotopic record. The ubiquity of oscillations suggests that they may share a single origin rather than having many disparate causes. Here we present a simple two-box model of the geological carbon cycle exhibiting such oscillations: the Carbon-Cycle Oscillator. Analogous to a damped mass-spring system, the burial fluxes of carbonate and phosphate in the model act like friction, whereas P supply and Corg burial act like the restoring force of the spring. When the sensitivities of P supply and Corg burial to the sizes of the C and P reservoirs, respectively, increase above a critical threshold, the model exhibits oscillations upon perturbation. We suggest that intervals with large oscillations in bulk ocean-atmosphere δ13C are characterized by a greater sensitivity of the C:P burial-ratio and ALK:P weathering-ratio to the state of the ocean-atmosphere carbon pool. In addition, moderating of the slope of that dependence in general can account for the observed decrease in the amplitude of oscillations over the past billion years. We hypothesize that factors with a unidirectional trajectory during Earth history (e.g. increased oxygenation of the deep ocean, and evolution of pelagic calcifiers) led to a decrease in the Earth System's gain and increase in its resilience over geologic time, even in the face of continuing perturbations from the solid Earth and extraterrestrial realms.

  1. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, van der I.R.; Bloom, J.; Exbrayat, J.; Feng, L.; Williams, M.

    2015-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle

  2. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, van der I.R.; Bloom, J.; Exbrayat, J.; Feng, L.; Williams, M.

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle

  3. Development of a plant dynamics computer code for analysis of a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle energy converter coupled to a natural circulation lead-cooled fast reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.

    2007-03-08

    STAR-LM is a lead-cooled pool-type fast reactor concept operating under natural circulation of the coolant. The reactor core power is 400 MWt. The open-lattice core consists of fuel pins attached to the core support plate, (the does not consist of removable fuel assemblies). The coolant flows outside of the fuel pins. The fuel is transuranic nitride, fabricated from reprocessed LWR spent fuel. The cladding material is HT-9 stainless steel; the steady-state peak cladding temperature is 650 C. The coolant is single-phase liquid lead under atmospheric pressure; the core inlet and outlet temperatures are 438 C and 578 C, respectively. (The Pb coolant freezing and boiling temperatures are 327 C and 1749 C, respectively). The coolant is contained inside of a reactor vessel. The vessel material is Type 316 stainless steel. The reactor is autonomous meaning that the reactor power is self-regulated based on inherent reactivity feedbacks and no external power control (through control rods) is utilized. The shutdown (scram) control rods are used for startup and shutdown and to stop the fission reaction in case of an emergency. The heat from the reactor is transferred to the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle in in-reactor heat exchangers (IRHX) located inside the reactor vessel. The IRHXs are shell-and-tube type heat exchangers with lead flowing downwards on the shell side and CO{sub 2} flowing upwards on the tube side. No intermediate circuit is utilized. The guard vessel surrounds the reactor vessel to contain the coolant, in the very unlikely event of reactor vessel failure. The Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) implementing the natural circulation of air flowing upwards over the guard vessel is used to cool the reactor, in the case of loss of normal heat removal through the IRHXs. The RVACS is always in operation. The gap between the vessels is filled with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) to enhance the heat removal by air by significantly reducing the thermal

  4. Cycling of black carbon in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Alysha I.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.

    2016-05-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a by-product of combustion from wildfires and fossil fuels and is a slow-cycling component of the carbon cycle. Whether BC accumulates and ages on millennial time scales in the world oceans has remained unknown. Here we quantified dissolved BC (DBC) in marine dissolved organic carbon isolated by solid phase extraction at several sites in the world ocean. We find that DBC in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Arctic oceans ranges from 1.4 to 2.6 μM in the surface and is 1.2 ± 0.1 μM in the deep Atlantic. The average 14C age of surface DBC is 4800 ± 620 14C years and much older in a deep water sample (23,000 ± 3000 14C years). The range of DBC structures and 14C ages indicates that DBC is not homogeneous in the ocean. We show that there are at least two distinct pools of marine DBC, a younger pool that cycles on centennial time scales and an ancient pool that cycles on >105 year time scales.

  5. Carbon cycle uncertainty in the Alaskan Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Fisher

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is leading to a disproportionately large warming in the high northern latitudes, but the magnitude and sign of the future carbon balance of the Arctic are highly uncertain. Using 40 terrestrial biosphere models for Alaska, we provide a baseline of terrestrial carbon cycle structural and parametric uncertainty, defined as the multi-model standard deviation (σ against the mean (x for each quantity. Mean annual uncertainty (σ/x was largest for net ecosystem exchange (NEE (−0.01± 0.19 kg C m−2 yr−1, then net primary production (NPP (0.14 ± 0.33 kg C m−2 yr−1, autotrophic respiration (Ra (0.09 ± 0.20 kg C m−2 yr−1, gross primary production (GPP (0.22 ± 0.50 kg C m−2 yr−1, ecosystem respiration (Re (0.23 ± 0.38 kg C m−2 yr−1, CH4 flux (2.52 ± 4.02 g CH4 m−2 yr−1, heterotrophic respiration (Rh (0.14 ± 0.20 kg C m−2 yr−1, and soil carbon (14.0± 9.2 kg C m−2. The spatial patterns in regional carbon stocks and fluxes varied widely with some models showing NEE for Alaska as a strong carbon sink, others as a strong carbon source, while still others as carbon neutral. Additionally, a feedback (i.e., sensitivity analysis was conducted of 20th century NEE to CO2 fertilization (β and climate (γ, which showed that uncertainty in γ was 2x larger than that of β, with neither indicating that the Alaskan Arctic is shifting towards a certain net carbon sink or source. Finally, AmeriFlux data are used at two sites in the Alaskan Arctic to evaluate the regional patterns; observed seasonal NEE was captured within multi-model uncertainty. This assessment of carbon cycle uncertainties may be used as a baseline for the improvement of experimental and modeling activities, as well as a reference for future trajectories in carbon cycling with climate change in the Alaskan Arctic.

  6. Hyperdominance in Amazonian forest carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauset, Sophie; Johnson, Michelle O.; Gloor, Manuel; Baker, Timothy R.; Monteagudo M., Abel; Brienen, Roel J.W.; Feldpausch, Ted R.; Lopez-Gonzalez, Gabriela; Malhi, Yadvinder; ter Steege, Hans; Pitman, Nigel C.A.; Baraloto, Christopher; Engel, Julien; Pétronelli, Pascal; Andrade, Ana; Camargo, José Luís C.; Laurance, Susan G.W.; Laurance, William F.; Chave, Jerôme; Allie, Elodie; Vargas, Percy Núñez; Terborgh, John W.; Ruokolainen, Kalle; Silveira, Marcos; Aymard C., Gerardo A.; Arroyo, Luzmila; Bonal, Damien; Ramirez-Angulo, Hirma; Araujo-Murakami, Alejandro; Neill, David; Hérault, Bruno; Dourdain, Aurélie; Torres-Lezama, Armando; Marimon, Beatriz S.; Salomão, Rafael P.; Comiskey, James A.; Réjou-Méchain, Maxime; Toledo, Marisol; Licona, Juan Carlos; Alarcón, Alfredo; Prieto, Adriana; Rudas, Agustín; van der Meer, Peter J.; Killeen, Timothy J.; Marimon Junior, Ben-Hur; Poorter, Lourens; Boot, Rene G.A.; Stergios, Basil; Torre, Emilio Vilanova; Costa, Flávia R.C.; Levis, Carolina; Schietti, Juliana; Souza, Priscila; Groot, Nikée; Arets, Eric; Moscoso, Victor Chama; Castro, Wendeson; Coronado, Euridice N. Honorio; Peña-Claros, Marielos; Stahl, Clement; Barroso, Jorcely; Talbot, Joey; Vieira, Ima Célia Guimarães; van der Heijden, Geertje; Thomas, Raquel; Vos, Vincent A.; Almeida, Everton C.; Davila, Esteban Álvarez; Aragão, Luiz E.O.C.; Erwin, Terry L.; Morandi, Paulo S.; de Oliveira, Edmar Almeida; Valadão, Marco B.X.; Zagt, Roderick J.; van der Hout, Peter; Loayza, Patricia Alvarez; Pipoly, John J.; Wang, Ophelia; Alexiades, Miguel; Cerón, Carlos E.; Huamantupa-Chuquimaco, Isau; Di Fiore, Anthony; Peacock, Julie; Camacho, Nadir C. Pallqui; Umetsu, Ricardo K.; de Camargo, Plínio Barbosa; Burnham, Robyn J.; Herrera, Rafael; Quesada, Carlos A.; Stropp, Juliana; Vieira, Simone A.; Steininger, Marc; Rodríguez, Carlos Reynel; Restrepo, Zorayda; Muelbert, Adriane Esquivel; Lewis, Simon L.; Pickavance, Georgia C.; Phillips, Oliver L.

    2015-01-01

    While Amazonian forests are extraordinarily diverse, the abundance of trees is skewed strongly towards relatively few ‘hyperdominant' species. In addition to their diversity, Amazonian trees are a key component of the global carbon cycle, assimilating and storing more carbon than any other ecosystem on Earth. Here we ask, using a unique data set of 530 forest plots, if the functions of storing and producing woody carbon are concentrated in a small number of tree species, whether the most abundant species also dominate carbon cycling, and whether dominant species are characterized by specific functional traits. We find that dominance of forest function is even more concentrated in a few species than is dominance of tree abundance, with only ≈1% of Amazon tree species responsible for 50% of carbon storage and productivity. Although those species that contribute most to biomass and productivity are often abundant, species maximum size is also influential, while the identity and ranking of dominant species varies by function and by region. PMID:25919449

  7. Climate extremes and the carbon cycle (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichstein, M.; Bahn, M.; Ciais, P.; Mahecha, M. D.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Zscheischler, J.

    2013-12-01

    The terrestrial biosphere is a key component of the global carbon cycle and its carbon balance is strongly influenced by climate. Ongoing environmental changes are thought to increase global terrestrial carbon uptake. But evidence is mounting that rare climate extremes can lead to a decrease in ecosystem carbon stocks and therefore have the potential to negate the expected increase in terrestrial carbon uptake. Here we explore the mechanisms and impacts of climate extremes on the terrestrial carbon cycle, and propose a pathway to improve our understanding of present and future impacts of climate extremes on the terrestrial carbon budget. In addition to direct impact on the carbon fluxes of photosynthesis and respiration via extreme temperature and (or) drought, effects of extreme events may also lead to lagged responses, such as wildfires triggered by heat waves and droughts, or pest and pathogen outbreaks following wind-throw caused by heavy storms, reduced plant health due to drought stress or due to less frequent cold extremes in presently cold regions. One extreme event can potentially override accumulated previous carbon sinks, as shown by the Western European 2003 heat wave.. Extreme events have the potential to affect the terrestrial ecosystem carbon balance through a single factor, or as a combination of factors. Climate extremes can cause carbon losses from accumulated stocks, as well as long-lasting impacts on (e.g. lagged effects) on plant growth and mortality, extending beyond the duration of the extreme event itself. The sensitivity of terrestrial ecosystems and their carbon balance to climate change and extreme events varies according to the type of extreme, the climatic region, the land cover, and the land management. Extreme event impacts are very relevant in forests due to the importance of lagged and memory effects on tree growth and mortality, the longevity of tree species, the large forest carbon stocks and their vulnerability, as well as the

  8. Past and present of sediment and carbon biogeochemical cycling models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. T. Mackenzie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The global carbon cycle is part of the much more extensive sedimentary cycle that involves large masses of carbon in the Earth's inner and outer spheres. Studies of the carbon cycle generally followed a progression in knowledge of the natural biological, then chemical, and finally geological processes involved, culminating in a more or less integrated picture of the biogeochemical carbon cycle by the 1920s. However, knowledge of the ocean's carbon cycle behavior has only within the last few decades progressed to a stage where meaningful discussion of carbon processes on an annual to millennial time scale can take place. In geologically older and pre-industrial time, the ocean was generally a net source of CO2 emissions to the atmosphere owing to the mineralization of land-derived organic matter in addition to that produced in situ and to the process of CaCO3 precipitation. Due to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations because of fossil fuel combustion and land use changes, the direction of the air-sea CO2 flux has reversed, leading to the ocean as a whole being a net sink of anthropogenic CO2. The present thickness of the surface ocean layer, where part of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions are stored, is estimated as of the order of a few hundred meters. The oceanic coastal zone net air-sea CO2 exchange flux has also probably changed during industrial time. Model projections indicate that in pre-industrial times, the coastal zone may have been net heterotrophic, releasing CO2 to the atmosphere from the imbalance between gross photosynthesis and total respiration. This, coupled with extensive CaCO3 precipitation in coastal zone environments, led to a net flux of CO2 out of the system. During industrial time the coastal zone ocean has tended to reverse its trophic status toward a non-steady state situation of net autotrophy, resulting in net uptake of anthropogenic CO2 and storage of carbon in the coastal ocean, despite the significant calcification

  9. Organic carbon inventories in natural and restored Ecuadorian mangrove forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelVecchia, Amanda G; Bruno, John F; Benninger, Larry; Alperin, Marc; Banerjee, Ovik; de Dios Morales, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Mangroves can capture and store organic carbon and their protection and therefore their restoration is a component of climate change mitigation. However, there are few empirical measurements of long-term carbon storage in mangroves or of how storage varies across environmental gradients. The context dependency of this process combined with geographically limited field sampling has made it difficult to generalize regional and global rates of mangrove carbon sequestration. This has in turn hampered the inclusion of sequestration by mangroves in carbon cycle models and in carbon offset markets. The purpose of this study was to estimate the relative carbon capture and storage potential in natural and restored mangrove forests. We measured depth profiles of soil organic carbon content in 72 cores collected from six sites (three natural, two restored, and one afforested) surrounding Muisne, Ecuador. Samples up to 1 m deep were analyzed for organic matter content using loss-on-ignition and values were converted to organic carbon content using an accepted ratio of 1.72 (g/g). Results suggest that average soil carbon storage is 0.055 ± 0.002 g cm(-3) (11.3 ± 0.8% carbon content by dry mass, mean ± 1 SE) up to 1 m deep in natural sites, and 0.058 ± 0.002 g cm(-3) (8.0 ± 0.3%) in restored sites. These estimates are concordant with published global averages. Evidence of equivalent carbon stocks in restored and afforested mangrove patches emphasizes the carbon sink potential for reestablished mangrove systems. We found no relationship between sediment carbon storage and aboveground biomass, forest structure, or within-patch location. Our results demonstrate the long-term carbon storage potential of natural mangroves, high effectiveness of mangrove restoration and afforestation, a lack of predictability in carbon storage strictly based on aboveground parameters, and the need to establish standardized protocol for quantifying mangrove sediment carbon stocks.

  10. A Scientific Synthesis and Assessment of the Arctic Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Daniel J.; Guo, Laodong; McGuire, A. David

    2007-06-01

    The Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP), along with the Climate and Cryosphere (CliC) Project and the International Arctic Science Committee (IASC), sponsored the Arctic Carbon Cycle Assessment Workshop, at the Red Lion Hotel in Seattle, Wash., between 27 February and 1 March 2007. The workshop was held in a general effort toward the scientific synthesis and assessment of the Arctic system carbon cycle, as well as to generate feedback on the working draft of an assessment document. The initial assessment was prepared by the Arctic carbon cycle assessment writing team, which is led by A. David McGuire (University of Alaska Fairbanks) and includes Leif Anderson (Goteborg University, Sweden), Torben Christensen (Lund University, Sweden), Scott Dallimore (Natural Resources Canada), Laodong Guo (University of Southern Mississippi), Martin Heimann (Max Planck Institute, Germany), Robie MacDonald (Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Canada), and Nigel Roulet (McGill University, Canada). The workshop brought together leading researchers in the fields of terrestrial, marine, and atmospheric science to report on and discuss the current state of knowledge on contemporary carbon stocks and fluxes in the Artie and their potential responses to a changing climate. The workshop was attended by 35 scientists representing institutions from 10 countries in addition to two representatives of the sponsor agencies (John Calder for AMAP and Diane Verseghy for CliC).

  11. Heterotrophic denitrification vs. autotrophic anammox – quantifying collateral effects on the oceanic carbon cycle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koeve, W; Kähler, P

    2010-01-01

    .... Recently, it has been suggested that the trophic nature of pelagic N2 -production may have additional, "collateral" effects on the carbon cycle, where heterotrophic denitrification provides a shallow...

  12. Decadally cycling soil carbon is more sensitive to warming than faster-cycling soil carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Junjie; Zhu, Biao; Cheng, Weixin

    2015-12-01

    The response of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools to globally rising surface temperature crucially determines the feedback between climate change and the global carbon cycle. However, there is a lack of studies investigating the temperature sensitivity of decomposition for decadally cycling SOC which is the main component of total soil carbon stock and the most relevant to global change. We tackled this issue using two decadally (13) C-labeled soils and a much improved measuring system in a long-term incubation experiment. Results indicated that the temperature sensitivity of decomposition for decadally cycling SOC (>23 years in one soil and >55 years in the other soil) was significantly greater than that for faster-cycling SOC (<23 or 55 years) or for the entire SOC stock. Moreover, decadally cycling SOC contributed substantially (35-59%) to the total CO2 loss during the 360-day incubation. Overall, these results indicate that the decomposition of decadally cycling SOC is highly sensitive to temperature change, which will likely make this large SOC stock vulnerable to loss by global warming in the 21st century and beyond.

  13. Carbon cycle dynamics during recent interglacials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kleinen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Trends in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 during three recent interglacials, the Holocene, the Eemian and Marine Isotope Stage (MIS 11, are investigated using an Earth system Model of Intermediate Complexity, which we extended with modules to dynamically determine two slow carbon cycle processes – peat accumulation and shallow-water CaCO3 sedimentation (coral reef formation. For all three interglacials, model simulations considering peat accumulation and shallow water CaCO3 sedimentation substantially improve the agreement between model results and ice core CO2 reconstructions in comparison to a carbon cycle setup neglecting these processes. This enables us to model the trends in atmospheric CO2, with modelled trends similar to the ice core data, forcing the model only with orbital and sea level changes. During the Holocene, anthropogenic CO2 emissions are required to match the observed rise in atmospheric CO2 after 3 ka BP, but are not relevant before this time. Therefore our model experiments show for the first time how the CO2 evolution during the Holocene and two recent interglacials can be explained consistently using an identical model setup.

  14. An isopycnic ocean carbon cycle model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Assmann

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The carbon cycle is a major forcing component in the global climate system. Modelling studies, aiming to explain recent and past climatic changes and to project future ones, increasingly include the interaction between the physical and biogeochemical systems. Their ocean components are generally z-coordinate models that are conceptually easy to use but that employ a vertical coordinate that is alien to the real ocean structure. Here, we present first results from a newly-developed isopycnic carbon cycle model and demonstrate the viability of using an isopycnic physical component for this purpose. As expected, the model represents well the interior ocean transport of biogeochemical tracers and produces realistic tracer distributions. Difficulties in employing a purely isopycnic coordinate lie mainly in the treatment of the surface boundary layer which is often represented by a bulk mixed layer. The most significant adjustments of the ocean biogeochemistry model HAMOCC, for use with an isopycnic coordinate, were in the representation of upper ocean biological production. We present a series of sensitivity studies exploring the effect of changes in biogeochemical and physical processes on export production and nutrient distribution. Apart from giving us pointers for further model development, they highlight the importance of preformed nutrient distributions in the Southern Ocean for global nutrient distributions. The sensitivity studies show that iron limitation for biological particle production, the treatment of light penetration for biological production, and the role of diapycnal mixing result in significant changes of nutrient distributions and liniting factors of biological production.

  15. Building carbon-carbon bonds using a biocatalytic methanol condensation cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogorad, Igor W; Chen, Chang-Ting; Theisen, Matthew K; Wu, Tung-Yun; Schlenz, Alicia R; Lam, Albert T; Liao, James C

    2014-11-11

    Methanol is an important intermediate in the utilization of natural gas for synthesizing other feedstock chemicals. Typically, chemical approaches for building C-C bonds from methanol require high temperature and pressure. Biological conversion of methanol to longer carbon chain compounds is feasible; however, the natural biological pathways for methanol utilization involve carbon dioxide loss or ATP expenditure. Here we demonstrated a biocatalytic pathway, termed the methanol condensation cycle (MCC), by combining the nonoxidative glycolysis with the ribulose monophosphate pathway to convert methanol to higher-chain alcohols or other acetyl-CoA derivatives using enzymatic reactions in a carbon-conserved and ATP-independent system. We investigated the robustness of MCC and identified operational regions. We confirmed that the pathway forms a catalytic cycle through (13)C-carbon labeling. With a cell-free system, we demonstrated the conversion of methanol to ethanol or n-butanol. The high carbon efficiency and low operating temperature are attractive for transforming natural gas-derived methanol to longer-chain liquid fuels and other chemical derivatives.

  16. Phytoplankton responses and associated carbon cycling during shipboard carbonate chemistry manipulation experiments conducted around Northwest European shelf seas

    OpenAIRE

    Richier, S.; Achterberg, E. P.; C. Dumousseaud; A. J. Poulton; Suggett, D.J.; T. Tyrrell; M. V. Zubkov; Moore, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is significantly altering the carbonate chemistry of seawater, a phenomenon referred to as ocean acidification. Experimental manipulations have been increasingly used to gauge how continued ocean acidification will potentially impact marine ecosystems and their associated biogeochemical cycles in the future; however, results amongst studies, particularly when performed on natural communities, are highly variabl...

  17. Carbon cycling and phytoplankton responses within highly-replicated shipboard carbonate chemistry manipulation experiments conducted around Northwest European Shelf Seas

    OpenAIRE

    Richier, S.; Achterberg, E. P.; C. Dumousseaud; A. J. Poulton; Suggett, D.J.; T. Tyrrell; M. V. Zubkov; Moore, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is significantly altering the carbonate chemistry of seawater, a phenomenon referred to as ocean acidification. Experimental manipulations have been increasingly used to gauge how continued ocean acidification will potentially impact marine ecosystems and their associated biogeochemical cycles in the future; however, results amongst studies, particularly when performed on natural communities, a...

  18. Potential increases in natural disturbance rates could offset forest management impacts on ecosystem carbon stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John B. Bradford; Nicholas R. Jensen; Grant M. Domke; Anthony W. D' Amato

    2013-01-01

    Forested ecosystems contain the majority of the world’s terrestrial carbon, and forest management has implications for regional and global carbon cycling. Carbon stored in forests changes with stand age and is affected by natural disturbance and timber harvesting. We examined how harvesting and disturbance interact to influence forest carbon stocks over the Superior...

  19. Efficacy of natural cycle IVF : a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelinck, MJ; Hoek, A; Simons, AHM; Heineman, MJ

    2002-01-01

    Since the introduction of IVF treatments, natural cycle IVF has been largely replaced by IVF with ovarian stimulation. However, natural cycle IVF has several advantages. It is associated with a close to zero multiple pregnancy rate, and a zero risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Per cycle, na

  20. Iron, phytoplankton growth, and the carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Joseph H; Paytan, Adina

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms. Iron is required for the synthesis of chlorophyll and of several photosynthetic electron transport proteins and for the reduction of CO2, SO4(2-), and NO3(-) during the photosynthetic production of organic compounds. Iron concentrations in vast areas of the ocean are very low (iron in oxic seawater. Low iron concentrations have been shown to limit primary production rates, biomass accumulation, and ecosystem structure in a variety of open-ocean environments, including the equatorial Pacific, the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean and even in some coastal areas. Oceanic primary production, the transfer of carbon dioxide into organic carbon by photosynthetic plankton (phytoplankton), is one process by which atmospheric CO2 can be transferred to the deep ocean and sequestered for long periods of time. Accordingly, iron limitation of primary producers likely plays a major role in the global carbon cycle. It has been suggested that variations in oceanic primary productivity, spurred by changes in the deposition of iron in atmospheric dust, control atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and hence global climate, over glacial-interglacial timescales. A contemporary application of this "iron hypothesis" promotes the large-scale iron fertilization of ocean regions as a means of enhancing the ability of the ocean to store anthropogenic CO2 and mitigate 21st century climate change. Recent in situ iron enrichment experiments in the HNLC regions, however, cast doubt on the efficacy and advisability of iron fertilization schemes. The experiments have confirmed the role of iron in regulating primary productivity, but resulted in only small carbon export fluxes to the depths necessary for long-term sequestration. Above all, these experiments and other studies of iron biogeochemistry over the last two decades have begun to illustrate the great complexity of the ocean system. Attempts to engineer this system are likely to

  1. Influence of soil moisture-carbon cycle interactions on the terrestrial carbon cycle over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mystakidis, Stefanos; Davin, Edouard L.; Gruber, Nicolas; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2016-04-01

    Water availability is a crucial limiting factor for terrestrial ecosystems, but relatively few studies have quantitatively assessed the influence of soil moisture variability on the terrestrial carbon cycle. Here, we investigate the role of soil moisture variability and state in the contemporary terrestrial carbon cycle over Europe. For this we use a Regional Earth System Model (RESM) based on the COSMO-CLM Regional Climate Model, coupled to the Community Land Model version 4.0 (CLM4.0) and its carbon-nitrogen module. The simulation setup consists of a control simulation over the period 1979-2010 in which soil moisture is interactive and three sensitivity simulations in which soil moisture is prescribed to a mean, a very dry or a very wet seasonal cycle without inter-annual variability. The cumulative net biome productivity varies markedly between the different experiments ranging from a strong sink of up to 6PgC in the wet experiment to a source of up to 1.2PgC in the dry experiment. Changes in the land carbon uptake are driven by a combination of two factors: the direct impact of soil moisture on plant's carbon uptake (essentially in southern Europe) and an indirect effect through changes in temperature affecting ecosystem respiration (mainly in central and northern Europe). We find that removing temporal variations in soil moisture dampens interannual variations in terrestrial carbon fluxes (Gross Primary Productivity, respiration, Net Biome Productivity) by more than 50% over most of Europe. Moreover, the analysis reveals that on annual scale about two-thirds of central Europe and about 70% of southern Europe display statistically significant effect of drying and/or wetting on the terrestrial carbon budget and its components. Our findings confirm the crucial role of soil moisture in determining the magnitude and the inter-annual variability in land CO2 uptake which is a key contributor to the year-to-year variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  2. Comparative carbon cycle dynamics of the present and last interglacial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovkin, Victor; Brücher, Tim; Kleinen, Thomas; Zaehle, Sönke; Joos, Fortunat; Roth, Raphael; Spahni, Renato; Schmitt, Jochen; Fischer, Hubertus; Leuenberger, Markus; Stone, Emma J.; Ridgwell, Andy; Chappellaz, Jérôme; Kehrwald, Natalie; Barbante, Carlo; Blunier, Thomas; Dahl Jensen, Dorthe

    2016-04-01

    Changes in temperature and carbon dioxide during glacial cycles recorded in Antarctic ice cores are tightly coupled. However, this relationship does not hold for interglacials. While climate cooled towards the end of both the last (Eemian) and present (Holocene) interglacials, CO2 remained stable during the Eemian while rising in the Holocene. We identify and review twelve biogeochemical mechanisms of terrestrial (vegetation dynamics and CO2 fertilization, land use, wildfire, accumulation of peat, changes in permafrost carbon, subaerial volcanic outgassing) and marine origin (changes in sea surface temperature, carbonate compensation to deglaciation and terrestrial biosphere regrowth, shallow-water carbonate sedimentation, changes in the soft tissue pump, and methane hydrates), which potentially may have contributed to the CO2 dynamics during interglacials but which remain not well quantified. We use three Earth System Models (ESMs) of intermediate complexity to compare effects of selected mechanisms on the interglacial CO2 and δ13CO2 changes, focusing on those with substantial potential impacts: namely carbonate sedimentation in shallow waters, peat growth, and (in the case of the Holocene) human land use. A set of specified carbon cycle forcings could qualitatively explain atmospheric CO2 dynamics from 8 ka BP to the pre-industrial. However, when applied to Eemian boundary conditions from 126 to 115 ka BP, the same set of forcings led to disagreement with the observed direction of CO2 changes after 122 ka BP. This failure to simulate late-Eemian CO2 dynamics could be a result of the imposed forcings such as prescribed CaCO3 accumulation and/or an incorrect response of simulated terrestrial carbon to the surface cooling at the end of the interglacial. These experiments also reveal that key natural processes of interglacial CO2 dynamics - shallow water CaCO3 accumulation, peat and permafrost carbon dynamics - are not well represented in the current ESMs. Global

  3. Microbial potential for carbon and nutrient cycling in a geogenic supercritical carbon dioxide reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Adam J E; Tan, BoonFei; Thompson, Janelle R

    2017-06-01

    Microorganisms catalyze carbon cycling and biogeochemical reactions in the deep subsurface and thus may be expected to influence the fate of injected supercritical (sc) CO2 following geological carbon sequestration (GCS). We hypothesized that natural subsurface scCO2 reservoirs, which serve as analogs for the long-term fate of sequestered scCO2 , harbor a 'deep carbonated biosphere' with carbon cycling potential. We sampled subsurface fluids from scCO2 -water separators at a natural scCO2 reservoir at McElmo Dome, Colorado for analysis of 16S rRNA gene diversity and metagenome content. Sequence annotations indicated dominance of Sulfurospirillum, Rhizobium, Desulfovibrio and four members of the Clostridiales family. Genomes extracted from metagenomes using homology and compositional approaches revealed diverse mechanisms for growth and nutrient cycling, including pathways for CO2 and N2 fixation, anaerobic respiration, sulfur oxidation, fermentation and potential for metabolic syntrophy. Differences in biogeochemical potential between two production well communities were consistent with differences in fluid chemical profiles, suggesting a potential link between microbial activity and geochemistry. The existence of a microbial ecosystem associated with the McElmo Dome scCO2 reservoir indicates that potential impacts of the deep biosphere on CO2 fate and transport should be taken into consideration as a component of GCS planning and modelling. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. A carbon cycle science update since IPCC AR-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolman, A J; van der Werf, G R; van der Molen, M K; Ganssen, G; Erisman, J-W; Strengers, B

    2010-01-01

    We review important advances in our understanding of the global carbon cycle since the publication of the IPCC AR4. We conclude that: the anthropogenic emissions of CO2 due to fossil fuel burning have increased up through 2008 at a rate near to the high end of the IPCC emission scenarios; there are contradictory analyses whether an increase in atmospheric fraction, that might indicate a declining sink strength of ocean and/or land, exists; methane emissions are increasing, possibly through enhanced natural emission from northern wetland, methane emissions from dry plants are negligible; old-growth forest take up more carbon than expected from ecological equilibrium reasoning; tropical forest also take up more carbon than previously thought, however, for the global budget to balance, this would imply a smaller uptake in the northern forest; the exchange fluxes between the atmosphere and ocean are increasingly better understood and bottom up and observation-based top down estimates are getting closer to each other; the North Atlantic and Southern ocean take up less CO2, but it is unclear whether this is part of the 'natural' decadal scale variability; large-scale fires and droughts, for instance in Amazonia, but also at Northern latitudes, have lead to significant decreases in carbon uptake on annual timescales; the extra uptake of CO2 stimulated by increased N-deposition is, from a greenhouse gas forcing perspective, counterbalanced by the related additional N2O emissions; the amount of carbon stored in permafrost areas appears much (two times) larger than previously thought; preservation of existing marine ecosystems could require a CO2 stabilization as low as 450 ppm; Dynamic Vegetation Models show a wide divergence for future carbon trajectories, uncertainty in the process description, lack of understanding of the CO2 fertilization effect and nitrogen-carbon interaction are major uncertainties.

  5. Upscaling diurnal cycles of carbon fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodesheim, Paul; Jung, Martin; Mahecha, Miguel; Reichstein, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Carbon fluxes like Gross Primary Production (GPP) and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) are important variables for studying interactions between the atmosphere and the biosphere in different ecosystems. They are typically derived from measurements at Eddy covariance towers and the FLUXNET global network consists of hundreds of such sites. In order to diagnose global GPP and NEE patterns from FLUXNET, upscaling approaches have been used in the past to extrapolate the site measurements to continental and global scale. However, respective products have a daily or monthly temporal resolution and do not allow for analyzing patterns related to diurnal variations of GPP and NEE. To raise these upscaling approaches to the next level, we present our first results on upscaling diurnal cycles of GPP and NEE with half-hourly resolution. We use random forest regression models to estimate the relationship between predictor variables and fluxes based on more than four million half-hourly observations from FLUXNET sites. We have developed and tested two approaches that overcome the mismatch in the temporal resolution between predictor variables at daily resolution and fluxes at half-hourly resolution. Based on thorough leave-one-site-out cross-validation we show that the approach works very well. Finally, we used the trained models for computing global products of half-hourly GPP and NEE that cover the years 2001 to 2014 and present global patterns of diurnal carbon flux variations derived from the upscaling approach.

  6. Historical constraints on the origins of the carbon cycle concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez, Matthieu Emmanuel; Gaillardet, Jérôme

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the geological carbon cycle remains a major scientific challenge, although studies dedicated to this issue, in particular those of J.J. Ebelmen in the mid 19th century, have existed for over 200 years. The exact scientific and social pathways leading to the construction of the contemporaneous carbon cycle requires further investigation, which in turn may provide valuable insights into the modern state of scientific knowledge. The present study contributes to this question by demonstrating that, following the discovery of the compound nature of carbonic acid by A.L. Lavoisier at the end of the 18th century, studies initially investigated the mechanisms of respiration and photosynthesis until they were recognized as exerting an antagonistic effect on the composition of air. In the early 19th century, the consequence of these studies at the global scale had been foreseen, and applied to investigate the stability of the atmospheric composition over time. These early steps were only concerned with the fate of carbonic acid through life processes. However, between 1820 and 1840, the works of A.L. Brongniard and J.B. Boussingault established that geologic processes, such as the burial of carbonaceous material (CM) in sedimentary rocks and the release of CO2 by volcanoes, affect the composition of the atmosphere. By 1845, J.J. Ebelmen had brilliantly contributed to the emerging question of atmospheric composition by proposing that the alteration of silicates on continents and the precipitation of carbonates in the ocean should be considered as a sink of atmospheric CO2. He also used chemical formula of the time to quantify this process, which led him to mention a carbon rotation for the first time. The rotation of this element through geologic processes became, in itself, a matter worthy of investigation as was the composition of the atmosphere. We argue that J.J. Ebelmen's brilliant synthesis was made possible by the parallel development of the atomistic

  7. Towards a quantitative understanding of the late Neoproterozoic carbon cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Christian Jannik; Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2011-01-01

    The cycles of carbon and oxygen at the Earth surface are intimately linked, where the burial of organic carbon into sediments represents a source of oxygen to the surface environment. This coupling is typically quantified through the isotope records of organic and inorganic carbon. Yet, the late...... Neoproterozoic Eon, the time when animals first evolved, experienced wild isotope fluctuations which do not conform to our normal understanding of the carbon cycle and carbon-oxygen coupling. We interpret these fluctuations with a new carbon cycle model and demonstrate that all of the main features...... of the carbonate and organic carbon isotope record can be explained by the release of methane hydrates from an anoxic dissolved organic carbon-rich ocean into an atmosphere containing oxygen levels considerably less than today....

  8. Towards a quantitative understanding of the late Neoproterozoic carbon cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Christian J.; Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2011-01-01

    The cycles of carbon and oxygen at the Earth surface are intimately linked, where the burial of organic carbon into sediments represents a source of oxygen to the surface environment. This coupling is typically quantified through the isotope records of organic and inorganic carbon. Yet, the late...... Neoproterozoic Eon, the time when animals first evolved, experienced wild isotope fluctuations which do not conform to our normal understanding of the carbon cycle and carbon-oxygen coupling. We interpret these fluctuations with a new carbon cycle model and demonstrate that all of the main features...... of the carbonate and organic carbon isotope record can be explained by the release of methane hydrates from an anoxic dissolved organic carbon-rich ocean into an atmosphere containing oxygen levels considerably less than today....

  9. Tank bromeliad - a natural model ecosystem for methane cycling research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Guntars; Brandt, Franziska; Conrad, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Tank bromeliads are common epiphytes throughout neotropical forest ecosystems. They are relatively small discrete habitats for terrestrial and aquatic macro- and microorganisms and naturally replicated. Their tanks effectively collect leaf litter and water and harbor a diverse microbial community. Up to several thousands of these tank bromeliads per hectare of tropical forest create a unique wetland ecosystem responsible for significant methane emissions. In a field study in tropical montane forests of southern Ecuador we sampled tank bromeliads of different species, size and canopy height and found that tank water availability controlled community composition of methanogenic archaea, determined by molecular analysis of the archaeal 16S rRNA genes. We set up a greenhouse experiment to investigate drying and re-wetting effects on microbial community composition and methanogenesis. Additionally, we conducted 13-CH-4 and 13-CO-2 labeling studies to investigate potential interaction of plant and microbial metabolism during methane cycling in tank bromeliads. Drying resulted in rapid change of the microbial community composition. The relative abundance of acetoclastic methanogens increased and that of hydrogenotrophic methanogens decreased with decreasing tank water availability confirming our field observations. Labeling studies showed that carbon was released from the plant into the tank supporting methanogenesis and that tank-produced methane was ventilated through the bromeliad leaf structure into the atmosphere which is analogous to the rhizosphere environment of wetland ecosystems. The bromeliad ecosystem may therefore provide a natural model to study how environmental changes and plant-microbe interactions drive methane cycling in aquatic-terrestrial ecosystems.

  10. Sustainable Life Cycles of Natural-Precursor-Derived Nanocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazaka, Kateryna; Jacob, Mohan V; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2016-01-13

    Sustainable societal and economic development relies on novel nanotechnologies that offer maximum efficiency at minimal environmental cost. Yet, it is very challenging to apply green chemistry approaches across the entire life cycle of nanotech products, from design and nanomaterial synthesis to utilization and disposal. Recently, novel, efficient methods based on nonequilibrium reactive plasma chemistries that minimize the process steps and dramatically reduce the use of expensive and hazardous reagents have been applied to low-cost natural and waste sources to produce value-added nanomaterials with a wide range of applications. This review discusses the distinctive effects of nonequilibrium reactive chemistries and how these effects can aid and advance the integration of sustainable chemistry into each stage of nanotech product life. Examples of the use of enabling plasma-based technologies in sustainable production and degradation of nanotech products are discussed-from selection of precursors derived from natural resources and their conversion into functional building units, to methods for green synthesis of useful naturally degradable carbon-based nanomaterials, to device operation and eventual disintegration into naturally degradable yet potentially reusable byproducts.

  11. Warming alters coupled carbon and nutrient cycles in experimental streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Tanner J; Cross, Wyatt F; Benstead, Jonathan P; Gíslason, Gísli M; Hood, James M; Huryn, Alexander D; Johnson, Philip W; Welter, Jill R

    2016-06-01

    Although much effort has been devoted to quantifying how warming alters carbon cycling across diverse ecosystems, less is known about how these changes are linked to the cycling of bioavailable nitrogen and phosphorus. In freshwater ecosystems, benthic biofilms (i.e. thin films of algae, bacteria, fungi, and detrital matter) act as biogeochemical hotspots by controlling important fluxes of energy and material. Understanding how biofilms respond to warming is thus critical for predicting responses of coupled elemental cycles in freshwater systems. We developed biofilm communities in experimental streamside channels along a gradient of mean water temperatures (7.5-23.6 °C), while closely maintaining natural diel and seasonal temperature variation with a common water and propagule source. Both structural (i.e. biomass, stoichiometry, assemblage structure) and functional (i.e. metabolism, N2 -fixation, nutrient uptake) attributes of biofilms were measured on multiple dates to link changes in carbon flow explicitly to the dynamics of nitrogen and phosphorus. Temperature had strong positive effects on biofilm biomass (2.8- to 24-fold variation) and net ecosystem productivity (44- to 317-fold variation), despite extremely low concentrations of limiting dissolved nitrogen. Temperature had surprisingly minimal effects on biofilm stoichiometry: carbon:nitrogen (C:N) ratios were temperature-invariant, while carbon:phosphorus (C:P) ratios declined slightly with increasing temperature. Biofilm communities were dominated by cyanobacteria at all temperatures (>91% of total biovolume) and N2 -fixation rates increased up to 120-fold between the coldest and warmest treatments. Although ammonium-N uptake increased with temperature (2.8- to 6.8-fold variation), the much higher N2 -fixation rates supplied the majority of N to the ecosystem at higher temperatures. Our results demonstrate that temperature can alter how carbon is cycled and coupled to nitrogen and phosphorus. The

  12. Beyond the Calvin Cycle: Autotrophic Carbon Fixation in the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hügler, Michael; Sievert, Stefan M.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms capable of autotrophic metabolism assimilate inorganic carbon into organic carbon. They form an integral part of ecosystems by making an otherwise unavailable form of carbon available to other organisms, a central component of the global carbon cycle. For many years, the doctrine prevailed that the Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle is the only biochemical autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway of significance in the ocean. However, ecological, biochemical, and genomic studies carried out over the last decade have not only elucidated new pathways but also shown that autotrophic carbon fixation via pathways other than the CBB cycle can be significant. This has ramifications for our understanding of the carbon cycle and energy flow in the ocean. Here, we review the recent discoveries in the field of autotrophic carbon fixation, including the biochemistry and evolution of the different pathways, as well as their ecological relevance in various oceanic ecosystems.

  13. Carbon cycle: Global warming then and now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    A rapid warming event 55.8 million years ago was caused by extensive carbon emissions. The rate of change of carbon and oxygen isotopes in marine shelf sediments suggests that carbon emission rates were much slower than anthropogenic emissions.

  14. A New U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, A. M.; Jackson, R.; Marland, G.; Sabine, C.

    2009-05-01

    The report "A U.S. carbon cycle science plan" (J. L. Sarmiento and S. C. Wofsy, U.S. Global Change Res. Program, Washington, D. C., 1999) outlined research priorities and promoted coordinated carbon cycle research across federal agencies in the United States for nearly a decade. Building on this framework and subsequent reports (http://www.carboncyclescience.gov/docs.php), a working group comprised of 27 scientists was formed in 2008 under the United States Carbon Cycle Science Program to review the 1999 Science Plan, and to develop an updated strategy for carbon cycle research for the period from 2010 to 2020. This comprehensive review is being conducted with wide input from the research and stakeholder communities. The recommendations of the Carbon Cycle Science Working Group (CCSWG) will go to U.S. agency managers who have collective responsibility for setting national carbon cycle science priorities and for sponsoring much of the carbon cycle research in the United States. This presentation will provide an update on the ongoing planning process, will outline the steps that the CCSWG is undertaking in building consensus towards an updated U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Plan, and will seek input on the best ways in which to coordinate efforts with ongoing and upcoming research in Canada and Mexico, as well as with ongoing work globally.

  15. The GLOBE Carbon Cycle Project: Using a systems approach to understand carbon and the Earth's climate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, S. K.; Ollinger, S. V.; Martin, M. E.; Gengarelly, L. M.; Schloss, A. L.; Bourgeault, J. L.; Randolph, G.; Albrechtova, J.

    2009-12-01

    National Science Content Standards identify systems as an important unifying concept across the K-12 curriculum. While this standard exists, there is a recognized gap in the ability of students to use a systems thinking approach in their learning. In a similar vein, both popular media as well as some educational curricula move quickly through climate topics to carbon footprint analyses without ever addressing the nature of carbon or the carbon cycle. If students do not gain a concrete understanding of carbon’s role in climate and energy they will not be able to successfully tackle global problems and develop innovative solutions. By participating in the GLOBE Carbon Cycle project, students learn to use a systems thinking approach, while at the same time, gaining a foundation in the carbon cycle and it's relation to climate and energy. Here we present the GLOBE Carbon Cycle project and materials, which incorporate a diverse set of activities geared toward upper middle and high school students with a variety of learning styles. A global carbon cycle adventure story and game let students see the carbon cycle as a complete system, while introducing them to systems thinking concepts including reservoirs, fluxes and equilibrium. Classroom photosynthesis experiments and field measurements of schoolyard vegetation brings the global view to the local level. And the use of computer models at varying levels of complexity (effects on photosynthesis, biomass and carbon storage in global biomes, global carbon cycle) not only reinforces systems concepts and carbon content, but also introduces students to an important scientific tool necessary for understanding climate change.

  16. The Carbon Cycle: Implications for Climate Change and Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-13

    from human activities.4 Methane, black carbon, and organic carbon pollution are also part of the carbon cycle and have roles in human-induced climate...recovery and concludes that tropical regions dominated by rainforests or other forest types are a net source of carbon to the atmosphere. 27 However, a...Some model simulations suggest that the Southern Ocean around Antarctica accounts for nearly half of the net air -sea flux of anthropogenic carbon.43

  17. The Deep Carbon Cycle and CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovitch, N. B.; Mao, W. L.; Chou, I.; Mu, K.

    2009-12-01

    Increased understanding of the Earth’s carbon cycle may provide insight for future carbon storage. Long term geologic sequestration of CO2 occurs in the earth via exothermic reactions between CO2 and silicate minerals to form carbonate minerals. It has been shown that while there is a large enough supply of ultra mafic igneous rock to sequester the CO2 [1], the kinetics of this natural process are too slow to effectively manage our CO2 output. Most studies have focused on studying reaction kinetics at relatively low temperatures and pressures [2,3], and have found that the reaction kinetics are either too slow or (in the case of serpentine) necessitate an uneconomical heat pretreatment [3,4]. Our experiments expand the pressures and temperatures (up to 500 bars and exceeding 200 °C) at which the CO2 + silicate reaction is studied using fused silica capillary cells and Raman and XRD analysis. By increasing our understanding of the kinetics of this process and providing a valuable input for reactive flow and transport models, these results may guide approaches for practical CO2 sequestration in carbonate minerals as a way to manage atmospheric CO2 levels. High pressure and temperature results on carbonates have implications for understanding the deep carbon cycle. Most of the previous high pressure studies on carbonates have concentrated on magnesite (MgCO3), calcite (CaCO3), or dolomite ((Ca,Mg)CO3) [5,6]. While the Mg and Ca carbonates are the most abundant, iron-rich siderite (FeCO3) may be a significant player at greater depths within the earth. We performed XRD and Raman spectroscopy experiments on siderite to lower mantle pressures (up to 40 GPa) and observed a possible phase change around 13 GPa. References 1. Lackner, Klaus S., Wendt, Christopher H., Butt, Darryl P., Joyce, Edward L., Sharp, David H., 1995, Carbon dioxide disposal in carbonate minerals, Energy, Vol.20, No. 11, pp. 1153-1170 2. Bearat, Hamdallah, McKelvy, Michael J., Chizmeshya, Andrew V

  18. Iron cycling at corroding carbon steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason S; McBeth, Joyce M; Ray, Richard I; Little, Brenda J; Emerson, David

    2013-01-01

    Surfaces of carbon steel (CS) exposed to mixed cultures of iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) in seawater media under aerobic conditions were rougher than surfaces of CS exposed to pure cultures of either type of microorganism. The roughened surface, demonstrated by profilometry, is an indication of loss of metal from the surface. In the presence of CS, aerobically grown FeOB produced tight, twisted helical stalks encrusted with iron oxides. When CS was exposed anaerobically in the presence of FeRB, some surface oxides were removed. However, when the same FeOB and FeRB were grown together in an aerobic medium, FeOB stalks were less encrusted with iron oxides and appeared less tightly coiled. These observations suggest that iron oxides on the stalks were reduced and solubilized by the FeRB. Roughened surfaces of CS and denuded stalks were replicated with culture combinations of different species of FeOB and FeRB under three experimental conditions. Measurements of electrochemical polarization resistance established different rates of corrosion of CS in aerobic and anaerobic media, but could not differentiate rate differences between sterile controls and inoculated exposures for a given bulk concentration of dissolved oxygen. Similarly, total iron in the electrolyte could not be used to differentiate treatments. The experiments demonstrate the potential for iron cycling (oxidation and reduction) on corroding CS in aerobic seawater media.

  19. Durability of Lining Concrete of Subsea Tunnel under Combined Action of Freeze-thaw Cycle and Carbonation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Li; CHEN Jingru; ZHAO Tiejun

    2012-01-01

    Through the fast freeze-thaw cycle test,accelerated carbonation test,and natural carbonation test,the durability performance of lining concrete under combined action of freeze-thaw cycle and carbonation were studied.The experimental results indicate that freeze-thaw cycle apparently accelerates the process of concrete carbonation and carbonation deteriorates the freeze resistance of concrete.Under the combined action of freeze-thaw cycle and carbonation,the durability of lining concrete decreases.The carbonation depth of lining concrete at tunnel openings under freeze-thaw cycles and tunnel condition was predicted.For the high performance concrete with proposed mix ratio,the lining concrete tends to be unsafe because predicted carbonation depth exceeds the thickness of reinforced concrete protective coating.Adopting other measurements simultaneously to improve the durability of lining concrete at the tunnel openings is essential.

  20. Lakes and reservoirs as regulators of carbon cycling and climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tranvik, L.J.; Downing, J.A.; Cotner, J.B.; Loiselle, S.A.; Striegl, R.G.; Ballatore, T.J.; Dillon, P.; Knoll, L.B.; Kutser, T.; Larsen, S.; Laurion, I.; Leech, D.M.; McAllister, S.L.; McKnight, D.M.; Melack, J.; Overholt, E.; Porter, J.A.; Prairie, Y.T.; Renwick, W.H.; Roland, F.; Sherman, B.S.; Schindler, D.W.; Sobek, S.; Tremblay, A.; Vanni, M.J.; Verschoor, A.M.; von Wachenfeldt, E.; Weyhenmeyer, G.

    2009-01-01

    We explore the role of lakes in carbon cycling and global climate, examine the mechanisms influencing carbon pools and transformations in lakes, and discuss how the metabolism of carbon in the inland waters is likely to change in response to climate. Furthermore, we project changes as global climate

  1. Biomes and Natural Cycles. [CD-ROM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996

    This interactive multimedia software illustrates and explains life on planet Earth through colorful and dynamic representations. Clear explanations and animation elucidate a variety of subjects such as the organization of the ecosphere, the flux of energy, water cycles, climates, and characteristics of regions across the globe. Five animated films…

  2. Biomes and Natural Cycles. [CD-ROM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996

    This interactive multimedia software illustrates and explains life on planet Earth through colorful and dynamic representations. Clear explanations and animation elucidate a variety of subjects such as the organization of the ecosphere, the flux of energy, water cycles, climates, and characteristics of regions across the globe. Five animated films…

  3. Carbon cycle: Ocean dissolved organics matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amon, Rainer M. W.

    2016-12-01

    Large quantities of organic carbon are stored in the ocean, but its biogeochemical behaviour is elusive. Size-age-composition relations now quantify the production of tiny organic molecules as a major pathway for carbon sequestration.

  4. Carbon cycle: New pathways in the sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Organic carbon decomposition in anoxic marine sediments was thought to be dominated by bacteria, but experimental data and microbial culture studies now show that microalgae buried in coastal sands may also play an important role in carbon turnover.

  5. Carbon gels derived from natural resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Celzard

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Most carbon gels investigated so far and reportedin the literature were prepared from resorcinolcrosslinked with formaldehyde in water, and weregenerally dried with supercritical CO2 before beingpyrolysed. In the present paper, through someselected examples, we show how valuable carbongels can be derived from other phenolic resourceshaving a natural origin. Special emphasis is givento tannin and lignin, both derived from wood, aspotential precursors of carbon aero- and cryogels.However, natural compounds not obeying the usualconcepts of sol-gel chemistry may also be used forpreparing carbon gels, such as cellulose, and evenglucose. In the latter case, hydrothermal treatmentforces the phase separation to occur, and leads tomonoliths which can be advantageously convertedinto carbon aerogels by supercritical drying andsubsequent pyrolysis.

  6. The role of urbanization in the global carbon cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina eChurkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban areas account for more than 70% of CO2 emissions from burning fossil fuels. Urban expansion in tropics is responsible for 5% of the annual emissions from land use change. Here I show that the effect of urbanization on the global carbon cycle extends beyond these emissions. I quantify the contribution of urbanization to the major carbon fluxes and pools globally and identify gaps crucial for predicting the evolution of the carbon cycle in the future. Urban residents currently control ~22 (12-40 % of the land carbon uptake (112 PgC/yr and ~24 (15-39 % of the carbon emissions (117 PgC/yr from land globally. Urbanization resulted in the creation of new carbon pools on land such as buildings (~6.7 PgC and landfills (~30 PgC. Together these pools store 1.6 (±0.3 % of the total vegetation and soil carbon pools globally. The creation and maintenance of these new pools has been associated with high emissions of CO2, which are currently better understood than the processes associated with the dynamics of these pools and accompanying uptake of carbon. Predictions of the future trajectories of the global carbon cycle will require a much better understanding of how urban development affects the carbon cycle over the long term.

  7. From Flowers to Worms: Understanding Nature's Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Child Care, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Gardening helps children learn how plants sprout, grow, bloom, and then wither away, leaving seeds behind. Participating in this natural process allows children to experience the stages of life. Suggested gardening activities include studying dandelions, focusing on culture for garden plant selection, and constructing a worm box or worm terrarium…

  8. From Flowers to Worms: Understanding Nature's Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Child Care, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Gardening helps children learn how plants sprout, grow, bloom, and then wither away, leaving seeds behind. Participating in this natural process allows children to experience the stages of life. Suggested gardening activities include studying dandelions, focusing on culture for garden plant selection, and constructing a worm box or worm terrarium…

  9. Mineralogical Controls on Carbon Cycling in a Floodplain Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, B.; Dwivedi, D.; Steefel, C. I.; Spycher, N.; Fox, P. M.; Nico, P. S.

    2016-12-01

    With the overarching goal of understanding mineral-organic-microbe interactions on carbon and nutrient cycles, we are developing a reactive transport model that includes carbon (C) pools and transformations, a realistic treatment of protected C pools, multiple decomposition pathways, and radiocarbon (14C) dynamics. The objective of the modeling is to understand the impact of mineralogy on carbon turnover and residence times in a floodplain site in Rifle, CO. Previous studies have identified naturally reduced zones (NRZs) in the saturated zone of the Rifle site to be C hotspots and regions characterized by diffusion-limited transport and high rates of microbially-mediated biogeochemical reactions. Detailed characterization of the soil organic matter in both the NRZ and non-NRZ sediments at the Rifle site including radiocarbon dating, and extraction and chemical characterization of mineral-bound pool of organic matter, is used to inform the modeling. In this study, we describe the development of a coupled unsaturated-saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport model of the Rifle site along a two-dimensional cross-section (parallel to groundwater flow). The biogeochemical reaction network includes representations of bacterial and fungal activity, archetypal polymer and monomer carbon substrate groups, kinetic and equilibrium mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions, and aqueous and surface complexation. We use this model to explore fungal and bacterial community emergence at the site and compare organo-mineral interactions across NRZ and non-NRZ regions. Observed 14C profiles suggest that sediment-associated carbon in NRZ locations is much older than both the depositional age of the floodplain sediments and dissolved organic carbon in the groundwater. Model simulations were able to capture the observed soil organic matter (SOM) and ∆14C profiles across the Rifle site. Modeling results show higher lignin content in the NRZ sediments and greater Fe

  10. Nature of Reduced Carbon in Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; White, L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorites provide important information on the nature of reduced carbon components present on Mars throughout its history. The first in situ analyses for carbon on the surface of Mars by the Viking landers yielded disappointing results. With the recognition of Martian meteorites on Earth, investigations have shown carbon-bearing phases exist on Mars. Studies have yielded presence of reduced carbon, carbonates and inferred graphitic carbon phases. Samples ranging in age from the first approximately 4 Ga of Mars history [e.g. ALH84001] to nakhlites with a crystallization age of 1.3 Ga [e.g. Nakhla] with aqueous alteration processes occurring 0.5-0.7 Ga after crystallizaton. Shergottites demonstrate formation ages around 165-500 Ma with younger aqueous alterations events. Only a limited number of the Martian meteorites do not show evidence of significance terrestrial alterations. Selected areas within ALH84001, Nakhla, Yamato 000593 and possibly Tissint are suitable for study of their indigenous reduced carbon bearing phases. Nakhla possesses discrete, well-defined carbonaceous phases present within iddingsite alteration zones. Based upon both isotopic measurements and analysis of Nakhla's organic phases the presence of pre-terrestrial organics is now recognized. The reduced carbon-bearing phases appear to have been deposited during preterrestrial aqueous alteration events that produced clays. In addition, the microcrystalline layers of Nakhla's iddingsite have discrete units of salt crystals suggestive of evaporation processes. While we can only speculate on the origin of these unique carbonaceous structures, we note that the significance of such observations is that it may allow us to understand the role of Martian carbon as seen in the Martian meteorites with obvious implications for astrobiology and the pre-biotic evolution of Mars. In any case, our observations strongly suggest that reduced organic carbon exists as micrometer- size, discrete structures

  11. Carbon cycle and climate commitments from early human interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickfeld, K.; Solomon, S.

    2015-12-01

    According to the early anthropogenic hypothesis proposed by Ruddiman (2003), human influence on Earth's climate began several thousand years before the beginning of the industrial era. Agriculture and deforestation starting around 8000 years before present (BP) and slowly increasing over the Holocene, would have led to an increase in atmospheric methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, preventing a natural cooling of Earth's climate. Here, the emphasis is not on testing Ruddiman's hypothesis, but rather on exploring the carbon cycle and climate commitment from potential early CH4 and CO2 emissions. In contrast to modern greenhouse gas emissions, early emissions occurred over millennia, allowing the climate system to come to near-equilibrium with the applied forcing. We perform two transient Holocene simulations with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity - the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM). The first simulation is a standard transient Holocene simulation, forced with reconstructed changes in CO2 and CH4 concentrations and orbital and volcanic forcing. The second simulation is forced with CO2 and CH4 concentrations corrected for the net anthropogenic contribution postulated by Ruddiman (2007), with other forcings evolving as in the standard simulation. The difference in diagnosed emissions between the two simulations allows us to determine the anthropogenic emissions. After year 1850, anthropogenic CO2 and CH4 emissions are set to zero and the simulations continued for several hundred years. In this paper, we analyze the carbon cycle and climate response to the applied forcings, and quantify the resulting (post 1850) commitment from early anthropogenic interference.

  12. Technical comparison between Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Pablo Andres Silva; Venturini, Osvaldo Jose; Lora, Electo Eduardo Silva [Federal University of Itajuba - UNIFEI, MG (Brazil). Excellence Group in Thermal Power and Distributed Generation - NEST], e-mails: osvaldo@unifei.edu.br, electo@unifei.edu.br

    2010-07-01

    Among the emerging clean coal technologies for power generation, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Natural Gas Combined Cycle (NGCC) systems are receiving considerable attention as a potentially attractive option to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). The main reason is because these systems has high efficiency and low emissions in comparison with traditional power generation plants. Currently in IGCC and NGCC systems at demonstration stage is been considered to implement CCS technology. CO{sub 2} emissions can be avoided in a gasification-based power plant because by transferring almost all carbon compounds to CO{sub 2} through the water gas shift (WGS) reaction, then removing the CO{sub 2} before it is diluted in the combustion stage. The aim of this study is to compare the technical performance of an IGCC system that uses Brazilian coal and petroleum coke as fuel with a NGCC system, with the same fixed output power of 450 MW. The first section of this paper presents the plant configurations of IGCC systems. The following section presents an analysis of NGCC technology. (author)

  13. Phase heterogeneity in carbonate production by marine fish influences their roles in sediment generation and the inorganic carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Michael A; Harborne, Alastair R; Perry, Chris T; Wilson, Rod W

    2017-04-10

    Marine teleost fish are important carbonate producers in neritic and oceanic settings. However, the fates of the diverse carbonate phases (i.e., mineral and amorphous forms of CaCO3) they produce, and their roles in sediment production and marine inorganic carbon cycling, remain poorly understood. Here we quantify the carbonate phases produced by 22 Bahamian fish species and integrate these data with regional fish biomass data from The Bahamas to generate a novel platform-scale production model that resolves these phases. Overall carbonate phase proportions, ordered by decreasing phase stability, are: ~20% calcite, ~6% aragonite, ~60% high-Mg calcite, and ~14% amorphous carbonate. We predict that these phases undergo differing fates, with at least ~14% (amorphous carbonate) likely dissolving rapidly. Results further indicate that fisheries exploitation in The Bahamas has potentially reduced fish carbonate production by up to 58% in certain habitats, whilst also driving a deviation from natural phase proportions. These findings have evident implications for understanding sedimentary processes in shallow warm-water carbonate provinces. We further speculate that marked phase heterogeneity may be a hitherto unrecognised feature of fish carbonates across a wide range of neritic and oceanic settings, with potentially major implications for understanding their role in global marine inorganic carbon cycling.

  14. Interannual variability of carbon cycle implied by a 2-D atmospheric transport model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Can; XU Li; SHAO Min; ZHANG Ren-jian

    2004-01-01

    A 2-dimensional atmospheric transport model is deployed in a simplified CO2 inverse study. Calculated carbon flux distribution for the interval from 1981 to 1997 confirms the existence of a terrestrial carbon sink in mid-high latitude area of North Hemisphere. Strong interannual variability exists in carbon flux patterns, implying a possible link with ENSO and other natural episodes such as Pinatubo volcano eruption in 1991. Mechanism of this possible link was investigated with statistic method. Correlation analysis indicated that in North Hemisphere, climatic factors such as temperature and precipitation, to some extend, could influence the carbon cycle process of land and ocean, thus cause considerable change in carbon flux distribution. In addition, correlation study also demonstrated the possible important role of Asian terrestrial ecosystems in carbon cycle.

  15. Biochar and biological carbon cycling in temperate soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, S. A.; Vanbergen, A. J.; Bardgett, R. D.; Hopkins, D. W.; Ostle, N.

    2012-04-01

    Production of biochar, the recalcitrant residue formed by pyrolysis of plant matter, is suggested as a means of increasing storage of stable carbon (C) in the soil (1). Biochar has also been shown to act as a soil conditioner, increasing the productivity of certain crops by reducing nutrient leaching and improving soil water-holding capacity. However, the response of soil carbon pools to biochar addition is not yet well understood. Studies have shown that biochar has highly variable effects on microbial C cycling and thus on soil C storage (2,3,4). This discrepancy may be partially explained by the response of soil invertebrates, which occupy higher trophic levels and regulate microbial activity. This research aims to understand the role of soil invertebrates (i.e. Collembola and nematode worms) in biochar-mediated changes to soil C dynamics across a range of plant-soil communities. An open-air, pot-based mesocosm experiment was established in May, 2011 at the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Edinburgh. Three treatments were included in a fully-factorial design: biochar (presence [2 % w/w] or absence), soil type (arable sandy, arable sandy loam, grassland sandy loam), and vegetation type (Hordeum vulgare, Lolium perenne, unvegetated). Monitored parameters include: invertebrate and microbial species composition, soil C fluxes (CO2 and trace gas evolution, leachate C content, primary productivity and soil C content), and soil conditions (pH, moisture content and water-holding capacity). Preliminary results indicate that biochar-induced changes to soil invertebrate communities and processes are affected by pre-existing soil characteristics, and that soil texture in particular may be an important determinant of soil response to biochar addition. 1. Lehmann, 2007. A handful of carbon. Nature 447, 143-144. 2. Liang et al., 2010. Black carbon affects the cycling of non-black carbon in soil. Organic Geochemistry 41, 206-213. 3. Van Zwieten et al., 2010. Influence of

  16. Linking brownification to carbon cycling in headwater streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasching, C.; Behounek, B.; Singer, G. A.; Battin, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    Brownification of inland waters is becoming a global phenomenon with major implications for aquatic ecology and drinking water supply. The unprecedented export of humic substances from the terrestrial environment causes this notable change in colour of stream and lake waters. Given the net heterotrophy of most inland waters, altered carbon fluxes may impact microbial metabolism and ultimately carbon dioxide emissions from these inland waters. Yet the implications for carbon cycling remain elusive. Here, we investigate the coupling of microbial metabolism, organic carbon characteristics and streamwater CO2 concntration along a brownification gradient in 20 headwater streams draining catchments covered with coniferous forest and peatland in the Bohemian Massive, Austria. We break down brownification into its components of concentration and quality, and relate each to carbon cycling in headwater streams. Brownification did not only increase streamwater dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration but also induced changes in DOM quality. Humic-like and aromatic compounds of terrigenous origin -- conferring the brown colour to the water -- were metabolised by microbial heterotrophs in the streamwater yet at the cost of low carbon use efficiency (CUE). Potential CO2 evasion from headwaters was controlled by the quantity of bioavailable carbon as well as by the coupling of carbon qulity and microbial metabolism. This implies brownification to contribute to CO2 evasion from streams as a large fraction of terrigenous organic carbon is respired by microbial heterotrophs along the flow path. Our results illuminate the impact of brownification on carbon cycling which may gain relevance as global change progresses.

  17. Carbon dioxide, ground air and carbon cycling in Gibraltar karst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattey, D. P.; Atkinson, T. C.; Barker, J. A.; Fisher, R.; Latin, J.-P.; Durrell, R.; Ainsworth, M.

    2016-07-01

    We put forward a general conceptual model of CO2 behaviour in the vadose zone of karst aquifers, based on physical principles of air flow through porous media and caves, combined with a geochemical interpretation of cave monitoring data. This 'Gibraltar model' links fluxes of water, air and carbon through the soil with the porosity of the vadose zone, the circulation of ground air and the ventilation of caves. Gibraltar hosts many natural caves whose locations span the full length and vertical range of the Rock. We report results of an 8-year monitoring study of carbon in soil organic matter and bedrock carbonate, dissolved inorganic carbon in vadose waters, and gaseous CO2 in soil, cave and ground air. Results show that the regime of cave air CO2 results from the interaction of cave ventilation with a reservoir of CO2-enriched ground air held within the smaller voids of the bedrock. The pCO2 of ground air, and of vadose waters that have been in close contact with it, are determined by multiple factors that include recharge patterns, vegetation productivity and root respiration, and conversion of organic matter to CO2 within the soil, the epikarst and the whole vadose zone. Mathematical modelling and field observations show that ground air is subject to a density-driven circulation that reverses seasonally, as the difference between surface and underground temperatures reverses in sign. The Gibraltar model suggests that cave air pCO2 is not directly related to CO2 generated in the soil or the epikarstic zone, as is often assumed. Ground air CO2 formed by the decay of organic matter (OM) washed down into the deeper unsaturated zone is an important additional source of pCO2. In Gibraltar the addition of OM-derived CO2 is the dominant control on the pCO2 of ground air and the Ca-hardness of waters within the deep vadose zone. The seasonal regime of CO2 in cave air depends on the position of a cave in relation to the density-driven ground air circulation pattern which

  18. Glassy carbon supercapacitor: 100,000 cycles demonstrated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baertsch, M.; Braun, A.; Schnyder, B.; Koetz, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    A 5 V glassy carbon capacitor stack was built consisting of four bipolar and two end-plate electrodes. More than 100,000 charging/discharging cycles were applied to test the stability of the double-layer capacitor. Low and high frequency resistances were measured as a function of the number of cycles. (author) 2 figs., 1 ref.

  19. Carbon cycle observations: gaps threaten climate mitigation policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Birdsey; Nick Bates; MIke Behrenfeld; Kenneth Davis; Scott C. Doney; Richard Feely; Dennis Hansell; Linda Heath; et al.

    2009-01-01

    Successful management of carbon dioxide (CO2) requires robust and sustained carbon cycle observations. Yet key elements of a national observation network are lacking or at risk. A U.S. National Research Council review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program earlier this year highlighted the critical need for a U.S. climate observing system to...

  20. Interglacials, Milankovitch Cycles, Solar Activity, and Carbon Dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The existing understanding of interglacial periods is that they are initiated by Milankovitch cycles enhanced by rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. During interglacials, global temperature is also believed to be primarily controlled by carbon dioxide concentrations, modulated by internal processes such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the North Atlantic Oscillation. Recent work challenges the fundamental basis of these conceptions.

  1. Interglacials, Milankovitch Cycles, Solar Activity, and Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, Gerald E.

    2014-01-01

    The existing understanding of interglacial periods is that they are initiated by Milankovitch cycles enhanced by rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. During interglacials, global temperature is also believed to be primarily controlled by carbon dioxide concentrations, modulated by internal processes such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and the North Atlantic Oscillation. Recent work challenges the fundamental basis of these conceptions.

  2. Lowering Global Temperature by Enhancing the Natural Sulfur Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingenter, O. W.; Elliot, S. M.; Blake, D. R.

    2007-12-01

    We describe a well leveraged approach to partially regulate climate using limited iron enhancement to stimulate the natural sulfur cycle resulting in increased cloud reflectivity that could cool large regions of our planet. Our plan differs greatly in size and intended outcome from full scale ocean iron fertilization of the Southern Ocean (SO) as proposed previously to help mitigate rising CO2 in the atmosphere. Some regions of the Earth's oceans are high in nutrients but low in primary productivity. The largest such region is the SO followed by the equatorial Pacific. Several mesoscale (100 km2) experiments have shown that the limiting nutrient to productivity is iron. Yet, the effectiveness of iron fertilization for sequestering significant amounts of atmospheric CO2 is still in question. However, marine microorganisms not only consume inorganic carbon but also produce and consume many climate relevant organic gases. The greatest climate effect of iron fertilization may be in enhancing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) production, leading to changes in the optical properties of the atmosphere and cooling of the region. It appears that that full scale fertilization of the SO is not a viable solution because it would lead to over cooling of the region. Furthermore, our initial proposal differs from other solar shading plans as primary productivity may actually increase somewhat despite the slight loss in sunlight.

  3. Climate Cycling on Early Mars Caused by the Carbonate-Silicate Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.; Batalha, N. E.; Haqq-Misra, J. D.; Kopparapu, R.

    2016-12-01

    For decades, scientists have tried to explain the evidence for fluvial activity on early Mars, but a consensus has yet to emerge regarding the mechanism for producing it. One hypothesis suggests early Mars was warmed by a thick greenhouse atmosphere [1]. Another suggests early Mars was generally cold but was warmed occasionally by impacts or by episodes of enhanced volcanism [2,3], with warming possibly extended by cirrus clouds [4]. These latter hypotheses struggle to produce the amounts of rainfall needed to form the martian valleys, but are consistent with inferred low rates of weathering compared to Earth. We suggest that both schools of thought are partly correct. Mars experienced dramatic climate cycles with extended periods of glaciation punctuated by warm periods lasting up to 10 Myr [5]. Cycles of repeated glaciation and deglaciation occurred because stellar insolation was low, and because CO2 outgassing could not keep pace with CO2 consumption by silicate weathering followed by deposition of carbonates. In order to deglaciate early Mars, substantial outgassing of molecular hydrogen from Mars' reduced crust and mantle was also required, as our own climate model is unable to do this without adding some greenhouse warming from H2 [6,7]. Our hypothesis can be tested by future Mars exploration that better establishes the time scale for valley formation. References: [1] Pollack JB, Kasting JF, Richardson SM, Poliakoff K. 1987. Icarus 71: 203-24 [2] Halevy I, Head JW. 2014. Nature Geoscience 7: 865-8 [3] Segura TL, Toon OB, Colaprete A, Zahnle K. 2002. Science 298: 1977-80 [4] Urata RA, Toon OB. 2013. Icarus 226: 229-50 [5] Batalha NE, Kopparapu RK, Haqq-Misra JD, Kasting JF. submitted. Climate cycling on early Mars caused by the carbonate-silicate cycle. EPSL [6] Ramirez RM, Kopparapu R, Zugger ME, Robinson TD, Freedman R, Kasting JF. 2014. Nature Geosci 7: 59-63 [7] Batalha N, Domagal-Goldman SD, Ramirez R, Kasting JF. 2015. Icarus 258: 337-49

  4. Trailblazing the Carbon Cycle of Tropical Forests from Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Brown

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We review the literature that led to clarifying the role of tropical forests in the global carbon cycle from a time when they were considered sources of atmospheric carbon to the time when they were found to be atmospheric carbon sinks. This literature originates from work conducted by US Forest Service scientists in Puerto Rico and their collaborators. It involves the classification of forests by life zones, estimation of carbon density by forest type, assessing carbon storage changes with ecological succession and land use/land cover type, describing the details of the carbon cycle of forests at stand and landscape levels, assessing global land cover by forest type and the complexity of land use change in tropical regions, and assessing the ecological fluxes and storages that contribute to net carbon accumulation in tropical forests. We also review recent work that couples field inventory data, remote sensing technology such as LIDAR, and GIS analysis in order to more accurately determine the role of tropical forests in the global carbon cycle and point out new avenues of carbon research that address the responses of tropical forests to environmental change.

  5. The changing global carbon cycle: Linking plant-soil carbon dynamics to global consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, F. S.; McFarland, J.; McGuire, David A.; Euskirchen, E.S.; Ruess, Roger W.; Kielland, K.

    2009-01-01

    Most current climate-carbon cycle models that include the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle are based on a model developed 40 years ago by Woodwell & Whittaker (1968) and omit advances in biogeochemical understanding since that time. Their model treats net C emissions from ecosystems as the balance between net primary production (NPP) and heterotrophic respiration (HR, i.e. primarily decomposition).

  6. Measuring of carbon dioxide in water/steam cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daucik, Karol

    2004-12-01

    Prevention of corrosion of the water/steam cycle caused by anionic contamination is based on control of acid conductivity. The contribution of carbon dioxide to the corrosion is very limited and yet it contributes considerably to the acid conductivity as one of the most common contaminants. Monitoring of the dangerous anionic contamination has therefore been on the agenda for many years. Commercial monitors for this purpose are based on separation of carbon dioxide from stronger acids due to its high volatility. A systematic error in these monitors comes from high volatility of other anionic contaminants, e.g. formic and acetic acid. The aim of this investigation was to show that the separation could be made on a weak base anion exchanger working on the basis of differences in the strength of acids. This simple method was expected to give reliable results with low investment and low operating costs. The results showed that the separation is indeed effective. However, reliable data are received only if the anion exchange resin is in equilibrium with the actual concentration of carbon dioxide in the sample. It may take several hours to reach this equilibrium by natural flow of the sample through the anion exchange column. Changes in the concentration of carbon dioxide in the sample will therefore temporarily give false results until a new equilibrium is achieved. The simple monitoring method can be used only in places, where verification of carbon dioxide contamination is required by long-term operation with elevated and stable acid conductivity in the steam. For future design it is suggested to install a forced achievement of the new equilibrium by conditioning of the resin by means of short-lived additions of carbon dioxide or sodium hydroxide to the sample. In these periods the output from the monitor will be suspended. Output close to the equilibrium is expected to be reached within 10 minutes. This new suggested procedure will complicate the monitoring to such a

  7. Role of the seasonal cycle in coupling climate and carbon cycling in subanartic zone

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Monteiro, PMS

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence in the Southern Ocean that mesoscales and seasonal scales play an important role in the coupling of ocean carbon cycling and climate. The seasonal cycle is one of the strongest modes of variability in different...

  8. The Cycle Performance of a Hybrid Carbon Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sang-Yong; Kim, Sang-Chai; Jung, Ho-Young

    2016-02-01

    The behavior of a hybrid carbon battery is studied by using the Hg/Hg2SO4 reference electrode. The performance is confirmed in the discharge mode and a short-term cycle test. The capacities of the cell were 76.1, 60.3, 40.5, and 31.7 mAh at discharge currents of 150, 300, 600, and 900 mA, respectively. In the short-term cycle test, the capacity of the cell, 52.3 mAh at the first cycle, continuously increased to 66.7 mAh upon the fifth cycle (cut-off voltage 0.5 V in the deep cycle mode), indicating high feasibility of the hybrid carbon battery as a large-capacity energy storage system.

  9. Simulated Carbon Cycling in a Model Microbial Mat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, K. L.; Potter, C. S.

    2006-12-01

    We present here the novel addition of detailed organic carbon cycling to our model of a hypersaline microbial mat ecosystem. This ecosystem model, MBGC (Microbial BioGeoChemistry), simulates carbon fixation through oxygenic and anoxygenic photosynthesis, and the release of C and electrons for microbial heterotrophs via cyanobacterial exudates and also via a pool of dead cells. Previously in MBGC, the organic portion of the carbon cycle was simplified into a black-box rate of accumulation of simple and complex organic compounds based on photosynthesis and mortality rates. We will discuss the novel inclusion of fermentation as a source of carbon and electrons for use in methanogenesis and sulfate reduction, and the influence of photorespiration on labile carbon exudation rates in cyanobacteria. We will also discuss the modeling of decomposition of dead cells and the ultimate release of inorganic carbon. The detailed modeling of organic carbon cycling is important to the accurate representation of inorganic carbon flux through the mat, as well as to accurate representation of growth models of the heterotrophs under different environmental conditions. Because the model ecosystem is an analog of ancient microbial mats that had huge impacts on the atmosphere of early earth, this MBGC can be useful as a biological component to either early earth models or models of other planets that potentially harbor life.

  10. Urbanization and the carbon cycle: Contributions from social science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotullio, Peter J.; Hughes, Sara; Sarzynski, Andrea; Pincetl, Stephanie; Sanchez Peña, Landy; Romero-Lankao, Patricia; Runfola, Daniel; Seto, Karen C.

    2014-10-01

    This paper outlines the contributions of social science to the study of interactions between urbanization patterns and processes and the carbon cycle, and identifies gaps in knowledge and priority areas for future social scientific research contributions. While previously studied as a unidimensional process, we conceptualize urbanization as a multidimensional, social and biophysical process driven by continuous changes across space and time in various subsystems including biophysical, built environment, and socio-institutional (e.g., economic, political, demographic, behavioral, and sociological). We review research trends and findings focused on the socio-institutional subsystem of the urbanization process, and particularly the dynamics, relationships, and predictions relevant to energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Our findings suggest that a multidimensional perspective of urbanization facilitates a wider spectrum of research relevant to carbon cycle dynamics, even within the socio-institutional subsystem. However, there is little consensus around the details and mechanisms underlying the relationship between urban socio-institutional subsystems and the carbon cycle. We argue that progress in understanding the relationship between urbanization and the carbon cycle may be achieved if social scientists work collaboratively with each other as well as with scientists from other disciplines. From this review, we identify research priorities where collaborative social scientific efforts are necessary in conjunction with other disciplinary approaches to generate a more complete understanding of urbanization as a process and its relationship to the carbon cycle.

  11. Current systematic carbon cycle observations and needs for implementing a policy-relevant carbon observing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ciais

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A globally integrated carbon observation and analysis system is needed to improve the fundamental understanding of the global carbon cycle, to improve our ability to project future changes, and to verify the effectiveness of policies aiming to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase carbon sequestration. Building an integrated carbon observation system requires transformational advances from the existing sparse, exploratory framework towards a dense, robust, and sustained system in all components: anthropogenic emissions, the atmosphere, the ocean, and the terrestrial biosphere. The goal of this study is to identify the current state of carbon observations and needs for a global integrated carbon observation system that can be built in the next decade. A key conclusion is the substantial expansion (by several orders of magnitude of the ground-based observation networks required to reach the high spatial resolution for CO2 and CH4 fluxes, and for carbon stocks for addressing policy relevant objectives, and attributing flux changes to underlying processes in each region. In order to establish flux and stock diagnostics over remote areas such as the southern oceans, tropical forests and the Arctic, in situ observations will have to be complemented with remote-sensing measurements. Remote sensing offers the advantage of dense spatial coverage and frequent revisit. A key challenge is to bring remote sensing measurements to a level of long-term consistency and accuracy so that they can be efficiently combined in models to reduce uncertainties, in synergy with ground-based data. Bringing tight observational constraints on fossil fuel and land use change emissions will be the biggest challenge for deployment of a policy-relevant integrated carbon observation system. This will require in-situ and remotely sensed data at much higher resolution and density than currently achieved for natural fluxes, although over a small land area (cities, industrial

  12. Observing terrestrial ecosystems and the carbon cycle from space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimel, David [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA 91101 USA; Pavlick, Ryan [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA 91101 USA; Fisher, Joshua B. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA 91101 USA; Asner, Gregory P. [Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, 260 Panama St. Stanford CA 94305 USA; Saatchi, Sassan [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA 91101 USA; Townsend, Philip [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA; Miller, Charles [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA 91101 USA; Frankenberg, Christian [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA 91101 USA; Hibbard, Kathy [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999 MSIN: K9-34 Richland WA 99352 USA; Cox, Peter [College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, North Park Road Streatham Campus Harrison Building Exeter EX4 4QF UK

    2015-02-06

    Modeled terrestrial ecosystem and carbon cycle feedbacks contribute substantial uncertainty to projections of future climate. The limitations of current observing networks contribute to this uncertainty. Here we present a current climatology of global model predictions and observations for photosynthesis, biomass, plant diversity and plant functional diversity. Carbon cycle tipping points occur in terrestrial regions where fluxes or stocks are largest, and where biological variability is highest, the tropics and Arctic/Boreal zones. Global observations are predominately in the mid-latitudes and are sparse in high and low latitude ecosystems. Observing and forecasting ecosystem change requires sustained observations of sufficient density in time and space in critical regions. Using data and theory available now, we can develop a strategy to detect and forecast terrestrial carbon cycle-climate interactions, by combining in situ and remote techniques.

  13. Decoupling of the Carbon Cycle during Ocean Anoxic Event-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldrett, J.; Bergman, S. C.; Minisini, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Cenomanian to Turonian Boundary transition (95-93 Ma) represents one of the most profound global perturbations in the carbon cycle of the last 140 million years. This interval is characterized by widespread deposition of organic-rich fine-grained sediment marked by a globally recognised positive carbon isotope excursion (CIE) reflecting the widespread removal of 12C-enriched organic matter in marine sediments under global anoxic conditions. However, the exact timing and trigger of this inferred global phenomenon, termed Oceanic Anoxic Event-2 is still debated, with recent studies showing diachroneity between the deposition of the organic-rich sediment and the CIE, and conflicting interpretations on detailed redox analyses in several of these inferred anoxic settings. Here we present the first evidence for widespread and persistent oxygenation during OAE-2 based primarily on the distribution of redox-sensitive trace metals preserved in sediments from the Eagle Ford Formation, Western Interior Seaway of North America. We generated a δ13C curve which indicates an earlier initiation of the CIE in Texas compared to the Global Stratotype and Point Section at Pueblo, Colorado. Our data also indicate anoxic-euxinic conditions in the mid-late Cenomanian, but improved bottom-water oxygenation prior to and during the CIE, corroborated by increased bioturbation, abundance of benthic foraminifera and reduced total organic carbon values. Trace metal enrichments support large volumes of mafic volcanism possibly from the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (LIP), which occur during peak bottom-water oxygenation and a plateau in δ13Corg values and does not immediately precede the Cenomanian-Turonian CIE, as previously stated. This suggests that the emplacement of a LIP was not the primary trigger of the OAE-2 event. It is also unlikely that bottom-water oxygenation was promoted by the introduction of volcanogenic Fe inhibiting sulfate reduction, as the depletion in redox

  14. Advanced Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Mark [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sienicki, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, Anton [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Nellis, Gregory [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Klein, Sanford [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-10-21

    Fluids operating in the supercritical state have promising characteristics for future high efficiency power cycles. In order to develop power cycles using supercritical fluids, it is necessary to understand the flow characteristics of fluids under both supercritical and two-phase conditions. In this study, a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) methodology was developed for supercritical fluids flowing through complex geometries. A real fluid property module was implemented to provide properties for different supercritical fluids. However, in each simulation case, there is only one species of fluid. As a result, the fluid property module provides properties for either supercritical CO2 (S-CO2) or supercritical water (SCW). The Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) was employed to model the two-phase flow. HEM assumes two phases have same velocity, pressure, and temperature, making it only applicable for the dilute dispersed two-phase flow situation. Three example geometries, including orifices, labyrinth seals, and valves, were used to validate this methodology with experimental data. For the first geometry, S-CO2 and SCW flowing through orifices were simulated and compared with experimental data. The maximum difference between the mass flow rate predictions and experimental measurements is less than 5%. This is a significant improvement as previous works can only guarantee 10% error. In this research, several efforts were made to help this improvement. First, an accurate real fluid module was used to provide properties. Second, the upstream condition was determined by pressure and density, which determines supercritical states more precise than using pressure and temperature. For the second geometry, the flow through labyrinth seals was studied. After a successful validation, parametric studies were performed to study geometric effects on the leakage rate. Based on these parametric studies, an optimum design strategy for the see

  15. Orbital forcing of the Paleocene and Eocene carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeebe, Richard E.; Westerhold, Thomas; Littler, Kate; Zachos, James C.

    2017-05-01

    Multimillion-year proxy records across the Paleocene and Eocene show prominent variations on orbital time scales. The cycles, which have been identified at various sites across the globe, preferentially concentrate spectral power at eccentricity and precessional frequencies. It is evident that these cycles are an expression of changes in global climate and carbon cycling paced by astronomical forcing. However, little is currently known about the link between orbital forcing and the carbon cycle-climate system and the amplitude of associated atmospheric CO2 variations. Here we use simple and complex carbon cycle models to explore the basic effect of different orbital forcing schemes and noise on the carbon cycle. Our primary modeling target is the high-resolution, ˜7.7 Myr long, benthic isotope record at Ocean Drilling Program Site 1262 in the South Atlantic. For direct insolation forcing (as opposed to artificial eccentricity-tilt-precession), one major challenge is understanding how the system transfers spectral power from high to low frequencies. We discuss feasible solutions, including insolation transformations analogous to electronic AC-DC conversion (DC'ing). Regarding mechanisms, we focus on tropical insolation and a long-term carbon imbalance in terrestrial organic burial/oxidation but do not rule out other scenarios. Our analysis shows that high-latitude mechanisms are unlikely drivers of orbitally paced changes in the late Paleocene-early Eocene (LPEE) Earth system. Furthermore, we provide constraints on the origin and isotopic composition of a possible LPEE cyclic carbon imbalance/source responding to astronomical forcing. Our simulations also reveal a mechanism for the large δ13C-eccentricity lag at the 400 kyr period observed in Paleocene, Oligocene, and Miocene sections. We present the first estimates of orbital-scale variations in atmospheric CO2 during the late Paleocene and early Eocene.

  16. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle : Global retrievals of terrestrial carbon allocation, pools, and residence times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloom, A Anthony; Exbrayat, Jean-François; van der Velde, Ivar R; Feng, Liang; Williams, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle

  17. The decadal state of the terrestrial carbon cycle : Global retrievals of terrestrial carbon allocation, pools, and residence times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloom, A Anthony; Exbrayat, Jean-François; van der Velde, Ivar R; Feng, Liang; Williams, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle is currently the least constrained component of the global carbon budget. Large uncertainties stem from a poor understanding of plant carbon allocation, stocks, residence times, and carbon use efficiency. Imposing observational constraints on the terrestrial carbon cycle

  18. Redesigning Urban Carbon Cycles: from Waste Stream to Commodity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabander, D. J.; Fitzstevens, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    While there has been extensive research on the global scale to quantify the fluxes and reservoirs of carbon for predictive climate change models, comparably little attention has been focused on carbon cycles in the built environment. The current management of urban carbon cycles presents a major irony: while cities produce tremendous fluxes of organic carbon waste, their populations are dependent on imported carbon because most urban have limited access to locally sourced carbon. The persistence of outdated management schemes is in part due to the fact that reimagining the handling of urban carbon waste streams requires a transdisciplinary approach. Since the end of the 19th century, U.S. cities have generally relied on the same three options for managing organic carbon waste streams: burn it, bury it, or dilute it. These options still underpin the framework for today's design and management strategies for handling urban carbon waste. We contend that urban carbon management systems for the 21st century need to be scalable, must acknowledge how climate modulates the biogeochemical cycling of urban carbon, and should carefully factor local political and cultural values. Urban waste carbon is a complex matrix ranging from wastewater biosolids to municipal compost. Our first goal in designing targeted and efficient urban carbon management schemes has been examining approaches for categorizing and geochemically fingerprinting these matrices. To date we have used a combination of major and trace element ratio analysis and bulk matrix characteristics, such as pH, density, and loss on ignition, to feed multivariable statistical analysis in order to identify variables that are effective tracers for each waste stream. This approach was initially developed for Boston, MA, US, in the context of identifying components of municipal compost streams that were responsible for increasing the lead inventory in the final product to concentrations that no longer permitted its use in

  19. Decay of cacti and carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvie, Laurence A. J.

    2006-03-01

    Cacti contain large quantities of Ca-oxalate biominerals, with C derived from atmospheric CO2. Their death releases these biominerals into the environment, which subsequently transform to calcite via a monohydrocalcite intermediate. Here, the fate of Ca-oxalates released by plants in arid environments is investigated. This novel and widespread form of biomineralization has unexpected consequences on C cycling and calcite accumulation in areas with large numbers of cacti. The magnitude of this mineralization is revealed by studying the large columnar cactus Carnegiea gigantea (Engelm.) Britton and Rose in southwestern Arizona (locally called the saguaro). A large C. gigantea contains on the order of 1×105 g of the Ca-oxalate weddellite—CaC2O4·2H2O. In areas with high C. gigantea density, there is an estimated 40 g Catm m-2 sequestered in Ca-oxalates. Following the death of the plant, the weddellite transforms to calcite on the order to 10-20 years. In areas with high saguaro density, there is an estimated release of up to 2.4 g calcite m-2 year-1 onto the desert soil. Similar transformation mechanisms occur with the Ca-oxalates that are abundant in the majority of cacti. Thus, the total atmospheric C returned to the soil of areas with a high number density of cacti is large, suggesting that there may be a significant long-term accumulation of atmospheric C in these soils derived from Ca-oxalate biominerals. These findings demonstrate that plant decay in arid environments may have locally significant impacts on the Ca and inorganic C cycles.

  20. Proton cycling, buffering, and reaction stoichiometry in natural waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, A.F.; Middelburg, J.J.; Soetaert, K.; Wolf-Gladrow, D.A.; Meysman, F.J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing acidification of the global ocean necessitates a solid understanding of how biogeochemical processes are driving proton cycling and observed pH changes in natural waters. The standard way of calculating the pH evolution of an aquatic system is to specify first how biogeochemical processes af

  1. Black carbon from the Mississippi River: quantities, sources, and potential implications for the global carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Siddhartha; Bianchi, Thomas S; McKee, Brent A; Sutula, Martha

    2002-06-01

    Black carbon (BC) may be a major component of riverine carbon exported to the ocean, but its flux from large rivers is unknown. Furthermore, the global distribution of BC between natural and anthropogenic sources remains uncertain. We have determined BC concentrations in suspended sediments of the Mississippi River, the 7th largest river in the world in terms of sediment and water discharge, during high flow and low flow in 1999. The 1999 annual flux of BC from the Mississippi River was 5 x 10(-4) petagrams (1 Pg = 10(15) g = 1 gigaton). We also applied a principal components analysis to particulate-phase high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon isomer ratios in Mississippi River suspended sediments. In doing so, we determined that approximately 27% of the BC discharged from the Mississippi River in 1999 originated from fossil fuel combustion (coal and smelter-derived combustion), implicating fluvial BC as an important source of anthropogenic BC contamination into the ocean. Using our value for BC flux and the annual estimate for BC burial in ocean sediments, we calculate that, in 1999, the Mississippi River discharged approximately 5% of the BC buried annually in the ocean. These results have important implications, not only for the global carbon cycle but also for the fluvial discharge of particulate organic contaminants into the world's oceans.

  2. Global redox cycle of biospheric carbon: Interaction of photosynthesis and earth crust processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivlev, Alexander A

    2015-11-01

    A model of the natural global redox cycle of biospheric carbon is introduced. According to this model, carbon transfer between biosphere and geospheres is accompanied by a conversion of the oxidative forms, presented by CO2, bicarbonate and carbonate ions, into the reduced forms, produced in photosynthesis. The mechanism of carbon transfer is associated with two phases of movement of lithospheric plates. In the short-term orogenic phase, CO2 from the subduction (plates' collisions) zones fills the "atmosphere-hydrosphere" system, resulting in climate warming. In the long-term quiet (geosynclynal) phase, weathering and photosynthesis become dominant depleting the oxidative forms of carbon. The above asymmetric periodicity exerts an impact on climate, biodiversity, distribution of organic matter in sedimentary deposits, etc. Along with photosynthesis expansion, the redox carbon cycle undergoes its development until it reaches the ecological compensation point, at which CO2 is depleted to the level critical to support the growth and reproduction of plants. This occurred in the Permo-Carboniferous time and in the Neogene. Shorter-term perturbations of the global carbon cycle in the form of glacial-interglacial oscillations appear near the ecological compensation point.

  3. A tree-ring perspective on the terrestrial carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babst, Flurin; Alexander, M Ross; Szejner, Paul; Bouriaud, Olivier; Klesse, Stefan; Roden, John; Ciais, Philippe; Poulter, Benjamin; Frank, David; Moore, David J P; Trouet, Valerie

    2014-10-01

    Tree-ring records can provide valuable information to advance our understanding of contemporary terrestrial carbon cycling and to reconstruct key metrics in the decades preceding monitoring data. The growing use of tree rings in carbon-cycle research is being facilitated by increasing recognition of reciprocal benefits among research communities. Yet, basic questions persist regarding what tree rings represent at the ecosystem level, how to optimally integrate them with other data streams, and what related challenges need to be overcome. It is also apparent that considerable unexplored potential exists for tree rings to refine assessments of terrestrial carbon cycling across a range of temporal and spatial domains. Here, we summarize recent advances and highlight promising paths of investigation with respect to (1) growth phenology, (2) forest productivity trends and variability, (3) CO2 fertilization and water-use efficiency, (4) forest disturbances, and (5) comparisons between observational and computational forest productivity estimates. We encourage the integration of tree-ring data: with eddy-covariance measurements to investigate carbon allocation patterns and water-use efficiency; with remotely sensed observations to distinguish the timing of cambial growth and leaf phenology; and with forest inventories to develop continuous, annually-resolved and long-term carbon budgets. In addition, we note the potential of tree-ring records and derivatives thereof to help evaluate the performance of earth system models regarding the simulated magnitude and dynamics of forest carbon uptake, and inform these models about growth responses to (non-)climatic drivers. Such efforts are expected to improve our understanding of forest carbon cycling and place current developments into a long-term perspective.

  4. Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

    2012-01-27

    The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

  5. Carbon cycle changes during the Triassic-Jurassic transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhl, M.

    2010-01-01

    The end-Triassic is regarded as one of the five major mass extinction events of the Phanerozoic. This time interval is marked by up to 50% of marine biodiversity loss and major changes in terrestrial ecosystems. Mass extinction events are often marked by changes in the global carbon cycle. The reali

  6. Carbon cycle changes during the Triassic-Jurassic transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhl, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304838357

    2010-01-01

    The end-Triassic is regarded as one of the five major mass extinction events of the Phanerozoic. This time interval is marked by up to 50% of marine biodiversity loss and major changes in terrestrial ecosystems. Mass extinction events are often marked by changes in the global carbon cycle. The

  7. Simulation of terrestrial carbon cycle balance model in Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGJianlin:; HUDan; SUNZibao

    2003-01-01

    Based on climate material, the simplified terrestrial carbon cycle balance (TCCB) model was established, which is semi-mechanism and semi-statistics. Through TCCB model, our estimate indicates that the southeastern part of the Tibetan Plateau has much higher carbon content, and we have calculated the litter carbon pool, NPP, carbon fluxes and described their spatial characteristics in this region. Based on the TCCB model simulation, NPP in Tibet is 1.73 × 108tC/a, soil organic input rate is 0.66 × l08 tC/a, litter mineralization rate is 1.07× l08tC/a, vegetation litterfall rate is 1.73× l08 tC/a, the litter carbon pool is 7.26 × l08 tC, and soil decomposition rate is 309.54 × l08tC/a. The carbon budget was also analyzed based on the estimates of carbon pool and fluxes. The spatial distributions of carbon pools and carbon fluxes in different compartments of terrestrial ecosystem were depicted with map respectively in Tibet. The distribution of NPP, vegetation litterfall rate, litter, litter mineralization rate, soil organic input rate and the soil decomposition rate were abstracted with temperature, precipitation, fractional vegetation and land feature.

  8. Evolving Human Alteration of the Carbon Cycle: the Watershed Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, S.; Delaney Newcomb, K.; Newcomer Johnson, T.; Pennino, M. J.; Smith, R. M.; Beaulieu, J. J.; Belt, K.; Grese, M.; Blomquist, J.; Duan, S.; Findlay, S.; Likens, G.; Mayer, P. M.; Murthy, S.; Utz, R.; Yepsen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Watersheds experiencing land development are constantly evolving, and their biogeochemical signatures are expected to evolve across both space and time in drainage waters. We investigate how land development influences spatial and temporal evolution of the carbon cycle from small streams to major rivers in the Eastern U.S. Along the watershed continuum, we show that there is spatial evolution in: (1) the amount, chemical form, and bioavailability of carbon; (2) carbon retention/release at the reach scale; and (3) ecosystem metabolism of carbon from headwaters to coastal waters. Over shorter time scales, the interaction between land use and climate variability alters magnitude and frequency of carbon "pulses" in watersheds. Amounts and forms of carbon pulses in agricultural and urban watersheds respond similarly to climate variability due to headwater alteration and loss of ecosystem services to buffer runoff and temperature changes. Over longer time scales, land use change has altered organic carbon concentrations in tidal waters of Chesapeake Bay, and there have been increased bicarbonate alkalinity concentrations in rivers throughout the Eastern U.S. due to human activities. In summary, our analyses indicates that the form and reactivity of carbon have evolved over space and time along the watershed continuum with major implications for downstream ecosystem metabolism, biological oxygen demand, carbon dioxide production, and river alkalinization.

  9. Microbial control over carbon cycling in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua eSchimel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A major thrust of terrestrial microbial ecology is focused on understanding when and how the composition of the microbial community affects the functioning of biogeochemical processes at the ecosystem scale (meters-to-kilometers and days-to-years. While research has demonstrated these linkages for physiologically and phylogenetically narrow processes such as trace gas emissions and nitrification, there is less conclusive evidence that microbial community composition influences the broad processes of decomposition and organic matter turnover in soil. In this paper, we consider how soil microbial community structure influences C-cycling. We consider the phylogenetic level at which microbes form meaningful guilds, based on overall life history strategies, and suggest that these are associated with deep evolutionary divergences, while much of the species-level diversity probably reflects functional redundancy. We then consider under what conditions it is possible for differences among microbes to affect process dynamics, and argue that while microbial community structure may be important in the rate of OM breakdown in the rhizosphere and in detritus, it is likely not important in the mineral soil. In mineral soil, physical access to occluded or sorbed substrates is the rate-limiting process. Microbial community influences on OM turnover in mineral soils are based on how organisms allocate the C they take up—not only do the fates of the molecules differ, but they can affect the soil system differently as well. For example, extracellular enzymes and extracellular polysaccharides can be key controls on soil structure and function. How microbes allocate C may also be particularly important for understanding the long-term fate of C in soil—is it sequestered or not?

  10. Citric acid cycle biomimic on a carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokic-Lazic, Daria; Minteer, Shelley D

    2008-12-01

    The citric acid cycle is one of the main metabolic pathways living cells utilize to completely oxidize biofuels to carbon dioxide and water. The overall goal of this research is to mimic the citric acid cycle at the carbon surface of an electrode in order to achieve complete oxidation of ethanol at a bioanode to increase biofuel cell energy density. In order to mimic this process, dehydrogenase enzymes (known to be the electron or energy producing enzymes of the citric acid cycle) are immobilized in cascades at an electrode surface along with non-energy producing enzymes necessary for the cycle to progress. Six enzymatic schemes were investigated each containing an additional dehydrogenase enzyme involved in the complete oxidation of ethanol. An increase in current density is observed along with an increase in power density with each additional dehydrogenase immobilized on an electrode, reflecting increased electron production at the bioanode with deeper oxidation of the ethanol biofuel. By mimicking the complete citric acid cycle on a carbon electrode, power density was increased 8.71-fold compared to a single enzyme (alcohol dehydrogenase)-based ethanol/air biofuel cell.

  11. Urbanization and the Carbon Cycle: Synthesis of Ongoing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, K. R.; Duren, R. M.; Hutyra, L.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Patarasuk, R.; Song, Y.; Huang, J.; Davis, K.; Kort, E. A.; Shepson, P. B.; Turnbull, J. C.; Lauvaux, T.; Rao, P.; Eldering, A.; Miller, C. E.; Wofsy, S.; McKain, K.; Mendoza, D. L.; Lin, J. C.; Sweeney, C.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.

    2015-12-01

    Given the explosive growth in urbanization and its dominant role in current and future global greenhouse gas emissions, urban areas have received increasing research attention from the carbon cycle science community. The emerging focus is driven by the increasingly dense atmospheric observing capabilities - ground and space-based - in addition to the rising profile of cities within international climate change policymaking. Dominated by anthropogenic emissions, urban carbon cycle research requires a cross-disciplinary perspective with contributions from disciplines such as engineering, economics, social theory, and atmospheric science. We review the recent results from a sample of the active urban carbon research efforts including the INFLUX experiment (Indianapolis), the Megacity carbon project (Los Angeles), Salt Lake City, and Boston. Each of these efforts represent unique approaches in pursuit of different scientific and policy questions and assist in setting priorities for future research. From top-down atmospheric measurement systems to bottom-up estimation, these research efforts offer a view of the challenges and opportunities in urban carbon cycle research.

  12. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Variability [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Baldocchi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A growing literature is reporting on how the terrestrial carbon cycle is experiencing year-to-year variability because of climate anomalies and trends caused by global change. As CO2 concentration records in the atmosphere exceed 50 years and as satellite records reach over 30 years in length, we are becoming better able to address carbon cycle variability and trends. Here we review how variable the carbon cycle is, how large the trends in its gross and net fluxes are, and how well the signal can be separated from noise. We explore mechanisms that explain year-to-year variability and trends by deconstructing the global carbon budget. The CO2 concentration record is detecting a significant increase in the seasonal amplitude between 1958 and now. Inferential methods provide a variety of explanations for this result, but a conclusive attribution remains elusive. Scientists have reported that this trend is a consequence of the greening of the biosphere, stronger northern latitude photosynthesis, more photosynthesis by semi-arid ecosystems, agriculture and the green revolution, tropical temperature anomalies, or increased winter respiration. At the global scale, variability in the terrestrial carbon cycle can be due to changes in constituent fluxes, gross primary productivity, plant respiration and heterotrophic (microbial respiration, and losses due to fire, land use change, soil erosion, or harvesting. It remains controversial whether or not there is a significant trend in global primary productivity (due to rising CO2, temperature, nitrogen deposition, changing land use, and preponderance of wet and dry regions. The degree to which year-to-year variability in temperature and precipitation anomalies affect global primary productivity also remains uncertain. For perspective, interannual variability in global gross primary productivity is relatively small (on the order of 2 Pg-C y-1 with respect to a large and uncertain background (123 +/- 4 Pg-C y-1

  13. Inland Waters and the North American Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butman, D. E.; Striegl, R. G.; Stackpoole, S. M.; del Giorgio, P.; Prairie, Y.; Pilcher, D.; Raymond, P. A.; Alcocer, J.; Paz, F.

    2016-12-01

    Inland aquatic ecosystems process, store, and release carbon to the atmosphere and coastal margins. The form of this carbon is a function of terrestrial and aquatic primary and secondary production, the weathering of materials in soils and subsurface environments, the hydrologic controls on the movement of carbon from land to inland waters, and the connectivity between streams, rivers, lakes, reservoirs and groundwater. The 2007 1st State of the Carbon Cycle reported fluxes for the continental United States (CONUS) only. Streams and rivers exported 30-40 Tg C yr-1 to coastal environments, and 17-25 Tg C yr-1 were buried in lake and reservoir sediments. Remarkably, the 2007 report did not quantify gas emissions, which represent over half of the total carbon fluxes through inland water in the US. Current research has shown that 71-149 Tg C yr-1 exits freshwater systems either through atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide or as inorganic and organic carbon fluxes to the coast from the CONUS. These estimates did not include the Laurentian Great Lakes. Variation in the magnitude of these fluxes across regions of the CONUS has been linked to differences in precipitation and terrestrial net ecosystem production. Similar comprehensive assessments have not been done for Canada or Mexico. Here we provide, as part of the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle report, estimates for the river coastal export and vertical emissions of carbon from inland waters of North America, and report major data gaps, and weaknesses in methodologies. These findings stress that strong international partnerships are needed to improve assessment, monitoring, and modeling of human impacts on the magnitude and timing of aquatic fluxes in the future.

  14. Cenozoic carbon cycle imbalances and a variable weathering feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caves, Jeremy K.; Jost, Adam B.; Lau, Kimberly V.; Maher, Kate

    2016-09-01

    The long-term stability of Earth's climate and the recovery of the ocean-atmosphere system after carbon cycle perturbations are often attributed to a stabilizing negative feedback between silicate weathering and climate. However, evidence for the operation of this feedback over million-year timescales and in response to tectonic and long-term climatic change remains scarce. For example, the past 50 million years of the Cenozoic Era are characterized by long-term cooling and declining atmospheric CO2 (pCO2). During this interval, constant or decreasing carbon fluxes from the solid Earth to the atmosphere suggest that stable or decreasing weathering fluxes are needed to balance the carbon cycle. In contrast, marine isotopic proxies of weathering (i.e., 87Sr/86Sr, δ7 Li , and 187Os/188Os) are interpreted to reflect increasing weathering fluxes. Here, we evaluate the existence of a negative feedback by reconstructing the imbalance in the carbon cycle during the Cenozoic using the surface inventories of carbon and alkalinity. Only a sustained 0.25-0.5% increase in silicate weathering is necessary to explain the long-term decline in pCO2 over the Cenozoic. We propose that the long-term decrease in pCO2 is due to an increase in the strength of the silicate weathering feedback (i.e., the constant of proportionality between the silicate weathering flux and climate), rather than an increase in the weathering flux. This increase in the feedback strength, which mirrors the marine isotope proxies, occurs as transient, 1 million year timescales remains invariant to match the long-term inputs of carbon. Over the Cenozoic, this results in stable long-term weathering fluxes even as pCO2 decreases. We attribute increasing feedback strength to a change in the type and reactivity of rock in the weathering zone, which collectively has increased the reactivity of the surface of the Earth. Increasing feedback strength through the Cenozoic reconciles mass balance in the carbon cycle with

  15. Bony fish and their contribution to marine inorganic carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Michael; Perry, Chris; Wilson, Rod; Harborne, Alistair

    2016-04-01

    Conventional understanding of the marine inorganic carbon cycle holds that CaCO3 (mostly as low Mg-calcite and aragonite) precipitates in the upper reaches of the ocean and sinks to a point where it either dissolves or is deposited as sediment. Thus, it plays a key role controlling the distribution of DIC in the oceans and in regulating their capacity to absorb atmospheric CO2. However, several aspects of this cycle remain poorly understood and have long perplexed oceanographers, such as the positive alkalinity anomaly observed in the upper water column of many of the world's oceans, above the aragonite and calcite saturation horizons. This anomaly would be explained by extensive dissolution of a carbonate phase more soluble than low Mg-calcite or aragonite, but major sources for such phases remain elusive. Here we highlight marine bony fish as a potentially important primary source of this 'missing' high-solubility CaCO3. Precipitation of CaCO3 takes place within the intestines of all marine bony fish as part of their normal physiological functioning, and global production models suggest it could account for up to 45 % of total new marine CaCO3 production. Moreover, high Mg-calcite containing >25 % mol% MgCO3 - a more soluble phase than aragonite - is a major component of these precipitates. Thus, fish CaCO3 may at least partially explain the alkalinity anomaly in the upper water column. However, the issue is complicated by the fact that carbonate mineralogy actually varies among fish species, with high Mg-calcite (HMC), low Mg-calcite (LMC), aragonite, and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) all being common products. Using data from 22 Caribbean fish species, we have generated a novel production model that resolves phase proportions. We evaluate the preservation/dissolution potential of these phases and consider potential implications for marine inorganic carbon cycling. In addition, we consider the dramatic changes in fish biomass structure that have resulted

  16. The State of the Carbon Cycle: Ten Years On

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, A. W.; Dilling, L.; Fairman, D. M.; Houghton, R. A.; Marland, G.; Rose, A.; Wilbanks, T. J.; Zimmerman, G.

    2015-12-01

    It has been nearly ten years since the First State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-1) was published in 2007. Much has changed in the intervening years, but much has remained the same. In anticipation of a Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-2), we, the members of the SOCCR-1 Coordinating Team, felt that a perspective from the first SOCCR and reflection on changes in the state of carbon cycle science and policy in the intervening years would be appropriate. The purpose of SOCCR-1 was to provide "…a synthesis and integration of the current knowledge of the North American carbon budget and its context within the global carbon cycle [i]n a format useful to decision makers." Being "useful to decision makers" was a guiding theme with three stakeholder workshops an integral part of the process. Drafting and revision of SOCCR-1 took place between 2005 and early 2007; the report's carbon budget was for circa 2003. In 2003, North America's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were approximately 27% of global emissions. Nearly 85% of North American emissions were from the US, still at that time the world's largest emitter of fossil-fuel CO2. China's annual CO2 emissions exceeded those of the US for the first time while SOCCR-1 was being written. Today global CO2 emissions are dominated by emissions from China (28% in 2013), with US emissions only 14% of global emissions. Emissions from the US and North America have actually declined by approximately 10% since 2003 while emissions from China have doubled. Based on inventories of terrestrial carbon stocks, SOCCR-1 estimated that circa 2003 North American vegetation removed and stored a net 500 Mt C y-1 (±50%) from the atmosphere. A more recent synthesis incorporating additional estimates from atmospheric inversions and terrestrial biosphere modeling estimated the North American land sink for the decade of 2000-2009 at 350-470 Mt C y-1, with a slightly greater uncertainty due to the wider range of estimates from the

  17. The long-term carbon cycle, fossil fuels and atmospheric composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Robert A

    2003-11-20

    The long-term carbon cycle operates over millions of years and involves the exchange of carbon between rocks and the Earth's surface. There are many complex feedback pathways between carbon burial, nutrient cycling, atmospheric carbon dioxide and oxygen, and climate. New calculations of carbon fluxes during the Phanerozoic eon (the past 550 million years) illustrate how the long-term carbon cycle has affected the burial of organic matter and fossil-fuel formation, as well as the evolution of atmospheric composition.

  18. Natural CO2 Analogs for Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott H. Stevens; B. Scott Tye

    2005-07-31

    The report summarizes research conducted at three naturally occurring geologic CO{sub 2} fields in the US. The fields are natural analogs useful for the design of engineered long-term storage of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in geologic formations. Geologic, engineering, and operational databases were developed for McElmo Dome in Colorado; St. Johns Dome in Arizona and New Mexico; and Jackson Dome in Mississippi. The three study sites stored a total of 2.4 billion t (46 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} equivalent to 1.5 years of power plant emissions in the US and comparable in size with the largest proposed sequestration projects. The three CO{sub 2} fields offer a scientifically useful range of contrasting geologic settings (carbonate vs. sandstone reservoir; supercritical vs. free gas state; normally pressured vs. overpressured), as well as different stages of commercial development (mostly undeveloped to mature). The current study relied mainly on existing data provided by the CO{sub 2} field operator partners, augmented with new geochemical data. Additional study at these unique natural CO{sub 2} accumulations could further help guide the development of safe and cost-effective design and operation methods for engineered CO{sub 2} storage sites.

  19. Estimating Externalities of Natural Gas Fuel Cycles, Report 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnthouse, L.W.; Cada, G.F.; Cheng, M.-D.; Easterly, C.E.; Kroodsma, R.L.; Lee, R.; Shriner, D.S.; Tolbert, V.R.; Turner, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes methods for estimating the external costs (and possibly benefits) to human health and the environment that result from natural gas fuel cycles. Although the concept of externalities is far from simple or precise, it generally refers to effects on individuals' well being, that result from a production or market activity in which the individuals do not participate, or are not fully compensated. In the past two years, the methodological approach that this report describes has quickly become a worldwide standard for estimating externalities of fuel cycles. The approach is generally applicable to any fuel cycle in which a resource, such as coal, hydro, or biomass, is used to generate electric power. This particular report focuses on the production activities, pollution, and impacts when natural gas is used to generate electric power. In the 1990s, natural gas technologies have become, in many countries, the least expensive to build and operate. The scope of this report is on how to estimate the value of externalities--where value is defined as individuals' willingness to pay for beneficial effects, or to avoid undesirable ones. This report is about the methodologies to estimate these externalities, not about how to internalize them through regulations or other public policies. Notwithstanding this limit in scope, consideration of externalities can not be done without considering regulatory, insurance, and other considerations because these institutional factors affect whether costs (and benefits) are in fact external, or whether they are already somehow internalized within the electric power market. Although this report considers such factors to some extent, much analysis yet remains to assess the extent to which estimated costs are indeed external. This report is one of a series of reports on estimating the externalities of fuel cycles. The other reports are on the coal, oil, biomass, hydro, and nuclear fuel cycles, and on general

  20. Glacial weathering, sulfide oxidation, and global carbon cycle feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Mark A.; Moosdorf, Nils; Hartmann, Jens; Adkins, Jess F.; West, A. Joshua

    2017-08-01

    Connections between glaciation, chemical weathering, and the global carbon cycle could steer the evolution of global climate over geologic time, but even the directionality of feedbacks in this system remain to be resolved. Here, we assemble a compilation of hydrochemical data from glacierized catchments, use this data to evaluate the dominant chemical reactions associated with glacial weathering, and explore the implications for long-term geochemical cycles. Weathering yields from catchments in our compilation are higher than the global average, which results, in part, from higher runoff in glaciated catchments. Our analysis supports the theory that glacial weathering is characterized predominantly by weathering of trace sulfide and carbonate minerals. To evaluate the effects of glacial weathering on atmospheric pCO2, we use a solute mixing model to predict the ratio of alkalinity to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) generated by weathering reactions. Compared with nonglacial weathering, glacial weathering is more likely to yield alkalinity/DIC ratios less than 1, suggesting that enhanced sulfide oxidation as a result of glaciation may act as a source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Back-of-the-envelope calculations indicate that oxidative fluxes could change ocean–atmosphere CO2 equilibrium by 25 ppm or more over 10 ky. Over longer timescales, CO2 release could act as a negative feedback, limiting progress of glaciation, dependent on lithology and the concentration of atmospheric O2. Future work on glaciation–weathering–carbon cycle feedbacks should consider weathering of trace sulfide minerals in addition to silicate minerals.

  1. Hydrological and biogeochemical constraints on terrestrial carbon cycle feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mystakidis, Stefanos; Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Gruber, Nicolas; Davin, Edouard L.

    2017-01-01

    The feedbacks between climate, atmospheric CO2 concentration and the terrestrial carbon cycle are a major source of uncertainty in future climate projections with Earth systems models. Here, we use observation-based estimates of the interannual variations in evapotranspiration (ET), net biome productivity (NBP), as well as the present-day sensitivity of NBP to climate variations, to constrain globally the terrestrial carbon cycle feedbacks as simulated by models that participated in the fifth phase of the coupled model intercomparison project (CMIP5). The constraints result in a ca. 40% lower response of NBP to climate change and a ca. 30% reduction in the strength of the CO2 fertilization effect relative to the unconstrained multi-model mean. While the unconstrained CMIP5 models suggest an increase in the cumulative terrestrial carbon storage (477 PgC) in response to an idealized scenario of 1%/year atmospheric CO2 increase, the constraints imply a ca. 19% smaller change. Overall, the applied emerging constraint approach offers a possibility to reduce uncertainties in the projections of the terrestrial carbon cycle, which is a key determinant of the future trajectory of atmospheric CO2 concentration and resulting climate change.

  2. SONNE: Solar-Based Man-Made Carbon Cycle and the Carbon Dioxide Economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Detlev [Brandenburg Technical Univ., Berlin (Germany)], e-mail: moe@btu-lc.fta-berlin.de

    2012-06-15

    Humans became a global force in the chemical evolution with respect to climate change by interrupting naturally evolved biogeochemical cycles. However, humans also have all the facilities to turn the 'chemical revolution' into a sustainable chemical evolution. I define a sustainable society as one able to balance the environment, other life forms, and human interactions over an indefinite time period. There is much discussion on 'sustainable chemistry' (often called green chemistry), but, in my understanding, the basic principle, is to transfer matter for energetic and material use only within global cycles, without changing reservoir concentrations above a critical level. With respect to atmospheric pollution, the last unsolved issues (remaining pollutants) are 'greenhouse' gases, namely CO{sub 2}, which contributes to about 70 % of anthropogenically caused global warming (other important gases such as CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O contribute to roughly 25 % of warming; these gases are associated mainly with agricultural activities). The dilemma is given simply by time scales: limits of the 2 deg threshold by 2050 and drastic reduction in global CO{sub 2} emission; that is, the cumulative CO{sub 2} emissions determine atmospheric (and oceanic) CO{sub 2} levels. Because of the large CO{sub 2} residence time in natural reservoirs, in the order of 1000 years in the atmosphere and about 200 000 years for dissolved inorganic carbon-DIC in surface seawater, humans now determine the still unknown relationships of possible climate recovery, irreversible climate change, and future abatement strategies. (Solomon et al. 2009). The percentage not accumulated in the atmosphere must have been taken up by the ocean and terrestrial biosphere as well. Mining and the combustion of fossils fuels now results in the geological reservoir redistribution of carbon close to (or even surpassing) the 'tipping point'. It is assumed that in the near future

  3. Life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions of shale gas, natural gas, coal, and petroleum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Andrew; Han, Jeongwoo; Clark, Corrie E; Wang, Michael; Dunn, Jennifer B; Palou-Rivera, Ignasi

    2012-01-17

    The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. It has been debated whether the fugitive methane emissions during natural gas production and transmission outweigh the lower carbon dioxide emissions during combustion when compared to coal and petroleum. Using the current state of knowledge of methane emissions from shale gas, conventional natural gas, coal, and petroleum, we estimated up-to-date life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings that need to be further addressed. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than conventional natural gas, 23% lower than gasoline, and 33% lower than coal. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas. Moreover, this life-cycle analysis, among other work in this area, provides insight on critical stages that the natural gas industry and government agencies can work together on to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

  4. Global Biogeochemistry Models and Global Carbon Cycle Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covey, C; Caldeira, K; Guilderson, T; Cameron-Smith, P; Govindasamy, B; Swanston, C; Wickett, M; Mirin, A; Bader, D

    2005-05-27

    The climate modeling community has long envisioned an evolution from physical climate models to ''earth system'' models that include the effects of biology and chemistry, particularly those processes related to the global carbon cycle. The widely reproduced Box 3, Figure 1 from the 2001 IPCC Scientific Assessment schematically describes that evolution. The community generally accepts the premise that understanding and predicting global and regional climate change requires the inclusion of carbon cycle processes in models to fully simulate the feedbacks between the climate system and the carbon cycle. Moreover, models will ultimately be employed to predict atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases as a function of anthropogenic and natural processes, such as industrial emissions, terrestrial carbon fixation, sequestration, land use patterns, etc. Nevertheless, the development of coupled climate-carbon models with demonstrable quantitative skill will require a significant amount of effort and time to understand and validate their behavior at both the process level and as integrated systems. It is important to consider objectively whether the currently proposed strategies to develop and validate earth system models are optimal, or even sufficient, and whether alternative strategies should be pursued. Carbon-climate models are going to be complex, with the carbon cycle strongly interacting with many other components. Off-line process validation will be insufficient. As was found in coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs, feedbacks between model components can amplify small errors and uncertainties in one process to produce large biases in the simulated climate. The persistent tropical western Pacific Ocean ''double ITCZ'' and upper troposphere ''cold pole'' problems are examples. Finding and fixing similar types of problems in coupled carbon-climate models especially will be difficult, given

  5. Modelling the soil carbon cycle of pine ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, K. [Hiroshima, Univ., Dept. of Environ. Studies, Fac. of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Higashi Hiroshima (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    Soil carbon cycling rates and carbon budgets were calculated for stands of four pine species. Pinus sylvestris (at Jaedraaas, Sweden), P. densiflora (Hiroshima, Japan), P. elliottii (Florida, USA) and P. radiata (Canberra, Australia), using a simulation model driven by daily observations of mean air temperature and precipitation. Inputs to soil carbon through litterfall differ considerably among the four pine forests, but the accumulation of the A{sub 0} layer and humus in mineral soil is less variable. Decomposition of the A{sub 0} layer and humus is fastest for P. densiflora and slowest for P. sylvestris stands with P. radiata and P. elliottii intermediate. The decomposition rate is lower for the P. elliottii stand than for P. densiflora in spite of its higher temperatures and slightly higher precipitation. Seasonal changes in simulated soil carbon are observed only for the A{sub 0} layer at the P. densiflora site. Simulated soil respiration rates vary seasonally in three stands (P. sylvestris, P. densiflora and P. radiata). In simulations for pine trees planted on bare soil, all soil organic matter fractions except the humus in mineral soil recover to half their asymptotic values within 30 to 40 years of planting for P. sylvestris and P. densiflora, compared with 10 to 20 years for P. radiata and P. elliottii. The simulated recovery of soil carbon following clear-cutting is fastest for the P. elliottii stand and slowest for P. sylvestris. Management of P. elliottii and P. radiata stands on 40-years rotations is sustainable because carbon removed through harvest is restored in the interval between successive clear-cuts. However p. densiflora and P. sylvestris stands may be unable to maintain soil carbon under such a short rotation. High growth rates of P. elliottii and p. radiata stands in spite of relatively poor soil conditions and slow carbon cycling may be related to the physiological responses of species to environmental conditions. (Abstract Truncated)

  6. Carbon Cycle Science in Support of Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M. E.; West, T. O.; McGlynn, E.; Gurwick, N. P.; Duren, R. M.; Ocko, I.; Paustian, K.

    2016-12-01

    There has been an extensive amount of basic and applied research conducted on biogeochemical cycles, land cover change, watershed to earth system modeling, climate change, and energy efficiency. Concurrently, there continues to be interest in how to best reduce net carbon emissions, including maintaining or augmenting global carbon stocks and decreasing fossil fuel emissions. Decisions surrounding reductions in net emissions should be grounded in, and informed by, existing scientific knowledge and analyses in order to be most effective. The translation of scientific research to decision-making is rarely direct, and often requires coordination of objectives or intermediate research steps. For example, complex model output may need to be simplified to provide mean estimates for given activities; biogeochemical models used for climate change prediction may need to be altered to estimate net carbon flux associated with particular activities; or scientific analyses may need to aggregate and analyze data in a different manner to address specific questions. In the aforementioned cases, expertise and capabilities of researchers and decision-makers are both needed, and early coordination and communication is most effective. Initial analysis of existing science and current decision-making needs indicate that (a) knowledge that is co-produced by scientists and decision-makers has a higher probability of being usable for decision making, (b) scientific work in the past decade to integrate activity data into models has resulted in more usable information for decision makers, (c) attribution and accounting of carbon cycle fluxes is key to using carbon cycle science for decision-making, and (d) stronger, long-term links among research on climate and management of carbon-related sectors (e.g., energy, land use, industry, and buildings) are needed to adequately address current issues.

  7. Biological productivity and carbon cycling in the Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Primary production, bacterial production, particulate organic carbon fluxes and organic carbon burial rates were quantified during the summer period of 1999 in the Arctic Ocean via 14C uptake, 3H uptake, 234Th/238U disequilibrium and 210Pbex dating, respectively. The integrated primary production in the water column was as high as 197 mmolC/(m2@d) in the Chukchi shelf and was 3.8 mmolC/(m2@d) in the Canada Basin. These rates are higher than those reported previously. The ratios of bacterial production to primary production in the study region were higher than 0.5, indicating that microbial activity is not depressed but important in cold Arctic waters. 234Th/238U disequilibria were evident at the station in the Canada Basin. The presence of significant 234Th deficiency suggested that scavenging and removal processes are also important to biogeochemical cycles of trace elements in the Arctic Ocean. Particulate organic carbon export flux was estimated to be 1.0 mmolC/(m2@d). Measurements of sediment excess 210Pb profile in the Chukchi shelf allowed us to estimate the amount of organic carbon buried in the bottom sediment, which ranged from 25 to 35 mmolC/(m2@d) and represented about 59%-82% of the mean primary production in the euphotic zone. Overall, our results indicated that the Arctic Ocean has active carbon cycling and is not a biological desert as previously believed. Therefore, the Arctic Ocean may play an important role in the global carbon cycle and climate change.

  8. Response of land carbon cycle to stratospheric aerosol geoengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Ji, D.

    2016-12-01

    Stabilizing the climate through geoengineering aims to mitigate the climate change induced by increasing atmospheric CO2 and other green house gases. These impacts in climate affect terrestrial ecosystem considerably because terrestrial carbon fluxes are sensitivity to climate change. Here we analyzed the responses of land carbon cycle to GeoMIP G4 experiment from six Earth System Models (ESMs), in which negative radiative forcing is produced by an injection of SO2 into the stratosphere to compensate the global warming in RCP4.5. From the year 2020 to 2090, there was an increase in land carbon uptake with significant discrepancy among models (20 PgC to 260 PgC) for both G4 and RCP4.5 scenario, due to the CO2 fertilization effect. For comparison with RCP4.5, all of the models showed higher land carbon uptakes in G4 scenario (30 Pg C on average), with both increases in vegetation and soil carbon stores. These land carbon increases relative to RCP4.5 are mainly resulted from reduced heterotrophic respiration under cooler temperature, whilst changes in vegetation productivity only account a negligible part of land carbon changes. The models also varied in their sensitivities of carbon fluxes to changes in air temperature and precipitation. Partial correlation analysis shows that interannual sensitivities of NBP to temperature and precipitation increased by 2 folds in the G4 experiment, due to higher sensitivities of NPP and Rh, yet with large differences among ESMs and spatial heterogeneity. This work suggests that stratospheric aerosol engineering would have small and positive impact on land carbon uptake but could increase climate sensitivities of terrestrial carbon fluxes significantly.

  9. Is Titan's shape explained by its meteorology and carbon cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choukroun, M.; Sotin, C.

    2012-04-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, is unique in the Solar System: it is the only satellite bearing a dense atmosphere and it is the only place besides Earth with stable liquid bodies at its surface. In addition complex organics are produced in its atmosphere by the photolysis of methane, the second most abundant atmospheric molecule that irreversibly produces ethane and other more complex carbon bearing molecules. The Cassini/Huygens mission has revealed that the difference between its equatorial and polar radii is several hundred meters larger than that expected from its spin rate, and that it is in hydrostatic equilibrium. Global circulation models predict a large meridional circulation with upwelling at the summer hemisphere and downwelling at the winter pole where ethane can condense and fall at the surface. Lakes and Mare have been observed at the poles only (Stofan et al., Nature, 2007). Ethane has been spectroscopically identified in one of the lakes (Brown et al., Nature, 2008). The present study investigates the subsidence associated with ethane rain at the poles. As suggested by laboratory experiments, ethane flows very easily in a porous crust made of either pure water ice or methane clathrates. Loading of the lithosphere by liquid hydrocarbons induces a tendency of the polar terrains to subside relative to the lower latitudes terrains. In addition, laboratory experiments suggest that ethane substitutes to methane in a methane clathrate crust. The present study estimates the kinetics of this transformation. It suggests that such a transformation would occur on timescales much smaller than geological timescales. To explain a value of 270 m of the subsidence as determined by the radar instrument onboard the Cassini spacecraft (Zebker et al., Science, 2009), our study predicts that the percolation of ethane liquid in the polar crust should have operated during the last 300 - 1,200 Myr. This number is in agreement with the isotopic age of the atmospheric

  10. Integrating the nitrogen cycle in carbon and GHG observation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsch, W. L.; Brummer, C.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen is an important factor for the regulation of carbon and GHG fluxes within ecosystems and between ecosystems and the atmosphere. Nitrogen fertilization is important for high agricultural yields but also increases N2O emissions. In Germany, e.g., N2O emissions from agriculture comprise about 6 % of the total GHG inventory. Nitrogen deposition may enhance productivity of ecosystems (e.g. forests, natural grasslands or wetlands) but may also change community structure - in particular in ecosystems that are adapted to low nitrogen availability. It also can lead to increased N2O emissions. Global nitrogen fluxes due to the trade of agricultural products may concentrate nitrogen in specific areas (e.g. in areas with high animal stock). In these areas increased N2O emissions are to be expected. The Thünen Institute of Climate-Smart Agriculture drives parts of the German ICOS consortium with a special focus on agricultural sites or indirect effects of agriculture on GHG emissions. We propose a concept to integrate nitrogen into research infrastructures for GHG monitoring. A conceptual frame will identify the most important parameters of the N cycle. Data from the CarboEurope and NitroEurope core site Gebesee (crop) will be presented to show first integrative results.Finally, first experiences with new technologies will be presented, comprising quantum cascade laser measurements of N2O and ammonia used with eddy covariance (EC) and chambers and EC measurements of total reactive nitrogen with the TRANC methodology (Marx et al. 2012).

  11. Modelling of cycling of lithium battery with microporous carbon electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Portnyagin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Charge/discharge cycles of lithium cell with microporous carbon electrode under potentiodynamic control have been modelled. Predictions of the models with variable and constant diffusion coefficient neglecting the electric field inside the particle (CPM, DFM are compared to the predictions of the models with variable and constant diffusion coefficient in which electrostatic interaction inside the particles of carbon electrode (CPME, DFME is taken into account. There is observed a considerable difference between both. Electrostatic interactions of lithium ions with each other and the charge distributed inside the particle promote intercalation during the discharge of the cell and deintercalation during the charge. The dependance of the effect of hysteresis during the cycling of the cell on the rate of change of the applied voltage is studied. The larger is the speed of change of the applied voltage the more effective is hysteresis. We have also obtained concentration profiles at different stages of charge/discharge process.

  12. Climate change impact on the carbon cycle in Russian peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavalishin, N. N.

    2009-04-01

    Dynamic compartment model with annual time resolution of carbon cycle functioning with elements of nitrogen and water cycles for three basic types of peatlands (oligotrophic, mesotrophic, eutrophic) is designed and verified based on data for several peatland ecosystems from Russian European part and Western Siberia as well as on estimates of relative areas occupied by these types in each of wetland provinces marked by Kats (1970). Flows between three main reservoirs and input-output fluxes can have donor-, recipient-, Volterra-controlled forms or be saturation functions of storages in participating reservoirs. Possible steady states of combined cycles allow to distinguish forest, forest-swamp and swamp for each of three types of peatland ecosystems as stable equilibria. Stability and bifurcation analysis of the dynamic model, as well as numerical modeling of transient non-equilibrium dynamic regimes, is carried out in the space of three parameters corresponding to intensities of atmospheric carbon assimilation by vegetation, output runoff from soils and litter, decay of dead organic matter by animals and microorganisms. These parameters depend on climatic magnitudes - annual temperature and total precipitation, soil moisture, availability of nitrogen in the litterfall. Atmospheric CO2 concentration increase can lead to appearance of oscillations in system compartments or to transition into other steady states depending on two other parameter values. Numerical simulations and analytical findings allow establish stability boundaries of each peatland type as an equilibrium of the model, and to calculate critical values of external parameters for which stable functioning of matter cycles is provided. Change in climatic or human perturbation parameters initiates a shift in the model parameter space corresponding to the temporal evolution of carbon cycle capable to change the ecosystem state significantly. Estimations of relative areas occupied by peatland types in some

  13. Soil networks become more connected and take up more carbon as nature restoration progresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morriën, Elly; Hannula, S Emilia; Snoek, L Basten

    2017-01-01

    the course of nature restoration on abandoned arable land a compositional shift in soil biota, preceded by tightening of the belowground networks, corresponds with enhanced efficiency of carbon uptake. In mid- and long-term abandoned field soil, carbon uptake by fungi increases without an increase in fungal...... biomass or shift in bacterial-to-fungal ratio. The implication of our findings is that during nature restoration the efficiency of nutrient cycling and carbon uptake can increase by a shift in fungal composition and/or fungal activity. Therefore, we propose that relationships between soil food web...

  14. Mission Design for Continental-Scale Carbon Cycle Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervin, J. C.; Esper, J.; McClain, C. R.; Hall, F. G.; Middleton, E. M.; Gregg, W. W.; Mannino, A.; Knox, R. G.; Dabney, P. W.; Huemmrich, K. F.; Wood, H. J.; Roberto, M.

    2003-12-01

    Carbon cycle scientific requirements in both land and ocean studies point toward the need for multiple spectrally detailed observations per day. For terrestrial research, accurate estimates of carbon, water and energy (CWE) exchange between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere are needed to identify the geographical locations of carbon sources/sinks and to improve regional climate models and global climate change assessments. It is an enormous challenge to estimate CWE exchange from the infrequent temporal coverage provided by most polar-orbiting satellites, and without benefit of spectral indices that capture vegetation responses to stress conditions that down-regulate photosynthesis. Physiological status can be better assessed with spectral indices based on narrow (role in climate change scenarios. In the plan for developing new observations, we need to: 1)continue to improve estimates of ocean productivity; and 2 expand the emphasis of coastal ocean processes and specific regions of critical importance. Remote sensing of the coastal ocean represents a unique challenge due to the small-scale spatial variability and elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, detritus and chlorophyll, which are difficult to distinguish, because they absorb light intensely in the blue spectrum. Observations in the ultraviolet are essential to improve our capability to distinguish these ocean constituents. A hyperspectral instrument design capable of observing in the ultraviolet, in addition to the visible and near infrared spectrum, is essential to investigate the variability, dynamics and biogeochemical cycles of the world's coastal and open ocean regions. For both terrestrial and ocean carbon cycle science objectives, a hyperspectral geostationary sensor should enable the development of new remote sensing measurements for important but as yet unobservable variables, and with the overall goal of linking both terrestrial and ocean carbon cycle processes to climate

  15. Multi-century Changes to Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C

    2005-02-17

    In this paper, we use a coupled climate and carbon cycle model to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to year 2300 that would occur if CO{sub 2} emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the atmosphere. By year 2300, the global climate warms by about 8 K and atmospheric CO{sub 2} reaches 1423 ppmv. The warming is higher than anticipated because the sensitivity to radiative forcing increases as the simulation progresses. In our simulation, the rate of emissions peak at over 30 PgC yr{sup -1} early in the 22nd century. Even at year 2300, nearly 50% of cumulative emissions remain in the atmosphere. In our simulations both soils and living biomass are net carbon sinks throughout the simulation. Despite having relatively low climate sensitivity and strong carbon uptake by the land biosphere, our model projections suggest severe long-term consequences for global climate if all the fossil-fuel carbon is ultimately released to the atmosphere.

  16. Multi-century Changes to Global Climate and Carbon Cycle: Results from a Coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C

    2005-02-17

    In this paper, we use a coupled climate and carbon cycle model to investigate the global climate and carbon cycle changes out to year 2300 that would occur if CO{sub 2} emissions from all the currently estimated fossil fuel resources were released to the atmosphere. By year 2300, the global climate warms by about 8 K and atmospheric CO{sub 2} reaches 1423 ppmv. The warming is higher than anticipated because the sensitivity to radiative forcing increases as the simulation progresses. In our simulation, the rate of emissions peak at over 30 PgC yr{sup -1} early in the 22nd century. Even at year 2300, nearly 50% of cumulative emissions remain in the atmosphere. In our simulations both soils and living biomass are net carbon sinks throughout the simulation. Despite having relatively low climate sensitivity and strong carbon uptake by the land biosphere, our model projections suggest severe long-term consequences for global climate if all the fossil-fuel carbon is ultimately released to the atmosphere.

  17. Potential increases in natural disturbance rates could offset forest management impacts on ecosystem carbon stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, John B.; Jensen, Nicholas R.; Domke, Grant M.; D’Amato, Anthony W.

    2013-01-01

    Forested ecosystems contain the majority of the world’s terrestrial carbon, and forest management has implications for regional and global carbon cycling. Carbon stored in forests changes with stand age and is affected by natural disturbance and timber harvesting. We examined how harvesting and disturbance interact to influence forest carbon stocks over the Superior National Forest, in northern Minnesota. Forest inventory data from the USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis program were used to characterize current forest age structure and quantify the relationship between age and carbon stocks for eight forest types. Using these findings, we simulated the impact of alternative management scenarios and natural disturbance rates on forest-wide terrestrial carbon stocks over a 100-year horizon. Under low natural mortality, forest-wide total ecosystem carbon stocks increased when 0% or 40% of planned harvests were implemented; however, the majority of forest-wide carbon stocks decreased with greater harvest levels and elevated disturbance rates. Our results suggest that natural disturbance has the potential to exert stronger influence on forest carbon stocks than timber harvesting activities and that maintaining carbon stocks over the long-term may prove difficult if disturbance frequency increases in response to climate change.

  18. Cycle Monitors and Devices in Natural Family Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freundl G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For fertility awareness based methods- (FAB- users charting and checking of menstrual cycle symptoms may be supported by different instruments and devices. These cycle monitors promise to detect the fertile and infertile days by using direct and indirect markers of fertility in a woman´s menstrual cycle. In this article we use data of our own studies, data out of the literature research in Medline and PubMed and from our own German NFP (natural family planning database. We tried to rate the efficacy of the tested monitors. We figured out that only for one hormone- and for one temperature-computer reasonable prospective studies exist. To get more comparable results we have performed in 2000 a small pilot study on 6 devices and the symptothermal method of NFP (NFP-DAG together with “Stiftung Warentest”. The efficacy of the various devices differed significantly. We therefore urgently need more clinical studies on menstrual cycle monitors for reliable information of users.

  19. Warm Spring Reduced Impact of Summer Drought on Carbon Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Sebastian; Keenan, Trevor F.; Fisher, Joshua B.; Baldocchi, Dennis

    2015-04-01

    Drought severely impacts biosphere-atmosphere carbon and water fluxes of terrestrial ecosystems by reducing productivity, carbon uptake and water transport to the atmosphere. The 2012 US drought was among the most intense and widespread drought events in the U.S. since the 'Dust Bowl' period in the 1930s, and had devastating effects on agricultural production. In addition, 2012 was among the warmest years on record. Using eddy covariance measurements of carbon, water and energy exchange from AmeriFlux sites along with remote sensing products, we show that this summer drought substantially reduced ecosystem productivity, net carbon uptake and water transport to the atmosphere. However, the warm spring with higher ecosystem productivity reduced the impact of the summer drought on annual carbon uptake. Shifts in vegetation activity during spring also triggered feedbacks that contributed to the summer heatwave. Although the drought was exceptional, 2012 was an example of what is expected in terms of future climate change - i.e. warmer temperatures all year and an increased frequency and duration of drought in summer. Understanding the response of ecosystem carbon and water cycling to drought will help to mitigate these changes, and our study provides important new insights for that.

  20. Role of volcanic forcing on future global carbon cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Tjiputra

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Using a fully coupled global climate-carbon cycle model, we assess the potential role of volcanic eruptions on future projection of climate change and its associated carbon cycle feedback. The volcanic-like forcings are applied together with a business-as-usual IPCC-A2 carbon emissions scenario. We show that very large volcanic eruptions similar to Tambora lead to short-term substantial global cooling. However, over a long period, smaller eruptions similar to Pinatubo in amplitude, but set to occur frequently, would have a stronger impact on future climate change. In a scenario where the volcanic external forcings are prescribed with a five-year frequency, the induced cooling immediately lower the global temperature by more than one degree before it returns to the warming trend. Therefore, the climate change is approximately delayed by several decades, and by the end of the 21st century, the warming is still below two degrees when compared to the present day period. Our climate-carbon feedback analysis shows that future volcanic eruptions induce positive feedbacks (i.e., more carbon sink on both the terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle. The feedback signal on the ocean is consistently smaller than the terrestrial counterpart and the feedback strength is proportionally related to the frequency of the volcanic eruption events. The cooler climate reduces the terrestrial heterotrophic respiration in the northern high latitude and increases net primary production in the tropics, which contributes to more than 45 % increase in accumulated carbon uptake over land. The increased solubility of CO2 gas in seawater associated with cooler SST is offset by a reduced CO2 partial pressure gradient between the ocean and the atmosphere, which results in small changes in net ocean carbon uptake. Similarly, there is nearly no change in the seawater buffer capacity simulated between the different volcanic scenarios. Our study shows that even

  1. Role of volcanic forcing on future global carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjiputra, J. F.; Otterå, O. H.

    2011-06-01

    Using a fully coupled global climate-carbon cycle model, we assess the potential role of volcanic eruptions on future projection of climate change and its associated carbon cycle feedback. The volcanic-like forcings are applied together with a business-as-usual IPCC-A2 carbon emissions scenario. We show that very large volcanic eruptions similar to Tambora lead to short-term substantial global cooling. However, over a long period, smaller eruptions similar to Pinatubo in amplitude, but set to occur frequently, would have a stronger impact on future climate change. In a scenario where the volcanic external forcings are prescribed with a five-year frequency, the induced cooling immediately lower the global temperature by more than one degree before it returns to the warming trend. Therefore, the climate change is approximately delayed by several decades, and by the end of the 21st century, the warming is still below two degrees when compared to the present day period. Our climate-carbon feedback analysis shows that future volcanic eruptions induce positive feedbacks (i.e., more carbon sink) on both the terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle. The feedback signal on the ocean is consistently smaller than the terrestrial counterpart and the feedback strength is proportionally related to the frequency of the volcanic eruption events. The cooler climate reduces the terrestrial heterotrophic respiration in the northern high latitude and increases net primary production in the tropics, which contributes to more than 45 % increase in accumulated carbon uptake over land. The increased solubility of CO2 gas in seawater associated with cooler SST is offset by a reduced CO2 partial pressure gradient between the ocean and the atmosphere, which results in small changes in net ocean carbon uptake. Similarly, there is nearly no change in the seawater buffer capacity simulated between the different volcanic scenarios. Our study shows that even in the relatively extreme scenario where

  2. Thermodynamic Cycles using Carbon Dioxide as Working Fluid : CO2 transcritical power cycle study

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Chen

    2011-01-01

    The interest in utilizing the energy in low‐grade heat sources and waste heat is increasing. There is an abundance of such heat sources, but their utilization today is insufficient, mainly due to the limitations of the conventional power cycles in such applications, such as low efficiency, bulky size or moisture at the expansion outlet (e.g. problems for turbine blades). Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been widely investigated for use as a working fluid in refrigeration cycles, because it has no ozo...

  3. Microbial Carbon Cycling in Permafrost-Affected Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishnivetskaya, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liebner, Susanne [University of Tromso, Norway; Wilhelm, Ronald [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Wagner, Dirk [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, Germany

    2011-01-01

    The Arctic plays a key role in Earth s climate system as global warming is predicted to be most pronounced at high latitudes and because one third of the global carbon pool is stored in ecosystems of the northern latitudes. In order to improve our understanding of the present and future carbon dynamics in climate sensitive permafrost ecosystems, present studies concentrate on investigations of microbial controls of greenhouse gas fluxes, on the activity and structure of the involved microbial communities, and on their response to changing environmental conditions. Permafrost-affected soils can function as both a source and a sink for carbon dioxide and methane. Under anaerobic conditions, caused by flooding of the active layer and the effect of backwater above the permafrost table, the mineralization of organic matter can only be realized stepwise by specialized microorganisms. Important intermediates of the organic matter decomposition are hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate, which can be further reduced to methane by methanogenic archaea. Evolution of methane fluxes across the subsurface/atmosphere boundary will thereby strongly depend on the activity of anaerobic methanogenic archaea and obligately aerobic methane oxidizing proteobacteria, which are known to be abundant and to significantly reduce methane emissions in permafrost-affected soils. Therefore current studies on methane-cycling microorganisms are the object of particular attention in permafrost studies, because of their key role in the Arctic methane cycle and consequently of their significance for the global methane budget.

  4. Working cycles of devices based on bistable carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, Oleg; Mockensturm, Eric; Crespi, Vincent; Carbon Nanotubes Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Shape-changing nanotubes are an example of variable-shape sp2 carbon-based systems where the competition between strain and surface energies can be moderated by an externally controllable stimuli such as applied voltage, temperature, or pressure of gas encapsulated inside the tube. Using any of these stimuli one can transition a bistable carbon nanotube between the collapsed and inflated states and thus perform mechanical work. During the working cycle of such a device, energy from an electric or heat source is transferred to mechanical energy. Combinations of these stimuli allow the system to convert energy between different sources using the bistable shape-changing tube as a mediator. For example, coupling a bistable carbon nanotube to the heat and charge reservoirs can enable energy transfer between heat and electric forms. The developed theory can be extended to other nano-systems which change configurations in response to external stimuli.

  5. Resistance Responses of Carbon Fiber Cement to Cycled Compressive Stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHUI Zhonghe; LI Chao; LIAO Weidong

    2005-01-01

    The stress-resistance relationship of carbon fiber cement was studicd. Attention has been paid to explore the improvement of the stress-resistance sensitivity under cycled stress restriction. The prismy carbon fiber cement sensors were pre-fabricated. The factors such as contents of carbon fibers, silica fume, dispersant and the w/ c were taken into account. The electrical resistance variations with the dynamic and static loads were simulated using a strain-controlled test machine. The test results show that there is an optimal fiber content, with which the compression-sensitivity achieves a high level. The addition of silica fume can improve the sensitivity. Urder the optimal test conditions, the measured resistances can greatly correspond with the changes of the load.

  6. Modelling carbon dynamics from urban land conversion: fundamental model of city in relation to a local carbon cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellnhuber Hans-Joachim

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main task is to estimate the qualitative and quantitative contribution of urban territories and precisely of the process of urbanization to the Global Carbon Cycle (GCC. Note that, on the contrary to many investigations that have considered direct anthropogenic emission of CO2(urbanized territories produce ca. 96–98% of it, we are interested in more subtle, and up until the present time, weaker processes associated with the conversion of the surrounding natural ecosystems and landscapes into urban lands. Such conversion inevitably takes place when cities are sprawling and additional "natural" lands are becoming "urbanized". Results In order to fulfil this task, we first develop a fundamental model of urban space, since the type of land cover within a city makes a difference for a local carbon cycle. Hence, a city is sub-divided by built-up, „green" (parks, etc. and informal settlements (favelas fractions. Another aspect is a sub-division of the additional two regions, which makes the total number reaching eight regions, while the UN divides the world by six. Next, the basic model of the local carbon cycle for urbanized territories is built. We consider two processes: carbon emissions as a result of conversion of natural lands caused by urbanization; and the transformation of carbon flows by "urbanized" ecosystems; when carbon, accumulated by urban vegetation, is exported to the neighbouring territories. The total carbon flow in the model depends, in general, on two groups of parameters. The first includes the NPP, and the sum of living biomass and dead organic matter of ecosystems involved in the process of urbanization, and namely them we calculate here, using a new more realistic approach and taking into account the difference in regional cities' evolution. Conclusion There is also another group of parameters, dealing with the areas of urban territories, and their annual increments. A method of dynamic forecasting

  7. Soil networks become more connected and take up more carbon as nature restoration progresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morriën, Elly; Hannula, S. Emilia; Snoek, L. Basten; Helmsing, Nico R.; Zweers, Hans; de Hollander, Mattias; Soto, Raquel Luján; Bouffaud, Marie-Lara; Buée, Marc; Dimmers, Wim; Duyts, Henk; Geisen, Stefan; Girlanda, Mariangela; Griffiths, Rob I.; Jørgensen, Helene-Bracht; Jensen, John; Plassart, Pierre; Redecker, Dirk; Schmelz, Rűdiger M; Schmidt, Olaf; Thomson, Bruce C.; Tisserant, Emilie; Uroz, Stephane; Winding, Anne; Bailey, Mark J.; Bonkowski, Michael; Faber, Jack H.; Martin, Francis; Lemanceau, Philippe; de Boer, Wietse; van Veen, Johannes A.; van der Putten, Wim H.

    2017-01-01

    Soil organisms have an important role in aboveground community dynamics and ecosystem functioning in terrestrial ecosystems. However, most studies have considered soil biota as a black box or focussed on specific groups, whereas little is known about entire soil networks. Here we show that during the course of nature restoration on abandoned arable land a compositional shift in soil biota, preceded by tightening of the belowground networks, corresponds with enhanced efficiency of carbon uptake. In mid- and long-term abandoned field soil, carbon uptake by fungi increases without an increase in fungal biomass or shift in bacterial-to-fungal ratio. The implication of our findings is that during nature restoration the efficiency of nutrient cycling and carbon uptake can increase by a shift in fungal composition and/or fungal activity. Therefore, we propose that relationships between soil food web structure and carbon cycling in soils need to be reconsidered. PMID:28176768

  8. Evaluation method for regional water cycle health based on nature-society water cycle theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanghong; Fan, Weiwei; Yi, Yujun; Zhao, Yong; Liu, Jiahong

    2017-08-01

    Regional water cycles increasingly reflect the dual influences of natural and social processes, and are affected by global climate change and expanding human activities. Understanding how to maintain a healthy state of the water cycle has become an important proposition for sustainable development of human society. In this paper, natural-social attributes of the water cycle are synthesized and 19 evaluation indices are selected from four dimensions, i.e., water-based ecosystem integrity, water quality, water resource abundance and water resource use. A hierarchical water-cycle health evaluation system is established. An analytic hierarchy process is used to set the weight of the criteria layer and index layer, and the health threshold for each index is defined. Finally, a water-cycle health composite-index assessment model and fuzzy recognition model are constructed based on the comprehensive index method and fuzzy mathematics theory. The model is used to evaluate the state of health of the water cycle in Beijing during 2010-2014 and in the planning year (late 2014), considering the transfer of 1 billion m3 of water by the South-to-North Water Diversion Project (SNWDP). The results show health scores for Beijing of 2.87, 3.10, 3.38, 3.11 and 3.02 during 2010-2014. The results of fuzzy recognition show that the sub-healthy grade accounted for 54%, 49%, 61% and 49% of the total score, and all years had a sub-healthy state. Results of the criteria layer analysis show that water ecosystem function, water quality and water use were all at the sub-healthy level and that water abundance was at the lowest, or sick, level. With the water transfer from the SNWDP, the health score of the water cycle in Beijing reached 4.04. The healthy grade accounted for 60% of the total score, and the water cycle system was generally in a healthy state. Beijing's water cycle health level is expected to further improve with increasing water diversion from the SNWDP and industrial

  9. Assessing and Synthesizing the Last Decade of Research on the Major Pools and Fluxes of the Carbon Cycle in the US and North America: An Interagency Governmental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, N.; Shrestha, G.; Stover, D. B.; Zhu, Z.; Ombres, E. H.; Deangelo, B.

    2015-12-01

    The 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-2) is focused on US and North American carbon stocks and fluxes in managed and unmanaged systems, including relevant carbon management science perspectives and tools for supporting and informing decisions. SOCCR-2 is inspired by the US Carbon Cycle Science Plan (2011) which emphasizes global scale research on long-lived, carbon-based greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide and methane, and the major pools and fluxes of the global carbon cycle. Accordingly, the questions framing the Plan inform this report's topical roadmap, with a focus on US and North America in the global context: 1) How have natural processes and human actions affected the global carbon cycle on land, in the atmosphere, in the oceans and in the ecosystem interfaces (e.g. coastal, wetlands, urban-rural)? 2) How have socio-economic trends affected the levels of the primary carbon-containing gases, carbon dioxide and methane, in the atmosphere? 3) How have species, ecosystems, natural resources and human systems been impacted by increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, the associated changes in climate, and by carbon management decisions and practices? To address these aspects, SOCCR-2 will encompass the following broad assessment framework: 1) Carbon Cycle at Scales (Global Perspective, North American Perspective, US Perspective, Regional Perspective); 2) Role of carbon in systems (Soils; Water, Oceans, Vegetation; Terrestrial-aquatic Interfaces); 3) Interactions/Disturbance/Impacts from/on the carbon cycle. 4) Carbon Management Science Perspective and Decision Support (measurements, observations and monitoring for research and policy relevant decision-support etc.). In this presentation, the Carbon Cycle Interagency Working Group and the U.S. Global Change Research Program's U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office will highlight the scientific context, strategy, structure, team and production process of the report, which is part of the USGCRP's Sustained

  10. The Coupled Nature of C and N Cycles in Forest Ecosystems: Evidence, Implications and Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollinger, S. V.; Aber, J. D.; Sievering, H.

    2001-12-01

    Cycles of carbon and nitrogen in forest ecosystems are mutually and interactively linked through a shared set of biological processes. A large number of field studies across diverse biomes have documented strong and generalizable relationships between foliar nitrogen concentrations and rates of net photosynthesis. This trend reflects the fact that the majority of N in plant canopies is found in the proteins responsible for CO2 capture (e.g. rubisco). In soils, the accumulation and availability of nitrogen is, in turn, affected by the quality and N content of litter inputs from vegetation. Taken together, these patterns reflect the broadly-coupled nature of terrestrial C and N cycles and suggest that human alteration of any aspect of one cycle can have important implications for the other. Nevertheless, the exact nature of C-N interactions in natural ecosystems can depend on a variety of factors including historical disturbance patterns, the effects of carbon quality on decomposition and N turnover, and the resulting differences in plant-soil feedbacks among species and functional groups. All of these factors greatly complicate efforts to characterize present-day patterns of C and N fluxes across real forested landscapes. Further, human-induced increases in atmospheric CO2 and N deposition hold the potential for either tightening the linkages between C and N cycles, or causing them to become uncoupled. This presentation will build on basic concepts to address several broad questions regarding C-N interactions in forests, both as they occur naturally and as they may be affected by elevated CO2 or N deposition: 1) What evidence is available from the field to demonstrate the coupled nature of C-N cycles in native forest ecosystems? 2) How are C-N interactions in forests influenced by the growth and allocation strategies of different species and/or functional groups? 3) To what degree are current C and N cycles reflected in the chemistry of forest foliage, and 4) Is

  11. Economic and Environmental Assessment of Natural Gas Plants with Carbon Capture and Storage (NGCC-CCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CO2 intensity of electricity produced by state-of-the-art natural gas combined-cycle turbines (NGCC) isapproximately one-third that of the U.S. fleet of existing coal plants. Compared to new nuclear plants and coal plantswith integrated carbon capture, NGCC has a lower invest...

  12. Using Radiocarbon to Test Models of Ecosystem Carbon Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbore, S.; Lin, H.; Randerson, J.

    2007-05-01

    The radiocarbon content of carbon stored in and respired by ecosystems provides a direct measure of ecosystem carbon dynamics that can be directly compared to model predictions. Because carbon cycles through ecosystems on a variety of timescales, the mean age of C in standing biomass and soil organic matter pools is older than the mean age of microbially respired carbon. In turn, each pathway for C transit through ecosystems my respond differently to edaphic conditions; for example, soil organic matter mean age is controlled by factors affecting stabilization of C on very long timescales, such as mineralogy, while a factor like litter quality that effects decomposition rates reflects vegetation and climate characteristics. We compare the radiocarbon signature of heterotrophically respired CO2 across a number of ecosystems with models predicted using the CASA ecosystem model. The major controls of microbially respired CO2 from ecosystems include the residence time of C in living plant pools (i.e. the age of C in litter inputs to soil) and factors that control decomposition rates (litter quality and climate). Major differences between model and measured values at low latitudes are related to how woody debris pools are treated differently in models and measurements. The time lag between photosynthesis and respiration is a key ecosystem property that defines its potential to store or release carbon given variations in annual net primary production. Radiocarbon provides a rare case where models can be directly compared with measurements to provide a test of this parameter.

  13. Forest defoliator pests alter carbon and nitrogen cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüning, Maren; Simon, Judy; Reinhardt, Annett-Barbara; Lamersdorf, Norbert; Thies, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Climate change may foster pest epidemics in forests, and thereby the fluxes of elements that are indicators of ecosystem functioning. We examined compounds of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in insect faeces, leaf litter, throughfall and analysed the soils of deciduous oak forests (Quercus petraea L.) that were heavily infested by the leaf herbivores winter moth (Operophtera brumata L.) and mottled umber (Erannis defoliaria L.). In infested forests, total net canopy-to-soil fluxes of C and N deriving from insect faeces, leaf litter and throughfall were 30- and 18-fold higher compared with uninfested oak forests, with 4333 kg C ha−1 and 319 kg N ha−1, respectively, during a pest outbreak over 3 years. In infested forests, C and N levels in soil solutions were enhanced and C/N ratios in humus layers were reduced indicating an extended canopy-to-soil element pathway compared with the non-infested forests. In a microcosm incubation experiment, soil treatments with insect faeces showed 16-fold higher fluxes of carbon dioxide and 10-fold higher fluxes of dissolved organic carbon compared with soil treatments without added insect faeces (control). Thus, the deposition of high rates of nitrogen and rapidly decomposable carbon compounds in the course of forest pest epidemics appears to stimulate soil microbial activity (i.e. heterotrophic respiration), and therefore, may represent an important mechanism by which climate change can initiate a carbon cycle feedback. PMID:27853551

  14. Carbon flows in natural plankton communities in the Anthropocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kluijver, A.

    2012-01-01

    Human activities have large impacts on organisms, ecosystems and biogeochemical cycling. A major human impact is the alteration of the global carbon cycle that lead to a rapid increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations, which has been partially absorbed by the oceans, altering seawater chemistry and

  15. Slow growth rates of Amazonian trees: Consequences for carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Simone; Trumbore, Susan; Camargo, Plinio B.; Selhorst, Diogo; Chambers, Jeffrey Q.; Higuchi, Niro; Martinelli, Luiz Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Quantifying age structure and tree growth rate of Amazonian forests is essential for understanding their role in the carbon cycle. Here, we use radiocarbon dating and direct measurement of diameter increment to document unexpectedly slow growth rates for trees from three locations spanning the Brazilian Amazon basin. Central Amazon trees, averaging only ≈1mm/year diameter increment, grow half as fast as those from areas with more seasonal rainfall to the east and west. Slow growth rates mean that trees can attain great ages; across our sites we estimate 17-50% of trees with diameter >10 cm have ages exceeding 300 years. Whereas a few emergent trees that make up a large portion of the biomass grow faster, small trees that are more abundant grow slowly and attain ages of hundreds of years. The mean age of carbon in living trees (60-110 years) is within the range of or slightly longer than the mean residence time calculated from C inventory divided by annual C allocation to wood growth (40-100 years). Faster C turnover is observed in stands with overall higher rates of diameter increment and a larger fraction of the biomass in large, fast-growing trees. As a consequence, forests can recover biomass relatively quickly after disturbance, whereas recovering species composition may take many centuries. Carbon cycle models that apply a single turnover time for carbon in forest biomass do not account for variations in life strategy and therefore may overestimate the carbon sequestration potential of Amazon forests. PMID:16339903

  16. Transparent exopolymer particles: Effects on carbon cycling in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, Xavier; Passow, Uta; Migon, Christophe; Burd, Adrian B.; Legendre, Louis

    2017-02-01

    Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP) have received considerable attention since they were first described in the ocean more than 20 years ago. This is because of their carbon-rich composition, their high concentrations in ocean's surface waters, and especially because of their ability to promote aggregation due to their high stickiness (i.e. biological glue). As large aggregates contribute significantly to vertical carbon flux, TEP are commonly seen as a key factor that drives the downward flux of particulate organic carbon (POC). However, the density of TEP is lower than that of seawater, which causes them to remain in surface waters and even move upwards if not ballasted by other particles, which often leads to their accumulation in the sea surface microlayer. Hence we question here the generally accepted view that TEP always increase the downward flux of POC via gravitational settling. In the present reassessment of the role of TEP, we examine how the presence of a pool of non-sinking carbon-rich particulate organic matter in surface waters influences the cycling of organic carbon in the upper ocean at daily to decadal time scales. In particular, we focus on the role of TEP in the retention of organic carbon in surface waters versus downward export, and discuss the potential consequences of climate change on this process and on the efficiency of the biological carbon pump. We show that TEP sink only when ballasted with enough high-density particles to compensate their low density, and hence that their role in vertical POC export is not solely linked to their ability to promote aggregation, but also to their contribution to the buoyancy of POC. It follows that the TEP fraction of POC determines the degree of retention and remineralization of POC in surface waters versus its downward export. A high TEP concentration may temporally decouple primary production and downward export. We identify two main parameters that affect the contribution of TEP to POC cycling

  17. Shear Flow Induced Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes in Natural Rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure for the fabrication of natural rubber composite with aligned carbon nanotubes is provided in this study. The two-step approach is based on (i the preparation of mixture latex of natural rubber, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and other components and (ii the orientation of carbon nanotubes by a flow field. Rubber composite sheets filled with variable volume fraction of aligned carbon nanotubes were fabricated and then confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy studies. An obvious increase in thermal conductivity has been obtained after the alignment of carbon nanotubes. The dynamic mechanical analysis was carried out in a tear mode for the composite.

  18. A Study on Variations of Mechanical Properties of Carbon-epoxy Composites with Thermal Fatigue Cycles or Thermal Shock Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.S.; Park, S.M. [Myongji University, Suwon (Korea)

    2000-05-01

    Applications of composites materials have been in progress noticeably in manufacturing areas of automotive, aircraft and in other industries, resulting in ensuing research activities. Carbon-epoxy, one of major composite materials, is investigated for its thermal characteristics. Upon treatments of the composite material with repeated heatings and coolings variation of its elastic constants are monitored to reveal the thermal nature of the composite material. In this study, generally, changes in elastic constants are observed to occur mostly during the first 10{approx}20 thermal cycles. Values of G{sub 13} remain almost unchanged except a minor decrease. However in the observed small changes thermal shocks produce less effect than thermal fatigues. On the other hand, values of E{sub 1} show gradual increases with the number of applied thermal cycles and temperatures. Meanwhile, values of E{sub 2} and G{sub 23} decrease to a certain extent in the early stage during the applications of thermal cycling but are not appreciably affected by frequencies of thermal cycles. Also, thermal shocks are observed to induce different effects depending on treatment temperatures. (author). 13 refs., 17 figs.

  19. Microbial diversity and carbon cycling in San Francisco Bay wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theroux, Susanna [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Hartman, Wyatt [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; He, Shaomei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Tringe, Susannah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2014-03-21

    Wetland restoration efforts in San Francisco Bay aim to rebuild habitat for endangered species and provide an effective carbon storage solution, reversing land subsidence caused by a century of industrial and agricultural development. However, the benefits of carbon sequestration may be negated by increased methane production in newly constructed wetlands, making these wetlands net greenhouse gas (GHG) sources to the atmosphere. We investigated the effects of wetland restoration on below-ground microbial communities responsible for GHG cycling in a suite of historic and restored wetlands in SF Bay. Using DNA and RNA sequencing, coupled with real-time GHG monitoring, we profiled the diversity and metabolic potential of wetland soil microbial communities. The wetland soils harbor diverse communities of bacteria and archaea whose membership varies with sampling location, proximity to plant roots and sampling depth. Our results also highlight the dramatic differences in GHG production between historic and restored wetlands and allow us to link microbial community composition and GHG cycling with key environmental variables including salinity, soil carbon and plant species.

  20. What Have We Learned About Arctic Carbon Since The First State of the Carbon Cycle Report?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuur, E.

    2015-12-01

    Large pools of organic carbon were reported in The First State of the Carbon Cycle Report, but measurements from high latitude ecosystems, in particular for deeper soils >1m depth, remained scarce. A newly enlarged soil carbon database with an order of magnitude more numerous deep sampling sites has verified the widespread pattern of large quantities of carbon accumulated deep in permafrost (perennially frozen) soils. The known pool of permafrost carbon across the northern circumpolar permafrost zone is now estimated to be 1330-1580 Pg C, with the potential for an additional ~400 Pg C in deep permafrost sediments. In addition, an uncertainty estimate of plus/minus 15% has now been calculated for the soil carbon pool in the surface 0-3m. Laboratory incubations of these permafrost soils reveal that a significant fraction can be mineralized by microbes upon thaw and converted to carbon dioxide and methane on time scales of years to decades, with decade-long average losses from aerobic incubations ranging from 6-34% of initial carbon. Carbon emissions from the same soils incubated in an anaerobic environment are, on average, 78-85% lower than aerobic soils. But, the more potent greenhouse gas methane released under anaerobic conditions in part increases the climate impact of these emissions. While mean quantities of methane are only 3% to 7% that of carbon dioxide emitted from anaerobic incubations (by weight of C), these mean methane values represent 25% to 45% of the overall potential impact on climate when accounting for the higher global warming potential of methane. Taken together though, in spite of the more potent greenhouse gas methane, a unit of newly thawed permafrost carbon could have a greater impact on climate over a century if it thaws and decomposes within a drier, aerobic soil as compared to an equivalent amount of carbon within a waterlogged soil or sediment. Model projections tend to estimate losses of carbon in line with empirical measurements, but

  1. Arsenic cycling in hydrocarbon plumes: secondary effects of natural attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Schreiber, Madeline E.; Erickson, Melinda L.; Ziegler, Brady A.

    2016-01-01

    Monitored natural attenuation is widely applied as a remediation strategy at hydrocarbon spill sites. Natural attenuation relies on biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled with reduction of electron acceptors, including solid phase ferric iron (Fe(III)). Because arsenic (As) adsorbs to Fe-hydroxides, a potential secondary effect of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons coupled with Fe(III) reduction is a release of naturally occurring As to groundwater. At a crude-oil-contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota, anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons coupled to Fe(III) reduction has been well documented. We collected groundwater samples at the site annually from 2009 to 2013 to examine if As is released to groundwater and, if so, to document relationships between As and Fe inside and outside of the dissolved hydrocarbon plume. Arsenic concentrations in groundwater in the plume reached 230 µg/L, whereas groundwater outside the plume contained less than 5 µg/L As. Combined with previous data from the Bemidji site, our results suggest that (1) naturally occurring As is associated with Fe-hydroxides present in the glacially derived aquifer sediments; (2) introduction of hydrocarbons results in reduction of Fe-hydroxides, releasing As and Fe to groundwater; (3) at the leading edge of the plume, As and Fe are removed from groundwater and retained on sediments; and (4) downgradient from the plume, patterns of As and Fe in groundwater are similar to background. We develop a conceptual model of secondary As release due to natural attenuation of hydrocarbons that can be applied to other sites where an influx of biodegradable organic carbon promotes Fe(III) reduction.

  2. Exploring Viral Mediated Carbon Cycling in Thawing Permafrost Microbial Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubl, G. G.; Solonenko, N.; Moreno, M.; Sullivan, M. B.; Rich, V. I.

    2014-12-01

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on Earth and their impact on carbon cycling in permafrost habitats is poorly understood. Arctic C cycling is particularly important to interpret due to the rapid climate change occurring and the large amount of C stockpiled there (~1/3 of global soil C is stored in permafrost). Viruses of microbes (i.e. phages) play central roles in C cycling in the oceans, through cellular lysis (phage drive the largest ocean C flux about 150 Gt yr-1, dwarfing all others by >5-fold), production of associated DOC, as well as transport and expression during infection (1029 transduction events day-1). C cycling in thawing permafrost systems is critical in understanding the climate trajectory and phages may be as important for C cycling here as they are in the ocean. The thawed C may become a food source for microbes, producing CO2 and potentially CH4, both potent greenhouse gases. To address the potential role of phage in C cycling in these dynamic systems, we are examining phage from an arctic permafrost thaw gradient in northern Sweden. We have developed a protocol for successfully extracting phage from peat soils and are quantifying phage in 15 peat and 2 lake sediment cores, with the goal of sequencing viromes. Preliminary data suggest that phage are present at 109 g-1 across the permafrost thaw gradient (compared to the typical marine count ~105 ml-1), implying a potentially robust phage-host interaction web in these changing environments. We are examining phage from 11 depth intervals (covering the active and permafrost layer) in the cores to assess phage-host community dynamics. Phage morphology and abundance for each layer and environment are being determined using qTEM and EFM. Understanding the phage that infect bacteria and archaea in these rapidly changing habitats will provide insight into the controls on current and future CH4 and CO2 emissions in permafrost habitats.

  3. Why are East Asian ecosystems important for carbon cycle research?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG JingYun; TANG YanHong; SON Yohan

    2010-01-01

    @@ The global carbon cycle is one of the most important biogeochemical cycles.Through photosynthesis, green plants absorb CO2 from the atmosphere to produce organic matters, such as sugars, and covert solar energy into chemical energy.The organic matters are then used by all other life forms including humans.When ecosystems and atmosphere are in dynamic equilibrium, the flow of CO2 from the atmosphere into the biosphere because of photosynthesis should be equivalent to the flow of CO2 released back into the atmosphere by respiration.However, during the past century atmospheric CO2 concentration has increased substantially because of the burning of fossil fuels.It is highly likely that the atmospheric increase has resulted in global warming and sea level rise, as suggested by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) [1].

  4. Marine geochemistry ocean circulation, carbon cycle and climate change

    CERN Document Server

    Roy-Barman, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Marine geochemistry uses chemical elements and their isotopes to study how the ocean works. It brings quantitative answers to questions such as: What is the deep ocean mixing rate? How much atmospheric CO2 is pumped by the ocean? How fast are pollutants removed from the ocean? How do ecosystems react to the anthropogenic pressure? The book provides a simple introduction to the concepts (environmental chemistry, isotopes), the methods (field approach, remote sensing, modeling) and the applications (ocean circulation, carbon cycle, climate change) of marine geochemistry with a particular emphasis on isotopic tracers. Marine geochemistry is not an isolated discipline: numerous openings on physical oceanography, marine biology, climatology, geology, pollutions and ecology are proposed and provide a global vision of the ocean. It includes new topics based on ongoing research programs such as GEOTRACES, Global Carbon Project, Tara Ocean. It provides a complete outline for a course in marine geochemistry. To favor a...

  5. Methanogenic burst in the end-Permian carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Daniel H; Fournier, Gregory P; French, Katherine L; Alm, Eric J; Boyle, Edward A; Cao, Changqun; Summons, Roger E

    2014-04-15

    The end-Permian extinction is associated with a mysterious disruption to Earth's carbon cycle. Here we identify causal mechanisms via three observations. First, we show that geochemical signals indicate superexponential growth of the marine inorganic carbon reservoir, coincident with the extinction and consistent with the expansion of a new microbial metabolic pathway. Second, we show that the efficient acetoclastic pathway in Methanosarcina emerged at a time statistically indistinguishable from the extinction. Finally, we show that nickel concentrations in South China sediments increased sharply at the extinction, probably as a consequence of massive Siberian volcanism, enabling a methanogenic expansion by removal of nickel limitation. Collectively, these results are consistent with the instigation of Earth's greatest mass extinction by a specific microbial innovation.

  6. Carbonate concretions as a significant component of ancient marine carbon cycles: Insights from paired organic and inorganic carbon isotope analyses of a Cretaceous shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate concretions often occur within fine-grained, organic-rich sedimentary rocks. This association reflects the common production of diagenetic minerals through biologic cycling of organic matter. Chemical analysis of carbonate concretions provides the rare opportunity to explore ancient shallow diagenetic environments, which are inherently transient due to progressive burial but are an integral component of the marine carbon cycle. The late Cretaceous Holz Shale (~80 Ma) contains abundant calcite concretions that exhibit textural and geochemical characteristics indicative of relatively shallow formation (i.e., near the sediment-water interface). Sampled concretions contain between 5.4 and 9.8 wt.% total inorganic carbon (TIC), or ~45 and 82 wt.% CaCO3, compared to host shale values which average ~1.5 wt.% TIC. Organic carbon isotope compositions (δ13Corg) are relatively constant in host and concretion samples ranging from ­-26.3 to -24.0‰ (VPDB). Carbonate carbon isotope compositions (δ13Ccarb) range from -22.5 to -3.4‰, indicating a significant but not entirely organic source of carbon. Concretions of the lower Holz Shale exhibit considerably elevated δ13Ccarb values averaging -4.8‰, whereas upper Holz Shale concretions express an average δ13Ccarb value of -17.0‰. If the remaining carbonate for lower Holz Shale concretions is sourced from marine fluids and/or dissolved marine carbonate minerals (e.g., shells), a simple mass balance indicates that ~28% of concretion carbon was sourced from organic matter and ~72% from late Cretaceous marine inorganic carbon (with δ13C ~ +2.5‰). Upper Holz Shale calculations indicate a ~73% contribution from organic matter and a ~27% contribution from inorganic carbon. When normalized for carbonate, organic contents within the concretions are ~2-13 wt.% enriched compared to host contents. This potentially reflects the protective nature of cementation that acts to limit permeability and chemical destruction of

  7. The SML pump of carbon cycles in oceans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Zhengbin; GONG; Haidong; LIU; Liansheng

    2006-01-01

    Different from the solution/physical pump, biological pump and continental shelf pump of carbon cycle in oceans, a new pump named "surface microlayer (SML) pump" is developed based on data obtained from marine investigations and lab study. The SML pump has: (1) left-right dissymmetry of "pH-depth" curve; (2) the non-linearity of "concentration-depth" curve; and (3) difference of affecting confine of the SML pump. The issue of "source" or "sink" of atmospheric CO2 in the Yellow Sea and South China Sea is discussed.

  8. Superior flexibility of a wrinkled carbon shell under electrochemical cycling

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Qianqian

    2014-01-01

    Nanocarbon composites have been extensively employed in engineering alloy-type anodes in order to improve the poor cyclability caused by the enormous volume changes during lithium (Li+) insertion/extraction. The chemical vapor deposited wrinkled carbon shell (WCS) shows high electrical conductivity, excellent thermal stability and remarkable mechanical robustness, which help in retaining the structural integrity around the tin (Sn) anode core despite ∼250% variation in volume during repetitive lithiation and delithiation. In situ transmission electron microscopy reveals no embrittlement in the lithiated WCS, which fully recovers its original shape after severe mechanical deformation with no obvious structural change. Further analysis indicates that the capacity to accommodate large strains is closely related to the construction of the carbon shell, that is, the stacking of wrinkled few-layer graphenes. Both the pre-existing wrinkles and the few-layer thickness render the carbon shell superior flexibility and good elasticity under bending or expansion of the interior volume. Moreover, the WCS possesses fast lithium ion diffusion channels, which have lower activation barriers (∼0.1 eV) than that on a smooth graphene (∼0.3 eV). The results provide an insight into the improvement in cycle performance that can be achieved through carbon coating of anodes of lithium ion batteries. © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. The GLOBE Carbon Project: Integrating the Science of Carbon Cycling and Climate Change into K-12 Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollinger, S. V.; Silverberg, S.; Albrechtova, J.; Freuder, R.; Gengarelly, L.; Martin, M.; Randolph, G.; Schloss, A.

    2007-12-01

    The global carbon cycle is a key regulator of the Earth's climate and is central to the normal function of ecological systems. Because rising atmospheric CO2 is the principal cause of climate change, understanding how ecosystems cycle and store carbon has become an extremely important issue. In recent years, the growing importance of the carbon cycle has brought it to the forefront of both science and environmental policy. The need for better scientific understanding has led to establishment of numerous research programs, such as the North American Carbon Program (NACP), which seeks to understand controls on carbon cycling under present and future conditions. Parallel efforts are greatly needed to integrate state-of-the-art science on the carbon cycle and its importance to climate with education and outreach efforts that help prepare society to make sound decisions on energy use, carbon management and climate change adaptation. Here, we present a new effort that joins carbon cycle scientists with the International GLOBE Education program to develop carbon cycle activities for K-12 classrooms. The GLOBE Carbon Cycle project is focused on bringing cutting edge research and research techniques in the field of terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycling into the classroom. Students will collect data about their school field site through existing protocols of phenology, land cover and soils as well as new protocols focused on leaf traits, and ecosystem growth and change. They will also participate in classroom activities to understand carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems, these will include plant- a-plant experiments, hands-on demonstrations of various concepts, and analysis of collected data. In addition to the traditional GLOBE experience, students will have the opportunity to integrate their data with emerging and expanding technologies including global and local carbon cycle models and remote sensing toolkits. This program design will allow students to explore research

  10. Soil carbon model alternatives for ECHAM5/JSBACH climate model: Evaluation and impacts on global carbon cycle estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thum, T.; Raisanen, P.; Sevanto, S.

    2011-01-01

    model formulation produced soil carbon stock estimates that were much closer to measured values. It also captured better the seasonal cycle of the direct CO2 exchange measurements at the three grassland sites considered (RMS error reduced by 12%), while for the five forest sites also analyzed......The response of soil organic carbon to climate change might lead to significant feedbacks affecting global warming. This response can be studied by coupled climate-carbon cycle models but so far the description of soil organic carbon cycle in these models has been quite simple. In this work we used...... the coupled climate-carbon cycle model ECHAM5/JSBACH (European Center/Hamburg Model 5/Jena Scheme for Biosphere-Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg) with two different soil carbon modules, namely (1) the original soil carbon model of JSBACH called CBALANCE and (2) a new soil carbon model Yasso07, to study...

  11. Climate and carbon cycle dynamics in a CESM simulation from 850–2100 CE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lehner

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Under the protocols of the Paleoclimate and Coupled Modelling Intercomparison Projects a number of simulations were produced that provide a range of potential climate evolutions from the last millennium to the end of the current century. Here, we present the first simulation with the Community Earth System Model (CESM, which includes an interactive carbon cycle, that continuously covers the last millennium, the historical period, and the twenty-first century. Besides state-of-the-art forcing reconstructions, we apply a modified reconstruction of total solar irradiance to shed light on the issue of forcing uncertainty in the context of the last millennium. Nevertheless, we find that structural uncertainties between different models can still dominate over forcing uncertainty for quantities such as hemispheric temperatures or the land and ocean carbon cycle response. Comparing with other model simulations we find forced decadal-scale variability to occur mainly after volcanic eruptions, while during other periods internal variability masks potentially forced signals and calls for larger ensembles in paleoclimate modeling studies. At the same time, we fail to attribute millennial temperature trends to orbital forcing, as has been suggested recently. The climate-carbon cycle sensitivity in CESM during the last millennium is estimated to be about 1.3 ppm °C−1. However, the dependence of this sensitivity on the exact time period and scale illustrates the prevailing challenge of deriving robust constrains on this quantity from paleoclimate proxies. In particular, the response of the land carbon cycle to volcanic forcing shows fundamental differences between different models. In CESM the tropical land dictates the response to volcanoes with a distinct behavior for large and moderate eruptions. Under anthropogenic emissions, global land and ocean carbon uptake rates emerge from the envelope of interannual natural variability as simulated for the last

  12. Climate and carbon cycle dynamics in a CESM simulation from 850 to 2100 CE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, F.; Joos, F.; Raible, C. C.; Mignot, J.; Born, A.; Keller, K. M.; Stocker, T. F.

    2015-07-01

    Under the protocols of phase 3 of the Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project, a number of simulations were produced that provide a range of potential climate evolutions from the last millennium to the end of the current century. Here, we present the first simulation with the Community Earth System Model (CESM), which includes an interactive carbon cycle, that covers the last millennium. The simulation is continued to the end of the twenty-first century. Besides state-of-the-art forcing reconstructions, we apply a modified reconstruction of total solar irradiance to shed light on the issue of forcing uncertainty in the context of the last millennium. Nevertheless, we find that structural uncertainties between different models can still dominate over forcing uncertainty for quantities such as hemispheric temperatures or the land and ocean carbon cycle response. Compared to other model simulations, we find forced decadal-scale variability to occur mainly after volcanic eruptions, while during other periods internal variability masks potentially forced signals and calls for larger ensembles in paleoclimate modeling studies. At the same time, we were not able to attribute millennial temperature trends to orbital forcing, as has been suggested recently. The climate-carbon-cycle sensitivity in CESM during the last millennium is estimated to be between 1.0 and 2.1 ppm °C-1. However, the dependence of this sensitivity on the exact time period and scale illustrates the prevailing challenge of deriving robust constraints on this quantity from paleoclimate proxies. In particular, the response of the land carbon cycle to volcanic forcing shows fundamental differences between different models. In CESM the tropical land dictates the response to volcanoes, with a distinct behavior for large and moderate eruptions. Under anthropogenic emissions, global land and ocean carbon uptake rates emerge from the envelope of interannual natural variability by about year 1947 and 1877

  13. A dynamic process model of a natural gas combined cycle -- Model development with startup and shutdown simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liese, Eric [U.S. DOE; Zitney, Stephen E. [U.S. DOE

    2013-01-01

    Research in dynamic process simulation for integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC) with carbon capture has been ongoing at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), culminating in a full operator training simulator (OTS) and immersive training simulator (ITS) for use in both operator training and research. A derivative work of the IGCC dynamic simulator has been a modification of the combined cycle section to more closely represent a typical natural gas fired combined cycle (NGCC). This paper describes the NGCC dynamic process model and highlights some of the simulator’s current capabilities through a particular startup and shutdown scenario.

  14. Deep Carbon Cycling in the Deep Hydrosphere: Abiotic Organic Synthesis and Biogeochemical Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood Lollar, B.; Sutcliffe, C. N.; Ballentine, C. J.; Warr, O.; Li, L.; Ono, S.; Wang, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Research into the deep carbon cycle has expanded our understanding of the depth and extent of abiotic organic synthesis in the deep Earth beyond the hydrothermal vents of the deep ocean floor, and of the role of reduced gases in supporting deep subsurface microbial communities. Most recently, this research has expanded our understanding not only of the deep biosphere but the deep hydrosphere - identifying for the first time the extreme antiquity (millions to billions of years residence time) of deep saline fracture waters in the world's oldest rocks. Energy-rich saline fracture waters in the Precambrian crust that makes up more than 70% of the Earth's continental lithosphereprovide important constraints on our understanding of the extent of the crust that is habitable, on the time scales of hydrogeologic isolation (and conversely mixing) of fluids relevant to the deep carbon cycle, and on the geochemistry of substrates that sustain both abiotic organic synthesis and biogeochemical cycles driven by microbial communities. Ultimately the chemistry and hydrogeology of the deep hydrosphere will help define the limits for life in the subsurface and the boundary between the biotic-abiotic fringe. Using a variety of novel techniques including noble gas analysis, clumped isotopologues of methane, and compound specific isotope analysis of CHNOS, this research is addressing questions about the distribution of deep saline fluids in Precambrian rocks worldwide, the degree of interconnectedness of these potential biomes, the habitability of these fluids, and the biogeographic diversity of this new realm of the deep hydrosphere.

  15. Tracking heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon cycling by magnetotactic bacteria in freshwater sediments using DNA stable isotope probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürşat Coşkun, Ömer; Roud, Sophie; He, Kuang; Petersen, Nikolai; Gilder, Stuart; Orsi, William D.

    2017-04-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are diverse, widespread, motile prokaryotes which biomineralize nanosize magnetic minerals, either magnetite or gregite, under highly conserved genetic control and have magnetotaxis to align their position in aquatic environment according to Earth's magnetic field. They play important roles on some geobiological cycle of important minerals such as iron, sulphur, nitrogen and carbon. Yet, to date, their importance in carbon cycle and carbon source in their natural environment have not been previously studied. In this study, we focused on freshwater benthic carbon cycling of MTB and total bacteria using DNA stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP) technique coupled with quantitative PCR (qPCR). Pond sediments from Unterlippach (Germany) were amended with 13C-labelled sodium bicarbonate and 13C-labelled organic matter, and incubated in the dark over a two week time period. Applying separate qPCR assays specific for total bacteria and MTB, respectively, allowed us to estimate the contribution of MTB to total heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon cycling via DNA-SIP. After one week, there was a slight degree of autotrophic activity which increased markedly after two weeks. Comparing total DNA to the qPCR data revealed that changes in the buoyant density of DNA was due mainly to autotrophic bacterial production. DNA-SIP also identified heterotrophic utilization of 13C-labelled organic matter by MTB after 1 week. The qPCR data also allowed us to estimate uptake rates based on the incubation times for heterotrophic and autotrophic MTB. High-throughput DNA sequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that most of the MTB involved in carbon cycling were related to the Magnetococcus genus. This study sheds light on the carbon sources for MTB in a natural environment and helps unravel their ecological role in the carbon cycle.

  16. Carbon cycling and phytoplankton responses within highly-replicated shipboard carbonate chemistry manipulation experiments conducted around Northwest European Shelf Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richier, S.; Achterberg, E. P.; Dumousseaud, C.; Poulton, A. J.; Suggett, D. J.; Tyrrell, T.; Zubkov, M. V.; Moore, C. M.

    2014-03-01

    The ongoing oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is significantly altering the carbonate chemistry of seawater, a phenomenon referred to as ocean acidification. Experimental manipulations have been increasingly used to gauge how continued ocean acidification will potentially impact marine ecosystems and their associated biogeochemical cycles in the future; however, results amongst studies, particularly when performed on natural communities, are highly variable, which in part likely reflects inconsistencies in experimental approach. To investigate the potential for identification of more generic responses and greater experimentally reproducibility, we devised and implemented a series of highly replicated (n = 8), short term (2-4 days) multi-level (≥ 4 conditions) carbonate chemistry/nutrient manipulation experiments on a range of natural microbial communities sampled in Northwest European shelf seas. Carbonate chemistry manipulations and resulting biological responses were found to be highly reproducible within individual experiments and to a lesser extent between geographically different experiments. Statistically robust reproducible physiological responses of phytoplankton to increasing pCO2, characterized by a suppression of net growth for small sized cells (ocean.

  17. Phytoplankton responses and associated carbon cycling during shipboard carbonate chemistry manipulation experiments conducted around Northwest European shelf seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richier, S.; Achterberg, E. P.; Dumousseaud, C.; Poulton, A. J.; Suggett, D. J.; Tyrrell, T.; Zubkov, M. V.; Moore, C. M.

    2014-09-01

    The ongoing oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is significantly altering the carbonate chemistry of seawater, a phenomenon referred to as ocean acidification. Experimental manipulations have been increasingly used to gauge how continued ocean acidification will potentially impact marine ecosystems and their associated biogeochemical cycles in the future; however, results amongst studies, particularly when performed on natural communities, are highly variable, which may reflect community/environment-specific responses or inconsistencies in experimental approach. To investigate the potential for identification of more generic responses and greater experimentally reproducibility, we devised and implemented a series (n = 8) of short-term (2-4 days) multi-level (≥4 conditions) carbonate chemistry/nutrient manipulation experiments on a range of natural microbial communities sampled in Northwest European shelf seas. Carbonate chemistry manipulations and resulting biological responses were found to be highly reproducible within individual experiments and to a lesser extent between geographically separated experiments. Statistically robust reproducible physiological responses of phytoplankton to increasing pCO2, characterised by a suppression of net growth for small-sized cells (ocean.

  18. Sources and mobility of carbonate melts beneath cratons, with implications for deep carbon cycling, metasomatism and rift initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappe, Sebastian; Romer, Rolf L.; Stracke, Andreas; Steenfelt, Agnete; Smart, Katie A.; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Torsvik, Trond H.

    2017-05-01

    Kimberlite and carbonatite magmas that intrude cratonic lithosphere are among the deepest probes of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Their co-existence on thick continental shields is commonly attributed to continuous partial melting sequences of carbonated peridotite at >150 km depths, possibly as deep as the mantle transition zone. At Tikiusaaq on the North Atlantic craton in West Greenland, approximately 160 Ma old ultrafresh kimberlite dykes and carbonatite sheets provide a rare opportunity to study the origin and evolution of carbonate-rich melts beneath cratons. Although their Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb-Li isotopic compositions suggest a common convecting upper mantle source that includes depleted and recycled oceanic crust components (e.g., negative ΔεHf coupled with > + 5 ‰ δ7Li), incompatible trace element modelling identifies only the kimberlites as near-primary low-degree partial melts (0.05-3%) of carbonated peridotite. In contrast, the trace element systematics of the carbonatites are difficult to reproduce by partial melting of carbonated peridotite, and the heavy carbon isotopic signatures (-3.6 to - 2.4 ‰ δ13C for carbonatites versus -5.7 to - 3.6 ‰ δ13C for kimberlites) require open-system fractionation at magmatic temperatures. Given that the oxidation state of Earth's mantle at >150 km depth is too reduced to enable larger volumes of 'pure' carbonate melt to migrate, it is reasonable to speculate that percolating near-solidus melts of carbonated peridotite must be silicate-dominated with only dilute carbonate contents, similar to the Tikiusaaq kimberlite compositions (e.g., 16-33 wt.% SiO2). This concept is supported by our findings from the North Atlantic craton where kimberlite and other deeply derived carbonated silicate melts, such as aillikites, exsolve their carbonate components within the shallow lithosphere en route to the Earth's surface, thereby producing carbonatite magmas. The relative abundances of trace elements of such highly

  19. Thermodynamics of natural selection II: Chemical Carnot cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric

    2008-05-21

    This is the second in a series of three papers devoted to energy flow and entropy changes in chemical and biological processes, and to their relations to the thermodynamics of computation. In the first paper of the series, it was shown that a general-form dimensional argument from the second law of thermodynamics captures a number of scaling relations governing growth and development across many domains of life. It was also argued that models of physiology based on reversible transformations provide sensible approximations within which the second-law scaling is realized. This paper provides a formal basis for decomposing general cyclic, fixed-temperature chemical reactions, in terms of the chemical equivalent of Carnot's cycle for heat engines. It is shown that the second law relates the minimal chemical work required to perform a cycle to the Kullback-Leibler divergence produced in its chemical output ensemble from that of a Gibbs equilibrium. Reversible models of physiology are used to create reversible models of natural selection, which relate metabolic energy requirements to information gain under optimal conditions. When dissipation is added to models of selection, the second-law constraint is generalized to a relation between metabolic work and the combined energies of growth and maintenance.

  20. Almacenamiento de gas natural en carbones activados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lozano-Castelló

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Los carbones activados (CAs presentan unas de las porosidades y áreas superficiales más elevadas conocidas en sólidos, lo que les confiere una capacidad de adsorción excepcional.

  1. The links between global carbon, water and nutrient cycles in an urbanizing world — the case of coastal eutrophication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, C.; Hofstra, N.; Ivens, W.; Löhr, A.; Strokal, M.; Wijnen, van J.

    2013-01-01

    The natural cycles of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and water have been disturbed substantially by human activities. Urbanizing coastal drainage basins and large river deltas are located at the interface of freshwater and coastal components of the larger earth system and the process of ur

  2. In Situ Activity and Functional Diversity of Microbes Linking Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles in Marine Ecosystems: BI-OMP Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodson, Robert E. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2004-05-01

    We developed methods to simultaneously detect genes or gene expression involved with carbon and nitrogen cycling in individual marine bacterial cells in their natural matrices. The technique focuses on in situ polymerase chain reaction which we were the first lab to successfully obtain with intact prokaryotic cells. We listed the papers published to date from this project and summarize highlights of our results.

  3. Soils and Global Change in the Carbon Cycle over Geological Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retallack, G. J.

    2003-12-01

    content of greenhouse gases can be measured, estimated, or modeled on all timescales from annual to eonal (Figure 2). The actively cycling surficial carbon reservoirs are biomass, surface oceans, air, and soils, so it is no surprise that the fossil record of life on Earth shows strong linkage to global climate change (Berner, 1997; Algeo and Scheckler, 1998; Retallack, 2000a). There is an additional line of evidence for past climatic and atmospheric history in the form of fossil soils, or paleosols, now known to be abundant throughout the geological record ( Retallack, 1997a, 2001a). This chapter addresses evidence from fossil soils for global climate change in the past, and attempts to assess the role of soils in carbon cycle fluctuations through the long history of our planet. (30K)Figure 2. Variation in atmospheric CO2 composition on a variety of timescales ranging from annual to eonal (a) Keeling et al., 1982; reproduced from Carban Dioxide Review 1982, 377-385 (b) Petit et al., 1999; reproduced by permission of Nature Publishing Group from Nature 1999, 399, 429-436 (c) Retallack, 2001d; reproduced by J. Geol. 2001, 109, 407-426 (d) Berner and Kothavala, 2001; reproduced by permission of American Journal of Science from Am. J. Sci. 2001, 301, 182-204.

  4. Toward a Mexican eddy covariance network for carbon cycle science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Rodrigo; Yépez, Enrico A.

    2011-09-01

    First Annual MexFlux Principal Investigators Meeting; Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico, 4-8 May 2011; The carbon cycle science community has organized a global network, called FLUXNET, to measure the exchange of energy, water, and carbon dioxide (CO2) between the ecosystems and the atmosphere using the eddy covariance technique. This network has provided unprecedented information for carbon cycle science and global climate change but is mostly represented by study sites in the United States and Europe. Thus, there is an important gap in measurements and understanding of ecosystem dynamics in other regions of the world that are seeing a rapid change in land use. Researchers met under the sponsorship of Red Temática de Ecosistemas and Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACYT) to discuss strategies to establish a Mexican eddy covariance network (MexFlux) by identifying researchers, study sites, and scientific goals. During the meeting, attendees noted that 10 study sites have been established in Mexico with more than 30 combined years of information. Study sites span from new sites installed during 2011 to others with 9 to 6 years of measurements. Sites with the longest span measurements are located in Baja California Sur (established by Walter Oechel in 2002) and Sonora (established by Christopher Watts in 2005); both are semiarid ecosystems. MexFlux sites represent a variety of ecosystem types, including Mediterranean and sarcocaulescent shrublands in Baja California; oak woodland, subtropical shrubland, tropical dry forest, and a grassland in Sonora; tropical dry forests in Jalisco and Yucatan; a managed grassland in San Luis Potosi; and a managed pine forest in Hidalgo. Sites are maintained with an individual researcher's funds from Mexican government agencies (e.g., CONACYT) and international collaborations, but no coordinated funding exists for a long-term program.

  5. Dissolved Organic Carbon Cycling in Forested Watersheds: A Carbon Isotope Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, S. L.; Aravena, R.; Trumbore, S. E.; Dillon, P. J.

    1990-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is important in the acid-base chemistry of acid-sensitive freshwater systems; in the complexation, mobility, persistence, and toxicity of metals and other pollutants; and in lake carbon metabolism. Carbon isotopes (13C and 14C) are used to study the origin, transport, and fate of DOC in a softwater catchment in central Ontario. Precipitation, soil percolates, groundwaters, stream, beaver pond, and lake waters, and lake sediment pore water were characterized chemically and isotopically. In addition to total DOC, isotopic measurements were made on the humic and fulvic DOC fractions. The lake is a net sink for DOC. Δ14C results indicate that the turnover time of most of the DOC in streams, lakes, and wetlands is fast, less than 40 years, and on the same time scale as changes in acidic deposition. DOC in groundwaters is composed of older carbon than surface waters, indicating extensive cycling of DOC in the upper soil zone or aquifer.

  6. A Brief Review of the Application of 14C in Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilderson, T; Mcfarlane, K

    2009-10-22

    An over-arching goal of the DOE TCP program is to understand the mechanistic controls over the fate, transport, and residence time of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere. Many of the modern process and modeling studies focus on seasonal to interannual variability. However, much of the carbon on the landscape and in soils is in separate reservoirs with turnover times that are multi-decadal to millennial. It is the controls on these longer term pools or reservoirs that is a critical unknown in the face of rising GHGs and climate change and uncertainties of the terrestrial biosphere as a future global sink or source of atmospheric CO{sub 2} [eg., Friedlingstein et al., 2006; Govindasamy et al., 2005; Thompson et al., 2004]. Radiocarbon measurements, in combination with other data, can provide insight into, and constraints on, terrestrial carbon cycling. Radiocarbon (t{sub 1/2} 5730yrs) is produced naturally in the stratosphere when secondary neutrons generated by cosmic rays collide with {sup 14}N atoms [Libby 1946; Arnold and Libby, 1949]. Upon formation, {sup 14}C is rapidly oxidized to CO and then to CO{sub 2}, and is incorporated into the carbon cycle. Due to anthropogenic activities, the amount of {sup 14}C in the atmosphere doubled in the mid/late 1950s and early 1960s from its preindustrial value of {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio of 1.18 x 10{sup -12} [eg., Nydal and Lovseth, 1983]. Following the atmospheric weapons test ban in 1963, the {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio, has decreased due to the net isotopic exchange between the ocean and terrestrial biosphere [eg., Levin and Hessheimer, 2000] and a dilution effect due to the burning of {sup 14}C-free fossil fuel carbon, the 'Suess Effect' [Suess, 1955]. In the carbon cycle literature, radiocarbon measurements are generally reported as {Delta}{sup 14}C, which includes a correction for mass dependent fractionation [Stuiver and Polach, 1977]. In the context of carbon cycle studies radiocarbon measurements can be

  7. Targeting patterns: A path forward for uncertainty quantification in carbon cycle science? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, A. M.; Fang, Y.; Miller, S. M.; Ray, J.; Shiga, Y. P.; Yadav, V.; Zscheischler, J.

    2013-12-01

    The central challenge in carbon cycle science is to understand where, why, and how the terrestrial biosphere and oceans are taking up approximately half of the carbon being emitted through human activity. Such understanding would make it possible to decrease the uncertainty associated with predictions of carbon-climate feedbacks, and therefore reduce one of the key uncertainties in atmospheric carbon abundance and climate predictions. A second emerging challenge is that of quantifying the anthropogenic emissions themselves, and their changes over time, in support of efforts aimed at limiting emissions. Much work has focused on quantifying carbon exchange (a.k.a. fluxes) on scales ranging from local to continental using observed variability in atmospheric concentrations of carbon gases as a constraint. Uncertainties, however, have not decreased substantially over time. The difficulty associated with constraining the carbon budget can be attributed in part to the fact that (1) net fluxes are a small residual of large gross variability in emissions and uptake, especially for carbon dioxide (2) the intermediate (i.e. local to continental) scales of interest to carbon cycle studies are not well constrained by existing observing systems, and (3) the budgets inferred through inverse modeling studies are very sensitive to the atmospheric boundary conditions of the examined regions. While these modeling challenges can be addressed over time through improvements in observational and modeling approaches, the question that emerges is: What can be done to address some of the core questions given the state of current resources? One potential approach is, rather than focus on spatially and temporally aggregated quantities (i.e. magnitude of net fluxes over given regions during given time periods), to focus instead on the ability to identify the spatiotemporal patterns of net fluxes, and linking these to the underlying driving processes. In other words, one might shift the primary

  8. To spatially explicitly quantify the indirect effect of disturbances on carbon cycle of Canada's forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W.; Cihlar, J.; Wang, S.; Zhang, Q.; Ung, C.; Price, D.; Fernandes, R.; Fraser, R.

    2001-12-01

    Disturbances (i.e., fire, insects-induced mortality, and harvesting) affect the carbon cycle of forested ecosystems directly in the year of occurrence and indirectly in many years after. For example, forest fire directly releases a fraction of carbon in biomass and forest floor to the atmosphere. The carbon cycle is also affected indirectly by disturbances which set the disturbed stand to age zero. So far, most studies estimate the indirect effect of disturbances on carbon balance at regional to national scales by aggregated forests in a region or a country into a few units, and largely ignoring the effect of spatial heterogeneity of disturbances and environmental factors. Because the effects of disturbances and environmental factors are usually non-linear, ignoring their spatial heterogeneity may introduce large error in the carbon budget estimates. In order to reduce this potential large error, spatially explicit quantification of the indirect effect of disturbances are urgently needed. Spatially explicit estimates of carbon cycle at 1-km resolution also allow direct testing against field measurements, as well as provide essential information for sustainable development of natural resources. To spatially explicitly quantify the indirect effect of disturbances on carbon cycle, we need first to quantify how stand age affects NPP. Our early results indicated the effect of stand age on NPP is species and site quality dependent. Therefore, age-NPP relationships are needed for all major forest species to carry out the spatially explicitly quantification of indirect effect of disturbances. We will derive these age-NPP relationships using existing yield tables, biomass allometric equations, and recent data on fine root and foliage production. To apply these age-NPP relationships, we need geo-spatial information on species, age, and site quality. Several initiatives have been underway to develop these spatial data layers. Because the NPP derived using these age

  9. A new stepwise carbon cycle data assimilation system using multiple data streams to constrain the simulated land surface carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peylin, Philippe; Bacour, Cédric; MacBean, Natasha; Leonard, Sébastien; Rayner, Peter; Kuppel, Sylvain; Koffi, Ernest; Kane, Abdou; Maignan, Fabienne; Chevallier, Frédéric; Ciais, Philippe; Prunet, Pascal

    2016-09-01

    Large uncertainties in land surface models (LSMs) simulations still arise from inaccurate forcing, poor description of land surface heterogeneity (soil and vegetation properties), incorrect model parameter values and incomplete representation of biogeochemical processes. The recent increase in the number and type of carbon cycle-related observations, including both in situ and remote sensing measurements, has opened a new road to optimize model parameters via robust statistical model-data integration techniques, in order to reduce the uncertainties of simulated carbon fluxes and stocks. In this study we present a carbon cycle data assimilation system that assimilates three major data streams, namely the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) observations of vegetation activity, net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and latent heat (LE) flux measurements at more than 70 sites (FLUXNET), as well as atmospheric CO2 concentrations at 53 surface stations, in order to optimize the main parameters (around 180 parameters in total) of the Organizing Carbon and Hydrology in Dynamics Ecosystems (ORCHIDEE) LSM (version 1.9.5 used for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations). The system relies on a stepwise approach that assimilates each data stream in turn, propagating the information gained on the parameters from one step to the next. Overall, the ORCHIDEE model is able to achieve a consistent fit to all three data streams, which suggests that current LSMs have reached the level of development to assimilate these observations. The assimilation of MODIS-NDVI (step 1) reduced the growing season length in ORCHIDEE for temperate and boreal ecosystems, thus decreasing the global mean annual gross primary production (GPP). Using FLUXNET data (step 2) led to large improvements in the seasonal cycle of the NEE and LE fluxes for all ecosystems (i.e., increased amplitude for temperate ecosystems). The

  10. Closing the carbon cycle through rational use of carbon-based fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacElroy, J M Don

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a brief overview is presented of natural gas as a fuel resource with subsequent carbon capture and re-use as a means to facilitate reduction and eventual elimination of man-made carbon emissions. A particular focus is shale gas and, to a lesser extent, methane hydrates, with the former believed to provide the most reasonable alternative as a transitional fuel toward a low-carbon future. An emphasis is placed on the gradual elimination of fossil resource usage as a fuel over the coming 35 to 85 years and its eventual replacement with renewable resources and nuclear power. Furthermore, it is proposed that synthesis of chemical feedstocks from recycled carbon dioxide and hydrogen-rich materials should be undertaken for specific applications in the transport sector which require access to high energy density fuels. To achieve the latter, carbon dioxide capture is imperative and possible synthetic routes for chemical feedstock production are briefly reviewed.

  11. Where Carbon Goes When Water Flows: Carbon Cycling across the Aquatic Continuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Nicholas D.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Medeiros, Patricia M.; Seidel, Michael; Richey, Jeffrey E.; Keil, Richard G.; Sawakuchi, Henrique O.

    2017-01-31

    The purpose of this review is to highlight progress in unraveling carbon cycling dynamics across the continuum of landscapes, inland waters, coastal oceans, and the atmosphere. Earth systems are intimately interconnected, yet most biogeochemical studies focus on specific components in isolation. The movement of water drives the carbon cycle, and, as such, inland waters provide a critical intersection between terrestrial and marine biospheres. Inland, estuarine, and coastal waters are well studied in regions near centers of human population in the Northern hemisphere. However, many of the world’s large river systems and their marine receiving waters remain poorly characterized, particularly in the tropics, which contribute to a disproportionately large fraction of the transformation of terrestrial organic matter to carbon dioxide, and the Arctic, where positive feedback mechanisms are likely to amplify global climate change. There are large gaps in current coverage of environmental observations along the aquatic continuum. For example, tidally-influenced reaches of major rivers and near-shore coastal regions around river plumes are often left out of carbon budgets due to a combination of methodological constraints and poor data coverage. We suggest that closing these gaps could potentially alter global estimates of CO2 outgassing from surface waters to the atmosphere by several-fold. Finally, in order to identify and constrain/embrace uncertainties in global carbon budget estimations it is important that we further adopt statistical and modeling approaches that have become well-established in the fields of oceanography and paleoclimatology, for example.

  12. Plumbing the global carbon cycle: Integrating inland waters into the terrestrial carbon budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J.J.; Prairie, Y.T.; Caraco, N.F.; McDowell, W.H.; Tranvik, L.J.; Striegl, R.G.; Duarte, C.M.; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Downing, J.A.; Middelburg, J.J.; Melack, J.

    2007-01-01

    Because freshwater covers such a small fraction of the Earth's surface area, inland freshwater ecosystems (particularly lakes, rivers, and reservoirs) have rarely been considered as potentially important quantitative components of the carbon cycle at either global or regional scales. By taking published estimates of gas exchange, sediment accumulation, and carbon transport for a variety of aquatic systems, we have constructed a budget for the role of inland water ecosystems in the global carbon cycle. Our analysis conservatively estimates that inland waters annually receive, from a combination of background and anthropogenically altered sources, on the order of 1.9 Pg C y-1 from the terrestrial landscape, of which about 0.2 is buried in aquatic sediments, at least 0.8 (possibly much more) is returned to the atmosphere as gas exchange while the remaining 0.9 Pg y-1 is delivered to the oceans, roughly equally as inorganic and organic carbon. Thus, roughly twice as much C enters inland aquatic systems from land as is exported from land to the sea. Over prolonged time net carbon fluxes in aquatic systems tend to be greater per unit area than in much of the surrounding land. Although their area is small, these freshwater aquatic systems can affect regional C balances. Further, the inclusion of inland, freshwater ecosystems provides useful insight about the storage, oxidation and transport of terrestrial C, and may warrant a revision of how the modern net C sink on land is described. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  13. The impact of Indonesian peatland degradation on downstream marine ecosystems and the global carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Jesse F; Hohn, Sönke; Rixen, Tim; Baum, Antje; Merico, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    Tropical peatlands are among the most space-efficient stores of carbon on Earth containing approximately 89 Gt C. Of this, 57 Gt (65%) are stored in Indonesian peatlands. Large-scale exploitation of land, including deforestation and drainage for the establishment of oil palm plantations, is changing the carbon balance of Indonesian peatlands, turning them from a natural sink to a source via outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere and leakage of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) into the coastal ocean. The impacts of this perturbation to the coastal environment and at the global scale are largely unknown. Here, we evaluate the downstream effects of released Indonesian peat carbon on coastal ecosystems and on the global carbon cycle. We use a biogeochemical box model in combination with novel and literature observations to investigate the impact of different carbon emission scenarios on the combined ocean-atmosphere system. The release of all carbon stored in the Indonesian peat pool, considered as a worst-case scenario, will increase atmospheric pCO2 by 8 ppm to 15 ppm within the next 200 years. The expected impact on the Java Sea ecosystems is most significant on the short term (over a few hundred years) and is characterized by an increase of 3.3% in phytoplankton, 32% in seagrass biomass, and 5% decrease in coral biomass. On the long term, however, the coastal ecosystems will recover to reach near pre-excursion conditions. Our results suggest that the ultimate fate of the peat carbon is in the deep ocean with 69% of it landing in the deep DIC pool after 1000 years, but the effects on the global ocean carbonate chemistry will be marginal. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Simulation and Assessment of Whole Life-Cycle Carbon Emission Flows from Different Residential Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikun Wen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To explore the differences in carbon emissions over the whole life-cycle of different building structures, the published calculated carbon emissions from residential buildings in China and abroad were normalized. Embodied carbon emission flows, operations stage carbon emission flows, demolition and reclamation stage carbon emission flows and total life-cycle carbon emission flows from concrete, steel, and wood structures were obtained. This study is based on the theory of the social cost of carbon, with an adequately demonstrated social cost of carbon and social discount rate. Taking into consideration both static and dynamic situations and using a social discount rate of 3.5%, the total life-cycle carbon emission flows, absolute carbon emission and building carbon costs were calculated and assessed. The results indicated that concrete structures had the highest embodied carbon emission flows and negative carbon emission flows in the waste and reclamation stage. Wood structures that started the life-cycle with stored carbon had the lowest carbon emission flows in the operations stage and relatively high negative carbon emission flows in the reclamation stage. Wood structures present the smallest carbon footprints for residential buildings.

  15. The terrestrial carbon cycle on the regional and global scale : modeling, uncertainties and policy relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnen, van J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Contains the chapters: The importance of three centuries of climate and land-use change for the global and regional terrestrial carbon cycle; and The terrestrial C cycle and its role in the climate change policy

  16. The terrestrial carbon cycle on the regional and global scale : modeling, uncertainties and policy relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnen, van J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Contains the chapters: The importance of three centuries of climate and land-use change for the global and regional terrestrial carbon cycle; and The terrestrial C cycle and its role in the climate change policy

  17. Carbon Isotope Tracking of the Fluvial Carbon Cycles in two Southeast Asian Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K.; Ishak, M.; Veizer, J.; Clark, I. D.

    2012-12-01

    Two rivers in Peninsular Malaysia, Langat and Kelantan, were sampled for dissolved organic and inorganic carbon (DOC/DIC) concentrations and stable carbon isotope data over the course of 20 months. Water samples were taken twice a month from three points along each river and from local groundwater reservoirs from May 2011 to December 2012. These were later analyzed for DIC/DOC concentration and d13C values. The data suggests that DOC and DIC in both basins are sourced primarily from biologically-respired carbon from a C3-vegetation dominated environment, with carbonate rock providing an additional input. Riverine PCO2 in Langat River, estimated from the DIC data, revealed over-pressurization of riverine CO2 relative to atmospheric levels during most periods of sampling, in some cases approaching 30 times that of the averaged global value of ~380 ppm. The Langat River degases CO2 during much of the year, and further calculations showed that the average annual efflux in the upstream sub-catchment of this river (~20 x 10^3 t C/yr) is comparable to the fluvial export of dissolved carbon (~12 x 10^3 t C/yr) and particulate organic carbon (~7 x 10^3 t C/yr), estimated from total suspended solid (TSS) and river flow data from the literature. However, the combined gas efflux and fluvial export of dissolved carbon only amount to roughly 6 % of total ecosystem uptake of CO2 within the sub-catchment (~600-700 x 10^3 t C/yr). The remainder of this carbon is mostly respired back into the atmosphere, although a minor portion may be stored within the watershed. These findings confirm the more complex role of rivers in the global carbon cycle, beyond that of a simple link between terrestrial and oceanic reservoirs.

  18. Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in Urban Landscapes: Global, Regional Dynamics and Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirejeva-Hopkins, A.; Nardoto, G. B.; Schellnhuber, H.

    2008-12-01

    The urban population has been growing rapidly in the last decades and is predicted to continue its exponential trend, especially in the developing countries, which would create additional pressure on the environment by overpopulated unsustainable cities and will continue to substantially change the main Biogeochemical cycles. Such disturbances in the main driving cycle of the Biosphere (global carbon cycle) and the nitrogen cycle, induced by sprawling urban human activities, lead to global, regional and local environmental problems, i.e. global warming, photochemical smog, stratospheric ozone depletion, soil acidification, nitrate pollution of surface and ground water, coastal ecosystem disturbances. Since urban areas are expected to continue their rapid expansion in the 21st century, accompanied by growing energy production, increased food demand, expanding transportation and industrialization it becomes more and more important to be able to describe and forecast the dynamics of biogeochemical functioning of these landscapes (which have altered characteristics compared to the natural ecosystems). Moreover, from the environmental policy perspective, a high density of people makes cities focal points of vulnerability to global environmental change. The model based on the forecasting the dynamics of urban area growth, allows us to forecast the dynamics of Carbon and Nitrogen on the urban territories at different scales. However, nitrogen cycle is very complex and is closely interlinked with the other major biogeochemical cycles, such as oxygen and water. The system of water supply and liquid waste carried by water out of the system 'city' is investigated. In order to better understand the mechanisms of cycling, we consider the case studies, when we investigated the detailed fluxes of Carbon and Nitrogen in Sao Paolo (Brazil) and Paris (France). When we know the yearly amounts of carbon and nitrogen, produced by a city, we should be capable of coming up with what

  19. Herbivores modify the carbon cycle in a warming arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoon, S. M.; Sullivan, P.; Welker, J. M.; Post, E.

    2009-12-01

    Typically, our studies of arctic terrestrial ecosystem responses to changes in climate focus on abiotic drivers (i.e. warming or added rain or added snow) and subsequent biogeochemical cycles and plant physiological performance. However, many arctic systems, such as those in western Greenland, are home ranges for large herbivores such as muskoxen and caribou. In order to fully understand how tundra landscapes in Greenland will respond to change, experiments are needed that allow us to quantify whether abiotic (climate warming) and or biotic (presence or absence of herbivores) drivers or their combinations regulate ecosystem function and structure. Here we present the results of two consecutive field seasons in western Greenland in which we quantified the interactive effects of local herbivore foraging and simulated climate warming on ecosystem C and N cycling and leaf level physiology. Large exclosure fences were erected in 2002, and ITEX passive warming chambers were established in 2003 within and adjacent to the fences. We performed weekly CO2 flux measurements during the 2008 and 2009 growing seasons which we normalized to a common irradiance by generating light-response curves at all plots (n=9). Although we observed interannual variability in soil moisture and average daily air temperature, browsing by herbivores was a key factor in the seasonal carbon dynamics. By physically removing leaves and upper stems, caribou and muskoxen altered the community composition, reduced leaf area and in turn decreased gross ecosystem photosynthesis (GEP), regardless of the warming treatment. Neither herbivory nor warming significantly affected ecosystem respiration rates. Thus the reduction in net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was primarily driven by reductions in GEP associated with leaf area removal by grazers. Our results indicate that the biotic influence from large herbivores can significantly influence carbon-derived climatic feedbacks and can no longer be overlooked in

  20. The Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report: The Persistence and Vulnerability of Carbon in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, V. L.; Lajtha, K.

    2016-12-01

    Soils are a critical reservoir for the global C cycle, containing approximately 3 times the atmospheric C load, and more than twice the amount of C cycling in the surface oceans. Yet soil is not a stagnant reservoir, as evidenced by traditional classifications of different soils as C "sinks" or "sources." Soil C is highly dynamic and the soil C cycle shifts in response to land use, and to climate and weather perturbations. These shifts from nominally "stable" pools to "active" are likely a function of new litter inputs, microbial decomposition, and physical and chemical protection mechanisms; net losses include gas fluxes and run-off, both of which will significantly affect other global C compartments. These traits, and others, are being used to frame and advance soil C cycle models and also global C models to more accurately predict feedbacks from the soil to the physical Earth system via greenhouse gas emissions. The Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report comprehensively addresses the role of soils in the global C cycle for the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

  1. Mechanisms of below-ground carbon cycling in subarctic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsrud, Maria

    2004-10-01

    Some components of the below-ground carbon cycle in terrestrial ecosystems are still poorly understood. A better understanding will be necessary to predict adequately the impacts of global change factors on C cycling and storage, especially in high-latitude ecosystems, where much of the C is stored below-ground. In this work some of the mechanisms of the below-ground C cycle in subarctic ecosystems were studied and responses to present and potential future environmental conditions assessed. Using {sup 14}C pulse-labelling, C allocation to above-ground biomass, rhizomes, coarse roots, fine roots, hair roots, ericoid mycorrhizas, microbes and dissolved organic C (DOC) was determined repeatedly over the growing season in four of the most common vegetation types of the Scandinavian subarctic: (1) Dry dwarf shrub tundra; (2) Semi-wet mire; (3) Wet mire; and (4) the understorey of subarctic birch forest. Effects of increased temperatures, increased atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations and both factors in combination on below-ground C allocation, ericoid mycorrhizal colonisation and functioning were studied in an full-factorial open-top chamber experiment. Furthermore, responses of ericoid mycorrhizal colonisation rates to environmental variation during the growing season were investigated. Ecosystem C partitioning varied temporally in all studied ecosystems, possibly indicating changes in growth, nutrient uptake or C storage by vegetation. The relative importance of C pools with 'fast' versus 'slow' turnover rates varied spatially, among vegetation types. Therefore it is important for global change studies to consider the possible effects of vegetation changes on ecosystem C dynamics. Allocation of recent assimilates to fast-turnover C pools such as hair roots and DOC was particularly high in a dwarf shrub tundra making them quantitatively interesting pools to consider in studies of ecosystem C dynamics. Furthermore, a significant proportion of

  2. Science and Observation Recommendations for Future NASA Carbon Cycle Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Charles R.; Collatz, G. J.; Kawa, S. R.; Gregg, W. W.; Gervin, J. C.; Abshire, J. B.; Andrews, A. E.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Demaio, L. D.; Knox, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Between October 2000 and June 2001, an Agency-wide planning, effort was organized by elements of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to define future research and technology development activities. This planning effort was conducted at the request of the Associate Administrator of the Office of Earth Science (Code Y), Dr. Ghassem Asrar, at NASA Headquarters (HQ). The primary points of contact were Dr. Mary Cleave, Deputy Associate Administrator for Advanced Planning at NASA HQ (Headquarters) and Dr. Charles McClain of the Office of Global Carbon Studies (Code 970.2) at GSFC. During this period, GSFC hosted three workshops to define the science requirements and objectives, the observational and modeling requirements to meet the science objectives, the technology development requirements, and a cost plan for both the science program and new flight projects that will be needed for new observations beyond the present or currently planned. The plan definition process was very intensive as HQ required the final presentation package by mid-June 2001. This deadline was met and the recommendations were ultimately refined and folded into a broader program plan, which also included climate modeling, aerosol observations, and science computing technology development, for contributing to the President's Climate Change Research Initiative. This technical memorandum outlines the process and recommendations made for cross-cutting carbon cycle research as presented in June. A separate NASA document outlines the budget profiles or cost analyses conducted as part of the planning effort.

  3. Hydrologic control of carbon cycling and aged carbon discharge in the Congo River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schefuß, Enno; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Spencer-Jones, Charlotte L.; Rullkötter, Jürgen; de Pol-Holz, Ricardo; Talbot, Helen M.; Grootes, Pieter M.; Schneider, Ralph R.

    2016-09-01

    The age of organic material discharged by rivers provides information about its sources and carbon cycling processes within watersheds. Although elevated ages in fluvially transported organic matter are usually explained by erosion of soils and sedimentary deposits, it is commonly assumed that mainly young organic material is discharged from flat tropical watersheds due to their extensive plant cover and rapid carbon turnover. Here we present compound-specific radiocarbon data of terrigenous organic fractions from a sedimentary archive offshore the Congo River, in conjunction with molecular markers for methane-producing land cover reflecting wetland extent. We find that the Congo River has been discharging aged organic matter for several thousand years, with apparently increasing ages from the mid- to the Late Holocene. This suggests that aged organic matter in modern samples is concealed by radiocarbon from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. By comparison to indicators for past rainfall changes we detect a systematic control of organic matter sequestration and release by continental hydrology, mediating temporary carbon storage in wetlands. As aridification also leads to exposure and rapid remineralization of large amounts of previously stored labile organic matter, we infer that this process may cause a profound direct climate feedback that is at present underestimated in carbon cycle assessments.

  4. Gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.R.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the project is to develop engineering evaluations of technologies for the capture, use, and disposal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This project emphasizes CO{sub 2}-capture technologies combined with integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. Complementary evaluations address CO{sub 2} transportation, CO{sub 2} use, and options for the long-term sequestering of unused CO{sub 2}. Commercially available CO{sub 2}-capture technology is providing a performance and economic baseline against which to compare innovative technologies. The intent is to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an {open_quotes}equivalent CO{sub 2}{close_quotes} budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps, in addition to process design capital and operating costs. The value used for the {open_quotes}equivalent CO{sub 2}{close_quotes} budget is 1 kg of CO{sub 2} per kilowatt-hour (electric). The base case is a 458-MW IGCC system that uses an air-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal feed, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production of 454 MW, with a CO{sub 2} release rate of 0.835 kg/kWhe. Two additional life-cycle energy balances for emerging technologies were considered: (1) high-temperature CO{sub 2} separation with calcium- or magnesium-based sorbents, and (2) ambient-temperature facilitated-transport polymer membranes for acid-gas removal.

  5. Carbon cycling in the deep eastern North Pacific benthic food web: Investigating the effect of organic carbon input

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunlop, K.M.; Van Oevelen, D.; Ruhl, H.A.; Huffard, C.L.; Kuhnz, L.A.; Smith, K.L.

    2016-01-01

    The deep ocean benthic environment plays a role in long-term carbon sequestration. Understanding carbon cycling in the deep ocean floor is critical to evaluate the impact of changing climate on the oceanic systems. Linear inverse modeling was used to quantify carbon transfer between compartments in

  6. Carbon cycling in the deep eastern North Pacific benthic food web: Investigating the effect of organic carbon input

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunlop, K.M.; Van Oevelen, D.; Ruhl, H.A.; Huffard, C.L.; Kuhnz, L.A.; Smith, K.L.

    2016-01-01

    The deep ocean benthic environment plays a role in long-term carbon sequestration. Understanding carbon cycling in the deep ocean floor is critical to evaluate the impact of changing climate on the oceanic systems. Linear inverse modeling was used to quantify carbon transfer between compartments in

  7. Carbon Quantum Dots and Their Derivative 3D Porous Carbon Frameworks for Sodium-Ion Batteries with Ultralong Cycle Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hongshuai; Banks, Craig E; Jing, Mingjun; Zhang, Yan; Ji, Xiaobo

    2015-12-16

    A new methodology for the synthesis of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) for large production is proposed. The as-obtained CQDs can be transformed into 3D porous carbon frameworks exhibiting superb sodium storage properties with ultralong cycle life and ultrahigh rate capability, comparable to state-of-the-art carbon anode materials for sodium-ion batteries.

  8. Application of stable carbon isotopes in long term mesocosm studies for carbon cycle investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an effective greenhouse gas. The Oceans absorb ca. 30% of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions and thereby partly attenuate deleterious climate effects. A consequence of the oceanic CO2 uptake is a decreased seawater pH and planktonic community shifts. The quantification of the anthropogenic perturbation was investigated through stable carbon isotope analysis in three "long term" mesocosm experiments (Sweden 2013, Gran Canaria 2014, Norway 2015) which reproduced near natural ecosystem conditions under both controlled and modified future CO2 level (up to 2000 ppm) scenarios. Parallel measurements of the stable isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) dissolved organic carbon (δ13CDOC) and particulate carbon (δ13CTPC) both from the mesocosms water column and sediment traps showed similar trends in all the three experiments. A CO2 response was noticeable in the isotopic dataset, but increased CO2 levels had only a subtle effect on the concentrations of the dissolved and particulate organic carbon pool. Distinctive δ13C signatures of the particulate carbon pool both in the water column and the sediments were detectable for the different CO2 treatments and they were strongly correlated with the δ13CDIC signatures but not with the δ13CDOC pool. The validity of the isotopic data was verified by cross-analyses of multiple substances of known isotopic signatures on a GasBench, Elemental Analyser (EA) and on an in-house TOC-IRMS setup for the analysis of δ13CDIC, δ13CTPC and δ13CDOC, respectively. Results from these mesocosm experiments proved the stable carbon isotope approach to be an effective tool for quantifying the uptake and carbon transfer among the various compartments of the marine carbon system.

  9. Mass transfer and carbon isotope evolution in natural water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Plummer, L.N.; Pearson, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical treatment of the evolution of the carbon isotopes C13 and C14 in natural waters and in precipitates which derive from such waters. The effects of an arbitrary number of sources (such as dissolution of carbonate minerals and oxidation of organic material) and sinks (such as mineral precipitation, CO2 degassing and production of methane), and of equilibrium fractionation between solid, gas and aqueous phases are considered. The results are expressed as equations relating changes in isotopic composition to changes in conventional carbonate chemistry. One implication of the equations is that the isotopic composition of an aqueous phase may approach a limiting value whenever there are simultaneous inputs and outputs of carbonate. In order to unambiguously interpret isotopic data from carbonate precipitates and identify reactants and products in reacting natural waters, it is essential that isotopic changes are determined chiefly by reactant and product stoichiometry, independent of reaction path. We demonstrate that this is so by means of quantitative examples. The evolution equations are applied to: 1. (1) carbon-14 dating of groundwaters; 2. (2) interpretation of the isotopic composition of carbonate precipitates, carbonate cements and diagenetically altered carbonates; and 3. (3) the identification of chemical reaction stoichiometry. These applications are illustrated by examples which show the variation of ??C13 in solutions and in precipitates formed under a variety of conditions involving incongruent dissolution, CO2 degassing, methane production and mineral precipitation. ?? 1978.

  10. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes using natural carbon precursor: Castor oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raziah, A. Z.; Junizah, A. R.; Saifuddin, N.

    2012-09-01

    Castor oil has long been an article of commerce due to its versatility as it is widely used as a starting material for many industrial chemical products because of its unique structure. In this study, carbon nanotubes has been synthesized by thermal decomposition of castor oil in nitrogen atmosphere at 300-400δC using custom-made microwave processing unit. The precursor material was catalyzed by iron clusters originating from the addition of ferrocene. The morphology and characterization of the CNTs were studied and discussed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  11. Sensitivity analysis of parameters affecting carbon footprint of fossil fuel power plants based on life cycle assessment scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dalir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study a pseudo comprehensive carbon footprint model for fossil fuel power plants is presented. Parameters which their effects are considered in this study include: plant type, fuel type, fuel transmission type, internal consumption of the plant, degradation, site ambient condition, transmission and distribution losses. Investigating internal consumption, degradation and site ambient condition effect on carbon footprint assessment of fossil fuel power plant is the specific feature of the proposed model. To evaluate the model, a sensitivity analysis is performed under different scenarios covering all possible choices for investigated parameters. The results show that carbon footprint of fossil fuel electrical energy that is produced, transmitted and distributed, varies from 321 g CO2 eq/kWh to 980 g CO2 equivalent /kWh. Carbon footprint of combined cycle with natural gas as main fuel is the minimum carbon footprint. Other factors can also cause indicative variation. Fuel type causes a variation of 28%. Ambient condition may change the result up to 13%. Transmission makes the carbon footprint larger by 4%. Internal consumption and degradation influence the result by 2 and 2.5%, respectively. Therefore, to minimize the carbon footprint of fossil fuel electricity, it is recommended to construct natural gas ignited combined cycles in low lands where the temperature is low and relative humidity is high. And the internal consumption is as least as possible and the maintenance and overhaul is as regular as possible.

  12. Reconstructing Sulfur Cycling at Cretaceous Methane Seeps: Novel Perspectives from Carbonate-Associated Sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, L. G.; Lyons, T. W.; Gill, B. C.; Formolo, M.; Shapiro, R. S.; Tripati, A.; Loyd, S. J.; Bates, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    The mechanisms of methane cycling have been studied extensively, but its full role in the chemical and organismal evolution of the ocean through time, including its closely coupled relationship to the sulfur cycle, is still largely unresolved. Modern and ancient seeps are ideal natural labs for studying coupled methane-sulfur cycles and their geochemical fingerprints as a function of the flux of methane through these systems and its availability in the ocean and marine sediments more generally. Many seep studies examine sulfur in pyrite, but pyrite formation in these settings is typically limited by the availability of reactive iron, thus only capturing the earliest diagenetic processes. In such cases, a better way to track sulfur and its role in modulating methane production and consumption is by following the pathways of dissolved sulfate, using carbonate-associated sulfate or CAS. While commonly used to track evolving seawater composition, CAS can also constrain conditions of diagenetic carbonate precipitation. This study focuses on a Cretaceous system of methane seeps, the Tepee Buttes in Colorado--which is marked by complex carbonate paragenesis--and traces sulfur, carbon, and oxygen isotopes to unravel ancient methane cycling, its relationship to sulfur metabolic pathways, and the preservational history of proxies such as CAS during burial. Burial history of this system is further unraveled through use of carbon and oxygen isotopes of various carbonate fabrics, including clumped isotope analysis. Additional geochemical measurements from the surrounding shales, such as data for redox sensitive metals, provide a context for the host setting in the Western Interior Seaway. Preliminary data suggest that paired isotopic and concentration measurements of CAS could be used to closely track spatiotemporal variation in rates of microbial sulfate reduction as coupled to anaerobic methane oxidation. These rates in both ancient and modern settings vary spatially and

  13. Photoperiodic Regulation of the Seasonal Pattern of Photosynthetic Capacity and the Implications for Carbon Cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauerle, William L. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Way, Danielle A. [Duke University; Qian, Song S. [Duke University; Stoy, Paul C. [Montana State University; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Bowden, Joseph D. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Reynolds, Robert F. [Clemson University

    2012-01-01

    Although temperature is an important driver of seasonal changes in photosynthetic physiology, photoperiod also regulates leaf activity. Climate change will extend growing seasons if temperature cues predominate, but photoperiod-controlled species will show limited responsiveness to warming. We show that photoperiod explains more seasonal variation in photosynthetic activity across 23 tree species than temperature. Although leaves remain green, photosynthetic capacity peaks just after summer solstice and declines with decreasing photoperiod, before air temperatures peak. In support of these findings, saplings grown at constant temperature but exposed to an extended photoperiod maintained high photosynthetic capacity, but photosynthetic activity declined in saplings experiencing a naturally shortening photoperiod; leaves remained equally green in both treatments. Incorporating a photoperiodic correction of photosynthetic physiology into a global-scale terrestrial carbon-cycle model significantly improves predictions of seasonal atmospheric CO{sub 2} cycling, demonstrating the benefit of such a function in coupled climate system models. Accounting for photoperiod-induced seasonality in photosynthetic parameters reduces modeled global gross primary production 2.5% ({approx}4 PgC y{sup -1}), resulting in a >3% ({approx}2 PgC y{sup -1}) decrease of net primary production. Such a correction is also needed in models estimating current carbon uptake based on remotely sensed greenness. Photoperiod-associated declines in photosynthetic capacity could limit autumn carbon gain in forests, even if warming delays leaf senescence.

  14. Photoperiodic regulation of the seasonal pattern of photosynthetic capacity and the implications for carbon cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerle, William L; Oren, Ram; Way, Danielle A; Qian, Song S; Stoy, Paul C; Thornton, Peter E; Bowden, Joseph D; Hoffman, Forrest M; Reynolds, Robert F

    2012-05-29

    Although temperature is an important driver of seasonal changes in photosynthetic physiology, photoperiod also regulates leaf activity. Climate change will extend growing seasons if temperature cues predominate, but photoperiod-controlled species will show limited responsiveness to warming. We show that photoperiod explains more seasonal variation in photosynthetic activity across 23 tree species than temperature. Although leaves remain green, photosynthetic capacity peaks just after summer solstice and declines with decreasing photoperiod, before air temperatures peak. In support of these findings, saplings grown at constant temperature but exposed to an extended photoperiod maintained high photosynthetic capacity, but photosynthetic activity declined in saplings experiencing a naturally shortening photoperiod; leaves remained equally green in both treatments. Incorporating a photoperiodic correction of photosynthetic physiology into a global-scale terrestrial carbon-cycle model significantly improves predictions of seasonal atmospheric CO(2) cycling, demonstrating the benefit of such a function in coupled climate system models. Accounting for photoperiod-induced seasonality in photosynthetic parameters reduces modeled global gross primary production 2.5% (∼4 PgC y(-1)), resulting in a >3% (∼2 PgC y(-1)) decrease of net primary production. Such a correction is also needed in models estimating current carbon uptake based on remotely sensed greenness. Photoperiod-associated declines in photosynthetic capacity could limit autumn carbon gain in forests, even if warming delays leaf senescence.

  15. The decrease of carbonation efficiency of CaO along calcination-carbonation cycles: Experiments and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouquet, E.; Leyssens, G.; Schonnenbeck, C.; Gilot, P. [Laboratoire de Gestion des Risques et Environnement, Mulhouse (France)

    2009-05-15

    Successive calcination-carbonation cycles, using CaO as sorbent, have been performed either in a classical fixed bed reactor or using a thermogravimetric analyser. Significant differences in carbonation efficiencies were obtained, possibly due to different conditions prevailing for CaO sintering during the calcination stage. The effect of the presence of CO{sub 2} on sintering was confirmed. A simple model of the decay of the carbonation capacity along cycles based on the specific surface area of non-sintered micrograins of CaO is able to predict the decrease of the extent of conversion obtained after 40 carbonations along calcination-carbonation cycles. The asymptotic extent of conversion is obtained when all the micrograins present within a grain are sintered. A detailed model of the carbonation shows that the voids present between the micrograins are filled up by carbonate when a critical thickness of the carbonate layer around each micrograin reaches 43 nm. Then, carbonation becomes controlled by diffusion at the scale of the whole grain, with the CO{sub 2} diffusion coefficient decreasing (at 650 {sup o}C) from 2 x 10{sup -12} to 6.5 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}/s as carbonation proceeds from 50% conversion to 76% (first cycle). This scale change for diffusion is responsible for the drastic decrease of the carbonation rate after the voids between micrograins are filled up.

  16. Ultralong Cycle Life Achieved by a Natural Plant: Miscanthus × giganteus for Lithium Oxygen Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu; Bi, Xuanxuan; Tao, Ran; Wang, Qingzhen; Yao, Ying; Wu, Feng; Zhang, Cunzhong

    2017-02-08

    Large energy-storage systems and electric vehicles require energy devices with high power and high energy density. Lithium oxygen (Li-O2) batteries could achieve high energy density, but they are still facing problems such as low practical capacity and poor cyclability. Here, we prepare activated carbons (MGACs) based on the natural plant Miscanthus × giganteus (MG) through slow pyrolysis. It possesses a large surface area, plenty of active sites, and high porosity, which are beneficial to the utilization of oxygen electrode in Li-O2 batteries. The MGACs-based oxygen electrode delivers a high specific capacity of 9400 mAh/g at 0.02 mA/cm(2), and long cycle life of 601 cycles (with a cutoff capacity of 500 mAh/g) and 295 cycles (with a cutoff capacity of 1000 mAh/g) at 0.2 mA/cm(2), respectively. Additionally, the material exhibits high rate capability and high reversibility, which is a promising candidate for the application in Li-O2 batteries.

  17. Carbothermal Reduction of Quartz with Carbon from Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Tangstad, Merete

    2017-04-01

    Carbothermal reaction between quartz and two different carbons originating from natural gas were investigated in this paper. One of two carbons is the commercial carbon black produced from natural gas in a medium thermal production process. The other carbon is obtained from natural gas cracking at 1273 K (1000 °C) deposited directly on the quartz pellet. At the 1923 K (1650 °C) and CO atmosphere, the impact of carbon content, pellet structure, gas transfer, and heating rate are investigated in a thermo-gravimetric furnace. The reaction process can be divided into two steps: an initial SiC-producing step followed by a SiO-producing step. Higher carbon content and increased gas transfer improves the reaction rate of SiC-producing step, while the thicker carbon coating in carbon-deposited pellet hinders reaction rate. Better gas transfer of sample holder improves reaction rate but causes more SiO loss. Heating rate has almost no influence on reaction. Mass balance analysis shows that mole ratios between SiO2, free carbon, and SiC in the SiC-producing step and SiO-producing step in CO and Ar fit the reaction SiO2(s) + 3 C(s) = SiC(s) + 2 CO(g). SiC-particle and SiC-coating formation process in mixed pellet and carbon-deposited pellet are proposed. SiC whiskers formed in the voids of these two types of pellets.

  18. Carbothermal Reduction of Quartz with Carbon from Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Tangstad, Merete

    2017-01-01

    Carbothermal reaction between quartz and two different carbons originating from natural gas were investigated in this paper. One of two carbons is the commercial carbon black produced from natural gas in a medium thermal production process. The other carbon is obtained from natural gas cracking at 1273 K (1000 °C) deposited directly on the quartz pellet. At the 1923 K (1650 °C) and CO atmosphere, the impact of carbon content, pellet structure, gas transfer, and heating rate are investigated in a thermo-gravimetric furnace. The reaction process can be divided into two steps: an initial SiC-producing step followed by a SiO-producing step. Higher carbon content and increased gas transfer improves the reaction rate of SiC-producing step, while the thicker carbon coating in carbon-deposited pellet hinders reaction rate. Better gas transfer of sample holder improves reaction rate but causes more SiO loss. Heating rate has almost no influence on reaction. Mass balance analysis shows that mole ratios between SiO2, free carbon, and SiC in the SiC-producing step and SiO-producing step in CO and Ar fit the reaction SiO2(s) + 3 C(s) = SiC(s) + 2 CO(g). SiC-particle and SiC-coating formation process in mixed pellet and carbon-deposited pellet are proposed. SiC whiskers formed in the voids of these two types of pellets.

  19. Extent of partial ice cover due to carbon cycle feedback in a zonal energy balance model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Huntingford

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A global carbon cycle is introduced into a zonally averaged energy balance climate model. The physical model components are similar to those of Budyko (1969 and Sellers (1969. The new carbon components account for atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and the terrestrial and oceanic storage of carbon. Prescribing values for the sum of these carbon components, it is found that inclusion of a closed carbon cycle reduces the range of insolation over which stable partial ice cover solutions may occur. This highly simplified climate model also predicts that the estimated release of carbon from fossil fuel burning over the next hundred years could result in the eventual melting of the ice sheets. Keywords: climate, carbon cycle,zonal model, earth system modelling

  20. Biophysical Controls on Carbon Cycling in Restored and Unrestored Urban Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, L. G.; Harvey, J. W.; Singh, J. D.; Sinclair, G. A.; Langston, T.; Maglio, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    Stream restoration is a multibillion dollar industry, yet how restoration impacts the ecological functioning of streams remains poorly understood. Because stream restoration may alter numerous biophysical controls, including light availability (through tree removal during bank regrading), hydraulics, sediment characteristics, and/or nutrient concentrations, it can be challenging to achieve a general understanding of how different aspects of stream restoration design influence ecosystem function (e.g., carbon cycling). In this study we combined strategies of continuously monitoring hydrology, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen at a station with spatially distributed but temporally sparse synoptic sampling to understand how restoration and land-use impact carbon fixation and respiration in urban streams. The study was performed over three years in three adjacent 3rd-4th order stream reaches in the urban Chesapeake Bay watershed, one of which was restored in 2002 using the ubiquitous Natural Channel Design method. By parsing the dissolved oxygen time series into contributions from respiration and gross primary production, we found the unrestored urban reach to be the most heterotrophic. It removed two times more carbon from the stream to the atmosphere than an unrestored suburban stream that was nutrient impacted and five times more carbon than the restored urban stream. The synoptic sampling revealed that nutrients, light, and hydrodynamic disturbance were the primary controls on carbon fixation and respiration, with fine sediment also exhibiting importance, likely as a vehicle for nutrient transport. Low rates of net carbon removal in the restored stream arose from high light availability resulting in high primary production, combined with low fine sediment availability restricting respiration. Thus, while restoration may have been effective for stream stabilization, it has decreased the functionality of the stream for net carbon removal to the atmosphere. Surprisingly

  1. 土壤碳循环研究进展及干旱区土壤碳循环研究展望%Progress of research on soil carbon cycle and perspectives of soil carbon cycle in arid region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许文强; 陈曦; 罗格平; 蔺卿

    2011-01-01

    Soil is a major C pool, and it has a close link with atmospheric and biotic pools. Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the largest carbon pool in the terrestrial biosphere and accounts for two-thirds of the total carbon pool in the terrestrial ecosystem. The pool of SOC in the farmland forms about 8% -10% of terrestrial carbon pool. Study on soil carbon pool dynamic and its driving mechanism is one of hot topics of terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycle and global change. With the attention to the "Kyoto Protocol", the study on soil carbon pool and its source or sink effect in the agroecosystem has been strengthened more and more by many countries. Large-scale reclamation in arid land over northwest China during the past 50 years has converted the natural desert landscape into the man -made oasis, particularly in the lower part of watersheds. Some natural desert vegetation was replaced by artificial vegetation or totally eliminated for settlement areas. Meantime, original soil has been gradually modified through irrigation and fertilization. Drastic human activities may have caused the change in soil organic carbon (SOC) in artificial oasis. The soil C pool comprises both organic and inorganic components. The previous study is emphasized in soil organic carbon cycle, whereas soil inorganic cycle is usually neglected. However, soil inorganic carbon pool in arid region is huge and has significant contribution to carbon cycle. In arid and semiarid zones, soil inorganic carbon pool is about 2-5 times more than soil organic carbon pool. For these regions, size and turnover of soil inorganic carbon pool play important role in soil carbon balance. The soil inorganic carbon comprises both lithogenic carbonate and pedogenic carbonate components. Lithogenic carbonate is inherited carbonate from the parent material of the soil, such as limestone and alluvium. Pedogenic carbonate can form through a dissolution and precipitation process of the carbonate parent material. Pedogenic

  2. Nitrogen attenuation of terrestrial carbon cycle response to global environmental factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atul Jain; Xiaojuan Yang; Haroon Kheshgi; A. David McGuire; Wilfred Post; David. Kicklighter

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen cycle dynamics have the capacity to attenuate the magnitude of global terrestrial carbon sinks and sources driven by CO2 fertilization and changes in climate. In this study, two versions of the terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycle components of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) are used to evaluate how variation in nitrogen...

  3. Climate-induced interannual variability of marine primary and export production in three global coupled climate carbon cycle models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Schneider

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Fully coupled climate carbon cycle models are sophisticated tools that are used to predict future climate change and its impact on the land and ocean carbon cycles. These models should be able to adequately represent natural variability, requiring model validation by observations. The present study focuses on the ocean carbon cycle component, in particular the spatial and temporal variability in net primary productivity (PP and export production (EP of particulate organic carbon (POC. Results from three coupled climate carbon cycle models (IPSL, MPIM, NCAR are compared with observation-based estimates derived from satellite measurements of ocean colour and results from inverse modelling (data assimilation. Satellite observations of ocean colour have shown that temporal variability of PP on the global scale is largely dominated by the permanently stratified, low-latitude ocean (Behrenfeld et al., 2006 with stronger stratification (higher sea surface temperature; SST being associated with negative PP anomalies. Results from all three coupled models confirm the role of the low-latitude, permanently stratified ocean for anomalies in globally integrated PP, but only one model (IPSL also reproduces the inverse relationship between stratification (SST and PP. An adequate representation of iron and macronutrient co-limitation of phytoplankton growth in the tropical ocean has shown to be the crucial mechanism determining the capability of the models to reproduce observed interactions between climate and PP.

  4. Future ocean hypercapnia driven by anthropogenic amplification of the natural CO2 cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Ben I; Sasse, Tristan P

    2016-01-21

    High carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in sea-water (ocean hypercapnia) can induce neurological, physiological and behavioural deficiencies in marine animals. Prediction of the onset and evolution of hypercapnia in the ocean requires a good understanding of annual variations in oceanic CO2 concentration, but there is a lack of relevant global observational data. Here we identify global ocean patterns of monthly variability in carbon concentration using observations that allow us to examine the evolution of surface-ocean CO2 levels over the entire annual cycle under increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We predict that the present-day amplitude of the natural oscillations in oceanic CO2 concentration will be amplified by up to tenfold in some regions by 2100, if atmospheric CO2 concentrations continue to rise throughout this century (according to the RCP8.5 scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). The findings from our data are broadly consistent with projections from Earth system climate models. Our predicted amplification of the annual CO2 cycle displays distinct global patterns that may expose major fisheries in the Southern, Pacific and North Atlantic oceans to hypercapnia many decades earlier than is expected from average atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We suggest that these ocean 'CO2 hotspots' evolve as a combination of the strong seasonal dynamics of CO2 concentration and the long-term effective storage of anthropogenic CO2 in the oceans that lowers the buffer capacity in these regions, causing a nonlinear amplification of CO2 concentration over the annual cycle. The onset of ocean hypercapnia (when the partial pressure of CO2 in sea-water exceeds 1,000 micro-atmospheres) is forecast for atmospheric CO2 concentrations that exceed 650 parts per million, with hypercapnia expected in up to half the surface ocean by 2100, assuming a high-emissions scenario (RCP8.5). Such extensive ocean hypercapnia has detrimental implications for

  5. Future ocean hypercapnia driven by anthropogenic amplification of the natural CO2 cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Ben I.; Sasse, Tristan P.

    2016-01-01

    High carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in sea-water (ocean hypercapnia) can induce neurological, physiological and behavioural deficiencies in marine animals. Prediction of the onset and evolution of hypercapnia in the ocean requires a good understanding of annual variations in oceanic CO2 concentration, but there is a lack of relevant global observational data. Here we identify global ocean patterns of monthly variability in carbon concentration using observations that allow us to examine the evolution of surface-ocean CO2 levels over the entire annual cycle under increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We predict that the present-day amplitude of the natural oscillations in oceanic CO2 concentration will be amplified by up to tenfold in some regions by 2100, if atmospheric CO2 concentrations continue to rise throughout this century (according to the RCP8.5 scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). The findings from our data are broadly consistent with projections from Earth system climate models. Our predicted amplification of the annual CO2 cycle displays distinct global patterns that may expose major fisheries in the Southern, Pacific and North Atlantic oceans to hypercapnia many decades earlier than is expected from average atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We suggest that these ocean ‘CO2 hotspots’ evolve as a combination of the strong seasonal dynamics of CO2 concentration and the long-term effective storage of anthropogenic CO2 in the oceans that lowers the buffer capacity in these regions, causing a nonlinear amplification of CO2 concentration over the annual cycle. The onset of ocean hypercapnia (when the partial pressure of CO2 in sea-water exceeds 1,000 micro-atmospheres) is forecast for atmospheric CO2 concentrations that exceed 650 parts per million, with hypercapnia expected in up to half the surface ocean by 2100, assuming a high-emissions scenario (RCP8.5). Such extensive ocean hypercapnia has detrimental implications for

  6. Calcium and calcium isotope changes during carbon cycle perturbations at the end-Permian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Nemanja; Zeebe, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Negative carbon and calcium isotope excursions, as well as climate shifts, took place during the most severe mass extinction event in Earth's history, the end-Permian (˜252 Ma). Investigating the connection between carbon and calcium cycles during transient carbon cycle perturbation events, such as the end-Permian, may help resolve the intricacies between the coupled calcium-carbon cycles, as well as provide a tool for constraining the causes of mass extinction. Here, we identify the deficiencies of a simplified calcium model employed in several previous studies and we demonstrate the importance of a fully coupled carbon-cycle model when investigating the dynamics of carbon and calcium cycling. Simulations with a modified version of the LOSCAR model, which includes a fully coupled carbon-calcium cycle, indicate that increased weathering rates and ocean acidification (potentially caused by Siberian Trap volcanism) are not capable of producing trends observed in the record, as previously claimed. Our model results suggest that combined effects of carbon input via Siberian Trap volcanism (12,000 Pg C), the cessation of biological carbon export, and variable calcium isotope fractionation (due to a change in the seawater carbonate ion concentration) represents a more plausible scenario. This scenario successfully reconciles δ13C and δ44Ca trends observed in the sediment record, as well as the proposed warming of >6oC.

  7. Carbon and Nitrogen cycling in a permafrost soil profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, V. G.; Schaedel, C.; Mack, M. C.; Schuur, E.

    2015-12-01

    In high latitude ecosystems, active layer soils thaw during the growing season and are situated on top of perennially frozen soils (permafrost). Permafrost affected soil profiles currently store a globally important pool of carbon (1330-1580 PgC) due to cold temperatures constraining the decomposition of soil organic matter. With global warming, however, seasonal thaw is expected to increase in speed and extend to deeper portions of the soil profile. As permafrost soils become part of the active layer, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) previously stored in soil organic matter will be released via decomposition. In this experiment, the dynamic relationship between N mineralization, C mineralization, and C quality was investigated in moist acidic tundra soils. Soils from the active layer surface down through the permafrost (80cm) were incubated aerobically at 15°C for 225 days. Carbon dioxide fluxes were fit with a two pool exponential decay model so that the size and turnover of both the quickly decomposing C pool (Cfast) and the slowly decomposing C pool (Cslow) could be assessed. Soil extractions with 2M KCl were performed at six time points throughout the incubation so that dissolve inorganic N (DIN) and dissolved organic C (DOC) could be measured. DIN was readily extractable from deep permafrost soils throughout the incubation (0.05 mgN/g dry soil) but in active layer soils DIN was only produced after Cfast had been depleted. In contrast, active layer soils had high levels of DOC (0.65 mgC/g dry soil) throughout the incubation but in permafrost soils, DOC became depleted as Cfast reduced in size. The strong contrasts between the C and N cycling in active layer soils versus permafrost soils suggest that the deeper thaw will dramatically increase N availability in these soil profiles. Plants and soil microbes in the tundra are currently N limited so our findings imply that deepening thaw will 1) provide N necessary for increased plant growth and 2) stimulate losses of

  8. The Global Carbon Cycle: It's a Small World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ineson, Philip; Milcu, Alexander; Subke, Jens-Arne; Wildman, Dennis; Anderson, Robert; Manning, Peter; Heinemeyer, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Predicting future atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), together with the impacts of these changes on global climate, are some of the most urgent and important challenges facing mankind. Modelling is the only way in which such predictions can be made, leading to the current generation of increasingly complex computer simulations, with associated concerns about embedded assumptions and conflicting model outputs. Alongside analysis of past climates, the GCMs currently represent our only hope of establishing the importance of potential runaway positive feedbacks linking climate change and atmospheric greenhouse gases yet the incorporation of necessary biospheric responses into GCMs markedly increases the uncertainty of predictions. Analysis of the importance of the major components of the global carbon (C) cycle reveals that an understanding of the conditions under which the terrestrial biosphere could switch from an overall carbon (C) sink to a source is critical to our ability to make future climate predictions. Here we present an alternative approach to assessing the short term biotic (plant and soil) sensitivities to elevated temperature and atmospheric CO2 through the use of a purely physical analogue. Centred on the concept of materially-closed systems containing scaled-down ratios of the global C stocks for the atmosphere, vegetation and soil we show that, in these model systems, the terrestrial biosphere is able to buffer a rise of 3oC even when coupled to very strong CO2-temperature positive feedbacks. The system respiratory response appears to be extremely well linked to temperature and is critical in deciding atmospheric concentrations of CO2. Simulated anthropogenic emissions of CO2 into the model systems showed an initial corresponding increase in atmospheric CO2 but, somewhat surprisingly, CO2 concentrations levelled off at ca. 480 p.p.m.v., despite continuing additions of CO2. Experiments were performed in which reversion of atmospheric

  9. Effect of natural iron fertilization on carbon sequestration in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Stéphane; Quéguiner, Bernard; Armand, Leanne; Belviso, Sauveur; Bombled, Bruno; Bopp, Laurent; Bowie, Andrew; Brunet, Christian; Brussaard, Corina; Carlotti, François; Christaki, Urania; Corbière, Antoine; Durand, Isabelle; Ebersbach, Frederike; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Garcia, Nicole; Gerringa, Loes; Griffiths, Brian; Guigue, Catherine; Guillerm, Christophe; Jacquet, Stéphanie; Jeandel, Catherine; Laan, Patrick; Lefèvre, Dominique; Lo Monaco, Claire; Malits, Andrea; Mosseri, Julie; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Park, Young-Hyang; Picheral, Marc; Pondaven, Philippe; Remenyi, Thomas; Sandroni, Valérie; Sarthou, Géraldine; Savoye, Nicolas; Scouarnec, Lionel; Souhaut, Marc; Thuiller, Doris; Timmermans, Klaas; Trull, Thomas; Uitz, Julia; van Beek, Pieter; Veldhuis, Marcel; Vincent, Dorothée; Viollier, Eric; Vong, Lilita; Wagener, Thibaut

    2007-04-26

    The availability of iron limits primary productivity and the associated uptake of carbon over large areas of the ocean. Iron thus plays an important role in the carbon cycle, and changes in its supply to the surface ocean may have had a significant effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations over glacial-interglacial cycles. To date, the role of iron in carbon cycling has largely been assessed using short-term iron-addition experiments. It is difficult, however, to reliably assess the magnitude of carbon export to the ocean interior using such methods, and the short observational periods preclude extrapolation of the results to longer timescales. Here we report observations of a phytoplankton bloom induced by natural iron fertilization--an approach that offers the opportunity to overcome some of the limitations of short-term experiments. We found that a large phytoplankton bloom over the Kerguelen plateau in the Southern Ocean was sustained by the supply of iron and major nutrients to surface waters from iron-rich deep water below. The efficiency of fertilization, defined as the ratio of the carbon export to the amount of iron supplied, was at least ten times higher than previous estimates from short-term blooms induced by iron-addition experiments. This result sheds new light on the effect of long-term fertilization by iron and macronutrients on carbon sequestration, suggesting that changes in iron supply from below--as invoked in some palaeoclimatic and future climate change scenarios--may have a more significant effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations than previously thought.

  10. Soil carbon model alternatives for ECHAM5/JSBACH climate model: Evaluation and impacts on global carbon cycle estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thum, T.; RäIsäNen, P.; Sevanto, S.; Tuomi, M.; Reick, C.; Vesala, T.; Raddatz, T.; Aalto, T.; JäRvinen, H.; Altimir, N.; Pilegaard, K.; Nagy, Z.; Rambal, S.; Liski, J.

    2011-06-01

    The response of soil organic carbon to climate change might lead to significant feedbacks affecting global warming. This response can be studied by coupled climate-carbon cycle models but so far the description of soil organic carbon cycle in these models has been quite simple. In this work we used the coupled climate-carbon cycle model ECHAM5/JSBACH (European Center/Hamburg Model 5/Jena Scheme for Biosphere-Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg) with two different soil carbon modules, namely (1) the original soil carbon model of JSBACH called CBALANCE and (2) a new soil carbon model Yasso07, to study the interaction between climate variability and soil organic carbon. Equivalent ECHAM5/JSBACH simulations were conducted using both soil carbon models, with freely varying atmospheric CO2 for the last 30 years (1977-2006). In this study, anthropogenic CO2 emissions and ocean carbon cycle were excluded. The new model formulation produced soil carbon stock estimates that were much closer to measured values. It also captured better the seasonal cycle of the direct CO2 exchange measurements at the three grassland sites considered (RMS error reduced by 12%), while for the five forest sites also analyzed, the results were ambiguous and the RMS error was 12% larger for Yasso07 than for CBALANCE. As a response to climatic changes, Yasso07 showed greater release of soil carbon to the atmosphere than the original model formulation during the years 1977-2006. This emphasizes the need for better understanding the processes affecting soil carbon stocks and their turnover rates to predict the climatic feedbacks.

  11. Optimising the FAMOUS climate model: inclusion of global carbon cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. T. Williams

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available FAMOUS fills an important role in the hierarchy of climate models, both explicitly resolving atmospheric and oceanic dynamics yet being sufficiently computationally efficient that either very long simulations or large ensembles are possible. An improved set of carbon cycle parameters for this model has been found using a perturbed physics ensemble technique. This is an important step towards building the "Earth System" modelling capability of FAMOUS, which is a reduced resolution, and hence faster running, version of the Hadley Centre Climate model, HadCM3. Two separate 100 member perturbed parameter ensembles were performed; one for the land surface and one for the ocean. The land surface scheme was tested against present day and past representations of vegetation and the ocean ensemble was tested against observations of nitrate. An advantage of using a relatively fast climate model is that a large number of simulations can be run and hence the model parameter space (a large source of climate model uncertainty can be more thoroughly sampled. This has the associated benefit of being able to assess the sensitivity of model results to changes in each parameter. The climatologies of surface and tropospheric air temperature and precipitation are improved relative to previous versions of FAMOUS. The improved representation of upper atmosphere temperatures is driven by improved ozone concentrations near the tropopause and better upper level winds.

  12. The potential role of natural gas power plants with carbon capture and storage as a bridge to a low-carbon future

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CO2 intensity of electricity produced by state-of-the-art natural gas combined-cycle turbines (NGCC) is approximately one-third that of the U.S. fleet of existing coal plants. Compared to new nuclear plants and coal plants with integrated carbon capture, NGCC has a lower inve...

  13. The potential role of natural gas power plants with carbon capture and storage as a bridge to a low-carbon future

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CO2 intensity of electricity produced by state-of-the-art natural gas combined-cycle turbines (NGCC) is approximately one-third that of the U.S. fleet of existing coal plants. Compared to new nuclear plants and coal plants with integrated carbon capture, NGCC has a lower inve...

  14. New approach to global barium cycle understanding: barium isotopic composition of marine carbonates and seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretet, Chloé; Nägler, Thomas F.; Reynaud, Stéphanie; de Lange, Gert J.; Turpin, Mélanie; Immenhauser, Adrian; Böttcher, Michael E.; Samankassou, Elias

    2013-04-01

    In this communication we present the Ba isotope fractionation (delta137/134Ba) study on marine carbonates and seawater, initiated to gain a first order view of the marine Ba isotope cycle. A special focus is the question whether the nutrient type distribution of Ba in the water column, as well as different Ba sources, are reflected in Ba isotope ratios of carbonate archives. The approach ultimately aims to provide an improved Ba based paleonutrient proxy. The data set is composed of carbonates (micrites and limestone standard), coral skeleton and seawater (IAPSO standard and Mediterranean seawater). Part of the corals were cultured in monitored environments (CSM, Monaco) others originate from natural environments (shallow and warm water corals from the Bahamas/Florida and cold water corals from the Norwegian shelf). The analytical procedure includes the application of a 130Ba/135Ba double spike, a cation exchange column followed by isotope measurements on a Nu Instruments Multicollector ICP-MS. The Ba fractionation of the samples is compared to a Ba nitrate standard solution and a standard natural limestone BSC-CRM 393 (0.05 ± 0.04 ‰, 2SEM). No isotopic fractionation has been observed in the limestone standard and micrites (N=8) (-0.01 ± 0.04 ‰, 2SEM) compared to the Ba nitrate standard. On the contrary, coral skeletons show a significant positive fractionation (mean = 0.4 ± 0.05 ‰, 2 SEM). No significant difference was found between different cultured coral species. Thus no species-specific fractionation is identified within the same environmental conditions. Diagenetic influence on Ba isotopic composition was further tested on 5 natural samples with varying calcite to aragonite ratios (0 to 0.3). No significant effect was observed. Moreover, the Ba isotope composition seems independant from the Ba concentration in the studied coral skeleton, within our measurement resolution. Seawater isotopic composition (-0.05 ± 0.07 ‰, 2SD) is lighter than coral

  15. Carbon and nitrogen cycling in intertidal sediments near Doel, Scheldt Estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Klaver, G.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Vlug, T.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen cycling in intertidal mud flat sediments in the Scheldt Estuary was studied using measurements of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide emission rates and pore-water profiles of ΣCO2, ammonium and nitrate. A comparison between chamber measured carbon dioxide fluxes and those

  16. Carbon cycle in the paleoenvironment: an abrupt increase of biogenic carbon in the end-Cretaceous atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryunosuke Kikuchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A knowledge of what has happened in the past seems helpful in improving the predictability of the link between global-scale phenomena and the carbon cycle; this paper therefore attempts to reconstruct the end-Cretaceous carbon cycle (65 million years ago by means of modeling. The performed simulation suggests that a great amount (130 gigatons at least of biogenic carbon was rapidly injected to the atmosphere. Methane originating from gas hydrate (GH is the most likely candidate for the input of biogenic carbon at the end of the ereCretaceous period because it is considered that thick GH stability zones were damaged by perturbations associated with the Chicxulub asteroid impact, and the vast amount of methane was released to the atmosphere as a gas blast. Though GH deposits are greater than other major reservoirs of carbon, these deposits are not commonly categorized as typical carbon reservoirs in terms of the global carbon cycle. How to integrate GH-related methane with well-known carbon reservoirs remains for a future study in order to improve the predictability of the future carbon cycle.

  17. A thermodynamic review of cryogenic refrigeration cycles for liquefaction of natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    2015-12-01

    A thermodynamic review is presented on cryogenic refrigeration cycles for the liquefaction process of natural gas. The main purpose of this review is to examine the thermodynamic structure of various cycles and provide a theoretical basis for selecting a cycle in accordance with different needs and design criteria. Based on existing or proposed liquefaction processes, sixteen ideal cycles are selected and the optimal conditions to achieve their best thermodynamic performance are investigated. The selected cycles include standard and modified versions of Joule-Thomson (JT) cycle, Brayton cycle, and their combined cycle with pure refrigerants (PR) or mixed refrigerants (MR). Full details of the cycles are presented and discussed in terms of FOM (figure of merit) and thermodynamic irreversibility. In addition, a new method of nomenclature is proposed to clearly identify the structure of cycles by abbreviation.

  18. Connecting Taxon-Specific Microbial Activities to Carbon Cycling in the Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungate, B. A.; Morrissey, E.; Schwartz, E.; Dijkstra, P.; Blazewicz, S.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Koch, G. W.; Marks, J.; Koch, B.; McHugh, T. A.; Mau, R. L.; Hayer, M.

    2016-12-01

    Plant carbon inputs influence microbial growth in the rhizosphere, but the quantitative details of these effects are not well understood, nor are their consequences for carbon cycling in the rhizosphere. With a new pulse of carbon input to soil, which microbial taxa increase their growth rates, and by how much? Do any microbial taxa respond negatively? And how does the extra carbon addition alter the utilization of other resources, including other carbon sources, as well as inorganic nitrogen? This talk will present new research using quantitative stable isotope probing that reveals the distribution of growth responses among microbial taxa, from positive to neutral to negative, and how these growth responses are associated with various substrates. For example, decomposition of soil C in response to added labile carbon occurred as a phylogenetically-diverse majority of taxa shifted toward soil C use for growth. In contrast, bacteria with suppressed growth or that relied directly on glucose for growth clustered strongly by phylogeny. These results suggest that priming is a prototypical response of bacteria to sustained labile C addition, consistent with the widespread occurrence of the priming effect in nature. These results also illustrate the potential power of molecular tools and models that seek to estimate metrics directly relevant to quantitative ecology and biogeochemistry, moreso than is the standard currently in microbial ecology. Tools that estimate growth rate, mortality rate, and rates of substrate use - all quantified with the taxonomic precision afforded by modern sequencing - provide a foundation for quantifying the biogeochemical significance of microbial biodiversity, and a more complete understanding of the rich ecosystem of the rhizosphere.

  19. Linking the lithogenic, atmospheric, and biogenic cycles of silicate, carbonate, and organic carbon in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. V.; Gattuso, J.-P.

    2009-07-01

    Geochemical theory describes long term cycling of atmospheric CO2 between the atmosphere and rocks at the Earth surface in terms of rock weathering and precipitation of sedimentary minerals. Chemical weathering of silicate rocks takes up atmospheric CO2, releases cations and HCO3- to water, and precipitates SiO2, while CaCO3 precipitation consumes Ca2+ and HCO3- and releases one mole of CO2 to the atmosphere for each mole of CaCO3 precipitated. At steady state, according to this theory, the CO2 uptake and release should equal one another. In contradiction to this theory, carbonate precipitation in the present surface ocean releases only about 0.6 mol of CO2 per mole of carbonate precipitated. This is a result of the buffer effect described by Ψ, the molar ratio of net CO2 gas evasion to net CaCO3 precipitation from seawater in pCO2 equilibrium with the atmosphere. This asymmetry in CO2 flux between weathering and precipitation would quickly exhaust atmospheric CO2, posing a conundrum in the classical weathering and precipitation cycle. While often treated as a constant, Ψ actually varies as a function of salinity, pCO2, and temperature. Introduction of organic C reactions into the weathering-precipitation couplet largely reconciles the relationship. ψ in the North Pacific Ocean central gyre rises from 0.6 to 0.9, as a consequence of organic matter oxidation in the water column. ψ records the combined effect of CaCO3 and organic reactions and storage of dissolved inorganic carbon in the ocean, as well as CO2 gas exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. Further, in the absence of CaCO3 reactions, Ψ would rise to 1.0. Similarly, increasing atmospheric pCO2 over time, which leads to ocean acidification, alters the relationship between organic and inorganic C reactions and carbon storage in the ocean. Thus, the carbon reactions and ψ can cause large variations in oceanic carbon storage with little exchange with the atmosphere.

  20. Linking the lithogenic, atmospheric, and biogenic cycles of silicate, carbonate, and organic carbon in the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Smith

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical theory describes long term cycling of atmospheric CO2 between the atmosphere and rocks at the Earth surface in terms of rock weathering and precipitation of sedimentary minerals. Chemical weathering of silicate rocks takes up atmospheric CO2, releases cations and HCO3 to water, and precipitates SiO2, while CaCO3 precipitation consumes Ca2+ and HCO3 and releases one mole of CO2 to the atmosphere for each mole of CaCO3 precipitated. At steady state, according to this theory, the CO2 uptake and release should equal one another. In contradiction to this theory, carbonate precipitation in the present surface ocean releases only about 0.6 mol of CO2 per mole of carbonate precipitated. This is a result of the buffer effect described by Ψ, the molar ratio of net CO2 gas evasion to net CaCO3 precipitation from seawater in pCO2 equilibrium with the atmosphere. This asymmetry in CO2 flux between weathering and precipitation would quickly exhaust atmospheric CO2, posing a conundrum in the classical weathering and precipitation cycle.

    While often treated as a constant, Ψ actually varies as a function of salinity, pCO2, and temperature. Introduction of organic C reactions into the weathering-precipitation couplet largely reconciles the relationship. ψ in the North Pacific Ocean central gyre rises from 0.6 to 0.9, as a consequence of organic matter oxidation in the water column. ψ records the combined effect of CaCO3 and organic reactions and storage of dissolved inorganic carbon in the ocean, as well as CO2 gas exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. Further, in the absence of CaCO3 reactions, Ψ would rise to 1.0. Similarly, increasing atmospheric pCO2

  1. Global terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycling insensitive to estimates of biological N fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkamp, J.; Weber, B.; Werner, C.; Hickler, T.

    2015-12-01

    Dinitrogen (N2) is the most abundant molecule in the atmosphere and incorporated in other molecules an essential nutrient for life on earth. However, only few natural processes can initiate a reaction of N2. These natural processes are fire, lightning and biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) with BNF being the largest source. In the course of the last century humans have outperformed the natural processes of nitrogen fixation by the production of fertilizer. Industrial and other human emission of reactive nitrogen, as well as fire and lightning lead to a deposition of 63 Tg (N) per year. This is twice the amount of BNF estimated by the default setup of the dynamic global vegetation model LPJ-GUESS (30 Tg), which is a conservative approach. We use different methods and parameterizations for BNF in LPJ-GUESS: 1.) varying total annual amount; 2.) annual evenly distributed and daily calculated fixation rates; 3.) an improved dataset of BNF by cryptogamic covers (free-living N-fixers). With this setup BNF is ranging from 30 Tg to 60 Tg. We assess the impact of BNF on carbon storage and grand primary production (GPP) of the natural vegetation. These results are compared to and evaluated against available independent datasets. We do not see major differences in the productivity and carbon stocks with these BNF estimates, suggesting that natural vegetation is insensitive to BNF on a global scale and the vegetation can compensate for the different nitrogen availabilities. Current deposition of nitrogen compounds and internal cycling through mineralization and uptake is sufficient for natural vegetation productivity. However, due to the coarse model grid and spatial heterogeneity in the real world this conclusion does not exclude the existence of habitats constrained by BNF.

  2. Capturing carbon dioxide as a polymer from natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chih-Chau; Tour, Josiah J; Kittrell, Carter; Espinal, Laura; Alemany, Lawrence B; Tour, James M

    2014-06-03

    Natural gas is considered the cleanest and recently the most abundant fossil fuel source, yet when it is extracted from wells, it often contains 10-20 mol% carbon dioxide (20-40 wt%), which is generally vented to the atmosphere. Efforts are underway to contain this carbon dioxide at the well-head using inexpensive and non-corrosive methods. Here we report nucleophilic porous carbons are synthesized from simple and inexpensive carbon-sulphur and carbon-nitrogen precursors. Infrared, Raman and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance signatures substantiate carbon dioxide fixation by polymerization in the carbon channels to form poly(CO2) under much lower pressures than previously required. This growing chemisorbed sulphur- or nitrogen-atom-initiated poly(CO2) chain further displaces physisorbed hydrocarbon, providing a continuous carbon dioxide selectivity. Once returned to ambient conditions, the poly(CO2) spontaneously depolymerizes, leading to a sorbent that can be easily regenerated without the thermal energy input that is required for traditional sorbents.

  3. Capturing carbon dioxide as a polymer from natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chih-Chau; Tour, Josiah J.; Kittrell, Carter; Espinal, Laura; Alemany, Lawrence B.; Tour, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Natural gas is considered the cleanest and recently the most abundant fossil fuel source, yet when it is extracted from wells, it often contains 10-20 mol% carbon dioxide (20-40 wt%), which is generally vented to the atmosphere. Efforts are underway to contain this carbon dioxide at the well-head using inexpensive and non-corrosive methods. Here we report nucleophilic porous carbons are synthesized from simple and inexpensive carbon-sulphur and carbon-nitrogen precursors. Infrared, Raman and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance signatures substantiate carbon dioxide fixation by polymerization in the carbon channels to form poly(CO2) under much lower pressures than previously required. This growing chemisorbed sulphur- or nitrogen-atom-initiated poly(CO2) chain further displaces physisorbed hydrocarbon, providing a continuous carbon dioxide selectivity. Once returned to ambient conditions, the poly(CO2) spontaneously depolymerizes, leading to a sorbent that can be easily regenerated without the thermal energy input that is required for traditional sorbents.

  4. Reviews and syntheses: Systematic Earth observations for use in terrestrial carbon cycle data assimilation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholze, Marko; Buchwitz, Michael; Dorigo, Wouter; Guanter, Luis; Quegan, Shaun

    2017-07-01

    The global carbon cycle is an important component of the Earth system and it interacts with the hydrology, energy and nutrient cycles as well as ecosystem dynamics. A better understanding of the global carbon cycle is required for improved projections of climate change including corresponding changes in water and food resources and for the verification of measures to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. An improved understanding of the carbon cycle can be achieved by data assimilation systems, which integrate observations relevant to the carbon cycle into coupled carbon, water, energy and nutrient models. Hence, the ingredients for such systems are a carbon cycle model, an algorithm for the assimilation and systematic and well error-characterised observations relevant to the carbon cycle. Relevant observations for assimilation include various in situ measurements in the atmosphere (e.g. concentrations of CO2 and other gases) and on land (e.g. fluxes of carbon water and energy, carbon stocks) as well as remote sensing observations (e.g. atmospheric composition, vegetation and surface properties).We briefly review the different existing data assimilation techniques and contrast them to model benchmarking and evaluation efforts (which also rely on observations). A common requirement for all assimilation techniques is a full description of the observational data properties. Uncertainty estimates of the observations are as important as the observations themselves because they similarly determine the outcome of such assimilation systems. Hence, this article reviews the requirements of data assimilation systems on observations and provides a non-exhaustive overview of current observations and their uncertainties for use in terrestrial carbon cycle data assimilation. We report on progress since the review of model-data synthesis in terrestrial carbon observations by Raupach et al.(2005), emphasising the rapid advance in relevant space-based observations.

  5. Combination of IVF and IVM in naturally cycling women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang-Pedersen, Mikael; Westergaard, Lars Grabow; Erb, Karin;

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the combination of an unstimulated IVF cycle with in-vitro maturation (IVM) of additional immature cumulus-oocyte-complexes (COC) from the same cycle collected at the same time as the spontaneous preovulatory follicle. This could potentially improve rates of embryo transfer...... and pregnancy/live births compared with conventional unstimulated IVF treatment and at the same time eliminate the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. This prospective trial included 77 women with regular menstrual cycles. Age at inclusion was between 20 and 37 years. Results showed a retrieval rate...... between endometrial factors and IVM oocytes together with unknown competence of IVM embryos is suspected. For some time, there has been an increasing interest in mild approaches for fertility treatment, in particular IVF. In-vitro maturation (IVM) of immature eggs outside the ovaries followed by IVF...

  6. Carbon Isotopes in Ocean and Land Carbon Cycle Models: Atmospheric Forcing Data and Applications for CMIP6 and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven, H. D.; Allison, C. E.; Etheridge, D. M.; Hammer, S.; Keeling, R. F.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Levin, I.; Rubino, M.; Trudinger, C. M.; Vaughn, B. H.; White, J. W. C.

    2016-12-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of ocean and land carbon reservoirs is influenced by fossil fuel burning, carbon residence time, and fractionation associated with biological and physical processes. Additionally, 14C produced during nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 60s has enriched 14C/C ratios in decadally overturning reservoirs. Comparisons of simulated 14C and 13C dynamics between models and with observations can provide insights to key processes in the global carbon cycle including air-sea gas exchange, ocean mixing, terrestrial drought response, and vegetation and soil carbon turnover rates. However, the inclusion of carbon isotopes in large-scale model intercomparisons has so far been limited. One study, the Ocean Carbon Cycle Model Intercomparison Project 2 (OCMIP2), used simulations of ocean 14C to identify biases in model ocean circulation that affect simulated anthropogenic CO2 uptake and marine biogeochemistry. Within the context of CMIP6, we are working to advance the use of carbon isotopes for carbon cycle science, model evaluation and model intercomparison. The variables requested for DECK, OMIP and C4MIP simulations in CMIP6 include stocks and fluxes of 14C and 13C (for models that simulate 14C and 13C). We will present the historical and future atmospheric forcing datasets for Δ14C and δ13C in CO2 that we are making available to modeling groups as part of CMIP6. The historical data uses atmospheric measurements and ice core and tree ring records. For future atmospheric forcing, we use a simple carbon cycle model with CO2 emissions and atmospheric CO2 concentration for different scenarios from ScenarioMIP. We will also describe potential applications for carbon isotope simulations from CMIP6 or other modeling activities. In particular, we will present an evaluation of terrestrial carbon turnover with simulations of bomb-derived 14C inventories in simplified off-line models based on carbon stocks and fluxes in CMIP5 terrestrial models.

  7. Black carbon, a 'hidden' player in the global C cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santín, C.; Doerr, S. H.

    2012-04-01

    During the 2011 alone more than 600 scientific papers about black carbon (BC) were published, half of them dealing with soils (ISI Web of Knowledge, accessed 15/01/2012). If the search is extended to the other terms by which BC is commonly named (i.e. biochar, charcoal, pyrogenic C or soot), the number of 2011 publications increases to >2400, 20% of them also related to soils. These figures confirm BC as a well-known feature in the scientific literature and, thus, in our research community. In fact, there is a wide variety of research topics where BC is currently studied: from its potential as long-term C reservoir in soils (man-made biochar), to its effects on the Earth's radiation balance (soot-BC), including its value as indicator in paleoenvironmental studies (charcoal) or, even surprisingly, its use in suicide attempts. BC is thus relevant to many aspects of our environment, making it a very far-reaching, but also very complex topic. When focusing 'only' on the role of BC in the global C cycle, numerous questions arise. For example: (i) how much BC is produced by different sources (i.e. vegetation fires, fossil fuel and biofuel combustion); (ii) what are the main BC forms and their respective proportions generated (i.e. proportion of atmospheric BC [BC-soot] and the solid residues [char-BC]); (iii) where does this BC go (i.e. main mobilization pathways and sinks); (iv) how long does BC stay in the different systems (i.e. residence times in soils, sediments, water and atmosphere); (v) which are the BC stocks and its main transformations within and between the different systems (i.e. BC preservation, alteration and mineralization); (vi) what is the interaction of BC with other elements and how does this influence BC half-life (i.e. physical protection, interaction with pollutants, priming effects in other organic materials)? These questions, and some suggestions about how to tackle these, will be discussed in this contribution. It will focus in particular on the

  8. Comparison of clinical outcomes of frozen-thawed blastocysts transfer in natural and hormonally controlled cycles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Hui; Sun Zheng-yi; Deng Cheng-yan; Yu Qi; He Fang-fang

    2007-01-01

    Objectives:To assess the clinical outcomes of frozen-thawed blastocysts transfer in natural and hormonally controlled cycles.Methods: A retrospective analysis of natural and hormonally controlled cycle for 246 frozen-thawed blastocyst transfer cycles, the clinical pregnancy rate, implantation rate, early abortion rate were compared.Results: Of the 192 hormonally controlled cycles, the cancel rate, clinical pregnancy rate per ET, implantation rate and abortion rate were 7.3% (14/192), 53.9% (96/178), 38.8% (131/338)and 11.5% (11/96)respectively,whereas in 54 natural cycles, these rates were 16.7%(9/54), 68.9%(31/45), 52.9%(45/85) and 16.1%(5/31)respectively.There was no significant difference between the two groups with regard to the clinical pregnancy and abortion rate per ET, but the cancel rate and implantation rate were higher in natural cycles.However, the pregnancy and implantation rates of patients without PCOS in hormonal control cycles(57.2%, 40.9%) were similar with those in natural cycles(P>0.05).Conclusion: These findings suggested that both hormonally controlled and natural cycles had similar pregnancy outcomes in frozen-thawed blastocysts transfer.

  9. A meta-analysis of soil biodiversity impacts on the carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, M.-A.; Adkins, J.; Kardol, P.; Throop, H. L.

    2015-03-01

    Loss of biodiversity impacts ecosystem functions, such as carbon (C) cycling. Soils are the largest terrestrial C reservoir, containing more C globally than the biotic and atmospheric pools together. As such, soil C cycling, and the processes controlling it, has the potential to affect atmospheric CO2 concentrations and subsequent climate change. Despite the growing evidence of links between plant diversity and soil C cycling, there is a dearth of information on whether similar relationships exist between soil biodiversity and C cycling. This knowledge gap occurs even though there has been increased recognition that soil communities display high levels of both taxonomic and functional diversity and are key drivers of fluxes of C between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we used meta-analysis and regression analysis to quantitatively assess how soil biodiversity affects soil C cycling pools and processes (i.e., soil C respiration, litter decomposition, and plant biomass). We compared the response of process variables to changes in diversity both within and across groups of soil organisms that differed in body size, a grouping that typically correlates with ecological function. When studies that manipulated both within- and across-body size group diversity were included in the meta-analysis, loss of diversity significantly reduced soil C respiration (-27.5%) and plant tissue decomposition (-18%) but did not affect above- or belowground plant biomass. The loss of within-group diversity significantly reduced soil C respiration, while loss of across-group diversity did not. Decomposition was negatively affected both by loss of within-group and across-group diversity. Furthermore, loss of microbial diversity strongly reduced soil C respiration (-41%). In contrast, plant tissue decomposition was negatively affected by loss of soil faunal diversity but was unaffected by loss of microbial diversity. Taken together, our findings show that loss of soil

  10. Evaluating the Carbon Cycle of a Coupled Atmosphere-Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delire, C; Foley, J A; Thompson, S

    2002-08-21

    We investigate how well a coupled biosphere-atmosphere model, CCM3-IBIS, can simulate the functioning of the terrestrial biosphere and the carbon cycling through it. The simulated climate is compared to observations, while the vegetation cover and the carbon cycle are compared to an offline version of the biosphere model IBIS forced with observed climatic variables. The simulated climate presents some local biases that strongly affect the vegetation (e.g., a misrepresentation of the African monsoon). Compared to the offline model, the coupled model simulates well the globally averaged carbon fluxes and vegetation pools. The zonal mean carbon fluxes and the zonal mean seasonal cycle are also well represented except between 0{sup o} and 20{sup o}N due to the misrepresentation of the African monsoon. These results suggest that, despite regional biases in climate and ecosystem simulations, this coupled atmosphere-biosphere model can be used to explore geographic and temporal variations in the global carbon cycle.

  11. Effects of climate extremes on the terrestrial carbon cycle: concepts, processes and potential future impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, Dorothea; Reichstein, Markus; Bahn, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Extreme droughts, heat waves, frosts, precipitation, wind storms and other climate extremes may impact the structure, composition and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, and thus carbon cycling and its feedbacks to the climate system. Yet, the interconnected avenues through which climate...... extremes drive ecological and physiological processes and alter the carbon balance are poorly understood. Here, we review the literature on carbon cycle relevant responses of ecosystems to extreme climatic events. Given that impacts of climate extremes are considered disturbances, we assume the respective...... which climate extremes may act on the carbon cycle. We find that ecosystem responses can exceed the duration of the climate impacts via lagged effects on the carbon cycle. The expected regional impacts of future climate extremes will depend on changes in the probability and severity of their occurrence...

  12. Belowground carbon cycle of Napier and Guinea grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Y.; Crow, S. E.; Litton, C. M.; Deenik, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Soil carbon (C) sequestration may partially offset rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum) and Guinea grass (Panicum maximum), in particular, are perennial C4 grasses with high capacity to produce large amounts of both aboveground and belowground biomass. Thus, they have a potential to sequester soil C while simultaneously provide aboveground biomass for energy production. In this study, both grasses were ratooned (no-till) to leave belowground biomass intact and facilitate C accumulation through improvement of soil aggregation. The primary objective of the study was to determine if and how these grasses sequester soil C. For 8 selected grass varieties, we: (1) determined the quantity and quality of belowground C input, (2) quantified changes in soil organic C (SOC) during two harvesting cycles (May 2010 to July 2011), and (3) fractionated soil C pools to determine where changes in SOC occurred. Soil-surface CO2 efflux and root biomass were used as measures of the quantity of belowground C input. Root lignin/N ratios and decay constants from litterbag studies were used as measures of the belowground C input quality. We hypothesized that grass varieties with higher quantity and lower quality of belowground C input would sequester more soil C. Root biomass collected on May 2010 ranged from 13 to 302 g m-2 at 15 cm depth, where Local (Napier) and OG05 (Guinea) varieties were significantly greater than the K06 variety (Guinea). However, cumulative soil-surface CO2 efflux showed no significant differences between the three varieties. Root Lignin/N ranged from 16 to 55 and Guinea varieties were significantly higher on average than Napier varieties. Root decay constants were variable among varieties, with OG05 and K06 showing higher resistance to decay compared to Local. Soil C sequestration potentials and factors affecting the process are imperative to determine suitable variety for bioenergy production.

  13. Rapid electron transfer by the carbon matrix in natural pyrogenic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianran; Levin, Barnaby D. A.; Guzman, Juan J. L.; Enders, Akio; Muller, David A.; Angenent, Largus T.; Lehmann, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Surface functional groups constitute major electroactive components in pyrogenic carbon. However, the electrochemical properties of pyrogenic carbon matrices and the kinetic preference of functional groups or carbon matrices for electron transfer remain unknown. Here we show that environmentally relevant pyrogenic carbon with average H/C and O/C ratios of less than 0.35 and 0.09 can directly transfer electrons more than three times faster than the charging and discharging cycles of surface functional groups and have a 1.5 V potential range for biogeochemical reactions that invoke electron transfer processes. Surface functional groups contribute to the overall electron flux of pyrogenic carbon to a lesser extent with greater pyrolysis temperature due to lower charging and discharging capacities, although the charging and discharging kinetics remain unchanged. This study could spur the development of a new generation of biogeochemical electron flux models that focus on the bacteria–carbon–mineral conductive network. PMID:28361882

  14. Major role of marine vegetation on the oceanic carbon cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duarte, C.M.; Middelburg, J.J.; Caraco, N.

    2005-01-01

    The carbon burial in vegetated sediments, ignored in past assessments of carbon burial in the ocean, was evaluated using a bottom-up approach derived from upscaling a compilation of published individual estimates of carbon burial in vegetated habitats (seagrass meadows, salt marshes and mangrove for

  15. Election cycles in natural resource rents : Empirical evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, Jeroen; de Haan, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    We examine whether governments' natural resource rents are affected by upcoming elections and if so, whether the incumbent uses these additional rents for re-election purposes. Estimates of a dynamic panel model for about 60 countries for 1975-2011 suggest that elections increase natural resource re

  16. Election cycles in natural resource rents: Empirical evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, Jeroen; Haan, de Jakob

    2016-01-01

    We examine whether governments' natural resource rents are affected by upcoming elections and if so, whether the incumbent uses these additional rents for re-election purposes. Estimates of a dynamic panel model for about 60 countries for 1975-2011 suggest that elections increase natural resource

  17. Investigation of the plasma processability of natural carbon bearing formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchanov, V. P.

    2017-01-01

    In the south of the Russian Far East, a new perspective source of minerals was pioneered, which is the metal-bearing high carbon rocks of the Ruzhinskaya square. The rocks are rich in crystalline graphite, gold, platinum and carbon nanostructures (fullerene, nanotubes and diamond-like carbon). The technique of extraction of ultrapure (99.98%) crystalline graphite from these rocks has been developed using hydrometallugical methods. The obtained graphite was used as a raw material for plasma-chemical tests succeeded in the separation of nanodimensional carbon structures, part of which could be inherited from the natural graphite-bearing rocks. The results of investigation will be used in the development of resource-saving technology of minerals extraction.

  18. Remote sensing of wetland parameters related to carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, David S.; Johnson, Robert W.

    1985-01-01

    Measurement of the rates of important biogeochemical fluxes on regional or global scales is vital to understanding the geochemical and climatic consequences of natural biospheric processes and of human intervention in those processes. Remote data gathering and interpretation techniques were used to examine important cycling processes taking place in wetlands over large geographic expanses. Large area estimation of vegetative biomass and productivity depends upon accurate, consistent measurements of canopy spectral reflectance and upon wide applicability of algorithms relating reflectance to biometric parameters. Results of the use of airborne multispectral scanner data to map above-ground biomass in a Delaware salt marsh are shown. The mapping uses an effective algorithm linking biomass to measured spectral reflectance and a means to correct the scanner data for large variations in the angle of observation of the canopy. The consistency of radiometric biomass algorithms for marsh grass when they are applied over large latitudinal and tidal range gradients were also examined. Results of a 1 year study of methane emissions from tidal wetlands along a salinity gradient show marked effects of temperature, season, and pore-water chemistry in mediating flux to the atmosphere.

  19. Carbon cycle changes during the end-Marjuman (Cambrian) extinction in the Southern Appalachians

    OpenAIRE

    Gerhardt, Angela Mae

    2014-01-01

    The late Cambrian-early Ordovician transition contains several trilobite extinctions. The first of these extinctions (the end-Marjuman) is thought to coincide with the Steptoean Positive Carbon Isotope Excursion or SPICE, a large and rapid excursion in the marine carbon isotope record. This excursion, which is expressed in sedimentary successions globally, is thought to represent a large perturbation to the carbon cycle during this time. Additionally, a limited amount of carbon isotope data f...

  20. Formulating energy policies related to fossil fuel use: Critical uncertainties in the global carbon cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, W.M.; Dale, V.H.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; O' Neill, R.V.; Peng, T.-H.; Farrell, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    The global carbon cycle is the dynamic interaction among the earth's carbon sources and sinks. Four reservoirs can be identified, including the atmosphere, terrestrial biosphere, oceans, and sediments. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration is determined by characteristics of carbon fluxes among major reservoirs of the global carbon cycle. The objective of this paper is to document the knowns, and unknowns and uncertainties associated with key questions that if answered will increase the understanding of the portion of past, present, and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} attributable to fossil fuel burning. Documented atmospheric increases in CO{sub 2} levels are thought to result primarily from fossil fuel use and, perhaps, deforestation. However, the observed atmospheric CO{sub 2} increase is less than expected from current understanding of the global carbon cycle because of poorly understood interactions among the major carbon reservoirs. 87 refs.

  1. Formulating Energy Policies Related to Fossil Fuel Use: Critical Uncertainties in the Global Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, W. M.; Dale, V. H.; DeAngelis, D. L.; Mann, L. K.; Mulholland, P. J.; O`Neill, R. V.; Peng, T. -H.; Farrell, M. P.

    1990-02-01

    The global carbon cycle is the dynamic interaction among the earth's carbon sources and sinks. Four reservoirs can be identified, including the atmosphere, terrestrial biosphere, oceans, and sediments. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration is determined by characteristics of carbon fluxes among major reservoirs of the global carbon cycle. The objective of this paper is to document the knowns, and unknowns and uncertainties associated with key questions that if answered will increase the understanding of the portion of past, present, and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} attributable to fossil fuel burning. Documented atmospheric increases in CO{sub 2} levels are thought to result primarily from fossil fuel use and, perhaps, deforestation. However, the observed atmospheric CO{sub 2} increase is less than expected from current understanding of the global carbon cycle because of poorly understood interactions among the major carbon reservoirs.

  2. Current systematic carbon-cycle observations and the need for implementing a policy-relevant carbon observing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciais, P.; Dolman, A. J.; Bombelli, A.; Duren, R.; Peregon, A.; Rayner, P. J.; Miller, C.; Gobron, N.; Kinderman, G.; Marland, G.; Gruber, N.; Chevallier, F.; Andres, R. J.; Balsamo, G.; Bopp, L.; Bréon, F.-M.; Broquet, G.; Dargaville, R.; Battin, T. J.; Borges, A.; Bovensmann, H.; Buchwitz, M.; Butler, J.; Canadell, J. G.; Cook, R. B.; DeFries, R.; Engelen, R.; Gurney, K. R.; Heinze, C.; Heimann, M.; Held, A.; Henry, M.; Law, B.; Luyssaert, S.; Miller, J.; Moriyama, T.; Moulin, C.; Myneni, R. B.; Nussli, C.; Obersteiner, M.; Ojima, D.; Pan, Y.; Paris, J.-D.; Piao, S. L.; Poulter, B.; Plummer, S.; Quegan, S.; Raymond, P.; Reichstein, M.; Rivier, L.; Sabine, C.; Schimel, D.; Tarasova, O.; Valentini, R.; Wang, R.; van der Werf, G.; Wickland, D.; Williams, M.; Zehner, C.

    2014-07-01

    A globally integrated carbon observation and analysis system is needed to improve the fundamental understanding of the global carbon cycle, to improve our ability to project future changes, and to verify the effectiveness of policies aiming to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase carbon sequestration. Building an integrated carbon observation system requires transformational advances from the existing sparse, exploratory framework towards a dense, robust, and sustained system in all components: anthropogenic emissions, the atmosphere, the ocean, and the terrestrial biosphere. The paper is addressed to scientists, policymakers, and funding agencies who need to have a global picture of the current state of the (diverse) carbon observations. We identify the current state of carbon observations, and the needs and notional requirements for a global integrated carbon observation system that can be built in the next decade. A key conclusion is the substantial expansion of the ground-based observation networks required to reach the high spatial resolution for CO2 and CH4 fluxes, and for carbon stocks for addressing policy-relevant objectives, and attributing flux changes to underlying processes in each region. In order to establish flux and stock diagnostics over areas such as the southern oceans, tropical forests, and the Arctic, in situ observations will have to be complemented with remote-sensing measurements. Remote sensing offers the advantage of dense spatial coverage and frequent revisit. A key challenge is to bring remote-sensing measurements to a level of long-term consistency and accuracy so that they can be efficiently combined in models to reduce uncertainties, in synergy with ground-based data. Bringing tight observational constraints on fossil fuel and land use change emissions will be the biggest challenge for deployment of a policy-relevant integrated carbon observation system. This will require in situ and remotely sensed data at much higher

  3. Microbial Enzyme Activity and Carbon Cycling in Grassland Soil Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, S. D.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are necessary to degrade complex organic compounds present in soils. Using physical fractionation procedures, we tested whether old soil carbon is spatially isolated from degradative enzymes across a prairie restoration chronosequence in Illinois, USA. We found that carbon-degrading enzymes were abundant in all soil fractions, including macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the clay fraction, which contains carbon with a mean residence time of ~200 years. The activities of two cellulose-degrading enzymes and a chitin-degrading enzyme were 2-10 times greater in organic matter fractions than in bulk soil, consistent with the rapid turnover of these fractions. Polyphenol oxidase activity was 3 times greater in the clay fraction than in the bulk soil, despite very slow carbon turnover in this fraction. Changes in enzyme activity across the restoration chronosequence were small once adjusted for increases in soil carbon concentration, although polyphenol oxidase activity per unit carbon declined by 50% in native prairie versus cultivated soil. These results are consistent with a `two-pool' model of enzyme and carbon turnover in grassland soils. In light organic matter fractions, enzyme production and carbon turnover both occur rapidly. However, in mineral-dominated fractions, both enzymes and their carbon substrates are immobilized on mineral surfaces, leading to slow turnover. Soil carbon accumulation in the clay fraction and across the prairie restoration chronosequence probably reflects increasing physical isolation of enzymes and substrates on the molecular scale, rather than the micron to millimeter scale.

  4. Pyrogenic Carbon as a Nonlinear Driver in the Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiello, C. A.; Silberg, J. J.; Cheng, H. Y.; Gao, X.; Del Valle, I.

    2016-12-01

    Our first conceptual models of pyrogenic carbon's effects on the carbon cycle treated this material as a form of organic matter whose environmental residence time was long enough to render it inert, and PyC was modeled as an unreactive mass that moved through C cycle reservoirs essentially unmodified. This concept saw modifications with the recognition that some fractions of PyC were labile. For example, the reactive sugars and lignin monomers cleaved off the lignocellulose matrix by heating have lifetimes on the order of hours to weeks. However, the now-common multiple component model of PyC does not satisfactorily explain many nonlinearities that have been observed when it is added to soils. These nonlinearities include the positive and negative "priming" effects sometimes triggered, where the presence of PyC in some matrices can trigger shifts in the overall microbial community metabolism, as well as alteration of microbial community structure, shifts in the behavior of belowground and aboveground plant parasites, and shifted rates of greenhouse gas emissions that are not well-correlated to shifts in soil hydrologic processes. To understand the effects of PyC on the global C and N cycles, we will need a better understanding of the mechanisms behind PyC-driven C and N cycle nonlinearities. This talk will examine potential mechanisms driving the nonlinearities observed in soil systems following the introduction of PyC. Potential mechanisms discussed will include PyC effects on soil microbial communication and PyC effects on microbial electron transfer. Cell-cell communication through the secretion and detection of small molecules is used by soil microbes to manage many biogeochemically relevant processes including production of biofilms, production of extracellular enzymes, and management of methanogenesis and denitrification. PyC disrupts microbial cell-cell communication differentially, altering some species' ability to communicate more than others. Electron

  5. Perspectives on Applying Metabolomics to Understand Carbon Cycling and Process Rates in Deep-Sea Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidoudez, C.; Saghatelian, A.; Girguis, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    The metabolisms of deep-sea microorganisms are still poorly characterized. So far, transcriptomics has been the most comprehensive proxy for the whole metabolisms of these organisms, but this approach is limited because it only represents the physiological poise of the cells, and is not linearly correlated to the rates and activity of the metabolic pathways. Using thermodynamics calculations and isotopic analyses can provide constraints on activity, but there are often discrepancies between available energy and calculated active biomass. A further understanding of metabolism both at the species and community level is necessary and metabolomics provides a means of capturing a "snapshot" of cell's metabolite pools, or of following labelled substrates as they move through metabolic pathways. We present our method development and initial results from our studies of the model organism Photobacterium profundum, and the benefits and challenges in meaningfully applying these methods to natural communities. These methods open the way to better understanding deep-sea metabolism on a more comprehensive level, including reserves compounds, alternate and secondary metabolism and potentially new metabolic pathways, and moreover the response of metabolism to changes in experimental conditions and carbon source can be readily followed. These will allow a better understanding of the carbon cycling pathways and their rate in natural communities.

  6. Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Paulina; Griffin, W Michael; Matthews, H Scott

    2007-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/ LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG.

  7. Global warming and marine carbon cycle feedbacks on future atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joos; Plattner; Stocker; Marchal; Schmittner

    1999-04-16

    A low-order physical-biogeochemical climate model was used to project atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming for scenarios developed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The North Atlantic thermohaline circulation weakens in all global warming simulations and collapses at high levels of carbon dioxide. Projected changes in the marine carbon cycle have a modest impact on atmospheric carbon dioxide. Compared with the control, atmospheric carbon dioxide increased by 4 percent at year 2100 and 20 percent at year 2500. The reduction in ocean carbon uptake can be mainly explained by sea surface warming. The projected changes of the marine biological cycle compensate the reduction in downward mixing of anthropogenic carbon, except when the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation collapses.

  8. Adsorption kinetics, thermodynamics and desorption of natural dissolved organic matter by multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fengsheng; Lu, Chungsying

    2007-09-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were thermally treated and were employed as adsorbents to study their adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics of natural dissolved organic matter (NDOM) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption kinetics follows the first-order rate law while the adsorption thermodynamics indicates the exothermic and spontaneous nature. A comparative study on the adsorption/desorption properties of NDOM between CNTs and granular activated carbon (GAC) was also conducted and revealed that the CNTs possess more NDOM adsorption capacities and show less weight loss through 10 cycles of water treatment and reactivation than the GAC. This suggests that the CNTs are promising NDOM adsorbents for preventing the microbiological degradation of drinking water quality as well as the formation of disinfection by products in water treatment.

  9. Intra-cycle variation of the uterine cavity indentation assessed with three-dimensional ultrasound in natural and stimulated cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravelos, Sotirios H; Li, Tin-Chiu

    2016-05-01

    The recent ESHRE-ESGE classification for female genital anomalies attempts to promote objectivity in diagnosis of normal and septate uteri. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether the uterine cavity indentation - the characteristic feature of septate uteri - varies significantly throughout the cycle. Seventy consecutive women underwent three-dimensional ultrasound twice: 35 during the proliferative and luteal phase of a natural cycle, and 35 during the first and final day of a stimulated cycle. Endometrial thickness, interostial distance, cavity indentation and percentage of cavity indentation were all assessed in accordance with the ESHRE-ESGE consensus on diagnosis of female genital anomalies. Overall, throughout both cycles, there was a significant increase in endometrial thickness (from 4.6 mm to 10.2 mm; P cavity indentation (from 30.3% to 15.0%; P uterine cavity indentation has important implications for both clinical practice and research.

  10. Progress in the Research of Carbon Cycle and Management of Urban System%城市系统碳循环与碳管理研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵荣钦; 黄贤金; 徐慧; 高珊

    2009-01-01

    Land use change and fossil fuel combustion caused by urbanization are the major reasons for global climate change and greenhouse effect. Understanding the process, way, direction and mechanism of carbon cycle of regional urban system is helpful to better forecast the future concentration of atmospheric greenhouse gases and to put forward corresponding carbon management measures. Urban system is an integrated multi-factor and multi-level social-economic system, and its carbon cycle process has some characteristics that are quite different from natural e-cosystems, such as complexity, uncertainty and spatial heterogeneity. The carbon cycle of urban system is a very complex process that includes natural and human process, horizontal and vertical process, economic and social process etc., which are essentially different from that of natural ecosystems. Firstly, based on the carbon cycle research of urban system in China and overseas, this paper summarized and analyzed the characteristics, spatial extent and carbon cycle process of urban system. Secondly, the paper discussed the main research aspects in carbon cycle of urban system at present such as carbon emission from urban energy use, carbon cycle of urban vegetation and soil, the influence of urban expansion on carbon emission, city metabolism and carbon process, modeling carbon cycle of urban system etc. During the discussion of the above aspects, this paper mainly illustrated the key points and train of thought of each research field, and analyzed the effects of human factors and economic activities on the spatial heterogeneity of urban carbon cycle. Thirdly, it talked about the theoretical framework, scientific problems, main strategies and aims of carbon management according to URCM (Urban and Regional Carbon Management) research project. Finally, it put forward the future direction and suggestion in this field, such as strengthening the researches on economic and social mechanism of carbon cycle process of

  11. Global geochemical cycles of carbon, sulfur and oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Time resolved data on the carbon isotopic composition of carbonate minerals and the sulfur isotopic composition or sulfate minerals show a strong negative correlation during the Cretaceous. Carbonate minerals are isotopically heavy during this period while sulfate minerals are isotopically light. The implication is that carbon is being transferred from the oxidized, carbonate reservoir to the reservoir of isotopically light reduced organic carbon in sedimentary rocks while sulfur is being transferred from the reservoir of isotopically light sedimentary sulfide to the oxidized, sulfate reservoir. These apparently oppositely directed changes in the oxidation state of average sedimentary carbon and sulfur are surprising because of a well-established and easy to understand correlation between the concentrations of reduced organic carbon and sulfide minerals in sedimentary rocks. Rocks rich in reduced carbon are also rich in reduced sulfur. The isotopic and concentration data can be reconciled by a model which invokes a significant flux of hydrothermal sulfide to the deep sea, at least during the Cretaceous.

  12. A Comparison of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Configurations with an Emphasis on CSP Applications (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neises, T.; Turchi, C.

    2013-09-01

    Recent research suggests that an emerging power cycle technology using supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) operated in a closed-loop Brayton cycle offers the potential of equivalent or higher cycle efficiency versus supercritical or superheated steam cycles at temperatures relevant for CSP applications. Preliminary design-point modeling suggests that s-CO2 cycle configurations can be devised that have similar overall efficiency but different temperature and/or pressure characteristics. This paper employs a more detailed heat exchanger model than previous work to compare the recompression and partial cooling cycles, two cycles with high design-point efficiencies, and illustrates the potential advantages of the latter. Integration of the cycles into CSP systems is studied, with a focus on sensible heat thermal storage and direct s-CO2 receivers. Results show the partial cooling cycle may offer a larger temperature difference across the primary heat exchanger, thereby potentially reducing heat exchanger cost and improving CSP receiver efficiency.

  13. An Update on Natural Products with Carbonic Anhydrase Inhibitory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karioti, Anastasia; Carta, Fabrizio; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyze the fundamental reaction of CO2 hydration in all living organisms, being actively involved in the regulation of a plethora of patho/physiological processes. They represent a typical example of enzyme convergent evolution, as six genetically unrelated families of such enzymes were described so far. It is more than 70 years that synthetic compounds, mainly sulfonamides, have been used in clinical practice as diuretics and systemic acting antiglaucoma drugs. Recent studies using natural product libraries and isolated constituents from natural sources (such as fungi and plants) have disclosed novel chemotypes possessing carbonic anhydrase inhibition activities. These natural sources offer new opportunities in the search for new and more effective carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, and may serve as new leads for the design and development of future drugs. This review will discuss the most recent advances in the search of naturally occurring products and their synthetic derivatives that inhibit the CAs and their mechanisms of action at molecular level. Plant extracts are not considered in the present review.

  14. The Carbon Cycle as the Main Determinant of Glacial-Interglacial Periods

    CERN Document Server

    de la Cuesta, Diego Jiménez; Núñez, Darío; Rumbos, Beatriz; Vergara-Cervantes, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    An intriguing problem in climate science is the existence of Earth's glacial cycle. We show that it is possible to generate these periodic changes in climate by means of the Earth's carbon cycle as the main source factor. The carbon exchange between the Ocean, the Continent and the Atmosphere is modeled by means of a Lotka-Volterra three species system and the resulting atmospheric carbon cycle is used as the unique radiative forcing mechanism. It is shown that the carbon dioxide and temperature paths that are thus obtained have the same qualitative structure as the 100 kyr glacial-interglacial cycles depicted by the Vostok ice core data, reproducing the asymmetries of rapid heating--slow cooling, and short interglacial--long glacial ages.

  15. Synthetic fuel production via carbon neutral cycles with high temperature nuclear reactors as a power source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konarek, E.; Coulas, B.; Sarvinis, J. [Hatch Ltd., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    This paper analyzes a number of carbon neutral cycles, which could be used to produce synthetic hydrocarbon fuels. Synthetic hydrocarbons are produced via the synthesis of Carbon Monoxide and Hydrogen. The . cycles considered will either utilize Gasification processes, or carbon capture as a source of feed material. In addition the cycles will be coupled to a small modular Nuclear Reactor (SMR) as a power and heat source. The goal of this analysis is to reduce or eliminate the need to transport diesel and other fossil fuels to remote regions and to provide a carbon neutral, locally produced hydrocarbon fuel for remote communities. The technical advantages as well as the economic case are discussed for each of the cycles presented. (author)

  16. The large influence of climate model bias on terrestrial carbon cycle simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlström, Anders; Schurgers, Guy; Smith, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Global vegetation models and terrestrial carbon cycle models are widely used for projecting the carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems. Ensembles of such models show a large spread in carbon balance predictions, ranging from a large uptake to a release of carbon by the terrestrial biosphere, constituting a large uncertainty in the associated feedback to atmospheric CO2 concentrations under global climate change. Errors and biases that may contribute to such uncertainty include ecosystem model structure, parameters and forcing by climate output from general circulation models (GCMs) or the atmospheric components of Earth system models (ESMs), e.g. as prepared for use in IPCC climate change assessments. The relative importance of these contributing factors to the overall uncertainty in carbon cycle projections is not well characterised. Here we investigate the role of climate model-derived biases by forcing a single global ecosystem-carbon cycle model, with original climate outputs from 15 ESMs and GCMs from the CMIP5 ensemble. We show that variation among the resulting ensemble of present and future carbon cycle simulations propagates from biases in annual means of temperature, precipitation and incoming shortwave radiation. Future changes in carbon pools, and thus land carbon sink trends, are also affected by climate biases, although to a smaller extent than the absolute size of carbon pools. Our results suggest that climate biases could be responsible for a considerable fraction of the large uncertainties in ESM simulations of land carbon fluxes and pools, amounting to about 40% of the range reported for ESMs. We conclude that climate bias-induced uncertainties must be decreased to make accurate coupled atmosphere-carbon cycle projections.

  17. Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and the Global Carbon Cycle: The Key Uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, T. H.; Post, W. M.; DeAngelis, D. L.; Dale, V. H.; Farrell, M. P.

    1987-12-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of carbon between its sources and sinks determines the rate of increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The observed increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} content is less than the estimated release from fossil fuel consumption and deforestation. This discrepancy can be explained by interactions between the atmosphere and other global carbon reservoirs such as the oceans, and the terrestrial biosphere including soils. Undoubtedly, the oceans have been the most important sinks for CO{sub 2} produced by man. But, the physical, chemical, and biological processes of oceans are complex and, therefore, credible estimates of CO{sub 2} uptake can probably only come from mathematical models. Unfortunately, one- and two-dimensional ocean models do not allow for enough CO{sub 2} uptake to accurately account for known releases. Thus, they produce higher concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} than was historically the case. More complex three-dimensional models, while currently being developed, may make better use of existing tracer data than do one- and two-dimensional models and will also incorporate climate feedback effects to provide a more realistic view of ocean dynamics and CO{sub 2} fluxes. The instability of current models to estimate accurately oceanic uptake of CO{sub 2} creates one of the key uncertainties in predictions of atmospheric CO{sub 2} increases and climate responses over the next 100 to 200 years.

  18. Carbon cycling in the Arctic Archipelago: the export of Pacific carbon to the North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. H. Shadwick

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic Ocean is expected to be disproportionately sensitive to climatic changes, and is thought to be an area where such changes might be detected. The Arctic hydrological cycle is influenced by: runoff and precipitation, sea ice formation/melting, and the inflow of saline waters from Bering and Fram Straits and the Barents Sea Shelf. Pacific water is recognizable as intermediate salinity water, with high concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, flowing from the Arctic Ocean to the North Atlantic via the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. We present DIC data from an east-west section through the Archipelago, as part of the Canadian International Polar Year initiatives. The fractions of Pacific and Arctic Ocean waters leaving the Archipelago and entering Baffin Bay, and subsequently the North Atlantic, are computed. The eastward transport of carbon from the Pacific, via the Arctic, to the North Atlantic is estimated.

    Altered mixing ratios of Pacific and freshwater in the Arctic Ocean have been recorded in recent decades. Any climatically driven alterations in the composition of waters leaving the Arctic Archipelago may have implications for anthropogenic CO2 uptake, and hence ocean acidification, in the subpolar and temperate North Atlantic.

  19. Carbon Cycling in the Arctic Archipelago: The Export of Pacific Carbon to the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadwick, E. H.; Papakyriakou, T.; Prowe, A. E. F.; Leong, D.; Moore, S.; Thomas, H.

    2009-04-01

    The Arctic Ocean is expected to be disproportionately sensitive to climatic changes, and thought to be an area where such changes might be detected. The Arctic hydrological cycle is influenced by: runoff and precipitation, sea ice formation/melting, and the inflow of saline waters from Bering and Fram Straits and the Barents Sea Shelf. Pacific water is recognizable as low salinity water, with high concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), flowing from the Arctic Ocean to the North Atlantic via the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. We present DIC data from an east-west section through the Archipelago, as part of the Canadian International Polar Year initiatives. The fractions of Pacific and Arctic Ocean waters leaving the Archipelago and entering Baffin Bay, and subsequently the North Atlantic, are computed. The eastward transport of carbon from the Pacific, via the Arctic, to the North Atlantic is estimated. Altered mixing ratios of Pacific and freshwater in the Arctic Ocean have been recorded in recent decades. Any climatically driven alterations in the composition of waters leaving the Arctic Archipelago may have implications for anthropogenic CO2 uptake, and hence ocean acidification, in the subpolar and temperate North Atlantic.

  20. Atmospheric carbon dioxide and the global carbon cycle: The key uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, T.H.; Post, W.M.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Dale, V.H.; Farrell, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of carbon between its sources and sinks determines the rate of increase in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations. The observed increase in atmospheric CO/sub 2/ content is less than the estimated release from fossil fuel consumption and deforestation. This discrepancy can be explained by interactions between the atmosphere and other global carbon reservoirs such as the oceans, and the terrestrial biosphere including soils. Undoubtedly, the oceans have been the most important sinks for CO/sub 2/ produced by man. But, the physical, chemical, and biological processes of oceans are complex and, therefore, credible estimates of CO/sub 2/ uptake can probably only come from mathematical models. Unfortunately, one- and two-dimensional ocean models do not allow for enough CO/sub 2/ uptake to accurately account for known releases. Thus, they produce higher concentrations of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ than was historically the case. More complex three-dimensional models, while currently being developed, may make better use of existing tracer data than do one- and two-dimensional models and will also incorporate climate feedback effects to provide a more realistic view of ocean dynamics and CO/sub 2/ fluxes. The instability of current models to estimate accurately oceanic uptake of CO/sub 2/ creates one of the key uncertainties in predictions of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ increases and climate responses over the next 100 to 200 years. 60 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Life Cycle Analysis of Carbon Flow and Carbon Footprint of Harvested Wood Products of Larix principis-rupprechtii in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Lun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Larix principis-rupprechtii is a native tree species in North China with a large distribution; and its harvested timbers can be used for producing wood products. This study focused on estimating and comparing carbon flows and carbon footprints of different harvested wood products (HWPs from Larix principis-ruppechtii based on the life cycle analysis (from seedling cultivation to HWP final disposal. Based on our interviews and surveys, the system boundary in this study was divided into three processes: the forestry process, the manufacturing process, and the use and disposal process. By tracking carbon flows of HWPs along the entire life cycle, we found that, for one forest rotation period, a total of 26.81 tC/ha sequestered carbon was transferred into these HWPs, 66.2% of which were still stored in the HWP when the rotation period had ended; however, the HWP carbon storage decreased to 0.25 tC/ha (only 0.9% left in the 100th year after forest plantation. The manufacturing process contributed more than 90% of the total HWP carbon footprint, but it was still smaller than the HWP carbon storage. In terms of the carbon storage and the carbon footprint, construction products had the largest net positive carbon balance compared to furniture and panel products. In addition, HWP are known to have a positive impact on global carbon mitigation because they can store parts of the sequestered carbon for a certain period of time and they have a substitution effect on carbon mitigation. Furthermore, there still exist great opportunities for carbon mitigation from HWPs through the use of cleaner energy and increasing the utilization efficiency of wood fuel.

  2. Projections of forest contributions to global carbon cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael E. Goerndt; Stephen R. Shifley; Patrick D. Miles; Dave Wear; Francisco X. Aguilar

    2016-01-01

    Forests cover 42 percent of the Northern United States, and collectively they store 13 billion tons of carbon in live trees (29 percent), roots (6 percent), forest floor (9 percent), dead trees (6 percent), and soils (50 percent). About half the biomass of a live tree (dry weight basis) is sequestered carbon (Woodall et al. 2011) - not the largest but the most dynamic...

  3. Institutional Context of Carbon Cycle Science Research in the U.S. and North America - A SOCCR perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, G.; Cavallaro, N.; Ste-Marie, C.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon cycle science has been a research priority in the U.S. for decades. Interagency coordination interests and research needs in U.S. carbon cycle science led to the establishment of the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program, the North American Carbon Program (NACP), the Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Program (OCB) and other intergovernmental collaboration platforms such as CarboNA, involving the U.S., Mexico and Canada. This presentation highlights some of these activities, and the historical context, the institutional frameworks and the operational mechanisms that have helped to facilitate and advance large scale collaborative research in carbon cycle in the U.S. and North America.

  4. Aqueous Carbonation of Natural Brucite for CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Sang, L.; Chen, J.; Ji, J.; Teng, H.

    2009-12-01

    Experimental study is carried out at conditions of room temperature and moderate CO2 pressure to examine the carbonation reaction of natural brucite in aqueous environment. Two sets of initial conditions are examined, one is brucite in pure water, and the other is in 1% HCl. Time-dependent XRD analysis shows that carbon fixation process begins within 30 min of the experiments irrespective of the original makeup of the slurry. Ensuing measurements by XRD and FT-IR reveal that nesquehonite (> 78%) is by far the dominant C-bearing species in the carbonate mineral product assembly. Minor product components observed in water are basic magnesium carbonate hydromagnesite and dypingite; when HCl is added in the starting slurry, chloride-bearing artinite replaces hydromagnesite. However, thermodynamic calculation suggests that the assembly of such composition is most likely a kinetically favored product at the experimental conditions which are more strongly saturated with respect to hydromagnesite and magnesite than to nesquehonite. A pseudo first-order rate law is found to best describe the time-dependent measurements for both water and HCl experiments. Moreover, fitting the rate expression to the experimental data yields a higher rate constant for the experiments performed in HCl solutions. The faster kinetics relative to that in water implies that the carbonation reaction may be a multi-stepped process, involving first the dissolution of brucite and CO2 to generate Mg2+ and CO32-, followed by precipitation of magnesium carbonate phases from aqueous solutions. This leads to our proposition that direct heterogeneous reaction between hydrated CO2 and solid phase of Mg(OH)2 is probably not the pathway for the overall carbonation process. Assuming the upper limit of carbon content Cmax = 8.7% (based upon that of nesquehonite), measured total carbon in the product Ctot show a carbonation rate of 83.9% and 94.3% for brucite in HCl and DDW at the end of 2.5 hr experiments

  5. Mode change of millennial CO2 variability during the last glacial cycle associated with a bipolar marine carbon seesaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereiter, Bernhard; Lüthi, Dieter; Siegrist, Michael; Schüpbach, Simon; Stocker, Thomas F; Fischer, Hubertus

    2012-06-19

    Important elements of natural climate variations during the last ice age are abrupt temperature increases over Greenland and related warming and cooling periods over Antarctica. Records from Antarctic ice cores have shown that the global carbon cycle also plays a role in these changes. The available data shows that atmospheric CO(2) follows closely temperatures reconstructed from Antarctic ice cores during these variations. Here, we present new high-resolution CO(2) data from Antarctic ice cores, which cover the period between 115,000 and 38,000 y before present. Our measurements show that also smaller Antarctic warming events have an imprint in CO(2) concentrations. Moreover, they indicate that during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5, the peak of millennial CO(2) variations lags the onset of Dansgaard/Oeschger warmings by 250 ± 190 y. During MIS 3, this lag increases significantly to 870 ± 90 y. Considerations of the ocean circulation suggest that the millennial variability associated with the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) undergoes a mode change from MIS 5 to MIS 4 and 3. Ocean carbon inventory estimates imply that during MIS 3 additional carbon is derived from an extended mass of carbon-enriched Antarctic Bottom Water. The absence of such a carbon-enriched water mass in the North Atlantic during MIS 5 can explain the smaller amount of carbon released to the atmosphere after the Antarctic temperature maximum and, hence, the shorter lag. Our new data provides further constraints for transient coupled carbon cycle-climate simulations during the entire last glacial cycle.

  6. Carbon cycling in the mantled karst of the Ozark Plateaus, central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knierim, Katherine; Pollock, Erik D.; Covington, Matthew D.; Hays, Phillip D.; Brye, Kristofor R.

    2017-01-01

    The nature of carbon (C) cycling in the unsaturated zone where groundwater is in contact with abundant gas-filled voids is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to trace inorganic-C cycling in a karst landscape using stable-C isotopes, with emphasis on a shallow groundwater flow path through the soil, to an underlying cave, and to the spring outlet of a cave stream in the Ozark Plateaus of northwestern Arkansas. Carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration and isotopic composition (δ13C-CO2) in gas and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration and isotopic composition (δ13C-DIC) in water were measured in samples collected from two suction-cup soil samplers above the cave, three sites in the cave, and at the spring outlet of the cave stream. Soil-gas CO2 concentration (median 2,578 ppm) and δ13C-CO2 (median − 21.5‰) were seasonally variable, reflecting the effects of surface temperature changes on soil-CO2 production via respiration and organic-matter decomposition. Cave-air CO2 (median 1,026 ppm) was sourced from the soil zone and the surface atmosphere, with seasonally changing proportions of each source controlled by surface temperature-driven air density gradients. Soil-DIC concentration (median 1.7 mg L− 1) was lower and soil-δ13C-DIC (median − 19.5‰) was lighter compared to the cave (median 23.3 mg L− 1 and − 14.3‰, respectively) because carbonate-bedrock dissolution provided an inorganic source of C to the cave. Carbon species in the soil had a unique, light stable-C isotopic signature compared to the cave. Discrimination of soil-C sources to karst groundwater was achieved, which is critical for developing hydrologic budgets using environmental tracers such as C.

  7. Dynamics of carbon, water and energy cycles in a heterogeneous landscape and a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; Law, B. E.; Still, C. J.; Hilker, T.

    2016-12-01

    The combined effects of changes in land-use and land cover (LULC) and climate on carbon and water cycling need to be assessed at regional scales. LULC changes over time have many drivers such as expanding urban areas, exploration of new agricultural areas due to overused natural resources of current agricultural areas (e.g. degraded soil), economical reasons, or policy changes that encourage the use of alternative energy resources. Our study assesses the effects of conversion of semi-arid sagebrush and agricultural crops to bioenergy production on carbon, water and energy cycling, and resulting heating or cooling effects. Our project focusses on Oregon, where agricultural crops, significant forest area, and urban expansion are coupled with a strong spatial climate gradient that allows us to examine influences on carbon sequestration by the terrestrial biosphere. Our inverse modeling results showed that the prior fluxes modelled with CLM4.5 underestimated NEE in the highly productive western Douglas fir forests by more than 50%. Based on the results of our Bayesian inversion, we optimized ecosystem fluxes and changed CLM model parameters accordingly. By integrating remote sensing LULC data, eddy covariance data from flux sites, tall tower CO2 observations, biomass estimates from field samples, and CLM4.5, we predict current and future statewide carbon sequestration with unprecedented accuracy. Using inventories and tower flux data, we determined the effect of conversion of hay and grass seed cropland (323,200 ha) to hybrid poplar and found the state NEP increased from 4 TgCO2 per year to 13 TgCO2 per year for that area. The last coal power plant in the state (Boardman) is in the process of switching from coal combustion to biofuel burning to meet the state's goal for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Our results show that the 7816 tons of biomass per day to keep the 518 MW power plant running at base load would amount to 35,000 hectares of hybrid poplar per

  8. The Effects of Insect Outbreak Disturbances on the North American Carbon Cycle: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicke, J. A.; Hall, R. J.; Raffa, K.; Desai, A. R.; Kashian, D.

    2009-12-01

    Disturbances are important ecosystem processes that greatly affect carbon cycling. In forests, disturbances contribute to modifications to carbon stocks and fluxes by increasing the amount of decomposing dead organic matter and decreasing the amount of carbon taken up by the ecosystem through photosynthesis. The net effect immediately following a disturbance is that forest ecosystems are carbon sources to the atmosphere. Within several decades, the carbon source becomes a carbon sink as the dead wood decays and the forest regrows. In North America, insect outbreaks are major forest disturbances, killing millions of trees in bark beetle and defoliator outbreaks that range over millions of ha. This presentation will review the role that insect infestations have in the North American carbon budget. We summarize estimates of the extent, frequency, and severity of outbreaks and the uncertainty associated with how these estimates are derived. We describe drivers of insect epidemics, which include climate, stand-structure, and predator-prey interactions. Finally, we describe studies that have documented impacts to the carbon cycle by insect infestations and discuss ongoing efforts. Although the role of insect disturbances is not well documented, these forest disturbances appear to be major factors that need inclusion for robust estimates of contemporary carbon budgets and for prediction of future carbon cycling given feedbacks with climate change.

  9. Natural Product Polyamines That Inhibit Human Carbonic Anhydrases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan A. Davis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural product compound collections have proven an effective way to access chemical diversity and recent findings have identified phenolic, coumarin, and polyamine natural products as atypical chemotypes that inhibit carbonic anhydrases (CAs. CA enzymes are implicated as targets of variable drug therapeutic classes and the discovery of selective, drug-like CA inhibitors is essential. Just two natural product polyamines, spermine and spermidine, have until now been investigated as CA inhibitors. In this study, five more complex natural product polyamines 1–5, derived from either marine sponge or fungi, were considered for inhibition of six different human CA isozymes of interest in therapeutic drug development. All compounds share a simple polyamine core fragment, either spermine or spermidine, yet display substantially different structure activity relationships for CA inhibition. Notably, polyamines 1–5 were submicromolar inhibitors of the cancer drug target CA IX, this is more potent than either spermine or spermidine.

  10. Soil biotic interactions and climate change: consequences for carbon cycle feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardgett, Richard

    2015-04-01

    There is currently much interest in understanding the biological mechanisms that regulate carbon exchanges between land and atmosphere, and how these exchanges respond to climate change. Climate change impacts on biogeochemical cycles via a variety of mechanisms; but there is now mounting evidence that biotic interactions between plants and diverse soil communities play a major role in determining carbon cycle responses to climate change across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Over seasonal and annual timescales, climate change impacts the growth and physiology of plants and their roots, with knock on effects for the activity of soil biota and carbon transformations; in the longer term, over tens to hundreds of years, climate change can cause shifts in community composition, and species range expansions and contractions, with cascading impacts on belowground communities and carbon cycling in soil. These responses have local and, potentially, global scale implications for carbon cycle feedbacks. In this talk, I will draw on recent research to illustrate this hierarchy of plant-soil feedback responses to climate change, the mechanisms involved, and consequences for the carbon cycle at local and global scales. I will also discuss how such knowledge on plant-soil interactions might be harnessed to inform management strategies for soil carbon sequestration and mitigation of climate change, and identify some major research challenges for the future.

  11. Major role of marine vegetation on the oceanic carbon cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Duarte

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The carbon burial in vegetated sediments, ignored in past assessments of carbon burial in the ocean, was evaluated using a bottom-up approach derived from upscaling a compilation of published individual estimates of carbon burial in vegetated habitats (seagrass meadows, salt marshes and mangrove forests to the global level and a top-down approach derived from considerations of global sediment balance and a compilation of the organic carbon content of vegeatated sediments. Up-scaling of individual burial estimates values yielded a total carbon burial in vegetated habitats of 111 Tmol C y-1. The total burial in unvegetated sediments was estimated to be 126 Tg C y-1, resulting in a bottom-up estimate of total burial in the ocean of about 244 Tg C y-1, two-fold higher than estimates of oceanic carbon burial that presently enter global carbon budgets. The organic carbon concentrations in vegetated marine sediments exceeds by 2 to 10-fold those in shelf/deltaic sediments. Top-down recalculation of ocean sediment budgets to account for these, previously neglected, organic-rich sediments, yields a top-down carbon burial estimate of 216 Tg C y-1, with vegetated coastal habitats contributing about 50%. Even though vegetated carbon burial contributes about half of the total carbon burial in the ocean, burial represents a small fraction of the net production of these ecosystems, estimated at about 3388 Tg C y-1, suggesting that bulk of the benthic net ecosystem production must support excess respiration in other compartments, such as unvegetated sediments and the coastal pelagic compartment. The total excess organic carbon available to be exported to the ocean is estimated at between 1126 to 3534 Tg C y-1, the bulk of which must be respired in the open ocean. Widespread loss of vegetated coastal habitats must have reduced carbon burial in the ocean by about 30 Tg C y-1, identifying the destruction of these ecosystems as an important loss of CO

  12. Badlands and the Carbon cycle: a significant source of petrogenic organic carbon in rivers and marine environments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copard, Yoann; Eyrolle-Boyer, Frederique; Radakovitch, Olivier; Poirel, Alain; Raimbault, Patrick; Lebouteiller, Caroline; Gairoard, Stéphanie; Di-Giovanni, Christian

    2016-04-01

    A key issue in the study of carbon biogeochemical cycle is to well constrain each carbon origin in term of fluxes between all C-reservoirs. From continental surfaces to oceans, rivers convey particulate organic carbon originate from the biomass (biospheric OC) and /or from the sedimentary rocks (petrogenic OC). Existence and importance of this petrogenic OC export to oceans was debated for several decades (see Copard et al., 2007 and ref.), but it is now assumed that 20% of the global carbon export to ocean has a geological origin (Galy et al., 2015). The main current challenge is to constrain the major contributors to this petrogenic OC flux. Amongst the expected sedimentary sources of petrogenic OC in rivers, sedimentary rocks forming badlands can be rightly considered as some viable candidates. Indeed these rocks show a strong erosion rate, may exceed 50 kt km-2 y-1 and in addition, shales, marls and argillaceous rocks, frequently forming badlands (see Nadal-Romero et al., 2011 for the Mediterranean area), contain a significant amount of petrogenic OC (frequently over 0.50 wt. %, Ronov and Yaroshevsky 1976). Our work illustrates the contribution of badlands, mainly distributed within the Durance catchment (a main tributary of the Rhône river), in the petrogenic OC export to the Mediterranean Sea. The approach is based on (i) the use of previous and new data on radiogenic carbon, (ii) bulk organic geochemistry (Rock-Eval pyrolysis), (iii) optical quantification of particulate OM (palynofacies), performed on suspended sediments from the Durance, the Rhône rivers and from small rivers draining the badlands. A mean erosion rate of badlands, previously calculated for instrumented catchments (SOERE Draix-Bléone, Graz et al., 2012) was also applied to the badlands disseminated within the Durance catchment. These different methodologies converge to a petrogenic contribution of the OC export to the Mediterranean Sea close to 30 %. Badlands from the Durance catchment

  13. Structures of dolomite at ultrahigh pressure and their influence on the deep carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, Marco; Crichton, Wilson A; Hanfland, Michael; Gemmi, Mauro; Müller, Harald; Kupenko, Ilya; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2012-08-21

    Carbon-bearing solids, fluids, and melts in the Earth's deep interior may play an important role in the long-term carbon cycle. Here we apply synchrotron X-ray single crystal micro-diffraction techniques to identify and characterize the high-pressure polymorphs of dolomite. Dolomite-II, observed above 17 GPa, is triclinic, and its structure is topologically related to CaCO(3)-II. It transforms above 35 GPa to dolomite-III, also triclinic, which features carbon in [3 + 1] coordination at the highest pressures investigated (60 GPa). The structure is therefore representative of an intermediate between the low-pressure carbonates and the predicted ultra-high pressure carbonates, with carbon in tetrahedral coordination. Dolomite-III does not decompose up to the melting point (2,600 K at 43 GPa) and its thermodynamic stability demonstrates that this complex phase can transport carbon to depths of at least up to 1,700 km. Dolomite-III, therefore, is a likely occurring phase in areas containing recycled crustal slabs, which are more oxidized and Ca-enriched than the primitive lower mantle. Indeed, these phases may play an important role as carbon carriers in the whole mantle carbon cycling. As such, they are expected to participate in the fundamental petrological processes which, through carbon-bearing fluids and carbonate melts, will return carbon back to the Earth's surface.

  14. Structures of dolomite at ultrahigh pressure and their influence on the deep carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, Marco; Crichton, Wilson A.; Hanfland, Michael; Gemmi, Mauro; Müller, Harald; Kupenko, Ilya; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    Carbon-bearing solids, fluids, and melts in the Earth's deep interior may play an important role in the long-term carbon cycle. Here we apply synchrotron X-ray single crystal micro-diffraction techniques to identify and characterize the high-pressure polymorphs of dolomite. Dolomite-II, observed above 17 GPa, is triclinic, and its structure is topologically related to CaCO3-II. It transforms above 35 GPa to dolomite-III, also triclinic, which features carbon in [3 + 1] coordination at the highest pressures investigated (60 GPa). The structure is therefore representative of an intermediate between the low-pressure carbonates and the predicted ultra-high pressure carbonates, with carbon in tetrahedral coordination. Dolomite-III does not decompose up to the melting point (2,600 K at 43 GPa) and its thermodynamic stability demonstrates that this complex phase can transport carbon to depths of at least up to 1,700 km. Dolomite-III, therefore, is a likely occurring phase in areas containing recycled crustal slabs, which are more oxidized and Ca-enriched than the primitive lower mantle. Indeed, these phases may play an important role as carbon carriers in the whole mantle carbon cycling. As such, they are expected to participate in the fundamental petrological processes which, through carbon-bearing fluids and carbonate melts, will return carbon back to the Earth’s surface. PMID:22869705

  15. Low pressure storage of natural gas on activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyn, J.; Wiesmann, H.; Lee, T.

    The introduction of natural gas to the transportation energy sector offers the possibility of displacing imported oil with an indigenous fuel. The barrier to the acceptance of natural gas vehicles (NGV) is the limited driving range due to the technical difficulties of on-board storage of a gaseous fuel. In spite of this barrier, compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles are today being successfully introduced into the market place. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate an adsorbent natural gas (ANG) storage system as a viable alternative to CNG storage. It can be argued that low pressure ANG has reached near parity with CNG, since the storage capacity of CNG (2400 psi) is rated at 190 V/V, while low pressure ANG (500 psi) has reached storage capacities of 180 V/V in the laboratory. A program, which extends laboratory results to a full-scale vehicle test, is necessary before ANG technology will receive widespread acceptance. The objective of this program is to field test a 150 V/V ANG vehicle in FY 1994. As a start towards this goal, carbon adsorbents have been screened by Brookhaven for their potential use in a natural gas storage system. This paper reports on one such carbon, trade name Maxsorb, manufactured by Kansai Coke under an Amoco license.

  16. Biochar for soil fertility and natural carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, C.E.; Rutherford, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Biochar is charcoal (similar to chars generated by forest fires) that is made for incorporation into soils to increase soil fertility while providing natural carbon sequestration. The incorporation of biochar into soils can preserve and enrich soils and also slow the rate at which climate change is affecting our planet. Studies on biochar, such as those cited by this report, are applicable to both fire science and soil science.

  17. Effectiveness of indometacin to prevent ovulation in modified natural-cycle IVF : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken-Zijlstra, T. M.; Haadsma, M. L.; Hammer, C.; Burgerhof, J. G. M.; Pelinck, M. J.; Simons, A. H. M.; van Echten-Arends, J.; Arts, J. G. E. M.; Land, J. A.; Groen, H.; Hoek, A.

    2013-01-01

    Modified natural-cycle IVF has a lower pregnancy rate per started cycle as compared with IVF with ovarian stimulation due to, for example, premature ovulation. Indometacin administered before ovulation prevents follicle rupture. Therefore, addition of indometacin may improve the effectiveness of mod

  18. Carbon cycling in benthic diatom mats: Novel applications of LC/IRMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerdijk-Poortvliet, T.C.W.

    2016-01-01

    Life on our planet is based on carbon and this life-sustaining element is essential in order to live, grow and reproduce. The cycling of carbon from the atmosphere, land and ocean into organisms, and back again needs to be in balance. If not, serious consequences, such as global climate disruption,

  19. The Impact of Agricultural Soil Erosion on the Global Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural soil erosion is thought to perturb the global carbon cycle, but estimates of its effect range from a source of 1 Pg/year to a sink of the same magnitude. By using Caesium-137 and carbon inventory measurements from a large-scale survey, we found consistent evidence for an erosion-induced...

  20. Ewing Symposium in Honor of Taro Takahashi: The controversial aspects of the contemporary [carbon] cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broecker, Wallace Smith

    2001-12-31

    This Ewing Symposium in honor of Taro Takahashi's work on the carbon cycle was held at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, New York, on October 26-27, 2000. A program and set of abstracts are appended to this report. A summary of the meeting (included in this report) will be published in Global Biogeochemical Cycles. The theme of the symposium was the magnitude and cause of excess carbon storage on the north temperate continents. Disagreement exists on the relative roles of forest regrowth and fertilization by excess fixed nitrogen and carbon dioxide, as well as the distribution of this storage. Phenomena playing important roles include pre-anthropogenic gradients in carbon dioxide, the so-called rectification effect, uptake and release of carbon dioxide by the ocean, soil nitrogen dynamics, atmospheric carbon-13 gradients, and the role of fire.

  1. Ewing Symposium in Honor of Taro Takahashi: The controversial aspects of the contemporary [carbon] cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broecker, Wallace Smith

    2001-12-31

    This Ewing Symposium in honor of Taro Takahashi's work on the carbon cycle was held at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, New York, on October 26-27, 2000. A program and set of abstracts are appended to this report. A summary of the meeting (included in this report) will be published in Global Biogeochemical Cycles. The theme of the symposium was the magnitude and cause of excess carbon storage on the north temperate continents. Disagreement exists on the relative roles of forest regrowth and fertilization by excess fixed nitrogen and carbon dioxide, as well as the distribution of this storage. Phenomena playing important roles include pre-anthropogenic gradients in carbon dioxide, the so-called rectification effect, uptake and release of carbon dioxide by the ocean, soil nitrogen dynamics, atmospheric carbon-13 gradients, and the role of fire.

  2. Reconciling Top Down and Bottom Up Approaches to Understand Land Carbon Cycle Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collatz, G. J.; Gurney, K. R.; Denning, A. S.; Randerson, J. T.; van der Werf, G. R.

    2004-12-01

    Cycle Variability Two fundamentally different approaches for estimating global carbon sources and sinks have been used over the past 15 years. The so-called "Top-down" approach involves analysis of atmospheric composition and often includes inversions of atmospheric transport. Bottom-up approaches, on the other hand, involve using carbon cycle process models driven by various observational data. Reconciling the results of these two approaches can provide powerful constraints on each but is challenging because of the large uncertainties in atmospheric measurements and transport and in our understanding of the processes controlling biogeochemical cycling of carbon. Recently, the Atmospheric Carbon Inversion Intercomparison (TransCom 3) completed mean seasonal cycle and interannual variability inversions using 12 transport models. Their results include predictions of biogeochemically driven net carbon fluxes with associated uncertainties for the globe divided into 22 regions, half of which are land regions. The cyclo-stationary inversions predicted the mean seasonal cycle as well as the mean sink/source of each region. The interannual inversions predicted the interannual variability in the sources and sinks for each region between 1980 and 2000. This study describes an analysis of the processes controlling biogeochemically driven net carbon fluxes over the seasonal cycle for each of the Transcom land regions. The processes considered are those included in the CASA biogeochemical model. The seasonally variable model inputs include NDVI, temperature, precipitation and solar radiation and burned area. The contributions of NPP, heterotrophic respiration and fire season to the seasonal cycle are evaluated for each of the 11 TransCom 3 land regions. We prescribed plausible scenarios in the biogeochemical model to evaluate the mechanisms responsible for the size and seasonality of the mean annual carbon sinks reported by TransCom 3. Initial results will also be presented for

  3. Carbon cycle: A hump in ocean-air exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Christopher M.

    2016-06-01

    Semivolatile organic compounds from fossil fuels or incomplete combustion are ubiquitous. A suite of circumglobal measurements of their oceanic and atmospheric concentrations reveals large carbon fluxes through the deposition of these compounds.

  4. Life cycle study. Carbon dioxide emissions lower in electric heating than in oil heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikkinen, A.; Jaervinen, P.; Nikula, A.

    1996-11-01

    A primary objective of energy conservation is to cut carbon dioxide emissions. A comparative study on the various heating forms, based on the life cycle approach, showed that the carbon dioxide emissions resulting form heating are appreciably lower now that electric heating has become more common. The level of carbon dioxide emissions in Finland would have been millions of tonnes higher had oil heating been chosen instead of electric heating. (orig.)

  5. Life cycle study. Carbon dioxide emissions lower in electric heating than in oil heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikkinen, A.; Jaervinen, P.; Nikula, A.

    1996-11-01

    A primary objective of energy conservation is to cut carbon dioxide emissions. A comparative study on the various heating forms, based on the life cycle approach, showed that the carbon dioxide emissions resulting form heating are appreciably lower now that electric heating has become more common. The level of carbon dioxide emissions in Finland would have been millions of tonnes higher had oil heating been chosen instead of electric heating. (orig.)

  6. Carbon and Water Cycles in a New Zealand Peat Bog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D.; Smith, J.

    2001-12-01

    Peat soils represent globally significant stores of carbon and an understanding of carbon exchange processes between peat wetland ecosystems and the atmosphere is important for understanding the effects of, and impacts upon, global climate change. Eddy covariance measurements of CO2, water vapour and energy fluxes were made during 1999 and 2000 at a remnant oligotrophic raised peat bog in North Island, New Zealand. The bog's hydrology has been modified by drainage of surrounding agricultural land, so that the water table is relatively deep compared to that of unmodified bogs in the region. Vegetation is dominated by two indigenous species of rush-like vascular plants belonging to the Southern hemisphere family Restionaceae. Maximum daytime CO2 fluxes were commonly -9 {μ }mol m-2 s-1 and averaged -1.3 {μ }mol m-2 s-1 over the 24-hour period in summertime. The ecosystem was a sink of atmospheric carbon for most of the year, with wintertime characterised by 12--15 weeks of carbon neutrality or slight carbon loss. Average carbon uptake by the ecosystem was 196 gC m-2 yr-1 for the two-year period. Modelling suggests that the key factor determining inter-annual variability of the carbon budget is seasonal soil temperature, whereas ecosystem respiration is relatively insensitive to the position of the lowered water table. The bog vegetation acts as a major control over water vapour loss and energy partitioning favors sensible heat production with mean summertime Bowen ratios of approximately 2.0. Water use efficiency was highest in the morning, indicating that the vegetation maximizes CO2 assimilation while the saturation vapour pressure deficit and transpiration rates are low. The dense canopy structure also restricts penetration of solar radiation to the peat surface, which minimizes evaporation and soil respiration.

  7. New Adsorption Cycles for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Ritter; Armin Ebner; Steven Reynolds Hai Du; Amal Mehrotra

    2008-07-31

    The objective of this three-year project was to study new pressure swing adsorption (PSA) cycles for CO{sub 2} capture and concentration at high temperature. The heavy reflux (HR) PSA concept and the use of a hydrotalcite like (HTlc) adsorbent that captures CO{sub 2} reversibly at high temperatures simply by changing the pressure were two key features of these new PSA cycles. Through the completion or initiation of nine tasks, a bench-scale experimental and theoretical program has been carried out to complement and extend the process simulation study that was carried out during Phase I (DE-FG26-03NT41799). This final report covers the entire project from August 1, 2005 to July 31, 2008. This program included the study of PSA cycles for CO{sub 2} capture by both rigorous numerical simulation and equilibrium theory analysis. The insight gained from these studies was invaluable toward the applicability of PSA for CO{sub 2} capture, whether done at ambient or high temperature. The rigorous numerical simulation studies showed that it is indeed possible to capture and concentrate CO{sub 2} by PSA. Over a wide range of conditions it was possible to achieve greater than 90% CO{sub 2} purity and/or greater than 90% CO{sub 2} recovery, depending on the particular heavy reflux (HR) PSA cycle under consideration. Three HR PSA cycles were identified as viable candidates for further study experimentally. The equilibrium theory analysis, which represents the upper thermodynamic limit of the performance of PSA process, further validated the use of certain HR PSA cycles for CO{sub 2} capture and concentration. A new graphical approach for complex PSA cycle scheduling was also developed during the course of this program. This new methodology involves a priori specifying the cycle steps, their sequence, and the number of beds, and then following a systematic procedure that requires filling in a 2-D grid based on a few simple rules, some heuristics and some experience. It has been

  8. Effects of climate extremes on the terrestrial carbon cycle: concepts, processes and potential future impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, Dorothea; Reichstein, Markus; Bahn, Michael;

    2015-01-01

    Extreme droughts, heat waves, frosts, precipitation, wind storms and other climate extremes may impact the structure, composition and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, and thus carbon cycling and its feedbacks to the climate system. Yet, the interconnected avenues through which climate...... pools and fluxes, potentially large indirect and lagged impacts, and long recovery time to regain previous stocks. At the global scale, we presume that droughts have the strongest and most widespread effects on terrestrial carbon cycling. Comparing impacts of climate extremes identified via remote...... extremes drive ecological and physiological processes and alter the carbon balance are poorly understood. Here, we review the literature on carbon cycle relevant responses of ecosystems to extreme climatic events. Given that impacts of climate extremes are considered disturbances, we assume the respective...

  9. Carbon cycle history through the Middle Jurassic of Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Gregory; Fozy, Istvan; Galacz, Andras

    2016-04-01

    A carbonate carbon isotope curve from the Aalenian-Bathonian interval is presented from the Obanya valley, of the Mecsek Mountains, Hungary. This interval is less well constrained and studied that other Jurassic time slices. The Obanya valley lies in the eastern part of the Mecsek Mountains, between Obanya and Kisujbanya and provides excellent exposures of a near continuous Aalenian to Lower Cretaceous sequence. It is not strongly affected by tectonics, as compared to other sections of eastern Mecsek of the same age. In parts, a rich fossil assemblage has been collected; the Bathonian ammonites are especially valuable as this locality. The pelagic Middle Jurassic is represented by thin-bedded limestones (the Obanya Limestone) and is overlain by Upper Jurassic siliceous limestones and radiolarites (the Fonyaszo Limestone). The new data indicates a series of positive anomalies within the late Aalenian and early-middle Bajocian. These data are comparable with carbonate carbon isotope recorded from other Tethyan margin sediments. Our integrated biostratigraphy and carbon isotope stratigraphy enables us to improve stratigraphic correlation and age determination of the examined strata.

  10. Development of a system emulating the global carbon cycle in Earth system models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tachiiri

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have indicated that the uncertainty in the global carbon cycle may have a significant impact on the climate. Since state of the art models are too computationally expensive for it to be possible to explore their parametric uncertainty in anything approaching a comprehensive fashion, we have developed a simplified system for investigating this problem. By combining the strong points of general circulation models (GCMs, which contain detailed and complex processes, and Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs, which are quick and capable of large ensembles, we have developed a loosely coupled model (LCM which can represent the outputs of a GCM-based Earth system model, using much smaller computational resources. We address the problem of relatively poor representation of precipitation within our EMIC, which prevents us from directly coupling it to a vegetation model, by coupling it to a precomputed transient simulation using a full GCM. The LCM consists of three components: an EMIC (MIROC-lite which consists of a 2-D energy balance atmosphere coupled to a low resolution 3-D GCM ocean (COCO including an ocean carbon cycle (an NPZD-type marine ecosystem model; a state of the art vegetation model (Sim-CYCLE; and a database of daily temperature, precipitation, and other necessary climatic fields to drive Sim-CYCLE from a precomputed transient simulation from a state of the art AOGCM. The transient warming of the climate system is calculated from MIROC-lite, with the global temperature anomaly used to select the most appropriate annual climatic field from the pre-computed AOGCM simulation which, in this case, is a 1% pa increasing CO2 concentration scenario.

    By adjusting the effective climate sensitivity (equivalent to the equilibrium climate sensitivity for an energy balance model of MIROC-lite, the transient warming of the LCM could be adjusted to closely follow the low sensitivity (with an equilibrium

  11. Carbon and nitrogen isotope variations in tree-rings as records of perturbations in regional carbon and nitrogen cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukata, Andrew R; Kyser, T Kurtis

    2007-02-15

    Increasing anthropogenic pollution from urban centers and fossil fuel combustion can impact the carbon and nitrogen cycles in forests. To assess the impact of twentieth century anthropogenic pollution on forested system carbon and nitrogen cycles, variations in the carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of tree-rings were measured. Individual annual growth rings in trees from six sites across Ontario and one in New Brunswick, Canada were used to develop site chronologies of tree-ring delta 15N and delta 13C values. Tree-ring 615N values were approximately 0.5% per hundred higher and correlated with contemporaneous foliar samples from the same tree, but not with delta 15N values of soil samples. Temporal trends in carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of these tree-rings are consistent with increasing anthropogenic influence on both the carbon and nitrogen cycles since 1945. Tree-ring delta 13C values and delta 15N values are correlated at both remote and urban-proximal sites, with delta 15N values decreasing since 1945 and converging on 1% per hundred at urban-proximal sites and decreasing but not converging on a single delta 15N value in remote sites. These results indicate that temporal trends in tree-ring nitrogen and carbon isotopic compositions record the regional extent of pollution.

  12. Uncertainty in the carbon cycle and its contributions to overall uncertainty in future climate projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Andrei

    2010-05-01

    The contribution of carbon cycle uncertainty to the uncertainty in future climate projections is studied by means of numerical simulations with the MIT Integrated Global System Model (IGSM). Three ensembles of 21st century climate simulations were carried out using input probability distributions for climate sensitivity, rate of heat uptake by the ocean and strength of aerosol forcing consistent with the changes in climate over 20th century. Uncertainties in the rate of oceanic carbon uptake and strength of CO2 fertilization were also included. Each ensemble consists of 400 simulations. In first ensemble all sub-components of the IGSM were fully coupled. To evaluate uncertainty in the feedback between climate and carbon cycle, an additional ensemble of radiatively uncoupled simulations was carried out. Because the terrestrial ecosystem model used in the IGSM takes into account nitrogen limitation on carbon uptake by vegetation, feedbacks associated with terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle have different signs. As a result, total feedback between climate and carbon cycle is rather weak and can be either positive or negative. This explains why the probability distribution for surface warming obtained from simulations with the IGSM is more symmetric than ones presented in the IPCC AR4. Reference greenhouse gases and aerosol emissions for business as usual scenario were used in first two ensembles. In all simulations of the third ensemble the IGSM was forced by the GHGs concentrations from the simulation with the median values of all climate parameter, thus eliminating uncertainty in the carbon cycle. Contribution of carbon cycle uncertainty to the uncertainties in projected climate changes turned out to be surprisingly small, at least for business as usual emission scenario.

  13. Carbon cycling along the land to ocean continuum (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciais, P.; Regnier, P.; Friedlingstein, P.; Mackenzie, F. T.; Gruber, N.; Raymond, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    A fraction of atmospheric CO2 taken up on land through photosynthesis and chemical weathering is transported laterally from upland terrestrial ecosystems into the ocean. Global carbon budget estimates have assumed that the lateral transport and sources / sinks along this aquatic continuum have remained unchanged. Based upon the recent review of Regnier et al., the main flux components of carbon fluxes along the land to ocean continuum will be presented, together with more recent estimates of CO2 outgassing fluxes from rivers and lakes. The potential origin of carbon delivered to rivers will be discussed, as well as missing components in the system such as wetlands and flooded regions. How these processes could be incorporated in Earth System Models will be presented.

  14. Kirishites, a new type of natural high-carbon compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Yu. B.; Skublov, G. T.; Yushkin, N. P.

    2010-01-01

    On the right-hand bank of the Volkhov River, in the natural area of tektite-like glasses (Volkhovites), fragments of shungites and slags with bunches of hairlike dark brownish enclosures were found. The filament thickness ranged from 20 to 100 μm, and separate “hairlines” were 3 cm in length. The composition of shungites and “hairlines” was found to be identical, which allowed us to consider the latter as aposhungite carbon formations. The high-carbon hairline structures associated with volkhovites are called kirishites. Kirishites are a new type of high-carbon structures that formed simultaneously with volkhovites in the case of explosion-type delivery of carbon slag and shungite fragments to the daylight surface during Holocene explosive activity. Under sharply reductive conditions, the slags partially melted, the melts were segregated, and carbonaceous-silicate and carbonaceous-ferriferous glasses formed with subsequent decompression-explosive liberation of carbon-supersaturated structures, which were extruded from shungite and slag fragments in the form of a resinoid mass. The “hairlines” were found to be zonal in structure: the central axial zones are composed of high-nitrogen hydrocarbon compounds, and peripheral regions are essentially carbonaceous with a high content of organic-mineral compounds and numerous microanomalies of petrogenic, volatile, rare, and ore elements. Infrared spectroscopy identified in kirishites proteinlike compounds, diagnosed in absorption bands (in cm-1) 600-720 (Amid V), 1200-1300 (Amid III), 1480-1590 (Amid II), 1600-1700 (Amid I), 3000-3800 (vibrations in NH2 and II groups). Gas chromatography, with the possibility of differentiation of left- and right-handed forms, revealed a broad spectrum of amino acids in kirishites, with their total content found to be the absolutely highest record for natural bitumens, an order of magnitude higher than the largest amino acid concentrations ever revealed in fibrous high

  15. Use of N Natural Abundance and N Species Concentrations to Assess N-Cycling in Constructed and Natural Coastal Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Marjorie Aelion

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural abundance of N stable isotopes used in combination with concentrations may be useful indicators of N-cycling in wetlands. Concentrations and N signatures of NO3−, NH4+, and sediment organic nitrogen (SON were measured in two impacted coastal golf course retention ponds and two natural marshes. Limited NO3− was detected in natural site surface water or pore water, but both isotopic signature and concentrations of NO3− in surface water of impacted sites indicated anthropogenic inputs. In natural sites, NH4+ concentrations were greatest in deeper pore water and least in surface water, suggesting diffusion predominates. The natural sites had greater %SON, and N indicated that the natural sites also had greater NH4+ released from SON mineralization than impacted sites. In NO3−-limited systems, neither concentrations nor N natural abundance was able to provide information on N-cycling, while processes associated with NH4+ were better elucidated by using both concentrations and N natural abundance.

  16. Dry Air Cooler Modeling for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lv, Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-07-28

    Modeling for commercially available and cost effective dry air coolers such as those manufactured by Harsco Industries has been implemented in the Argonne National Laboratory Plant Dynamics Code for system level dynamic analysis of supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) Brayton cycles. The modeling can now be utilized to optimize and simulate sCO2 Brayton cycles with dry air cooling whereby heat is rejected directly to the atmospheric heat sink without the need for cooling towers that require makeup water for evaporative losses. It has sometimes been stated that a benefit of the sCO2 Brayton cycle is that it enables dry air cooling implying that the Rankine steam cycle does not. A preliminary and simple examination of a Rankine superheated steam cycle and an air-cooled condenser indicates that dry air cooling can be utilized with both cycles provided that the cycle conditions are selected appropriately

  17. An approach to include soil carbon changes in life cycle assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bjorn Molt; Knudsen, Marie Trydeman; Hermansen, John Erik

    2013-01-01

    Globally, soil carbon sequestration is expected to hold a major potential to mitigate agricultural greenhouse gas emissions. However, the majority of life cycle assessments (LCA) of agricultural products have not included possible changes in soil carbon sequestration. In the present study, a method...... production in China. The suggested approach considers the time of the soil CO2 emissions for the LCA by including the Bern Carbon Cycle Model. Time perspectives of 20,100 and 200 years are used and a soil depth of 0-100 cm is considered. The application of the suggested method showed that the results were...... to estimate carbon sequestration to be included in LCA is suggested and applied to two examples where the inclusion of carbon sequestration is especially relevant: 1) Bioenergy: removal of straw from a Danish soil for energy purposes and 2) Organic versus conventional farming: comparative study of soybean...

  18. Carbon cycle and climate effects of forcing from fire-emitted aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Jean-Sébastien; Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Damon Matthews, H.

    2017-02-01

    Aerosols emitted by landscape fires affect many climatic processes. Here, we combined an aerosol–climate model and a coupled climate–carbon model to study the carbon cycle and climate effects caused by fire-emitted aerosols (FEA) forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface. This forcing (‘best guess’ present-day values of ‑0.10 and ‑1.3 W m‑2 at the top of the atmosphere and surface, respectively) had a predominant cooling influence that altered regional land carbon stocks on decadal timescales by modifying vegetation productivity and soil–litter decomposition. Changes in regional land and ocean carbon stocks became much stronger for FEA forcing acting on multi-century timescales; this occurred because carbon stocks responded to the forcing itself on such timescales and also due to gradual effects on the climate (e.g. through increased sea ice cover) that further affected the carbon cycle. Carbon increases and decreases in different regions partly offset each other, so that absolute changes in global land, atmosphere, and ocean stocks were all Asia, respectively. This suggests the potential for remote carbon cycle effects from regions emitting large amounts of fire aerosols.

  19. Modeling carbon cycle dynamics and response to drought in semi-arid ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, T. W.; Fox, A. M.; Krofcheck, D. J.; Litvak, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    The southwestern United States is presently experiencing a multi-year drought. Though the carbon uptake per unit area of the semi-arid biomes in this region is smaller than that of more temperate biomes, these biomes cover roughly 40 percent of the world's land surface, and thus make a significant contribution to the global terrestrial biological carbon cycle. Here we test the ability of two land surface model structures to diagnose the carbon cycle dynamics of semi-arid landscapes during the ongoing extreme drought. We use the New Mexico Elevation Gradient (NMEG) as a testbed for these modeling experiments. The NMEG comprises eight eddy covariance towers observing ecosystems ranging from desert grassland ( 1600 m elevation) to alpine mixed coniferous forest ( 3000 m elevation). During the drought the ecosystems observed by these towers saw their annual net carbon uptake decline between 33 and 100 percent (50 to 150 gC m^{-2} year^{-1}), with two of the eight sites becoming net sources of carbon to the atmosphere and one transitioning from a net carbon sink to carbon-neutral. We parametrize a simple light-use efficiency (LUE)-based model (Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model, VPRM) and a complex model which simulates many land surface processes (Community Land Model, CLM). We explore the capacity of both models to diagnose the terrestrial carbon cycle in semi-arid biomes where water availability is highly episodic.

  20. Solid phase extraction method for the study of black carbon cycling in dissolved organic carbon using radiocarbon

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V.. Radiocarbon analysis is a powerful tool for understanding the cycling of individual components within carbon pools, such as black carbon (BC) in dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Radiocarbon (δ14C) measurements of BC in DOC provide insight into one source of aged, recalcitrant DOC. We report a modified solid phase extraction (SPE) method to concentrate 43±6% of DOC (SPE-DOC) from seawater. We used the Benzene Polycarboxylic Acid (BPCA) method to isolate BC from SPE-DOC (SP...

  1. Subalpine Forest Carbon Cycling Short- and Long-Term Influence ofClimate and Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueppers, L.; Harte, J.

    2005-08-23

    Ecosystem carbon cycle feedbacks to climate change comprise one of the largest remaining sources of uncertainty in global model predictions of future climate. Both direct climate effects on carbon cycling and indirect effects via climate-induced shifts in species composition may alter ecosystem carbon balance over the long term. In the short term, climate effects on carbon cycling may be mediated by ecosystem species composition. We used an elevational climate and tree species composition gradient in Rocky Mountain subalpine forest to quantify the sensitivity of all major ecosystem carbon stocks and fluxes to these factors. The climate sensitivities of carbon fluxes were species-specific in the cases of relative above ground productivity and litter decomposition, whereas the climate sensitivity of dead wood decay did not differ between species, and total annual soil CO2 flux showed no strong climate trend. Lodge pole pine relative productivity increased with warmer temperatures and earlier snowmelt, while Engelmann spruce relative productivity was insensitive to climate variables. Engelmann spruce needle decomposition decreased linearly with increasing temperature(decreasing litter moisture), while lodgepole pine and subalpine fir needle decay showed a hump-shaped temperature response. We also found that total ecosystem carbon declined by 50 percent with a 2.88C increase in mean annual temperature and a concurrent 63 percent decrease ingrowing season soil moisture, primarily due to large declines in mineral soil and dead wood carbon. We detected no independent effect of species composition on ecosystem C stocks. Overall, our carbon flux results suggest that, in the short term, any change in subalpine forest net carbon balance will depend on the specific climate scenario and spatial distribution of tree species. Over the long term, our carbon stock results suggest that with regional warming and drying, Rocky Mountain subalpine forest will be a net source of carbon

  2. The climate dependence of the terrestrial carbon cycle, including parameter and structural uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Smith

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The feedback between climate and the terrestrial carbon cycle will be a key determinant of the dynamics of the Earth System (the thin layer that contains and supports life over the coming decades and centuries. However, Earth System Model projections of the terrestrial carbon-balance vary widely over these timescales. This is largely due to differences in their terrestrial carbon cycle models. A major goal in biogeosciences is therefore to improve understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle to enable better constrained projections. Utilising empirical data to constrain and assess component processes in terrestrial carbon cycle models will be essential to achieving this goal. We used a new model construction method to data-constrain all parameters of all component processes within a global terrestrial carbon model, employing as data constraints a collection of 12 empirical data sets characterising global patterns of carbon stocks and flows. Our goals were to assess the climate dependencies inferred for all component processes, assess whether these were consistent with current knowledge and understanding, assess the importance of different data sets and the model structure for inferring those dependencies, assess the predictive accuracy of the model and ultimately to identify a methodology by which alternative component models could be compared within the same framework in the future. Although formulated as differential equations describing carbon fluxes through plant and soil pools, the model was fitted assuming the carbon pools were in states of dynamic equilibrium (input rates equal output rates. Thus, the parameterised model is of the equilibrium terrestrial carbon cycle. All but 2 of the 12 component processes to the model were inferred to have strong climate dependencies, although it was not possible to data-constrain all parameters, indicating some potentially redundant details. Similar climate dependencies were obtained for most

  3. Tropical wetlands: A missing link in the global carbon cycle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögersten, Sofie; Black, Colin R; Evers, Stephanie; Hoyos-Santillan, Jorge; Wright, Emma L; Turner, Benjamin L

    2014-01-01

    Tropical wetlands are not included in Earth system models, despite being an important source of methane (CH4) and contributing a large fraction of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from land use, land use change, and forestry in the tropics. This review identifies a remarkable lack of data on the carbon balance and gas fluxes from undisturbed tropical wetlands, which limits the ability of global change models to make accurate predictions about future climate. We show that the available data on in situ carbon gas fluxes in undisturbed forested tropical wetlands indicate marked spatial and temporal variability in CO2 and CH4 emissions, with exceptionally large fluxes in Southeast Asia and the Neotropics. By upscaling short-term measurements, we calculate that approximately 90 ± 77 Tg CH4 year−1 and 4540 ± 1480 Tg CO2 year−1 are released from tropical wetlands globally. CH4 fluxes are greater from mineral than organic soils, whereas CO2 fluxes do not differ between soil types. The high CO2 and CH4 emissions are mirrored by high rates of net primary productivity and litter decay. Net ecosystem productivity was estimated to be greater in peat-forming wetlands than on mineral soils, but the available data are insufficient to construct reliable carbon balances or estimate gas fluxes at regional scales. We conclude that there is an urgent need for systematic data on carbon dynamics in tropical wetlands to provide a robust understanding of how they differ from well-studied northern wetlands and allow incorporation of tropical wetlands into global climate change models. PMID:26074666

  4. Revisiting the terrestrial carbon cycle: New insights from isothermal microcalorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Anke M.; Boye, Kristin; Bölscher, Tobias; Nunan, Naoise; Coucheney, Elsa; Schaefer, Michael; Fendorf, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Energy is continuously transformed in environmental systems through the metabolic activities of living organisms. In terrestrial ecosystems, there is a general consensus that the diversity of microbial metabolic processes is poorly related to overall ecosystem function because of the inherent functional redundancy that exists within many microbial communities. Here, we propose a conceptual ecological model of microbial energetics in various terrestrial ecosystems (e.g. Scandinavian arable systems or temporarily flooded systems in South East Asia). Using isothermal microcalorimetry, we show that direct measures of energetics provide a functional link between energy flow and the composition of belowground microbial communities at a high taxonomic level. In contrast, this link is not apparent when carbon dioxide (CO2) was used as an aggregate measure of microbial metabolism. Our results support the notion that systems with higher relative abundances of fungi have more efficient microbial metabolism. Furthermore, we suggest that the microbial energetics approach combined with spectroscopic and aqueous chemical measurements is a viable approach to determine the effect of energy release from organic matter on metal(loid) mobility in soils and sediments under anaerobic conditions. We advocate that the microbial energetics approach provides complementary information to soil respiration for investigating the involvement of microbial communities in belowground carbon dynamics. Our results indicate that microbial metabolic processes are an essential constituent in governing the terrestrial carbon balance and that microbial diversity should not be neglected in ecosystem modeling. Quantification of microbial energetics incorporates thermodynamic principles and our conceptual model provides empirical data that can feed into carbon-climate based ecosystem feedback modeling. Together they disentangle the intrinsically complex yet essential carbon dynamics of soils to address

  5. China’s Forests and Their Impact on Global Carbon Cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Forests have multiple benefits and functions, including mitigation of climate change. The impacts of forests on the global carbon cycle include forests as carbon sinks, wood-based products as carbon sinks, bio-energy, and production and use of non-timber products. In the past decades, forest cover of China has increased from 8.6% to 18.21% by large-scale afforestation and conversion of cropland into forests. Forest biomass carbon (C) stock increased from 4.3 Pg C (1 Pg C = 1 015 g C) in the early 1980s to 5...

  6. Key issues and options in accounting for carbon sequestration and temporary storage in life cycle assessment and carbon footprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandao, Miguel; Levasseur, Annie; Kirschbaum, Miko U. F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Biological sequestration can increase the carbon stocks of non-atmospheric reservoirs (e.g. land and landbased products). Since this contained carbon is sequestered from, and retained outside, the atmosphere for a period of time, the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere is temporarily...... footprinting (CF) are increasingly popular tools for the environmental assessment of products, that take into account their entire life cycle. There have been significant efforts to develop robust methods to account for the benefits, if any, of sequestration and temporary storage and release of biogenic carbon....... However, there is still no overall consensus on the most appropriate ways of considering and quantifying it. Method: This paper reviews and discusses six available methods for accounting for the potential climate impacts of carbon sequestration and temporary storage or release of biogenic carbon in LCA...

  7. Quasi-100 ky glacial-interglacial cycles triggered by subglacial burial carbon release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Zeng

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A new mechanism is proposed in which climate, carbon cycle and icesheets interact with each other to produce a feedback that can produce quasi-100 ky glacial-interglacial cycles. A key process is the burial and preservation of organic carbon by icesheets. The switch from glacial maximum to deglaciation is triggered by the ejection of glacial burial carbon when icesheets grow to sufficiently large size and subglacial transport becomes significant. Glacial inception is initiated by CO2 drawdown due to a ''rebound'' from a high but transient interglacial CO2 value as the land-originated CO2 invades into deep ocean via thermohaline circulation and CaCO3 compensation. Also important for glacial inception is the CO2 uptake by vegetation regrowth in the previously ice-covered boreal regions. When tested using a fully coupled Earth system model with comprehensive carbon cycle components and semi-empirical physical climate components, it produced self-sustaining glacial-interglacial cycles of duration about 93 ky, CO2 change of 90 ppmv, temperature change of 6°C under certain parameter regimes. Since the 100 ky cycles can not be easily explained by the weak Milankovitch astronomical forcing alone, this carbon-climate mechanism provides a strong feedback that could interact with external forcings to produce the major observed Quaternary climatic variations.

  8. Natural sisal fibers derived hierarchical porous activated carbon as capacitive material in lithium ion capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhewei; Guo, Huajun; Li, Xinhai; Wang, Zhixing; Yan, Zhiliang; Wang, Yansen

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-ion capacitor (LIC) is a novel advanced electrochemical energy storage (EES) system bridging gap between lithium ion battery (LIB) and electrochemical capacitor (ECC). In this work, we report that sisal fiber activated carbon (SFAC) was synthesized by hydrothermal treatment followed by KOH activation and served as capacitive material in LIC for the first time. Different particle structure, morphology, specific surface area and heteroatoms affected the electrochemical performance of as-prepared materials and corresponding LICs. When the mass ratio of KOH to char precursor was 2, hierarchical porous structured SFAC-2 was prepared and exhibited moderate specific capacitance (103 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1), superior rate capability and cyclic stability (88% capacity retention after 5000 cycles at 1 A g-1). The corresponding assembled LIC (LIC-SC2) with optimal comprehensive electrochemical performance, displayed the energy density of 83 Wh kg-1, the power density of 5718 W kg-1 and superior cyclic stability (92% energy density retention after 1000 cycles at 0.5 A g-1). It is worthwhile that the source for activated carbon is a natural and renewable one and the synthesis method is eco-friendly, which facilitate that hierarchical porous activated carbon has potential applications in the field of LIC and other energy storage systems.

  9. Black Carbon Emissions from Associated Natural Gas Flaring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyant, Cheryl L; Shepson, Paul B; Subramanian, R; Cambaliza, Maria O L; Heimburger, Alexie; McCabe, David; Baum, Ellen; Stirm, Brian H; Bond, Tami C

    2016-02-16

    Approximately 150 billion cubic meters (BCM) of natural gas is flared and vented in the world annually, emitting greenhouse gases and other pollutants with no energy benefit. About 7 BCM per year is flared in the United States, and half is from North Dakota alone. There are few emission measurements from associated gas flares and limited black carbon (BC) emission factors have been previously reported from the field. Emission plumes from 26 individual flares in the Bakken formation in North Dakota were sampled. Methane, carbon dioxide, and BC were measured simultaneously, allowing the calculation of BC mass emission factors using the carbon balance method. Particle optical absorption was measured using a three-wavelength particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) and BC particle number and mass concentrations were measured with a single particle soot photometer. The BC emission factors varied over 2 orders of magnitude, with an average and uncertainty range of 0.14 ± 0.12 g/kg hydrocarbons in associated gas and a median of 0.07 g/kg which represents a lower bound on these measurements. An estimation of the BC emission factor derived from PSAP absorption provides an upper bound at 3.1 g/kg. These results are lower than previous estimations and laboratory measurements. The BC mass absorption cross section was 16 ± 12 m(2)/g BC at 530 nm. The average absorption Ångström exponent was 1.2 ± 0.8, suggesting that most of the light absorbing aerosol measured was black carbon and the contribution of light absorbing organic carbon was small.

  10. Pacific carbon cycling constrained by organic matter size, age and composition relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Brett D.; Beaupré, Steven R.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; McCarthy, Matthew D.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.

    2016-12-01

    Marine organic matter is one of Earth’s largest actively cycling reservoirs of organic carbon and nitrogen. The processes controlling organic matter production and removal are important for carbon and nitrogen biogeochemical cycles, which regulate climate. However, the many possible cycling mechanisms have hindered our ability to quantify marine organic matter transformation, degradation and turnover rates. Here we analyse existing and new measurements of the carbon:nitrogen ratio and radiocarbon age of organic matter spanning sizes from large particulate organic matter to small dissolved organic molecules. We find that organic matter size is negatively correlated with radiocarbon age and carbon:nitrogen ratios in coastal, surface and deep waters of the Pacific Ocean. Our measurements suggest that organic matter is increasingly chemically degraded as it decreases in size, and that small particles and molecules persist in the ocean longer than their larger counterparts. Based on these correlations, we estimate the production rates of small, biologically recalcitrant dissolved organic matter molecules at 0.11-0.14 Gt of carbon and about 0.005 Gt of nitrogen per year in the deep ocean. Our results suggest that the preferential remineralization of large over small particles and molecules is a key process governing organic matter cycling and deep ocean carbon storage.

  11. Reduced Graphene Oxide and Its Natural Counterpart Shungite Carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Sheka, Elena F

    2016-01-01

    Large variety of structure and chemical-composition of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) is explained from a quantum-chemical standpoint. The related molecular theory of graphene oxide, supported by large experience gained by the modern graphene science, has led the foundation of the concept of a multi-stage graphene oxide reduction. This microscopic approach has found a definite confirmation when analyzing the available empirical data concerning both synthetic and natural RGO products, the latter in view of shungite carbon, suggesting the atomic-microscopic model for its structure.

  12. Effects of climate extremes on the terrestrial carbon cycle: concepts, processes and potential future impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Dorothea; Reichstein, Markus; Bahn, Michael; Thonicke, Kirsten; Frank, David; Mahecha, Miguel D; Smith, Pete; van der Velde, Marijn; Vicca, Sara; Babst, Flurin; Beer, Christian; Buchmann, Nina; Canadell, Josep G; Ciais, Philippe; Cramer, Wolfgang; Ibrom, Andreas; Miglietta, Franco; Poulter, Ben; Rammig, Anja; Seneviratne, Sonia I; Walz, Ariane; Wattenbach, Martin; Zavala, Miguel A; Zscheischler, Jakob

    2015-08-01

    Extreme droughts, heat waves, frosts, precipitation, wind storms and other climate extremes may impact the structure, composition and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, and thus carbon cycling and its feedbacks to the climate system. Yet, the interconnected avenues through which climate extremes drive ecological and physiological processes and alter the carbon balance are poorly understood. Here, we review the literature on carbon cycle relevant responses of ecosystems to extreme climatic events. Given that impacts of climate extremes are considered disturbances, we assume the respective general disturbance-induced mechanisms and processes to also operate in an extreme context. The paucity of well-defined studies currently renders a quantitative meta-analysis impossible, but permits us to develop a deductive framework for identifying the main mechanisms (and coupling thereof) through which climate extremes may act on the carbon cycle. We find that ecosystem responses can exceed the duration of the climate impacts via lagged effects on the carbon cycle. The expected regional impacts of future climate extremes will depend on changes in the probability and severity of their occurrence, on the compound effects and timing of different climate extremes, and on the vulnerability of each land-cover type modulated by management. Although processes and sensitivities differ among biomes, based on expert opinion, we expect forests to exhibit the largest net effect of extremes due to their large carbon pools and fluxes, potentially large indirect and lagged impacts, and long recovery time to regain previous stocks. At the global scale, we presume that droughts have the strongest and most widespread effects on terrestrial carbon cycling. Comparing impacts of climate extremes identified via remote sensing vs. ground-based observational case studies reveals that many regions in the (sub-)tropics are understudied. Hence, regional investigations are needed to allow a global

  13. Effects of Biosolids on Carbon Sequestration and Nitrogen Cycling

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jinling

    2013-01-01

    Land application of biosolids has been demonstrated to improve nutrient availability (mainly N and P) and improve organic matter in soils, but the effects of biosolids on C sequestration and N cycling in the Mid-Atlantic region is not well understood. The objectives were: 1) to investigate soil C sequestration at sites with a long-term history of biosolids either in repeated application or single large application; 2) to characterize and compare soil C chemistry using advanced 13C nuclear mag...

  14. Intertidal foraminifera (Protista) and carbon-nitrogen cycling: combined effects of temperature and diet quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukovits, Julia; Enge, Annekatrin Julie; Oberrauch, Max; Watzka, Margarete; Wanek, Wolfgang; Heinz, Petra

    2017-04-01

    Benthic foraminifera (eukaryotic protists) are to a large extent acting as detrivores, feeding on microalgal detritus. Phytodetritus constitutes a main component of the intertidal carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pool, thus making foraminifera important players in intertidal nutrient fluxes. These fluxes are strongly dependent on interactions between biotic and abiotic environmental factors, as e.g. the energetic value or the quality of phytodetritus that depends on environmental nutrient availability. Increased inorganic C concentrations in coastal water bodies (e.g. due to increased atmospheric CO2) can have a negative effect on the phytodetrital quality by increasing microalgal C:N ratios. Simultanous warming of the environment can cause increased metabolic rates of exposed heterotrophic organisms, like foraminifera. The combination of lower food quality and increased metabolic rates is supposed to cause cascading effects on organismic C cycling, potentially diminishing the role of detrivorous food as a C sink in marine food webs by increased discharge of excess C. In this study, the above described scenario was tested in laboratory feeding experiments on a common and abundant intertidal foraminiferal species (Haynesina germanica, collected in the German Wadden Sea). Two batches of artificially produced and dual isotope labeled (13C and 15N) chlorophyte detritus (1.5 gDW m-2) with different C:N ratios (5.5 and 7.6) and one batch of isotopically labelled diatom detritus (C:N 5.6) were fed under controlled conditions at three different temperatures. Results were extrapolated to the in situ abundance of live H. germanica individuals in the sampling area (sediment core data), to estimate the magnitude of the effect on an areal basis within the natural habitat. The study revealed significant, temperature induced variations in the carbon and nitrogen processing of H. germanica. The food source with an increased C:N ratio doubled the release of carbon from the H. germanica

  15. Hydrogen Storage in the Carbon Dioxide - Formic Acid Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Cornel; Montandon-Clerc, Mickael; Laurenczy, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    This year Mankind will release about 39 Gt carbon dioxide into the earth's atmosphere, where it acts as a greenhouse gas. The chemical transformation of carbon dioxide into useful products becomes increasingly important, as the CO(2) concentration in the atmosphere has reached 400 ppm. One approach to contribute to the decrease of this hazardous emission is to recycle CO(2), for example reducing it to formic acid. The hydrogenation of CO(2) can be achieved with a series of catalysts under basic and acidic conditions, in wide variety of solvents. To realize a hydrogen-based charge-discharge device ('hydrogen battery'), one also needs efficient catalysts for the reverse reaction, the dehydrogenation of formic acid. Despite of the fact that the overwhelming majority of these reactions are carried out using precious metals-based catalysts (mainly Ru), we review here developments for catalytic hydrogen evolution from formic acid with iron-based complexes.

  16. Climate Cycling on Early Mars Caused by the Carbonate-Silicate Cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Batalha, Natasha E; Haqq-Misra, Jacob; Kasting, James F

    2016-01-01

    For decades, scientists have tried to explain the evidence for fluvial activity on early Mars, but a consensus has yet to emerge regarding the mechanism for producing it. One hypothesis suggests early Mars was warmed by a thick greenhouse atmosphere. Another suggests that early Mars was generally cold but was warmed occasionally by impacts or by episodes of enhanced volcanism. These latter hypotheses struggle to produce the amounts of rainfall needed to form the martian valleys, but are consistent with inferred low rates of weathering compared to Earth. Here, we provide a geophysical mechanism that could have induced cycles of glaciation and deglaciation on early Mars. Our model produces dramatic climate cycles with extended periods of glaciation punctuated by warm periods lasting up to 10 Myr, much longer than those generated in other episodic warming models. The cycles occur because stellar insolation was low, and because CO2 outgassing is not able to keep pace with CO2 consumption by silicate weathering fo...

  17. Combination Carbon Nanotubes with Graphene Modified Natural Graphite and Its Electrochemical Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DENG Ling-feng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The CNTs/rGO/NG composite lithiumion battery anode material was synthesized by thermal reducing, using graphene oxide (GO and carbon nanotubes (CNTs as precursors for a 5 ∶ 3 proportion. The morphology, structure, and electrochemical performance of the composite were characterized by scanning electron microscopy(SEM, X-ray diffractometry(XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR and electrochemical measurements. The results show that reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes form a perfect three-dimensional network structure on the surface of natural graphite. CNTs/rGO/NG composite has good rate performance and cycle life,compared with pure natural graphite.The initial discharge capacity of designed anode is 479mAh/g at 0.1C, the reversible capacity up to 473mAh/g after 100 cycles,the capacity is still 439.5mAh/g, the capacity retention rate is 92%,and the capacity is 457, 433, 394mAh/g at 0.5, 1, 5C, respectively.

  18. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Energy Conversion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jae Eun; Kim, S. O.; Seong, S. H.; Eoh, J. H.; Lee, T. H.; Choi, S. K.; Han, J. W.; Bae, S. W

    2007-12-15

    This report contains the description of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle coupled to KALIMER-600 as an alternative energy conversion system. For system development, a computer code was developed to calculate heat balance of 100% power operation condition. Based on the computer code, the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle energy conversion system was constructed for the KALIMER-600. Using the developed turbomachinery models, the off-design characteristics and the sensitivities of the S-CO{sub 2} turbomachinery were investigated. For the development of PCHE models, a one-dimensional analysis computer code was developed to evaluate the performance of the PCHE. Possible control schemes for power control in the KALIMER-600 S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle were investigated by using the MARS code. Simple power reduction and recovery event was selected and analyzed for the transient calculation. For the evaluation of Na/CO{sub 2} boundary failure event, a computer was developed to simulate the complex thermodynamic behaviors coupled with the chemical reaction between liquid sodium and CO{sub 2} gas. The long term behavior of a Na/CO{sub 2} boundary failure event and its consequences which lead to a system pressure transient were evaluated.

  19. The cycling of carbon into and out of dust

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Anthony P; Koehler, Melanie; Fanciullo, Lapo; Bocchio, Marco; Micelotta, Elisabetta; Verstraete, Laurent; Guillet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Observational evidence seems to indicate that the depletion of interstellar carbon into dust shows rather wide variations and that carbon undergoes rather rapid recycling in the interstellar medium (ISM). Small hydrocarbon grains are processed in photo-dissociation regions by UV photons, by ion and electron collisions in interstellar shock waves and by cosmic rays. A significant fraction of hydrocarbon dust must therefore be re-formed by accretion in the dense, molecular ISM. A new dust model (Jones et al., Astron. Astrophys., 2013, 558, A62) shows that variations in the dust observables in the diffuse interstellar medium (nH = 1000 cm^3), can be explained by systematic and environmentally-driven changes in the small hydrocarbon grain population. Here we explore the consequences of gas-phase carbon accretion onto the surfaces of grains in the transition regions between the diffuse ISM and molecular clouds (e.g., Jones, Astron. Astrophys., 2013, 555, A39). We find that significant carbonaceous dust re-processi...

  20. Isothermal microcalorimetry provides new insight into terrestrial carbon cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Anke M; Coucheney, Elsa; Nunan, Naoise

    2014-04-15

    Energy is continuously transformed in environmental systems through the metabolic activities of living organisms, but little is known about the relationship between the two. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that microbial energetics are controlled by microbial community composition in terrestrial ecosystems. We determined the functional diversity profiles of the soil biota (i.e., multiple substrate-induced respiration and microbial energetics) in soils from an arable ecosystem with contrasting long-term management regimes (54 years). These two functional profiling methods were then related to the soils' microbial community composition. Using isothermal microcalorimetry, we show that direct measures of energetics provide a functional link between energy flows and the composition of below-ground microbial communities at a high taxonomic level (Mantel R = 0.4602, P = 0.006). In contrast, this link was not apparent when carbon dioxide (CO2) was used as an aggregate measure of microbial metabolism (Mantel R = 0.2291, P = 0.11). Our work advocates that the microbial energetics approach provides complementary information to soil respiration for investigating the involvement of microbial communities in below-ground carbon dynamics. Empirical data of our proposed microbial energetics approach can feed into carbon-climate based ecosystem feedback modeling with the suggested conceptual ecological model as a base.

  1. Microbial carbon cycling in Lost City hydrothermal chimneys and other serpentinite-hosted ecosystems (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazelton, W. J.; Lang, S. Q.; Morrill, P. L.; Twing, K. I.; Crespo-Medina, M.; Morgan-Smith, D.; Früh-Green, G. L.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    Ultramafic rocks formed in the Earth's mantle and uplifted into the crust represent an immense but poorly described reservoir of carbon. The biological availability of this rock-hosted carbon reservoir is unknown, but the set of geochemical reactions known as serpentinization can mobilize carbon from the subsurface and trigger the growth of dense microbial communities. Serpentinite-hosted ecosystems such as the chimney biofilms of the Lost City hydrothermal field can support dense populations of bacteria and archaea fueled by the copious quantities of H2 and methane (CH4) released by serpentinization (1-5). The metabolic pathways involved, however, remain unknown, and conventional interpretations of genomic and experimental data are complicated by the unusual carbon speciation in these environments. Carbon dioxide is scarce due to the highly reducing, high pH conditions. Instead, the predominant forms of carbon are CH4 and formate (5). Despite its natural abundance, however, direct evidence for CH4-derived biomass is lacking (1,4,5), and the role of formate is potentially significant but largely unexplored (1,5). To gain a more generalized perspective of carbon cycling in serpentinite-hosted ecosystems, we have recently investigated fluids and rocks collected from serpentinizing ophiolites in California, Canada, and Italy. Our results point to potentially H2-utilizing, autotrophic Betaproteobacteria thriving in shallow, oxic-anoxic transition zones and anaerobic Clostridia inhabiting anoxic, subsurface zones (1,6). The carbon sources utilized by the Clostridia are unknown, but preliminary metagenomic evidence is consistent with a fermentation-style metabolic strategy that may be conducive to an oxidant-limited, subsurface environment. Curiously, despite the abundance of H2 and CH4 in these continental springs, none of the geochemical, genomic, or experimental results obtained thus far contain any evidence for biological methanogenesis (1,6). This is in stark

  2. Increasing the Confidence of African Carbon Cycle Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardö, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    Scarcity of in situ measurements of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes hamper calibration and validation of assessments of carbon budgets in Africa. It limits essential studies of ecosystem function and ecosystem processes. The wide range reported net primary production (NPP) and gross primary production (GPP) for continental African is partly a function of the uncertainty originating from this data scarcity. GPP estimates, based on vegetation models and remote sensing based models, range from ~17 to ~40 Pg C yr-1 and NPP estimates roughly range from ~7 to ~20 Pg C yr-1 for continental Africa. According to the MOD17 product does Africa contribute about 23 % of the global GPP and about 25 % of the global NPP. These percentages have recently increased slightly. Differences in modeled carbon use efficiency (i.e. the NPP/GPP ratio) further enhance the uncertainty caused by low spatial resolution driver data sets when deriving NPP from GPP. Current substantial uncertainty in vegetation productivity estimates for Africa (both magnitudes and carbon use efficiency) may be reduced by increased abundance and availability of in situ collected field data including meteorology, radiation, spectral properties, GHG fluxes as well as long term ecological field experiments. Current measurements of GHGs fluxes in Africa are sparse and lacking impressive coordination. The European Fluxes Database Cluster includes ~24 African sites with carbon flux data, most of them with a small amount of data in short time series. Large and diverse biomes such as the evergreen broad leafed forest are under-represented whereas savannas are slightly better represented. USA for example, with 171 flux site listed in FLUXNET has a flux site density of 17 sites per million km2, whereas Africa has density of 0.8 sites per million km2. Increased and coordinated collection of data on fluxes of GHGs, ecosystem properties and processes, both through advanced micro meteorological measurements and through cost

  3. Contribution of semi-arid ecosystems to interannual variability of the global carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, Benjamin; Frank, David; Ciais, Philippe; Myneni, Ranga B; Andela, Niels; Bi, Jian; Broquet, Gregoire; Canadell, Josep G; Chevallier, Frederic; Liu, Yi Y; Running, Steven W; Sitch, Stephen; van der Werf, Guido R

    2014-05-29

    The land and ocean act as a sink for fossil-fuel emissions, thereby slowing the rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Although the uptake of carbon by oceanic and terrestrial processes has kept pace with accelerating carbon dioxide emissions until now, atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations exhibit a large variability on interannual timescales, considered to be driven primarily by terrestrial ecosystem processes dominated by tropical rainforests. We use a terrestrial biogeochemical model, atmospheric carbon dioxide inversion and global carbon budget accounting methods to investigate the evolution of the terrestrial carbon sink over the past 30 years, with a focus on the underlying mechanisms responsible for the exceptionally large land carbon sink reported in 2011 (ref. 2). Here we show that our three terrestrial carbon sink estimates are in good agreement and support the finding of a 2011 record land carbon sink. Surprisingly, we find that the global carbon sink anomaly was driven by growth of semi-arid vegetation in the Southern Hemisphere, with almost 60 per cent of carbon uptake attributed to Australian ecosystems, where prevalent La Niña conditions caused up to six consecutive seasons of increased precipitation. In addition, since 1981, a six per cent expansion of vegetation cover over Australia was associated with a fourfold increase in the sensitivity of continental net carbon uptake to precipitation. Our findings suggest that the higher turnover rates of carbon pools in semi-arid biomes are an increasingly important driver of global carbon cycle inter-annual variability and that tropical rainforests may become less relevant drivers in the future. More research is needed to identify to what extent the carbon stocks accumulated during wet years are vulnerable to rapid decomposition or loss through fire in subsequent years.

  4. Estimating soil carbon change and biofuel life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions with economic, ecosystem and life-cycle models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Z.; Dunn, J.; Kwon, H. Y.; Mueller, S.; Wander, M.

    2015-12-01

    Land-use change (LUC) resulting from biofuel feedstock production can alter soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks of lands producing those crops and the crops they displace, possibly resulting in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. LUC GHG emissions included in biofuel life cycle analysis (LCA) have at times been estimated to be so great that biofuels did not offer a greenhouse gas reduction compared to conventional fossil fuels. To improve the accuracy of emissions estimates, SOC changes must be considered at a finer spatial resolution and take into account climate, soil, land use and management factors. This study reports on the incorporation of global LUC as predicted by a computable general equilibrium model (i.e., GTAP) and spatially-explicit modeled SOC estimates (using surrogate CENTURY) for various biofuel feedstock scenarios into a widely-used LCA model (i.e., GREET). Resulting estimates suggest: SOC changes associated with domestic corn production might contribute 2-6% or offset as much as 5% of total corn ethanol life-cycle GHG emissions. On the other hand, domestic LUC GHG emissions for switchgrass ethanol have the potential offset up to 60% of GHG emissions in the fuel's life cycle. Further, large SOC sequestration is predicted for Miscanthus feedstock production, enabling Miscanthus-based ethanol systems to offset all life-cycle GHG emissions and create a net carbon sink. LUC GHG emissions for ethanol derived from corn stover are small compared to other sources. Total life-cycle GHG emissions (g CO2eq MJ-1, 100cm soil) were estimated to be 59-66 for corn ethanol, 14 for stover ethanol, 18-26 for switchgrass ethanol, and -7 - -0.6 for Miscanthus ethanol.

  5. HEAT RECOVERY FROM A NATURAL GAS POWERED INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE BY CO2 TRANSCRITICAL POWER CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Farzaneh-Gord

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work provides details of energy accounting of a natural gas powered internal combustion engine and achievable work of a utilized CO2 power cycle. Based on experimental performance analysis of a new designed IKCO (Iran Khodro Company 1.7 litre natural gas powered engine, full energy accounting of the engine were carried out on various engine speeds and loads. Further, various CO2 transcritical power cycle configurations have been appointed to take advantages of exhaust and coolant water heat lost. Based on thermodynamic analysis, the amount of recoverable work obtainable by CO2 transcritical power cycles have been calculated on various engine conditions. The results show that as much as 18 kW power could be generated by the power cycle. This would be considerable amount of power especially if compared with the engine brake power.

  6. Effects of Lime and Concrete Waste on Vadose Zone Carbon Cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Eike Marie; Jessen, Søren; Postma, D.;

    2014-01-01

    In this work we investigate how lime and crushed concrete waste (CCW) affect carbon cycling in the vadose zone and explore whether these amendments could be employed to mitigate climate change by increasing the transport of CO2 from the atmosphere to the groundwater. We use a combination of exper......In this work we investigate how lime and crushed concrete waste (CCW) affect carbon cycling in the vadose zone and explore whether these amendments could be employed to mitigate climate change by increasing the transport of CO2 from the atmosphere to the groundwater. We use a combination.......) grown on podzolic soil material, we have investigated inorganic carbon cycling through the gaseous and liquid phases and how it is affected by different soil amendments. The mesocosm amendments comprised the addition of 0, 9.6, or 21.2 kg m−2 of crushed concrete waste (CCW) or 1 kg lime m−2. The CCW...

  7. Crosslinked Carbon Nanotubes/Polyaniline Composites as a Pseudocapacitive Material with High Cycling Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Xue; Deng, Jinxing; Zhou, Chenglong; Guo, Jinshan; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    The poor cycling stability of polyaniline (PANI) limits its practical application as a pseudocapacitive material due to the volume change during the charge-discharge procedure. Herein, crosslinked carbon nanotubes/polyaniline (C-CNTs/PANI) composites had been designed by the in situ chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of crosslinked carbon nanotubes (C-CNTs), which were obtained by coupling of the functionalized carbon nanotubes with 1,4-benzoquinone. The composite showed a specific capacitance of 294 F/g at the scan rate of 10 mV/s, and could retain 95% of its initial specific capacitance after 1000 CV cycles. Such high electrochemical cycling stability resulting from the crosslinked skeleton of the C-CNTs makes them potential electrode materials for a supercapacitor. PMID:28347050

  8. Pervasive Drought Legacy Effects in Forest Ecosystems and their Carbon Cycle Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderegg, W.; Schwalm, C.; Biondi, F.; Camarero, J. J.; Koch, G. W.; Litvak, M. E.; Ogle, K.; Shaw, J.; Shevliakova, E.; Williams, P.; Wolf, A.; Ziaco, E.; Pacala, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    The impacts of climate extremes on terrestrial ecosystems are poorly understood but central for predicting carbon cycle feedbacks to climate change. Coupled climate-carbon cycle models typically assume that vegetation recovery from extreme drought is immediate and complete, which conflicts with basic plant physiological understanding. We examine the recovery of tree stem growth after severe drought at 1,338 forest sites globally comprising 49,339 site-years and compare it to simulated recovery in climate-vegetation models. We find pervasive and substantial "legacy effects" of reduced growth and incomplete recovery for 1-4 years after severe drought, and that legacy effects are most prevalent in dry ecosystems, Pinaceae, and species with low hydraulic safety margins. In contrast, no or limited legacy effects are simulated in current climate-vegetation models after drought. Our results highlight hysteresis in ecosystem carbon cycling and delayed recovery from climate extremes.

  9. Quasi-100 ky glacial-interglacial cycles triggered by subglacial burial carbon release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Zeng

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism is proposed in which climate, carbon cycle and icesheets interact with each other to produce a feedback that can lead to quasi-100 ky glacial-interglacial cycles. A central process is the burial and preservation of organic carbon by icesheets which contributes to the observed glacial-interglacial CO2 change (the glacial burial hypothesis, Zeng, 2003. Allowing carbon cycle to interact with physical climate, here I further hypothesize that deglaciation can be triggered by the ejection of glacial burial carbon when a major icesheet grows to sufficiently large size after a prolonged glaciation so that subglacial transport becomes significant. Glacial inception may be initiated by CO2 drawdown due to a relaxation from a high but transient interglacial CO2 value as the land-originated CO2 invades into deep ocean via thermohaline circulation and CaCO3 compensation. Also important for glacial inception may be the CO2 uptake by vegetation and soil regrowth in the previously ice-covered regions. When tested in a fully coupled Earth system model with comprehensive carbon cycle components and semi-empirical physical climate components, it produced under certain parameter regimes self-sustaining glacial-interglacial cycles with durations of 93 ky, CO2 changes of 90 ppmv, temperature changes of 6°C. Since the 100 ky cycles can not be easily explained by the Milankovitch astronomical forcing alone, this carbon-climate-icesheet mechanism provides a strong feedback that could interact with external forcings to produce the major observed Quaternary climatic variations. It is speculated that some glacial terminations may be triggered by this internal feedback while others by orbital forcing. Some observable consequences are highlighted that may support or falsify the theory.

  10. Cellulose: A review as natural, modified and activated carbon adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhas; Gupta, V K; Carrott, P J M; Singh, Randhir; Chaudhary, Monika; Kushwaha, Sarita

    2016-09-01

    Cellulose is a biodegradable, renewable, non-meltable polymer which is insoluble in most solvents due to hydrogen bonding and crystallinity. Natural cellulose shows lower adsorption capacity as compared to modified cellulose and its capacity can be enhanced by modification usually by chemicals. This review focuses on the utilization of cellulose as an adsorbent in natural/modified form or as a precursor for activated carbon (AC) for adsorbing substances from water. The literature revealed that cellulose can be a promising precursor for production of activated carbon with appreciable surface area (∼1300m(2)g(-1)) and total pore volume (∼0.6cm(3)g(-1)) and the surface area and pore volume varies with the cellulose content. Finally, the purpose of review is to report a few controversies and unresolved questions concerning the preparation/properties of ACs from cellulose and to make aware to readers that there is still considerable scope for future development, characterization and utilization of ACs from cellulose.

  11. Circadian Entrainment to the Natural Light-Dark Cycle across Seasons and the Weekend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothard, Ellen R; McHill, Andrew W; Depner, Christopher M; Birks, Brian R; Moehlman, Thomas M; Ritchie, Hannah K; Guzzetti, Jacob R; Chinoy, Evan D; LeBourgeois, Monique K; Axelsson, John; Wright, Kenneth P

    2017-02-20

    Reduced exposure to daytime sunlight and increased exposure to electrical lighting at night leads to late circadian and sleep timing [1-3]. We have previously shown that exposure to a natural summer 14 hr 40 min:9 hr 20 min light-dark cycle entrains the human circadian clock to solar time, such that the internal biological night begins near sunset and ends near sunrise [1]. Here we show that the beginning of the biological night and sleep occur earlier after a week's exposure to a natural winter 9 hr 20 min:14 hr 40 min light-dark cycle as compared to the modern electrical lighting environment. Further, we find that the human circadian clock is sensitive to seasonal changes in the natural light-dark cycle, showing an expansion of the biological night in winter compared to summer, akin to that seen in non-humans [4-8]. We also show that circadian and sleep timing occur earlier after spending a weekend camping in a summer 14 hr 39 min:9 hr 21 min natural light-dark cycle compared to a typical weekend in the modern environment. Weekend exposure to natural light was sufficient to achieve ∼69% of the shift in circadian timing we previously reported after a week's exposure to natural light [1]. These findings provide evidence that the human circadian clock adapts to seasonal changes in the natural light-dark cycle and is timed later in the modern environment in both winter and summer. Further, we demonstrate that earlier circadian timing can be rapidly achieved through natural light exposure during a weekend spent camping.

  12. Determination of calcium carbonate and sodium carbonate melting curves up to Earth's transition zone pressures with implications for the deep carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zeyu; Li, Jie; Lange, Rebecca; Liu, Jiachao; Militzer, Burkhard

    2017-01-01

    Melting of carbonated eclogite or peridotite in the mantle influences the Earth's deep volatile cycles and bears on the long-term evolution of the atmosphere. Existing data on the melting curves of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) are limited to 7 GPa and therefore do not allow a full understanding of carbon storage and cycling in deep Earth. We determined the melting curves of CaCO3 and Na2CO3 to the pressures of Earth's transition zone using a multi-anvil apparatus. Melting was detected in situ by monitoring a steep and large increase in ionic conductivity, or inferred from sunken platinum markers in recovered samples. The melting point of CaCO3 rises from 1870 K at 3 GPa to ∼2000 K at 6 GPa and then stays within 50 K of 2000 K between 6 and 21 GPa. In contrast, the melting point of Na2CO3 increases continuously from ∼1123 K at 3 GPa to ∼1950 K at 17 GPa. A pre-melting peak in the alternating current through solid CaCO3 is attributed to the transition from aragonite to calcite V. Accordingly the calcite V-aragonite-liquid invariant point is placed at 13 ± 1 GPa and 1970 ± 40 K, with the Clapeyron slope of the calcite V to aragonite transition constrained at ∼70 K/GPa. The experiments on CaCO3 suggest a slight decrease in the melting temperature from 8 to 13 GPa, followed by a slight increase from 14 to 21 GPa. The negative melting slope is consistent with the prediction from our ab initio simulations that the liquid may be more compressible and become denser than calcite V at sufficiently high pressure. The positive melting slope at higher pressures is supported by the ab initio prediction that aragonite is denser than the liquid at pressures up to 30 GPa. At transition zone pressures the melting points of CaCO3 are comparable to that of Na2CO3 but nearly 400 K and 500 K lower than that of MgCO3. The fusible nature of compressed CaCO3 may be partially responsible for the majority of carbonatitic melts found on Earth's surface

  13. Effects of climate variability and functional changes on carbon cycling in a temperate deciduous forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Jian

    Temperate forests are globally important carbon (C) stocks and sinks. A decadal (1997-2009) trend of increasing C uptake has been observed in an intensively studied temperate deciduous forest, Sorø (Zealand, Denmark). This gave the impetus to investigate the factors controlling the C cycling...... calculated ECB components based on mass balance equations, a synthesis of the carbon cycling was performed. The results showed that this temperature deciduous forest was moderately productive with both high rates of gross primary production and ecosystem respiration. Approximately 62% of the gross...... of studies in order to provide a complete assessment of the carbon storage and allocation within the ecosystem and clarify the mechanisms responsible for the observed variability and trend in the ecosystem C fluxes. Combining all independently estimated ecosystem carbon budget (ECB) datasets and other...

  14. Linking carbon and water cycles using stable isotopes across scales: progress and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Werner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool for tracing biogeochemical processes in the carbon and water cycles. One particularly powerful approach is to employ multiple isotopes where the simultaneous assessment of the D/H,18O/16O and/or 13C/12C in different compounds provide a unique means to investigate the coupling of water and carbon fluxes at various temporal and spatial scales. Here, we present a research update on recent advances in our process-based understanding of the utilization of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen isotopes to lend insight into carbon and water cycling. We highlight recent technological developments and approaches, their strengths and methodological precautions with examples covering scales from minutes to centuries and from the leaf to the globe.

  15. Configuration Consideration for Expander in Transcritical Carbon Dioxide Two-Stage Compression Cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yitai; YANG Junlan; GUAN Haiqing; LI Minxia

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the configuration consideration of expander in transcritical carbon dioxide two-stage compression cycle, the best place in the cycle should be searched for to reinvest the recovery work so as to improve the system efficiency. The expander and the compressor are connected to the same shaft and integrated into one unit, with the latter being driven by the former, thus the transfer loss and leakage loss can be decreased greatly. In these systems, the expander can be either connected with the first stage compressor (shortened as DCDL cycle) or the second stage compressor (shortened as DCDH cycle), but the two configuration ways can get different performances. By setting up theoretical model for two kinds of expander configuration ways in the transcritical carbon dioxide two-stage compression cycle, the first and the second laws of thermodynamics are used to analyze the coefficient of performance, exergy efficiency, inter-stage pressure, discharge temperature and exergy losses of each component for the two cycles. From the model results, the performance of DCDH cycle is better than that of DCDL cycle. The analysis results are indispensable to providing a theoretical basis for practical design and operating.

  16. Perturbation of Aptian and Valanginian Carbon Cycle and Marine Biocalcification Crises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissert, H.; Burla, S.

    2005-12-01

    The mid-Cretaceous is known as a time of major perturbations of the global carbon cycle, which coincided with widespread biocalcification crises. Detailed Ccarbonate and Corganic carbon isotope records through the early Aptian show a prominent negative spike followed by a positive carbon isotope anomaly with amplitude of up to 3permil. Based on cyclostratigraphy, the negative C-isotope anomaly lasted up to a few hundred thousand years while the positive excursion had duration of up to millions of years. The negative spike coincides with low oxygen isotope values documented from the Pacific and Tethys Oceans. Tethyan carbon isotope data indicate that fractionation between marine organic matter and carbonate was largest during the time of most negative carbon isotope values. These data provide evidence that atmospheric carbon dioxide levels were highest during the time of the negative spike. The negative carbon isotope spike coincides with a major biocalcification crisis which is recorded in pelagic, neritic and coastal environments. New carbon and strontium isotope data from Aptian coastal successions in Portugal confirm that the most severe Aptian biocalcification crisis started before but culminated during negative carbon isotope anomaly. The widespread Aptian biocalcifcation crisis seems to have been triggered by elevated atmospheric CO2 values related to volcanic activity. Sudden methane release contributed to an amplification of greenhouse climate and it led to further weakening of marine calcification. Comparable calcification crises are recognized in the Valanginian. There, a negative carbon isotope anomaly recoding a methane pulse is not observed. Volcanic degassing alone seems to have triggered this calcification crisis. The positive carbon isotope excursions in the early Aptian and in the Valanginian following the biocalcification crises record the response of oceans and biota to greenhouse climate. Increased organic carbon burial and an accelerated

  17. "Days of future passed" - climate change and carbon cycle history (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissert, Helmut

    2013-04-01

    With the beginning of the fossil fuel age in the 19th century mankind has become an important geological agent on a global scale. For the first time in human history action of man has an impact on global biogeochemical cycles. Increasing CO2 concentrations will result in a perturbation of global carbon cycling coupled with climate change. Investigations of past changes in carbon cycling and in climate will improve our predictions of future climate. Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations will drive climate into a mode of operation, which may resemble climate conditions in the deep geological past. Pliocene climate will give insight into 400ppm world with higher global sea level than today. Doubling of pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 levels will shift the climate system into a state resembling greenhouse climate in the Early Cenozoic or even in the Cretaceous. Carbon isotope geochemistry serves as tool for tracing the pathway of the carbon cycle through geological time. Globally registered negative C-isotope anomalies in the C-isotope record are interpreted as signatures of rapid addition (103 to a few 104 years) of CO2 to the ocean-atmosphere system. Positive C-isotope excursions following negative spikes record the slow post-perturbation recovery of the biosphere at time scales of 105 to 106 years. Duration of C-cycle perturbations in earth history cannot be directly compared with rapid perturbation characterizing the Anthropocene. However, the investigation of greenhouse pulses in the geological past provides insight into different climate states, it allows to identify tipping points in past climate systems and it offers the opportunity to learn about response reactions of the biosphere to rapid changes in global carbon cycling. Sudden injection of massive amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is recorded in C-isotope record of the Early Cretaceous. The Aptian carbon cycle perturbation triggered changes in temperature and in global hydrological cycling

  18. Connecting the Water and Carbon Cycles for the Generation of Food Security and Ecosystem Services

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Shivaan M.; Poncé-Hernandez, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Water scarcity and food insecurity are pervasive issues in the developing world and are also intrinsically linked to one another. Through the connection of the water cycle and the carbon cycle this study illustrates that synergistic benefits can be realized by small scale farmers through the implementation of waste water irrigated agroforestry. The WaNuLCAS model is employed using La Huerta agroforestry site in Texcoco, South Central Mexico, as the basis for parameterization. The results of m...

  19. Eccentricity pacing of eastern equatorial Pacific carbonate dissolution cycles during the Miocene Climatic Optimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhann, Karlos G. D.; Holbourn, Ann; Kuhnt, Wolfgang; Channell, James E. T.; Lyle, Mitch; Shackford, Julia K.; Wilkens, Roy H.; Andersen, Nils

    2016-09-01

    The Miocene Climatic Optimum (MCO; ~16.9 to 14.7 Ma) provides an outstanding opportunity to investigate climate-carbon cycle dynamics during a geologically recent interval of global warmth. We present benthic stable oxygen (δ18O) and carbon (δ13C) isotope records (5-12 kyr time resolution) spanning the late early to middle Miocene interval (18 to 13 Ma) at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1335 (eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean). The U1335 stable isotope series track the onset and development of the MCO as well as the transitional climatic phase culminating with global cooling and expansion of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet at ~13.8 Ma. We integrate these new data with published stable isotope, geomagnetic polarity, and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanner-derived carbonate records from IODP Sites U1335, U1336, U1337, and U1338 on a consistent, astronomically tuned timescale. Benthic isotope and XRF scanner-derived CaCO3 records depict prominent 100 kyr variability with 400 kyr cyclicity additionally imprinted on δ13C and CaCO3 records, pointing to a tight coupling between the marine carbon cycle and climate variations. Our intersite comparison further indicates that the lysocline behaved in highly dynamic manner throughout the MCO, with >75% carbonate loss occurring at paleodepths ranging from ~3.4 to ~4 km in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean. Carbonate dissolution maxima coincide with warm phases (δ18O minima) and δ13C decreases, implying that climate-carbon cycle feedbacks fundamentally differed from the late Pleistocene glacial-interglacial pattern, where dissolution maxima correspond to δ13C maxima and δ18O minima. Carbonate dissolution cycles during the MCO were, thus, more similar to Paleogene hyperthermal patterns.

  20. Nitrogen restrictions buffer modeled interactions of water with the carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuanyuan; Gerber, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon and water cycles are coupled at multiple spatiotemporal scales and are crucial to carbon sequestration. Water related climate extremes, such as drought and intense precipitation, can substantially affect the carbon cycle. Meanwhile, nitrogen is a limiting resource to plant and has therefore the potential to alter the coupling of water and carbon cycles on land. Here we assess the effect of nitrogen limitation on the response of the terrestrial carbon cycle to moisture anomalies using Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's land surface model LM3V-N. We analyzed the response of three central carbon fluxes: net primary productivity (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), and net ecosystem productivity (NEP, the difference between NPP and Rh) and how these fluxes were altered under anomalies of the standardized precipitation and evapotranspiration index (SPEI). We found that globally, the correlations between each of the carbon flux and SPEI depended on the timescale and a strong legacy effect of SPEI anomalies on Rh. Consideration of nitrogen constraints reduced anomalies in carbon fluxes in response to extreme dry/wet events. This nitrogen-induced buffer constrained the growth of plants under wet extremes and allowed for enhanced growth during droughts. Extra gain of soil moisture from the downregulation of canopy transpiration by nitrogen limitation and shifts in the relative importance of water and nitrogen limitation during dry/wet extreme events are possible mechanisms contributing to the buffering of modeled NPP and NEP. Responses of Rh to moisture anomalies were much weaker compared to NPP, and N buffering effects were less evident.

  1. Black carbon or brown carbon? The nature of light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Andreae

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the definition and measurement techniques for atmospheric 'black carbon' ('BC' or 'elemental carbon'' ('EC' have long been subjects of scientific controversy, the recent discovery of light-absorbing carbon that is not black ('brown carbon, Cbrown' makes it imperative to reassess and redefine the components that make up light-absorbing carbonaceous matter (LAC in the atmosphere. Evidence for the atmospheric presence of Cbrown comes from (1 spectral aerosol light absorption measurements near specific combustion sources, (2 observations of spectral properties of water extracts of continental aerosol, (3 laboratory studies indicating the formation of light-absorbing organic matter in the atmosphere, and (4 indirectly from the chemical analogy of aerosol species to colored natural humic substances. We show that brown carbon may severely bias measurements of 'BC' and 'EC' over vast parts of the troposphere, especially those strongly polluted by biomass burning, where the mass concentration of Cbrown is high relative to that of soot carbon. Chemical measurements to determine 'EC' are biased by the refractory nature of Cbrown as well as by complex matrix interferences. Optical measurements of 'BC' suffer from a number of problems: (1 many of the presently used instruments introduce a substantial bias into the determination of aerosol light absorption, (2 there is no unique conversion factor between light absorption and 'EC' or 'BC' concentration in ambient aerosols, and (3 the difference in spectral properties between the different types of LAC, as well as the chemical complexity of Cbrown, lead to several conceptual as well as practical complications. We also suggest that due to the sharply increasing absorption of Cbrown towards the UV, single-wavelength light absorption measurements may not be adequate for the assessment of absorption of solar radiation in the troposphere. We discuss the possible consequences of these effects for our

  2. Plant impact on the coupled terrestrial biogeochemical cycles of silicon and carbon: Implications for biogeochemical carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhaoliang; Wang, Hailong; Strong, P. James; Li, Zimin; Jiang, Peikun

    2012-12-01

    The coupled terrestrial biogeochemical cycles of silicon (Si) and carbon (C) that are driven by plant action play a crucial role in the regulation of atmospheric CO2. Generally, the processes involved in the coupled cycles of Si and C include plant-enhanced silicate weathering, phytolith formation and solubilization, secondary aluminosilicate accumulation, phytolith occlusion of C as well as physico-chemical protection of organic C in soils. There is increasing evidence of biological pumping of Si in terrestrial ecosystems, suggesting that complex feedbacks exist amongst the processes within the coupled Si and C cycles. Recent advances in the coupled Si and C cycles offer promising new possibilities for enhancing atmospheric CO2 sequestration. Organic mulching, rock powder amendment, cultivating Si-accumulating plants and partial plant harvesting are potential measures that may allow for long-term manipulation and biogeochemical sequestration of atmospheric CO2 in soil-plant systems.

  3. Climate extremes and the carbon cycle - a review using an integrated approach with regional examples for forests & native ecosystems -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, D.; Reichstein, M.; Bahn, M.; Beer, C.; Ciais, P.; Mahecha, M.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Smith, P.; van Oijen, M.; Walz, A.

    2012-04-01

    The terrestrial carbon cycle provides an important biogeochemical feedback to climate and is itself particularly susceptible to extreme climate events. Climate extremes can override any (positive) effects of mean climate change as shown in European and recent US-American heat waves and dry spells. They can impact the structure, composition, and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems and have the potential to cause rapid carbon losses from accumulated stocks. We review how climate extremes like severe droughts, heat waves, extreme precipitation or storms can cause direct impacts on the CO2 fluxes [e.g. due to extreme temperature and/ or drought events] as well as lagged impacts on the carbon cycle [e.g. via an increased fire risk, or disease outbreaks and pest invasions]. The relative impact of the different climate extremes varies according to climate region and vegetation type. We present lagged effects on plant growth (and mortality) in the year(s) following an extreme event and their impacts on the carbon sequestration of forests and natural ecosystems. Comprehensive regional or even continental quantification with regard to extreme events is missing, and especially compound extreme events, the role of lagged effects and aspects of the return frequency are not studied enough. In a case study of a Mediterranean ecosystem we illustrate that the response of the net carbon balance at ecosystem level to regional climate change is hard to predict as interacting and partly compensating processes are affected and several processes which have the ability to substantially alter the carbon balance are not or not sufficiently represented in state-of-the-art biogeochemical models.

  4. Summary of Recent Climate Change Studies on the Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles in the Terrestrial Ecosystem and Ocean in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yongfu; HUANG Yao; LI Yangchun

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances over the past 4 years in the study of the carbon-nitrogen cycling and their relationship to climate change in China.The net carbon sink in the Chinese terrestrial ecosystem was 0.19- 0.26 Pg C yr -1 for the 1980s and 1990s. Both natural wetlands and the rice-paddy regions emitted 1.76 Tg and 6.62 Tg of CH4 per year for the periods 1995-2004 and 2005 2009,respectively.China emitted ~1.1 Tg N2O-N yr-1 to the atmosphere in 2004. Land soil contained ~8.3 Pg N.The excess nitrogen stored in farmland of the Yangtze River basin reached 1.51 Tg N and 2.67 Tg N in 1980 and 1990,respectively.The outer Yangtze Estuary served as a moderate or significant sink of atmospheric CO2 except in autumn.Phytoplankton could take up carbon at a rate of 6.4 ×1011 kg yr-1 in the China Sea.The global ocean absorbed anthropogenic CO2 at the rates of 1.64 and 1.73 Pg C yr-1 for two simulations in the 1990s.Land net ecosystem production in China would increase until the mid-21st century then would decrease gradually under future climate change scenarios. This research should be strengthened in the future,including collection of more observation data,measurement of the soil organic carbon (SOC) loss and sequestration,evaluation of changes in SOC in deep soil layers,and the impacts of grassland management,carbon-nitrogen coupled effects,and development and improvement of various component models and of the coupled carbon cycle-climate model.

  5. Key issues and options in accounting for carbon sequestration and temporary storage in life cycle assessment and carbon footprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandao, Miguel; Levasseur, Annie; Kirschbaum, Miko U. F.

    2013-01-01

    footprinting (CF) are increasingly popular tools for the environmental assessment of products, that take into account their entire life cycle. There have been significant efforts to develop robust methods to account for the benefits, if any, of sequestration and temporary storage and release of biogenic carbon....... However, there is still no overall consensus on the most appropriate ways of considering and quantifying it. Method: This paper reviews and discusses six available methods for accounting for the potential climate impacts of carbon sequestration and temporary storage or release of biogenic carbon in LCA...... and CF. Several viewpoints and approaches are presented in a structured manner to help decision-makers in their selection of an option from competing approaches for dealing with timing issues, including delayed emissions of fossil carbon. Results: Key issues identified are that the benefits of temporary...

  6. Rethinking the area of protection "natural resources" in life cycle assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewulf, Jo; Benini, Lorenzo; Mancini, Lucia; Sala, Serenella; Blengini, Gian Andrea; Ardente, Fulvio; Recchioni, Marco; Maes, Joachim; Pant, Rana; Pennington, David

    2015-05-05

    Life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) in classical life cycle assessment (LCA) aims at analyzing potential impacts of products and services typically on three so-called areas of protection (AoPs): Natural Environment, Human Health, and Natural Resources. This paper proposes an elaboration of the AoP Natural Resources. It starts with analyzing different perspectives on Natural Resources as they are somehow sandwiched in between the Natural Environment (their cradle) and the human-industrial environment (their application). Reflecting different viewpoints, five perspectives are developed with the suggestion to select three in function of classical LCA. They result in three safeguard subjects: the Asset of Natural Resources, their Provisioning Capacity, and their role in Global Functions. Whereas the Provisioning Capacity is fully in function of humans, the global functions go beyond provisioning as they include nonprovisioning functions for humans and regulating and maintenance services for the globe as a whole, following the ecosystem services framework. A fourth and fifth safeguard subject has been identified: recognizing the role Natural Resources for human welfare, either specifically as building block in supply chains of products and services as such, either with or without their functions beyond provisioning. But as these are far broader as they in principle should include characterization of mechanisms within the human industrial society, they are considered as subjects for an integrated sustainability assessment (LCSA: life cycle sustainability assessment), that is, incorporating social, economic and environmental issues.

  7. Responses in Arctic marine carbon cycle processes: conceptual scenarios and implications for ecosystem function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen S. Findlay

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic Ocean is one of the fastest changing oceans, plays an important role in global carbon cycling and yet is a particularly challenging ocean to study. Hence, observations tend to be relatively sparse in both space and time. How the Arctic functions, geophysically, but also ecologically, can have significant consequences for the internal cycling of carbon, and subsequently influence carbon export, atmospheric CO2 uptake and food chain productivity. Here we assess the major carbon pools and associated processes, specifically summarizing the current knowledge of each of these processes in terms of data availability and ranges of rates and values for four geophysical Arctic Ocean domains originally described by Carmack & Wassmann (2006: inflow shelves, which are Pacific-influenced and Atlantic-influenced; interior, river-influenced shelves; and central basins. We attempt to bring together knowledge of the carbon cycle with the ecosystem within each of these different geophysical settings, in order to provide specialist information in a holistic context. We assess the current state of models and how they can be improved and/or used to provide assessments of the current and future functioning when observational data are limited or sparse. In doing so, we highlight potential links in the physical oceanographic regime, primary production and the flow of carbon within the ecosystem that will change in the future. Finally, we are able to highlight priority areas for research, taking a holistic pan-Arctic approach.

  8. Linking calcification by exotic snails to stream inorganic carbon cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchkiss, Erin R; Hall, Robert O

    2010-05-01

    Biotic calcification is rarely considered in freshwater C budgets, despite calculations suggesting that calcifying animals can alter inorganic C cycling. Most studies that have quantified biocalcification in aquatic ecosystems have not directly linked CO(2) fluxes from biocalcification with whole-ecosystem rates of inorganic C cycling. The freshwater snail, Melanoides tuberculata, has achieved a high abundance and 37.4 g biomass m(-2) after invading Kelly Warm Springs in Grand Teton National Park. This high biomass suggests that introduced populations of Melanoides may alter ecosystem processes. We measured Melanoides growth rates and biomass to calculate the production of biomass, shell mass, and CO(2). We compared Melanoides biomass and inorganic C production with ecosystem C pools and fluxes, as well as with published rates of CO(2) production by other calcifying organisms. Melanoides calcification in Kelly Warm Springs produced 12.1 mmol CO(2) m(-2) day(-1) during summer months. We measured high rates of gross primary productivity and respiration in Kelly Warm Springs (-378 and 533 mmol CO(2) m(-2) day(-1), respectively); CO(2) produced from biocalcification increased net CO(2) production in Kelly Warm Springs from 155 to 167 mmol CO(2) m(-2) day(-1). This rate of CO(2) production via biocalcification is within the published range of calcification by animals. But these CO(2) fluxes are small when compared to ecosystem C fluxes from stream metabolism. The influence of animals is relative to ecosystem processes, and should always be compared with ecosystem fluxes to quantify the importance of a specific animal in its environment.

  9. Nutrient and carbon cycling in the Kafue River (Zambia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbruegg, R.; Senn, D.; Lehmann, M.; Wamulume, J.; Nyambe, I.; Wehrli, B.

    2008-12-01

    The lower Kafue River in central Zambia flows through the Kafue Flats (830 sq. km), a sensitive floodplain ecosystem (Ramsar site), and serves as an important subsistence fishery. The lower Kafue River (Qavg ~ 300 m3/s) is heavily impacted by two dams that regulate flow and flooding, and in so doing have substantially degraded the habitats. While the hydrology and ecology of the system have been studied extensively in some sections, there have been no systematic studies of the dam impacts on floodplain biogeochemistry. In May 2008 we initiated a study of C, N, and P cycling in the lower Kafue River through sampling at 10-20 km resolution along 300 km of river. Low inorganic nitrogen levels (40 uM), suggesting that the riverine N budget is dominated by organic N. Phosphate concentrations increased by a factor of 4 along the river (0.2 uM to 0.8 uM), and transitioned from representing only a small fraction of total P upstream to accounting for nearly 100% of total P at downstream stations. Along one short (35 km; travel time ~ 16 h), relatively pristine stretch of river with a substantial flow rate (400 m3/s) and no visible tributaries, dissolved oxygen levels decreased from >5 mg/l to 1 mg/l. A drop in pH from (7.9 to 7.2) accompanied the sharp oxygen decline, consistent with respiration occurring either within the river or in the adjacent floodplain. Low dissolved oxygen levels (<2 mg/l). persisted for another 150 km downstream despite reaeration. This presentation will explore in greater detail the factors contributing to this persistent low oxygen stretch in the Kafue River, along with an exploration of N, C, and P cycling in the system

  10. The climate dependence of the terrestrial carbon cycle; including parameter and structural uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Smith

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The feedback between climate and the terrestrial carbon cycle will be a key determinant of the dynamics of the Earth System over the coming decades and centuries. However Earth System Model projections of the terrestrial carbon-balance vary widely over these timescales. This is largely due to differences in their carbon cycle models. A major goal in biogeosciences is therefore to improve understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle to enable better constrained projections. Essential to achieving this goal will be assessing the empirical support for alternative models of component processes, identifying key uncertainties and inconsistencies, and ultimately identifying the models that are most consistent with empirical evidence. To begin meeting these requirements we data-constrained all parameters of all component processes within a global terrestrial carbon model. Our goals were to assess the climate dependencies obtained for different component processes when all parameters have been inferred from empirical data, assess whether these were consistent with current knowledge and understanding, assess the importance of different data sets and the model structure for inferring those dependencies, assess the predictive accuracy of the model, and to identify a methodology by which alternative component models could be compared within the same framework in future. Although formulated as differential equations describing carbon fluxes through plant and soil pools, the model was fitted assuming the carbon pools were in states of dynamic equilibrium (input rates equal output rates. Thus, the parameterised model is of the equilibrium terrestrial carbon cycle. All but 2 of the 12 component processes to the model were inferred to have strong climate dependencies although it was not possible to data-constrain all parameters indicating some potentially redundant details. Similar climate dependencies were obtained for most processes whether inferred

  11. Revisiting the subduction zone carbon cycle: What goes down, mostly comes up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Peter; Manning, Craig

    2016-04-01

    As we reported (PNAS 2015), carbon fluxes in subduction zones can be better constrained by including new estimates of carbon concentration in subducting mantle peridotites, consideration of carbonate solubility in aqueous fluid along subduction geotherms, and diapirism of carbon-bearing metasediments. Whereas previous studies concluded that about half the subducting carbon is returned to the convecting mantle, we find it is likely that relatively little carbon is recycled. If so, input from subduction zones into the overlying plate is larger than output from arc volcanoes plus diffuse venting, and substantial quantities of carbon are stored in the mantle lithosphere and crust. Also, if the subduction zone carbon cycle is nearly closed on time scales of 5-10 Ma, then the carbon content of the mantle lithosphere + crust + ocean + atmosphere must be increasing. This is consistent with inferences from noble gas data and crustal carbon inventories (review in Hayes & Waldbauer PTRSL 2006). Carbon in diamonds, which may have been recycled into the convecting mantle, is a small fraction of the global carbon inventory. Increasing NaCl and decreasing pH and fO2 in aqueous fluids all increase carbon solubility at HP to UHP conditions, strengthening the prediction of wt% solubility (Manning & Kelemen, Fall AGU 2015), while hydrous carbonatite formed on high T subduction geotherms (Poli, Nat Geosci 2015) has still higher concentrations. Fractures heal rapidly at UHP conditions, so fluid transport is mainly via porous flow, with increasing downstream solubility and porosity due to heating in the subducting plate and base of the mantle wedge. Depending on flow and reaction rates vs diffusivity (Damkohler number), this could yield diffuse or channelized flow. High, increasing solubilities and reaction rates, with slow diffusion, can produce diffuse, pervasive porous flow (e.g., Hoefner & Fogler, AIChEJ 1988; Spiegelman et al, JGR 2001) and efficient recycling of carbon.

  12. Linking AS, SE, V, and MN Behavior to Natural Biostimulated Uranium Cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keimowitz, Alison [Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY (United States); Ranville, James [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Mailloux, Brian [Barnard College, New York, NY (United States); Figueroa, Linda [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-03-16

    The project “Linking As, Se, V, and Mn behavior to Natural and Biostimulated Uranium Cycling” successfully investigated Arsenic cycling the Rifle Colorado IFRC. This project trained undergraduate and graduate students at the Colorado School of Mines, Vassar College, and Barnard College. This resulted in both undergraduate theses and a PhD thesis and multiple publications. The science was highly successful and we were able to test the main hypotheses. We have shown that (H1) under reducing conditions that promote uranium immobilization arsenic is readily mobilized, that (H2) thioarsenic species are abundant during this mobilization, and (H3) we have examined arsenic mobilization for site sediment. At the Rifle IFRC Acetate was added during experiments to immobilize Uranium. These experiments successfully immobilized uranium but unfortunately would mobilize arsenic. We developed robust sampling and analysis methods for thioarsenic species. We showed that the mobilization occurred under sulfate reducing conditions and the majority of the arsenic was in the form of thioarsenic species. Previous studies had predicted the presence of thioarsenic species but this study used robust field and laboratory methods to quantitatively determine the presence of thioarsenic species. During stimulation in wells with high arsenic the primary species were trithioarsenate and dithioarsenate. In wells with low levels of arsenic release thioarsenates were absent or minor components. Fortunately after the injection of acetate ended the aquifer would become less reducing and the arsenic concentrations would decrease to pre-injection levels. In aquifers where organic carbon is being added as a remedial method or as a contaminant the transient mobility of arsenic during sulfidogenesis should be considered especially in sulfate rich aquifers as this could impact downgradient water quality.

  13. Climate and landscape influence on indicators of lake carbon cycling through spatial patterns in dissolved organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Jean-Francois; Seekell, David A; Del Giorgio, Paul A

    2015-12-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are strongly influenced by both climate and the surrounding landscape, yet the specific pathways connecting climatic and landscape drivers to the functioning of lake ecosystems are poorly understood. Here, we hypothesize that the links that exist between spatial patterns in climate and landscape properties and the spatial variation in lake carbon (C) cycling at regional scales are at least partly mediated by the movement of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the aquatic component of the landscape. We assembled a set of indicators of lake C cycling (bacterial respiration and production, chlorophyll a, production to respiration ratio, and partial pressure of CO2 ), DOC concentration and composition, and landscape and climate characteristics for 239 temperate and boreal lakes spanning large environmental and geographic gradients across seven regions. There were various degrees of spatial structure in climate and landscape features that were coherent with the regionally structured patterns observed in lake DOC and indicators of C cycling. These different regions aligned well, albeit nonlinearly along a mean annual temperature gradient; whereas there was a considerable statistical effect of climate and landscape properties on lake C cycling, the direct effect was small and the overall effect was almost entirely overlapping with that of DOC concentration and composition. Our results suggest that key climatic and landscape signals are conveyed to lakes in part via the movement of terrestrial DOC to lakes and that DOC acts both as a driver of lake C cycling and as a proxy for other external signals.

  14. Task Order 20: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Energy Conversion Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Paul [AREVA Federal Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States); Lindsay, Edward [AREVA Federal Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States); McDowell, Michael [AREVA Federal Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States); Huang, Megan [AREVA Federal Services, LLC, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2015-04-23

    AREVA Inc. developed this study for the US Department of Energy (DOE) office of Nuclear Energy (NE) in accordance with Task Order 20 Statement of Work (SOW) covering research and development activities for the Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (sCO2) Brayton Cycle energy conversion. The study addresses the conversion of sCO2 heat energy to electrical output by use of a Brayton Cycle system and focuses on the potential of a net efficiency increase via cycle recuperation and recompression stages. The study also addresses issues and study needed to advance development and implementation of a 10 MWe sCO2 demonstration project.

  15. Aquatic carbon cycling in the conterminous United States and implications for terrestrial carbon accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butman, David; Stackpoole, Sarah; Stets, Edward; McDonald, Cory P; Clow, David W; Striegl, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Inland water ecosystems dynamically process, transport, and sequester carbon. However, the transport of carbon through aquatic environments has not been quantitatively integrated in the context of terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we present the first integrated assessment, to our knowledge, of freshwater carbon fluxes for the conterminous United States, where 106 (range: 71-149) teragrams of carbon per year (TgC⋅y(-1)) is exported downstream or emitted to the atmosphere and sedimentation stores 21 (range: 9-65) TgC⋅y(-1) in lakes and reservoirs. We show that there is significant regional variation in aquatic carbon flux, but verify that emission across stream and river surfaces represents the dominant flux at 69 (range: 36-110) TgC⋅y(-1) or 65% of the total aquatic carbon flux for the conterminous United States. Comparing our results with the output of a suite of terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs), we suggest that within the current modeling framework, calculations of net ecosystem production (NEP) defined as terrestrial only may be overestimated by as much as 27%. However, the internal production and mineralization of carbon in freshwaters remain to be quantified and would reduce the effect of including aquatic carbon fluxes within calculations of terrestrial NEP. Reconciliation of carbon mass-flux interactions between terrestrial and aquatic carbon sources and sinks will require significant additional research and modeling capacity.

  16. Large perturbations of the carbon cycle during recovery from the end-permian extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Jonathan L; Lehrmann, Daniel J; Wei, Jiayong; Orchard, Michael J; Schrag, Daniel P; Knoll, Andrew H

    2004-07-23

    High-resolution carbon isotope measurements of multiple stratigraphic sections in south China demonstrate that the pronounced carbon isotopic excursion at the Permian-Triassic boundary was not an isolated event but the first in a series of large fluctuations that continued throughout the Early Triassic before ending abruptly early in the Middle Triassic. The unusual behavior of the carbon cycle coincides with the delayed recovery from end-Permian extinction recorded by fossils, suggesting a direct relationship between Earth system function and biological rediversification in the aftermath of Earth's most devastating mass extinction.

  17. The CharXive Challenge. Regulation of global carbon cycles by vegetation fires

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, R

    2010-01-01

    It is an open, but not unanswerable, question as to how much atmospheric CO2 is sequestered globally by vegetation fires. In this work I conceptualise the question in terms of the general CharXive Challenge, discuss a mechanism by which thermoconversion of biomass may regulate the global distribution of carbon between reservoirs, show how suppression of vegetation fires by human activities may increase the fraction of carbon in the atmospheric pool, and pose three specific CharXive Challenges of crucial strategic significance to our management of global carbon cycles.

  18. The role of mycorrhizal fungi in integrated carbon and nitrogen cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebel, Karin; Phillips, Rich; Fransson, Petra; Brzostek, Eddie; Wassen, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the role of terrestrial ecosystems in removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere remains one of the fundamental challenges to predicting future changes in the Earth's climate. Will forests continue to sequester carbon (C) under rising atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen (N) deposition, or will the capacity of trees to build new biomass be constrained by lack of nutrients? Recent research shows that not all tree species react similarly to N-deposition; differences are found in growth rates, survival and C-storage. Mycorrhizal fungi are an important link in coupling the C and N cycles and are critical for tree growth. Mycorrhizal fungi form mutualistic relationships, receiving carbohydrates from their plant hosts and in return enhancing the supply of critical nutrients. The two most abundant mycorrhizal associations are arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) and ectomycorrhizae (EM), both having different mechanisms of N acquisition, which may explain observed differences in tree species response to N-deposition. Changing environmental variables influence mycorrhizal fungi. Increasing CO2 concentration increases mycorrhizal abundance, growth and plant C allocation belowground. However, the effect of N-deposition on mycorrhizae is less clear. N-deposition can have positive, neutral or negative effects on mycorrhizal abundance and growth. It has been hypothesized that the effect of N-deposition on mycorrhizal growth depends on initial soil nutrient status. This soil nutrient status may also determine the nature of the mycorrhizal relationship to the tree, where in nutrient poor conditions, they could be more beneficial than in nutrient rich conditions. In this research, we extend the hypothesis to include growth of trees associated with either EM or AM, as a function of increasing nitrogen deposition and soil nutrient status. Therefore, we take into account the C-cost and the N-gain of the mycorrhizal fungi for the tree in the different nutrient stages.

  19. Nitrogen management through coupling carbon and nitrogen cycling in agroecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonitto, C.; Gardner, J. B.; David, M. B.; Drinkwater, L. E.

    2011-12-01

    We examined the potential to reduce N loss from agroecosystems through management practices which promote coupled C and N cycling. Point application of inorganic N fertilizer in conventional agricultural systems has decoupled C and N cycling. We compared alternative rotations which reduce bare fallow periods to conventional corn-soybean rotations with a winter bare fallow which are common across the Corn Belt. In a review using meta-analysis we demonstrated that including cover crops in current annual grain rotations reduces nitrate leaching an average of 70% relative to conventional rotations, with no statistically significant change in crop yield. The potential for significant reductions in nitrate leaching in alternative relative to conventional rotations was also demonstrated through simulations using the DNDC model. Rotations including a winter cover crop showed a 35% and 55% reduction in nitrate leaching from corn and soybean fields respectively relative to conventional management; more complex rotations which included a legume N source averaged a 50% reduction in nitrate leaching from corn and soybean fields relative to the conventional system. Our comparison of crop rotations using the DNDC model also demonstrated increasing rotation complexity reduced N2O emissions relative to conventional systems. Examination of N2O loss under different crop rotations using an empirical modeling approach verified a reduced cumulative N2O emission rate under complex rotations. However, while extreme N2O emissions were observed in DNDC simulation outcomes, empirical modeling work concludes extreme N2O flux events are statistically rare given currently available observations. Quantification of 15N recovery using meta-analysis demonstrated that management which varies the type, timing, or placement of inorganic fertilizer resulted in 0-26% recovery of N applied in vegetation or soil. In contrast in legume-fertilized systems 42% of legume-derived N inputs are recovered in

  20. U.S. Eastern Continental Shelf Carbon Cycling (USECoS): Modeling, Data Assimilation, and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Although the oceans play a major role in the uptake of fossil fuel CO2 from the atmosphere, there is much debate about the contribution from continental shelves, since many key shelf fluxes are not yet well quantified: the exchange of carbon across the land-ocean and shelf-slope interfaces, air-sea exchange of CO2, burial, and biological processes including productivity. Our goal is to quantify these carbon fluxes along the eastern U.S. coast using models quantitatively verified by comparison to observations, and to establish a framework for predicting how these fluxes may be modified as a result of climate and land use change. Our research questions build on those addressed with previous NASA funding for the USECoS (U.S. Eastern Continental Shelf Carbon Cycling) project. We have developed a coupled biogeochemical ocean circulation model configured for this study region and have extensively evaluated this model with both in situ and remotely-sensed data. Results indicate that to further reduce uncertainties in the shelf component of the global carbon cycle, future efforts must be directed towards 1) increasing the resolution of the physical model via nesting and 2) making refinements to the biogeochemical model and quantitatively evaluating these via the assimilation of biogeochemical data (in situ and remotely-sensed). These model improvements are essential for better understanding and reducing estimates of uncertainties in current and future carbon transformations and cycling in continental shelf systems. Our approach and science questions are particularly germane to the carbon cycle science goals of the NASA Earth Science Research Program as well as the U.S. Climate Change Research Program and the North American Carbon Program. Our interdisciplinary research team consists of scientists who have expertise in the physics and biogeochemistry of the U.S. eastern continental shelf, remote-sensing data analysis and data assimilative numerical models.

  1. U.S. Eastern Continental Shelf Carbon Cycling (USECoS): Modeling, Data Assimilation, and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Although the oceans play a major role in the uptake of fossil fuel CO2 from the atmosphere, there is much debate about the contribution from continental shelves, since many key shelf fluxes are not yet well quantified: the exchange of carbon across the land-ocean and shelf-slope interfaces, air-sea exchange of CO2, burial, and biological processes including productivity. Our goal is to quantify these carbon fluxes along the eastern U.S. coast using models quantitatively verified by comparison to observations, and to establish a framework for predicting how these fluxes may be modified as a result of climate and land use change. Our research questions build on those addressed with previous NASA funding for the USECoS (U.S. Eastern Continental Shelf Carbon Cycling) project. We have developed a coupled biogeochemical ocean circulation model configured for this study region and have extensively evaluated this model with both in situ and remotely-sensed data. Results indicate that to further reduce uncertainties in the shelf component of the global carbon cycle, future efforts must be directed towards 1) increasing the resolution of the physical model via nesting and 2) making refinements to the biogeochemical model and quantitatively evaluating these via the assimilation of biogeochemical data (in situ and remotely-sensed). These model improvements are essential for better understanding and reducing estimates of uncertainties in current and future carbon transformations and cycling in continental shelf systems. Our approach and science questions are particularly germane to the carbon cycle science goals of the NASA Earth Science Research Program as well as the U.S. Climate Change Research Program and the North American Carbon Program. Our interdisciplinary research team consists of scientists who have expertise in the physics and biogeochemistry of the U.S. eastern continental shelf, remote-sensing data analysis and data assimilative numerical models.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of gas – steam combined cycle with carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions saving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Gupta, Om Prakash, S.K. Shukla

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, cogeneration or combined heat and power (CHP cycle has been analyzed in order to improve the efficiency of the gas – steam combined cycle and utilization of waste heat. The efficiency of the combined cycle is improved by decreasing the compressor inlet temperature (CIT and increasing the turbine inlet temperature (TIT. It is observed that the cycle offers the advantage of making efficient use of the energy available in the fuel and in turn, eliminate some portion of pollution associated with the power generation. The study also reveals that if this cycle is being employed for cogeneration, there is a significant saving (11.60% in the amount of Carbon dioxide (CO2 emitted by the coal-fired thermal power plants.

  3. Role of organic soils in the world carbon cycle: problem analysis and research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armentano, T.V. (ed.)

    1980-02-01

    In May 1979, The Institute of Ecology held a workshop to determine the role of organic soils in the global carbon cycle and to ascertain their past, present and future significance in world carbon flux. Wetlands ecologists and soil scientists who participated in the workshop examined such topics as Soils as Sources of Atmospheric CO/sub 2/, Organic Soils, Primary Production and Growth of Wetlands Ecosystems, and Management of Peatlands. The major finding of the workshop is that the organic soils are important in the overall carbon budget. Histosols and Gleysols, the major organic soil deposits of the world, normally sequester organic carbon fixed by plants. They may now be releasing enough carbon to account for nearly 10% of the annual rise in atmospheric content of CO/sub 2/.

  4. Potential multiple steady-states in the long-term carbon cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Tennenbaum, Stephen; Schwartzman, David

    2013-01-01

    Modelers of the long term carbon cycle in Earth history have previously assumed there is only one stable climatic steady state. Here we investigate the possibility of multiple steady states. We find them in Abiotic World, lacking any biotic influence, resulting from possible variations in planetary albedo in different temperature, atmospheric carbon dioxide level regimes, with the same weathering forcing balancing a volcanic source to the atmosphere, ocean pool. In Plant World modeling relevant to the Phanerozoic, we include the additional effects of biotic enhancement of weathering on land, organic carbon burial, oxidation of reduced organic carbon in terrestrial sediments and the variation of biotic productivity with temperature, finding a second stable steady state appearing between twenty and fifty degrees C. The very warm early Triassic climate may be the prime candidate for an upper temperature steady state. Given our results, the anthropogenic driven rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide could potentially...

  5. Impact of climate change on carbon cycle in freshwater ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kankaala, P.; Ojala, A.; Tulonen, T.; Haapamaeki, J.; Arvola, L. [Helsinki Univ., Lammi (Finland). Lammi Biological Station

    1996-12-31

    The impacts of the expected climate change on Finnish lake ecosystems were studied with the biota of the mesohumic Lake Paeaejaervi, southern Finland. Experimental conditions, from small-scale experiments on single species level to a large-scale ecosystem manipulation, were established to simulate directly the future climate and/or loading of nutrients and dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the drainage area. The experimental studies were accomplished by modelling the carbon flow in the pelagic food web as well as the growth of littoral macrophytes. The main hypothese tested were as follows: As a consequence of the climate change (rising temperature and increasing precipitation) the loading of nutrients and dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the drainage area to the lake will increase. In the pelagic zone this will be first reflected i higher productivity of primary producers and bacteria, but will later affect the entire food chain. Increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and ambient temperature as well as longer growing season will enhance the overall productivity of littoral macrophytes. The higher productivity of the littoral zone will be reflected in the pelagic zone an thus may change the whole ecosystem of the lake

  6. Accelerating the carbon cycle: the ethics of enhanced weathering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawford-Smith, H; Currie, A

    2017-04-01

    Enhanced weathering, in comparison to other geoengineering measures, creates the possibility of a reduced cost, reduced impact way of decreasing atmospheric carbon, with positive knock-on effects such as decreased oceanic acidity. We argue that ethical concerns have a place alongside empirical, political and social factors as we consider how to best respond to the critical challenge that anthropogenic climate change poses. We review these concerns, considering the ethical issues that arise (or would arise) in the large-scale deployment of enhanced weathering. We discuss post-implementation scenarios, failures of collective action, the distribution of risk and externalities and redress for damage. We also discuss issues surrounding 'dirty hands' (taking conventionally immoral action to avoid having to take action that is even worse), whether enhanced weathering research might present a moral hazard, the importance of international governance and the notion that the implementation of large-scale enhanced weathering would reveal problematic hubris. Ethics and scientific research interrelate in complex ways: some ethical considerations caution against research and implementation, while others encourage them. Indeed, the ethical perspective encourages us to think more carefully about how, and what types of, geoengineering should be researched and implemented. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. DESIGN OF HYBRID POWER GENERATION CYCLES EMPLOYING AMMONIA-WATER-CARBON DIOXIDE MIXTURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashish Gupta

    2002-06-01

    A power cycle generates electricity from the heat of combustion of fossil fuels. Its efficiency is governed by the cycle configuration, the operating parameters, and the working fluid. Typical. designs use pure water as the fluid. in the last two decades, hybrid cycles based on ammonia-water, and carbon-dioxide mixtures as the working fluid have been proposed. These cycles may improve the power generation efficiency of Rankine cycles by 15%. Improved efficiency is important for two reasons: it lowers the cost of electricity being produced, and by reducing the consumption of fossil fuels per unit power, it reduces the generation of environmental pollutants. The goal of this project is to develop a computational optimization-based method for the design and analysis of hybrid bottoming power cycles to minimize the usage of fossil fuels. The development of this methodology has been achieved by formulating this task as that of selecting the least cost power cycle design from all possible configurations. They employ a detailed thermodynamic property prediction package they have developed under a DOE-FETC grant to model working fluid mixtures. Preliminary results from this work suggest that a pure NH{sub 3} cycle outperforms steam or the expensive Kalina cycle.

  8. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lovenduski

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−] on the basis of a~long control simulation with an Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32−] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean time series sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32−] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in association with El Niño–Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32−] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20–30-year periods. North Atlantic [CO32−] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these results

  9. Electrophysical properties and structural features of shungite (natural nanostructured carbon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubev, E. A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations of the electrical conductive properties with a nanoscale locality at nanoampere currents and the results of an analysis of the correlation between the electrical conductivity and structural features of natural glassy carbon, i.e., shungite. The investigations have been performed using atomic force microscopy, electric force spectroscopy, scanning spreading resistance microscopy, X-ray spectroscopic analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. It has been found that there are differences in electrical conductive properties of the structurally similar shungite samples formed under different PT conditions. Based on the analysis of the structural parameters and specific features of the shungite compositions, it has been shown that the effect of intercalation of impurities into boundary layers of graphene sheets has the most significant influence on the electrical and physical properties of the shungites. The differences in types and values of conductivity of the shungite samples are determined by the different degrees of intercalation.

  10. Seasonal carbon cycling in a Greenlandic fjord: an integrated pelagic and benthic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Heidi Louise; Meire, Lorenz; Juul-Pedersen, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to have a pronounced effect on biogeochemical cycling in Arctic fjords, but current insight on the biogeochemical functioning of these systems is limited. Here, we present seasonal data on primary production, export of particulate organic carbon (POC), and the coupling...

  11. The Effects of Climate Sensitivity and Carbon Cycle Interactions on Mitigation Policy Stringency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Edmonds, James A.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Waldhoff, Stephanie T.; Wise, Marshall A.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2015-07-01

    Climate sensitivity and climate-carbon cycle feedbacks interact to determine how global carbon and energy cycles will change in the future. While the science of these connections is well documented, their economic implications are not well understood. Here we examine the effect of climate change on the carbon cycle, the uncertainty in climate outcomes inherent in any given policy target, and the economic implications. We examine three policy scenarios—a no policy “Reference” (REF) scenario, and two policies that limit total radiative forcing—with four climate sensitivities using a coupled integrated assessment model. Like previous work, we find that, within a given scenario, there is a wide range of temperature change and sea level rise depending on the realized climate sensitivity. We expand on this previous work to show that temperature-related feedbacks on the carbon cycle result in more mitigation required as climate sensitivity increases. Thus, achieving a particular radiative forcing target becomes increasingly expensive as climate sensitivity increases.

  12. Life Cycle Assessment as a Tool to Enhance the Environmental Performanceof Carbon Nanotube Products: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    The importance of evaluating the environmental performance of emerging carbon nanotube (CNT) products from a life cycle perspective is emphasized in this work. Design, development and deployment of CNT products offer many potential benefits to society, but not without negative im...

  13. Comparing American and Chinese Students' Learning Progression on Carbon Cycling in Socio-Ecological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Anderson, C. W.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies identified a learning progression on the concept of carbon cycling that was typically followed by American students when they progress from elementary to high school. This study examines the validity of this previously identified learning progression for a different group of learners--Chinese students. The results indicate that…

  14. The Environmental Impact of Industrial Bamboo Products: Life-cycle Assessment and Carbon Sequestration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogtlander, J.G.; Van der Lugt, P.

    2014-01-01

    This report gives a Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) and carbon footprint analysis on a selection of industrial bamboo products. The LCA is made for cradle-to-gate, plus the end-of-life stages of the bamboo products. For end-of-life it is assumed that 90% of the bamboo products are incinerated in an elec

  15. Life Cycle Assessment as a Tool to Enhance the Environmental Performanceof Carbon Nanotube Products: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    The importance of evaluating the environmental performance of emerging carbon nanotube (CNT) products from a life cycle perspective is emphasized in this work. Design, development and deployment of CNT products offer many potential benefits to society, but not without negative im...

  16. Seasonal carbon cycling in a Greenlandic fjord: an integrated pelagic and benthic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sørensen, H.L.; Meire, L.; Juul-Pedersen, T.; de Stigter, H.C.; Meysman, F.J.R.; Rysgaard, S.; Thamdrup, B.; Glud, R.N.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to have a pronounced effect on biogeochemical cycling in Arctic fjords, but current insight on the biogeochemical functioning of these systems is limited. Here, we present seasonal data on primary production, export of particulate organic carbon (POC), and the coupling to

  17. 全球碳计划(GCP)北京办公室:了解区域碳循环研究的桥梁%Global Carbon Project (GCP) Beijing Office: a new bridge for understanding regional carbon cycles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶波; 曹明奎; 于贵瑞

    2006-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that human activities, especially burning fossil fuels and land use change, have altered the climate on earth and anthropogenic carbon fluxes have become comparable in magnitude with the natural fluxes in the global carbon cycle. The present and potential threat of adverse consequences has focused the attention of the scientists, policy makers and general public on the interaction among carbon cycle, climate change and human system. Asia is a hot spot from environmental change and sustainable development perspectives. The development pathways and environmental changes in the region have obvious consequences for the regional carbon cycle, even for global carbon budget, and the complex, diverse social, economic and environmental conditions make it highly difficult to understand and quantify these consequences. The GCP Beijing Office "will have a supporting and coordinating role and will provide coordination, leadership and capacity building on carbon cycle sciences in China and to the larger region of Asia" and "liaise with the two International Project Offices based in Canberra and Tsukuba to coordinate a regional and global strategy consistent with the GCP Science and Implementation Framework".

  18. Carbon isotope fractionation in developing natural phototrophic biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staal, M.; Thar, R.; Kühl, M.; van Loosdrecht, M. C. M.; Wolf, G.; de Brouwer, J. F. C.; Rijstenbil, J. W.

    2007-01-01

    Natural phototrophic biofilms are influenced by a broad array of abiotic and biotic factors and vary over temporal and spatial scales. Different developmental stages can be distinguished and growth rates will vary due to the thickening of the biofilm, which are expected to lead to a limitation of light or mass transport. In this study it is shown that a variation of the availability of CO2 leads to a shift in fractionation, thereby affecting δ13C signatures during the successive developmental stages. For phototrophic freshwater biofilms it was found that the δ13C value became less negative with the thickening of the biofilm, while the opposite trend in δ13C values was found in marine biofilms. Modeling and pH profiling indicated that the change in the freshwater system was caused by an increase in CO2 limitation resulting in an increase of HCO3- as C-source. The opposite trend in the marine system could be explained by a higher heterotrophic biomass and activity causing a higher carbon recycling and thereby lower δ13C values. We conclude that δ13C was more related to the net areal photosynthesis rate and carbon recycling, rather than to the growth rate of the biofilms.

  19. Soils Alive! From Tiny Rocks to Composting. Cycling Back to Nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Robert L.; And Others

    This environmental sourcebook contains activities focusing on the living and nonliving components of soil and their relationship to the earth's natural cycles. The materials contained in this guide are for use with youth ages ten and older and are designed to stimulate a sense of stewardship for the environment through group discussion, role…

  20. Wavelength-dependent xanthophyll cycle activity in marine microalgae exposed to natural ultraviolet radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buma, Anita G. J.; Visser, Ronald J. W.; Van De Poll, Willem H.; Villafane, Virginia E.; Janknegt, Paul J.; Walter Helbling, E.

    2009-01-01

    The wavelength dependency of xanthophyll cycling in two marine microalgae (Thalassiosira weissflogii and Dunaliella tertiolecta) was studied by establishing biological weighting functions (BWFs) during exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation. High-(HL) and low-(LL) light-acclimated cultures of

  1. Soils Alive! From Tiny Rocks to Composting. Cycling Back to Nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Robert L.; And Others

    This environmental sourcebook contains activities focusing on the living and nonliving components of soil and their relationship to the earth's natural cycles. The materials contained in this guide are for use with youth ages ten and older and are designed to stimulate a sense of stewardship for the environment through group discussion, role…

  2. The Plio-Pleistocene climatic evolution as a consequence of orbital forcing on the carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, Didier

    2017-09-01

    Since the discovery of ice ages in the 19th century, a central question of climate science has been to understand the respective role of the astronomical forcing and of greenhouse gases, in particular changes in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide. Glacial-interglacial cycles have been shown to be paced by the astronomy with a dominant periodicity of 100 ka over the last million years, and a periodicity of 41 ka between roughly 1 and 3 million years before present (Myr BP). But the role and dynamics of the carbon cycle over the last 4 million years remain poorly understood. In particular, the transition into the Pleistocene about 2.8 Myr BP or the transition towards larger glaciations about 0.8 Myr BP (sometimes referred to as the mid-Pleistocene transition, or MPT) are not easily explained as direct consequences of the astronomical forcing. Some recent atmospheric CO2 reconstructions suggest slightly higher pCO2 levels before 1 Myr BP and a slow decrease over the last few million years (Bartoli et al., 2011; Seki et al., 2010). But the dynamics and the climatic role of the carbon cycle during the Plio-Pleistocene period remain unclear. Interestingly, the δ13C marine records provide some critical information on the evolution of sources and sinks of carbon. In particular, a clear 400 kyr oscillation has been found at many different time periods and appears to be a robust feature of the carbon cycle throughout at least the last 100 Myr (e.g. Paillard and Donnadieu, 2014). This oscillation is also visible over the last 4 Myr but its relationship with the eccentricity appears less obvious, with the occurrence of longer cycles at the end of the record, and a periodicity which therefore appears shifted towards 500 kyr (see Wang et al., 2004). In the following we present a simple dynamical model that provides an explanation for these carbon cycle variations, and how they relate to the climatic evolution over the last 4 Myr. It also gives an explanation for

  3. Process contributions of Australian ecosystems to interannual variations in the carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverd, Vanessa; Smith, Benjamin; Trudinger, Cathy

    2016-05-01

    New evidence is emerging that semi-arid ecosystems dominate interannual variability (IAV) of the global carbon cycle, largely via fluctuating water availability associated with El Niño/Southern Oscillation. Recent evidence from global terrestrial biosphere modelling and satellite-based inversion of atmospheric CO2 point to a large role of Australian ecosystems in global carbon cycle variability, including a large contribution from Australia to the record land sink of 2011. However the specific mechanisms governing this variability, and their bioclimatic distribution within Australia, have not been identified. Here we provide a regional assessment, based on best available observational data, of IAV in the Australian terrestrial carbon cycle and the role of Australia in the record land sink anomaly of 2011. We find that IAV in Australian net carbon uptake is dominated by semi-arid ecosystems in the east of the continent, whereas the 2011 anomaly was more uniformly spread across most of the continent. Further, and in contrast to global modelling results suggesting that IAV in Australian net carbon uptake is amplified by lags between production and decomposition, we find that, at continental scale, annual variations in production are dampened by annual variations in decomposition, with both fluxes responding positively to precipitation anomalies.

  4. Carbon dioxide emission in hydrogen production technology from coke oven gas with life cycle approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burmistrz Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of Carbon Footprint (CF for technology of hydrogen production from cleaned coke oven gas was performed. On the basis of real data and simulation calculations of the production process of hydrogen from coke gas, emission indicators of carbon dioxide (CF were calculated. These indicators are associated with net production of electricity and thermal energy and direct emission of carbon dioxide throughout a whole product life cycle. Product life cycle includes: coal extraction and its transportation to a coking plant, the process of coking coal, purification and reforming of coke oven gas, carbon capture and storage. The values were related to 1 Mg of coking blend and to 1 Mg of the hydrogen produced. The calculation is based on the configuration of hydrogen production from coke oven gas for coking technology available on a commercial scale that uses a technology of coke dry quenching (CDQ. The calculations were made using ChemCAD v.6.0.2 simulator for a steady state of technological process. The analysis of carbon footprint was conducted in accordance with the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA.

  5. Carbon Cycling, Climate Regulation, and Disturbances in Canadian Forests: Scientific Principles for Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Sébastien Landry

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Canadian forests are often perceived as pristine and among the last remaining wilderness, but the majority of them are officially managed and undergo direct land use, mostly for wood harvest. This land use has modified their functions and properties, often inadvertently (e.g., age structure but sometimes purposefully (e.g., fire suppression. Based on a review of the literature pertaining to carbon cycling, climate regulation, and disturbances from logging, fire, and insect outbreaks, we propose five scientific principles relevant for Canadian managed forests. Among these, a principle we wish to highlight is the need to properly account for the management-related fossil fuel emissions, because they will affect the global carbon cycle and climate for millennia unless massive atmospheric carbon dioxide removal becomes a reality. We also use these five principles to address questions of current interest to research scientists, forest managers, and policy makers. Our review focusses on total ecosystem carbon storage and various mechanisms through which forests affect climate, in particular albedo and aerosols forcings—including how disturbances influence all these elements—but also touches on other ecosystem goods and services. Our review underscores the importance of conducting >100-year time horizon studies of carbon cycling, climate regulation, and disturbances in Canadian managed forests.

  6. PALADYN, a comprehensive land surface-vegetation-carbon cycle model of intermediate complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willeit, Matteo; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    PALADYN is presented, a new comprehensive and computationally efficient land surface-vegetation-carbon cycle model designed to be used in Earth system models of intermediate complexity for long-term simulations and paleoclimate studies. The model treats in a consistent manner the interaction between atmosphere, terrestrial vegetation and soil through the fluxes of energy, water and carbon. Energy, water and carbon are conserved. The model explicitly treats permafrost, both in physical processes and as important carbon pool. The model distinguishes 9 surface types of which 5 are different vegetation types, bare soil, land ice, lake and ocean shelf. Including the ocean shelf allows to treat continuous changes in sea level and shelf area associated with glacial cycles. Over each surface type the model solves the surface energy balance and computes the fluxes of sensible, latent and ground heat and upward shortwave and longwave radiation. It includes a single snow layer. The soil model distinguishes between three different macro surface types which have their own soil column: vegetation and bare soil, ice sheet and ocean shelf. The soil is vertically discretized into 5 layers where prognostic equations for temperature, water and carbon are consistently solved. Phase changes of water in the soil are explicitly considered. A surface hydrology module computes precipitation interception by vegetation, surface runoff and soil infiltration. The soil water equation is based on Darcy's law. Given soil water content, the wetland fraction is computed based on a topographic index. Photosynthesis is computed using a light use efficiency model. Carbon assimilation by vegetation is coupled to the transpiration of water through stomatal conductance. The model includes a dynamic vegetation module with 5 plant functional types competing for the gridcell share with their respective net primary productivity. Each macro surface type has its own carbon pools represented by a litter, a fast

  7. Optimization and Comparison of Direct and Indirect Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Plant Cycles for Nuclear Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar

    2011-11-01

    There have been a number of studies involving the use of gases operating in the supercritical mode for power production and process heat applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is particularly attractive because it is capable of achieving relatively high power conversion cycle efficiencies in the temperature range between 550 C and 750 C. Therefore, it has the potential for use with any type of high-temperature nuclear reactor concept, assuming reactor core outlet temperatures of at least 550 C. The particular power cycle investigated in this paper is a supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle. The CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle can be used as either a direct or indirect power conversion cycle, depending on the reactor type and reactor outlet temperature. The advantage of this cycle when compared to the helium Brayton cycle is the lower required operating temperature; 550 C versus 850 C. However, the supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle requires an operating pressure in the range of 20 MPa, which is considerably higher than the required helium Brayton cycle operating pressure of 8 MPa. This paper presents results of analyses performed using the UniSim process analyses software to evaluate the performance of both a direct and indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle for different reactor outlet temperatures. The direct supercritical CO2 cycle transferred heat directly from a 600 MWt reactor to the supercritical CO2 working fluid supplied to the turbine generator at approximately 20 MPa. The indirect supercritical CO2 cycle assumed a helium-cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), operating at a primary system pressure of approximately 7.0 MPa, delivered heat through an intermediate heat exchanger to the secondary indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle, again operating at a pressure of about 20 MPa. For both the direct and indirect cycles, sensitivity calculations were performed for reactor outlet temperature

  8. Evidence for microbial carbon and sulfur cycling in deeply buried ridge flank basalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever, Mark A; Rouxel, Olivier; Alt, Jeffrey C; Shimizu, Nobumichi; Ono, Shuhei; Coggon, Rosalind M; Shanks, Wayne C; Lapham, Laura; Elvert, Marcus; Prieto-Mollar, Xavier; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Inagaki, Fumio; Teske, Andreas

    2013-03-15

    Sediment-covered basalt on the flanks of mid-ocean ridges constitutes most of Earth's oceanic crust, but the composition and metabolic function of its microbial ecosystem are largely unknown. By drilling into 3.5-million-year-old subseafloor basalt, we demonstrated the presence of methane- and sulfur-cycling microbes on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Depth horizons with functional genes indicative of methane-cycling and sulfate-reducing microorganisms are enriched in solid-phase sulfur and total organic carbon, host δ(13)C- and δ(34)S-isotopic values with a biological imprint, and show clear signs of microbial activity when incubated in the laboratory. Downcore changes in carbon and sulfur cycling show discrete geochemical intervals with chemoautotrophic δ(13)C signatures locally attenuated by heterotrophic metabolism.

  9. A synthesis of the arctic terrestrial and marine carbon cycles under pressure from a dwindling cryosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmentier, Frans-Jan W; Christensen, Torben R; Rysgaard, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The current downturn of the arctic cryosphere, such as the strong loss of sea ice, melting of ice sheets and glaciers, and permafrost thaw, affects the marine and terrestrial carbon cycles in numerous interconnected ways. Nonetheless, processes in the ocean and on land have been too often...... considered in isolation while it has become increasingly clear that the two environments are strongly connected: Sea ice decline is one of the main causes of the rapid warming of the Arctic, and the flow of carbon from rivers into the Arctic Ocean affects marine processes and the air-sea exchange of CO2....... This review, therefore, provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of the arctic terrestrial and marine carbon cycle, connections in between, and how this complex system is affected by climate change and a declining cryosphere. Ultimately, better knowledge of biogeochemical processes combined...

  10. Belowground Carbon Cycling Processes at the Molecular Scale: An EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Nancy J.; Brown, Gordon E.; Plata, Charity

    2014-02-21

    As part of the Belowground Carbon Cycling Processes at the Molecular Scale workshop, an EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel meeting held in February 2013, attendees discussed critical biogeochemical processes that regulate carbon cycling in soil. The meeting attendees determined that as a national scientific user facility, EMSL can provide the tools and expertise needed to elucidate the molecular foundation that underlies mechanistic descriptions of biogeochemical processes that control carbon allocation and fluxes at the terrestrial/atmospheric interface in landscape and regional climate models. Consequently, the workshop's goal was to identify the science gaps that hinder either development of mechanistic description of critical processes or their accurate representation in climate models. In part, this report offers recommendations for future EMSL activities in this research area. The workshop was co-chaired by Dr. Nancy Hess (EMSL) and Dr. Gordon Brown (Stanford University).

  11. Earth's Early Biosphere and the Biogeochemical Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMarais, David

    2004-01-01

    Our biosphere has altered the global environment principally by influencing the chemistry of those elements most important for life, e g., C, N, S, O, P and transition metals (e.g., Fe and Mn). The coupling of oxygenic photosynthesis with the burial in sediments of photosynthetic organic matter, and with the escape of H2 to space, has increased the state of oxidation of the Oceans and atmosphere. It has also created highly reduced conditions within sedimentary rocks that have also extensively affected the geochemistry of several elements. The decline of volcanism during Earth's history reduced the flow of reduced chemical species that reacted with photosynthetically produced O2. The long-term net accumulation of photosynthetic O2 via biogeochemical processes has profoundly influenced our atmosphere and biosphere, as evidenced by the O2 levels required for algae, multicellular life and certain modem aerobic bacteria to exist. When our biosphere developed photosynthesis, it tapped into an energy resource that was much larger than the energy available from oxidation-reduction reactions associated with weathering and hydrothermal activity. Today, hydrothermal sources deliver globally (0.13-1.1)x10(exp l2) mol yr(sup -1) of reduced S, Fe(2+), Mn(2+), H2 and CH4; this is estimated to sustain at most about (0.2-2)xl0(exp 12)mol C yr(sup -1) of organic carbon production by chemautotrophic microorganisms. In contrast, global photosynthetic productivity is estimated to be 9000x10(exp 12) mol C yr(sup -1). Thus, even though global thermal fluxes were greater in the distant geologic past than today, the onset of oxygenic photosynthesis probably increased global organic productivity by some two or more orders of magnitude. This enormous productivity materialized principally because oxygenic photosynthesizers unleashed a virtually unlimited supply of reduced H that forever freed life from its sole dependence upon abiotic sources of reducing power such as hydrothermal emanations

  12. Earth's Early Biosphere and the Biogeochemical Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMarais, David

    2004-01-01

    Our biosphere has altered the global environment principally by influencing the chemistry of those elements most important for life, e g., C, N, S, O, P and transition metals (e.g., Fe and Mn). The coupling of oxygenic photosynthesis with the burial in sediments of photosynthetic organic matter, and with the escape of H2 to space, has increased the state of oxidation of the Oceans and atmosphere. It has also created highly reduced conditions within sedimentary rocks that have also extensively affected the geochemistry of several elements. The decline of volcanism during Earth's history reduced the flow of reduced chemical species that reacted with photosynthetically produced O2. The long-term net accumulation of photosynthetic O2 via biogeochemical processes has profoundly influenced our atmosphere and biosphere, as evidenced by the O2 levels required for algae, multicellular life and certain modem aerobic bacteria to exist. When our biosphere developed photosynthesis, it tapped into an energy resource that was much larger than the energy available from oxidation-reduction reactions associated with weathering and hydrothermal activity. Today, hydrothermal sources deliver globally (0.13-1.1)x10(exp l2) mol yr(sup -1) of reduced S, Fe(2+), Mn(2+), H2 and CH4; this is estimated to sustain at most about (0.2-2)xl0(exp 12)mol C yr(sup -1) of organic carbon production by chemautotrophic microorganisms. In contrast, global photosynthetic productivity is estimated to be 9000x10(exp 12) mol C yr(sup -1). Thus, even though global thermal fluxes were greater in the distant geologic past than today, the onset of oxygenic photosynthesis probably increased global organic productivity by some two or more orders of magnitude. This enormous productivity materialized principally because oxygenic photosynthesizers unleashed a virtually unlimited supply of reduced H that forever freed life from its sole dependence upon abiotic sources of reducing power such as hydrothermal emanations

  13. Nutrient limitation reduces land carbon uptake in simulations with a model of combined carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Goll

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial carbon (C cycle models applied for climate projections simulate a strong increase in net primary productivity (NPP due to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration during the 21st century. These models usually neglect the limited availability of nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P, nutrients that commonly limit plant growth and soil carbon turnover. To investigate how the projected C sequestration is altered when stoichiometric constraints on C cycling are considered, we incorporated a P cycle into the land surface model JSBACH (Jena Scheme for Biosphere–Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg, which already includes representations of coupled C and N cycles.

    The model reveals a distinct geographic pattern of P and N limitation. Under the SRES (Special Report on Emissions Scenarios A1B scenario, the accumulated land C uptake between 1860 and 2100 is 13% (particularly at high latitudes and 16% (particularly at low latitudes lower in simulations with N and P cycling, respectively, than in simulations without nutrient cycles. The combined effect of both nutrients reduces land C uptake by 25% compared to simulations without N or P cycling. Nutrient limitation in general may be biased by the model simplicity, but the ranking of limitations is robust against the parameterization and the inflexibility of stoichiometry. After 2100, increased temperature and high CO2 concentration cause a shift from N to P limitation at high latitudes, while nutrient limitation in the tropics declines. The increase in P limitation at high-latitudes is induced by a strong increase in NPP and the low P sorption capacity of soils, while a decline in tropical NPP due to high autotrophic respiration rates alleviates N and P limitations. The quantification of P limitation remains challenging. The poorly constrained processes of soil P sorption and biochemical mineralization are identified as the main uncertainties in the strength of P limitation

  14. Can a bog drained for forestry be a stronger carbon sink than a natural bog forest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommeltenberg, J.; Schmid, H. P.; Drösler, M.; Werle, P.

    2014-07-01

    This study compares the CO2 exchange of a natural bog forest, and of a bog drained for forestry in the pre-Alpine region of southern Germany. The sites are separated by only 10 km, they share the same soil formation history and are exposed to the same climate and weather conditions. In contrast, they differ in land use history: at the Schechenfilz site a natural bog-pine forest (Pinus mugo ssp. rotundata) grows on an undisturbed, about 5 m thick peat layer; at Mooseurach a planted spruce forest (Picea abies) grows on drained and degraded peat (3.4 m). The net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) at both sites has been investigated for 2 years (July 2010-June 2012), using the eddy covariance technique. Our results indicate that the drained, forested bog at Mooseurach is a much stronger carbon dioxide sink (-130 ± 31 and -300 ± 66 g C m-2 a-1 in the first and second year, respectively) than the natural bog forest at Schechenfilz (-53 ± 28 and -73 ± 38 g C m-2 a-1). The strong net CO2 uptake can be explained by the high gross primary productivity of the 44-year old spruces that over-compensates the two-times stronger ecosystem respiration at the drained site. The larger productivity of the spruces can be clearly attributed to the larger plant area index (PAI) of the spruce site. However, even though current flux measurements indicate strong CO2 uptake of the drained spruce forest, the site is a strong net CO2 source when the whole life-cycle since forest planting is considered. It is important to access this result in terms of the long-term biome balance. To do so, we used historical data to estimate the difference between carbon fixation by the spruces and the carbon loss from the peat due to drainage since forest planting. This rough estimate indicates a strong carbon release of +134 t C ha-1 within the last 44 years. Thus, the spruces would need to grow for another 100 years at about the current rate, to compensate the potential peat loss of the former years. In

  15. Can a bog drained for forestry be a stronger carbon sink than a natural bog forest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hommeltenberg

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the CO2 exchange of a natural bog forest, and of a bog drained for forestry in the pre-alpine region of southern Germany. The sites are separated by only ten kilometers, they share the same formation history and are exposed to the same climate and weather conditions. In contrast, they differ in land use history: at the Schechenfilz site a natural bog-pine forest (Pinus mugo rotundata grows on an undisturbed, about 5 m thick peat layer; at Mooseurach a planted spruce forest (Picea abies grows on drained and degraded peat (3.4 m. The net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE at both sites has been investigated for two years (July 2010 to June 2012, using the eddy covariance technique. Our results indicate that the drained, forested bog at Mooseurach is a much stronger carbon dioxide sink (−130 ± 31 and −300 ± 66 g C m−2 a−1 in the first and second year respectively than the natural bog forest at Schechenfilz (−53 ± 28 and −73±38 g C m−2 a−1. The strong net CO2 uptake can be explained by the high gross primary productivity of the spruces that over-compensates the two times stronger ecosystem respiration at the drained site. The larger productivity of the spruces can be clearly attributed to the larger LAI of the spruce site. However, even though current flux measurements indicate strong CO2 uptake of the drained spruce forest, the site is a strong net CO2 source, if the whole life-cycle, since forest planting is considered. We determined the difference between carbon fixation by the spruces and the carbon loss from the peat due to drainage since forest planting. The estimate resulted in a strong carbon release of +156 t C ha−1 within the last 44 yr, means the spruces would need to grow for another 100 yr, at the current rate, to compensate the peat loss of the former years. In contrast, the natural bog-pine ecosystem has likely been a small but consistent carbon sink for decades, which our results suggest is very

  16. Life-Cycle Analyses of Energy Consumption and GHG Emissions of Natural Gas-Based Alternative Vehicle Fuels in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunmin Ou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tsinghua life-cycle analysis model (TLCAM has been used to examine the primary fossil energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions for natural gas- (NG- based alternative vehicle fuels in China. The results show that (1 compress NG- and liquid NG-powered vehicles have similar well-to-wheels (WTW fossil energy uses to conventional gasoline- and diesel-fueled vehicles, but differences emerge with the distance of NG transportation. Additionally, thanks to NG having a lower carbon content than petroleum, CNG- and LNG-powered vehicles emit 10–20% and 5–10% less GHGs than gasoline- and diesel-fueled vehicles, respectively; (2 gas-to-liquid- (GTL- powered vehicles involve approximately 50% more WTW fossil energy uses than conventional gasoline- and diesel-fueled vehicles, primarily because of the low efficiency of GTL production. Nevertheless, since NG has a lower carbon content than petroleum, GTL-powered vehicles emit approximately 30% more GHGs than conventional-fuel vehicles; (3 The carbon emission intensity of the LNG energy chain is highly sensitive to the efficiency of NG liquefaction and the form of energy used in that process.

  17. New natural product carbonic anhydrase inhibitors incorporating phenol moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karioti, Anastasia; Ceruso, Mariangela; Carta, Fabrizio; Bilia, Anna-Rita; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-11-15

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyze the fundamental reaction of CO2 hydration in all living organisms, being actively involved in the regulation of a plethora of patho/physiological conditions. They represent a typical example of enzyme convergent evolution, as six genetically unrelated families of such enzymes were described so far. The need to find selective CA inhibitors (CAIs) triggered the investigation of natural product libraries, which proved to be a valid source of agents with such an activity, as demonstrated for the phenols, polyamines and coumarins. Herein we report an in vitro inhibiti