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Sample records for native polyhistidine-tagged proteins

  1. Nickel nanoparticle decorated graphene for highly selective isolation of polyhistidine-tagged proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Wei; Yang, Ting; Ma, Lin-Yu; Chen, Xu-Wei; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2013-12-20

    Nickel nanoparticle decorated graphene (GP-Ni) is prepared by one-pot hydrothermal reduction of graphene oxide and nickel cations by hydrazine hydrate in the presence of poly(sodium-p-styrenesulfonate) (PSS). The GP-Ni hybrid is characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM, XPS, Raman and FT-IR spectra, demonstrating the formation of poly-dispersed nickel nanoparticles with an average size of 83 nm attached on the surface of graphene sheets. The GP-Ni hybrid exhibits ferromagnetic behavior with a magnetization saturation of 31.1 emu g(-1) at 10,000 Oersted (Oe). The GP-Ni also possesses favorable stability in aqueous medium and rapid magnetic response to an external magnetic field. These make it a novel magnetic adsorbent for the separation/isolation of His6-tagged recombinant proteins from a complex sample matrix (cell lysate). The targeted protein species is captured onto the surface of the GP-Ni hybrid via specific metal affinity force between polyhistidine groups and nickel nanoparticles. The SDS-PAGE assay indicates highly selective separation of His6-tagged Smt A from cell lysate. The GP-Ni hybrid displays favorable performance on the separation/isolation of His6-tagged recombinant proteins with respect to the commercial NTA-Ni(2+) column.

  2. New shuttle vector-based expression system to generate polyhistidine-tagged fusion proteins in Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendener, Sybille; Perreten, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Four Staphylococcus aureus-Escherichia coli shuttle vectors were constructed for gene expression and production of tagged fusion proteins. Vectors pBUS1-HC and pTSSCm have no promoter upstream of the multiple cloning site (MCS), and this allows study of genes under the control of their native promoters, and pBUS1-Pcap-HC and pTSSCm-Pcap contain the strong constitutive promoter of S. aureus type 1 capsule gene 1A (Pcap) upstream of a novel MCS harboring codons for the peptide tag Arg-Gly-Ser-hexa-His (rgs-his6). All plasmids contained the backbone derived from pBUS1, including the E. coli origin ColE1, five copies of terminator rrnB T1, and tetracycline resistance marker tet(L) for S. aureus and E. coli. The minimum pAMα1 replicon from pBUS1 was improved through either complementation with the single-strand origin oriL from pUB110 (pBUS1-HC and pBUS1-Pcap-HC) or substitution with a pT181-family replicon (pTSSCm and pTSSCm-Pcap). The new constructs displayed increased plasmid yield and segregational stability in S. aureus. Furthermore, pBUS1-Pcap-HC and pTSSCm-Pcap offer the potential to generate C-terminal RGS-His6 translational fusions of cloned genes using simple molecular manipulation. BcgI-induced DNA excision followed by religation converts the TGA stop codon of the MCS into a TGC codon and links the rgs-his6 codons to the 3' end of the target gene. The generation of the rgs-his6 codon-fusion, gene expression, and protein purification were demonstrated in both S. aureus and E. coli using the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance gene erm(44) inserted downstream of Pcap. The new His tag expression system represents a helpful tool for the direct analysis of target gene function in staphylococcal cells.

  3. Characterization of soluble RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from dengue virus serotype 2: The polyhistidine tag compromises the polymerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamkaew, Maliwan; Chimnaronk, Sarin

    2015-08-01

    The viral RNA polymerase is an attractive target for inhibition in the treatment of viral infections. In the case of dengue virus (DENV), a member of the genus Flavivirus, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity resides in the C-terminal two-thirds of non-structural protein (NS) 5 responsible for the de novo synthesis of the viral RNA genome. Among four distinct, but closely related dengue serotypes, serotype 2 (DENV-2) produces more severe diseases than other serotypes. It has been reported that bacterial production of the recombinant DENV-2 RdRp was difficult due to its low expression and solubility levels. To facilitate functional and structural analyses, we here demonstrate complete protocols for overexpression and purification of soluble DENV-2 RdRp, increasing protein yields by a remarkable 10 times compared to earlier reports. Three different forms of DENV-2 RdRp as either N- or C-terminally His-tagged fusions, or without tag, were purified to homogeneity. We show here that the presence of both the N- and C-terminal His-tag had a deleterious effect on polymerase activity and, in contrast to earlier studies, our non-tagged RdRp did not require manganese ions to activate RNA polymerization. We also determined an apparent Kd value of 53nM for binding to the 5'-UTR RNA by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Our work provide a more suitable material for basic research of viral RdRp and for drug development.

  4. Immobilised metal-ion affinity chromatography purification of histidine-tagged recombinant proteins : a wash step with a low concentration of EDTA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, DF; Welling, GW; Koedijk, DGAM; Scheffer, AJ; The, TH; Welling-Wester, S

    2001-01-01

    Immobilised metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) is widely used for the purification of recombinant proteins in which a poly-histidine tag is introduced. However, other proteins may also bind to IMAC columns. We describe the use of a washing buffer with a low concentration of EDTA (0.5 mM) for t

  5. Multiple conformations of proteins in native state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Examples of protein sequences that can adopt multiple native states are recently accumulated. Characterization of the protein multiple conformations will have important implications for our understanding of the relationship between structure and function, and their folding kinetics. In present review, the experimental evidence for the existence of multiple conformations in the native state of proteins, the molecular basis and the biological significance of multiple conformations of proteins are focused.

  6. Critical fluctuations in proteins native states

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Qian-Yuan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Wei; Chialvo, Dante R

    2016-01-01

    We study a large data set of protein structure ensembles of very diverse sizes determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. By examining the distance-dependent correlations in the displacement of residues pairs and conducting finite size scaling analysis it was found that the correlations and susceptibility behave as in systems near a critical point implying that, at the native state, the motion of each amino acid residue is felt by every other residue up to the size of the protein molecule. Furthermore certain protein's shapes corresponding to maximum susceptibility were found to be more probable than others. Overall the results suggest that the protein's native state is critical, implying that despite being posed near the minimum of the energy landscape, they still preserve their dynamic flexibility.

  7. Charging of Proteins in Native Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susa, Anna C.; Xia, Zijie; Tang, Henry Y. H.; Tainer, John A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2017-02-01

    Factors that influence the charging of protein ions formed by electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions in which proteins have native structures and function were investigated. Protein ions ranging in molecular weight from 12.3 to 79.7 kDa and pI values from 5.4 to 9.6 were formed from different solutions and reacted with volatile bases of gas-phase basicities higher than that of ammonia in the cell of a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The charge-state distribution of cytochrome c ions formed from aqueous ammonium or potassium acetate is the same. Moreover, ions formed from these two solutions do not undergo proton transfer to 2-fluoropyridine, which is 8 kcal/mol more basic than ammonia. These results provide compelling evidence that proton transfer between ammonia and protein ions does not limit protein ion charge in native electrospray ionization. Both circular dichroism and ion mobility measurements indicate that there are differences in conformations of proteins in pure water and aqueous ammonium acetate, and these differences can account for the difference in the extent of charging and proton-transfer reactivities of protein ions formed from these solutions. The extent of proton transfer of the protein ions with higher gas-phase basicity bases trends with how closely the protein ions are charged to the value predicted by the Rayleigh limit for spherical water droplets approximately the same size as the proteins. These results indicate that droplet charge limits protein ion charge in native mass spectrometry and are consistent with these ions being formed by the charged residue mechanism.

  8. How amide hydrogens exchange in native proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Filip; Halle, Bertil

    2015-08-18

    Amide hydrogen exchange (HX) is widely used in protein biophysics even though our ignorance about the HX mechanism makes data interpretation imprecise. Notably, the open exchange-competent conformational state has not been identified. Based on analysis of an ultralong molecular dynamics trajectory of the protein BPTI, we propose that the open (O) states for amides that exchange by subglobal fluctuations are locally distorted conformations with two water molecules directly coordinated to the N-H group. The HX protection factors computed from the relative O-state populations agree well with experiment. The O states of different amides show little or no temporal correlation, even if adjacent residues unfold cooperatively. The mean residence time of the O state is ∼100 ps for all examined amides, so the large variation in measured HX rate must be attributed to the opening frequency. A few amides gain solvent access via tunnels or pores penetrated by water chains including native internal water molecules, but most amides access solvent by more local structural distortions. In either case, we argue that an overcoordinated N-H group is necessary for efficient proton transfer by Grotthuss-type structural diffusion.

  9. Native mass spectrometry of photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Hao; Cui, Weidong; Gross, Michael L; Blankenship, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    .... This approach is now a powerful tool to investigate protein complexes. This article reviews the background of native MS of protein complexes and describes its strengths, taking photosynthetic pigment...

  10. Folding and Stabilization of Native-Sequence-Reversed Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Weber, Jeffrey K; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-04-26

    Though the problem of sequence-reversed protein folding is largely unexplored, one might speculate that reversed native protein sequences should be significantly more foldable than purely random heteropolymer sequences. In this article, we investigate how the reverse-sequences of native proteins might fold by examining a series of small proteins of increasing structural complexity (α-helix, β-hairpin, α-helix bundle, and α/β-protein). Employing a tandem protein structure prediction algorithmic and molecular dynamics simulation approach, we find that the ability of reverse sequences to adopt native-like folds is strongly influenced by protein size and the flexibility of the native hydrophobic core. For β-hairpins with reverse-sequences that fail to fold, we employ a simple mutational strategy for guiding stable hairpin formation that involves the insertion of amino acids into the β-turn region. This systematic look at reverse sequence duality sheds new light on the problem of protein sequence-structure mapping and may serve to inspire new protein design and protein structure prediction protocols.

  11. Folding and Stabilization of Native-Sequence-Reversed Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-01

    Though the problem of sequence-reversed protein folding is largely unexplored, one might speculate that reversed native protein sequences should be significantly more foldable than purely random heteropolymer sequences. In this article, we investigate how the reverse-sequences of native proteins might fold by examining a series of small proteins of increasing structural complexity ({\\alpha}-helix, \\b{eta}-hairpin, {\\alpha}-helix bundle, and {\\alpha}/\\b{eta}-protein). Employing a tandem protein structure prediction algorithmic and molecular dynamics simulation approach, we find that the ability of reverse sequences to adopt native-like folds is strongly in influenced by protein size and the flexibility of the native hydrophobic core. For \\b{eta}-hairpins with reverse-sequences that fail to fold, we employ a simple mutational strategy for guiding stable hairpin formation that involves the insertion of amino acids into the \\b{eta}-turn region. This systematic look at reverse sequence duality sheds new light on t...

  12. Relation between native ensembles and experimental structures of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Best, R. B.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; DePristo, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Data Bank ensembles; moreover, we show that the effects of uncertainties in structure determination are insufficient to explain the results. These results highlight the importance of accounting for native-state protein dynamics in making comparisons with ensemble-averaged experimental data and suggest......Different experimental structures of the same protein or of proteins with high sequence similarity contain many small variations. Here we construct ensembles of "high-sequence similarity Protein Data Bank" (HSP) structures and consider the extent to which such ensembles represent the structural...... heterogeneity of the native state in solution. We find that different NMR measurements probing structure and dynamics of given proteins in solution, including order parameters, scalar couplings, and residual dipolar couplings, are remarkably well reproduced by their respective high-sequence similarity Protein...

  13. Probabilistic Determination of Native State Ensembles of Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Simon; Vögeli, Beat Rolf; Cavalli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The motions of biological macromolecules are tightly coupled to their functions. However, while the study of fast motions has become increasingly feasible in recent years, the study of slower, biologically important motions remains difficult. Here, we present a method to construct native state...... ensembles of proteins by the combination of physical force fields and experimental data through modern statistical methodology. As an example, we use NMR residual dipolar couplings to determine a native state ensemble of the extensively studied third immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G (GB3...

  14. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy of native membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Daniel J; Engel, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Membrane proteins comprise 30% of the proteome of higher organisms. They mediate energy conversion, signal transduction, solute transport and secretion. Their native environment is a bilayer in a physiological buffer solution, hence their structure and function are preferably assessed in this environment. The surface structure of single membrane proteins can be determined in buffer solutions by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at a lateral resolution of less than 1 nm and a vertical resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm. Moreover, single proteins can be directly addressed, stuck to the AFM stylus and subsequently unfolded, revealing the molecular interactions of the protein studied. The examples discussed here illustrate the power of AFM in the structural analysis of membrane proteins in a native environment.

  15. Analysis of protein interactions at native chloroplast membranes by ellipsometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Kriechbaumer

    Full Text Available Membrane bound receptors play vital roles in cell signaling, and are the target for many drugs, yet their interactions with ligands are difficult to study by conventional techniques due to the technical difficulty of monitoring these interactions in lipid environments. In particular, the ability to analyse the behaviour of membrane proteins in their native membrane environment is limited. Here, we have developed a quantitative approach to detect specific interactions between low-abundance chaperone receptors within native chloroplast membranes and their soluble chaperone partners. Langmuir-Schaefer film deposition was used to deposit native chloroplasts onto gold-coated glass slides, and interactions between the molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90 and their receptors in the chloroplast membranes were detected and quantified by total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE. We show that native chloroplast membranes deposited on gold-coated glass slides using Langmuir-Schaefer films retain functional receptors capable of binding chaperones with high specificity and affinity. Taking into account the low chaperone receptor abundance in native membranes, these binding properties are consistent with data generated using soluble forms of the chloroplast chaperone receptors, OEP61 and Toc64. Therefore, we conclude that chloroplasts have the capacity to selectively bind chaperones, consistent with the notion that chaperones play an important role in protein targeting to chloroplasts. Importantly, this method of monitoring by TIRE does not require any protein labelling. This novel combination of techniques should be applicable to a wide variety of membranes and membrane protein receptors, thus presenting the opportunity to quantify protein interactions involved in fundamental cellular processes, and to screen for drugs that target membrane proteins.

  16. Native protein nanolithography that can write, read and erase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinazli, Ali; Piehler, Jacob; Beuttler, Mirjam; Guckenberger, Reinhard; Tampé, Robert

    2007-04-01

    The development of systematic approaches to explore protein-protein interactions and dynamic protein networks is at the forefront of biological sciences. Nanopatterned protein arrays offer significant advantages for sensing applications, including short diffusion times, parallel detection of multiple targets and the requirement for only tiny amounts of sample. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques have successfully demonstrated patterning of molecules, including stable proteins, with submicrometre resolution. Here, we introduce native protein nanolithography for the nanostructured assembly of even fragile proteins or multiprotein complexes under native conditions. Immobilized proteins are detached by a novel vibrational AFM mode (contact oscillation mode) and replaced by other proteins, which are selectively self-assembled from the bulk. This nanolithography permits rapid writing, reading and erasing of protein arrays in a versatile manner. Functional protein complexes may be assembled with uniform orientation at dimensions down to 50 nm. Such fabrication of two-dimensionally arranged nano-objects with biological activity will prove powerful for proteome-wide interaction screens and single molecule/virus/cell analyses.

  17. Blotting protein complexes from native gels to electron microscopy grids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, Roland Wilhelm; Kofler, Christine; Boicu, Marius; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Nickell, Stephan

    2012-01-08

    We report a simple and generic method for the direct transfer of protein complexes separated by native gel electrophoresis to electron microscopy grids. After transfer, sufficient material remains in the gel for identification and characterization by mass spectrometry. The method should facilitate higher-throughput single-particle analysis by substantially reducing the time needed for protein purification, as demonstrated for three complexes from Thermoplasma acidophilum.

  18. Relation between native ensembles and experimental structures of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Best, R. B.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; DePristo, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Different experimental structures of the same protein or of proteins with high sequence similarity contain many small variations. Here we construct ensembles of "high-sequence similarity Protein Data Bank" (HSP) structures and consider the extent to which such ensembles represent the structural...... Data Bank ensembles; moreover, we show that the effects of uncertainties in structure determination are insufficient to explain the results. These results highlight the importance of accounting for native-state protein dynamics in making comparisons with ensemble-averaged experimental data and suggest...

  19. Site-Selective Conjugation of Native Proteins with DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trads, Julie Brender; Tørring, Thomas; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2017-01-01

    . In recent years, a number of chemical methods that target conjugation to specific sites at native proteins have become available, and an overview of these methods is provided in this Account. Our laboratory has investigated DNA-templated protein conjugation (DTPC), which offers an alternative approach...... to site-selective conjugation of DNA to proteins. The method is inspired by the concept of DNA-templated synthesis where functional groups conjugated to DNA strands are preorganized by DNA hybridization to dramatically increase the reaction rate. In DPTC, we target metal binding sites in proteins...

  20. Natively unfolded proteins: a point where biology waits for physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uversky, Vladimir N

    2002-04-01

    The experimental material accumulated in the literature on the conformational behavior of intrinsically unstructured (natively unfolded) proteins was analyzed. Results of this analysis showed that these proteins do not possess uniform structural properties, as expected for members of a single thermodynamic entity. Rather, these proteins may be divided into two structurally different groups: intrinsic coils, and premolten globules. Proteins from the first group have hydrodynamic dimensions typical of random coils in poor solvent and do not possess any (or almost any) ordered secondary structure. Proteins from the second group are essentially more compact, exhibiting some amount of residual secondary structure, although they are still less dense than native or molten globule proteins. An important feature of the intrinsically unstructured proteins is that they undergo disorder-order transition during or prior to their biological function. In this respect, the Protein Quartet model, with function arising from four specific conformations (ordered forms, molten globules, premolten globules, and random coils) and transitions between any two of the states, is discussed.

  1. Native antigen fractionation protein microarrays for biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiazzo, Robert J; O'Rourke, Dennis J; Barder, Timothy J; Nelson, Bryce P; Liu, Brian C-S

    2011-01-01

    In this protocol, we used the T24 human bladder cancer cell line as a source of native antigens to construct fractionated lysate microarrays. Subsequently, these microarrays were used to compare the autoantibody responses of individuals with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) to those of normal female controls. To accomplish this, T24 cells were lysed under nondenaturing conditions to obtain native antigens. These native antigens were then fractionated in 2D using a PF-2D liquid chromatography; the first dimension separated the proteins by their isoelectric points, and the second separated them according to hydrophobicity. The resulting protein fractions were printed onto nitrocellulose-coated glass slides (PATH slides) to create a set of fractionated lysate microarrays. To compare the autoantibody responses of IC/PBS patients with normal controls, the fractionated lysate arrays were competitively hybridized with fluorescently labeled IgG samples purified from both IC/PBS and control sera. This protocol presents a detailed description of the creation and use of native antigen fractionated lysate microarrays for autoantibody profiling.

  2. Amyloid oligomer conformation in a group of natively folded proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Yoshiike

    Full Text Available Recent in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that destabilized proteins with defective folding induce aggregation and toxicity in protein-misfolding diseases. One such unstable protein state is called amyloid oligomer, a precursor of fully aggregated forms of amyloid. Detection of various amyloid oligomers with A11, an anti-amyloid oligomer conformation-specific antibody, revealed that the amyloid oligomer represents a generic conformation and suggested that toxic beta-aggregation processes possess a common mechanism. By using A11 antibody as a probe in combination with mass spectrometric analysis, we identified GroEL in bacterial lysates as a protein that may potentially have an amyloid oligomer conformation. Surprisingly, A11 reacted not only with purified GroEL but also with several purified heat shock proteins, including human Hsp27, 40, 70, 90; yeast Hsp104; and bovine Hsc70. The native folds of A11-reactive proteins in purified samples were characterized by their anti-beta-aggregation activity in terms of both functionality and in contrast to the beta-aggregation promoting activity of misfolded pathogenic amyloid oligomers. The conformation-dependent binding of A11 with natively folded Hsp27 was supported by the concurrent loss of A11 reactivity and anti-beta-aggregation activity of heat-treated Hsp27 samples. Moreover, we observed consistent anti-beta-aggregation activity not only by chaperones containing an amyloid oligomer conformation but also by several A11-immunoreactive non-chaperone proteins. From these results, we suggest that the amyloid oligomer conformation is present in a group of natively folded proteins. The inhibitory effects of A11 antibody on both GroEL/ES-assisted luciferase refolding and Hsp70-mediated decelerated nucleation of Abeta aggregation suggested that the A11-binding sites on these chaperones might be functionally important. Finally, we employed a computational approach to uncover possible A11-binding sites on

  3. Tannin-assisted aggregation of natively unfolded proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchi, D.; Narayanan, T.; Hagenmuller, D.; Baron, A.; Guyot, S.; Cabane, B.; Bouhallab, S.

    2008-06-01

    Tannin-protein interactions are essentially physical: hydrophobic and hydrogen-bond-mediated. We explored the tannin-assisted protein aggregation on the case of β-casein, which is a natively unfolded protein known for its ability to form micellar aggregates. We used several tannins with specified length. Our SAXS results show that small tannins increase the number of proteins per micelle, but keeping their size constant. It leads to a tannin-assisted compactization of micelles. Larger tannins, with linear dimensions greater than the crown width of micelles, lead to the aggregation of micelles by a bridging effect. Experimental results can be understood within a model where tannins are treated as effective enhancers of hydrophobic attraction between specific sites in proteins.

  4. Analysis of Proteins, Protein Complexes, and Organellar Proteomes Using Sheathless Capillary Zone Electrophoresis - Native Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Arseniy M.; Viner, Rosa; Santos, Marcia R.; Horn, David M.; Bern, Marshall; Karger, Barry L.; Ivanov, Alexander R.

    2017-09-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) is a rapidly advancing field in the analysis of proteins, protein complexes, and macromolecular species of various types. The majority of native MS experiments reported to-date has been conducted using direct infusion of purified analytes into a mass spectrometer. In this study, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was coupled online to Orbitrap mass spectrometers using a commercial sheathless interface to enable high-performance separation, identification, and structural characterization of limited amounts of purified proteins and protein complexes, the latter with preserved non-covalent associations under native conditions. The performance of both bare-fused silica and polyacrylamide-coated capillaries was assessed using mixtures of protein standards known to form non-covalent protein-protein and protein-ligand complexes. High-efficiency separation of native complexes is demonstrated using both capillary types, while the polyacrylamide neutral-coated capillary showed better reproducibility and higher efficiency for more complex samples. The platform was then evaluated for the determination of monoclonal antibody aggregation and for analysis of proteomes of limited complexity using a ribosomal isolate from E. coli. Native CZE-MS, using accurate single stage and tandem-MS measurements, enabled identification of proteoforms and non-covalent complexes at femtomole levels. This study demonstrates that native CZE-MS can serve as an orthogonal and complementary technique to conventional native MS methodologies with the advantages of low sample consumption, minimal sample processing and losses, and high throughput and sensitivity. This study presents a novel platform for analysis of ribosomes and other macromolecular complexes and organelles, with the potential for discovery of novel structural features defining cellular phenotypes (e.g., specialized ribosomes). [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Protein's native state stability in a chemically induced denaturation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Quiroz, L; Garcia-Colin, L S

    2007-05-21

    In this work, we present a generalization of Zwanzig's protein unfolding analysis [Zwanzig, R., 1997. Two-state models of protein folding kinetics. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 94, 148-150; Zwanzig, R., 1995. Simple model of protein folding kinetics. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 92, 9801], in order to calculate the free energy change Delta(N)(D)F between the protein's native state N and its unfolded state D in a chemically induced denaturation. This Extended Zwanzig Model (EZM) is both based on an equilibrium statistical mechanics approach and the inclusion of experimental denaturation curves. It enables us to construct a suitable partition function Z and to derive an analytical formula for Delta(N)(D)F in terms of the number K of residues of the macromolecule, the average number nu of accessible states for each single amino acid and the concentration C(1/2) where the midpoint of the ND transition occurs. The results of the EZM for proteins where chemical denaturation follows a sigmoidal-type profile, as it occurs for the case of the T70N human variant of lysozyme (PDB code: T70N) [Esposito, G., et al., 2003. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 25910-25918], can be splitted into two lines. First, EZM shows that for sigmoidal denaturation profiles, the internal degrees of freedom of the chain play an outstanding role in the stability of the native state. On the other hand, that under certain conditions DeltaF can be written as a quadratic polynomial on concentration C(1/2), i.e., DeltaF approximately aC(1/2)(2)+bC(1/2)+c, where a,b,c are constant coefficients directly linked to protein's size K and the averaged number of non-native conformations nu. Such functional form for DeltaF has been widely known to fit experimental measures in chemically induced protein denaturation [Yagi, M., et al., 2003. J. Biol. Chem. 278, 47009-47015; Asgeirsson, B., Guojonsdottir, K., 2006. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1764, 190-198; Sharma, S., et al., 2006. Protein Pept. Lett. 13(4), 323-329; Salem, M., et al

  6. Development and characterization of stabilized, polymerized phospholipid bilayers on silica particles for specific immobilization of His-tagged proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seid M Adem

    2015-04-01

    Stabilized phospholipid bilayer (PLB) coated silica microspheres were prepared via polymerization of lipid monomers. These lipid coated silica microspheres are stable to both extended storage in solution at 4°C and dry storage at room temperature. These stabilized lipid coated microspheres have also been functionalized with nickel-chelating lipids, a commonly used tool for immobilizing polyhistidine-tagged proteins. It is shown that 6xHis-EGFP interacts with (poly)bis-SorbPC/DOGS-NTA-Ni2+ coated silica and this interaction was interrupted by washing with imidazole indicating the reversibility of the interaction. No interaction was observed between the functionalized silica substrate and EGFP, which lacks the 6xHis-tag. Furthermore, these biocompatible (poly)bis-SorbPC coated microspheres were able to minimize non-specific protein adsorption.

  7. A new scoring function for protein-protein docking that identifies native structures with unprecedented accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, Irina S.; da Silva Martins, João Miguel; Coimbra, João T.S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein (P-P) 3D structures are fundamental to structural biology and drug discovery. However, most of them have never been determined. Many docking algorithms were developed for that purpose, but they have a very limited accuracy in generating native-like structures and identifying...... the most correct one, in particular when a single answer is asked for. With such a low success rate it is difficult to point out one docked structure as being native-like. Here we present a new, high accuracy, scoring method to identify the 3D structure of P-P complexes among a set of trial poses...... the trial structures and identifies the native-like structures with unprecedented accuracy (∼94%), providing the correct P-P 3D structures that biochemists and molecular biologists need to pursue their studies. With such a success rate, the bottleneck of protein-protein docking moves from the scoring...

  8. Probabilistic Determination of Native State Ensembles of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Simon; Vögeli, Beat Rolf; Cavalli, Andrea; Boomsma, Wouter; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2014-08-12

    The motions of biological macromolecules are tightly coupled to their functions. However, while the study of fast motions has become increasingly feasible in recent years, the study of slower, biologically important motions remains difficult. Here, we present a method to construct native state ensembles of proteins by the combination of physical force fields and experimental data through modern statistical methodology. As an example, we use NMR residual dipolar couplings to determine a native state ensemble of the extensively studied third immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G (GB3). The ensemble accurately describes both local and nonlocal backbone fluctuations as judged by its reproduction of complementary experimental data. While it is difficult to assess precise time-scales of the observed motions, our results suggest that it is possible to construct realistic conformational ensembles of biomolecules very efficiently. The approach may allow for a dramatic reduction in the computational as well as experimental resources needed to obtain accurate conformational ensembles of biological macromolecules in a statistically sound manner.

  9. Self-assembly studies of native and recombinant fibrous proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Donna Lucille

    The structure of silk proteins consists of alternating amorphous (glycine-rich) and ordered crystalline regions (poly(alanine) and poly(glycine-alanine) repeats), where the organized regions are typically beta-sheet assemblies. In collagen, the basic helical repeat (glycine-proline-hydroxyproline and variants on this repeat) drives hierarchical assembly. Three polypeptide chains form left-handed poly-proline II-like helices, these three chains then self-assemble to form a right-handed triple helix. The focus of this thesis is on these proteins and defined variations thereof to reveal features of fibrous protein self-assembly. The amino acid sequences of native silk and collagen and their respective assembly environments have been systematically manipulated. Spider silk protein, based on the consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes dragline-silk, was genetically engineered to include methionines flanking the beta-sheet forming polyalanine regions. These methionines could be selectively oxidized and reduced, altering the bulkiness and charge of a methionine-based sulfoxide group to control beta-sheet formation by steric hindrance. A second version of the sterical trigger included a recognition site for Protein Kinase A allowing for the selective phosphorylation of a serine. Patterning a monolayer of precursor "director" molecules on length scales ranging from nanometer- to micrometer-length scales simplifies the interpretation of supramolecular assembly. Utilizing the atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based technique of dip-pen nanolithography, thiolated collagen and a collagen-like peptide were patterned at 30--50 nm line widths on evaporated gold surfaces. These are the largest molecules thus far positively printed on a surface at such small-length scales. The method preserved the triple helical structure and biological activity of collagen and even fostered the formation of characteristic higher-levels of structural organization. Nanopatterns were also achieved for

  10. Structural Characterization of Native Proteins and Protein Complexes by Electron Ionization Dissociation-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huilin; Sheng, Yuewei; McGee, William; Cammarata, Michael; Holden, Dustin; Loo, Joseph A

    2017-03-07

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has played an increasingly important role in the identification and structural and functional characterization of proteins. In particular, the use of tandem mass spectrometry has afforded one of the most versatile methods to acquire structural information for proteins and protein complexes. The unique nature of electron capture dissociation (ECD) for cleaving protein backbone bonds while preserving noncovalent interactions has made it especially suitable for the study of native protein structures. However, the intra- and intermolecular interactions stabilized by hydrogen bonds and salt bridges can hinder the separation of fragments even with preactivation, which has become particularly problematic for the study of large macromolecular proteins and protein complexes. Here, we describe the capabilities of another activation method, 30 eV electron ionization dissociation (EID), for the top-down MS characterization of native protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes. Rich structural information that cannot be delivered by ECD can be generated by EID. EID allowed for the comparison of the gas-phase and the solution-phase structural stability and unfolding process of human carbonic anhydrase I (HCA-I). In addition, the EID fragmentation patterns reflect the structural similarities and differences among apo-, Zn-, and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) dimers. In particular, the structural changes due to Cu-binding and a point mutation (G41D) were revealed by EID-MS. The performance of EID was also compared to that of 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD), which allowed us to explore their qualitative similarities and differences as potential valuable tools for the MS study of native proteins and protein complexes.

  11. Statistical analysis of native contact formation in the folding of designed model proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiana, Guido; Broglia, Ricardo A.

    2001-02-01

    The time evolution of the formation probability of native bonds has been studied for designed sequences which fold fast into the native conformation. From this analysis a clear hierarchy of bonds emerge: (a) local, fast forming highly stable native bonds built by some of the most strongly interacting amino acids of the protein; (b) nonlocal bonds formed late in the folding process, in coincidence with the folding nucleus, and involving essentially the same strongly interacting amino acids already participating in the fast bonds; (c) the rest of the native bonds whose behavior is subordinated, to a large extent, to that of the strong local and nonlocal native contacts.

  12. Statistical Analysis of Native Contact Formation in the Folding of Designed Model Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Tiana, G.; R. A. Broglia(University of Milano, INFN Milano and University of Copenhagen)

    2000-01-01

    The time evolution of the formation probability of native bonds has been studied for designed sequences which fold fast into the native conformation. From this analysis a clear hierarchy of bonds emerge a) local, fast forming highly stable native bonds built by some of the most strongly interacting amino acids of the protein, b) non-local bonds formed late in the folding process, in coincidence with the folding nucleus, and involving essentially the same strongly interacting amino acids alrea...

  13. Native SDS-PAGE: High Resolution Electrophoretic Separation of Proteins With Retention of Native Properties Including Bound Metal Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Andrew B.; Wobig, William J.; Petering, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl-sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) is commonly used to obtain high resolution separation of complex mixtures of proteins. The method initially denatures the proteins that will undergo electrophoresis. Although covalent structural features of resolved proteins can be determined with SDS-PAGE, functional properties are destroyed, including the presence of non-covalently bound metal ions. To address this shortcoming, blue-native (BN)-PAGE has been introduced. This method retains functional properties but at the cost of protein resolving power. To address the need for a high resolution PAGE method that results in the separation of native proteins, experiments tested the impact of changing the conditions of SDS-PAGE on the quality of protein separation and retention of functional properties. Removal of SDS and EDTA from the sample buffer together with omission of a heating step had no effect on the results of PAGE. Reduction of SDS in the running buffer from 0.1% to 0.0375% together with deletion of EDTA also made little impact on the quality of the electrophoretograms of fractions of pig kidney (LLC-PK1) cell proteome in comparison with that achieved with the SDS-PAGE method. The modified conditions were called native (N)SDS-PAGE. Retention of Zn2+ bound in proteomic samples increased from 26 to 98% upon shifting from standard to modified conditions. Moreover, seven of nine model enzymes, including four Zn2+ proteins that were subjected to NSDS-PAGE retained activity. All nine were active in BN-PAGE, whereas all underwent denaturation during SDS-PAGE. Metal retention after electrophoresis was additionally confirmed using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and in-gel Zn-protein staining using the fluorophore TSQ. PMID:24686569

  14. Insecticidal crystal proteins from native Bacillus thuringiensis: numerical analysis and biological activity against Spodoptera frugiperda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Analía; Pera, Licia M; Loto, Flavia; Virla, Eduardo G; Baigori, Mario D

    2009-01-01

    Fourteen strains of Bacillus thuringiensis collected from both larvae showing disease symptoms and soil samples in northwest Argentina were characterized by insecticidal activity against Spodoptera frugiperda. First instar larvae and protein profile SDS-PAGE analysis of whole cell proteins not only allowed the differentiation of native Bacillus thuringiensis but also revealed the possibility of applying protein profile analysis in classification of toxicity patterns. Cluster analysis showed that there were two main groups. Interestingly, one of them only contained the most pathogenic native strains. The biomass-bound protease activity of native pathogenic isolates and the reference strain Bt 4D1 is also reported.

  15. Genome-scale metabolic model of Pichia pastoris with native and humanized glycosylation of recombinant proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irani, Zahra Azimzadeh; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas;

    2016-01-01

    Pichia pastoris is used for commercial production of human therapeutic proteins, and genome-scale models of P. pastoris metabolism have been generated in the past to study the metabolism and associated protein production by this yeast. A major challenge with clinical usage of recombinant proteins...... produced by P. pastoris is the difference in N-glycosylation of proteins produced by humans and this yeast. However, through metabolic engineering, a P. pastoris strain capable of producing humanized N-glycosylated proteins was constructed. The current genome-scale models of P. pastoris do not address...... native nor humanized N-glycosylation, and we therefore developed ihGlycopastoris, an extension to the iLC915 model with both native and humanized N-glycosylation for recombinant protein production, but also an estimation of N-glycosylation of P. pastoris native proteins. This new model gives a better...

  16. Application of native signal sequences for recombinant proteins secretion in Pichia pastoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borodina, Irina; Do, Duy Duc; Eriksen, Jens C.;

    alpha‐mating factor (MF) prepropeptide from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is most commonly used. Our aim was to test whether signal peptides from P. pastoris native secreted proteins could be used to direct secretion of recombinant proteins. Results Eleven native signal peptides from P. pastoris were tested...... with the promoter and signal peptide of choice (or a mix thereof) and the basic expression vector. The mix is treated with USER enzyme and transformed into E. coli. The plasmids (or plasmid mixes) are further purified, linearized and transformed into P. pastoris. We illustrate the commodity of the system...... by optimization of expression of three different proteins in P. pastoris. Conclusions Native signal peptides from P. pastoris can be used to direct secretion of recombinant proteins. A novel USER‐based P. pastoris system allows easy cloning of protein‐coding gene with the promoter and leader sequence of choice....

  17. SYNTHESIS OF PROTEINS BY NATIVE CHEMICAL LIGATION USING FMOC-BASED CHEMISTRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A; Mitchell, A R

    2005-01-20

    C-terminal peptide {alpha}-thioesters are valuable intermediates in the synthesis/semisynthesis of proteins by native chemical ligation. They are prepared either by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) or biosynthetically by protein splicing techniques. The present paper reviews the different methods available for the chemical synthesis of peptide {alpha}-thioesters using Fmoc-based SPPS.

  18. Native protein recovery from potato fruit juice by ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijnenberg, Harmen Jan; Kemperman, Antonius J.B.; Boerrigter, M.E.; Lotz, Martin; Dijksterhuis, Jan F.; Koops, G.H.; Poulsen, Poul Emil

    2002-01-01

    Potato fruit juice, i.e. the stream resulting after the extraction of the starch from the potato, contains up to 2.5% [w/w] of proteins that are potentially valuable for the food market. However, today the recovery of protein from the potato fruit juice with reverse osmosis membranes results in a

  19. Quantitation of the Noncovalent Cellular Retinol-Binding Protein, Type 1 Complex Through Native Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjing; Yu, Jianshi; Kane, Maureen A.

    2017-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) has become a valuable tool in probing noncovalent protein-ligand interactions in a sample-efficient way, yet the quantitative application potential of native MS has not been fully explored. Cellular retinol binding protein, type I (CrbpI) chaperones retinol and retinal in the cell, protecting them from nonspecific oxidation and delivering them to biosynthesis enzymes where the bound (holo-) and unbound (apo-) forms of CrbpI exert distinct biological functions. Using nanoelectrospray, we developed a native MS assay for probing apo- and holo-CrbpI abundance to facilitate exploring their biological functions in retinoid metabolism and signaling. The methods were developed on two platforms, an Orbitrap-based Thermo Exactive and a Q-IMS-TOF-based Waters Synapt G2S, where similar ion behaviors under optimized conditions were observed. Overall, our results suggested that within the working range ( 1-10 μM), gas-phase ions in the native state linearly correspond to solution concentration and relative ion intensities of the apo- and holo-protein ions can linearly respond to the solution ratios, suggesting native MS is a viable tool for relative quantitation in this system.

  20. A highly compliant protein native state with a spontaneous-like mechanical unfolding pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidarsson, Petur O.; Valpapuram, Immanuel; Camilloni, Carlo;

    2012-01-01

    of the four-α-helix acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) in the low-force regime using optical tweezers and ratcheted molecular dynamics simulations. The results of our studies reveal an unprecedented mechanical behavior of a natively folded protein. ACBP displays an atypical compliance along two nearly orthogonal......The mechanical properties of proteins and their force-induced structural changes play key roles in many biological processes. Previous studies have shown that natively folded proteins are brittle under tension, unfolding after small mechanical deformations, while partially folded intermediate...... states, such as molten globules, are compliant and can deform elastically a great amount before crossing the transition state barrier. Moreover, under tension proteins appear to unfold through a different sequence of events than during spontaneous unfolding. Here, we describe the response to force...

  1. Probing native protein structures by chemical cross-linking, mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Alexander; Walzthoeni, Thomas; Kahraman, Abdullah; Herzog, Franz; Rinner, Oliver; Beck, Martin; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2010-08-01

    Chemical cross-linking of reactive groups in native proteins and protein complexes in combination with the identification of cross-linked sites by mass spectrometry has been in use for more than a decade. Recent advances in instrumentation, cross-linking protocols, and analysis software have led to a renewed interest in this technique, which promises to provide important information about native protein structure and the topology of protein complexes. In this article, we discuss the critical steps of chemical cross-linking and its implications for (structural) biology: reagent design and cross-linking protocols, separation and mass spectrometric analysis of cross-linked samples, dedicated software for data analysis, and the use of cross-linking data for computational modeling. Finally, the impact of protein cross-linking on various biological disciplines is highlighted.

  2. Size distribution of native cytosolic proteins of Thermoplasma acidophilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Na; Tamura, Noriko; Tamura, Tomohiro; Knispel, Roland Wilhelm; Hrabe, Thomas; Kofler, Christine; Nickell, Stephan; Nagy, István

    2009-07-01

    We used molecular sieve chromatography in combination with LC-MS/MS to identify protein complexes that can serve as templates in the template matching procedures of visual proteomics approaches. By this method the sample complexity was lowered sufficiently to identify 464 proteins and - on the basis of size distribution and bioinformatics analysis - 189 of them could be assigned as subunits of macromolecular complexes over the size of 300 kDa. From these we purified six stable complexes of Thermoplasma acidophilum whose size and subunit composition - analyzed by electron microscopy and MALDI-TOF-MS, respectively - verified the accuracy of our method.

  3. A Robust Workflow for Native Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Affinity-Isolated Endogenous Protein Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinares, Paul Dominic B; Dunn, Amelia D; Padovan, Júlio C; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Rout, Michael P; Chait, Brian T

    2016-03-01

    The central players in most cellular events are assemblies of macromolecules. Structural and functional characterization of these assemblies requires knowledge of their subunit stoichiometry and intersubunit connectivity. One of the most direct means for acquiring such information is so-called "native mass spectrometry (MS)", wherein the masses of the intact assemblies and parts thereof are accurately determined. It is of particular interest to apply native MS to the study of endogenous protein assemblies-i.e., those wherein the component proteins are expressed at endogenous levels in their natural functional states, rather than the overexpressed (sometimes partial) constructs commonly employed in classical structural studies, whose assembly can introduce stoichiometry artifacts and other unwanted effects. To date, the application of native MS to the elucidation of endogenous protein complexes has been limited by the difficulty in obtaining pristine cell-derived assemblies at sufficiently high concentrations for effective analysis. Here, to address this challenge, we present a robust workflow that couples rapid and efficient affinity isolation of endogenous protein complexes with a sensitive native MS readout. The resulting workflow has the potential to provide a wealth of data on the stoichiometry and intersubunit connectivity of endogenous protein assemblies-information that is key to successful integrative structural elucidation of biological systems.

  4. Monoclonal antibody to native P39 protein from Borrelia burgdorferi.

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, T J; Hechemy, K E; Harris, H L; Rudofsky, U H; Samsonoff, W A; Peterson, A J; Evans, B. D.; Balaban, S L

    1994-01-01

    We have produced, by using a sonicate of Borrelia burgdorferi, a monoclonal antibody (MAb), NYSP39H, that is specific for the P39 protein band. This MAb reacted with 13 isolates of B. burgdorferi but not with eight different spirochetes (four borrelias, two leptospiras, and two treponemas). Surface labeling of B. burgdorferi with biotin and subsequent treatment with Nonidet P-40 showed that P39 was not biotinylated but was extracted with Nonidet P-40, indicating that it is present within the ...

  5. Sensitive Electrochemical Detection of Native and Aggregated -Synuclein Protein Involved in Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masarik, Michal; Stobiecka, Agata; Kizek, René; Jelen, Frantisek; Pechan, Zdenk; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Subramaniam, Vinod; Palecek, Emil

    2004-01-01

    The aggregation of α-synuclein, a 14 kDa protein, is involved in several human neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease. We studied native and in vitro aggregated α-synuclein by circular dichroism (CD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical methods. We used constant cur

  6. Simultaneous isolation of mRNA and native protein from minute samples of cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Tonny Studsgaard; Andersen, Claus Yding

    2014-01-01

    Precious biological samples often lack a sufficient number of cells for multiple procedures, such as extraction of mRNA while maintaining protein in a non-denatured state suitable for subsequent characterization. Here we present a new method for the simultaneous purification of mRNA and native pr...

  7. Pupylated proteins in Corynebacterium glutamicum revealed by MudPIT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küberl, Andreas; Fränzel, Benjamin; Eggeling, Lothar; Polen, Tino; Wolters, Dirk Andreas; Bott, Michael

    2014-06-01

    In a manner similar to ubiquitin, the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup) has been shown to target proteins for degradation via the proteasome in mycobacteria. However, not all actinobacteria possessing the Pup protein also contain a proteasome. In this study, we set out to study pupylation in the proteasome-lacking non-pathogenic model organism Corynebacterium glutamicum. A defined pup deletion mutant of C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 grew aerobically as the parent strain in standard glucose minimal medium, indicating that pupylation is dispensable under these conditions. After expression of a Pup derivative carrying an aminoterminal polyhistidine tag in the Δpup mutant and Ni(2+)-chelate affinity chromatography, pupylated proteins were isolated. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS of the elution fraction unraveled 55 proteins being pupylated in C. glutamicum and 66 pupylation sites. Similar to mycobacteria, the majority of pupylated proteins are involved in metabolism or translation. Our results define the first pupylome of an actinobacterial species lacking a proteasome, confirming that other fates besides proteasomal degradation are possible for pupylated proteins.

  8. Application of native agarose gel electrophoresis of serum proteins in veterinary diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Jania Bartosz; Andraszek Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Electrophoretic techniques, used to separate mixtures of electrically charged particles, are widely used in science. One of these techniques, native protein electrophoresis in an agarose gel, is applied in human and veterinary medicine. Changes in the proportions of individual protein fractions correspond to significant changes in the physiology of the body. Although the pattern obtained by electrophoretic separation rarely indicates a specific disease, it provides valuable information for th...

  9. Peptic and tryptic hydrolysis of native and heated whey protein to reduce its antigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S B; Ki, K S; Khan, M A; Lee, W S; Lee, H J; Ahn, B S; Kim, H S

    2007-09-01

    This study examined the effects of enzymes on the production and antigenicity of native and heated whey protein concentrate (WPC) hydrolysates. Native and heated (10 min at 100 degrees C) WPC (2% protein solution) were incubated at 50 degrees C for 30, 60, 90, and 120 min with 0.1, 0.5, and 1% pepsin and then with 0.1, 0.5, and 1% trypsin on a protein-equivalent basis. A greater degree of hydrolysis was achieved and greater nonprotein nitrogen concentrations were obtained in heated WPC than in native WPC at all incubation times. Hydrolysis of WPC was increased with an increasing level of enzymes and higher incubation times. The highest hydrolysis (25.23%) was observed in heated WPC incubated with 1% pepsin and then with 1% trypsin for 120 min. High molecular weight bands, such as BSA, were completely eliminated from sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE of both native and heated WPC hydrolysates produced with pepsin for the 30-min incubation. The alpha-lactalbumin in native WPC was slightly degraded when incubated with 0.1% pepsin and then with 0.1% trypsin; however, it was almost completely hydrolyzed within 60 min of incubation with 0.5% pepsin and then with 0.5% trypsin. Incubation of native WPC with 1% pepsin and then with 1% trypsin for 30 min completely removed the BSA and alpha-lactalbumin. The beta-lactoglobulin in native WPC was not affected by the pepsin and trypsin treatments. The beta-lactoglobulin in heated WPC was partially hydrolyzed by the 0.1 and 0.5% pepsin and trypsin treatments and was completely degraded by the 1% pepsin and trypsin treatment. Antigenicity reversibly mimicked the hydrolysis of WPC and the removal of beta-lactoglobulin from hydrolysates. Antigenicity in heated and native WPC was reduced with an increasing level of enzymes. A low antigenic response was observed in heated WPC compared with native WPC. The lowest antigenicity was observed when heated WPC was incubated with 1% pepsin and then with 1% trypsin. These results suggested that

  10. EPR Distance Measurements in Native Proteins with Genetically Encoded Spin Labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Moritz J; Fedoseev, Artem; Bücker, Dennis; Borbas, Julia; Peter, Christine; Drescher, Malte; Summerer, Daniel

    2015-12-18

    The genetic encoding of nitroxide amino acids in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) distance measurements enables precise structural studies of native proteins, i.e. without the need for mutations to create unique reactive sites for chemical labeling and thus with minimal structural perturbation. We here report on in vitro DEER measurements in native E. coli thioredoxin (TRX) that establish the nitroxide amino acid SLK-1 as a spectroscopic probe that reports distances and conformational flexibilities in the enzyme with nonmutated catalytic centers that are not accessible by the use of the traditional methanethiosulfonate spin label (MTSSL). We generated a rotamer library for SLK-1 that in combination with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation enables predictions of distance distributions between two SLK-1 labels incorporated into a target protein. Toward a routine use of SLK-1 for EPR distance measurements in proteins and the advancement of the approach to intracellular environments, we study the stability of SLK-1 in E. coli cultures and lysates and establish guidelines for protein expression and purification that offer maximal nitroxide stability. These advancements and insights provide new perspectives for facile structural studies of native, endogenous proteins by EPR distance measurements.

  11. Analysis of Native-Like Proteins and Protein Complexes Using Cation to Anion Proton Transfer Reactions (CAPTR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Bush, Matthew F.

    2015-12-01

    Mass spectra of native-like protein complexes often exhibit narrow charge-state distributions, broad peaks, and contributions from multiple, coexisting species. These factors can make it challenging to interpret those spectra, particularly for mixtures with significant heterogeneity. Here we demonstrate the use of ion/ion proton transfer reactions to reduce the charge states of m/ z-selected, native-like ions of proteins and protein complexes, a technique that we refer to as cation to anion proton transfer reactions (CAPTR). We then demonstrate that CAPTR can increase the accuracy of charge state assignments and the resolution of interfering species in native mass spectrometry. The CAPTR product ion spectra for pyruvate kinase exhibit ~30 peaks and enable unambiguous determination of the charge state of each peak, whereas the corresponding precursor spectra exhibit ~6 peaks and the assigned charge states have an uncertainty of ±3%. 15+ bovine serum albumin and 21+ yeast enolase dimer both appear near m/ z 4450 and are completely unresolved in a mixture. After a single CAPTR event, the resulting product ions are baseline resolved. The separation of the product ions increases dramatically after each subsequent CAPTR event; 12 events resulted in a 3000-fold improvement in separation relative to the precursor ions. Finally, we introduce a framework for interpreting and predicting the figures of merit for CAPTR experiments. More generally, these results suggest that CAPTR strongly complements other mass spectrometry tools for analyzing proteins and protein complexes, particularly those in mixtures.

  12. A Blue Native-PAGE analysis of membrane protein complexes in Clostridium thermocellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Keqiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium thermocellum is a Gram-positive thermophilic anaerobic bacterium with the unusual capacity to convert cellulosic biomass into ethanol and hydrogen. Identification and characterization of protein complexes in C. thermocellum are important toward understanding its metabolism and physiology. Results A two dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE procedure was developed to separate membrane protein complexes of C. thermocellum. Proteins spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF Mass spectrometry. 24 proteins were identified representing 13 distinct protein complexes, including several putative intact complexes. Interestingly, subunits of both the F1-F0-ATP synthase and the V1-V0-ATP synthase were detected in the membrane sample, indicating C. thermocellum may use alternative mechanisms for ATP generation. Conclusion Two dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE was used to detect membrane protein complexes in C. thermocellum. More than a dozen putative protein complexes were identified, revealing the simultaneous expression of two sets of ATP synthase. The protocol developed in this work paves the way for further functional characterization of these protein complexes.

  13. Determining Membrane Protein-Lipid Binding Thermodynamics Using Native Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiao; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wen; Liang, Xiaowen; Russell, David H; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2016-04-06

    Membrane proteins are embedded in the biological membrane where the chemically diverse lipid environment can modulate their structure and function. However, the thermodynamics governing the molecular recognition and interaction of lipids with membrane proteins is poorly understood. Here, we report a method using native mass spectrometry (MS), to determine thermodynamics of individual ligand binding events to proteins. Unlike conventional methods, native MS can resolve individual ligand binding events and, coupled with an apparatus to control the temperature, determine binding thermodynamic parameters, such as for protein-lipid interactions. We validated our approach using three soluble protein-ligand systems (maltose binding protein, lysozyme, and nitrogen regulatory protein) and obtained similar results to those using isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance. We also determined for the first time the thermodynamics of individual lipid binding to the ammonia channel (AmtB), an integral membrane protein from Escherichia coli. Remarkably, we observed distinct thermodynamic signatures for the binding of different lipids and entropy-enthalpy compensation for binding lipids of variable chain length. Additionally, using a mutant form of AmtB that abolishes a specific phosphatidylglycerol (PG) binding site, we observed distinct changes in the thermodynamic signatures for binding PG, implying these signatures can identify key residues involved in specific lipid binding and potentially differentiate between specific lipid binding sites.

  14. Prediction and functional analysis of native disorder in proteins from the three kingdoms of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, J J; Sodhi, J S; McGuffin, L J; Buxton, B F; Jones, D T

    2004-03-26

    An automatic method for recognizing natively disordered regions from amino acid sequence is described and benchmarked against predictors that were assessed at the latest critical assessment of techniques for protein structure prediction (CASP) experiment. The method attains a Wilcoxon score of 90.0, which represents a statistically significant improvement on the methods evaluated on the same targets at CASP. The classifier, DISOPRED2, was used to estimate the frequency of native disorder in several representative genomes from the three kingdoms of life. Putative, long (>30 residue) disordered segments are found to occur in 2.0% of archaean, 4.2% of eubacterial and 33.0% of eukaryotic proteins. The function of proteins with long predicted regions of disorder was investigated using the gene ontology annotations supplied with the Saccharomyces genome database. The analysis of the yeast proteome suggests that proteins containing disorder are often located in the cell nucleus and are involved in the regulation of transcription and cell signalling. The results also indicate that native disorder is associated with the molecular functions of kinase activity and nucleic acid binding.

  15. Specific non-local interactions are not necessary for recovering native protein dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Dasgupta

    Full Text Available The elastic network model (ENM is a widely used method to study native protein dynamics by normal mode analysis (NMA. In ENM we need information about all pairwise distances, and the distance between contacting atoms is restrained to the native value. Therefore ENM requires O(N2 information to realize its dynamics for a protein consisting of N amino acid residues. To see if (or to what extent such a large amount of specific structural information is required to realize native protein dynamics, here we introduce a novel model based on only O(N restraints. This model, named the 'contact number diffusion' model (CND, includes specific distance restraints for only local (along the amino acid sequence atom pairs, and semi-specific non-local restraints imposed on each atom, rather than atom pairs. The semi-specific non-local restraints are defined in terms of the non-local contact numbers of atoms. The CND model exhibits the dynamic characteristics comparable to ENM and more correlated with the explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulation than ENM. Moreover, unrealistic surface fluctuations often observed in ENM were suppressed in CND. On the other hand, in some ligand-bound structures CND showed larger fluctuations of buried protein atoms interacting with the ligand compared to ENM. In addition, fluctuations from CND and ENM show comparable correlations with the experimental B-factor. Although there are some indications of the importance of some specific non-local interactions, the semi-specific non-local interactions are mostly sufficient for reproducing the native protein dynamics.

  16. Specific non-local interactions are not necessary for recovering native protein dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Kasahara, Kota; Kamiya, Narutoshi; Nakamura, Haruki; Kinjo, Akira R

    2014-01-01

    The elastic network model (ENM) is a widely used method to study native protein dynamics by normal mode analysis (NMA). In ENM we need information about all pairwise distances, and the distance between contacting atoms is restrained to the native value. Therefore ENM requires O(N2) information to realize its dynamics for a protein consisting of N amino acid residues. To see if (or to what extent) such a large amount of specific structural information is required to realize native protein dynamics, here we introduce a novel model based on only O(N) restraints. This model, named the 'contact number diffusion' model (CND), includes specific distance restraints for only local (along the amino acid sequence) atom pairs, and semi-specific non-local restraints imposed on each atom, rather than atom pairs. The semi-specific non-local restraints are defined in terms of the non-local contact numbers of atoms. The CND model exhibits the dynamic characteristics comparable to ENM and more correlated with the explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulation than ENM. Moreover, unrealistic surface fluctuations often observed in ENM were suppressed in CND. On the other hand, in some ligand-bound structures CND showed larger fluctuations of buried protein atoms interacting with the ligand compared to ENM. In addition, fluctuations from CND and ENM show comparable correlations with the experimental B-factor. Although there are some indications of the importance of some specific non-local interactions, the semi-specific non-local interactions are mostly sufficient for reproducing the native protein dynamics.

  17. Kinetic Control of Histidine-Tagged Protein Surface Density on Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, Jeffrey A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Groves, Jay T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-02-28

    Nickel-chelating lipids are general tools for anchoring polyhistidine-tagged proteins to supported lipid bilayers (SLBs), but controversy exists over the stability of the protein-lipid attachment. In this study, we show that chelator lipids are suitable anchors for building stable, biologically active surfaces but that a simple Langmuirian model is insufficient to describe their behavior. Desorption kinetics from chelator lipids are governed by the valency of surface binding: monovalently bound proteins desorb within minutes (t1/2 ≈ 6 min), whereas polyvalently bound species remain bound for hours (t1/2 ≈ 12 h). Evolution between surface states is slow, so equilibrium is unlikely to be reached on experimental timescales. However, by tuning incubation conditions, the populations of each species can be kinetically controlled, providing a wide range of protein densities on SLBs with a single concentration of chelator lipid. In conclusion, we propose guidelines for the assembly of SLB surfaces functionalized with specific protein densities and demonstrate their utility in the formation of hybrid immunological synapses.

  18. Predicting protein folding pathways at the mesoscopic level based on native interactions between secondary structure elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Sing-Hoi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since experimental determination of protein folding pathways remains difficult, computational techniques are often used to simulate protein folding. Most current techniques to predict protein folding pathways are computationally intensive and are suitable only for small proteins. Results By assuming that the native structure of a protein is known and representing each intermediate conformation as a collection of fully folded structures in which each of them contains a set of interacting secondary structure elements, we show that it is possible to significantly reduce the conformation space while still being able to predict the most energetically favorable folding pathway of large proteins with hundreds of residues at the mesoscopic level, including the pig muscle phosphoglycerate kinase with 416 residues. The model is detailed enough to distinguish between different folding pathways of structurally very similar proteins, including the streptococcal protein G and the peptostreptococcal protein L. The model is also able to recognize the differences between the folding pathways of protein G and its two structurally similar variants NuG1 and NuG2, which are even harder to distinguish. We show that this strategy can produce accurate predictions on many other proteins with experimentally determined intermediate folding states. Conclusion Our technique is efficient enough to predict folding pathways for both large and small proteins at the mesoscopic level. Such a strategy is often the only feasible choice for large proteins. A software program implementing this strategy (SSFold is available at http://faculty.cs.tamu.edu/shsze/ssfold.

  19. A pairwise residue contact area-based mean force potential for discrimination of native protein structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezeshk Hamid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering energy function to detect a correct protein fold from incorrect ones is very important for protein structure prediction and protein folding. Knowledge-based mean force potentials are certainly the most popular type of interaction function for protein threading. They are derived from statistical analyses of interacting groups in experimentally determined protein structures. These potentials are developed at the atom or the amino acid level. Based on orientation dependent contact area, a new type of knowledge-based mean force potential has been developed. Results We developed a new approach to calculate a knowledge-based potential of mean-force, using pairwise residue contact area. To test the performance of our approach, we performed it on several decoy sets to measure its ability to discriminate native structure from decoys. This potential has been able to distinguish native structures from the decoys in the most cases. Further, the calculated Z-scores were quite high for all protein datasets. Conclusions This knowledge-based potential of mean force can be used in protein structure prediction, fold recognition, comparative modelling and molecular recognition. The program is available at http://www.bioinf.cs.ipm.ac.ir/softwares/surfield

  20. Influence of Alkylammonium Acetate Buffers on Protein-Ligand Noncovalent Interactions Using Native Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaoyu; Gavriilidou, Agni F. M.; Zenobi, Renato

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the influence of three volatile alkylammonium acetate buffers on binding affinities for protein-ligand interactions determined by native electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Four different types of proteins were chosen for this study. A charge-reduction effect was observed for all the cases studied, in comparison to the ions formed in ammonium acetate solution. When increasing the collision energy, the complexes of trypsin and the ligand were found to be more stable when sprayed from alkylammonium acetate buffers than from ammonium acetate. The determined dissociation constant (Kd) also exhibited a drop (up to 40%) when ammonium acetate was replaced by alkylammonium acetate buffers for the case of lysozyme and the ligand. The prospective uses of these ammonium acetate analogs in native ESI-MS are discussed in this paper as well.

  1. Why and how does native topology dictate the folding speed of a protein?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, Mark; Ghosh, Kingshuk

    2012-11-28

    Since the pioneering work of Plaxco, Simons, and Baker, it is now well known that the rates of protein folding strongly correlate with the average sequence separation (absolute contact order (ACO)) of native contacts. In spite of multitude of papers, our understanding to the basis of the relation between folding speed and ACO is still lacking. We model the transition state as a gaussian polymer chain decorated with weak springs between native contacts while the unfolded state is modeled as a gaussian chain only. Using these hamiltonians, our perturbative calculation explicitly shows folding speed and ACO are linearly related when only the first order term in the series is considered. However, to the second order, we notice the existence of two new topological metrics, termed COC(1) and COC(2) (COC stands for contact order correction). These additional correction terms are needed to properly account for the entropy loss due to overlapping (nested or linked) loops that are not well described by simple addition of entropies in ACO. COC(1) and COC(2) are related to fluctuations and correlations among different sequence separations. The new metric combining ACO, COC(1), and COC(2) improves folding speed dependence on native topology when applied to three different databases: (i) two-state proteins with only α∕β and β proteins, (ii) two-state proteins (α∕β, β and purely helical proteins all combined), and (iii) master set (multi-state and two-state) folding proteins. Furthermore, the first principle calculation provides us direct physical insights to the meaning of the fit parameters. The coefficient of ACO, for example, is related to the average strength of the contacts, while the constant term is related to the protein folding speed limit. With the new scaling law, our estimate of the folding speed limit is in close agreement with the widely accepted value of 1 μs observed in proteins and RNA. Analyzing an exhaustive set (7367) of monomeric proteins from

  2. New supercharging reagents produce highly charged protein ions in native mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Going, Catherine C; Xia, Zijie; Williams, Evan R

    2015-11-07

    The effectiveness of two new supercharging reagents for producing highly charged ions by electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions in which proteins have native structures and reactivities were investigated. In aqueous solution, 2-thiophenone and 4-hydroxymethyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-one (HD) at a concentration of 2% by volume can increase the average charge of cytochrome c and myoglobin by up to 163%, resulting in even higher charge states than those that are produced from water/methanol/acid solutions in which these proteins are denatured. The greatest extent of supercharging occurs in pure water, but these supercharging reagents are also highly effective in aqueous solutions containing 200 mM ammonium acetate buffer commonly used in native mass spectrometry (MS). These reagents are less effective supercharging reagents than m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) and propylene carbonate (PC) when ions are formed from water/methanol/acid. The extent to which loss of the heme group from myoglobin occurs is related to the extent of supercharging. Results from guanidine melts of cytochrome c monitored with tryptophan fluorescence show that the supercharging reagents PC, sulfolane and HD are effective chemical denaturants in solution. These results provide additional evidence for the role of protein structural changes in the electrospray droplet as the primary mechanism for supercharging with these reagents in native MS. These results also demonstrate that for at least some proteins, the formation of highly charged ions from native MS is no longer a significant barrier for obtaining structural information using conventional tandem MS methods.

  3. Isolation of Metarhizium anisopliae carboxypeptidase A with native disulfide bonds from the cytosol of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Brian P; Waugh, David S

    2012-03-01

    The carboxypeptidase A enzyme from Metarhizium anisopliae (MeCPA) has broader specificity than the mammalian A-type carboxypeptidases, making it a more useful reagent for the removal of short affinity tags and disordered residues from the C-termini of recombinant proteins. When secreted from baculovirus-infected insect cells, the yield of pure MeCPA was 0.25mg per liter of conditioned medium. Here, we describe a procedure for the production of MeCPA in the cytosol of Escherichia coli that yields approximately 0.5mg of pure enzyme per liter of cell culture. The bacterial system is much easier to scale up and far less expensive than the insect cell system. The expression strategy entails maintaining the proMeCPA zymogen in a soluble state by fusing it to the C-terminus of maltose-binding protein (MBP) while simultaneously overproducing the protein disulfide isomerase DsbC in the cytosol from a separate plasmid. Unexpectedly, we found that the yield of active and properly oxidized MeCPA was highest when coexpressed with DsbC in BL21(DE3) cells that do not also contain mutations in the trxB and gor genes. Moreover, the formation of active MeCPA was only partially dependent on the disulfide-isomerase activity of DsbC. Intriguingly, we observed that most of the active MeCPA was generated after cell lysis and amylose affinity purification of the MBP-proMeCPA fusion protein, during the time that the partially purified protein was held overnight at 4°C prior to activation with thermolysin. Following removal of the MBP-propeptide by thermolysin digestion, active MeCPA (with a C-terminal polyhistidine tag) was purified to homogeneity by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC), ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration.

  4. A highly compliant protein native state with a spontaneous-like mechanical unfolding pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarsson, Pétur O; Valpapuram, Immanuel; Camilloni, Carlo; Imparato, Alberto; Tiana, Guido; Poulsen, Flemming M; Kragelund, Birthe B; Cecconi, Ciro

    2012-10-17

    The mechanical properties of proteins and their force-induced structural changes play key roles in many biological processes. Previous studies have shown that natively folded proteins are brittle under tension, unfolding after small mechanical deformations, while partially folded intermediate states, such as molten globules, are compliant and can deform elastically a great amount before crossing the transition state barrier. Moreover, under tension proteins appear to unfold through a different sequence of events than during spontaneous unfolding. Here, we describe the response to force of the four-α-helix acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) in the low-force regime using optical tweezers and ratcheted molecular dynamics simulations. The results of our studies reveal an unprecedented mechanical behavior of a natively folded protein. ACBP displays an atypical compliance along two nearly orthogonal pulling axes, with transition states located almost halfway between the unfolded and folded states. Surprisingly, the deformability of ACBP is greater than that observed for the highly pliant molten globule intermediate states. Furthermore, when manipulated from the N- and C-termini, ACBP unfolds by populating a transition state that resembles that observed during chemical denaturation, both for structure and position along the reaction coordinate. Our data provide the first experimental evidence of a spontaneous-like mechanical unfolding pathway of a protein. The mechanical behavior of ACBP is discussed in terms of topology and helix propensity.

  5. Isolation of Camelid Single-Domain Antibodies Against Native Proteins Using Recombinant Multivalent Peptide Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alturki, Norah A; Henry, Kevin A; MacKenzie, C Roger; Arbabi-Ghahroudi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Generation of antibodies against desired epitopes on folded proteins may be hampered by various characteristics of the target protein, including antigenic and immunogenic dominance of irrelevant epitopes and/or steric occlusion of the desired epitope. In such cases, peptides encompassing linear epitopes of the native protein represent attractive alternative reagents for immunization and screening. Peptide antigens are typically prepared by fusing or conjugating the peptide of interest to a carrier protein. The utility of such antigens depends on many factors including the peptide's amino acid sequence, display valency, display format (synthetic conjugate vs. recombinant fusion) and characteristics of the carrier. Here we provide detailed protocols for: (1) preparation of DNA constructs encoding peptides fused to verotoxin (VT) multimerization domain; (2) expression, purification, and characterization of the multivalent peptide-VT ligands; (3) concurrent panning of a non-immune phage-displayed camelid VHH library against the peptide-VT ligands and native protein; and (4) identification of VHHs enriched via panning using next-generation sequencing techniques. These methods are simple, rapid and can be easily adapted to yield custom peptide-VT ligands that appear to maintain the antigenic structures of the peptide. However, we caution that peptide sequences should be chosen with great care, taking into account structural, immunological, and biophysical information on the protein of interest.

  6. Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis for the rapid discrimination between native-like and non-native states in freeze-dried protein formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Sigrid; Vander Heyden, Yvan; Roger, Jean-Michel; D'Hondt, Matthias; Hansen, Laurent; Palagos, Bernard; De Spiegeleer, Bart; Remon, Jean-Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates whether Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis (MVA) enables a rapid and direct differentiation between two classes of conformational states, i.e., native-like and non-native proteins, in freeze-dried formulations. A data set comprising of 99 spectra, both from native-like and various types of non-native freeze-dried protein formulations, was obtained by freeze-drying lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as model protein under various conditions. Changes in the secondary structure in the solid freeze-dried proteins were determined through visual interpretation of the blank corrected second derivative amide I band in the ATR-FTIR spectra (further called FTIR spectra) and served as an independent reference to assign class labels. Exploratory analysis and supervised classification, using Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Squares - Linear Discriminant Analysis (PLS-LDA), respectively, revealed that Raman spectroscopy is with 95% accuracy able to correctly discriminate between native-like and non-native states in the tested freeze-dried LDH formulations. Backbone (i.e., amide III) and side chain sensitive spectral regions proved important for making the discrimination between both classes. As discrimination was not influenced by the spectral signals from the tested excipients, there was no need for blank corrections. The Raman model may allow direct and automated analysis of the investigated quality attribute, opening possibilities for a real time and in-line quality indication as a future step. However, the sensitivity of the method should be further investigated and where possible improved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of low-density lipoprotein-associated proteins using the method of digitized native protein mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ya; Chen, Jin; Wang, Ahui; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Shumin; Manabe, Takashi; Tan, Wen

    2016-07-01

    The method of digitized native protein mapping, combining nondenaturing micro 2DE, grid gel-cutting, and quantitative LC-MS/MS (in data-independent acquisition mode, or MS(E) ), was improved by using a new MS/MS mode, ion mobility separation enhanced-MS(E) (HDMS(E) ), and applied to analyze the area of human plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL). An 18 mm × 4.8 mm rectangular area which included LDL on a nondenaturing micro 2D gel of human plasma was grid-cut into 72 square gel pieces and subjected to quantitative LC-MS/MS. Compared with MS(E) , HDMS(E) showed significantly higher performance, by assigning 50% more proteins and detecting each protein in more squares. A total of 253 proteins were assigned with LC-HDMS(E) and the quantity distribution of each was reconstructed as a native protein map. The maps showed that Apo B-100 was the most abundant protein in the grid-cut area, concentrated at pI ca. 5.4-6.1 and apparent mass ca. 1000 kDa, which corresponded to four gel pieces, squares 39-42. An Excel macro was prepared to search protein maps which showed protein quantity peaks localized within this concentrated region of Apo B-100. Twenty-two proteins out of the 252 matched this criterion, in which 19 proteins have been reported to be associated with LDL. This method only requires several microliters of a plasma sample and the principle of the protein separation is totally different from the commonly used ultracentrifugation. The results obtained by this method would provide new insights on the structure and function of LDL.

  8. Detection and analysis of protein-protein interactions in organellar and prokaryotic proteomes by native gel electrophoresis: (Membrane) protein complexes and supercomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Frank

    2006-07-01

    It is an essential and challenging task to unravel protein-protein interactions in their actual in vivo context. Native gel systems provide a separation platform allowing the analysis of protein complexes on a rather proteome-wide scale in a single experiment. This review focus on blue-native (BN)-PAGE as the most versatile and successful gel-based approach to separate soluble and membrane protein complexes of intricate protein mixtures derived from all biological sources. BN-PAGE is a charge-shift method with a running pH of 7.5 relying on the gentle binding of anionic CBB dye to all membrane and many soluble protein complexes, leading to separation of protein species essentially according to their size and superior resolution than other fractionation techniques can offer. The closely related colorless-native (CN)-PAGE, whose applicability is restricted to protein species with intrinsic negative net charge, proved to provide an especially mild separation capable of preserving weak protein-protein interactions better than BN-PAGE. The essential conditions determining the success of detecting protein-protein interactions are the sample preparations, e.g. the efficiency/mildness of the detergent solubilization of membrane protein complexes. A broad overview about the achievements of BN- and CN-PAGE studies to elucidate protein-protein interactions in organelles and prokaryotes is presented, e.g. the mitochondrial protein import machinery and oxidative phosphorylation supercomplexes. In many cases, solubilization with digitonin was demonstrated to facilitate an efficient and particularly gentle extraction of membrane protein complexes prone to dissociation by treatment with other detergents. In general, analyses of protein interactomes should be carried out by both BN- and CN-PAGE.

  9. Overexpression and Purification of Human Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide - Receptor Component Protein (CGRP-RCP) in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolun, Adviye A.; Dickerson, Ian M.; Malhotra, Arun

    2007-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide secreted by the central and peripheral nervous system nerves that has important physiological functions such as vasodilation, cardiotonic actions, metabolic and pro-inflammatory effects. The CGRP receptor is unique among G-protein coupled receptors in that a functional CGRP receptor consists of at least three proteins: Calcitonin Like Receptor (CLR), Receptor Activity Modifying Protein (RAMP1) and Receptor Component Protein (RCP). RCP is a required factor in CGRP-mediated signal transduction and it couples the CGRP receptor to the signal transduction pathway. Here we describe methods to overexpress and purify RCP for structure-function studies. Human RCP was cloned and overexpressed with a poly-histidine tag and as a Maltose Binding Protein (MBP) fusion in Escherichia coli using commercially available expression vectors. While his-tagged RCP is prone to aggregation, solubility is improved when RCP is expressed as a MBP fusion. Expression and purification procedures for these constructs are described. Results from these studies will facilitate structural analysis of human RCP, and allow further understanding of RCP function. PMID:17067815

  10. Layer-by-Layer Deposition with Polymers Containing Nitrilotriacetate, A Convenient Route to Fabricate Metal- and Protein-Binding Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeratne, Salinda; Liu, Weijing; Dong, Jinlan; Ning, Wenjing; Ratnayake, Nishanka Dilini; Walker, Kevin D; Bruening, Merlin L

    2016-04-27

    This paper describes a convenient synthesis of nitrilotriacetate (NTA)-containing polymers and subsequent layer-by-layer adsorption of these polymers on flat surfaces and in membrane pores. The resulting films form NTA-metal-ion complexes and capture 2-3 mmol of metal ions per mL of film. Moreover, these coatings bind multilayers of polyhistidine-tagged proteins through association with NTA-metal-ion complexes. Inclusion of acrylic acid repeat units in NTA-containing copolymers promotes swelling to increase protein binding in films on Au-coated wafers. Adsorption of NTA-containing films in porous nylon membranes gives materials that capture ∼46 mg of His-tagged ubiquitin per mL. However, the binding capacity decreases with the protein molecular weight. Due to the high affinity of NTA for metal ions, the modified membranes show modest leaching of Ni(2+) in binding and rinsing buffers. Adsorption of NTA-containing polymers is a simple method to create metal- and protein-binding films and may, with future enhancement of stability, facilitate development of disposable membranes that rapidly purify tagged proteins.

  11. Anisotropic coarse-grained statistical potentials improve the ability to identify native-like protein structures

    CERN Document Server

    Buchete, N V; Thirumalai, D

    2003-01-01

    We present a new method to extract distance and orientation dependent potentials between amino acid side chains using a database of protein structures and the standard Boltzmann device. The importance of orientation dependent interactions is first established by computing orientational order parameters for proteins with alpha-helical and beta-sheet architecture. Extraction of the anisotropic interactions requires defining local reference frames for each amino acid that uniquely determine the coordinates of the neighboring residues. Using the local reference frames and histograms of the radial and angular correlation functions for a standard set of non-homologue protein structures, we construct the anisotropic pair potentials. The performance of the orientation dependent potentials was studied using a large database of decoy proteins. The results demonstrate that the new distance and orientation dependent residue-residue potentials present a significantly improved ability to recognize native folds from a set o...

  12. Folding 19 proteins to their native state and stability of large proteins from a coarse-grained model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Abhijeet; Travesset, Alex

    2014-03-01

    We develop an intermediate resolution model, where the backbone is modeled with atomic resolution but the side chain with a single bead, by extending our previous model (Proteins (2013) DOI: 10.1002/prot.24269) to properly include proline, preproline residues and backbone rigidity. Starting from random configurations, the model properly folds 19 proteins (including a mutant 2A3D sequence) into native states containing β sheet, α helix, and mixed α/β. As a further test, the stability of H-RAS (a 169 residue protein, critical in many signaling pathways) is investigated: The protein is stable, with excellent agreement with experimental B-factors. Despite that proteins containing only α helices fold to their native state at lower backbone rigidity, and other limitations, which we discuss thoroughly, the model provides a reliable description of the dynamics as compared with all atom simulations, but does not constrain secondary structures as it is typically the case in more coarse-grained models. Further implications are described. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Characteristics of surface layer proteins from two new and native strains of Lactobacillus brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarak Qamsari, Elahe; Kasra Kermanshahi, Rouha; Erfan, Mohammad; Ghadam, Parinaz; Sardari, Soroush; Eslami, Neda

    2017-02-01

    In this work, some important characteristics of surface layer (S-layer) proteins extracted from two new and native Lactobacillus strains, L.brevis KM3 and L.brevis KM7, were investigated. The presence of S-layer on the external surface of L.brevis KM3 was displayed by thin sectioning and negative staining. SDS-PAGE analysis were shown same dominant protein bands approximately around 48kDa for both S-layer proteins. Moreover, the S-layer reappeared when LiCl treated cells were allowed to grow again. Protein secondary structure and thermal behavior were evaluated by using circular dichroism (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), respectively. Both S-layer proteins had high content of β-sheet and low amount of α-helix. The thermograms of lyophilized S-layer proteins of L.brevis KM3 and L.brevis KM7 showed one transition peak at 67.9°C and 59.14°C, respectively. To determine monodispersity of extracted S-layer proteins, dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used. The results indicated that the main population of S-layer molecules in two tested lactobacillus strains were composed of monomer with an expected diameter close to 10nm. Furthermore, Zeta potential measurements were showed positive potential for both S-layer proteins, as expected. Our results could be used as the basis for biotechnological applications of these two new S-layer proteins.

  14. A real valued Genetic Algorithm for generating native like structure of small globular protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusmita, S; Singh, Harjinder; Karlapalem, Kamalakar; Mitra, Abhijit

    2008-01-01

    Predicting the 3D native conformation of a protein given the amino acid sequence is known as protein structure prediction (PSP) problem and is one of the greatest challenges of computational biology. The current work uses a real valued Genetic Algorithm (GA), a powerful variate of GA to simulate the PSP problem. This algorithm consists of basic evolutionary operators and a fitness vector. The fitness vector is designed by combining a set of knowledge based biophysical filters viz. persistence length, radius of gyration, packing fraction, hydrophobicity ratio and irregularity index of phi and psi. This vector converts all these biophysical measures into a real value by using specific weights or factors. The algorithm has been validated on six known globular proteins, with their length varying from 17-61 residues and total number of helices and strands in the range of 2-4. For all the test protein the algorithm converges rapidly and the converged structure shows a backbone RMSD (root mean square deviation) of 3-6A as compared to the native structure.

  15. Blood-Brain Barrier Transport of Cationized Immunoglobulin G: Enhanced Delivery Compared to Native Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triguero, Domingo; Buciak, Jody B.; Yang, Jing; Pardridge, William M.

    1989-06-01

    IgG molecules are potential neuropharmaceuticals that may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. However, IgG molecules are excluded from entering brain, owing to a lack of transport of these plasma proteins through the brain capillary wall, or blood-brain barrier (BBB). The possibility of enhanced IgG delivery through the BBB by cationization of the proteins was explored in the present studies. Native bovine IgG molecules were cationized by covalent coupling of hexamethylenediamine and the isoelectric point was raised to >10.7 based on isoelectric focusing studies. Native and cationized IgG molecules were radiolabeled with 125I and chloramine T. Cationized IgG, but not native IgG, was rapidly taken up by isolated bovine brain microvessels, which were used as an in vitro model system of the BBB. Cationized IgG binding was time and temperature dependent and was saturated by increasing concentrations of unlabeled cationized IgG (dissociation constant of the high-affinity binding site, 0.90 ± 0.37 μ M; Bmax, 1.4 ± 0.4 nmol per mg of protein). In vivo studies documented enhanced brain uptake of 125I-labeled cationized IgG relative to [3H]albumin, and complete transcytosis of the 125I-labeled cationized IgG molecule through the BBB and into brain parenchyma was demonstrated by thaw-mount autoradiography of frozen sections of rat brain obtained after carotid arterial infusions of 125I-labeled cationized IgG. These studies demonstrate that cationization of IgG molecules greatly facilitates the transport of these plasma proteins through the BBB in vivo, and this process may provide a new strategy for IgG delivery through the BBB.

  16. Blood-brain barrier transport of cationized immunoglobulin G: Enhanced delivery compared to native protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triguero, D.; Buciak, J.B.; Yang, J.; Pardridge, W.M.

    1989-06-01

    IgG molecules are potential neuropharmaceuticals that may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. However, IgG molecules are excluded from entering brain, owing to a lack of transport of these plasma proteins through the brain capillary wall, or blood-brain barrier (BBB). The possibility of enhanced IgG delivery through the BBB by cationization of the proteins was explored in the present studies. Native bovine IgG molecules were cationized by covalent coupling of hexamethylenediamine and the isoelectric point was raised to greater than 10.7 based on isoelectric focusing studies. Native and cationized IgG molecules were radiolabeled with /sup 125/I and chloramine T. Cationized IgG, but not native IgG, was rapidly taken up by isolated bovine brain microvessels, which were used as an in vitro model system of the BBB. Cationized IgG binding was time and temperature dependent and was saturated by increasing concentrations of unlabeled cationized IgG (dissociation constant of the high-affinity binding site, 0.90 +/- 0.37 microM; Bmax, 1.4 +/- 0.4 nmol per mg of protein). In vivo studies documented enhanced brain uptake of 125I-labeled cationized IgG relative to (3H)albumin, and complete transcytosis of the 125I-labeled cationized IgG molecule through the BBB and into brain parenchyma was demonstrated by thaw-mount autoradiography of frozen sections of rat brain obtained after carotid arterial infusions of 125I-labeled cationized IgG. These studies demonstrate that cationization of IgG molecules greatly facilitates the transport of these plasma proteins through the BBB in vivo, and this process may provide a new strategy for IgG delivery through the BBB.

  17. Recombinant chymosin used for exact and complete removal of a prochymosin derived fusion tag releasing intact native target protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Sune; Lamberth, Kasper; Nielsen, Lise-Lotte B

    2009-01-01

    Fusion tags add desirable properties to recombinant proteins, but they are not necessarily acceptable in the final products. Ideally, fusion tags should be removed releasing the intact native protein with no trace of the tag. Unique endoproteinases with the ability to cleave outside their own...... characteristics for the exact removal of fusion tags. It is readily available in highly purified recombinant versions approved by the FDA for preparation of food for human consumption. We suggest that one should consider extending the use of chymosin to the preparation of pharmaceutical proteins....... recognition sequence can potentially cleave at the boundary of any native protein. Chymosin was recently shown to cleave a pro-chymosin derived fusion tag releasing native target proteins. In our hands, however, not all proteins are chymosin-resistant under the acidic cleavage conditions (pH 4.5) used...

  18. Importance of native-state topology for determining the folding rate of two-state proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromiha, M Michael

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between amino acid sequences and folding rate of proteins is a challenging task similar to protein folding problem. In this work, we have analyzed the relative importance of protein sequence and structure for predicting the protein folding rates in terms of amino acid properties and contact distances, respectively. We found that the parameters derived with protein sequence (physical-chemical, energetic, and conformational properties of amino acid residues) show very weak correlation (|r| proteins, indicating that the sequence information alone is not sufficient to understand the folding rates of two-state proteins. However, the maximum positive correlation obtained for the properties, number of medium-range contacts, and alpha-helical tendency reveals the importance of local interactions to initiate protein folding. On the other hand, a remarkable correlation (r varies from -0.74 to -0.88) has been obtained between structural parameters (contact order, long-range order, and total contact distance) and protein folding rates. Further, we found that the secondary structure content and solvent accessibility play a marginal role in determining the folding rates of two-state proteins. Multiple regression analysis carried out with the combination of three properties, beta-strand tendency, enthalpy change, and total contact distance improved the correlation to 0.92 with protein folding rates. The relative importance of existing methods along with multiple-regression model proposed in this work will be discussed. Our results demonstrate that the native-state topology is the major determinant for the folding rates of two-state proteins.

  19. Defining Gas-Phase Fragmentation Propensities of Intact Proteins During Native Top-Down Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverland, Nicole A; Skinner, Owen S; Fellers, Ryan T; Tariq, Areeba A; Early, Bryan P; LeDuc, Richard D; Fornelli, Luca; Compton, Philip D; Kelleher, Neil L

    2017-06-01

    Fragmentation of intact proteins in the gas phase is influenced by amino acid composition, the mass and charge of precursor ions, higher order structure, and the dissociation technique used. The likelihood of fragmentation occurring between a pair of residues is referred to as the fragmentation propensity and is calculated by dividing the total number of assigned fragmentation events by the total number of possible fragmentation events for each residue pair. Here, we describe general fragmentation propensities when performing top-down mass spectrometry (TDMS) using denaturing or native electrospray ionization. A total of 5311 matched fragmentation sites were collected for 131 proteoforms that were analyzed over 165 experiments using native top-down mass spectrometry (nTDMS). These data were used to determine the fragmentation propensities for 399 residue pairs. In comparison to denatured top-down mass spectrometry (dTDMS), the fragmentation pathways occurring either N-terminal to proline or C-terminal to aspartic acid were even more enhanced in nTDMS compared with other residues. More generally, 257/399 (64%) of the fragmentation propensities were significantly altered (P ≤ 0.05) when using nTDMS compared with dTDMS, and of these, 123 were altered by 2-fold or greater. The most notable enhancements of fragmentation propensities for TDMS in native versus denatured mode occurred (1) C-terminal to aspartic acid, (2) between phenylalanine and tryptophan (F|W), and (3) between tryptophan and alanine (W|A). The fragmentation propensities presented here will be of high value in the development of tailored scoring systems used in nTDMS of both intact proteins and protein complexes. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. Efficient Synthesis of Peptide and Protein Functionalized Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamides Using Native Chemical Ligation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian M. G. Janssen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of DNA-based bionanotechnology requires efficient strategies to functionalize DNA nanostructures in a specific manner with other biomolecules, most importantly peptides and proteins. Common DNA-functionalization methods rely on laborious and covalent conjugation between DNA and proteins or peptides. Pyrrole-imidazole (Py–Im polyamides, based on natural minor groove DNA-binding small molecules, can bind to DNA in a sequence specific fashion. In this study, we explore the use of Py–Im polyamides for addressing proteins and peptides to DNA in a sequence specific and non-covalent manner. A generic synthetic approach based on native chemical ligation was established that allows efficient conjugation of both peptides and recombinant proteins to Py–Im polyamides. The effect of Py–Im polyamide conjugation on DNA binding was investigated by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR. Although the synthesis of different protein-Py–Im-polyamide conjugates was successful, attenuation of DNA affinity was observed, in particular for the protein-Py–Im-polyamide conjugates. The practical use of protein-Py–Im-polyamide conjugates for addressing DNA structures in an orthogonal but non-covalent manner, therefore, remains to be established.

  1. Nonspecific native elution of proteins and mumps virus in immunoaffinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brgles, Marija; Sviben, Dora; Forčić, Dubravko; Halassy, Beata

    2016-05-20

    Immunoaffinity chromatography, based on the antigen-antibody recognition, enables specific purification of any antigen (protein, virus) by its antibody. The problem with immunoaffinity chromatography is the harsh elution conditions required for disrupting strong antigen-antibody interactions, such as low pH buffers, which are often deleterious for the immobilized protein and the protein to be isolated since they can also disrupt the intramolecular forces. Therefore, immunoaffinity chromatography can only be partially used for protein and virus purification. Here we report on a nonspecific elution in immunoaffinity chromatography using native conditions by elution with amino acid solution at physiological pH for which we suppose possible competing mechanism of action. Elution potential of various amino acid solutions was tested using immunoaffinity columns specific for ovalbumin and mumps virus, and protein G affinity column. Results have shown that the most successful elution solutions were those containing imidazole and arginine of high molarity. Imidazole represents aromatic residues readily found at the antigen-antibody interaction surface and arginine is most frequently found on protein surface in general. Therefore, results on their eluting power in immunoaffinity chromatography, which increases with increasing molarity, are in line with the competing mechanism of action. Virus immunoaffinity chromatography resulted in removal on nonviable virus particles, which is important for research and biotechnology purposes. In addition, amino acids are proven stabilizers for proteins and viruses making approach presented in this work a very convenient purification method.

  2. Efficient Synthesis of Peptide and Protein Functionalized Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamides Using Native Chemical Ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Brian M G; van Ommeren, Sven P F I; Merkx, Maarten

    2015-06-04

    The advancement of DNA-based bionanotechnology requires efficient strategies to functionalize DNA nanostructures in a specific manner with other biomolecules, most importantly peptides and proteins. Common DNA-functionalization methods rely on laborious and covalent conjugation between DNA and proteins or peptides. Pyrrole-imidazole (Py-Im) polyamides, based on natural minor groove DNA-binding small molecules, can bind to DNA in a sequence specific fashion. In this study, we explore the use of Py-Im polyamides for addressing proteins and peptides to DNA in a sequence specific and non-covalent manner. A generic synthetic approach based on native chemical ligation was established that allows efficient conjugation of both peptides and recombinant proteins to Py-Im polyamides. The effect of Py-Im polyamide conjugation on DNA binding was investigated by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). Although the synthesis of different protein-Py-Im-polyamide conjugates was successful, attenuation of DNA affinity was observed, in particular for the protein-Py-Im-polyamide conjugates. The practical use of protein-Py-Im-polyamide conjugates for addressing DNA structures in an orthogonal but non-covalent manner, therefore, remains to be established.

  3. Membrane proteins in their native habitat as seen by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins play many critical roles in cells, mediating flow of material and information across cell membranes. They have evolved to perform these functions in the environment of a cell membrane, whose physicochemical properties are often different from those of common cell membrane mimetics used for structure determination. As a result, membrane proteins are difficult to study by traditional methods of structural biology, and they are significantly underrepresented in the protein structure databank. Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SSNMR) has long been considered as an attractive alternative because it allows for studies of membrane proteins in both native-like membranes composed of synthetic lipids and in cell membranes. Over the past decade, SSNMR has been rapidly developing into a major structural method, and a growing number of membrane protein structures obtained by this technique highlights its potential. Here we discuss membrane protein sample requirements, review recent progress in SSNMR methodologies, and describe recent advances in characterizing membrane proteins in the environment of a cellular membrane. PMID:25973959

  4. Application of native agarose gel electrophoresis of serum proteins in veterinary diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jania Bartosz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrophoretic techniques, used to separate mixtures of electrically charged particles, are widely used in science. One of these techniques, native protein electrophoresis in an agarose gel, is applied in human and veterinary medicine. Changes in the proportions of individual protein fractions correspond to significant changes in the physiology of the body. Although the pattern obtained by electrophoretic separation rarely indicates a specific disease, it provides valuable information for the differential diagnosis. Decades of research on the types of patterns obtained in the case of particular diseases have led to the accumulation of substantial knowledge. The paper presents the available information on this topic. Serum protein electrophoresis is recommended in cases of increased levels of total protein in order to reveal the nature of the process. The basic information which can be obtained from electrophoretic separation includes the immune status of the organism. Both increased antigenic stimulation and immunodeficiency are clearly visible in electropherograms. Moreover, the level of heterogeneity of the corresponding protein fractions can help to distinguish between infectious diseases and cancer - multiple myeloma - the latter producing a homogeneous immunoglobulin fraction. Analysis of other protein fractions helps to detect or confirm an ongoing inflammatory process and provides information regarding liver function. Even when the concentration of total protein is within the reference range, this analysis can be recommended as a basic laboratory test.

  5. Native Contact Density and Nonnative Hydrophobic Effects in the Folding of Bacterial Immunity Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Chan, Hue Sun

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial colicin-immunity proteins Im7 and Im9 fold by different mechanisms. Experimentally, at pH 7.0 and 10°C, Im7 folds in a three-state manner via an intermediate but Im9 folding is two-state-like. Accordingly, Im7 exhibits a chevron rollover, whereas the chevron arm for Im9 folding is linear. Here we address the biophysical basis of their different behaviors by using native-centric models with and without additional transferrable, sequence-dependent energies. The Im7 chevron rollover is not captured by either a pure native-centric model or a model augmented by nonnative hydrophobic interactions with a uniform strength irrespective of residue type. By contrast, a more realistic nonnative interaction scheme that accounts for the difference in hydrophobicity among residues leads simultaneously to a chevron rollover for Im7 and an essentially linear folding chevron arm for Im9. Hydrophobic residues identified by published experiments to be involved in nonnative interactions during Im7 folding are found to participate in the strongest nonnative contacts in this model. Thus our observations support the experimental perspective that the Im7 folding intermediate is largely underpinned by nonnative interactions involving large hydrophobics. Our simulation suggests further that nonnative effects in Im7 are facilitated by a lower local native contact density relative to that of Im9. In a one-dimensional diffusion picture of Im7 folding with a coordinate- and stability-dependent diffusion coefficient, a significant chevron rollover is consistent with a diffusion coefficient that depends strongly on native stability at the conformational position of the folding intermediate. PMID:26016652

  6. Native contact density and nonnative hydrophobic effects in the folding of bacterial immunity proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Chan, Hue Sun

    2015-05-01

    The bacterial colicin-immunity proteins Im7 and Im9 fold by different mechanisms. Experimentally, at pH 7.0 and 10°C, Im7 folds in a three-state manner via an intermediate but Im9 folding is two-state-like. Accordingly, Im7 exhibits a chevron rollover, whereas the chevron arm for Im9 folding is linear. Here we address the biophysical basis of their different behaviors by using native-centric models with and without additional transferrable, sequence-dependent energies. The Im7 chevron rollover is not captured by either a pure native-centric model or a model augmented by nonnative hydrophobic interactions with a uniform strength irrespective of residue type. By contrast, a more realistic nonnative interaction scheme that accounts for the difference in hydrophobicity among residues leads simultaneously to a chevron rollover for Im7 and an essentially linear folding chevron arm for Im9. Hydrophobic residues identified by published experiments to be involved in nonnative interactions during Im7 folding are found to participate in the strongest nonnative contacts in this model. Thus our observations support the experimental perspective that the Im7 folding intermediate is largely underpinned by nonnative interactions involving large hydrophobics. Our simulation suggests further that nonnative effects in Im7 are facilitated by a lower local native contact density relative to that of Im9. In a one-dimensional diffusion picture of Im7 folding with a coordinate- and stability-dependent diffusion coefficient, a significant chevron rollover is consistent with a diffusion coefficient that depends strongly on native stability at the conformational position of the folding intermediate.

  7. Native-sized spider silk proteins synthesized in planta via intein-based multimerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Valeska; Weichert, Nicola; Menzel, Matthias; Knoch, Dominic; Paege, Norman; Scheller, Jürgen; Spohn, Uwe; Conrad, Udo; Gils, Mario

    2013-04-01

    The synthesis of native-sized proteins is a pre-requisite for exploiting the potential of spider silk as a bio-based material. The unique properties of spider silk, such as extraordinary tensile strength and elasticity, result from the highly repetitive nature of spider silk protein motifs. The present report describes the combination of spider silk flagelliform protein (FLAG) production in the endoplasmic reticulum of tobacco plant leaf cells with an intein-based posttranslational protein fusion technology. The repeated ligation of FLAG monomers resulted in the formation of large multimers. This method avoids the need for highly repetitive transgenes, which may result in a higher genetic and transcriptional stability. Here we show, for the first time, the production of synthetic, high molecular weight spider silk proteins larger than 250 kDa based on the assembly of protein monomers via intein-mediated trans-splicing in planta. The resulting multimeric structures form microfibers, thereby demonstrating their great potential as a biomaterial.

  8. Dynamics of completely unfolded and native proteins through solid-state nanopores as a function of electric driving force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukhaled, Abdelghani; Cressiot, Benjamin; Bacri, Laurent; Pastoriza-Gallego, Manuela; Betton, Jean-Michel; Bourhis, Eric; Jede, Ralf; Gierak, Jacques; Auvray, Loïc; Pelta, Juan

    2011-05-24

    We report experimentally the dynamic properties of the entry and transport of unfolded and native proteins through a solid-state nanopore as a function of applied voltage, and we discuss the experimental data obtained as compared to theory. We show an exponential increase in the event frequency of current blockades and an exponential decrease in transport times as a function of the electric driving force. The normalized current blockage ratio remains constant or decreases for folded or unfolded proteins, respectively, as a function of the transmembrane potential. The unfolded protein is stretched under the electric driving force. The dwell time of native compact proteins in the pore is almost 1 order of magnitude longer than that of unfolded proteins, and the event frequency for both protein conformations is low. We discuss the possible phenomena hindering the transport of proteins through the pores, which could explain these anomalous dynamics, in particular, electro-osmotic counterflow and protein adsorption on the nanopore wall.

  9. Identification of protein complexes of microsomes in rat adipocytes by native gel coupled with LC-ESI-QTOF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Ming; Zhang, Yongqian; Xiong, Yan; Saeed, Yasmeen; Deng, Yulin

    2016-04-01

    The study of the composition of microsome proteins/complexes/interactions in adipocytes provides useful information for researchers related to energy metabolism disorders. The native gel coupled with LC-ESI-QTOF approach was employed here for separating protein complexes. We found a series of proteins functionally clustered in biological processes of protein metabolism, cellular carbohydrate catabolism, response to stimulus and wounding, macromolecular complex subunit organization, positive regulation of molecular function, regulation of programmed cell death and biomolecule transport. According to clustering of proteins' electrophoresis profiles across native gel fractions and bioinformatics data retrieval, protein complexes/interactions involved in protein metabolism, cellular carbohydrate catabolism, macromolecular complex subunit organization and biomolecule transport were identified. Besides, the results also revealed some functional linkages, which may provide useful information for discovering previously unknown interactions. The interaction between SSAO and ALDH2 was verified by co-immunoprecipitation. The native gel combining mass spectrometry approach appeared to be a useful tool for investigating microsome proteins and complexes to complement the traditional electrophoresis approaches. The native gel strategy together with our findings should facilitate future studies of the composition of rat adipocyte microsome protein complexes under different conditions.

  10. Casein kinase Ⅱ interacts with prion protein in vitro and forms complex with na-tive prion protein in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The most essential and crucial step during the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy is the conformational change of cellular prion protein to pathologic isoform. Casein kinase Ⅱ (CK2) is a ubiquitously expressed and evolutiouarily conserved pleiotropic protein kinase that is essential for viability. To explore the possible molecular interaction between CK2 and prion protein (PrP), the full-length sequences of human CK2α and CK2β complementary DNA were amplified with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using the total messenger RNA from cell line SH-SY5Y as the template; then, the fusion proteins histidine-CK2α and glutathione S-transferase-histidine-CK2β were expressed in Escherichia coll. The interaction between CK2 and PrP was evaluated with co-immunoprecipi-tation and pull-down assays. The results demonstrated that recombinant PrP bound specifically with CK2α, but not with CK2β. The native CK2 and PrP in hamster brains interacted with each other, forming protein complexes. Three different glycosylated forms of PrP (diglycosylated, monoglycosylated and unglycosylated PrP) from normal brains interacted with the CK2α subunit, though the unglycosylated PrP seemed to have a stronger binding ability with CK2α subunit. The domain responsible for interacting with CK2α was located at the C-terminal segment of PrP (residues 91-231). This study proposed reliable experimental data for the molecular interaction between PrP and CK2α (both in recombinant and native categories), scientific clues for further assessing the potential biological significance of the PrP-CK2 interaction, and the possible role of CK2 in the pathogenesis of prion diseases.

  11. Selective refinement and selection of near-native models in protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiong; Barz, Bogdan; Zhang, Jingfen; Xu, Dong; Kosztin, Ioan

    2015-10-01

    In recent years in silico protein structure prediction reached a level where fully automated servers can generate large pools of near-native structures. However, the identification and further refinement of the best structures from the pool of models remain problematic. To address these issues, we have developed (i) a target-specific selective refinement (SR) protocol; and (ii) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based ranking (SMDR) method. In SR the all-atom refinement of structures is accomplished via the Rosetta Relax protocol, subject to specific constraints determined by the size and complexity of the target. The best-refined models are selected with SMDR by testing their relative stability against gradual heating through all-atom MD simulations. Through extensive testing we have found that Mufold-MD, our fully automated protein structure prediction server updated with the SR and SMDR modules consistently outperformed its previous versions.

  12. STRUCTURAL VIROLOGY. X-ray crystal structures of native HIV-1 capsid protein reveal conformational variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gres, Anna T; Kirby, Karen A; KewalRamani, Vineet N; Tanner, John J; Pornillos, Owen; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2015-07-03

    The detailed molecular interactions between native HIV-1 capsid protein (CA) hexamers that shield the viral genome and proteins have been elusive. We report crystal structures describing interactions between CA monomers related by sixfold symmetry within hexamers (intrahexamer) and threefold and twofold symmetry between neighboring hexamers (interhexamer). The structures describe how CA builds hexagonal lattices, the foundation of mature capsids. Lattice structure depends on an adaptable hydration layer modulating interactions among CA molecules. Disruption of this layer alters interhexamer interfaces, highlighting an inherent structural variability. A CA-targeting antiviral affects capsid stability by binding across CA molecules and subtly altering interhexamer interfaces remote to the ligand-binding site. Inherent structural plasticity, hydration layer rearrangement, and effector binding affect capsid stability and have functional implications for the retroviral life cycle. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Cooperative formation of native-like tertiary contacts in the ensemble of unfolded states of a four-helix protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Susanne W; Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Danielsson, Jens

    2010-01-01

    In studies of the ensembles of unfolded structures of a four-helix bundle protein, we have detected the presence of potential precursors of native tertiary structures. These observations were based on the perturbation of NMR chemical shifts of the protein backbone atoms by single site mutations. ...

  14. X-ray Structure of Native Scorpion Toxin BmBKTx1 by Racemic Protein Crystallography Using Direct Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Pentelute, Brad L.; Tereshko, Valentina; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Kent, Stephen B.H.; (UC)

    2009-04-08

    Racemic protein crystallography, enabled by total chemical synthesis, has allowed us to determine the X-ray structure of native scorpion toxin BmBKTx1; direct methods were used for phase determination. This is the first example of a protein racemate that crystallized in space group I41/a.

  15. Transition from natively unfolded to folded state induced by desiccation in an anhydrobiotic nematode protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Kshamata; Tisi, Laurence; Basran, Amrik; Browne, John; Burnell, Ann; Zurdo, Jesus; Tunnacliffe, Alan

    2003-04-11

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are associated with desiccation tolerance in resurrection plants and in plant seeds, and the recent discovery of a dehydration-induced Group 3 LEA-like gene in the nematode Aphelenchus avenae suggests a similar association in anhydrobiotic animals. Despite their importance, little is known about the structure of Group 3 LEA proteins, although computer modeling and secondary structure algorithms predict a largely alpha-helical monomer that forms coiled coil oligomers. We have therefore investigated the structure of the nematode protein, AavLEA1, in the first such analysis of a well characterized Group 3 LEA-like protein. Immunoblotting and subunit cross-linking experiments demonstrate limited oligomerization of AavLEA1, but analytical ultracentrifugation and gel filtration show that the vast majority of the protein is monomeric. Moreover, CD, fluorescence emission, and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy indicate an unstructured conformation for the nematode protein. Therefore, in solution, no evidence was found to support structure predictions; instead, AavLEA1 seems to be natively unfolded with a high degree of hydration and low compactness. Such proteins can, however, be induced to fold into more rigid structures by partner molecules or by altered physiological conditions. Because AavLEA1 is associated with desiccation stress, its Fourier transform-infrared spectrum in the dehydrated state was examined. A dramatic but reversible increase in alpha-helix and, possibly, coiled coil formation was observed on drying, indicating that computer predictions of secondary structure may be correct for the solid state. This unusual finding offers the possibility that structural shifts in Group 3 LEA proteins occur on dehydration, perhaps consistent with their role in anhydrobiosis.

  16. Prion protein gene polymorphism and genetic risk evaluation for scrapie in all Turkish native sheep breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meydan, H; Yüceer, B; Degirmenci, R; Özkan, M M; Yildiz, M A

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the prion protein (PrP) gene polymorphism in a total of 1,110 healthy sheep from 18 Turkish native sheep breeds. There were nine alleles and 22 genotypes observed based on codons 136, 154, and 171 of the PrP gene. The ARQ allele was predominant for all breeds. The most resistant allele to scrapie, ARR, was present in all breeds. The VRQ allele, associated with the highest susceptibility to scrapie, was detected at low frequencies in İvesi (0.06), Kıvırcık (0.021), Sakız (0.010), Karayaka (0.011), Çine Çaparı (0.012), and Güneykaraman (0.017). In general, the ARQ/ARQ genotype was predominant in all breeds. The most resistant genotype to scrapie, ARR/ARR, was found with the frequency lower than 0.180. The most susceptible genotype, VRQ/VRQ, was found in only Kıvırcık. The TRR and TRH alleles and the genotypes of ARR/TRR, ARR/ARK, and ARH/TRH have been found for the first time in Turkish native sheep breeds. According to these results, all breeds belong to risk group R3 followed by R2. It is propounded that the susceptibility to scrapie increased from eastern to western part of Turkey. Our findings of Turkish native sheep breeds with PrP gene polymorphisms will assist the sheep breeding program for selection of scrapie resistance genotypes to reduce the risk of scrapie.

  17. Reaction of Native and Denatured Brucella abortus (S19 Proteins with Antibody Using Affinity Chromatography and Immunoblotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Karimi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Western blotting or immunoblotting commonly use for study of reaction between antigens and antibodies. Denaturation of many proteins in immunoblotting can affect greatly the reactivity of antibodies and outcome of the procedure.In this study proteins of Brucella abortus (S19 was extracted by a mild method and reaction of the extracted proteins with serum of infected human and goat and immunized rabbit compared by affinity chromatography and immunoblotting. Gamma globulin (mostly IgG fraction of the sera was precipitated by half saturation of ammonium sulfate and linked to activated sepharose 4B. The extracted proteins were loaded on the affinity column. Attached proteins was eluted by low pH and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Reaction of the total extract and eluted fractions with IgG fraction of sera was evaluated by Western blotting.Upon the results of affinity chromatography and immunoblotting, Brucella proteins can be classified in four groups: 1- The proteins that adsorbed to the affinity column and react with IgG in westernblotting. 2- Proteins that react with IgG in native state but no in denatured state. 3- Proteins that do not react with IgG in native state but react in denatured state. 4- Proteins that do not react with IgG in native and denatured state.

  18. Evaluation of interspecimen trypsin digestion efficiency prior to multiple reaction monitoring-based absolute protein quantification with native protein calibrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, Irene; Smit, Nico P M; Romijn, Fred P H T M; van der Laarse, Arnoud; Deelder, André M; van der Burgt, Yuri E M; Cobbaert, Christa M

    2013-12-06

    Implementation of quantitative clinical chemistry proteomics (qCCP) requires targeted proteomics approaches, usually involving bottom-up multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) with stable-isotope labeled standard (SIS) peptides, to move toward more accurate measurements. Two aspects of qCCP that deserve special attention are (1) proper calibration and (2) the assurance of consistent digestion. Here, we describe the evaluation of tryptic digestion efficiency by monitoring various signature peptides, missed cleavages, and modifications during proteolysis of apolipoprotein A-I and B in normo- and hypertriglyceridemic specimens. Absolute quantification of apolipoprotein A-I and B was performed by LC-MRM-MS with SIS peptide internal standards at two time points (4 and 20 h), using three native protein calibrators. Comparison with an immunoturbidimetric assay revealed recoveries of 99.4 ± 6.5% for apolipoprotein A-I and 102.6 ± 7.2% for apolipoprotein B after 4 h of trypsin digestion. Protein recoveries after 20 h trypsin incubation equaled 95.9 ± 6.9% and 106.0 ± 10.0% for apolipoproteins A-I and B, respectively. In conclusion, the use of metrologically traceable, native protein calibrators looks promising for accurate quantification of apolipoprotein A-I and B. Selection of rapidly formed peptides, that is, with no or minor missed cleavages, and the use of short trypsin incubation times for these efficiently cleaved peptides are likely to further reduce the variability introduced by trypsin digestion and to improve the traceability of test results to reach the desirable analytical performance for clinical chemistry application.

  19. Induction of Bone Matrix Protein Expression by Native Bone Matrix Proteins in C2C12 Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHEN-MING HU; SEAN A. F. PEEL; STEPHEN K. C. HO; GEORGE K. B. SANDOR; CAMERON M. L. CLOKIE

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the expression of bone matrix protein (BMP) induced by bovine bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in vitro. Methods Type I collagen, osteopontin (OPN), osteonectin (ON), osteocalcin (OC), and bone sialoprotein (BSP) were detected by immunohistochemistry in C2C12 cultured from day 1 to day 28. Results The signaling of bone matrix protein expression became weaker except for type I collagen, OC and BSP after 5 days. Fourteen days after culture, the positive signaling of type I collagen, OPN, ON, OC, and BSP was gradually declined, and could be detected significantly as compared with that of the negative control on day 28. BMP assay showed that the Ikaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was higher in C2C12 culture than in the control during the 14-day culture. Also, total protein and DNA significantly increased during the 14-day culture. High levels of ALP were seen in preosteoblasts and osteoblsts in vivo and in differentiating ostcoblasts in vitro. ALP was well recognized as a marker reflecting osteoblastic activity. Conclusion Native bovine BMP induces conversion of myoblasts into osteoblasts, produces type 1 collagen, and plays significantly role in osteoinduction and bone matrix mineralization of C2C12 in vitro.

  20. Native SILAC: metabolic labeling of proteins in prototroph microorganisms based on lysine synthesis regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Florian; Christiano, Romain; Walther, Tobias C

    2013-07-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics has matured into a methodology able to detect and quantitate essentially all proteins of model microorganisms, allowing for unprecedented depth in systematic protein analyses. The most accurate quantitation approaches currently require lysine auxotrophic strains, which precludes analysis of most existing mutants, strain collections, or commercially important strains (e.g. those used for brewing or for the biotechnological production of metabolites). Here, we used MS-based proteomics to determine the global response of prototrophic yeast and bacteria to exogenous lysine. Unexpectedly, down-regulation of lysine synthesis in the presence of exogenous lysine is achieved via different mechanisms in different yeast strains. In each case, however, lysine in the medium down-regulates its biosynthesis, allowing for metabolic proteome labeling with heavy-isotope-containing lysine. This strategy of native stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (nSILAC) overcomes the limitations of previous approaches and can be used for the efficient production of protein standards for absolute SILAC quantitation in model microorganisms. As proof of principle, we have used nSILAC to globally analyze yeast proteome changes during salt stress.

  1. Structural fluctuation of protein in water around its native state: a new statistical mechanics formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bongsoo; Hirata, Fumio

    2013-02-07

    A new statistical mechanics formulation of characterizing the structural fluctuation of protein correlated with that of water is presented based on the generalized Langevin equation and the 3D-reference interaction site model (RISM)/RISM theory of molecular liquids. The displacement vector of atom positions, and their conjugated momentum, are chosen for the dynamic variables for protein, while the density fields of atoms and their momentum fields are chosen for water. Projection of other degrees of freedom onto those dynamic variables using the standard projection operator method produces essentially two equations, which describe the time evolution of fluctuation concerning the density field of solvent and the conformation of protein around an equilibrium state, which are coupled with each other. The equation concerning the protein dynamics is formally akin to that of the coupled Langevin oscillators, and is a generalization of the latter, to atomic level. The most intriguing feature of the new equation is that it contains the variance-covariance matrix as the "Hessian" term describing the "force" restoring an equilibrium conformation, which is the second moment of the fluctuation of atom positions. The "Hessian" matrix is naturally identified as the second derivative of the free energy surface around the equilibrium. A method to evaluate the Hessian matrix based on the 3D-RISM/RISM theory is proposed. Proposed also is an application of the present formulation to the molecular recognition, in which the conformational fluctuation of protein around its native state becomes an important factor as exemplified by so called "induced fitting."

  2. Bridging Experiments and Native-Centric Simulations of a Downhill Folding Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganathan, Athi N; De Sancho, David

    2015-11-25

    Experiments and atomistic simulations have independently contributed to the mechanistic understanding of protein folding. However, a coherent detailed picture explicitly combining both is currently lacking, a problem that seriously limits the amount of information that can be extracted. An alternative to atomistic models with physics-based potentials is the native-centric (i.e., Go̅ type) coarse-grained models, which for many years have been successfully employed to qualitatively understand features of protein folding energy landscapes. Again, quantitative validation of Go̅ models against experimental equilibrium unfolding curves is often not attempted. Here we use an atomistic topology-based model to study the folding mechanism of PDD, a protein that folds over a marginal thermodynamic barrier of ∼0.5 kBT at midpoint conditions. We find that the simulations are in exquisite agreement with several equilibrium experimental measurements including differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), an observable that is possibly the most challenging to reproduce from explicit-chain models. The dynamics, inferred using a detailed Markov state model, display a classical Chevron-like trend with a continuum of relaxation times under both folding and unfolding conditions, a signature feature of downhill folding. The number of populated microstates and the connectivity between them are shown to be temperature dependent with a maximum near the thermal denaturation midpoint, thus linking the macroscopic observation of a peak in the DSC profile of downhill folding proteins and the underlying microstate dynamics. The mechanistic picture derived from our analysis thus sheds light on the intricate and tunable nature of the downhill protein folding ensembles. In parallel, our work highlights the power of coarse-grained models to reproduce experiments at a quantitative level while also pointing at specific directions for their improvement.

  3. Predictors of natively unfolded proteins: unanimous consensus score to detect a twilight zone between order and disorder in generic datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deiana Antonio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natively unfolded proteins lack a well defined three dimensional structure but have important biological functions, suggesting a re-assignment of the structure-function paradigm. To assess that a given protein is natively unfolded requires laborious experimental investigations, then reliable sequence-only methods for predicting whether a sequence corresponds to a folded or to an unfolded protein are of interest in fundamental and applicative studies. Many proteins have amino acidic compositions compatible both with the folded and unfolded status, and belong to a twilight zone between order and disorder. This makes difficult a dichotomic classification of protein sequences into folded and natively unfolded ones. In this work we propose an operational method to identify proteins belonging to the twilight zone by combining into a consensus score good performing single predictors of folding. Results In this methodological paper dichotomic folding indexes are considered: hydrophobicity-charge, mean packing, mean pairwise energy, Poodle-W and a new global index, that is called here gVSL2, based on the local disorder predictor VSL2. The performance of these indexes is evaluated on different datasets, in particular on a new dataset composed by 2369 folded and 81 natively unfolded proteins. Poodle-W, gVSL2 and mean pairwise energy have good performance and stability in all the datasets considered and are combined into a strictly unanimous combination score SSU, that leaves proteins unclassified when the consensus of all combined indexes is not reached. The unclassified proteins: i belong to an overlap region in the vector space of amino acidic compositions occupied by both folded and unfolded proteins; ii are composed by approximately the same number of order-promoting and disorder-promoting amino acids; iii have a mean flexibility intermediate between that of folded and that of unfolded proteins. Conclusions Our results show that

  4. Predictors of natively unfolded proteins: unanimous consensus score to detect a twilight zone between order and disorder in generic datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Natively unfolded proteins lack a well defined three dimensional structure but have important biological functions, suggesting a re-assignment of the structure-function paradigm. To assess that a given protein is natively unfolded requires laborious experimental investigations, then reliable sequence-only methods for predicting whether a sequence corresponds to a folded or to an unfolded protein are of interest in fundamental and applicative studies. Many proteins have amino acidic compositions compatible both with the folded and unfolded status, and belong to a twilight zone between order and disorder. This makes difficult a dichotomic classification of protein sequences into folded and natively unfolded ones. In this work we propose an operational method to identify proteins belonging to the twilight zone by combining into a consensus score good performing single predictors of folding. Results In this methodological paper dichotomic folding indexes are considered: hydrophobicity-charge, mean packing, mean pairwise energy, Poodle-W and a new global index, that is called here gVSL2, based on the local disorder predictor VSL2. The performance of these indexes is evaluated on different datasets, in particular on a new dataset composed by 2369 folded and 81 natively unfolded proteins. Poodle-W, gVSL2 and mean pairwise energy have good performance and stability in all the datasets considered and are combined into a strictly unanimous combination score SSU, that leaves proteins unclassified when the consensus of all combined indexes is not reached. The unclassified proteins: i) belong to an overlap region in the vector space of amino acidic compositions occupied by both folded and unfolded proteins; ii) are composed by approximately the same number of order-promoting and disorder-promoting amino acids; iii) have a mean flexibility intermediate between that of folded and that of unfolded proteins. Conclusions Our results show that proteins unclassified by SSU

  5. X-Ray Structures of Native HIV-1 Capsid Protein Reveal Conformational Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gres, Anna T.; Kirby, Karen A.; KewalRamani, Vineet N.; Tanner, John J.; Pornillos, Owen; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2015-01-01

    The detailed molecular interactions between Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid protein (CA) hexamers have been elusive in the context of a native protein. We report crystal structures describing novel interactions between CA monomers related by 6-fold symmetry within a hexamer (intra-hexamer) and by 3-fold and 2-fold symmetry between neighboring hexamers (inter-hexamer). These structures help elucidate how CA builds a hexagonal lattice, the foundation of the mature capsid. Lattice structure depends on an adaptable hydration layer that modulates interactions among CA molecules. Disruption of this layer by crystal dehydration treatment alters inter-hexamer interfaces and condenses CA packing, highlighting an inherent structural variability. Capsid stability changes imparted by high concentrations of CA-targeting antiviral PF74 can be explained by variations at inter-hexamer interfaces remote to the ligand binding site. Inherent structural plasticity, hydration layer rearrangement, and effector molecule binding may perturb capsid uncoating or assembly and have functional implications for the retroviral life cycle. PMID:26044298

  6. Behavior of native microbial populations of WPC-34 and WPC-80 whey protein stored at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whey protein (WPC34 and 80) has been used as food ingredients and as a base for making biodegradable product. However, there is limited information on the behavior of native microflora associated with these products. WPC 34 and WPC80 were obtained from the manufacturer, and were stored at 5, 10, 15,...

  7. Native electrospray ionization and electron-capture dissociation for comparison of protein structure in solution and the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Cui, Weidong; Gross, Michael L

    2013-11-15

    The importance of protein and protein-complex structure motivates improvements in speed and sensitivity of structure determination in the gas phase and comparison with that in solution or solid state. An opportunity for the gas phase measurement is mass spectrometry (MS) combined with native electrospray ionization (ESI), which delivers large proteins and protein complexes in their near-native states to the gas phase. In this communication, we describe the combination of native ESI, electron-capture dissociation (ECD), and top-down MS for exploring the structures of ubiquitin and cytochrome c in the gas phase and their relation to those in the solid-state and solution. We probe structure by comparing the protein's flexible regions, as predicted by the B-factor in X-ray crystallography, with the ECD fragments. The underlying hypothesis is that maintenance of structure gives fragments that can be predicted from B-factors. This strategy may be applicable in general when X-ray structures are available and extendable to the study of intrinsically disordered proteins.

  8. Label-free detection of native proteins by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy using iodide-modified nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Jia; Zong, Cheng; Zheng, Xiao-Shan; Hu, Pei; Feng, Jia-Min; Ren, Bin

    2014-02-18

    Proteins perform vital functional and structural duties in living systems, and the in-depth investigation of protein in its native state is one of the most important challenges in the postgenomic era. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) can provide the intrinsic fingerprint information of samples with ultrahigh sensitivity but suffers from the reproducibility and reliability issues. In this paper, we proposed an iodide-modified Ag nanoparticles method (Ag IMNPs) for label-free detection of proteins. The silver nanoparticles provide the huge enhancement to boost the Raman signal of proteins, and the coated iodide layer offers a barrier to prevent the direct interaction between the proteins and the metal surface, helping to keep the native structures of proteins. With this method, highly reproducible and high-quality SERS signals of five typical proteins (lysozyme, avidin, bovine serum albumin, cytochrome c, and hemoglobin) have been obtained, and the SERS features of the proteins without chromophore were almost identical to the respective normal Raman spectra. This unique feature allows the qualitative identification of them by simply taking the intensity ratio of the Raman peaks of tryptophan to phenylalanine residues. We further demonstrated that the method can also be used for label-free multiplex analysis of protein mixture as well as to study the dynamic process of protein damage stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. This method proves to be very promising for further applications in proteomics and biomedical research.

  9. Bicistronic expression plasmid for the rapid production of recombinant fused proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yero, Daniel; Pajón, Rolando; Niebla, Olivia; Sardiñas, Gretel; Vivar, Isbel; Perera, Yasser; García, Darien; Delgado, Maité; Cobas, Karem

    2006-04-01

    In the post-genomic era, every aspect of the production of proteins must be accelerated. In this way, several vectors are currently exploited for rapid production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. N-terminal fusions to the first 47 amino acids of the LpdA (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase A) protein of Neisseria meningitidis have been shown to increase the expression of recombinant proteins. Consequently, we have constructed a modified N-terminal LpdA fusion vector, introducing the blue/white colony selection by exploiting a bicistronic gene organization. In the new vector, the sequence encoding the first 47 amino acids of meningococcal LpdA and the alpha-peptide sequence of beta-galactosidase were connected via a ribosome-binding site, and two MCSs (multiple cloning sites) were located surrounding the latter, allowing efficient cloning by colour selection of recombinants. The vector was also improved with the addition of a C-terminal polyhistidine tag, and an EKS (enterokinase recognition sequence) immediately after the LpdA fusion sequence. The new plasmid was employed in the expression and purification of six different bacterial polypeptides. One of these recombinant proteins, P6 protein from Haemophilus influenzae, was used as a model and its N-terminal fusion sequence was totally removed from the recombinant version after incubation with the enterokinase protease, while the polyhistidine tail successfully allowed the purification of the unfused protein from the protease reaction. Two completely new neisserial vaccine candidates, NMB0088 and NMB1126 proteins, were cloned, expressed and purified using this system. To our knowledge, this constitutes the first report of the cloning and expression of these proteins in E. coli.

  10. Are Charge-State Distributions a Reliable Tool Describing Molecular Ensembles of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins by Native MS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalello, Antonino; Santambrogio, Carlo; Grandori, Rita

    2016-10-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) has become a central tool of structural proteomics, but its applicability to the peculiar class of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is still object of debate. IDPs lack an ordered tridimensional structure and are characterized by high conformational plasticity. Since they represent valuable targets for cancer and neurodegeneration research, there is an urgent need of methodological advances for description of the conformational ensembles populated by these proteins in solution. However, structural rearrangements during electrospray-ionization (ESI) or after the transfer to the gas phase could affect data obtained by native ESI-MS. In particular, charge-state distributions (CSDs) are affected by protein conformation inside ESI droplets, while ion mobility (IM) reflects protein conformation in the gas phase. This review focuses on the available evidence relating IDP solution ensembles with CSDs, trying to summarize cases of apparent consistency or discrepancy. The protein-specificity of ionization patterns and their responses to ligands and buffer conditions suggests that CSDs are imprinted to protein structural features also in the case of IDPs. Nevertheless, it seems that these proteins are more easily affected by electrospray conditions, leading in some cases to rearrangements of the conformational ensembles.

  11. Are Charge-State Distributions a Reliable Tool Describing Molecular Ensembles of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins by Native MS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalello, Antonino; Santambrogio, Carlo; Grandori, Rita

    2017-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) has become a central tool of structural proteomics, but its applicability to the peculiar class of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is still object of debate. IDPs lack an ordered tridimensional structure and are characterized by high conformational plasticity. Since they represent valuable targets for cancer and neurodegeneration research, there is an urgent need of methodological advances for description of the conformational ensembles populated by these proteins in solution. However, structural rearrangements during electrospray-ionization (ESI) or after the transfer to the gas phase could affect data obtained by native ESI-MS. In particular, charge-state distributions (CSDs) are affected by protein conformation inside ESI droplets, while ion mobility (IM) reflects protein conformation in the gas phase. This review focuses on the available evidence relating IDP solution ensembles with CSDs, trying to summarize cases of apparent consistency or discrepancy. The protein-specificity of ionization patterns and their responses to ligands and buffer conditions suggests that CSDs are imprinted to protein structural features also in the case of IDPs. Nevertheless, it seems that these proteins are more easily affected by electrospray conditions, leading in some cases to rearrangements of the conformational ensembles.

  12. Release and protein binding of components from resin based composites in native saliva and other extraction media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothmund, Lena; Shehata, Mostafa; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Schweikl, Helmut; Carell, Thomas; Geurtsen, Werner; Hellwig, Elmar; Hickel, Reinhard; Reichl, Franz-Xaver; Högg, Christof

    2015-05-01

    Unpolymerized (co)monomers and additives can be released from resin based composites (RBCs) and can enter the human organism. In this study, the binding of ingredients from composites to salivary proteins and plasma proteins was investigated. The composites investigated were Admira(®) flow, Venus(®) Diamond flow, Filtek™ Supreme XTE flow, Tetric EvoCeram(®), Tetric EvoFlow(®). The samples (n=4) were polymerized according to the instructions of the manufacturer of RBCs. The samples were immersed into native saliva, protein-free saliva (artificial saliva), water and ethyl acetate, and incubated at 37°C for 24h or 72h. The eluates were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. To determine the binding to salivary proteins, the concentration of (co)monomers and additives detected in native saliva was compared to the concentration of (co)monomers and additives detected in protein-free saliva, water and ethyl acetate respectively. To assess the affinity of TEGDMA, EGDMA, DEGDMA, PMGDMA, BPA, and DCHP to human serum albumin (HSA) and human α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), a plasma protein binding assay (ABNOVA, Transil XL PPB Prediction Kit TMP-0212-2096) was performed. The statistical significance (psaliva was significantly lower than the concentration released in protein-free saliva or water (Admira(®) flow: concentration of TEGDMA after 72h: 0.08 mmol/L (native saliva), 0.34 mmol/L (protein-free saliva), 0.39 mmol/L (water)). The concentrations of HEMA, EGDMA, DDDMA and CQ released in native saliva remained even below the detection limit, compared to the other extraction media. Protein binding of the tested methacrylates to HSA+AGP was 82-85%, the binding of DCHP was 96.6%, and the binding of BPA was 95.2%. Artificial saliva or water as extraction medium does not reflect the real physiological situation in the body. Salivary and plasma proteins may bind (co)monomers and additives and may thereby contribute to a lower bioavailability of leachables from RBCs

  13. Recombinant production of native human α-1-antitrypsin protein in the liver HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaberie, Hajar; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2016-10-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency is associated with emphysema and liver disease. Only plasma-derived A1AT protein is available for augmentation therapy. Recombinant A1AT (recA1AT) protein expressed in various types of available hosts are either non-glycosylated or aberrantly glycosylated resulting into reduced stability and biological activity. To overcome these limitations, we have used the human liver HepG2 cell line to produce recA1AT protein. HepG2 cells were transfected by A1AT cDNA and cell populations were generated that stably overexpressed A1AT protein. Real-time RT-PCR and rocket immunoelectrophoresis of cell culture supernatants indicated that the transfection resulted more than two-fold increase in A1AT production compared to that of control parental cells. Immunoblot analysis showed that both plasma and HepG2-produced A1AT proteins have identical molecular weight in either glycosylated or deglycosylated form. Partial digestion with PNGase F indicated that the three N-glycosylation sites of recA1AT, like the native A1AT protein in plasma, are occupied. Recombinant A1AT also like the native A1AT was thermostable and could efficiently inhibit trypsin proteolytic activity against BSA and BAPNA chromogenic substrate. The recombinant HepG2 cells cultured in media containing B27 serum free supplement released recA1AT at the same level as in the serum containing media. RecA1AT production in HepG2 cells grown under serum free condition at a large scale could provide a reliable source of the native protein suitable for therapeutic use in human.

  14. Characterization of native 40 S particles from Krebs II mouse ascites tumor cells: resolution, nomenclature and molecular weights of the nonribosomal proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichert, G; Issinger, O G

    1981-01-01

    Native 40 S particles from Krebs II mouse ascites tumor cells were isolated on a large scale. A nonribosomal protein moiety of about 30 proteins could be removed from the ribosomal particles by treatment with 250 mM KCl. These proteins were analysed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electroph......Native 40 S particles from Krebs II mouse ascites tumor cells were isolated on a large scale. A nonribosomal protein moiety of about 30 proteins could be removed from the ribosomal particles by treatment with 250 mM KCl. These proteins were analysed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel...

  15. Discriminating the native structure from decoys using scoring functions based on the residue packing in globular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2009-12-28

    Setting the rules for the identification of a stable conformation of a protein is of utmost importance for the efficient generation of structures in computer simulation. For structure prediction, a considerable number of possible models are generated from which the best model has to be selected. Two scoring functions, Rs and Rp, based on the consideration of packing of residues, which indicate if the conformation of an amino acid sequence is native-like, are presented. These are defined using the solvent accessible surface area (ASA) and the partner number (PN) (other residues that are within 4.5 A) of a particular residue. The two functions evaluate the deviation from the average packing properties (ASA or PN) of all residues in a polypeptide chain corresponding to a model of its three-dimensional structure. While simple in concept and computationally less intensive, both the functions are at least as efficient as any other energy functions in discriminating the native structure from decoys in a large number of standard decoy sets, as well as on models submitted for the targets of CASP7. Rs appears to be slightly more effective than Rp, as determined by the number of times the native structure possesses the minimum value for the function and its separation from the average value for the decoys. Two parameters, Rs and Rp, are discussed that can very efficiently recognize the native fold for a sequence from an ensemble of decoy structures. Unlike many other algorithms that rely on the use of composite scoring function, these are based on a single parameter, viz., the accessible surface area (or the number of residues in contact), but still able to capture the essential attribute of the native fold.

  16. A 7-mer knowledge-based potential for detecting native protein structures from decoys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter

    to assign the lowest energy to the native structure and to have a nice minimum around the native structure in order to assign detectable lower values on a set larger than the sampling density. Here we consider the second part of the problem and use only the carbon alpha atoms of the structures to allow...... for faster sampling methods. Background: The C-alpha atoms define a polygonal curve in 3-space which is smoothened by the method presented in [1] and is illustrated below. The geometry of a 7-mer is described by two numbers that describe how stretched and curved the smoothening of the 7-mer is. These two...

  17. Probing possible downhill folding: native contact topology likely places a significant constraint on the folding cooperativity of proteins with approximately 40 residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badasyan, Artem; Liu, Zhirong; Chan, Hue Sun

    2008-12-12

    Experiments point to appreciable variations in folding cooperativity among natural proteins with approximately 40 residues, indicating that the behaviors of these proteins are valuable for delineating the contributing factors to cooperative folding. To explore the role of native topology in a protein's propensity to fold cooperatively and how native topology might constrain the degree of cooperativity achievable by a given set of physical interactions, we compared folding/unfolding kinetics simulated using three classes of native-centric C(alpha) chain models with different interaction schemes. The approach was applied to two homologous 45-residue fragments from the peripheral subunit-binding domain family and a 39-residue fragment of the N-terminal domain of ribosomal protein L9. Free-energy profiles as functions of native contact number were computed to assess the heights of thermodynamic barriers to folding. In addition, chevron plots of folding/unfolding rates were constructed as functions of native stability to facilitate comparison with available experimental data. Although common Gō-like models with pairwise Lennard-Jones-type interactions generally fold less cooperatively than real proteins, the rank ordering of cooperativity predicted by these models is consistent with experiment for the proteins investigated, showing increasing folding cooperativity with increasing nonlocality of a protein's native contacts. Models that account for water-expulsion (desolvation) barriers and models with many-body (nonadditive) interactions generally entail higher degrees of folding cooperativity indicated by more linear model chevron plots, but the rank ordering of cooperativity remains unchanged. A robust, experimentally valid rank ordering of model folding cooperativity independent of the multiple native-centric interaction schemes tested here argues that native topology places significant constraints on how cooperatively a protein can fold.

  18. Overlapping protein-encoding genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Silby

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The annotated genome sequences of prokaryotes seldom include overlapping genes encoded opposite each other by the same stretch of DNA. However, antisense transcription is becoming recognized as a widespread phenomenon in eukaryotes, and examples have been linked to important biological processes. Pseudomonas fluorescens inhabits aquatic and terrestrial environments, and can be regarded as an environmental generalist. The genetic basis for this ecological success is not well understood. In a previous search for soil-induced genes in P. fluorescens Pf0-1, ten antisense genes were discovered. These were termed 'cryptic' genes, as they had escaped detection by gene-hunting algorithms, and lacked easily recognizable promoters. In this communication, we designate such genes as 'non-predicted' or 'hidden'. Using reverse transcription PCR, we show that at each of six non-predicted gene loci chosen for study, transcription occurs from both 'sense' and 'antisense' DNA strands. Further, at least one of these hidden antisense genes, iiv14, encodes a protein, as does the sense transcript, both identified by poly-histidine tags on the C-terminus of the proteins. Mutational and complementation studies showed that this novel antisense gene was important for efficient colonization of soil, and multiple copies in the wildtype host improved the speed of soil colonization. Introduction of a stop codon early in the gene eliminated complementation, further implicating the protein in colonization of soil. We therefore designate iiv14 "cosA". These data suggest that, as is the case with eukaryotes, some bacterial genomes are more densely coded than currently recognized.

  19. Overlapping protein-encoding genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silby, Mark W; Levy, Stuart B

    2008-06-13

    The annotated genome sequences of prokaryotes seldom include overlapping genes encoded opposite each other by the same stretch of DNA. However, antisense transcription is becoming recognized as a widespread phenomenon in eukaryotes, and examples have been linked to important biological processes. Pseudomonas fluorescens inhabits aquatic and terrestrial environments, and can be regarded as an environmental generalist. The genetic basis for this ecological success is not well understood. In a previous search for soil-induced genes in P. fluorescens Pf0-1, ten antisense genes were discovered. These were termed 'cryptic' genes, as they had escaped detection by gene-hunting algorithms, and lacked easily recognizable promoters. In this communication, we designate such genes as 'non-predicted' or 'hidden'. Using reverse transcription PCR, we show that at each of six non-predicted gene loci chosen for study, transcription occurs from both 'sense' and 'antisense' DNA strands. Further, at least one of these hidden antisense genes, iiv14, encodes a protein, as does the sense transcript, both identified by poly-histidine tags on the C-terminus of the proteins. Mutational and complementation studies showed that this novel antisense gene was important for efficient colonization of soil, and multiple copies in the wildtype host improved the speed of soil colonization. Introduction of a stop codon early in the gene eliminated complementation, further implicating the protein in colonization of soil. We therefore designate iiv14 "cosA". These data suggest that, as is the case with eukaryotes, some bacterial genomes are more densely coded than currently recognized.

  20. Total Protein of Crude Extracts and Quantification the Native Bacillus Thuringiensis Strains Isolated From Boyacá and Cundinamarca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eneida Torres Cabra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Cry proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt produce parasporal crystal during sporulation which are toxic against insect larvae of lepidopteran, coleopteran and dipteran. In the present study, 10 native isolations of Bt strains were quantified from the Native Strains Bank of the Jorge Tadeo Lozano University, isolated from soil in the municipalities of Ráquira, Santa Sofía, Villa de Leyva and Sutamarchán, in Boyacá; and also in Susa, Cundinamarca. Crude extracts of total proteins from the 10 strains incubated in Luria-Bertani medium (LB for 15 days at 37 °C were obtained. For quantification of total protein of the spore crystal mixture was used the Bradford method using a standard pattern a calibration curve with bovine serum albumin (BSA. After 5 minutes, the determination was realized in the spectrophotometer at a wavelength of 595 nm. The brighter blue were presented by the strains ZBUJTL35 and ZBUJTL39, with a concentration of 560.71 and 526.43 mg / ml, respectively. The Bradford method is a simple and fast technique to estimate the protein concentration. The strains will be used to determine the toxicity over Bemisiatabaci larvae.

  1. Characterization of native 40 S particles from Krebs II mouse ascites tumor cells: resolution, nomenclature and molecular weights of the nonribosomal proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichert, G; Issinger, O G

    1981-01-01

    Native 40 S particles from Krebs II mouse ascites tumor cells were isolated on a large scale. A nonribosomal protein moiety of about 30 proteins could be removed from the ribosomal particles by treatment with 250 mM KCl. These proteins were analysed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electroph...

  2. Insight into Signal Response of Protein Ions in Native ESI-MS from the Analysis of Model Mixtures of Covalently Linked Protein Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Katharina; Wittwer, Yves; Barylyuk, Konstantin; Anders, Ulrike; Zenobi, Renato

    2017-09-01

    Native ESI-MS is increasingly used for quantitative analysis of biomolecular interactions. In such analyses, peak intensity ratios measured in mass spectra are treated as abundance ratios of the respective molecules in solution. While signal intensities of similar-size analytes, such as a protein and its complex with a small molecule, can be directly compared, significant distortions of the peak ratio due to unequal signal response of analytes impede the application of this approach for large oligomeric biomolecular complexes. We use a model system based on concatenated maltose binding protein units (MBPn, n = 1, 2, 3) to systematically study the behavior of protein mixtures in ESI-MS. The MBP concatamers differ from each other only by their mass while the chemical composition and other properties remain identical. We used native ESI-MS to analyze model mixtures of MBP oligomers, including equimolar mixtures of two proteins, as well as binary mixtures containing different fractions of the individual components. Pronounced deviation from a linear dependence of the signal intensity with concentration was observed for all binary mixtures investigated. While equimolar mixtures showed linear signal dependence at low concentrations, distinct ion suppression was observed above 20 μM. We systematically studied factors that are most often used in the literature to explain the origin of suppression effects. Implications of this effect for quantifying protein-protein binding affinity by native ESI-MS are discussed in general and demonstrated for an example of an anti-MBP antibody with its ligand, MBP. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Phosphoethanolamine-complexed C-reactive protein: A pharmacological-like macromolecule that binds to native low-density lipoprotein in human serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay K.; Suresh, Madathilparambil V.; Prayther, Deborah C.; Moorman, Jonathan P.; Rusiñol, Antonio E.; Agrawal, Alok

    2008-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase plasma protein. An important binding specificity of CRP is for the modified forms of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in which the phosphocholine-binding sites of CRP participate. CRP, however, does not bind to native LDL. Methods We investigated the interaction of CRP with native LDL using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. Results We found that the blocking of the phosphocholine-binding sites of CRP with phosphoethanolamine (PEt) converted CRP into a potent molecule for binding to native LDL. In the presence of PEt, CRP acquired the ability to bind to fluid-phase purified native LDL. Because purified native LDL may undergo subtle modifications, we also used whole human serum as the source of native LDL. In the presence of PEt, CRP bound to native LDL in serum also. The effect of PEt on CRP was selective for LDL because PEt-complexed CRP did not bind to high-density lipoprotein in the serum. Conclusions The pharmacologic intervention of endogenous CRP by PEt-based compounds, or the use of exogenously prepared CRP-PEt complexes, may turn out to be an effective approach to capture native LDL cholesterol in vivo to prevent the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:18486609

  4. Assembly of water-soluble chlorophyll-binding proteins with native hydrophobic chlorophylls in water-in-oil emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczyk, Dominika; Takahashi, Shigekazu; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Noy, Dror

    2015-03-01

    The challenges involved in studying cofactor binding and assembly, as well as energy- and electron transfer mechanisms in the large and elaborate transmembrane protein complexes of photosynthesis and respiration have prompted considerable interest in constructing simplified model systems based on their water-soluble protein analogs. Such analogs are also promising templates and building blocks for artificial bioinspired energy conversion systems. Yet, development is limited by the challenge of introducing the essential cofactors of natural proteins that are highly water-insoluble into the water-soluble protein analogs. Here we introduce a new efficient method based on water-in-oil emulsions for overcoming this challenge. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method in the assembly of native chlorophylls with four recombinant variants of the water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein of Brassicaceae plants. We use the method to gain new insights into the protein-chlorophyll assembly process, and demonstrate its potential as a fast screening system for developing novel chlorophyll-protein complexes.

  5. Recombinant paracoccin reproduces the biological properties of the native protein and induces protective Th1 immunity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Claudia Paiva Alegre

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Paracoccin is a dual-function protein of the yeast Paracoccidioides brasiliensis that has lectin properties and N-acetylglucosaminidase activities. Proteomic analysis of a paracoccin preparation from P. brasiliensis revealed that the sequence matched that of the hypothetical protein encoded by PADG-3347 of isolate Pb-18, with a polypeptide sequence similar to the family 18 endochitinases. These endochitinases are multi-functional proteins, with distinct lectin and enzymatic domains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The multi-exon assembly and the largest exon of the predicted ORF (PADG-3347, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and the features of the recombinant proteins were compared to those of the native paracoccin. The multi-exon protein was also used for protection assays in a mouse model of paracoccidioidomycosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that the recombinant protein reproduced the biological properties described for the native protein-including binding to laminin in a manner that is dependent on carbohydrate recognition-showed N-acetylglucosaminidase activity, and stimulated murine peritoneal macrophages to produce high levels of TNF-α and nitric oxide. Considering the immunomodulatory potential of glycan-binding proteins, we also investigated whether prophylactic administration of recombinant paracoccin affected the course of experimental paracoccidioidomycosis in mice. In comparison to animals injected with vehicle (controls, mice treated with recombinant paracoccin displayed lower pulmonary fungal burdens and reduced pulmonary granulomas. These protective effects were associated with augmented pulmonary levels of IL-12 and IFN-γ. We also observed that injection of paracoccin three days before challenge was the most efficient administration protocol, as the induced Th1 immunity was balanced by high levels of pulmonary IL-10, which may prevent the tissue damage caused by exacerbated

  6. Characterization of the anti-HIV effects of native lactoferrin and other milk proteins and protein-derived peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B; van Wamel, JLB; Beljaars, L; Meijer, DKF; Visser, Servaas; Floris, R

    2002-01-01

    In a search for natural proteins with anti-HIV activity, we screened a large set of purified proteins from bovine milk and peptide fragments thereof. Because several charged proteins and peptides are known to inhibit the process of virus entry, we selected proteins with an unusual charge composition

  7. Influences of heterogeneous native contact energy and many-body interactions on the prediction of protein folding mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuqing; Ouyang, Yanhua; Chen, Tao

    2016-11-16

    Since single-point mutant perturbation has been used to probe protein folding mechanisms in experiments, the ϕ-value has become a critical parameter to infer the transition state (TS) for two-state proteins. Experimentally, large scale analysis has shown a nearly single uniform ϕ-value with normally distributed error from 24 different proteins; moreover, in zero stability conditions, the intrinsic variable ϕ(0) is around 0.36. To explore how and to what extent theoretical models can capture experimental phenomena, we here use structure-based explicit chain coarse-grained models to investigate the influence of single-point mutant perturbation on protein folding for single domain two-state proteins. Our results indicate that uniform, additive contact energetic interactions cannot predict experimental Brønsted plots well. Those points deviate largely from the main data sets in Brønsted plots, are mostly hydrophobic, and are located in N- and C-terminal contacting regions. Heterogenous contact energy, which is dependent on sequence separation, can narrow the point dispersion in a Brønsted plot. Moreover, we demonstrate that combining many-body interactions with heterogeneous native contact energy can present mean ϕ-values consistent with experimental findings, with a comparable distributed error. This indicates that for more accurate elucidation of protein folding mechanisms by residue-level structure-based models, these elements should be considered.

  8. MAGGIE Component 1: Identification and Purification of Native and Recombinant Multiprotein Complexes and Modified Proteins from Pyrococcus furiosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Michael W. [University of Georgia; W. W. Adams, Michael

    2014-01-07

    Virtualy all cellular processes are carried out by dynamic molecular assemblies or multiprotein complexes (PCs), the composition of which is largely unknown. Structural genomics efforts have demonstrated that less than 25% of the genes in a given prokaryotic genome will yield stable, soluble proteins when expressed using a one-ORF-at-a-time approach. We proposed that much of the remaining 75% of the genes encode proteins that are part of multiprotein complexes or are modified post-translationally, for example, with metals. The problem is that PCs and metalloproteins (MPs) cannot be accurately predicted on a genome-wide scale. The only solution to this dilemma is to experimentally determine PCs and MPs in biomass of a model organism and to develop analytical tools that can then be applied to the biomass of any other organism. In other words, organisms themselves must be analyzed to identify their PCs and MPs: “native proteomes” must be determined. This information can then be utilized to design multiple ORF expression systems to produce recombinant forms of PCs and MPs. Moreover, the information and utility of this approach can be enhanced by using a hyperthermophile, one that grows optimally at 100°C, as a model organism. By analyzing the native proteome at close to 100 °C below the optimum growth temperature, we will trap reversible and dynamic complexes, thereby enabling their identification, purification, and subsequent characterization. The model organism for the current study is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophilic archaeon that grows optimally at 100°C. It is grown up to 600-liter scale and kg quantities of biomass are available. In this project we identified native PCs and MPs using P. furiosus biomass (with MS/MS analyses to identify proteins by component 4). In addition, we provided samples of abundant native PCs and MPs for structural characterization (using SAXS by component 5). We also designed and evaluated generic bioinformatics and

  9. Effects of Different Nitrogen Fertilizer Levels and Native Soil Properties on Rice Grain Fe, Zn and Protein Contents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. CHANDEL; S. BANERJEE; S. SEE; R. MEENA; D. J. SHARMA; S. B. VERULKAR

    2010-01-01

    Deposition of protein and metal ions (Fe, Zn) in rice grains is a complex polygenic trait showing considerable environmental effect. To analyze the effect of nitrogen application levels and native soil properties on rice grain protein, iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) contents, 32 rice genotypes were grown at three different locations each under 80 and 120 kg/hm2 nitrogen fertilizer applications. In treatments with nitrogen fertilizer application, the brown rice grain protein content (GPC) increased significantly (1.1% to 7.0%) under higher nitrogen fertilizer application (120 kg/hm2) whereas grain Fe/Zn contents showed non-significant effect of nitrogen application level, thus suggesting that the rate of uptake and translocation of macro-elements does not influence the uptake and translocation of micro-elements. The pH, organic matter content and inherent Fe/Zn levels of native soil showed significant effects on grain Fe and Zn contents of all the rice genotypes. Grain Zn content of almost all the tested rice genotypes was found to increase at Location III having loamy soil texture, neutral pH value (pH 6.83) and higher organic matter content than the other two locations (Locations I and II), indicating significant influence of native soil properties on brown rice grain Zn content while grain Fe content showed significant genotype × environment interaction effect. Genotypic difference was found to be the most significant factor to affect grain Fe/Zn contents in all the tested rice genotypes, indicating that although native soil properties influence phyto-availability of micronutrients and consequently influencing absorption, translocation and grain deposition of Fe/Zn ions, yet genetic makeup of a plant determines its response to varied soil conditions and other external factors. Two indica rice genotypes R-RF-31 (27.62 μg/g grain Zn content and 7.80% GPC) and R1033-968-2-1 (30.05 μg/g grain Zn content and 8.47% GPC) were identified as high grain Zn and moderate GPC

  10. Rational design of mutations that change the aggregation rate of a protein while maintaining its native structure and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilloni, Carlo; Sala, Benedetta Maria; Sormanni, Pietro; Porcari, Riccardo; Corazza, Alessandra; De Rosa, Matteo; Zanini, Stefano; Barbiroli, Alberto; Esposito, Gennaro; Bolognesi, Martino; Bellotti, Vittorio; Vendruscolo, Michele; Ricagno, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of human diseases is associated with mutations that, destabilizing proteins native state, promote their aggregation. However, the mechanisms leading from folded to aggregated states are still incompletely understood. To investigate these mechanisms, we used a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to compare the native state dynamics of Beta-2 microglobulin (β2m), whose aggregation is associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, and its aggregation-resistant mutant W60G. Our results indicate that W60G low aggregation propensity can be explained, beyond its higher stability, by an increased average protection of the aggregation-prone residues at its surface. To validate these findings, we designed β2m variants that alter the aggregation-prone exposed surface of wild-type and W60G β2m modifying their aggregation propensity. These results allowed us to pinpoint the role of dynamics in β2m aggregation and to provide a new strategy to tune protein aggregation by modulating the exposure of aggregation-prone residues.

  11. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanié, Sophie; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Bertagnoli, Stéphane; Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle

    2010-03-08

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor) and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-kappaB in the nucleus of TNFalpha-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1) were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein.

  12. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelfi Jacqueline

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Myxoma virus (MYXV, a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus. Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-κB in the nucleus of TNFα-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1 were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein.

  13. MNF, an ankyrin repeat protein of myxoma virus, is part of a native cellular SCF complex during viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV), a member of the Poxviridae family, is the agent responsible for myxomatosis, a fatal disease in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Like all poxviruses, MYXV is known for encoding multiple proteins that regulate cellular signaling pathways. Among them, four proteins share the same ANK/PRANC structure: M148R, M149R, MNF (Myxoma Nuclear factor) and M-T5, all of them described as virulence factors. This family of poxvirus proteins, recently identified, has drawn considerable attention for its potential role in modulating the host ubiquitin-proteasome system during viral infection. To date, many members of this novel protein family have been shown to interact with SCF components, in vitro. Here, we focus on MNF gene, which has been shown to express a nuclear protein presenting nine ANK repeats, one of which has been identified as a nuclear localization signal. In transfection, MNF has been shown to colocalise with the transcription factor NF-κB in the nucleus of TNFα-stimulated cells. Functionally, MNF is a critical virulence factor since its deletion generates an almost apathogenic virus. In this study, to pursue the investigation of proteins interacting with MNF and of its mechanism of action, we engineered a recombinant MYXV expressing a GFP-linked MNF under the control of MNF native promoter. Infection of rabbits with MYXV-GFPMNF recombinant virus provided the evidence that the GFP fusion does not disturb the main function of MNF. Hence, cells were infected with MYXV-GFPMNF and immunoprecipitation of the GFPMNF fusion protein was performed to identify MNF's partners. For the first time, endogenous components of SCF (Cullin-1 and Skp1) were co-precipitated with an ANK myxoma virus protein, expressed in an infectious context, and without over-expression of any protein. PMID:20211013

  14. Interactions of Intact Unfractionated Heparin with Its Client Proteins Can Be Probed Directly Using Native Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunlong; Abzalimov, Rinat R; Kaltashov, Igor A

    2016-02-01

    Heparin and related members of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) family are highly polyanionic linear saccharides that play important roles in a variety of physiological processes ranging from blood coagulation to embryo- and oncogenesis, tissue regeneration, and immune response regulation. These diverse functions are executed via a variety of mechanisms, including protein sequestration, activation, and facilitation of their interactions with cell-surface receptors, but deciphering the specific molecular mechanisms is frequently impossible due to the extremely high degree of GAG heterogeneity. As a result, the vast majority of studies of heparin (or related GAGs) interactions with its client proteins use synthetically produced heparin mimetics with defined structure or short heparin fragments. In this work we use native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) in combination with limited charge reduction in the gas phase to obtain meaningful information on noncovalent complexes formed by intact unfractionated heparin and antithrombin-III, interaction which is central to preventing blood clotting. Complexes of different stoichiometries are observed ranging from 1:1 to 1:3 (heparin/protein ratio). In addition to binding stoichiometry, the measurements allow the range of heparin chain lengths to be obtained for each complex and the contribution of each complex to the total ionic signal to be calculated. Incorporation of ion mobility measurements in the experimental workflow allows the total analysis time to be shortened very significantly and the charge state assignment for the charge-reduced species to be verified. The possibility to study interactions of intact unfractionated heparin with a client protein carried out directly by native ESI MS without the need to use relatively homogeneous surrogates demonstrated in this work opens up a host of new exciting opportunities and goes a long way toward ameliorating the persistent but outdated view of the

  15. Energy landscape analysis of native folding of the prion protein yields the diffusion constant, transition path time, and rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Gupta, Amar Nath; Liu, Xia; Neupane, Krishna; Brigley, Angela M; Sosova, Iveta; Woodside, Michael T

    2012-09-04

    Protein folding is described conceptually in terms of diffusion over a configurational free-energy landscape, typically reduced to a one-dimensional profile along a reaction coordinate. In principle, kinetic properties can be predicted directly from the landscape profile using Kramers theory for diffusive barrier crossing, including the folding rates and the transition time for crossing the barrier. Landscape theory has been widely applied to interpret the time scales for protein conformational dynamics, but protein folding rates and transition times have not been calculated directly from experimentally measured free-energy profiles. We characterized the energy landscape for native folding of the prion protein using force spectroscopy, measuring the change in extension of a single protein molecule at high resolution as it unfolded/refolded under tension. Key parameters describing the landscape profile were first recovered from the distributions of unfolding and refolding forces, allowing the diffusion constant for barrier crossing and the transition path time across the barrier to be calculated. The full landscape profile was then reconstructed from force-extension curves, revealing a double-well potential with an extended, partially unfolded transition state. The barrier height and position were consistent with the previous results. Finally, Kramers theory was used to predict the folding rates from the landscape profile, recovering the values observed experimentally both under tension and at zero force in ensemble experiments. These results demonstrate how advances in single-molecule theory and experiment are harnessing the power of landscape formalisms to describe quantitatively the mechanics of folding.

  16. Phosphorylation in vivo of non-ribosomal proteins from native 40 S ribosomal particles of Krebs II mouse ascites-tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuck, J; Reichert, G; Issinger, O G

    1981-01-01

    Four non-ribosomal proteins from native 40 S ribosomal subunits with mol.wts. of 110 000, 84 000, 68 000 and 26 000 were phosphorylated in vivo when ascites cells were incubated in the presence of [32P]Pi. The 110 000-, 84 000- and 26 000-dalton proteins are identical with phosphorylated products...

  17. Recombinant expression and purification of T4 phage Hoc, Soc, gp23, gp24 proteins in native conformations with stability studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Miernikiewicz

    Full Text Available Understanding the biological activity of bacteriophage particles is essential for rational design of bacteriophages with defined pharmacokinetic parameters and to identify the mechanisms of immunobiological activities demonstrated for some bacteriophages. This work requires highly purified preparations of the individual phage structural proteins, possessing native conformation that is essential for their reactivity, and free of incompatible biologically active substances such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS. In this study we describe expression in E. coli and purification of four proteins forming the surface of the bacteriophage T4 head: gp23, gp24, gphoc and gpsoc. We optimized protein expression using a set of chaperones for effective production of soluble proteins in their native conformations. The assistance of chaperones was critical for production of soluble gp23 (chaperone gp31 of T4 phage and of gpsoc (chaperone TF of E. coli. Phage head proteins were purified in native conditions by affinity chromatography and size-exclusion chromatography. Two-step LPS removal allowed immunological purity grade with the average endotoxin activity less than 1 unit per ml of protein preparation. The secondary structure and stability of the proteins were studied using circular dichroism (CD spectrometry, which confirmed that highly purified proteins preserve their native conformations. In increasing concentration of a denaturant (guanidine hydrochloride, protein stability was proved to increase as follows: gpsoc, gp23, gphoc. The denaturation profile of gp24 protein showed independent domain unfolding with the most stable larger domain. The native purified recombinant phage proteins obtained in this work were shown to be suitable for immunological experiments in vivo and in vitro.

  18. TRPC1 protein forms only one type of native store-operated channels in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skopin, Anton; Shalygin, Alexey; Vigont, Vladimir; Zimina, Olga; Glushankova, Lyubov; Mozhayeva, Galina N; Kaznacheyeva, Elena

    2013-02-01

    TRPC1 is a major component of store-operated calcium entry in many cell types. In our previous studies, three types of endogenous store-operated calcium channels have been described in HEK293 cells, but it remained unknown which of these channels are composed of TRPC1 proteins. Here, this issue has been addressed by performing single-channel analysis in HEK293 cells transfected with anti-TRPC1 siRNA (siTPRC1) or a TPRC1-encoding plasmid. The results show that thapsigargin-or agonist-induced calcium influx is significantly attenuated in siTRPC1-transfected HEK293 cells. TRPC1 knockdown by siRNA results in the disappearance of store-operated I(max) channels, while the properties of I(min) and I(NS) channels are unaffected. In HEK293 cells with overexpressed TRPC1 protein, the unitary current-voltage relationship of exogenous TRPC1 channels is almost linear, with a slope conductance of about 17 pS. The extrapolated reversal potential of expressed TRPC1 channels is +30 mV. Therefore, the main electrophysiological and regulatory properties of expressed TRPC1 and native I(max) channels are identical. Moreover, TRPC1 overexpression in HEK293 cells results in an increased number of store-operated I(max) channels. All these data allow us to conclude that TRPC1 protein forms native store-operated I(max) channels but is not an essential subunit for other store-operated channel types in HEK293 cells.

  19. Combination of native and denaturing PAGE for the detection of protein binding regions in long fragments of genomic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metsis Madis

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a traditional electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA a 32P-labeled double-stranded DNA oligonucleotide or a restriction fragment bound to a protein is separated from the unbound DNA by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE in nondenaturing conditions. An extension of this method uses the large population of fragments derived from long genomic regions (approximately 600 kb for the identification of fragments containing protein binding regions. With this method, genomic DNA is fragmented by restriction enzymes, fragments are amplified by PCR, radiolabeled, incubated with nuclear proteins and the resulting DNA-protein complexes are separated by two-dimensional PAGE. Shifted DNA fragments containing protein binding sites are identified by using additional procedures, i. e. gel elution, PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing. Although the method allows simultaneous analysis of a large population of fragments, it is relatively laborious and can be used to detect only high affinity protein binding sites. Here we propose an alternative and straightforward strategy which is based on a combination of native and denaturing PAGE. This strategy allows the identification of DNA fragments containing low as well as high affinity protein binding regions, derived from genomic DNA ( Results We have combined an EMSA-based selection step with subsequent denaturing PAGE for the localization of protein binding regions in long (up to10 kb fragments of genomic DNA. Our strategy consists of the following steps: digestion of genomic DNA with a 4-cutter restriction enzyme (AluI, BsuRI, TruI, etc, separation of low and high molecular weight fractions of resultant DNA fragments, 32P-labeling with Klenow polymerase, traditional EMSA, gel elution and identification of the shifted bands (or smear by denaturing PAGE. The identification of DNA fragments containing protein binding sites is carried out by running the gel-eluted fragments alongside

  20. The interaction of platinum-based drugs with native biologically relevant proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brauckmann, Christine; Wehe, Christoph A.; Kieshauer, Michael; Lanvers-Kaminsky, Claudia; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the identification of the products that are formed upon binding of therapeutically relevant platinum complexes to proteins like beta-lactoglobulin A (LGA), human serum albumin (HSA), or human hemoglobin (HB). The respective proteins were incubated with the platinum-based antica

  1. An assessment of the use of native and denatured forms of okra seed proteins as coagulants in drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alfred Ndahi; Bridgeman, John

    2016-10-01

    The effects of temperature, storage time and water pH on the coagulation performance of okra seed protein in water treatment were assessed. In a jar test experiment, okra salt extract achieved a notable improvement in treatment efficiency with storage time and showed good performance in quality after thermal treatment at 60, 97 and 140 °C temperatures for 6, 4 and 2 hours, respectively. The performance improvement of more than 8% is considered to be due to the denaturation and subsequent removal of coagulation-hindering proteins in okra seed. Furthermore, the results of a sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis show two distinctive bands of protein responsible for the coagulation process after denaturation. It was further shown that at optimal coagulant dose, the pH of the treated water remained unaffected as a result of the protein's buffering capability during coagulation. Therefore, denatured okra seed exhibited improved performance compared to the native crude extract and offers clear benefits as a water treatment coagulant.

  2. Analyzing modifiers of protein aggregation in C. elegans by native agarose gel electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmberg, Mats; Nollen, Ellen A A; Hatters, Danny M.; Hannan, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of specific aggregation-prone proteins during aging is thought to be involved in several diseases, most notably Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease as well as polyglutamine expansion disorders such as Huntington's disease. Caenorhabditis elegans disease models with transgenic

  3. Recombinant Minimalist Spider Wrapping Silk Proteins Capable of Native-Like Fiber Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingling; Rainey, Jan K.; Meng, Qing; Liu, Xiang-Qin

    2012-01-01

    Spider silks are desirable biomaterials characterized by high tensile strength, elasticity, and biocompatibility. Spiders produce different types of silks for different uses, although dragline silks have been the predominant focus of previous studies. Spider wrapping silk, made of the aciniform protein (AcSp1), has high toughness because of its combination of high elasticity and tensile strength. AcSp1 in Argiope trifasciata contains a 200-aa sequence motif that is repeated at least 14 times. Here, we produced in E. coli recombinant proteins consisting of only one to four of the 200-aa AcSp1 repeats, designated W1 to W4. We observed that purified W2, W3 and W4 proteins could be induced to form silk-like fibers by shear forces in a physiological buffer. The fibers formed by W4 were ∼3.4 µm in diameter and up to 10 cm long. They showed an average tensile strength of 115 MPa, elasticity of 37%, and toughness of 34 J cm−3. The smaller W2 protein formed fewer fibers and required a higher protein concentration to form fibers, whereas the smallest W1 protein did not form silk-like fibers, indicating that a minimum of two of the 200-aa repeats was required for fiber formation. Microscopic examinations revealed structural features indicating an assembly of the proteins into spherical structures, fibrils, and silk-like fibers. CD and Raman spectral analysis of protein secondary structures suggested a transition from predominantly α-helical in solution to increasingly β-sheet in fibers. PMID:23209681

  4. Recombinant minimalist spider wrapping silk proteins capable of native-like fiber formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Xu

    Full Text Available Spider silks are desirable biomaterials characterized by high tensile strength, elasticity, and biocompatibility. Spiders produce different types of silks for different uses, although dragline silks have been the predominant focus of previous studies. Spider wrapping silk, made of the aciniform protein (AcSp1, has high toughness because of its combination of high elasticity and tensile strength. AcSp1 in Argiope trifasciata contains a 200-aa sequence motif that is repeated at least 14 times. Here, we produced in E. coli recombinant proteins consisting of only one to four of the 200-aa AcSp1 repeats, designated W(1 to W(4. We observed that purified W(2, W(3 and W(4 proteins could be induced to form silk-like fibers by shear forces in a physiological buffer. The fibers formed by W(4 were ∼3.4 µm in diameter and up to 10 cm long. They showed an average tensile strength of 115 MPa, elasticity of 37%, and toughness of 34 J cm(-3. The smaller W(2 protein formed fewer fibers and required a higher protein concentration to form fibers, whereas the smallest W(1 protein did not form silk-like fibers, indicating that a minimum of two of the 200-aa repeats was required for fiber formation. Microscopic examinations revealed structural features indicating an assembly of the proteins into spherical structures, fibrils, and silk-like fibers. CD and Raman spectral analysis of protein secondary structures suggested a transition from predominantly α-helical in solution to increasingly β-sheet in fibers.

  5. The comprehensive native interactome of a fully functional tagged prion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothea Rutishauser

    Full Text Available The enumeration of the interaction partners of the cellular prion protein, PrP(C, may help clarifying its elusive molecular function. Here we added a carboxy proximal myc epitope tag to PrP(C. When expressed in transgenic mice, PrP(myc carried a GPI anchor, was targeted to lipid rafts, and was glycosylated similarly to PrP(C. PrP(myc antagonized the toxicity of truncated PrP, restored prion infectibility of PrP(C-deficient mice, and was physically incorporated into PrP(Sc aggregates, indicating that it possessed all functional characteristics of genuine PrP(C. We then immunopurified myc epitope-containing protein complexes from PrP(myc transgenic mouse brains. Gentle differential elution with epitope-mimetic decapeptides, or a scrambled version thereof, yielded 96 specifically released proteins. Quantitative mass spectrometry with isotope-coded tags identified seven proteins which co-eluted equimolarly with PrP(C and may represent component of a multiprotein complex. Selected PrP(C interactors were validated using independent methods. Several of these proteins appear to exert functions in axomyelinic maintenance.

  6. Transglutamination allows production and characterization of native-sized ELPylated spider silk proteins from transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichert, Nicola; Hauptmann, Valeska; Menzel, Matthias; Schallau, Kai; Gunkel, Philip; Hertel, Thomas C; Pietzsch, Markus; Spohn, Uwe; Conrad, Udo

    2014-02-01

    In the last two decades it was shown that plants have a great potential for production of specific heterologous proteins. But high cost and inefficient downstream processing are a main technical bottleneck for the broader use of plant-based production technology especially for protein-based products, for technical use as fibres or biodegradable plastics and also for medical applications. High-performance fibres from recombinant spider silks are, therefore, a prominent example. Spiders developed rather different silk materials that are based on proteins. These spider silks show excellent properties in terms of elasticity and toughness. Natural spider silk proteins have a very high molecular weight, and it is precisely this property which is thought to give them their strength. Transgenic plants were generated to produce ELPylated recombinant spider silk derivatives. These fusion proteins were purified by Inverse Transition Cycling (ITC) and enzymatically multimerized with transglutaminase in vitro. Layers produced by casting monomers and multimers were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based nanoindentation. The layered multimers formed by mixing lysine- and glutamine-tagged monomers were associated with the highest elastic penetration modulus. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Chemoselective Attachment of Biologically Active Proteins to Surfaces by Native Chemical Ligation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C L; de Yoreo, J J; Coleman, M; Camarero, J A

    2003-11-22

    The present work describes our ongoing efforts towards the creation of micro and nanoscaled ordered arrays of protein covalently attached to site-specific chemical linkers patterned by different microlithographic techniques. We present a new and efficient solid-phase approach for the synthesis of chemically modified long alkyl-thiols. These compounds can be used to introduce chemoselective reacting groups onto silicon-based surfaces. We show that these modified thiols can be used for creating nano- and micrometric chemical patterns by using different lithographic techniques. We show that these patterns can react chemoselectively with proteins which have been recombinantly modified to contain complementary chemical groups at specific positions thus resulting in the oriented attachment of the protein to the surface.

  8. Recombinant Neural Protein PrP Can Bind with Both Recombinant and Native Apolipoprotein E In Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen GAO; Wei ZHOU; Xiao-Ping DONG; Yan-Jun LEI; Jun HAN; Qi SHI; Lan CHEN; Yan GUO; Yong-Jun GAO; Jian-Ming CHEN; Hui-Ying JIANG

    2006-01-01

    The most essential and crucial step during the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy is the conformational change of cellular prion protein (PrPC) to pathologic isoform (prpSc). A lot of data revealed that caveolae-like domains (CLDs) in the cell surface were the probable place where the conversion of PrP proteins happened. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is an apolipoprotein which is considered to play an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases by forming protein complex through binding to the receptor located in the clathrin-coated pits of the cell surface.In this study, a 914-bp cDNA sequence encoding human ApoE3 was amplified from neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Three human ApoE isomers were expressed and purified from Escherichia coli. ApoE-specific antiserum was prepared by immunizing rabbits with the purified ApoE3. GST/His pull-down assay,immunoprecipitation and ELISA revealed that three full-length ApoE isomers interact with the recombinant full-length PrP protein in vitro. The regions corresponding to protein binding were mapped in the N-terminal segment of ApoE (amino acid 1-194) and the N-terminal of PrP (amino acid 23-90). Moreover, the recombinant PrP showed the ability to form a complex with the native ApoE from liver tissues. Our data provided direct evidence of molecular interaction between ApoE and PrP. It also supplied scientific clues for assessing the significance of CLDs on the surface of cellular membrane in the process of conformational conversion from PrPC to PrPSc and probing into the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy.

  9. Gradual disordering of the native state on a slow two-state folding protein monitored by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Luis A; Sadqi, Mourad; Liu, Jianwei; Wang, Xiang; English, Douglas S; Muñoz, Victor

    2013-10-24

    Theory predicts that folding free energy landscapes are intrinsically malleable and as such are expected to respond to perturbations in topographically complex ways. Structural changes upon perturbation have been observed experimentally for unfolded ensembles, folding transition states, and fast downhill folding proteins. However, the native state of proteins that fold in a two-state fashion is conventionally assumed to be structurally invariant during unfolding. Here we investigate how the native and unfolded states of the chicken α-spectrin SH3 domain (a well characterized slow two-state folder) change in response to chemical denaturants and/or temperature. We can resolve the individual properties of the two end-states across the chemical unfolding transition employing single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy (SM-FRET) and across the thermal unfolding transition by NMR because SH3 folds-unfolds in the slow chemical exchange regime. Our results demonstrate that α-spectrin SH3 unfolds in a canonical way in the sense that it converts between the native state and an unfolded ensemble that expands in response to chemical denaturants. However, as conditions become increasingly destabilizing, the native state also expands gradually, and a large fraction of its native intramolecular hydrogen bonds break up. This gradual disordering of the native state takes place in times shorter than the 100 μs resolution of our SM-FRET experiments. α-Spectrin SH3 thus showcases the extreme plasticity of folding landscapes, which extends to the native state of slow two-state proteins. Our results point to the idea that folding mechanisms under physiological conditions might be quite different from those obtained by linear extrapolation from denaturing conditions. Furthermore, they highlight a pressing need for re-evaluating the conventional procedures for analyzing and interpreting folding experiments, which may be based on too-simplistic assumptions.

  10. Analyzing modifiers of protein aggregation in C. elegans by native agarose gel electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmberg, Mats; Nollen, Ellen A A; Hatters, Danny M.; Hannan, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of specific aggregation-prone proteins during aging is thought to be involved in several diseases, most notably Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease as well as polyglutamine expansion disorders such as Huntington's disease. Caenorhabditis elegans disease models with transgenic expres

  11. Monitoring the native phosphorylation state of plasma membrane proteins from a single mouse cerebellum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schindler, J.; Ye, J. Y.; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal processing in the cerebellum involves the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of various plasma membrane proteins such as AMPA or NMDA receptors. Despite the importance of changes in phosphorylation pattern, no global phospho-proteome analysis has yet been performed. As plasma membrane...

  12. Comparing serum responses to acute feedings of an extensively hydrolyzed whey protein concentrate versus a native whey protein concentrate in rats: a metabolomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael D; Cruthirds, Clayton L; Lockwood, Christopher M; Pappan, Kirk; Childs, Thomas E; Company, Joseph M; Brown, Jacob D; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Booth, Frank W

    2014-02-01

    We examined how gavage feeding extensively hydrolyzed whey protein (WPH) versus a native whey protein concentrate (WPC) transiently affected serum biochemical profiles in rodents. Male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were 8 h fasted and subsequently fed isonitrogenous amounts of WPH or WPC, or remained unfed (control). Animals were sacrificed 15 min, 30 min, and 60 min post-gavage for serum extraction, and serum was analyzed using untargeted global metabolic profiling via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (MS) and liquid chromatography/MS/MS platforms. We detected 333 serum metabolites amongst the experimental and control groups. Both WPH and WPC generally increased amino acids (1.2-2.8-fold), branched-chain amino acids (1.2-1.7-fold), and serum di- and oligo-peptides (1.1-2.7-fold) over the 60 min time course compared with control (q protein sources led to a dramatic increase in free fatty acids compared with control (up to 6-fold increases, q protein sources.

  13. 76 FR 10378 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... the purification of recombinant proteins, but concerns about the potential impact of the tags on the... recombinant BoCPB has a C- terminal polyhistidine tag. This feature facilitates the purification of the enzyme... more favorable redox environment for disulfide bond formation, or utilize genetically modified strains...

  14. NMR analysis of native-state protein conformational flexibility by hydrogen exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Griselda; LeMaster, David M

    2009-01-01

    The rate of hydrogen exchange for the most protected amides of a protein is widely used to provide an estimate of global conformational stability by analyzing the exchange kinetics in the unfolded state in terms of model peptide exchange rates. The exchange behavior of the other amides of the protein which do not exchange via a global unfolding mechanism can provide insight into the smaller-scale conformational transitions that facilitate access to solvent as required for the exchange reaction. However, since the residual tertiary structure in the exchange-competent conformation can modulate the chemistry of the exchange reaction, equilibrium values estimated from normalization with model peptide rates are open to question. To overcome this limitation, the most robust approaches utilize differential analyses as a function of experimental variables such as denaturant concentration, temperature, pH, and mutational variation. Practical aspects of these various differential analysis techniques are considered with illustrations drawn from the literature.

  15. Optimization of native fluorescence detection of proteins using a pulsed nano laser excitation source

    OpenAIRE

    Heywood, Matthew S.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    We present a mathematical description of the S/N ratio in a fluorescence-based protein detector for capillary electrophoresis that uses a pulsed UV laser at 266 nm as an excitation source. The model accounts for photobleaching, detector volume, laser repetition rate, and analyte flow rate. We have experimentally characterized such a system, and present a comparison of the experimental data with the predictions of the model. Using the model, the system was optimized for test analytes tryptopha...

  16. Dissecting the Binding between Glutamine Synthetase and Its Two Natively Unfolded Protein Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja-Uceda, David; Neira, José L; Saelices, Lorena; Robles-Rengel, Rocío; Florencio, Francisco J; Muro-Pastor, M Isabel; Santoro, Jorge

    2016-06-21

    Ammonium is incorporated into carbon skeletons by the sequential action of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) in cyanobacteria. The activity of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 GS type I is controlled by protein-protein interactions with two intrinsically disordered inactivating factors (IFs): the 65-residue (IF7) and the 149-residue one (IF17). In this work, we studied both IF7 and IF17 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and we described their binding to GS by using NMR and biolayer interferometry. We assigned the backbone nuclei of all residues of IF7. Analyses of chemical shifts and the (15)N-{(1)H} NOEs at two field strengths suggest that IF7 region Thr3-Arg13 and a few residues around Ser27 and Phe41 populated helical conformations (although the percentage is smaller around Phe41). The two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N HSQC and CON experiments suggest that IF17 populated several conformations. We followed the binding between GS and IF7 by NMR at physiological pH, and the residues interacting first with IF7 were Gln6 and Ser27, belonging to those regions that appeared to be ordered in the isolated protein. We also determined the kon values and koff values for the binding of both IF7 and IF17 to GS, where the GS protein was bound to a biosensor. The measurements of the kinetic constants for the binding of IF7 to GS suggest that: (i) binding does not follow a kinetic two-state model ([Formula: see text]), (ii) there is a strong electrostatic component in the determined kon, and (iii) the binding is not diffusion-limited.

  17. Identifying native-like protein structures with scoring functions based on all-atom ECEPP force fields, implicit solvent models and structure relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnautova, Yelena A; Vorobjev, Yury N; Vila, Jorge A; Scheraga, Harold A

    2009-10-01

    Availability of energy functions which can discriminate native-like from non-native protein conformations is crucial for theoretical protein structure prediction and refinement of low-resolution protein models. This article reports the results of benchmark tests for scoring functions based on two all-atom ECEPP force fields, that is, ECEPP/3 and ECEPP05, and two implicit solvent models for a large set of protein decoys. The following three scoring functions are considered: (i) ECEPP05 plus a solvent-accessible surface area model with the parameters optimized with a set of protein decoys (ECEPP05/SA); (ii) ECEPP/3 plus the solvent-accessible surface area model of Ooi et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1987;84:3086-3090) (ECEPP3/OONS); and (iii) ECEPP05 plus an implicit solvent model based on a solution of the Poisson equation with an optimized Fast Adaptive Multigrid Boundary Element (FAMBEpH) method (ECEPP05/FAMBEpH). Short Monte Carlo-with-Minimization (MCM) simulations, following local energy minimization, are used as a scoring method with ECEPP05/SA and ECEPP3/OONS potentials, whereas energy calculation is used with ECEPP05/FAMBEpH. The performance of each scoring function is evaluated by examining its ability to distinguish between native-like and non-native protein structures. The results of the tests show that the new ECEPP05/SA scoring function represents a significant improvement over the earlier ECEPP3/OONS version of the force field. Thus, it is able to rank native-like structures with C(alpha) root-mean-square-deviations below 3.5 A as lowest-energy conformations for 76% and within the top 10 for 87% of the proteins tested, compared with 69 and 80%, respectively, for ECEPP3/OONS. The use of the FAMBEpH solvation model, which provides a more accurate description of the protein-solvent interactions, improves the discriminative ability of the scoring function to 89%. All failed tests in which the native-like structures cannot be discriminated as those with low

  18. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity of insecticidal crystal protein genes in native Bacillus thuringiensis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadeva Swamy, H M; Asokan, R; Mahmood, Riaz; Nagesha, S N

    2013-04-01

    The Western Ghats of Karnataka natural ecosystem are among the most diverse and is one of the eight hottest hotspots of biological diversity in the world, that runs along the western part of India through four states including Karnataka. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strains were isolated from soils of Western Ghats of Karnataka and characterized by molecular and analytical methods as a result of which 28 new Bt-like isolates were identified. Bt strains were isolated from soil samples using sodium acetate selection method. The morphology of crystals was studied using light and phase contrast microscopy. Isolates were further characterized for insecticidal cry gene by PCR, composition of toxins in bacterial crystals by SDS-PAGE cloning, sequencing and evaluation of toxicity was done. As a result 28 new Bt-like isolates were identified. Majority of the isolates showed the presence of a 55 kDa protein bands on SDS-PAGE while the rest showed 130, 73, 34, and 25 kDa bands. PCR analysis revealed predominance of Coleopteran-active cry genes in these isolates. The variations in the nucleotide sequences, crystal morphology, and mass of crystal protein(s) purified from the Bt isolates revealed genetic and molecular diversity. Three strains containing Coleopteran-active cry genes showed higher activity against larvae Myllocerus undecimpustulatus undatus Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) than B. thuringiensis subsp. Morrisoni. Results indicated that Bt isolates could be utilized for bioinsecticide production, aiming to reduce the use of chemical insecticide which could be useful to use in integrated pest management to control agriculturally important pests for sustainable crop production.

  19. Desempenho de novilhos suplementados com sais proteinados em pastagem nativa Performance of steers supplemented with protein salts on native pastures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Knorr

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito da suplementação com sais proteinados sobre o desempenho de novilhos em pastagem nativa diferida, no Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Os suplementos de sal proteinado avaliados foram: com uréia, com amiréia, com amiréia mais levedura e sal mineral. O experimento teve duração de 118 dias e foram utilizadas 8 parcelas com área de 7,5 ha, cada uma com 8 novilhos, de peso médio 264 kg, com idade de 18 meses, em delineamento completamente casualizado. A pastagem apresentou valores médios de 6,8% de proteína bruta, 73,3% de fibra em detergente neutro, e 42,5% de digestibilidade in vitro da matéria orgânica, sem que fossem detectadas diferenças significativas entre tratamentos. O ganho médio diário (0,287 kg dos animais suplementados com o sal proteinado com amiréia e levedura, foi superior ao apresentado pelos animais que consumiram sal mineralizado (0,019 kg mas não houve diferenças entre uréia (0,159 kg e amiréia (0,124 kg. O consumo diário dos suplementos proteinados (0,400 kg foi superior ao consumo do suplemento mineral (0,038 kg. A adição de levedura ativa, ao sal proteinado formulado com amiréia, melhora o desempenho de novilhos em pastagem nativa diferida.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of protein salts supplementation on performance of beef steers grazing differed native pasture in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Protein salts were supplemented with: urea, starea, starea plus yeast, and mineral salt. The experiment was conducted during 118 days, and utilized 8 paddocks with 7.5 ha each one, with 8 steers averaging 264 kg and 18 months old, in a completely randomized design. Average composition of pasture was 6.8% of crude protein, 73.3% of neutral detergent fiber, and 42.5% in vitro organic matter digestibility; significative differences weren't detected among treatments. Average daily weight gain of animals fed protein salt with starea plus yeast (0

  20. Single cell cytometry of protein function in RNAi treated cells and in native populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Andrew

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High Content Screening has been shown to improve results of RNAi and other perturbations, however significant intra-sample heterogeneity is common and can complicate some analyses. Single cell cytometry can extract important information from subpopulations within these samples. Such approaches are important for immune cells analyzed by flow cytometry, but have not been broadly available for adherent cells that are critical to the study of solid-tumor cancers and other disease models. Results We have directly quantitated the effect of resolving RNAi treatments at the single cell level in experimental systems for both exogenous and endogenous targets. Analyzing the effect of an siRNA that targets GFP at the single cell level permits a stronger measure of the absolute function of the siRNA by gating to eliminate background levels of GFP intensities. Extending these methods to endogenous proteins, we have shown that well-level results of the knockdown of PTEN results in an increase in phospho-S6 levels, but at the single cell level, the correlation reveals the role of other inputs into the pathway. In a third example, reduction of STAT3 levels by siRNA causes an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, but does not induce apoptosis or necrosis when compared to control cells that express the same levels of STAT3. In a final example, the effect of reduced p53 levels on increased adriamycin sensitivity for colon carcinoma cells was demonstrated at the whole-well level using siRNA knockdown and in control and untreated cells at the single cell level. Conclusion We find that single cell analysis methods are generally applicable to a wide range of experiments in adherent cells using technology that is becoming increasingly available to most laboratories. It is well-suited to emerging models of signaling dysfunction, such as oncogene addition and oncogenic shock. Single cell cytometry can demonstrate effects on cell

  1. Optimization of native fluorescence detection of proteins using a pulsed nanolaser excitation source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Matthew S; Farnsworth, Paul B

    2010-11-01

    We present a mathematical description of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in a fluorescence-based protein detector for capillary electrophoresis that uses a pulsed ultraviolet (UV) laser at 266 nm as an excitation source. The model accounts for photobleaching, detector volume, laser repetition rate, and analyte flow rate. We have experimentally characterized such a system, and we present a comparison of the experimental data with the predictions of the model. Using the model, the system was optimized for test analytes tryptophan, tyrosine, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and conalbumin, producing detection limits (3σ) of 0.67 nM, 5.7 nM, 0.9 nM, and 1.5 nM, respectively. Based on the photobleaching data, a photobleaching cross-section of 1.4 × 10(-18)cm(2) at 266 nm was calculated for tryptophan.

  2. Conferring biological activity to native spider silk: A biofunctionalized protein-based microfiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Quan, David N; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Liu, Yi; Terrell, Jessica L; Luo, Xiaolong; Yang, Jen-Chang; Payne, Gregory F; Bentley, William E

    2017-01-01

    Spider silk is an extraordinary material with physical properties comparable to the best scaffolding/structural materials, and as a fiber it can be manipulated with ease into a variety of configurations. Our work here demonstrates that natural spider silk fibers can also be used to organize biological components on and in devices through rapid and simple means. Micron scale spider silk fibers (5-10 μm in diameter) were surface modified with a variety of biological entities engineered with pentaglutamine tags via microbial transglutaminase (mTG). Enzymes, enzyme pathways, antibodies, and fluorescent proteins were all assembled onto spider silk fibers using this biomolecular engineering/biofabrication process. Additionally, arrangement of biofunctionalized fiber should in of itself generate a secondary level of biomolecular organization. Toward this end, as proofs of principle, spatially defined arrangement of biofunctionalized spider silk fiber was shown to generate effects specific to silk position in two cases. In one instance, arrangement perpendicular to a flow produced selective head and neck carcinoma cell capture on silk with antibodies complexed to conjugated protein G. In a second scenario, asymmetric bacterial chemotaxis arose from asymmetric conjugation of enzymes to arranged silk. Overall, the biofabrication processes used here were rapid, required no complex chemistries, were biologically benign, and also the resulting engineered silk microfibers were flexible, readily manipulated and functionally active. Deployed here in microfluidic environments, biofunctional spider silk fiber provides a means to convey complex biological functions over a range of scales, further extending its potential as a biomaterial in biotechnological settings. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 83-95. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Analysis of oligomeric transition of silkworm small heat shock protein sHSP20.8 using high hydrostatic pressure native PAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Tetsuro; Ueda, Toshifumi; Kameyama, Keiichi; Aso, Yoichi; Ishiguro, Ryo

    2013-06-01

    The small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) solubilize thermo-denatured proteins without adenosine triphosphate energy consumption to facilitate protein refolding. sHSP20.8 is one of the silkworm (Bombyx mori) sHSPs having only one cystein in the N-terminal domain: Cys43. We report a simple measurement of oligomeric transition of sHSP20.8 using high hydrostatic pressure native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (high hydrostatic pressure (HP) native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE)). At ambient pressure under oxydative condition, the native PAGE of thermal transition of sHSP20.8 oligomer displayed a cooperative association. In contrast, HP native PAGE clearly demonstrated that sHSP20.8 dissociated at 80 MPa and 25°C, and the resultant molecular species gradually reassociated with time under that condition. In addition, the reassociation process was suppressed in the presence of the reductant. These results are consistent with the idea that sHSP20.8 oligomer temporally dissociates at the first thermo-sensing step and reassociates with the oxidation of Cys43.

  4. Expression and Purification of Active Recombinant Cathepsin C (Dipeptidyl Aminopeptidase I of Kuruma Prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus in Insect Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao-Feng Qiu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin C (CTSC is a lysosomal cysteine protease belonging to the papain superfamily. Our previous study showed that CTSC precursor (zymogen is localized exclusively in cortical rods (CRs of mature oocyte in the kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus, suggesting that CTSC might have roles on regulating release and/or formation of a jelly layer. In this study, enzymically active CTSC of the kuruma prawn was prepared by recombinant expression in the High Five insect cell line. The recombinant enzyme with a polyhistidine tag at its C-terminus was considered to be initially secreted into the culture medium as an inactive form of zymogen, because Western blot with anti-CTSC antibody detected a 51 kDa protein corresponding to CTSC precursor. After purification by affinity chromatography on nickel-iminodiacetic acid resin, the enzyme displayed three forms of 51, 31, and 30 kDa polypeptides. All of the forms can be recognized by antiserum raised against C-terminal polyhistidine tag, indicating that the 31 and 30 kDa forms were generated from 51 kDa polypeptide by removal of a portion of the N-terminus of propeptide. Following activation at pH 5.5 and 37∘C for 40 hours under native conditions, the recombinant CTSC (rCTSC exhibited increased activity against the synthetic substrate Gly-Phe-β-naphthylamide and optimal pH at around 5. The purified rCTSC will be useful for further characterization of its exact physiological role on CRs release and/or formation of a jelly layer in kuruma prawn.

  5. Efficient assembly and secretion of recombinant subviral particles of the four dengue serotypes using native prM and E proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Gang Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Flavivirus infected cells produce infectious virions and subviral particles, both of which are formed by the assembly of prM and E envelope proteins and are believed to undergo the same maturation process. Dengue recombinant subviral particles have been produced in cell cultures with either modified or chimeric proteins but not using the native forms of prM and E. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have used a codon optimization strategy to obtain an efficient expression of native viral proteins and production of recombinant subviral particles (RSPs for all four dengue virus (DV serotypes. A stable HeLa cell line expressing DV1 prME was established (HeLa-prME and RSPs were analyzed by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. We found that E protein is mainly present in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER where assembly of RSPs could be observed. Biochemical characterization of DV1 RSPs secretion revealed both prM protein cleavage and homodimerization of E proteins before their release into the supernatant, indicating that RSPs undergo a similar maturation process as dengue virus. Pulse chase experiment showed that 8 hours are required for the secretion of DV1 RSPs. We have used HeLa-prME to develop a semi-quantitative assay and screened a human siRNA library targeting genes involved in membrane trafficking. Knockdown of 23 genes resulted in a significant reduction in DV RSP secretion, whereas for 22 others we observed an increase of RSP levels in cell supernatant. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data describe the efficient production of RSPs containing native prM and E envelope proteins for all dengue serotypes. Dengue RSPs and corresponding producing cell lines are safe and novel tools that can be used in the study of viral egress as well as in the development of vaccine and drugs against dengue virus.

  6. Differences in folate-protein interactions result in differing inhibition of native rat liver and recombinant glycine N-methyltransferase by 5-methyltetrahydrofolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luka, Zigmund; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; Newcomer, Marcia E; Wagner, Conrad [Vanderbilt; (LSU)

    2012-06-27

    Glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT) is a key regulatory enzyme in methyl group metabolism. In mammalian liver it reduces S-adenosylmethionine levels by using it to methylate glycine, producing N-methylglycine (sarcosine) and S-adenosylhomocysteine. GNMT is inhibited by binding two molecules of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (mono- or polyglutamate forms) per tetramer of the active enzyme. Inhibition is sensitive to the status of the N-terminal valine of GNMT and to polyglutamation of the folate inhibitor. It is inhibited by pentaglutamate form more efficiently compared to monoglutamate form. The native rat liver GNMT contains an acetylated N-terminal valine and is inhibited much more efficiently compared to the recombinant protein expressed in E. coli where the N-terminus is not acetylated. In this work we used a protein crystallography approach to evaluate the structural basis for these differences. We show that in the folate-GNMT complexes with the native enzyme, two folate molecules establish three and four hydrogen bonds with the protein. In the folate-recombinant GNMT complex only one hydrogen bond is established. This difference results in more effective inhibition by folate of the native liver GNMT activity compared to the recombinant enzyme.

  7. An enigmatic peptide ligation reaction: protease-catalyzed oligomerization of a native protein segment in neat aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaran, S; Datta, D; Roy, R P

    2000-04-01

    We report an enigmatic peptide ligation reaction catalyzed by Glu-specific Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease that occurs in neat aqueous solution around neutral pH utilizing a totally unprotected peptide substrate containing free alpha-carboxyl and alpha-amino groups. V8 protease catalyzed a chain of ligation steps between pH 6 and 8 at 4 degrees C, producing a gamut of covalent oligomers (dimer through octamer or higher) of a native protein segment TAAAKFE (S39) derived from ribonuclease A (RNAse A). Size-exclusion chromatography suggested the absence of strong interaction between the reacting peptides. The circular dichroism spectra of monomer through pentamer showed length-dependent enhancement of secondary structure in the oligomers, suggesting that protease-catalyzed ligation of a monomer to an oligomer resulted in a product that was more structured than its precursor. The relative conformational stability of the oligomers was reflected in their ability to resist proteolysis, indicating that the oligomerization reaction was facilitated as a consequence of the "conformational trapping" of the product. The ligation reaction proceeded in two phases-slow formation and accumulation of the dimer followed by a fast phase of oligomerization, implying that the conformational trap encountered in the oligomerization reaction was a two-step process. The Gly substitution at any position of the TAAAKFE sequence was deleterious, suggesting that the first step of the conformational trap, namely the dimerization reaction, that proceeded very slowly even with the parent peptide, was quite sensitive to amino acid sequence. In contrast, the oligomerization reaction of an Ala analog, AAAAKFE, occurred in much the same way as S39, albeit with faster rate, suggesting that Ala substitution stabilized the overall conformational trapping process. The results suggest the viability of the product-directed "conformational trap" as a mechanism to achieve peptide ligation of totally

  8. Anti-nutritional Factors and Ruminal Dry Matter and Crude Protein Degradability of Gamma and Microwave Irradiated Native Rapeseed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    sayyed roohollah ebrahimimahmoudabad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Native rapeseed (NRS is planted in some parts of Iran because of climatic condition. The consumption of NRS in animal nutrition is limited by anti-nutritional such as phytic acid and glucosinolate. Moreover, the protein of NRS is highly degraded by rumen microorganisms. Several processing methods have been used to enhance the nutritive value of whole oilseeds, including extrusion, roasting, toasting and Jet-Sploding. However, most heat processing methods adversely affect protein digestibility in the small intestine. Recently, other processing methods such as processing by gamma and microwave irradiation have been noticed. Therefore, this research was carried out to evaluate the effects of gamma irradiation (15, 30 and 45 kGy and microwave irradiation (800 W for 2, 4 and 6 min on ruminal dry matter (DM and crude protein (CP degradability, in vitro CP digestibility, anti-nutritional factors (glucosinolate and phytic acid and chemical composition of NRS. Materials and Methods Chemical composition (DM, CP, EE and Ash of untreated and irradiated NRS was determined by AOAC methods. Then, sufficient water was added to the sample to increase the moisture content to 250 g/kg. Gamma irradiation was completed by using a cobalt-60 irradiator at 20 ºC. The dose rate determined by Fricke dosimetry was 0.36 Gy/s. Another three samples (500 g each were subjected to microwave irradiation at a power of 800 W for 2, 4 and 6 min. Phytic acid and glucosinolate contents of untreated and irradiated samples were determined by standard methods. Degradation kinetics of DM or CP were determined according to in situ procedure. Six grams of untreated or irradiated NRS were incubated in the rumen of three ruminally fistulated Taleshi bulls for 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 and 48 h. Bags were placed in the rumen just before the bulls were offered their first meal. After retrieval from the rumen, bags were thoroughly washed with tap water until the rinsing water was clear

  9. Characterization of intact protein conjugates and biopharmaceuticals using ion-exchange chromatography with online detection by native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and top-down tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneeruddin, Khaja; Nazzaro, Mark; Kaltashov, Igor A

    2015-10-06

    Characterization of biopharmaceutical products is a challenging task, which needs to be carried out at several different levels (including both primary structure and conformation). An additional difficulty frequently arises due to the structural heterogeneity inherent to many protein-based therapeutics (e.g., extensive glycosylation or "designer" modifications such as chemical conjugation) or introduced postproduction as a result of stress (e.g., oxidation and deamidation). A combination of ion-exchange chromatography (IXC) with online detection by native electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) allows characterization of complex and heterogeneous therapeutic proteins and protein conjugates to be accomplished at a variety of levels without compromising their conformational integrity. The IXC/ESI MS measurements allow protein conjugates to be profiled by analyzing conjugation stoichiometry and the presence of multiple positional isomers, as well as to establish the effect of chemical modifications on the conformational integrity of each species. While mass profiling alone is not sufficient for identification of nonenzymatic post-translational modifications (PTMs) that result in a very small mass change of the eluting species (e.g., deamidation), this task can be completed using online top-down structural analysis, as demonstrated using stressed interferon-β as an example. The wealth of information that can be provided by IXC/native ESI MS and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) on protein-based therapeutics will undoubtedly make it a very valuable addition to the experimental toolbox of biopharmaceutical analysis.

  10. Localization of Proteins to the 1,2-Propanediol Utilization Microcompartment by Non-native Signal Sequences Is Mediated by a Common Hydrophobic Motif*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobson, Christopher M.; Kim, Edward Y.; Slininger, Marilyn F.; Chien, Alex; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Various bacteria localize metabolic pathways to proteinaceous organelles known as bacterial microcompartments (MCPs), enabling the metabolism of carbon sources to enhance survival and pathogenicity in the gut. There is considerable interest in exploiting bacterial MCPs for metabolic engineering applications, but little is known about the interactions between MCP signal sequences and the protein shells of different MCP systems. We found that the N-terminal sequences from the ethanolamine utilization (Eut) and glycyl radical-generating protein MCPs are able to target reporter proteins to the 1,2-propanediol utilization (Pdu) MCP, and that this localization is mediated by a conserved hydrophobic residue motif. Recapitulation of this motif by the addition of a single amino acid conferred targeting function on an N-terminal sequence from the ethanol utilization MCP system that previously did not act as a Pdu signal sequence. Moreover, the Pdu-localized signal sequences competed with native Pdu targeting sequences for encapsulation in the Pdu MCP. Salmonella enterica natively possesses both the Pdu and Eut operons, and our results suggest that Eut proteins might be localized to the Pdu MCP in vivo. We further demonstrate that S. enterica LT2 retained the ability to grow on 1,2-propanediol as the sole carbon source when a Pdu enzyme was replaced with its Eut homolog. Although the relevance of this finding to the native system remains to be explored, we show that the Pdu-localized signal sequences described herein allow control over the ratio of heterologous proteins encapsulated within Pdu MCPs. PMID:26283792

  11. Localization of proteins to the 1,2-propanediol utilization microcompartment by non-native signal sequences is mediated by a common hydrophobic motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobson, Christopher M; Kim, Edward Y; Slininger, Marilyn F; Chien, Alex; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2015-10-02

    Various bacteria localize metabolic pathways to proteinaceous organelles known as bacterial microcompartments (MCPs), enabling the metabolism of carbon sources to enhance survival and pathogenicity in the gut. There is considerable interest in exploiting bacterial MCPs for metabolic engineering applications, but little is known about the interactions between MCP signal sequences and the protein shells of different MCP systems. We found that the N-terminal sequences from the ethanolamine utilization (Eut) and glycyl radical-generating protein MCPs are able to target reporter proteins to the 1,2-propanediol utilization (Pdu) MCP, and that this localization is mediated by a conserved hydrophobic residue motif. Recapitulation of this motif by the addition of a single amino acid conferred targeting function on an N-terminal sequence from the ethanol utilization MCP system that previously did not act as a Pdu signal sequence. Moreover, the Pdu-localized signal sequences competed with native Pdu targeting sequences for encapsulation in the Pdu MCP. Salmonella enterica natively possesses both the Pdu and Eut operons, and our results suggest that Eut proteins might be localized to the Pdu MCP in vivo. We further demonstrate that S. enterica LT2 retained the ability to grow on 1,2-propanediol as the sole carbon source when a Pdu enzyme was replaced with its Eut homolog. Although the relevance of this finding to the native system remains to be explored, we show that the Pdu-localized signal sequences described herein allow control over the ratio of heterologous proteins encapsulated within Pdu MCPs. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Context dependent reference states of solvent accessibility derived from native protein structures and assessed by predictability analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Shandar

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solvent accessibility (ASA of amino acid residues is often transformed from absolute values of exposed surface area to their normalized relative values. This normalization is typically attained by assuming a highest exposure conformation based on extended state of that residue when it is surrounded by Ala or Gly on both sides i.e. Ala-X-Ala or Gly-X-Gly solvent exposed area. Exact sequence context, the folding state of the residues, and the actual environment of a folded protein, which do impose additional constraints on the highest possible (or highest observed values of ASA, are currently ignored. Here, we analyze the statistics of these constraints and examine how the normalization of absolute ASA values using context-dependent Highest Observed ASA (HOA instead of context-free extended state ASA (ESA of residues can influence the performance of sequence-based prediction of solvent accessibility. Characterization of burial and exposed states of residues based on this normalization has also been shown to provide better enrichment of DNA-binding sites in exposed residues. Results We compiled the statistics of highest observed ASA (HOA of residues in their different contexts and analyzed their distribution in all 400 possible combinations for each residue type. We observe that many trippetides are more exposed than ESA and that HOA residues are often found in turn, coil and bend conformations. On the other hand several residues are never observed in an exposure state close to ESA values. A neural networks trained with HOA-normalized data outperforms the one trained with ESA-normalized values. However, the improvements are subtle in some residues, while they are more significant in others. Conclusion HOA based normalization of solvent accessibility from native structures is proposed and it shows improvement in sequence-based predictability, as well as enrichment in interface residues on surface. There may still be some

  13. Resolution of two native monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina and the sequence of two napA genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Philippa J.L. [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McKinzie, Audra A. [School of Medical Sciences (Pharmacology) and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Codd, Rachel, E-mail: rachel.codd@sydney.edu.au [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Medical Sciences (Pharmacology) and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Two monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina. {yields} Sequence of napA from napEDABC-type operon and napA from NapDAGHB-type operon. {yields} Isolation of NAP as NapA or NapAB correlated with NapA P47E amino acid substitution. -- Abstract: The reduction of nitrate to nitrite in the bacterial periplasm occurs in the 90 kDa NapA subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP) system. Most Shewanella genomes contain two nap operons: napEDABC and napDAGHB, which is an unusual feature of this genus. Two native, monomeric, 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins were resolved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography from aerobic cultures of Shewanella gelidimarina replete with reduced nitrogen compounds. The 90 kDa protein obtained in higher yield was characterized as NapA by electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and was identified by LC/MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS as NapA from the napEDABC-type operon. The other 90 kDa protein, which was unstable and produced in low yields, was posited as NapA from the napDAGHB-type operon. Two napA genes have been sequenced from the napEDABC-type and napDAGHB-type operons of S. gelidimarina. Native NAP from S. putrefaciens was resolved as one NapA monomer and one NapAB heterodimer. Two amino acid substitutions in NapA correlated with the isolation of NAP as a NapA monomer or a NapAB heterodimer. The resolution of native, redox-active NapA isoforms in Shewanella provides new insight into the respiratory versatility of this genus, which has implications in bioremediation and the assembly of microbial fuel cells.

  14. Resolution of two native monomeric 90kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina and the sequence of two napA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Philippa J L; McKinzie, Audra A; Codd, Rachel

    2010-07-16

    The reduction of nitrate to nitrite in the bacterial periplasm occurs in the 90kDa NapA subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP) system. Most Shewanella genomes contain two nap operons: napEDABC and napDAGHB, which is an unusual feature of this genus. Two native, monomeric, 90kDa nitrate reductase active proteins were resolved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography from aerobic cultures of Shewanella gelidimarina replete with reduced nitrogen compounds. The 90kDa protein obtained in higher yield was characterized as NapA by electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and was identified by LC/MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS as NapA from the napEDABC-type operon. The other 90kDa protein, which was unstable and produced in low yields, was posited as NapA from the napDAGHB-type operon. Two napA genes have been sequenced from the napEDABC-type and napDAGHB-type operons of S. gelidimarina. Native NAP from S. putrefaciens was resolved as one NapA monomer and one NapAB heterodimer. Two amino acid substitutions in NapA correlated with the isolation of NAP as a NapA monomer or a NapAB heterodimer. The resolution of native, redox-active NapA isoforms in Shewanella provides new insight into the respiratory versatility of this genus, which has implications in bioremediation and the assembly of microbial fuel cells.

  15. Microscopic stability of cold shock protein A examined by NMR native state hydrogen exchange as a function of urea and trimethylamine N-oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaravine, V. A.; Rathgeb-Szabo, K.; Alexandrescu, A. T.

    2000-01-01

    Native state hydrogen exchange of cold shock protein A (CspA) has been characterized as a function of the denaturant urea and of the stabilizing agent trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO). The structure of CspA has five strands of beta-sheet. Strands beta1-beta4 have strongly protected amide protons that, based on experiments as a function of urea, exchange through a simple all-or-none global unfolding mechanism. By contrast, the protection of amide protons from strand beta5 is too weak to measure in water. Strand beta5 is hydrogen bonded to strands beta3 and beta4, both of which afford strong protection from solvent exchange. Gaussian network model (GNM) simulations, which assume that the degree of protection depends on tertiary contact density in the native structure, accurately predict the strong protection observed in strands beta1-beta4 but fail to account for the weak protection in strand beta5. The most conspicuous feature of strand beta5 is its low sequence hydrophobicity. In the presence of TMAO, there is an increase in the protection of strands beta1-beta4, and protection extends to amide protons in more hydrophilic segments of the protein, including strand beta5 and the loops connecting the beta-strands. TMAO stabilizes proteins by raising the free energy of the denatured state, due to highly unfavorable interactions between TMAO and the exposed peptide backbone. As such, the stabilizing effects of TMAO are expected to be relatively independent of sequence hydrophobicity. The present results suggest that the magnitude of solvent exchange protection depends more on solvent accessibility in the ensemble of exchange susceptible conformations than on the strength of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the native structure. PMID:10716181

  16. Antibodies against ribosomal protein S29 (RPS29) fused with glutathione's transferase specially react with native RPS29 in mouse and human cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jia; Zhang Junlei; Han Junfeng; Li Dongying; Jian Rui; Rao XianCai; Chen Wei; Wang Jiali; Xu Xiaofeng; Hu Zhen

    2011-01-01

    The ribosomal protein S29 also known as RPS29,is not only a component of the 40S subunit of ribosome,but also involved in embryonic development,oncogenesis and other pathologic conditions. However,rare commercial antibody against RPS29 restricts the discovery of precise physiological and pathological function of this protein. In this study,the whole RPS29 gene was inserted into plasmid pGEX-6p-1 to express glutathione's transferase (GST) fusion proteins in Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain BL21. High yields of soluble recombinant proteins were obtained. Mice were immunized with the recombinant RPS29 protein. The serum from the immunized mice could specially react with purified recombinant RPS29 proteins and native RPS29 proteins in CCE cells by western blotting,immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometric analysis. Further more the polyclonal antibodies also reacted specifically with human cell strain ECV304,which showed typical cytoplasmatic fluorescence. The polyclonal antibodies we prepared would be an available tool for studying the roles of RPS29 in embryonic development and human diseases.

  17. Differential binding of neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies to native-like soluble HIV-1 Env trimers, uncleaved Env proteins, and monomeric subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmeen, Anila; Ringe, Rajesh; Derking, Ronald; Cupo, Albert; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Burton, Dennis R; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A; Sanders, Rogier W; Moore, John P; Klasse, Per Johan

    2014-05-29

    The trimeric envelope glycoproteins (Env) on the surface of HIV-1 virions are the targets for neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). No candidate HIV-1 immunogen has yet induced potent, broadly active NAbs (bNAbs). Part of the explanation may be that previously tested Env proteins inadequately mimic the functional, native Env complex. Trimerization and the proteolytic processing of Env precursors into gp120 and gp41 profoundly alter antigenicity, but soluble cleaved trimers are too unstable to serve as immunogens. By introducing stabilizing mutations (SOSIP), we constructed soluble, cleaved Env trimers derived from the HIV-1 subtype A isolate BG505 that resemble native Env spikes on virions both structurally and antigenically. We used surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to quantify antibody binding to different forms of BG505 Env: the proteolytically cleaved SOSIP.664 trimers, cleaved gp120-gp41ECTO protomers, and gp120 monomers. Non-NAbs to the CD4-binding site bound only marginally to the trimers but equally well to gp120-gp41ECTO protomers and gp120 monomers, whereas the bNAb VRC01, directed to the CD4bs, bound to all three forms. In contrast, bNAbs to V1V2 glycan-dependent epitopes bound preferentially (PG9 and PG16) or exclusively (PGT145) to trimers. We also explored the antigenic consequences of three different features of SOSIP.664 gp140 trimers: the engineered inter-subunit disulfide bond, the trimer-stabilizing I559P change in gp41ECTO, and proteolytic cleavage at the gp120-gp41ECTO junction. Each of these three features incrementally promoted native-like trimer antigenicity. We compared Fab and IgG versions of bNAbs and validated a bivalent model of IgG binding. The NAbs showed widely divergent binding kinetics and degrees of binding to native-like BG505 SOSIP.664. High off-rate constants and low stoichiometric estimates of NAb binding were associated with large amounts of residual infectivity after NAb neutralization of the corresponding BG505.T332N pseudovirus

  18. Lack of detectable allergenicity in genetically modified maize containing "Cry" proteins as compared to native maize based on in silico & in vitro analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandni Mathur

    Full Text Available Genetically modified, (GM crops with potential allergens must be evaluated for safety and endogenous IgE binding pattern compared to native variety, prior to market release.To compare endogenous IgE binding proteins of three GM maize seeds containing Cry 1Ab,1Ac,1C transgenic proteins with non GM maize.An integrated approach of in silico & in vitro methods was employed. Cry proteins were tested for presence of allergen sequence by FASTA in allergen databases. Biochemical assays for maize extracts were performed. Specific IgE (sIgE and Immunoblot using food sensitized patients sera (n = 39 to non GM and GM maize antigens was performed.In silico approaches, confirmed for non sequence similarity of stated transgenic proteins in allergen databases. An insignificant (p> 0.05 variation in protein content between GM and non GM maize was observed. Simulated Gastric Fluid (SGF revealed reduced number of stable protein fractions in GM then non GM maize which might be due to shift of constituent protein expression. Specific IgE values from patients showed insignificant difference in non GM and GM maize extracts. Five maize sensitized cases, recognized same 7 protein fractions of 88-28 kD as IgE bindng in both GM and non-GM maize, signifying absence of variation. Four of the reported IgE binding proteins were also found to be stable by SGF.Cry proteins did not indicate any significant similarity of >35% in allergen databases. Immunoassays also did not identify appreciable differences in endogenous IgE binding in GM and non GM maize.

  19. Virtual Screening of Plant Volatile Compounds Reveals a High Affinity of Hylamorpha elegans (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Odorant-Binding Proteins for Sesquiterpenes From Its Native Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-González, Angélica; Palma-Millanao, Rubén; Yáñez, Osvaldo; Rojas, Maximiliano; Mutis, Ana; Venthur, Herbert; Quiroz, Andrés; Ramírez, Claudio C

    2016-01-01

    Hylamorpha elegans(Burmeister) is a native Chilean scarab beetle considered to be a relevant agricultural pest to pasture and cereal and small fruit crops. Because of their cryptic habits, control with conventional methods is difficult; therefore, alternative and environmentally friendly control strategies are highly desirable. The study of proteins that participate in the recognition of odorants, such as odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), offers interesting opportunities to identify new compounds with the potential to modify pest behavior and computational screening of compounds, which is commonly used in drug discovery, may help to accelerate the discovery of new semiochemicals. Here, we report the discovery of four OBPs inH. elegans as well as six new volatiles released by its native host Nothofagus obliqua(Mirbel). Molecular docking performed between OBPs and new and previously reported volatiles from N. oblique revealed the best binding energy values for sesquiterpenic compounds. Despite remarkable divergence at the amino acid level, three of the four OBPs evaluated exhibited the best interaction energy for the same ligands. Molecular dynamics investigation reinforced the importance of sesquiterpenes, showing that hydrophobic residues of the OBPs interacted most frequently with the tested ligands, and binding free energy calculations demonstrated van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions to be the most important. Altogether, the results suggest that sesquiterpenes are interesting candidates for in vitro and in vivo assays to assess their potential application in pest management strategies.

  20. Virtual Screening of Plant Volatile Compounds Reveals a High Affinity of Hylamorpha elegans (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Odorant-Binding Proteins for Sesquiterpenes From Its Native Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Millanao, Rubén; Yáñez, Osvaldo; Rojas, Maximiliano; Mutis, Ana; Venthur, Herbert; Quiroz, Andrés; Ramírez, Claudio C.

    2016-01-01

    Hylamorpha elegans (Burmeister) is a native Chilean scarab beetle considered to be a relevant agricultural pest to pasture and cereal and small fruit crops. Because of their cryptic habits, control with conventional methods is difficult; therefore, alternative and environmentally friendly control strategies are highly desirable. The study of proteins that participate in the recognition of odorants, such as odorant-binding proteins (OBPs), offers interesting opportunities to identify new compounds with the potential to modify pest behavior and computational screening of compounds, which is commonly used in drug discovery, may help to accelerate the discovery of new semiochemicals. Here, we report the discovery of four OBPs in H. elegans as well as six new volatiles released by its native host Nothofagus obliqua (Mirbel). Molecular docking performed between OBPs and new and previously reported volatiles from N. obliqua revealed the best binding energy values for sesquiterpenic compounds. Despite remarkable divergence at the amino acid level, three of the four OBPs evaluated exhibited the best interaction energy for the same ligands. Molecular dynamics investigation reinforced the importance of sesquiterpenes, showing that hydrophobic residues of the OBPs interacted most frequently with the tested ligands, and binding free energy calculations demonstrated van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions to be the most important. Altogether, the results suggest that sesquiterpenes are interesting candidates for in vitro and in vivo assays to assess their potential application in pest management strategies. PMID:27012867

  1. Corn steep liquor and fermented ammoniated condensed whey as protein sources for lactating cows and yearling heifers grazing winter native range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.J.; Lusby, K.S.; Horn, G.W.; Dvorak, M.J.

    1982-06-01

    Corn steep liquor (CSL) and fermented ammoniated condensed whey (FACW) were compared to cottonseed meal (CSM) as protein sources for wintering 61 lactating first-calf Hereford heifers and 32 yearling Hereford heifers on native range. Cattle were allotted by weight and individually fed 6 days per week for 12 weeks one of four protein treatments: negative control (NC), positive control (PC), CSL and FACW to provide .7, 1.5, .15 and 1.5 lb crude protein (CP) per day, respectively, to the lacating heifers and .2, .4, .4 and .4lb cP per day, respectively, to the yearling heifers. CMS was supplied in the CSL and FACW treatments at the same level as in the negative control. Lactating heifers fed the NC lost more (P less than .005) weight and body condition (120 lb and 1.6 units) than those fed the PC (45.8 lb and .9 units). Weight and condition losses were similar (P more than .05) for lactating heifers fed PC, CSL and FACW. Yearling heifers fed the NC lost more (P less than .005) weight than those fed the PC (49.4 vs 10.6 lb). Yearling heifers fed CSL and FACW gained more (P less than .005) weight than those fed the PC (17.6 and 9.3 vs - 10.6 lb). Feeding CSL resulted in signficantly lower rumen pH, lower ruminal acetate and higher ruminal butyrate, isovalerate and caproate levels than did feeding either control. Supplementing with FACW produced significantly lower rumen pH, higher rumen ammonia and soluble carbohydrate levels, lower ruminal acetate, and higher ruminal propionate and butyrate concentrations than did either control supplement. Corn steep liquor and FDCW appear to be effective protein sources for cows and heifers grazing winter native range.

  2. Dephytinisation of soyabean protein isolate with low native phytic acid content has limited impact on mineral and trace element absorption in healthy infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsson, Lena; Ziegler, Ekhard E; Kastenmayer, Peter; van Dael, Peter; Barclay, Denis

    2004-02-01

    Infant formulas based on soyabean protein isolate are often used as an alternative to cows'-based formulas. However, the presence of phytic acid in soya formulas has raised concern about the absorption of trace elements and minerals from these products. The aim of the present study was to evaluate mineral and trace element absorption from regular and dephytinised soya formula in healthy infants. Soyabean protein isolate with a relatively low native content of phytic acid was used for production of a regular soya formula (300 mg phytic acid/kg liquid formula) and an experimental formula was based on dephytinised soya protein isolate (absorptions were measured by a stable isotope technique based on 72 h faecal excretion of non-absorbed stable isotopes (Zn, Fe, Cu and Ca) and by the chemical balance technique (Mn, Zn, Cu and Ca) in nine infants (69-191 d old). Fe absorption was also measured by erythrocyte incorporation 14 d after intake. The results from the present study demonstrated that Zn absorption, measured by a stable isotope technique, was significantly greater after dephytinisation (mean value 16.7 v. 22.6 %; P=0.03). No other statistically significant differences between the two formulas were observed. The nutritional benefit of dephytinisation was marginal in the present study. Based on these results, the use of soyabean protein isolate with low native content of phytic acid should be promoted for production of soya formulas and adequate addition of ascorbic acid to enhance Fe absorption should be ensured in the products.

  3. Analysis by two-dimensional Blue Native/SDS-PAGE of membrane protein alterations in rat soleus muscle after hindlimb unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basco, Davide; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Desaphy, Jean-François; Camerino, Diana Conte; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria

    2010-12-01

    Muscle atrophy occurring in several pathophysiological conditions determines decreases in muscle protein synthesis, increases in the rate of proteolysis and changes in muscle fiber composition. To determine the effect of muscle atrophy induced by hindlimb unloading (HU) on membrane proteins from rat soleus, a proteomic approach based on two-dimensional Blue Native/SDS-PAGE was performed. Proteomic analysis of normal and HU soleus muscle demonstrates statistically significant changes in the relative level of 36 proteins. Among the proteins identified by mass spectrometry, most are involved in pathways associated with muscle fuel utilization, indicating a shift in metabolism from oxidative to glycolytic. Moreover, immunoblotting analysis revealed an increase in aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel and an alteration of proteins belonging to the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC). AQP4 and DGC are regulated in soleus muscle subjected to simulated microgravity in response to compensatory mechanisms induced by muscle atrophy, and they parallel the slow-to-fast twitch conversion that occurs in soleus fibers during HU. In conclusion, the alterations of soleus muscle membrane proteome may play a pivotal role in the mechanisms involved in disuse-induced muscle atrophy.

  4. Structure–function–folding relationships and native energy landscape of dynein light chain protein: nuclear magnetic resonance insights

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P M Krishna Mohan; Ramakrishna V Hosur

    2009-09-01

    The detailed characterization of the structure, dynamics and folding process of a protein is crucial for understanding the biological functions it performs. Modern biophysical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have provided a way to obtain accurate structural and thermodynamic information on various species populated on the energy landscape of a given protein. In this context, we review here the structure–function–folding relationship of an important protein, namely, dynein light chain protein (DLC8). DLC8, the smallest subunit of the dynein motor complex, acts as a cargo adaptor. The protein exists as a dimer under physiological conditions and dissociates into a pure monomer below pH 4. Cargo binding occurs at the dimer interface. Dimer stability and relay of perturbations through the dimer interface are anticipated to be playing crucial roles in the variety of functions the protein performs. NMR investigations have provided great insights into these aspects of DLC8 in recent years.

  5. Pro-Inflammatory S100A8 and S100A9 Proteins: Self-Assembly into Multifunctional Native and Amyloid Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmilla A. Morozova-Roche

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available S100A8 and S100A9 are EF-hand Ca2+ binding proteins belonging to the S100 family. They are abundant in cytosol of phagocytes and play critical roles in numerous cellular processes such as motility and danger signaling by interacting and modulating the activity of target proteins. S100A8 and S100A9 expression levels increased in many types of cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and they are implicated in the numerous disease pathologies. The Ca2+ and Zn2+-binding properties of S100A8/A9 have a pivotal influence on their conformation and oligomerization state, including self-assembly into homo- and heterodimers, tetramers and larger oligomers. Here we review how the unique chemical and conformational properties of individual proteins and their structural plasticity at the quaternary level account for S100A8/A9 functional diversity. Additional functional diversification occurs via non-covalent assembly into oligomeric and fibrillar amyloid complexes discovered in the aging prostate and reproduced in vitro. This process is also regulated by Ca2+and Zn2+-binding and effectively competes with the formation of the native complexes. High intrinsic amyloid-forming capacity of S100A8/A9 proteins may lead to their amyloid depositions in numerous ailments characterized by their elevated expression patterns and have additional pathological significance requiring further thorough investigation.

  6. The status and importance of crude protein and macro minerals in native pastures growing on Vertisols of the central highlands of Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizachew, Lemma; Smit, G N

    2012-01-01

    The effects of pasture management, season and soil nutrient status on crude protein (CP) and macro mineral concentration of native pasture was studied in the Vertisol areas of the central Ethiopian highland. Soil and herbage samples from 18 continuously grazed (CG) and 12 seasonally grazed (SG) pasture sites were analyzed for N, P, Ca, Mg, K and Na. Soil and dry season CG pasture samples were collected in January and February 2001 (dry season: November-February), while wet season CG and SG pasture samples were collected during September 2001 (wet season: April-October). The Potassium concentration (2.55%) of mixed herbage samples from SG pasture exceeded the K values (1.80%) from CG pasture (P macro minerals concentrations were noted among forage species. The mean CP and K concentrations of herbage from CG pasture were higher (P macro minerals and the corresponding herbage macro mineral concentrations, significant (P macro mineral composition. The levels of CP in CG pasture and that of P and Na in both CG and SG pastures may fall below the requirements of grazing livestock. Resting at critical stages of the growth cycle of the forage species encouraged the recovery of desirable species. For this reason resting of pasture can contribute significantly to the quality of the native pastures of the Vertisols of the central Ethiopian highlands and should be encouraged.

  7. Cy5 maleimide labelling for sensitive detection of free thiols in native protein extracts: identification of seed proteins targeted by barley thioredoxin h isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, K.; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2004-01-01

    search. HvTrxh1 and HvTrxh2 were shown to have similar target specificity. Barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor, previously demonstrated to be reduced by both HvTrxh1 and HvTrxh2, was among the identified target proteins, confirming the suitability of the method. Several alpha-amylase/trypsin...... inhibitors, some of which are already known as target proteins of thioredoxin h, and cyclophilin known as a target protein of m-type thioredoxin were also identified. Lipid transfer protein, embryo-specific protein, three chitinase isoenzymes, a single-domain glyoxalase-like protein and superoxide dismutase...

  8. A simple strategy for the purification of native recombinant full-length human RPL10 protein from inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Larissa M; Silva, Luana R; Alves, Joseane F; Marin, Nélida; Silva, Flavio Sousa; Morganti, Ligia; Silva, Ismael D C G; Affonso, Regina

    2014-09-01

    The L10 ribosomal protein (RPL10) plays a role in the binding of the 60 S and 40 S ribosomal subunits and in mRNA translation. The evidence indicates that RPL10 also has multiple extra-ribosomal functions, including tumor suppression. Recently, the presence of RPL10 in prostate and ovarian cancers was evaluated, and it was demonstrated to be associated with autistic disorders and premature ovarian failure. In the present work, we successfully cloned and expressed full-length human RPL10 (hRPL10) protein and isolated inclusion bodies containing this protein that had formed under mild growth conditions. The culture produced 376mg of hRPL10 protein per liter of induced bacterial culture, of which 102.4mg was present in the soluble fraction, and 25.6mg was recovered at approximately 94% purity. These results were obtained using a two-step process of non-denaturing protein extraction from pelleted inclusion bodies. We studied the characteristics of this protein using circular dichroism spectroscopy and by monitoring the changes induced by the presence or absence of zinc ions using fluorescence spectrometry. The results demonstrated that the protein obtained using these non-conventional methods retained its secondary and tertiary structure. The conformational changes induced by the incorporation of zinc suggested that this protein could interact with Jun or the SH3 domain of c-yes. The results suggested that the strategy used to obtain hRPL10 is simple and could be applied to obtaining other proteins that are susceptible to degradation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. α-Helix peptides designed from EBV-gH protein display higher antigenicity and induction of monocyte apoptosis than the native peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiza, Mauricio; Melo-Cardenas, Johanna; Guevara, Tatiana; Echeverria, Ignacia; Rodriguez, Isabel C; Vanegas, Magnolia; Amzel, Mario; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2010-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that stabilizing α-helix of Epstein-Barr virus gH-derived peptide 11438 used for binding human cells will increase its biological activity. Non-stable α-helix of peptide 11438 was unfolded in an entropy-driven process, despite the opposing effect of the enthalpy factor. Adding and/or changing amino acids in peptide 11438 allowed the designing of peptides 33207, 33208 and 33210; peptides 33208 and 33210 displayed higher helical content due to a decreased unfolding entropy change as was determined by AGADIR, molecular dynamics and circular dichroism analysis. Peptides 33207, 33208 and 33210 inhibited EBV invasion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and displayed epitopes more similar to native protein than peptide 11438; these peptides could be useful for detecting antibodies induced by native gH protein since they displayed high reactivity with anti-EBV antibodies. Anti-peptide 33207 antibodies showed higher reactivity with EBV than anti-peptide 11438 antibodies being useful for inducing antibodies against EBV. Anti-peptide 33210 antibodies inhibit EBV invasion of epithelial cells better than anti-peptide 11438 antibodies. Peptide 33210 bound to normal T lymphocytes and Raji cells stronger than peptide 11438 and also induced apoptosis of monocytes and Raji cells but not of normal T cells in a similar way to EBV-gH. Peptide 33210 inhibited the monocytes' development toward dendritic cells better than EBV and peptide 11438. In conclusion, stabilizing the α-helix in peptides 33208 and 33210 designed from peptide 11438 increased the antigenicity and the ability of the antibodies induced by peptides of inhibiting EBV invasion of host cells.

  10. Preliminary identification and coat protein gene phylogenetic relationships of begomoviruses associated with native flora and cultivated plants from the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Zepeda, Cecilia; Idris, Ali M; Carnevali, Germán; Brown, Judith K; Moreno-Valenzuela, Oscar A

    2007-12-01

    A number of native and cultivated eudicots in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico (YPM) exhibit symptoms associated with virus infection. Symptomatic leaves were collected and assessed for begomoviral detection using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and universal primers that amplify a fragment of the coat protein gene (core Cp). Begomovirus were detected in nine native and seven cultivated species, representing seven eudicot families. DNA extracts from the 16 hosts were used for PCR amplification and sequencing of a fragment containing the coat protein (Cp) gene. The complete Cp sequence was used to establish provisional species identification. Results indicated that 13 distinct begomovirus species were represented. Among these, five potentially new begomovirus species were identified, for which we propose the names Anoda golden mosaic virus (AnGMV), Boerhavia yellow spot virus (BoYSV), Papaya golden mosaic virus (PaGMV), Desmodium leaf distortion virus (DeLDV), and Hibiscus variegation virus (HiVV). Five previously described begomoviral species were provisionally identified for the first time in the YPM; these include Euphorbia mosaic virus (EuMV), Melon chlorotic leaf curl virus (MCLCuV), Okra yellow mosaic Mexico virus (OkYMMV), Sida golden mosaic virus (SiGMV), and Tobacco apical stunt virus (TbASV). Additionally, viruses previously reported from this region, Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV), Pepper golden mosaic virus (PepGMV), and Tomato mottle virus (ToMoV) were provisionally identified in cultivated hosts. Phylogenetic analysis provisionally placed all isolates from the YPM in a Western Hemisphere begomovirus clade.

  11. Structure–Biological Function Relationship Extended to Mitotic Arrest-Deficient 2-Like Protein Mad2 Native and Mutants-New Opportunity for Genetic Disorder Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avram, Speranta; Milac, Adina; Mernea, Maria; Mihailescu, Dan; Putz, Mihai V.; Buiu, Catalin

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of mitotic arrest-deficient proteins Mad1 and Mad2, two components of spindle assembly checkpoint, is a risk factor for chromosomal instability (CIN) and a trigger of many genetic disorders. Mad2 transition from inactive open (O-Mad2) to active closed (C-Mad2) conformations or Mad2 binding to specific partners (cell-division cycle protein 20 (Cdc20) or Mad1) were targets of previous pharmacogenomics studies. Here, Mad2 binding to Cdc20 and the interconversion rate from open to closed Mad2 were predicted and the molecular features with a critical contribution to these processes were determined by extending the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method to large-size proteins such as Mad2. QSAR models were built based on available published data on 23 Mad2 mutants inducing CIN-related functional changes. The most relevant descriptors identified for predicting Mad2 native and mutants action mechanism and their involvement in genetic disorders are the steric (van der Waals area and solvent accessible area and their subdivided) and energetic van der Waals energy descriptors. The reliability of our QSAR models is indicated by significant values of statistical coefficients: Cross-validated correlation q2 (0.53–0.65) and fitted correlation r2 (0.82–0.90). Moreover, based on established QSAR equations, we rationally design and analyze nine de novo Mad2 mutants as possible promoters of CIN. PMID:25411801

  12. Structure–Biological Function Relationship Extended to Mitotic Arrest-Deficient 2-Like Protein Mad2 Native and Mutants-New Opportunity for Genetic Disorder Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speranta Avram

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of mitotic arrest-deficient proteins Mad1 and Mad2, two components of spindle assembly checkpoint, is a risk factor for chromosomal instability (CIN and a trigger of many genetic disorders. Mad2 transition from inactive open (O-Mad2 to active closed (C-Mad2 conformations or Mad2 binding to specific partners (cell-division cycle protein 20 (Cdc20 or Mad1 were targets of previous pharmacogenomics studies. Here, Mad2 binding to Cdc20 and the interconversion rate from open to closed Mad2 were predicted and the molecular features with a critical contribution to these processes were determined by extending the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR method to large-size proteins such as Mad2. QSAR models were built based on available published data on 23 Mad2 mutants inducing CIN-related functional changes. The most relevant descriptors identified for predicting Mad2 native and mutants action mechanism and their involvement in genetic disorders are the steric (van der Waals area and solvent accessible area and their subdivided and energetic van der Waals energy descriptors. The reliability of our QSAR models is indicated by significant values of statistical coefficients: Cross-validated correlation q2 (0.53–0.65 and fitted correlation r2 (0.82–0.90. Moreover, based on established QSAR equations, we rationally design and analyze nine de novo Mad2 mutants as possible promoters of CIN.

  13. [Interaction of human apolipoprotein AI and HIV-1 envelope proteins with the native and recombinant CD4 receptors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panin, L E; Kostina, N E

    2003-01-01

    The method of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to show an interaction of soluble recombinant CD4-receptor (rsCD4) with human apolipoprotein A-1. Competitive interactions between envelope proteins VIH-1 (gp120 and gp41), on the one hand, and human apolipoprotein A-1 with CD4 receptor, present in the cellular membranes of line MT4 human lymphocytes, were demonstrated by the method of flow cytofluorimetry. It was suggested that the competitive interactions between the above proteins could manifest in respect to the apolipoprotein A-1 receptor, which affects the involvement of the latter in the regulation of protein biosynthesis and which leads to a decrease in the body weight of HIV-infected patients.

  14. ProRegIn: A regularity index for the selection of native-like tertiary structures of proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lipi Thukral; Sandhya R Shenoy; Kumkum Bhushan; B Jayaram

    2007-01-01

    Automated protein tertiary structure prediction from sequence information alone remains an elusive goal to computational prescriptions. Dividing the problem into three stages viz. secondary structure prediction, generation of plausible main chain loop dihedrals and side chain dihedral optimization, considerable progress has been achieved in our laboratory (http://www.scfbio-iitd.res.in/bhageerath/index.jsp) and elsewhere for proteins with less than 100 amino acids. As a part of our on-going efforts in this direction and to facilitate tertiary structure selection/rejection in containing the combinatorial explosion of trial structures for a specified amino acid sequence, we describe here a web-enabled tool ProRegIn (Protein Regularity Index) developed based on the regularity in the , Ψ dihedral angles of the amino acids that constitute loop regions. We have analysed the dihedrals in loop regions in a non-redundant dataset of 7351 proteins drawn from the Protein Data Bank and categorized them as helix-like or sheet-like (regular) or irregular. We noticed that the regularity thus defined exceeds 86% for barring glycine and 70% for Ψ for all the amino acid side chains including glycine, compelling us to reexamine the conventional view that loops are irregular regions structurally. The regularity index is presented here as a simple tool that finds its application in protein structure analysis as a discriminatory scoring function for rapid screening before the more compute intensive atomic level energy calculations could be undertaken. The tool is made freely accessible over the internet at www.scfbio-iitd.res.in/software/proregin.jsp.

  15. Cy5 maleimide labelling for sensitive detection of free thiols in native protein extracts: identification of seed proteins targeted by barley thioredoxin h isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kenji; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2004-03-01

    Barley thioredoxin h isoforms HvTrxh1 and HvTrxh2 differ in temporal and spatial distribution and in kinetic properties. Target proteins of HvTrxh1 and HvTrxh2 were identified in mature seeds and in seeds after 72 h of germination. Improvement of the established method for identification of thioredoxin-targeted proteins based on two-dimensional electrophoresis and fluorescence labelling of thiol groups was achieved by application of a highly sensitive Cy5 maleimide dye and large-format two-dimensional gels, resulting in a 10-fold increase in the observed number of labelled protein spots. The technique also provided information about accessible thiol groups in the proteins identified in the barley seed proteome. In total, 16 different putative target proteins were identified from 26 spots using tryptic in-gel digestion, matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS and database search. HvTrxh1 and HvTrxh2 were shown to have similar target specificity. Barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor, previously demonstrated to be reduced by both HvTrxh1 and HvTrxh2, was among the identified target proteins, confirming the suitability of the method. Several alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitors, some of which are already known as target proteins of thioredoxin h, and cyclophilin known as a target protein of m-type thioredoxin were also identified. Lipid transfer protein, embryospecific protein, three chitinase isoenzymes, a single-domain glyoxalase-like protein and superoxide dismutase were novel identifications of putative target proteins, suggesting new physiological roles of thioredoxin h in barley seeds.

  16. Analysis of native human plasma proteins and haemoglobin for the presence of bityrosine by high-performance liquid chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daneshvar, B; Frandsen, H; Dragsted, L O

    1997-01-01

    fluorescent substance, bityrosine. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of acid hydrolyzed serum albumin after oxidation with peroxidase/H2O2 or with Cu++/H2O2 showed that bityrosine had been formed whereas oxidation of this protein with Fe(III)/ascorbate did not result in the formation...

  17. Skeletal muscle myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rates are affected differently by altitude-induced hypoxia in native lowlanders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Haslund, Mads Lyhne; Robach, Paul

    2010-01-01

    As a consequence to hypobaric hypoxic exposure skeletal muscle atrophy is often reported. The underlying mechanism has been suggested to involve a decrease in protein synthesis in order to conserve O(2). With the aim to challenge this hypothesis, we applied a primed, constant infusion of 1-(13)C-...

  18. Slide preparation for single-cell-resolution imaging of fluorescent proteins in their three-dimensional near-native environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippert, H.J.G.; Schepers, A.G.; Delconte, G.; Siersema, P.D.; Clevers, H.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, many mouse models have been developed to mark and trace the fate of adult cell populations using fluorescent proteins. High-resolution visualization of such fluorescent markers in their physiological setting is thus an important aspect of adult stem cell research. Here we describe a

  19. Functionality of whey proteins covalently modified by allyl isothiocyanate. Part 1 physicochemical and antibacterial properties of native and modified whey proteins at pH 2 to 7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keppler, Julia Katharina; Martin, Dierk; Garamus, Vasil M.; Berton-Carabin, Claire; Nipoti, Elia; Coenye, Tom; Schwarz, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Whey protein isolate (WPI) (∼75% β-lactoglobulin (β-LG)) is frequently used in foods as a natural emulsifying agent. However, at an acidic pH value, its emulsification capacity is greatly reduced. The covalent attachment of natural electrophilic hydrophobic molecules to WPI proteins is a

  20. Functionality of whey proteins covalently modified by allyl isothiocyanate. Part 1 physicochemical and antibacterial properties of native and modified whey proteins at pH 2 to 7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keppler, Julia Katharina; Martin, Dierk; Garamus, Vasil M.; Berton-Carabin, Claire; Nipoti, Elia; Coenye, Tom; Schwarz, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Whey protein isolate (WPI) (∼75% β-lactoglobulin (β-LG)) is frequently used in foods as a natural emulsifying agent. However, at an acidic pH value, its emulsification capacity is greatly reduced. The covalent attachment of natural electrophilic hydrophobic molecules to WPI proteins is a promisin

  1. Using Nigella sativa meal as a substitute source for vegetable protein in rations of native growing calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Nasser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out on 15 growing local bull calves of about 150-200 kg, live body weight and 10-12 months old to investigate the effect of substituting soyabean meal as concentrate feed mixture protein by Nigella sativa meal (NSM at 0 , 60 and 100%. Animals were divided into 3 groups of 5 calves each, according to their live body weight for performing feeding trials. All groups of animals were fed iso-nitrogen (15% CP and iso-caloric (2.7 Mcal/kg. ME diets. Experimental rations were offered at 2.5% of live body weight with 1% of wheat straw. At the end of the feeding trial, which lasted for 105 days, blood samples were collected from all calves to estimate the total protein, albumin, globulin, triglyceride and cholesterol. Digestibility trial was carried out on three animals of each group to investigate the nutritional value of rations. Economical study was also carried out on experimental animals. Results indicated that there was an improvement in feed intake by 13 and 14% for groups fed a ration containing NSM compared with the group fed the control one. No significant differences were between groups of calves in total body weight gain and blood parameters. The feed conversion ratio improved by 12% for the group of calves fed control ration as compared with other groups. The same cost of producing 1 kg live body weight gain was found. Substituting soybean meal protein at 60 and 100% by NSM protein significantly improved crude fiber, ether extract, EE, and the values of digestion coefficient. It was concluded that NSM could be substituted instead of soyabean meal for growing local calves with out adverse effects on their performance.

  2. Skeletal muscle myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rates are affected differently by altitude-induced hypoxia in native lowlanders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Haslund, Mads Lyhne; Robach, Paul;

    2010-01-01

    and expired breath samples were collected hourly during the 4 hour trial and vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained at 1 and 4 hours after tracer priming in the overnight fasted state. Myofibrillar protein synthesis rate was doubled; 0.041±0.018 at sea-level to 0.080±0.018%·hr(-1) (p0.05). Trends...

  3. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    , a situation unique in the Solar System. In such a world, iron metal is unstable and, as we all know, oxidizes to the ferric iron compounds we call 'rust'. If we require iron metal it must be produced at high temperatures by reacting iron ore, usually a mixture of ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) oxides (Fe2O3......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost...... unique examples of iron metal, otherwise called 'native iron' or 'telluric iron', occur naturally....

  4. Stabilization of native amyloid β-protein oligomers by Copper and Hydrogen peroxide Induced Cross-linking of Unmodified Proteins (CHICUP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas L; Serpell, Louise C; Urbanc, Brigita

    2016-03-01

    Oligomeric assemblies are postulated to be proximate neurotoxic species in human diseases associated with aberrant protein aggregation. Their heterogeneous and transient nature makes their structural characterization difficult. Size distributions of oligomers of several amyloidogenic proteins, including amyloid β-protein (Aβ) relevant to Alzheimer's disease (AD), have been previously characterized in vitro by photo-induced cross-linking of unmodified proteins (PICUP) followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Due to non-physiological conditions associated with the PICUP chemistry, Aβ oligomers cross-linked by PICUP may not be representative of in vivo conditions. Here, we examine an alternative Copper and Hydrogen peroxide Induced Cross-linking of Unmodified Proteins (CHICUP), which utilizes naturally occurring divalent copper ions and hydrogen peroxide and does not require photo activation. Our results demonstrate that CHICUP and PICUP applied to the two predominant Aβ alloforms, Aβ40 and Aβ42, result in similar oligomer size distributions. Thioflavin T fluorescence data and atomic force microscopy images demonstrate that both CHICUP and PICUP stabilize Aβ oligomers and attenuate fibril formation. Relative to noncross-linked peptides, CHICUP-treated Aβ40 and Aβ42 cause prolonged disruption to biomimetic lipid vesicles. CHICUP-stabilized Aβ oligomers link the amyloid cascade, metal, and oxidative stress hypotheses of AD into a more comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of AD pathology. Because copper and hydrogen peroxide are elevated in the AD brain, CHICUP-stabilized Aβ oligomers are biologically relevant and should be further explored as a new therapeutic target.

  5. Residue-specific description of non-native transient structures in the ensemble of acid-denatured structures of the all-beta protein c-src SH3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösner, Heike I; Poulsen, Flemming Martin

    2010-01-01

    Secondary chemical shift analysis has been used to characterize the unfolded state of acid-denatured c-src SH3. Even though native c-src SH3 adopts an all-beta fold, we found evidence of transient helicity in regions corresponding to native loops. In particular, residues 40-46, connecting the n......-src loop to the third beta-strand, exhibited an apparent helicity of nearly 45%. Furthermore, the RT loop and the diverging turn appeared to adopt non-native-like helical conformations. Interestingly, none of the residues found in transient helical conformations exhibited significant varphi-values [Riddle......, D. S., et al. (1999) Nat. Struct. Biol. 6, 1016-1024]. This indicated that the transient helicity has no influence or only a weak influence on the actual protein folding reaction. The residual structural propensities were compared to those of other SH3 domains, revealing heterogeneity...

  6. Native immunogold labeling of cell surface proteins and viral glycoproteins for cryo-electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hong; Strauss, Joshua D; Ke, Zunlong; Alonas, Eric; Dillard, Rebecca S; Hampton, Cheri M; Lamb, Kristen M; Hammonds, Jason E; Santangelo, Philip J; Spearman, Paul W; Wright, Elizabeth R

    2015-10-01

    Numerous methods have been developed for immunogold labeling of thick, cryo-preserved biological specimens. However, most of the methods are permutations of chemical fixation and sample sectioning, which select and isolate the immunolabeled region of interest. We describe a method for combining immunogold labeling with cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) of the surface proteins of intact mammalian cells or the surface glycoproteins of assembling and budding viruses in the context of virus-infected mammalian cells cultured on EM grids. In this method, the cells were maintained in culture media at physiologically relevant temperatures while sequentially incubated with the primary and secondary antibodies. Subsequently, the immunogold-labeled specimens were vitrified and observed under cryo-conditions in the transmission electron microscope. Cryo-EM and cryo-ET examination of the immunogold-labeled cells revealed the association of immunogold particles with the target antigens. Additionally, the cellular structure was unaltered by pre-immunolabeling chemical fixation and retained well-preserved plasma membranes, cytoskeletal elements, and macromolecular complexes. We think this technique will be of interest to cell biologists for cryo-EM and conventional studies of native cells and pathogen-infected cells.

  7. SLA/LP/tRNP((Ser)Sec) antigen in autoimmune hepatitis: identification of the native protein in human hepatic cell extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmann, Martin; Luithle, Daniel; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Schnölzer, Martina; Fiedler, Sabine; Heid, Hans; Schulze-Bergkamen, Andrea; Strassburg, Christian P; Gehrke, Sven G; Manns, Michael P

    2010-02-01

    A diagnostic subgroup of AIH type 1 is characterized by specific serum antibodies against soluble liver protein. The respective autoantigen was named SLA/LP/tRNP((Ser)Sec), after three homologous recombinant polypeptides were isolated from expression gene libraries. We analyzed human cultured liver cells for the human homologue of recombinant SLA/LP/tRNP((Ser)Sec) by antigen purification. In addition, a monoclonal antibody was generated against recombinant SLA-p35, a truncated recombinant SLA-reactive polypeptide. With a positive patient serum, immune affinity chromatography was performed on the 52 kD-SLA main antigenic determinant pre-enriched by ion exchange chromatography. By mass spectrometry, the 52 kD-SLA/LP/tRNP ((Ser)Sec) autoantigen was unambiguously identified in the purification product. The identity of the recombinant SLA-p35 and its human homologue was further confirmed by a specific signal of the anti SLA-p35 monoclonal antibody with purified human SLA/LP/tRNP((Ser)Sec). The 48 kD-SLA species frequently comigrating in SLA-immunoblotting however was not identified by either approach. We conclude that the native counterpart of recombinant tRNP((Ser)(Sec)) indeed is detectable with a molecular weight of 52 kD in soluble liver extract of human cells as the major antigenic component of SLA/LP/tRNP((Ser)Sec). Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Haemophilus parasuis Subunit Vaccines Based on Native Proteins with Affinity to Porcine Transferrin Prevent the Expression of Proinflammatory Chemokines and Cytokines in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Frandoloso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of chemokines (CCL-2 and CXCL-8 and cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10 was evaluated by RT-qPCR in colostrum-deprived pigs vaccinated and challenged with Haemophilus parasuis serovar 5. Two vaccines containing native proteins with affinity to porcine transferrin (NPAPTim and NPAPTit were tested, along with two control groups: one inoculated with PBS instead of antigen (challenge group (CHG, and another one nonimmunized and noninfected (blank group. The use of NPAPTim and NPAPTit resulted in complete protection against H. parasuis (no clinical signs and/or lesions, and both vaccines were capable of avoiding the expression of the proinflammatory molecules to levels similar to physiological values in blank group. However, overexpression of all proinflammatory molecules was observed in CHG group, mainly in the target infection tissues (brain, lungs, and spleen. High expression of CCL-2, CXCL-8, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6 can be considered one of the characteristics of H. parasuis infection by serovar 5.

  9. Production of Transgenic Korean Native Cattle Expressing Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein Using a FIV-Based Lentiviral Vector Injected into MII Oocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Nan Xu; Joon-Ho Yoon; Dae-Hwan Ko; Teoan Kim; Nam-Hyung Kim; Sang-Jun Uhm; Bon-Chul Koo; Mo-Sun Kwon; Ji-Yeol Roh; Jung-Seok Yang; Hyun-Yong Choi; Young-Tae Heo; Xiang-Shun Cui

    2013-01-01

    The potential benefits of generating and using transgenic cattle range from improvements in agriculture to the production of large quantities of pharmaceutically relevant proteins.Previous studies have attempted to produce transgenic cattle and other livestock by pronuclear injection and somatic cell nuclear transfer,but these approaches have been largely ineffective; however,a third approach,lentivirus-mediated transgenesis,has successfully produced transgenic livestock.In this study,we generated transgenic (TG) Korean native cattle using perivitelline space injection of viral vectors,which expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) systemically.Two different types of lentiviral vectors derived from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)carrying EGFP were injected into the perivitelline space of MII oocytes.EGFP expression at 8-cell stage was significantly higher in the FIV group compared to the HIV group (47.5% ± 2.2% v.s.22.9% ± 2.9%).Eight-cell embryos that expressed EGFP were cultured into blastocysts and then transferred into 40 heifers.Ten heifers were successfully impregnated and delivered 10 healthy calves.All of these calves expressed EGFP as detected by in vivo imaging,PCR and Southern blotting.In addition,we established an EGFP-expressing cell line from TG calves,which was followed by nuclear transfer (NT).Recloned 8-cell embryos also expressed EGFP,and there were no differences in the rates of fusion,cleavage and development between cells derived from TG and non-TG calves,which were subsequently used for NT.These results illustrate that FIV-based lentiviruses are useful for the production of TG cattle.Moreover,our established EGFP cell line can be used for additional studies that involve induced pluripotent stem cells.

  10. Preparation, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis to 1.5 Å resolution of rat cysteine dioxygenase, a mononuclear iron enzyme responsible for cysteine thiol oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Chad R. [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Hao, Quan [MacCHESS at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Stipanuk, Martha H., E-mail: mhs6@cornell.edu [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been expressed, purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.5 Å resolution. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an ∼23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O{sub 2}, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  11. Preparation, Crystallization and X-ray Diffraction Analysis to 1.5 A Resolution of Rat Cysteine Dioxygenase, a Mononuclear Iron Enzyme Responsible for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons,C.; Hao, Q.; Stipanuk, M.

    2005-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an {approx}23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O2, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Angstroms resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Angstrom, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  12. Native Americans with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Native Americans with Diabetes Better diabetes care can decrease kidney failure Language: ... between 1996 and 2013. Problem Kidney failure from diabetes was highest among Native Americans. Native Americans are ...

  13. Combining blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry as an effective strategy for analyzing potential membrane protein complexes of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Weijun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis is an infectious bacterial disease in humans caused primarily by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and infects one-third of the world's total population. Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine has been widely used to prevent tuberculosis worldwide since 1921. Membrane proteins play important roles in various cellular processes, and the protein-protein interactions involved in these processes may provide further information about molecular organization and cellular pathways. However, membrane proteins are notoriously under-represented by traditional two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE and little is known about mycobacterial membrane and membrane-associated protein complexes. Here we investigated M. bovis BCG by an alternative proteomic strategy coupling blue native PAGE to liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS to characterize potential protein-protein interactions in membrane fractions. Results Using this approach, we analyzed native molecular composition of protein complexes in BCG membrane fractions. As a result, 40 proteins (including 12 integral membrane proteins, which were organized in 9 different gel bands, were unambiguous identified. The proteins identified have been experimentally confirmed using 2-D SDS PAGE. We identified MmpL8 and four neighboring proteins that were involved in lipid transport complexes, and all subunits of ATP synthase complex in their monomeric states. Two phenolpthiocerol synthases and three arabinosyltransferases belonging to individual operons were obtained in different gel bands. Furthermore, two giant multifunctional enzymes, Pks7 and Pks8, and four mycobacterial Hsp family members were determined. Additionally, seven ribosomal proteins involved in polyribosome complex and two subunits of the succinate dehydrogenase complex were also found. Notablely, some proteins with high hydrophobicity or multiple transmembrane

  14. Immunogenicity of a meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccine with attenuated endotoxin and over-expressed factor H binding protein in infant rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberling, Oliver; Seubert, Anja; Santos, George; Colaprico, Annalisa; Ugozzoli, Mildred; Donnelly, John; Granoff, Dan M

    2011-06-24

    We previously investigated immunogenicity of meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV) vaccines prepared from recombinant strains with attenuated endotoxin (ΔLpxL1) and over-expressed factor H binding protein (fHbp) in a mouse model. The vaccines elicited broad serum bactericidal antibody responses. While human toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) is mainly stimulated by wildtype meningococcal endotoxin, mouse TLR-4 is stimulated by both the wildtype and mutant endotoxin. An adjuvant effect in mice of the mutant endotoxin would be expected to be much less in humans, and may have contributed to the broad mouse bactericidal responses. Here we show that as previously reported for humans, rhesus primate peripheral blood mononuclear cells incubated with a NOMV vaccine from ΔLpxL1 recombinant strains had lower proinflammatory cytokine responses than with a control wildtype NOMV vaccine. The cytokine responses to the mutant vaccine were similar to those elicited by a detergent-treated, wildtype outer membrane vesicle vaccine that had been safely administered to humans. Monkeys (N=4) were immunized beginning at ages 2-3 months with three doses of a NOMV vaccine prepared from ΔLpxL1 recombinant strains with over-expressed fHbp in the variant 1 and 2 groups. The mutant NOMV vaccine elicited serum bactericidal titers≥1:4 against all 10 genetically diverse strains tested, including 9 with heterologous PorA to those in the vaccine. Negative-control animals had serum bactericidal titers<1:4. Thus, the mutant NOMV vaccine elicited broadly protective serum antibodies in a non-human infant primate model that is more relevant for predicting human antibody responses than mice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of replacing soybean protein by taro leaf (Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott) protein on growth performance of exotic (Landrace × Yorkshire) and native (Moo Lath) Lao pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaensombath, Lampheuy; Lindberg, Jan Erik

    2013-01-01

    The impact of replacing soybean crude protein (CP) with CP from ensiled taro leaves (ET) on growth performance, carcass traits, and organ weights in Landrace × Yorkshire (LY) and Moo Lath (ML) Lao pigs was studied. Twenty-four castrated male pigs, 12 of each breed, were allocated to the treatments according to a completely randomized 3 × 2 factorial (three levels of ET × two breeds) arrangement with four pigs per treatment. The pigs were kept in individual pens and were fed at 4 % dry matter of body weight for 105 days. The control diet (ET0) was formulated with soybean meal as the main CP source, and in the other two diets, soybean CP was replaced to 25 % (ET25) and 50 % (ET50), respectively, with CP from ensiled taro leaves. Calculated metabolizable energy intake decreased with increasing replacement of soybean CP in the diet, while dry matter intake (DMI), CP intake (CPI), average daily gain (ADG), and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were unaffected. Carcass weight, back fat thickness, and dressing percentage were unaffected by soybean CP replacement, while organ weights (except for spleen) increased (P < 0.001) when soybean CP was replaced by CP from ensiled taro leaves in the diet. LY pigs had higher (P < 0.001) DMI, CPI, and ADG and better (P < 0.001) FCR than ML pigs. LY pigs had higher carcass weight (P < 0.001), lower back fat thickness (P < 0.001), and higher organ weights (P < 0.05-0.001) than the ML pigs. In conclusion, taro leaf silage can replace up to 50 % of soybean CP in the diet of growing Lao LY and ML pigs without negative effects on performance and carcass traits.

  16. The effect of human factor H on immunogenicity of meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccines with over-expressed factor H binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beernink, Peter T; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Pajon, Rolando; Braga, Emily M; Ram, Sanjay; Granoff, Dan M

    2012-01-01

    The binding of human complement inhibitors to vaccine antigens in vivo could diminish their immunogenicity. A meningococcal ligand for the complement down-regulator, factor H (fH), is fH-binding protein (fHbp), which is specific for human fH. Vaccines containing recombinant fHbp or native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV) from mutant strains with over-expressed fHbp are in clinical development. In a previous study in transgenic mice, the presence of human fH impaired the immunogenicity of a recombinant fHbp vaccine. In the present study, we prepared two NOMV vaccines from mutant group B strains with over-expressed wild-type fHbp or an R41S mutant fHbp with no detectable fH binding. In wild-type mice in which mouse fH did not bind to fHbp in either vaccine, the NOMV vaccine with wild-type fHbp elicited 2-fold higher serum IgG anti-fHbp titers (P = 0.001) and 4-fold higher complement-mediated bactericidal titers against a PorA-heterologous strain than the NOMV with the mutant fHbp (P = 0.003). By adsorption, the bactericidal antibodies were shown to be directed at fHbp. In transgenic mice in which human fH bound to the wild-type fHbp but not to the R41S fHbp, the NOMV vaccine with the mutant fHbp elicited 5-fold higher serum IgG anti-fHbp titers (P = 0.002), and 19-fold higher bactericidal titers than the NOMV vaccine with wild-type fHbp (P = 0.001). Thus, in mice that differed only by the presence of human fH, the respective results with the two vaccines were opposite. The enhanced bactericidal activity elicited by the mutant fHbp vaccine in the presence of human fH far outweighed the loss of immunogenicity of the mutant protein in wild-type animals. Engineering fHbp not to bind to its cognate complement inhibitor, therefore, may increase vaccine immunogenicity in humans.

  17. The effect of human factor H on immunogenicity of meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccines with over-expressed factor H binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T Beernink

    Full Text Available The binding of human complement inhibitors to vaccine antigens in vivo could diminish their immunogenicity. A meningococcal ligand for the complement down-regulator, factor H (fH, is fH-binding protein (fHbp, which is specific for human fH. Vaccines containing recombinant fHbp or native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV from mutant strains with over-expressed fHbp are in clinical development. In a previous study in transgenic mice, the presence of human fH impaired the immunogenicity of a recombinant fHbp vaccine. In the present study, we prepared two NOMV vaccines from mutant group B strains with over-expressed wild-type fHbp or an R41S mutant fHbp with no detectable fH binding. In wild-type mice in which mouse fH did not bind to fHbp in either vaccine, the NOMV vaccine with wild-type fHbp elicited 2-fold higher serum IgG anti-fHbp titers (P = 0.001 and 4-fold higher complement-mediated bactericidal titers against a PorA-heterologous strain than the NOMV with the mutant fHbp (P = 0.003. By adsorption, the bactericidal antibodies were shown to be directed at fHbp. In transgenic mice in which human fH bound to the wild-type fHbp but not to the R41S fHbp, the NOMV vaccine with the mutant fHbp elicited 5-fold higher serum IgG anti-fHbp titers (P = 0.002, and 19-fold higher bactericidal titers than the NOMV vaccine with wild-type fHbp (P = 0.001. Thus, in mice that differed only by the presence of human fH, the respective results with the two vaccines were opposite. The enhanced bactericidal activity elicited by the mutant fHbp vaccine in the presence of human fH far outweighed the loss of immunogenicity of the mutant protein in wild-type animals. Engineering fHbp not to bind to its cognate complement inhibitor, therefore, may increase vaccine immunogenicity in humans.

  18. Protein extraction from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: Comparison of methods for analysis by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, native PAGE and surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumber, Sanjeev; Taylor, Deborah L; Whittington, Richard J

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease, a chronic bowel disease in ruminants worldwide and is currently incurable. This study was conducted to compare methods for examining the proteome of M. paratuberculosis. SDS-PAGE, native PAGE and SELDI-TOF-MS were compared and the efficacy of various lysis buffers was assessed. Chaotropic agents (Urea CHAPS and potassium thiocyanate) and non-ionic detergent (Tween20 and Triton X-100) extracts were compared on three different ProteinChip surfaces along with two energy absorbing molecules (EAM): EAM-1 proprietary formulation and sinapinic acid (Ciphergen). Urea CHAPS was efficient for extraction of proteins and their detection on all the ProteinChip surfaces. However, potassium thiocyanate was the most effective buffer, leading to detection of the greatest number of protein peaks on the immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) surface. Sinapinic acid was more efficient than the EAM-1 proprietary formulation and resulted in additional peaks with higher intensity for both the low and the medium molecular weight range proteins. Intra-chip and inter-chip coefficient of variation for mass/charge varied from 0.01% to 0.07% and 0.00% to 0.08%, respectively. SELDI-TOF-MS was an efficient tool for the protein profiling of M. paratuberculosis and will be useful for investigation of novel proteins, although SDS-PAGE/2D gel electrophoresis is recommended for study of high molecular weight species. All buffers were suitable for protein extraction for SDS-PAGE, while Tween20 was best for native PAGE.

  19. Topology of nucleotide-sugar:dolichyl phosphate glycosyltransferases involved in the dolichol pathway for protein glycosylation in native rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossuyt, X; Blanckaert, N

    1993-01-01

    Activities of nucleotide-sugar:dolichyl phosphate glycosyltransferases (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine:dolichyl phosphate N-acetylglucosaminyl 1-phosphotransferase, UDP-glucose:dolichyl phosphate glucosyltransferase and GDP-mannose:dolichyl phosphate mannosyltransferase) are not fully expressed in native microsomes and can be enhanced by pretreatment of the microsomes with detergent. To examine whether the latency of dolichyl phosphate glycosyltransferases in native microsomes reflects a lumenal orientation of the catalytic centre, we examined the effect of proteinase treatment of native microsomes on enzymic activity and investigated the relationship between enzymic activity and alteration of the permeability of the microsomal membrane barrier. The enzymic activities catalysing transfer of N-acetylglucosamine and glucose to lipid acceptors were proteinase-sensitive in native sealed microsomes. When various detergents were used to disrupt the membrane barrier, we found no relationship between activity of dolichyl phosphate glycosyltransferases and the latency of mannose-6-phosphatase, which is a marker of the permeability properties of the microsomal membrane. Permeabilization of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane by the pore-forming Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin did not affect glycosyltransferase activities. These results do not support the hypothesis that latency of the transferase activities is dependent on the permeability properties of the endoplasmic-reticulum membrane. Collectively our findings can best be explained by postulating that the active centres of the transferases are cytoplasmically oriented, while activation by detergent may be conformation-dependent. PMID:8280060

  20. Native Health Research Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... APP WITH JAVASCRIPT TURNED OFF. THE NATIVE HEALTH DATABASE REQUIRES JAVASCRIPT IN ORDER TO FUNCTION. PLEASE ENTER ... To learn more about searching the Native Health Database, click here. Keywords Title Author Source of Publication ...

  1. NATIVE VS NON-NATIVE ENGLISH TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masrizal Masrizal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the majority of English language teachers worldwide are non-native English speakers (NNS, no research was conducted on these teachers until recently. A pioneer research by Peter Medgyes in 1994 took quite a long time until the other researchers found their interests in this issue. There is a widespread stereotype that a native speaker (NS is by nature the best person to teach his/her foreign language. In regard to this assumption, we then see a very limited room and opportunities for a non native teacher to teach language that is not his/hers. The aim of this article is to analyze the differences among these teachers in order to prove that non-native teachers have equal advantages that should be taken into account. The writer expects that the result of this short article could be a valuable input to the area of teaching English as a foreign language in Indonesia.

  2. MBS Native Plant Communities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data layer contains results of the Minnesota County Biological Survey (MCBS). It includes polygons representing the highest quality native plant communities...

  3. Listen to the Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensky, Marc

    2006-01-01

    "Digital natives" refer to today's students because they are native speakers of technology, fluent in the digital language of computers, video games, and the Internet. Those who were not born into the digital world are referred to as digital immigrants. Educators, considered digital immigrants, have slid into the 21st century--and into the digital…

  4. Native sulfur/chlorine SAD phasing for serial femtosecond crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, Takanori [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Song, Changyong [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Suzuki, Mamoru [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nango, Eriko; Kobayashi, Jun [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Masuda, Tetsuya [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Inoue, Shigeyuki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Mizohata, Eiichi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nakatsu, Toru [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kyoto University, 46-29 Yoshida Shimoadachi-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Rie [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Shimamura, Tatsuro [Kyoto University, Yoshidakonoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Nureki, Osamu [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Iwata, So [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kyoto University, Yoshidakonoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Sugahara, Michihiro, E-mail: msuga@spring8.or.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2015-11-27

    Sulfur SAD phasing facilitates the structure determination of diverse native proteins using femtosecond X-rays from free-electron lasers via serial femtosecond crystallography. Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) allows structures to be determined with minimal radiation damage. However, phasing native crystals in SFX is not very common. Here, the structure determination of native lysozyme from single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) by utilizing the anomalous signal of sulfur and chlorine at a wavelength of 1.77 Å is successfully demonstrated. This sulfur SAD method can be applied to a wide range of proteins, which will improve the determination of native crystal structures.

  5. Recombinant phytochrome of the moss Ceratodon purpureus: heterologous expression and kinetic analysis of Pr-->Pfr conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidler, M; Lamparter, T; Hughes, J; Hartmann, E; Remberg, A; Braslavsky, S; Schaffner, K; Gärtner, W

    1998-12-01

    The phytochrome-encoding gene Cerpu;PHY;2 (CP2) of the moss Ceratodon purpureus was heterologously expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a polyhistidine-tagged apoprotein and assembled with phytochromobilin (P phi B) and phycocyanobilin (PCB). Nickel-affinity chromatography yielded a protein fraction containing approximately 80% phytochrome. The holoproteins showed photoreversibility with both chromophores. Difference spectra gave maxima at 644/716 nm (red-absorbing phytochrome [Pr]/far-red-absorbing phytochrome [Pfr]) for the PCB adduct, and 659/724 nm for the P phi B-adduct, the latter in close agreement with values for phytochrome extracted from Ceratodon itself, implying that P phi B is the native chromophore in this moss species. Immunoblots stained with the antiphytochrome antibody APC1 showed that the recombinant phytochrome had the same molecular size as phytochrome from Ceratodon extracts. Further, the mobility of recombinant CP2 holophytochrome on native size-exclusion chromatography was similar to that of native oat phytochrome, implying that CP2 forms a dimer. Kinetics of absorbance changes during the Pr-->Pfr photoconversion of the PCB adduct, monitored between 620 and 740 nm in the microsecond range, revealed the rapid formation of a red-shifted intermediate (I700), decaying with a time constant of approximately 110 microseconds. This is similar to the behavior of phytochromes from higher plants when assembled with the same chromophore. When following the formation of the Pfr state, two major processes were identified (with time constants of 3 and 18 ms) that are followed by slow reactions in the range of 166 ms and 8 s, respectively, albeit with very small amplitudes.

  6. Native mass spectrometry provides direct evidence for DNA mismatch-induced regulation of asymmetric nucleotide binding in mismatch repair protein MutS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Monti; S.X. Cohen (Serge); A. Fish (Alexander); H.H.K. Winterwerp (Herrie); A. Barendregt (Arjan); P. Friedhoff (Peter); A. Perrakis (Anastassis); A.J.R. Heck (Albert); T.K. Sixma (Titia); R.H.H. van den Heuvel (Robert); J.H.G. Lebbink (Joyce)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe DNA mismatch repair protein MutS recognizes mispaired bases in DNA and initiates repair in an ATP-dependent manner. Understanding of the allosteric coupling between DNA mismatch recognition and two asymmetric nucleotide binding sites at opposing sides of the MutS dimer requires ident

  7. Expression at the cell surface of native fusion protein of the Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain Italien from cloned cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espion, D; de Henau, S; Letellier, C; Wemers, C D; Brasseur, R; Young, J F; Gross, M; Rosenberg, M; Meulemans, G; Burny, A

    1987-01-01

    A cDNA library was constructed with poly(A)+-mRNAs from NDV-Italien infected BHK-21 cells. A clone, that hybridized to the F gene mRNA, was sequenced. A long open reading frame encodes for a protein of 553 amino acids, with a calculated molecular weight of 59,153, consisting of twelve cysteine residues and six potential glycosylation sites. The protein sequence contains a hydrophobic region at the N-terminus of F1 and a presumptive long transmembrane fragment near the C-terminus. Comparison of the F proteins from NDV strains Italien and Australia-Victoria shows that the sequences are very similar, with conservation of most cysteine residues and of the potential glycosylation sites. The F coding sequence was inserted into the genome of vaccinia virus under the control of vaccinia P7.5 transcriptional regulatory sequences. Expression of F protein was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence with five anti-F monoclonal antibodies known to react with conformational epitopes.

  8. Native grasslands fertilize themselves

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — News article about Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge and how the native soils and plants function to stimulate the system, creating a more productive grassland.

  9. Ultraviolet resonance Raman studies reveal the environment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues in the native and partially folded states of the E colicin-binding immunity protein Im7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Mendieta, Iñigo R; Spence, Graham R; Gell, Christopher; Radford, Sheena E; Smith, D Alastair

    2005-03-01

    Understanding the nature of partially folded proteins is a challenging task that is best accomplished when several techniques are applied in combination. Here we present ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy studies of the E colicin-binding immunity proteins, Im7* and Im9*, together with a series of variants of Im7* that are designed to trap a partially folded state at equilibrium. We show that the environments of the tryptophan and tyrosine residues in native wild-type Im7* and Im9* are indistinguishable, in contrast with models for their structures based on X-ray and NMR methods. In addition, we show that there is a general increase in the hydrophobicity in the environment of Trp75 in all of the variants compared with wild-type Im7*. These data suggest that a significant rearrangement of the tryptophan pocket occurs in the variants, which, together with an overall decrease in solvent accessibility of Trp75 as judged by time-resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements and fluorescence quenching experiments, rationalize the unusual fluorescence properties of the variants reported previously. The data highlight the power of UVRR in analyzing the structural properties of different conformational states of the same protein and reveal new information about the structural rearrangements occurring during Im7* folding, not possible using other spectroscopic methods alone. Finally, we describe a previously unreported dependence of the tryptophan Fermi doublet on excitation wavelength in the ultraviolet region revealed by these protein spectra. We corroborated this observation using tryptophan-containing model compounds and conclude that the conventional interpretation of this UVRR feature at these wavelengths is unreliable.

  10. Native listening: The flexibility dimension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.

    2012-01-01

    The way we listen to spoken language is tailored to the specific benefit of native-language speech input. Listening to speech in non-native languages can be significantly hindered by this native bias. Is it possible to determine the degree to which a listener is listening in a native-like manner? Pr

  11. Identification of native Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) proteins that bind to immobilized metal affinity chromatography under high imidazole conditions and use of 2D-DIGE to evaluate contamination pools with respect to recombinant protein expression level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlow, Patrick; Uechi, Guy T; Cardamone, John J; Sultana, Tamanna; Fruchtl, McKinzie; Beitle, Robert R; Ataai, Mohammad M

    2011-08-01

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) is a widely used purification tool for the production of active, soluble recombinant proteins. Escherichia coli proteins that routinely contaminate IMAC purifications have been characterized to date. The work presented here narrows that focus to the most problematic host proteins, those retaining nickel affinity under elevated imidazole conditions, using a single bind-and-elute step. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis, a favored technique for resolving complex protein mixtures and evaluating their expression, here discerns variation in the soluble extract pools that are loaded in IMAC and the remaining contaminants with respect to varied levels of recombinant protein expression. Peptidyl-prolyl isomerase SlyD and catabolite activator protein (CAP) are here shown to be the most persistent contaminants and have greater prevalence at low target protein expression.

  12. Expression of a soluble form of iodotyrosine deiodinase for active site characterization by engineering the native membrane protein from Mus musculus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, Jennifer M.; McTamney, Patrick M.; Rokita, Steven E. (Maryland)

    2012-06-27

    Reductive deiodination is critical for thyroid function and represents an unusual exception to the more common oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms of dehalogenation in mammals. Studies on the reductive processes have been limited by a lack of convenient methods for heterologous expression of the appropriate proteins in large scale. The enzyme responsible for iodide salvage in the thyroid, iodotyrosine deodinase, is now readily generated after engineering its gene from Mus musculus. High expression of a truncated derivative lacking the membrane domain at its N-terminal was observed in Sf9 cells, whereas expression in Pichia pastoris remained low despite codon optimization. Ultimately, the desired expression in Escherichia coli was achieved after replacing the two conserved Cys residues of the deiodinase with Ala and fusing the resulting protein to thioredoxin. This final construct provided abundant enzyme for crystallography and mutagenesis. Utility of the E. coli system was demonstrated by examining a set of active site residues critical for binding to the zwitterionic portion of substrate.

  13. Genetic transformation of European chestnut somatic embryos with a native thaumatin-like protein (CsTL1) gene isolated from Castanea sativa seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corredoira, Elena; Valladares, Silvia; Allona, Isabel; Aragoncillo, Cipriano; Vieitez, Ana M; Ballester, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    The availability of a system for direct transfer of antifungal candidate genes into European chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.) would offer an alternative approach to conventional breeding for production of chestnut trees tolerant to ink disease caused by Phytophthora spp. For the first time, a chestnut thaumatin-like protein gene (CsTL1), isolated from chestnut cotyledons, has been overexpressed in three chestnut somatic embryogenic lines. Transformation experiments have been performed using an Agrobacterium tumefaciens Smith and Townsend vector harboring the neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII) selectable and the green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter genes. The transformation efficiency, determined on the basis of the fluorescence of surviving explants, was clearly genotype dependent and ranged from 32.5% in the CI-9 line to 7.1% in the CI-3 line. A total of 126 independent transformed lines were obtained. The presence and integration of chestnut CsTL1 in genomic DNA was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analyses. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that CsTL1 expression was up to 13.5-fold higher in a transgenic line compared with its corresponding untransformed line. In only one of the 11 transformed lines tested, expression of the CsTL1 was lower than the control. The remaining 115 transformed lines were successfully subjected to cryopreservation. Embryo proliferation was achieved in all of the transgenic lines regenerated and the transformed lines showed a higher mean number of cotyledonary stage embryos and total number of embryos per embryo clump than their corresponding untransformed lines. Transgenic plants were regenerated after maturation and germination of transformed somatic embryos. Furthermore, due to the low plantlet conversion achieved, axillary shoot proliferation cultures were established from partially germinated embryos (only shoot development), which were multiplied and rooted according to procedures already

  14. Variations in the Regulatory Region of Alpha S1-Casein Milk Protein Gene among Tropically Adapted Indian Native (Bos Indicus) Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Amit; Mukesh, Manishi; Sobti, Ranbir C.; Mishra, Bishnu P.; Sodhi, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory region of milk protein alpha S1-casein (αS1-CN) gene was sequenced, characterized, and analyzed to detect variations among 13 Indian cattle (Bos indicus) breeds. Comparative analysis of 1,587 bp region comprising promoter (1,418 bp), exon-I (53 bp), and partial intron-I (116 bp) revealed 35 nucleotide substitutions (32 within promoter region, 1 in exon-I, and 2 in partial intron-I region) and 4 Indels. Within promoter, 15 variations at positions −1399 (A > G), −1288 (G > A), −1259 (T > C), −1158 (T > C), −1016 (A > T), −941 (T > G), −778 (C > T), −610 (G > A), −536 (A > G), −521 (A > G), −330 (A > C), −214 (A > G), −205 (A > T), −206 (C > A), and −175 (A > G) were located within the potential transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), namely, NF-κE1/c-Myc, GATA-1, GATA-1/NF-E, Oct-1/POU3F2, MEF-2/YY1, GATA-1, AP-1, POU1F1a/GR, TMF, GAL4, YY1/Oct-1, HNF-1, GRalpha/AR, GRalpha/AR, and AP-1, respectively. Seventy-four percent (26/35) of the observed SNPs were novel to Indian cattle and 11 of these novel SNPs were located within one or more TFBSs. Collectively, these might influence the binding affinity towards their respective nuclear TFs thus modulating the level of transcripts in milk and affecting overall protein composition. The study provides information on several distinct variations across indicine and taurine αS1-CN regulatory domains. PMID:25937984

  15. Immigrants and Native Workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Mette; Peri, Giovanni

    Using a database that includes the universe of individuals and establishments in Denmark over the period 1991-2008 we analyze the effect of a large inflow of non-European (EU) immigrants on Danish workers. We first identify a sharp and sustained supply-driven increase in the inflow of non......-EU immigrants in Denmark, beginning in 1995 and driven by a sequence of international events such as the Bosnian, Somalian and Iraqi crises. We then look at the response of occupational complexity, job upgrading and downgrading, wage and employment of natives in the short and long run. We find...... that the increased supply of non-EU low skilled immigrants pushed native workers to pursue more complex occupations. This reallocation happened mainly through movement across firms. Immigration increased mobility of natives across firms and across municipalities but it did not increase their probability...

  16. Native Folding of a Recombinant gpE1/gpE2 Heterodimer Vaccine Antigen from a Precursor Protein Fused with Fc IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Michael; Law, John; Wong, Jason Alexander Ji-Xhin; Hockman, Darren; Landi, Amir; Chen, Chao; Crawford, Kevin; Kundu, Juthika; Baldwin, Lesley; Johnson, Janelle; Dahiya, Anita; LaChance, Gerald; Marcotrigiano, Joseph; Law, Mansun; Foung, Steven; Tyrrell, Lorne; Houghton, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A recombinant strain HCV1 (hepatitis C virus [HCV] genotype 1a) gpE1/gpE2 (E1E2) vaccine candidate was previously shown by our group to protect chimpanzees and generate broad cross-neutralizing antibodies in animals and humans. In addition, recent independent studies have highlighted the importance of conserved neutralizing epitopes in HCV vaccine development that map to antigenic clusters in E2 or the E1E2 heterodimer. E1E2 can be purified using Galanthis nivalis lectin agarose (GNA), but this technique is suboptimal for global production. Our goal was to investigate a high-affinity and scalable method for isolating E1E2. We generated an Fc tag-derived (Fc-d) E1E2 that was selectively captured by protein G Sepharose, with the tag being removed subsequently using PreScission protease. Surprisingly, despite the presence of the large Fc tag, Fc-d E1E2 formed heterodimers similar to those formed by GNA-purified wild-type (WT) E1E2 and exhibited nearly identical binding profiles to HCV monoclonal antibodies that target conserved neutralizing epitopes in E2 (HC33.4, HC84.26, and AR3B) and the E1E2 heterodimer (AR4A and AR5A). Antisera from immunized mice showed that Fc-d E1E2 elicited anti-E2 antibody titers and neutralization of HCV pseudotype viruses similar to those with WT E1E2. Competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) showed that antisera from immunized mice inhibited monoclonal antibody binding to neutralizing epitopes. Antisera from Fc-d E1E2-immunized mice exhibited stronger competition for AR3B and AR5A than the WT, whereas the levels of competition for HC84.26 and AR4A were similar. We anticipate that Fc-d E1E2 will provide a scalable purification and manufacturing process using protein A/G-based chromatography.

  17. Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Protein Protein is found throughout the body—in muscle, ... the heart and respiratory system, and death. All Protein Isn’t Alike Protein is built from building ...

  18. Is Nativism Sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braine, Martin D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Provides a brief history of the empiricism-nativism issue, considering present-day intellectual roots of nativist and empiricist inclinations. A schema is proposed for explaining the ontogenetic origin of an innate attribute or principle relevant to language. An attempt is made to explain the origin of primitives as derived by learning. (Contains…

  19. Non-native seagrass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tussenbroek, B.I.; van Katwijk, M.M.; Bouma, T.J.; van der Heide, T.; Govers, L.L.; Leuven, R.S.E.W.

    2016-01-01

    Seagrasses comprise 78 species and are rarely invasive. But the seagrass Halophila stipulacea, firstly recorded in the Caribbean in the year 2002, has spread quickly throughout the region. Previous works have described this species as invasive in the Caribbean, forming dense mats that exclude native

  20. Native tandem and ion mobility mass spectrometry highlight structural and modular similarities in clustered-regularly-interspaced shot-palindromic-repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein complexes from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijn, Esther; Barbu, Ioana M; Barendregt, Arjan; Jore, Matthijs M; Wiedenheft, Blake; Lundgren, Magnus; Westra, Edze R; Brouns, Stan J J; Doudna, Jennifer A; van der Oost, John; Heck, Albert J R

    2012-11-01

    The CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated genes) immune system of bacteria and archaea provides acquired resistance against viruses and plasmids, by a strategy analogous to RNA-interference. Key components of the defense system are ribonucleoprotein complexes, the composition of which appears highly variable in different CRISPR/Cas subtypes. Previous studies combined mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, and small angle x-ray scattering to demonstrate that the E. coli Cascade complex (405 kDa) and the P. aeruginosa Csy-complex (350 kDa) are similar in that they share a central spiral-shaped hexameric structure, flanked by associating proteins and one CRISPR RNA. Recently, a cryo-electron microscopy structure of Cascade revealed that the CRISPR RNA molecule resides in a groove of the hexameric backbone. For both complexes we here describe the use of native mass spectrometry in combination with ion mobility mass spectrometry to assign a stable core surrounded by more loosely associated modules. Via computational modeling subcomplex structures were proposed that relate to the experimental IMMS data. Despite the absence of obvious sequence homology between several subunits, detailed analysis of sub-complexes strongly suggests analogy between subunits of the two complexes. Probing the specific association of E. coli Cascade/crRNA to its complementary DNA target reveals a conformational change. All together these findings provide relevant new information about the potential assembly process of the two CRISPR-associated complexes.

  1. Teores de proteína e minerais de espécies nativas, potenciais hortaliças e frutas Protein and mineral contents of native species, potential vegetables, and fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdely Ferreira Kinupp

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A Região Metropolitana de Porto Alegre (RMPA, Rio Grande do Sul (Brasil, apresenta uma significativa riqueza de hortaliças e frutas nativas com potencial alimentício negligenciado. Além de indicativos etnológicos sobre seus usos como alimento, pouco se conhece sobre elas, principalmente sobre sua composição bromatológica. Estudos revelam que plantas alimentícias não-convencionais são mais ricas nutricionalmente do que plantas domesticadas. Com o objetivo de prospectar o potencial alimentício e contribuir com dados sobre os teores de proteína e minerais de plantas nativas na RMPA foram selecionadas 69 espécies, distribuídas em 58 gêneros e 33 famílias botânicas, totalizando 76 análises de diferentes partes comestíveis. Além do N convertido em proteína, foram analisados os teores de Ca, Mg, Mn, P, Fe, Na, K, Cu, Zn, S e B. Muitas espécies mostraram-se promissoras, com teores protéico e mineral superiores ao das espécies comerciais de usos similares. Apesar de adaptadas e abundantes na RMPA e dos conteúdos significativos de proteína e minerais, a grande maioria destas espécies permanece desconhecida ou subutilizada. Estudos e incentivos efetivos para o aproveitamento econômico de espécies negligenciadas poderiam contribuir para a conservação, a valorização das espécies autóctones e para uma dieta mais diversa e saudável do homem.The Metropolitan Region of Porto Alegre (MRPA, Rio Grande do Sul state (Brazil, presents a significant richness of native vegetables and fruits with neglected nourishing potential. Beyond the ethnological indicatives on their uses as food, little is known on these vegetables and fruits, mainly regard to the bromatological composition. Studies reveal that the unconventional food plants are nutritionally richer than domesticated plants. In the aim to evaluate the nourishing potential of the native plants in the MRPA region and to contribute with data on their protein and mineral contents

  2. Boundaries of mass resolution in native mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lössl, Philip; Snijder, Joost; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades, native mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a valuable tool to study intact proteins and noncovalent protein complexes. Studied experimental systems range from small-molecule (drug)-protein interactions, to nanomachineries such as the proteasome and ribosome, to even viru

  3. Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    The Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop was held on October 28 through November 01, 1998, as part of a series of workshops being held around the U.S. to improve the understanding of the potential consequences of climate variability and change for the Nation. This workshop was specifically designed by Native Peoples to examine the impacts of climate change and extreme weather variability on Native Peoples and Native Homelands from an indigenous cultural and spiritual perspective and to develop recommendations as well as identify potential response actions. The workshop brought together interested Native Peoples, representatives of Tribal governments, traditional elders, Tribal leaders, natural resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, and climate scientists from government agencies and universities. It is clear that Tribal colleges and universities play a unique and critical role in the success of these emerging partnerships for decision-making in addition to the important education function for both Native and non-Native communities such as serving as a culturally- appropriate vehicle for access, analysis, control, and protection of indigenous cultural and intellectual property. During the discussions between scientists and policy-makers from both Native and non-Native communities, a number of important lessons emerged which are key to building more effective partnerships between Native and non-Native communities for collaboration and decision-making for a more sustainable future. This talk summarizes the key issues, recommendations, and lessons learned during this workshop.

  4. Intelligibility of native and non-native Dutch Speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, S.J. van

    2001-01-01

    The intelligibility of speech is known to be lower if the speaker is non-native instead of native for the given language. This study is aimed at quantifying the overall degradation due to limitations of non-native speakers of Dutch, specifically of Dutch-speaking Americans who have lived in the Neth

  5. Speech intelligibility of native and non-native speech

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, S.J. van

    1999-01-01

    The intelligibility of speech is known to be lower if the talker is non-native instead of native for the given language. This study is aimed at quantifying the overall degradation due to acoustic-phonetic limitations of non-native talkers of Dutch, specifically of Dutch-speaking Americans who have l

  6. Native Americans' Interest in Horticulture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Mary Hockenberry

    1999-01-01

    Focus groups arranged by local Native American Master Gardeners on two Minnesota reservations determined community interest in extension-horticulture programs. Topics of interest included food preservation and historical Native-American uses of plants. (SK)

  7. Native Prairie Adaptive Management (NPAM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — NPAM is a framework for guiding annual decisions about the management of Service‐owned native prairie parcels that are prone to invasions by non‐native grasses,...

  8. Who Stole Native American Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Lynn, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    Native American Studies has failed to develop into an academic discipline because of the continued influence of postcolonial theories, attempts to discredit Native American scholars, politically determined research agendas, and the ideology of the "New Historicism." Native American Studies must seek autonomy from other opportunistic…

  9. Who Stole Native American Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Lynn, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    Native American Studies has failed to develop into an academic discipline because of the continued influence of postcolonial theories, attempts to discredit Native American scholars, politically determined research agendas, and the ideology of the "New Historicism." Native American Studies must seek autonomy from other opportunistic…

  10. Digital Natives or Digital Tribes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Ian Robert

    2013-01-01

    This research builds upon the discourse surrounding digital natives. A literature review into the digital native phenomena was undertaken and found that researchers are beginning to identify the digital native as not one cohesive group but of individuals influenced by other factors. Primary research by means of questionnaire survey of technologies…

  11. Native plasma-derived FVIII/VWF complex has lower sensitivity to FVIII inhibitors than the combination of isolated FVIII and VWF proteins. Impact on Bethesda assay titration of FVIII inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, M I; Da Rocha-Souto, B; Grancha, S; Jorquera, J I

    2014-11-01

    Sensitivity to FVIII inhibitors of the native plasma-derived (pd) FVIII/VWF complex vs. the complexes formed after exogenous FVIII infusion in the haemophilic patient has not been thoroughly studied. The role of VWF in the interaction of FVIII with inhibitors was studied in vitro using different combinations of VWF and FVIII concentrates. Normal plasma, pdFVIII/VWF and isolated FVIII (recombinant FVIII, B-domain deleted and pdFVIII) were used. Titre (BU) was kinetically determined (up to 2 h) in serial dilutions of inhibitor IgG (purified from a pool of plasmas with inhibitors) mixed with VWF and then incubated with the different FVIII. Inhibitor was also added to previously mixed VWF+FVIII. Residual FVIII:C was determined. TGA assays were performed with FVIII-deficient plasma spiked with the FVIII-VWF mixtures with/without an ESH-8 antibody. Inhibitor titres for plasma and pdFVIII/VWF were comparable at all time points. Titres for all concentrates of isolated FVIII were significantly higher than those for plasma or pdFVIII/VWF (1.4-1.9 fold) even after preincubation with VWF. At t = 0 h, titres for plasma or pdFVIII/VWF were unquantifiable, but were detectable for isolated FVIII (0.6-1.6 BU). In contrast to pdFVIII/VWF, the decrease in thrombin generation parameters by isolated FVIII in the presence of ESH-8 was significant (P isolated proteins. Bethesda assay titration using different FVIII concentrates would be advisable to guide the treatment of inhibitor patients.

  12. Native Mass Spectrometry in Fragment-Based Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Pedro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The advent of native mass spectrometry (MS in 1990 led to the development of new mass spectrometry instrumentation and methodologies for the analysis of noncovalent protein–ligand complexes. Native MS has matured to become a fast, simple, highly sensitive and automatable technique with well-established utility for fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD. Native MS has the capability to directly detect weak ligand binding to proteins, to determine stoichiometry, relative or absolute binding affinities and specificities. Native MS can be used to delineate ligand-binding sites, to elucidate mechanisms of cooperativity and to study the thermodynamics of binding. This review highlights key attributes of native MS for FBDD campaigns.

  13. Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native > Asthma Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives In 2014, 218, ... Native American adults reported that they currently have asthma. American Indian/Alaska Native children are 30% more ...

  14. Stroke and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Stroke Stroke and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific ... non-Hispanic white adults to die from a stroke in 2010. In general, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander ...

  15. Natively unfolded domains in endocytosis: hooks, lines and linkers

    OpenAIRE

    Dafforn, Timothy R.; Smith, Corinne J I

    2004-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that a protein must adopt a tertiary structure to achieve its active native state and that regions of a protein that are devoid of α-helix or β-sheet structures are functionally inert. Although extended proline-rich regions are recognized as presenting binding motifs to, for example, Src homology 2 (SH2) and SH3 domains, the idea persists that natively unfolded regions in functional proteins are simply 'spacers' between the folded domains. Such a view has been challenge...

  16. Aquatic macroinvertebrate responses to native and non-native predators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haddaway N. R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-native species can profoundly affect native ecosystems through trophic interactions with native species. Native prey may respond differently to non-native versus native predators since they lack prior experience. Here we investigate antipredator responses of two common freshwater macroinvertebrates, Gammarus pulex and Potamopyrgus jenkinsi, to olfactory cues from three predators; sympatric native fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus, sympatric native crayfish (Austropotamobius pallipes, and novel invasive crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus. G. pulex responded differently to fish and crayfish; showing enhanced locomotion in response to fish, but a preference for the dark over the light in response to the crayfish. P.jenkinsi showed increased vertical migration in response to all three predator cues relative to controls. These different responses to fish and crayfish are hypothesised to reflect the predators’ differing predation types; benthic for crayfish and pelagic for fish. However, we found no difference in response to native versus invasive crayfish, indicating that prey naiveté is unlikely to drive the impacts of invasive crayfish. The Predator Recognition Continuum Hypothesis proposes that benefits of generalisable predator recognition outweigh costs when predators are diverse. Generalised responses of prey as observed here will be adaptive in the presence of an invader, and may reduce novel predators’ potential impacts.

  17. Differential labelling of cysteines for simultaneous identification of thioredoxin h-reducible disulphides in native protein extracts: insight into recognition and regulation of proteins in barley seeds by thioredoxin h

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Kenji; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2005-01-01

    ) to be distinguished from those inaccessible or disulphide bound form (pyridylethylated) according to the mass difference in the peptide mass maps obtained by matrixassistend laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry. Using this approach, in vitro reduction of disulphides in recombinant barley a....... Mass shifts of 15 peptides, induced by treatment with thioredoxin h and differential alkylation, identified specific reduction of nine disulphides in BASI, four a-amylase/trypsin inhibitors and a protein of unknown function. Two specific disulphides, located structurally close to the alpha......-amylase binding surfaces of BASI and alpha-amylase inhibitor BMAI-1 were demonstrated to be reduced to a particularly high extent. For the first time, specificity of thioredoxin h for particular disulphide bonds is demonstrated, providing a basis to study structural aspects of the recognition mechanism...

  18. Native Mass Spectrometry: What is in the Name?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leney, Aneika C.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2016-12-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is nowadays one of the cornerstones of biomolecular mass spectrometry and proteomics. Advances in sample preparation and mass analyzers have enabled researchers to extract much more information from biological samples than just the molecular weight. In particular, relevant for structural biology, noncovalent protein-protein and protein-ligand complexes can now also be analyzed by MS. For these types of analyses, assemblies need to be retained in their native quaternary state in the gas phase. This initial small niche of biomolecular mass spectrometry, nowadays often referred to as "native MS," has come to maturation over the last two decades, with dozens of laboratories using it to study mostly protein assemblies, but also DNA and RNA-protein assemblies, with the goal to define structure-function relationships. In this perspective, we describe the origins of and (re)define the term native MS, portraying in detail what we meant by "native MS," when the term was coined and also describing what it does (according to us) not entail. Additionally, we describe a few examples highlighting what native MS is, showing its successes to date while illustrating the wide scope this technology has in solving complex biological questions.

  19. Native Mass Spectrometry: What is in the Name?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leney, Aneika C.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2017-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is nowadays one of the cornerstones of biomolecular mass spectrometry and proteomics. Advances in sample preparation and mass analyzers have enabled researchers to extract much more information from biological samples than just the molecular weight. In particular, relevant for structural biology, noncovalent protein-protein and protein-ligand complexes can now also be analyzed by MS. For these types of analyses, assemblies need to be retained in their native quaternary state in the gas phase. This initial small niche of biomolecular mass spectrometry, nowadays often referred to as "native MS," has come to maturation over the last two decades, with dozens of laboratories using it to study mostly protein assemblies, but also DNA and RNA-protein assemblies, with the goal to define structure-function relationships. In this perspective, we describe the origins of and (re)define the term native MS, portraying in detail what we meant by "native MS," when the term was coined and also describing what it does (according to us) not entail. Additionally, we describe a few examples highlighting what native MS is, showing its successes to date while illustrating the wide scope this technology has in solving complex biological questions.

  20. Traditional West Coast Native Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Deagle, George

    1988-01-01

    An important part of the complex culture of the Native people of Canada's Pacific coast is the traditional system of medicine each culture has developed. Population loss from epidemics and the influence of dominant European cultures has resulted in loss of many aspects of traditional medicine. Although some Native practices are potentially hazardous, continuation of traditional approaches to illness remains an important part of health care for many Native people. The use of “devil's club” pla...

  1. Contribution of factor H-Binding protein sequence to the cross-reactivity of meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccines with over-expressed fHbp variant group 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Arianna; Rossi, Omar; Aruta, Maria Grazia; Micoli, Francesca; Rondini, Simona; Guadagnuolo, Serafina; Delany, Isabel; Henderson, Ian R; Cunningham, Adam F; Saul, Allan; MacLennan, Calman A; Koeberling, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Factor H-binding protein (fHbp) is an important meningococcal vaccine antigen. Native outer membrane vesicles with over-expressed fHbp (NOMV OE fHbp) have been shown to induce antibodies with broader functional activity than recombinant fHbp (rfHbp). Improved understanding of this broad coverage would facilitate rational vaccine design. We performed a pair-wise analysis of 48 surface-exposed amino acids involved in interacting with factor H, among 383 fHbp variant group 1 sequences. We generated isogenic NOMV-producing meningococcal strains from an African serogroup W isolate, each over-expressing one of four fHbp variant group 1 sequences (ID 1, 5, 9, or 74), including those most common among invasive African meningococcal isolates. Mice were immunised with each NOMV, and sera tested for IgG levels against each of the rfHbp ID and for ability to kill a panel of heterologous meningococcal isolates. At the fH-binding site, ID pairs differed by a maximum of 13 (27%) amino acids. ID 9 shared an amino acid sequence common to 83 ID types. The selected ID types differed by up to 6 amino acids, in the fH-binding site. All NOMV and rfHbp induced high IgG levels against each rfHbp. Serum killing from mice immunised with rfHbp was generally less efficient and more restricted compared to NOMV, which induced antibodies that killed most meningococci tested, with decreased stringency for ID type differences. Breadth of killing was mostly due to anti-fHbp antibodies, with some restriction according to ID type sequence differences. Nevertheless, under our experimental conditions, no relationship between antibody cross-reactivity and variation fH-binding site sequence was identified. NOMV over-expressing different fHbp IDs belonging to variant group 1 induce antibodies with fine specificities against fHbp, and ability to kill broadly meningococci expressing heterologous fHbp IDs. The work reinforces that meningococcal NOMV with OE fHbp is a promising vaccine strategy, and provides

  2. Native Speakers' Perception of Non-Native English Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Maysa; Hussein, Riyad F.

    2011-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the rating and intelligibility of different non-native varieties of English, namely French English, Japanese English and Jordanian English by native English speakers and their attitudes towards these foreign accents. To achieve the goals of this study, the researchers used a web-based questionnaire which…

  3. Native American youth and justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.Sc. Laurence A. French

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Youth and delinquency issues have long been problematic among Native Americans groups both on- and off-reservation. This phenomenon is further complicated by the cultural diversity among American Indians and Alaska Natives scattered across the United States. In address these issues, the paper begins with a historical overview of Native American youth. This history presents the long tradition of federal policies that, how well intended, have resulted in discriminatory practices with the most damages attacks being those directed toward the destruction of viable cultural attributes – the same attributes that make Native Americans unique within United States society. Following the historical material, the authors contrast the pervasive Native American aboriginal ethos of harmony with that of Protestant Ethic that dominates the ethos of the larger United States society. In addition to providing general information on Native American crime and delinquency, the paper also provides a case study of Native American justice within the Navajo Nation, the largest tribe, in both size and population, in the United States. The paper concludes with a discussion of issues specific to Native American youth and efforts to address these problems.

  4. Native American Foods and Cookery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tom; Potter, Eloise F.

    Native Americans had a well-developed agriculture long before the arrival of the Europeans. Three staples--corn, beans, and squash--were supplemented with other gathered plants or cultivated crops such as white potatoes, sweet potatoes, pumpkins, and peanuts. Native Americans had no cows, pigs, or domesticated chickens; they depended almost…

  5. Ohiyesa's Path: Reclaiming Native Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Adrienne Brant; Renville, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    As Natives have assumed increasing authority and responsibility for tribal and federally funded and administered schools, a more balanced and enlightened view is emerging. Notable among these events is the recognition of the critical need to shift emphasis to the untapped heritage of more recently recognized and acknowledged Native American…

  6. Coyote's Eyes: Native Cognition Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafoya, Terry

    1982-01-01

    Using a Native American parable, compares the Standard Average European (SAE) world view with the Standard Native American (SNA) world view and the effects they have on education. Points out possible areas of interethnic confusion as a result of these two world views in communication dealing with cognitive schemes. (LC)

  7. Native American Foods and Cookery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Tom; Potter, Eloise F.

    Native Americans had a well-developed agriculture long before the arrival of the Europeans. Three staples--corn, beans, and squash--were supplemented with other gathered plants or cultivated crops such as white potatoes, sweet potatoes, pumpkins, and peanuts. Native Americans had no cows, pigs, or domesticated chickens; they depended almost…

  8. Simulations of Protein Folding

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, M; Cahill, K E; Cahill, Michael; Fleharty, Mark; Cahill, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a simple, phenomenological, Monte-Carlo code that predicts the three-dimensional structure of globular proteins from the DNA sequences that define them. We have applied this code to two small proteins, the villin headpiece (1VII) and cole1 rop (1ROP). Our code folded the 36-residue villin headpiece to a mean rms distance of less than 5 A from its native structure as revealed by NMR; it folded a 56-residue fragment of the protein cole1 rop to within 11 A of its native structure. The denatured starting configurations of these two proteins were, respectively, 29 A and 55 A distant from their native structures.

  9. Antibody microarrays for native toxin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Victor C; Havenstrite, Karen L; Herr, Amy E

    2005-04-15

    We have developed antibody-based microarray techniques for the multiplexed detection of cholera toxin beta-subunit, diphtheria toxin, anthrax lethal factor and protective antigen, Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B, and tetanus toxin C fragment in spiked samples. Two detection schemes were investigated: (i) a direct assay in which fluorescently labeled toxins were captured directly by the antibody array and (ii) a competition assay that employed unlabeled toxins as reporters for the quantification of native toxin in solution. In the direct assay, fluorescence measured at each array element is correlated with labeled toxin concentration to yield baseline binding information (Langmuir isotherms and affinity constants). Extending from the direct assay, the competition assay yields information on the presence, identity, and concentration of toxins. A significant advantage of the competition assay over reported profiling assays is the minimal sample preparation required prior to analysis because the competition assay obviates the need to fluorescently label native proteins in the sample of interest. Sigmoidal calibration curves and detection limits were established for both assay formats. Although the sensitivity of the direct assay is superior to that of the competition assay, detection limits for unmodified toxins in the competition assay are comparable to values reported previously for sandwich-format immunoassays of antibodies arrayed on planar substrates. As a demonstration of the potential of the competition assay for unlabeled toxin detection, we conclude with a straightforward multiplexed assay for the differentiation and identification of both native S. aureus enterotoxin B and tetanus toxin C fragment in spiked dilute serum samples.

  10. Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Asthma Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders are 70 percent more likely to have asthma as non-Hispanic whites. National data for this ...

  11. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders among Native Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ISORDERS A MONG N ATIVE A MERICANS Native American cultures, which encompass American Indian, Alaska Native and Native ... among American Indians: The mythical and real properties. American Indian Culture and Research Journal 18(2):121-143. www. ...

  12. Obesity and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Obesity Obesity and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific ... youthonline . [Accessed 05/25/2016] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY More than 80 percent of people with type ...

  13. Native Speakers in Linguistic Imperialism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillipson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    is recognised as desirable by some British experts, the native speakers in question seldom have this key qualification. This is even the case when the host country (Brunei) aims at bilingual education. It is unlikely that the host countries are getting value for money. Whether the UK and other ‘English...... the linguicism of British pedagogical expertise are generally involved in native speaker export businesses. They underpin a hierarchy with under-qualified native speakers projected as superior to local teachers who are seen as in need of foreign ‘aid’. In view of the British bodies involved openly declaring...

  14. The Rise of native advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius MANIC

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Native advertising is described both as a new way for promoters to engage audiences and as a new, clever, source of revenue for publishers and media agencies. The debates around its morality and the need for a wide accepted framework are often viewed as calls for creativity. Aside from the various forms, strategies and the need for clarification, the fact that native advertising works and its revenue estimates increase annually transforms the new type of ad into a clear objective for companies, marketers and publishers. Native advertising stopped being a buzzword and started being a marketing reality.

  15. Analysis of Native-Like Ions Using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Samuel J; Eaton, Rachel M; Bush, Matthew F

    2016-09-20

    Ion mobility separation of native-like protein and protein complex ions expands the structural information available through native mass spectrometry analysis. Here, we implement Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) for the analysis of native-like ions. SLIM has been shown previously to operate with near lossless transmission of ions up to 3000 Da in mass. Here for the first time, SLIM was used to separate native-like protein and protein complex ions ranging in mass from 12 to 145 kDa. The resulting arrival-time distributions were monomodal and were used to determine collision cross section values that are within 3% of those determined from radio-frequency-confining drift cell measurements. These results are consistent with the retention of native-like ion structures throughout these experiments. The apparent resolving powers of native-like ions measured using SLIM are as high as 42, which is the highest value reported directly from experimental data for the native-like ion of a protein complex. Interestingly, the apparent resolving power depends strongly on the identity of the analyte, suggesting that the arrival-time distributions of these ions may have contributions from an ensemble of structures in the gas phase that is unique to each analyte. These results suggest that the broad range of emerging SLIM technologies may all be adaptable to the analysis of native-like ions, which will enable future applications in the areas of structural biology, biophysics, and biopharmaceutical characterization.

  16. Natively unstructured loops differ from other loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avner Schlessinger

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Natively unstructured or disordered protein regions may increase the functional complexity of an organism; they are particularly abundant in eukaryotes and often evade structure determination. Many computational methods predict unstructured regions by training on outliers in otherwise well-ordered structures. Here, we introduce an approach that uses a neural network in a very different and novel way. We hypothesize that very long contiguous segments with nonregular secondary structure (NORS regions differ significantly from regular, well-structured loops, and that a method detecting such features could predict natively unstructured regions. Training our new method, NORSnet, on predicted information rather than on experimental data yielded three major advantages: it removed the overlap between testing and training, it systematically covered entire proteomes, and it explicitly focused on one particular aspect of unstructured regions with a simple structural interpretation, namely that they are loops. Our hypothesis was correct: well-structured and unstructured loops differ so substantially that NORSnet succeeded in their distinction. Benchmarks on previously used and new experimental data of unstructured regions revealed that NORSnet performed very well. Although it was not the best single prediction method, NORSnet was sufficiently accurate to flag unstructured regions in proteins that were previously not annotated. In one application, NORSnet revealed previously undetected unstructured regions in putative targets for structural genomics and may thereby contribute to increasing structural coverage of large eukaryotic families. NORSnet found unstructured regions more often in domain boundaries than expected at random. In another application, we estimated that 50%-70% of all worm proteins observed to have more than seven protein-protein interaction partners have unstructured regions. The comparative analysis between NORSnet and DISOPRED2 suggested

  17. Natively unstructured loops differ from other loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlessinger, Avner; Liu, Jinfeng; Rost, Burkhard

    2007-07-01

    Natively unstructured or disordered protein regions may increase the functional complexity of an organism; they are particularly abundant in eukaryotes and often evade structure determination. Many computational methods predict unstructured regions by training on outliers in otherwise well-ordered structures. Here, we introduce an approach that uses a neural network in a very different and novel way. We hypothesize that very long contiguous segments with nonregular secondary structure (NORS regions) differ significantly from regular, well-structured loops, and that a method detecting such features could predict natively unstructured regions. Training our new method, NORSnet, on predicted information rather than on experimental data yielded three major advantages: it removed the overlap between testing and training, it systematically covered entire proteomes, and it explicitly focused on one particular aspect of unstructured regions with a simple structural interpretation, namely that they are loops. Our hypothesis was correct: well-structured and unstructured loops differ so substantially that NORSnet succeeded in their distinction. Benchmarks on previously used and new experimental data of unstructured regions revealed that NORSnet performed very well. Although it was not the best single prediction method, NORSnet was sufficiently accurate to flag unstructured regions in proteins that were previously not annotated. In one application, NORSnet revealed previously undetected unstructured regions in putative targets for structural genomics and may thereby contribute to increasing structural coverage of large eukaryotic families. NORSnet found unstructured regions more often in domain boundaries than expected at random. In another application, we estimated that 50%-70% of all worm proteins observed to have more than seven protein-protein interaction partners have unstructured regions. The comparative analysis between NORSnet and DISOPRED2 suggested that long

  18. Native Terrestrial Animal Species Richness

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted current distributions of all native mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and butterflies in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are...

  19. Native grassland inventory and monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Benton Lake refuge has nearly 6,000 acres of native western wheatgrass-green needlegrass prairie uplands. This pilot study was designed to assess the condition of...

  20. Charting Transnational Native American Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsinya Huang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction to the Special Forum entitled "Charting Transnational Native American Studies: Aesthetics, Politics, Identity," edited by Hsinya Huang, Philip J. Deloria, Laura M. Furlan, and John Gamber

  1. Extending the boundaries of native mass spectrometry to study virus structure and assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, J.

    2015-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool to study the composition and quaternary structure of protein complexes over a wide range of size and mass. As an analytical tool, native MS offers unmatched specificity and precision to pinpoint the stoichiometry of biomolecular complexes. It has been

  2. Physiologic and genetic characterization of Bacillus sphaericus native strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Dussen Garzón

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen pathogenic native strains of Bacillus sphaericus that were pathogens to mosquito larvae were isolated from different Colombia regions. The objective of this study was to evaluate at physiological and molecular level pathogenic strains and to compare them with the reference 2362 one. Cellular growth, sporulation percentage, pathogenic activity against third instar larvae of Culex quinquejasciaius, the presence of toxigenic proteins, the size of native plasmids and the genetic polymorphism among pathogenic and non pathogenic isolations was evaluated. The evaluated strains of Bs presented a latency stage ranging from 2 to 3 h and one logarithmic phase of 7 h; the sporulation in BHI was lower than 1% to 40 h of incubation, in NYSM medium was obtained ten times more production of biomass and spores, 26% of the population showed sporulation percentage higher than 90%; the isolations were classified in three groups of pathogenicity with [Formula] and [Formula]. Punctual mutations on the genes which encoding for native toxins were detected and was found a exclusive protein of 30 kDa in pathogenic native strains. The isolations of Bs presented a plasmid of 118Kb that was not related to the toxicity; pathogenic strains are a homogenous group with a similarity between 90 to 100%, whereas non-pathogenic ones are genetically heterogeneous group and conform a cluster aside. The native strains have a great potential in biological control of mosquito larvae that transmitting diseases such as dengue, malaria, encephalitis and filariasis among others.

  3. 78 FR 70956 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American... Title of Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian... American and Alaskan Native populations, most notably through the Indian Housing Block Grant. The level...

  4. Literacy Skill Differences between Adult Native English and Native Spanish Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Julia; Cote, Nicole Gilbert; Reilly, Lenore; Binder, Katherine S.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the literacy skills of adult native English and native Spanish ABE speakers. Participants were 169 native English speakers and 124 native Spanish speakers recruited from five prior research projects. The results showed that the native Spanish speakers were less skilled on morphology and passage comprehension…

  5. Literacy Skill Differences between Adult Native English and Native Spanish Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Julia; Cote, Nicole Gilbert; Reilly, Lenore; Binder, Katherine S.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the literacy skills of adult native English and native Spanish ABE speakers. Participants were 169 native English speakers and 124 native Spanish speakers recruited from five prior research projects. The results showed that the native Spanish speakers were less skilled on morphology and passage comprehension…

  6. In vitro palmitoylation of native bovine brain Goα

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The native Goα was purified from bovine brain cortex and palmitoylated in vitro. The in vitro palmitoylation site was the same as that in vivo. The internal palmitoylation of purified native Goα was found to be largely maintained. The apparant palmitoylation ratio was significantly increased after the Goa was treated with DTT. The GTPg S binding characteristic of Goα was not influenced by palmitoylation, however, the affinity for LUVs was increased dramatically. The in vitro palmitoylation model of Goα provides a better basis for studying the functional role of G protein palmitoylation in signal transduction.

  7. Formation of Native and Non-native Interactions in Ensembles of Denatured ACBP Molecules from Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancement Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansdottir, S.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Fieber, W.;

    2005-01-01

    in the denatured states with those in the transition state for folding we also provided new insights into the mechanism of formation of the native state of this protein. Keywords: protein folding; denatured state; NMR; molecular dynamics; structural studies Abbreviations: ACBP, acyl coenzyme A binding protein; Gu...... of the residual structure in the denatured state of ACBP under these different conditions has enabled us to infer that regions in the N and C-terminal parts of the protein sequence have a high tendency to interact in the unfolded state under physiological conditions. By comparing the structural features...

  8. Therapeutic Use of Native and Recombinant Enteroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jani Ylä-Pelto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Research on human enteroviruses has resulted in the identification of more than 100 enterovirus types, which use more than 10 protein receptors and/or attachment factors required in cell binding and initiation of the replication cycle. Many of these “viral” receptors are overexpressed in cancer cells. Receptor binding and the ability to replicate in specific target cells define the tropism and pathogenesis of enterovirus types, because cellular infection often results in cytolytic response, i.e., disruption of the cells. Viral tropism and cytolytic properties thus make native enteroviruses prime candidates for oncolytic virotherapy. Copy DNA cloning and modification of enterovirus genomes have resulted in the generation of enterovirus vectors with properties that are useful in therapy or in vaccine trials where foreign antigenic epitopes are expressed from or on the surface of the vector virus. The small genome size and compact particle structure, however, set limits to enterovirus genome modifications. This review focuses on the therapeutic use of native and recombinant enteroviruses and the methods that have been applied to modify enterovirus genomes for therapy.

  9. Therapeutic Use of Native and Recombinant Enteroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylä-Pelto, Jani; Tripathi, Lav; Susi, Petri

    2016-02-23

    Research on human enteroviruses has resulted in the identification of more than 100 enterovirus types, which use more than 10 protein receptors and/or attachment factors required in cell binding and initiation of the replication cycle. Many of these "viral" receptors are overexpressed in cancer cells. Receptor binding and the ability to replicate in specific target cells define the tropism and pathogenesis of enterovirus types, because cellular infection often results in cytolytic response, i.e., disruption of the cells. Viral tropism and cytolytic properties thus make native enteroviruses prime candidates for oncolytic virotherapy. Copy DNA cloning and modification of enterovirus genomes have resulted in the generation of enterovirus vectors with properties that are useful in therapy or in vaccine trials where foreign antigenic epitopes are expressed from or on the surface of the vector virus. The small genome size and compact particle structure, however, set limits to enterovirus genome modifications. This review focuses on the therapeutic use of native and recombinant enteroviruses and the methods that have been applied to modify enterovirus genomes for therapy.

  10. Speech Recognition of Non-Native Speech Using Native and Non-Native Acoustic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    NATIVE AND NON-NATIVE ACOUSTIC MODELS David A. van Leeuwen and Rosemary Orr vanLeeuwentm .tno. nl R. 0rr~kno. azn. nl TNO Human Factors Research...a] is pronounced closer to the [c] by the vowels . Journal of Phonetics, 25:437-470, 1997. 32 [2] D. B. Paul and J. M. Baker. The design for [9] R. H...J. Kershaw, [12] Tony Robinson. Private Communication. L. Lamel, D. A. van Leeuwen , D. Pye, A. J. Robinson, H. J. M. Steeneken, and P. C. Wood- [13

  11. Native herbaceous perennials as ornamentals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarne; Ørgaard, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Gardening with native perennials is a way to bring nature closer to urban citizens and bring up reflections on nature in a busy world. During three seasons of trialing Salvia pratensis, Dianthus deltoides, Campanula trachelium, Vincetoxicum hirundinaria, Saxifraga granulata, Plantago media and P...

  12. Native American College Student Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosholder, Richard; Goslin, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Native American students are the most likely racial/ethnic group tracked in post-secondary American education to be affected by poverty and limited access to educational opportunities. In addition, they are the most likely to be required to take remedial course work and are the least likely to graduate from college. A review of the literature was…

  13. Native Art of the Southwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langham, Barbara A.

    1997-01-01

    Provides historical information on native Southwest peoples and their arts to encourage appreciation and understanding of this cultural heritage. Provides instructions and supply lists for age-appropriate craft projects including woven baskets and rugs, clay pots, clay and paper beads, silver bracelets, kachina dolls, sand paintings, dream…

  14. 77 FR 72832 - Applications for New Awards; Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ..., traditional languages spoken by Native Americans, consistent with section 103 of the Native American Languages... methods of evaluation will provide performance feedback and permit periodic assessment of progress...

  15. Native and Non-Native Perceptions on a Non-Native Oral Discourse in an Academic Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Dikilitaş

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study investigates discourse-level patterns typically employed by a Turkish lecturer based on the syntactic patterns found in the collected data. More specifically, the study aims to reveal how different native and non-native speakers of English perceive discourse patterns used by a non-native lecturer teaching in English. The data gathered from a Turkish lecturer teaching finance, and the interviews both with the lecturer and the students. The lecturer and the students were videotaped and the data was evaluated by content analysis. The results revealed a difference between the way non-native and native speakers evaluate an oral discourse of a non-native lecturer teaching in English. Native speakers of English found the oral performance moderately comprehensible, while non-native speakers found it relatively comprehensible.

  16. Native Americans Make Progress Against Diabetes Complication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_162979.html Native Americans Make Progress Against Diabetes Complication Kidney failure down by 54 percent over 2 ... Failure Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Diabetes Complications Kidney Failure Native American Health About MedlinePlus Site ...

  17. Native Communities and the Peruvian Constitutional Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Indian Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    A loosely knit coalition of over 25 native groups, the Peruvian Amazon Peoples has prepared a statement directed at the Peruvian Constitutional Assembly for purposes of Native input into the preparation of a revised national constitution. (JC)

  18. 34 CFR 300.29 - Native language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Native language. 300.29 Section 300.29 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.29 Native language. (a) Native language, when used with respect to an individual who is limited English proficient, means the following: (1) The...

  19. Native American Children in Michigan. [Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. K. Kellogg Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Native American Children in Michigan," provides a historical context for the tenuous relationship between Michigan's 12 federally recognized tribes and the state government, paying particular attention to the erosion of Native American education programs and the disproportionate number of Native children who find themselves in both the child…

  20. Native herbaceous perennials as ornamentals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarne; Ørgaard, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Gardening with native perennials is a way to bring nature closer to urban citizens and bring up reflections on nature in a busy world. During three seasons of trialing Salvia pratensis, Dianthus deltoides, Campanula trachelium, Vincetoxicum hirundinaria, Saxifraga granulata, Plantago media and P....... as a realistic plant community with an attractive, low habit and beautiful colors. Phyteuma spicatum is an attractive, novel species for a shady garden site.......Gardening with native perennials is a way to bring nature closer to urban citizens and bring up reflections on nature in a busy world. During three seasons of trialing Salvia pratensis, Dianthus deltoides, Campanula trachelium, Vincetoxicum hirundinaria, Saxifraga granulata, Plantago media and P....... maritima were found suitable for cultivation in wholesale-containers and applicable for dry, sunny conditions in gardens. On the other hand, Narthecium ossifragum, Pulsatilla palustris, Drosera rotundifolia, Vaccinium oxycoccos, Eriophorum angustifolium and Sphagnum sp. were cultivated and planted...

  1. Native Speakers in Linguistic Imperialism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillipson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    An investigation of Native English Speaking Teachers’ performance in schemes in six Asian contexts, commissioned by the British Council, and undertaken by three British academics, is subjected to critical evaluation. Key issues for exploration are the issue of a monolingual approach to English...... learning and teaching, and the inappropriate qualifications of those sent to education systems when they are unfamiliar with the learners’ languages, cultures, and pedagogical traditions. Whether the schemes involved constitute linguistic imperialismis analysed. Whereas the need for multilingual competence...... is recognised as desirable by some British experts, the native speakers in question seldom have this key qualification. This is even the case when the host country (Brunei) aims at bilingual education. It is unlikely that the host countries are getting value for money. Whether the UK and other ‘English...

  2. Ecological impacts of non-native species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species are considered one of the greatest threats to freshwater biodiversity worldwide (Drake et al. 1989; Allen and Flecker 1993; Dudgeon et al. 2005). Some of the first hypotheses proposed to explain global patterns of amphibian declines included the effects of non-native species (Barinaga 1990; Blaustein and Wake 1990; Wake and Morowitz 1991). Evidence for the impact of non-native species on amphibians stems (1) from correlative research that relates the distribution or abundance of a species to that of a putative non-native species, and (2) from experimental tests of the effects of a non-native species on survival, growth, development or behaviour of a target species (Kats and Ferrer 2003). Over the past two decades, research on the effects of non-native species on amphibians has mostly focused on introduced aquatic predators, particularly fish. Recent research has shifted to more complex ecological relationships such as influences of sub-lethal stressors (e.g. contaminants) on the effects of non-native species (Linder et al. 2003; Sih et al. 2004), non-native species as vectors of disease (Daszak et al. 2004; Garner et al. 2006), hybridization between non-natives and native congeners (Riley et al. 2003; Storfer et al. 2004), and the alteration of food-webs by non-native species (Nystrom et al. 2001). Other research has examined the interaction of non-native species in terms of facilitation (i.e. one non-native enabling another to become established or spread) or the synergistic effects of multiple non-native species on native amphibians, the so-called invasional meltdown hypothesis (Simerloff and Von Holle 1999). Although there is evidence that some non-native species may interact (Ricciardi 2001), there has yet to be convincing evidence that such interactions have led to an accelerated increase in the number of non-native species and cumulative impacts are still uncertain (Simberloff 2006). Applied research on the control, eradication, and

  3. Native Terrestrial Animal Species Richness

    Science.gov (United States)

    These data represent predicted current distributions of all native mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and butterflies in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are available for both 8-digit HUCs and EMAP hexagons and represent total species counts for each spatial unit. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  4. Determinants of success in native and non-native listening comprehension: an individual differences approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Andringa; N. Olsthoorn; C. van Beuningen; R. Schoonen; J. Hulstijn

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explain individual differences in both native and non-native listening comprehension; 121 native and 113 non-native speakers of Dutch were tested on various linguistic and nonlinguistic cognitive skills thought to underlie listening comprehension. Structural equation mo

  5. Delayed Next Turn Repair Initiation in Native/Non-native Speaker English Conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jean

    2000-01-01

    Examines a form of other-initiated conversational repair that is delayed within next turn position, a form that is produced by non-native speakers of English whose native language is Mandarin. Using the framework of conversational analysis, shows that in native/non-native conversation, other-initiated repair is not always done as early as possible…

  6. Free classification of American English dialects by native and non-native listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clopper, Cynthia G; Bradlow, Ann R

    2009-10-01

    Most second language acquisition research focuses on linguistic structures, and less research has examined the acquisition of sociolinguistic patterns. The current study explored the perceptual classification of regional dialects of American English by native and non-native listeners using a free classification task. Results revealed similar classification strategies for the native and non-native listeners. However, the native listeners were more accurate overall than the non-native listeners. In addition, the non-native listeners were less able to make use of constellations of cues to accurately classify the talkers by dialect. However, the non-native listeners were able to attend to cues that were either phonologically or sociolinguistically relevant in their native language. These results suggest that non-native listeners can use information in the speech signal to classify talkers by regional dialect, but that their lack of signal-independent cultural knowledge about variation in the second language leads to less accurate classification performance.

  7. Chemical cross-linking and native mass spectrometry: A fruitful combination for structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinz, Andrea; Arlt, Christian; Chorev, Dror; Sharon, Michal

    2015-08-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is becoming increasingly popular in the field of structural biology for analyzing protein three-dimensional-structures and for mapping protein-protein interactions. In this review, the specific contributions of chemical crosslinking and native MS are outlined to reveal the structural features of proteins and protein assemblies. Both strategies are illustrated based on the examples of the tetrameric tumor suppressor protein p53 and multisubunit vinculin-Arp2/3 hybrid complexes. We describe the distinct advantages and limitations of each technique and highlight synergistic effects when both techniques are combined. Integrating both methods is especially useful for characterizing large protein assemblies and for capturing transient interactions. We also point out the future directions we foresee for a combination of in vivo crosslinking and native MS for structural investigation of intact protein assemblies.

  8. CN-GELFrEE - Clear Native Gel-eluted Liquid Fraction Entrapment Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melani, Rafael D; Seckler, Henrique S; Skinner, Owen S; Do Vale, Luis H F; Catherman, Adam D; Havugimana, Pierre C; Valle de Sousa, Marcelo; Domont, Gilberto B; Kelleher, Neil L; Compton, Philip D

    2016-02-29

    Protein complexes perform an array of crucial cellular functions. Elucidating their non-covalent interactions and dynamics is paramount for understanding the role of complexes in biological systems. While the direct characterization of biomolecular assemblies has become increasingly important in recent years, native fractionation techniques that are compatible with downstream analysis techniques, including mass spectrometry, are necessary to further expand these studies. Nevertheless, the field lacks a high-throughput, wide-range, high-recovery separation method for native protein assemblies. Here, we present clear native gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (CN-GELFrEE), which is a novel separation modality for non-covalent protein assemblies. CN-GELFrEE separation performance was demonstrated by fractionating complexes extracted from mouse heart. Fractions were collected over 2 hr and displayed discrete bands ranging from ~30 to 500 kDa. A consistent pattern of increasing molecular weight bandwidths was observed, each ranging ~100 kDa. Further, subsequent reanalysis of native fractions via SDS-PAGE showed molecular-weight shifts consistent with the denaturation of protein complexes. Therefore, CN-GELFrEE was proved to offer the ability to perform high-resolution and high-recovery native separations on protein complexes from a large molecular weight range, providing fractions that are compatible with downstream protein analyses.

  9. Coexistence of Native-Like and Non-Native Cytochrome c on Anionic Liposomes with Different Cardiolipin Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiscia, Leah A; Schweitzer-Stenner, Reinhard

    2015-10-08

    We employed a combination of fluorescence, visible circular dichroism, and absorption spectroscopy to study the conformational changes of ferricytochrome c upon its binding to cardiolipin-containing small unilamellar vesicles. The measurements were performed as a function of the cardiolipin concentration, the cardiolipin content of the liposomes, and the NaCl concentration of the solvent. The data were analyzed with a novel model that combines a single binding step with a conformational equilibrium between native-like and non-native-like proteins bound to the membrane surface. The equilibrium between the two conformations, which themselves are comprised of structurally slightly different subconformations, shifts to the more non-native-like conformation with increasing cardiolipin concentration. For the binding isotherms described in this paper, we explicitly considered the enthalpic and entropic contributions of molecular crowding to protein binding at low lipid concentrations and high occupancy of the liposome surface. Increasing the CL content of liposomes increases the overall binding affinity but makes the conformational distribution much more susceptible to the influence of sodium and chloride ions, which shifts the equilibrium toward the more native-like state and directly inhibits binding, particularly to liposomes with 100% cardiolipin content. Spectroscopic evidence further suggests that a fraction of the non-native conformers adopts a pentacoordinated state similar to those obtained in class C peroxidases. On the basis of our results, we propose a hypothesis that describes the balance between facilitating and impeding forces controlling the peroxidase activity of cytochrome c in the inner membrane space of mitochondria.

  10. Expanded utility of the native chemical ligation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Dawn S Y; Srinivasan, Rajavel; Chen, Grace Y J; Yao, Shao Q

    2004-10-04

    The post-genomic era heralds a multitude of challenges for chemists and biologists alike, with the study of protein functions at the heart of much research. The elucidation of protein structure, localization, stability, post-translational modifications, and protein interactions will steadily unveil the role of each protein and its associated biological function in the cell. The push to develop new technologies has necessitated the integration of various disciplines in science. Consequently, the role of chemistry has never been so profound in the study of biological processes. By combining the strengths of recombinant DNA technology, protein splicing, organic chemistry, and the chemoselective chemistry of native chemical ligation, various strategies have been successfully developed and applied to chemoselectively label proteins, both in vitro and in live cells, with biotin, fluorescent, and other small molecule probes. The site-specific incorporation of molecular entities with unique chemical functionalities in proteins has many potential applications in chemical and biological studies of proteins. In this article, we highlight recent progress of these strategies in several areas related to proteomics and chemical biology, namely, in vitro and in vivo protein biotinylation, protein microarray technologies for large-scale protein analysis, and live-cell bioimaging.

  11. Native and Non-Native English Language Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Walkinshaw

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The English language teaching industry in East and Southeast Asia subscribes to an assumption that native English-speaking teachers (NESTs are the gold standard of spoken and written language, whereas non-native English-speaking teachers (non-NESTs are inferior educators because they lack this innate linguistic skill. But does this premise correspond with the views of second language learners? This article reports on research carried out with university students in Vietnam and Japan exploring the advantages and disadvantages of learning English from NESTs and non-NESTs. Contrary to the above notion, our research illuminated a number of perceived advantages—and disadvantages—in both types of teachers. Students viewed NESTs as models of pronunciation and correct language use, as well as being repositories of cultural knowledge, but they also found NESTs poor at explaining grammar, and their different cultures created tension. Non-NESTs were perceived as good teachers of grammar, and had the ability to resort to the students’ first language when necessary. Students found classroom interaction with non-NESTs easier because of their shared culture. Non-NESTs’ pronunciation was often deemed inferior to that of NESTs, but also easier to comprehend. Some respondents advocated learning from both types of teachers, depending on learners’ proficiency and the skill being taught.

  12. Detection of Dihydroxyphenylalanine in Native Foot Proteins from Mytilus coruscus Byssus%厚壳贻贝Mytilus coruscus足丝盘及足丝的多巴分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李楠楠; 石戈; 杨宵旭; 王智平; 廖智

    2011-01-01

    The amino acid 3, 4-1-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) can be detected in a variety of foot proteins in mussel. The quantification of DOPA in proteins is essential to understand its role in mussel adhesion. DOPA can be detected with considerable sensitivity with nitroblue tetrazolium/Glycinate (NBT/Glycinate) staining. The Mytilus coruscus byssal proteins were experimented for the detections of the DOPA content, protein distribution, and adhesive ability of foot proteins from thread and plaque with electrophoresis and coating assay as well. We found that the average DOPA content in proteins of plaques was about 2.33 times higher than that of thread. The adhesive proteins of byssal plaque contained more DOPA and low molecular weight contents than those from the thread with the intensity difference about four folds as determined by PQuest semi-quantitative analysis. The coating ability on glass of the plaque proteins was greater than that of the thread proteins, which correlated with the difference in the protein composition. Our data may help to understand the functional diversity of adhesive proteins in mussel adhesion.%多巴(3,4-1-dihydroxyphenylalanine,DOPA)是贻贝足丝粘附蛋白中的一种特殊的氨基酸,由酪氨酸经羟化后生成,与贻贝足丝粘附蛋白的强粘附性能具有直接联系.目前,已鉴定的多种贻贝足丝蛋白序列中均发现有不同含量的DOPA存在.蛋白中DOPA的定量检测对于了解DOPA在蛋白粘附中的作用以及粘附蛋白的粘附机理具有重要意义.为了解厚壳贻贝足丝盘和足丝纤维中DOPA的含量以及DOPA与厚壳贻贝足丝蛋白的粘附性能之间的关系,利用氮蓝四唑(nitroblue tetrazolium,NBT)对DOPA的特异染色原理,结合蛋白质电泳、组织化学染色以及玻璃包被实验.分析和比较了厚壳贻贝足丝不同部位的DOPA含量、蛋白组成特点以及粘附能力.NBT可以在不水解蛋白质的情况下进行DOPA的定量分析,且与DOPA的氧

  13. Methods for labeling skeletal muscle ion channels site-specifically with fluorophores suitable for FRET-based structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Mohana; Fessenden, James D

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling is triggered by the concerted action of two enormous Ca(2+) channel complexes, the dihydropyridine receptor and the type 1 ryanodine receptor. Recent advances in our understanding of the structure of these large Ca(2+) channels have been driven by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based analysis. A methodological challenge in conducting these FRET measurements is the ability to site-specifically label these huge ion channels with donor and acceptor fluorophores capable of undergoing energy transfer. In this chapter, we detail specific protocols for tagging large membrane proteins with these fluorescent probes using three orthogonal labeling methods: fluorescent protein fusions, biarsenical reagents directed to engineered tetracysteine tags, and Cy3/5 nitrilotriacetic acid conjugates that bind to poly-histidine tags. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Chinese Native Speakers Counterfactuals Revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    1.IntroductionI have found,in my teaching experience,that English counterfactuals are among the most diffi-cult problems for Chinese native speaker EFL learners. A recent survey of EFL teachers in Guilin,China also supports these findings. In response to the question“What do you think is the most diffi-cult for your students to learn in English”,5 6out of 71 ,or 79% said the English subjunctive verbsare. To the question“Do you think the English subjunctives are difficultfor your students”,1 0 0 % ofthe EFL ...

  15. Native Chicken Production in Indonesia: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hidayat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is a country rich in native chicken genetic resources. There are 31 native chicken breed in Indonesia. Native chicken farming was developed for decades. In early period of 1907’s, mostly farmers reared their native chicken by traditional system (about 80%. In 1980s until now, the number of native chicken farmers which rear native chicken by semi intensive and intensive system have been increasing. These rearing system changing have significantly increased the native chicken productivity. The major constraints for the development of native chicken i.e. low growth rate, risks of high mortality, low egg production. Many research results stated that improving in breeding, feeding and management aspect will increase native chicken production. The information and data contained in this paper is the result of study literature for scientific papers, either in the form of journals, books, or proceedings, and livestock statistics books. This paper is made to support the development of native chickens in Indonesia.

  16. Molecular cloning of a beta-glucan pattern-recognition lipoprotein from the white shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei: correlations between the deduced amino acid sequence and the native protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Figueroa, María Gabriela; Vargas-Requena, Claudia; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Vargas-Albores, Francisco; Higuera-Ciapara, Inocencio; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria

    2004-06-01

    The hemolymph pattern-recognition beta-glucan binding protein from the white shrimp Penaeus (Litopenaeus) vannamei is also a high density lipoprotein (betaGBP-HDL) involved in innate immunity. The betaGBP-HDL full length cDNA sequence determined was 6.3 kb long, and contains a long 3'UTR region with a polyadenylation signal and a poly-A+ tail. The open reading frame is 1454 amino acids long and the N-terminal residue of the mature protein is localized in position 198 of the ORF. Comparison of the betaGBP-HDL amino acid sequence against GenBank detected only significant similarity to betaGBP from the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. betaGBP-HDL is expressed in hepatopancreas, muscle, pleopods and gills, but not in hemocytes as determined by RT-PCR. We discuss the analysis of the deduced primary sequence in terms of the predicted secondary structure, glucanase-like and RGD motives relevant to its dual roles in defence and lipid transport.

  17. Encrusted pyelitis of native kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertig, A; Duvic, C; Chretien, Y; Jungers, P; Grünfeld, J P; Rieu, P

    2000-06-01

    This study reports the first four cases of encrusted pyelitis involving native kidneys. The clinical features, management, and outcome of these patients were analyzed. Predisposing factors were underlying urologic disease and/or urologic manipulations, debilitating diseases, hospitalization, and prolonged antibiotic therapies. Presenting symptoms were renal failure in three patients with ureteroileal urinary diversion and manifestations of cystitis in one patient. Computed tomography scan of the urinary tract was critical for diagnosis. Presence of struvite was demonstrated by crystalluria and infrared spectrophotometry analysis of the encrusted material. Corynebacterium urealyticum urinary infection was identified in one case. Surgery (one patient) and palliative ureteral diversion (one patient), respectively, led to death and end-stage renal failure. Successful dissolution of encrusted pyelitis was obtained in two patients treated with intravenous vancomycin and local acidification of the renal collecting system. Clinical observation shows that encrusted pyelitis is a threatening disorder that destroys the native kidneys and may lead to end-stage renal failure. Successful treatment of the disease by chemolysis and antibiotics depends on correct and early diagnosis. Diagnosis required recognition of the predisposing factors, computed tomography imaging of the urinary tract, crystalluria, and identification of urea-splitting bacteria with prolonged culture on selective medium.

  18. Reconstructing Native American population history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, David; Patterson, Nick; Campbell, Desmond; Tandon, Arti; Mazieres, Stéphane; Ray, Nicolas; Parra, Maria V; Rojas, Winston; Duque, Constanza; Mesa, Natalia; García, Luis F; Triana, Omar; Blair, Silvia; Maestre, Amanda; Dib, Juan C; Bravi, Claudio M; Bailliet, Graciela; Corach, Daniel; Hünemeier, Tábita; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M; Petzl-Erler, María Luiza; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Riba, Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Lopez-Alarcón, Mardia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Alejandra V; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Gómez-Vázquez, Maria José; Molina, Julio; Carracedo, Angel; Salas, Antonio; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Witonsky, David B; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Sukernik, Rem I; Osipova, Ludmila; Fedorova, Sardana A; Vasquez, René; Villena, Mercedes; Moreau, Claudia; Barrantes, Ramiro; Pauls, David; Excoffier, Laurent; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Larrouy, Georges; Klitz, William; Labuda, Damian; Kidd, Judith; Kidd, Kenneth; Di Rienzo, Anna; Freimer, Nelson B; Price, Alkes L; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2012-08-16

    The peopling of the Americas has been the subject of extensive genetic, archaeological and linguistic research; however, central questions remain unresolved. One contentious issue is whether the settlement occurred by means of a single migration or multiple streams of migration from Siberia. The pattern of dispersals within the Americas is also poorly understood. To address these questions at a higher resolution than was previously possible, we assembled data from 52 Native American and 17 Siberian groups genotyped at 364,470 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Here we show that Native Americans descend from at least three streams of Asian gene flow. Most descend entirely from a single ancestral population that we call 'First American'. However, speakers of Eskimo-Aleut languages from the Arctic inherit almost half their ancestry from a second stream of Asian gene flow, and the Na-Dene-speaking Chipewyan from Canada inherit roughly one-tenth of their ancestry from a third stream. We show that the initial peopling followed a southward expansion facilitated by the coast, with sequential population splits and little gene flow after divergence, especially in South America. A major exception is in Chibchan speakers on both sides of the Panama isthmus, who have ancestry from both North and South America.

  19. Reconstructing Native American Population History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, David; Patterson, Nick; Campbell, Desmond; Tandon, Arti; Mazieres, Stéphane; Ray, Nicolas; Parra, Maria V.; Rojas, Winston; Duque, Constanza; Mesa, Natalia; García, Luis F.; Triana, Omar; Blair, Silvia; Maestre, Amanda; Dib, Juan C.; Bravi, Claudio M.; Bailliet, Graciela; Corach, Daniel; Hünemeier, Tábita; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M.; Petzl-Erler, María Luiza; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Riba, Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Lopez-Alarcón, Mardia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Alejandra V.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Gómez-Vázquez, María José; Molina, Julio; Carracedo, Ángel; Salas, Antonio; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Witonsky, David B.; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Sukernik, Rem I.; Osipova, Ludmila; Fedorova, Sardana; Vasquez, René; Villena, Mercedes; Moreau, Claudia; Barrantes, Ramiro; Pauls, David; Excoffier, Laurent; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Dugoujon, Jean Michel; Larrouy, Georges; Klitz, William; Labuda, Damian; Kidd, Judith; Kidd, Kenneth; Rienzo, Anna Di; Freimer, Nelson B.; Price, Alkes L.; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    The peopling of the Americas has been the subject of extensive genetic, archaeological and linguistic research; however, central questions remain unresolved1–5. One contentious issue is whether the settlement occurred via a single6–8 or multiple streams of migration from Siberia9–15. The pattern of dispersals within the Americas is also poorly understood. To address these questions at higher resolution than was previously possible, we assembled data from 52 Native American and 17 Siberian groups genotyped at 364,470 single nucleotide polymorphisms. We show that Native Americans descend from at least three streams of Asian gene flow. Most descend entirely from a single ancestral population that we call “First American”. However, speakers of Eskimo-Aleut languages from the Arctic inherit almost half their ancestry from a second stream of Asian gene flow, and the Na-Dene-speaking Chipewyan from Canada inherit roughly one-tenth of their ancestry from a third stream. We show that the initial peopling followed a southward expansion facilitated by the coast, with sequential population splits and little gene flow after divergence, especially in South America. A major exception is in Chibchan-speakers on both sides of the Panama Isthmus, who have ancestry from both North and South America. PMID:22801491

  20. Examining the Heterogeneous Genome Content of Multipartite Viruses BMV and CCMV by Native Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Snijder, Joost; Tsvetkova, Irina B.; Dragnea, Bogdan G.; Cornelissen, Jeroen J.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2016-06-01

    Since the concept was first introduced by Brian Chait and co-workers in 1991, mass spectrometry of proteins and protein complexes under non-denaturing conditions (native MS) has strongly developed, through parallel advances in instrumentation, sample preparation, and data analysis tools. However, the success rate of native MS analysis, particularly in heterogeneous mega-Dalton (MDa) protein complexes, still strongly depends on careful instrument modification. Here, we further explore these boundaries in native mass spectrometry, analyzing two related endogenous multipartite viruses: the Brome Mosaic Virus (BMV) and the Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV). Both CCMV and BMV are approximately 4.6 megadalton (MDa) in mass, of which approximately 1 MDA originates from the genomic content of the virion. Both viruses are produced as mixtures of three particles carrying different segments of the genome, varying by approximately 0.1 MDA in mass (~2%). This mixture of particles poses a challenging analytical problem for high-resolution native MS analysis, given the large mass scales involved. We attempt to unravel the particle heterogeneity using both Q-TOF and Orbitrap mass spectrometers extensively modified for analysis of very large assemblies. We show that manipulation of the charging behavior can provide assistance in assigning the correct charge states. Despite their challenging size and heterogeneity, we obtained native mass spectra with resolved series of charge states for both BMV and CCMV, demonstrating that native MS of endogenous multipartite virions is feasible.

  1. NativeView: A Geospatial Curriculum for Native Nation Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattling Leaf, J.

    2007-12-01

    In the spirit of collaboration and reciprocity, James Rattling Leaf of Sinte Gleska University on the Rosebud Reservation of South Dakota will present recent developments, experiences, insights and a vision for education in Indian Country. As a thirty-year young institution, Sinte Gleska University is founded by a strong vision of ancestral leadership and the values of the Lakota Way of Life. Sinte Gleska University (SGU) has initiated the development of a Geospatial Education Curriculum project. NativeView: A Geospatial Curriculum for Native Nation Building is a two-year project that entails a disciplined approach towards the development of a relevant Geospatial academic curriculum. This project is designed to meet the educational and land management needs of the Rosebud Lakota Tribe through the utilization of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Remote Sensing (RS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS). In conjunction with the strategy and progress of this academic project, a formal presentation and demonstration of the SGU based Geospatial software RezMapper software will exemplify an innovative example of state of the art information technology. RezMapper is an interactive CD software package focused toward the 21 Lakota communities on the Rosebud Reservation that utilizes an ingenious concept of multimedia mapping and state of the art data compression and presentation. This ongoing development utilizes geographic data, imagery from space, historical aerial photography and cultural features such as historic Lakota documents, language, song, video and historical photographs in a multimedia fashion. As a tangible product, RezMapper will be a project deliverable tool for use in the classroom and to a broad range of learners.

  2. Immigration, education and native wage inequality

    OpenAIRE

    Lumpe, Christian; Weigert, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the effect of immigration on the labour market prospects for different skill groups among natives. We develop a model of endogenous labour supply in which immigration affects educational decisions of natives. We argue that the distributional consequences of immigration with respect to native between-skill-group inequality are ambiguous in general and crucially depend on the host country's level of educational attainment. We show that this result is robust irrespective...

  3. Walking in Balance: Native American Recovery Programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Owen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews Native American ritual practices, frameworks and key concepts employed by several substance abuse treatments centres in the U.S. and Canada. It also examines the way Alcoholics Anonymous’ Twelve Step programme has been modified to attract and serve the needs of Native Americans and First Nations and its potential impact on the ritual practices. Native concepts of wellbeing are highlighted and linked to the idea of living in “balance”.

  4. Word Durations in Non-Native English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Rachel E.; Baese-Berk, Melissa; Bonnasse-Gahot, Laurent; Kim, Midam; Van Engen, Kristin J.; Bradlow, Ann R.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we compare the effects of English lexical features on word duration for native and non-native English speakers and for non-native speakers with different L1s and a range of L2 experience. We also examine whether non-native word durations lead to judgments of a stronger foreign accent. We measured word durations in English paragraphs read by 12 American English (AE), 20 Korean, and 20 Chinese speakers. We also had AE listeners rate the `accentedness' of these non-native speakers. AE speech had shorter durations, greater within-speaker word duration variance, greater reduction of function words, and less between-speaker variance than non-native speech. However, both AE and non-native speakers showed sensitivity to lexical predictability by reducing second mentions and high frequency words. Non-native speakers with more native-like word durations, greater within-speaker word duration variance, and greater function word reduction were perceived as less accented. Overall, these findings identify word duration as an important and complex feature of foreign-accented English. PMID:21516172

  5. Functionalizable self-assembled trichlorosilyl-based monolayer for application in biosensor technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Franier, Brian; Jankowski, Alexander; Thompson, Michael

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes the design and synthesis of 3-(3-(trichlorosilyl)propoxy)propanoyl chloride (MEG-Cl), a compound capable of forming functionalizable monolayers on hydroxylated surfaces. The compound was synthesized in high purity, as suggested by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, and in moderate overall yield. Contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirm the binding of MEG-Cl to an amorphous glass substrate and the further modification of the monolayer with a nickel (II)-binding ligand for the purpose of binding polyhistidine-tagged proteins. The compound will be useful in biosensing applications due to its ability to be easily modified with any number of nucleophilic functional groups subsequent to substrate monolayer formation.

  6. Sleep and native language interference affect non-native speech sound learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earle, F Sayako; Myers, Emily B

    2015-12-01

    Adults learning a new language are faced with a significant challenge: non-native speech sounds that are perceptually similar to sounds in one's native language can be very difficult to acquire. Sleep and native language interference, 2 factors that may help to explain this difficulty in acquisition, are addressed in 3 studies. Results of Experiment 1 showed that participants trained on a non-native contrast at night improved in discrimination 24 hr after training, while those trained in the morning showed no such improvement. Experiments 2 and 3 addressed the possibility that incidental exposure to perceptually similar native language speech sounds during the day interfered with maintenance in the morning group. Taken together, results show that the ultimate success of non-native speech sound learning depends not only on the similarity of learned sounds to the native language repertoire, but also to interference from native language sounds before sleep.

  7. Contrasting xylem vessel constraints on hydraulic conductivity between native and non-native woody understory species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S Smith

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We examined the hydraulic properties of 82 native and non-native woody species common to forests of Eastern North America, including several congeneric groups, representing a range of anatomical wood types. We observed smaller conduit diameters with greater frequency in non-native species, corresponding to lower calculated potential vulnerability to cavitation index. Non-native species exhibited higher vessel-grouping in metaxylem compared with native species, however, solitary vessels were more prevalent in secondary xylem. Higher frequency of solitary vessels in secondary xylem was related to a lower potential vulnerability index. We found no relationship between anatomical characteristics of xylem, origin of species and hydraulic conductivity, indicating that non-native species did not exhibit advantageous hydraulic efficiency over native species. Our results confer anatomical advantages for non-native species under the potential for cavitation due to freezing, perhaps permitting extended growing seasons.

  8. Chemical labelling for visualizing native AMPA receptors in live neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, Sho; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Arai, Itaru; Kakegawa, Wataru; Matsuda, Shinji; Ibata, Keiji; Nemoto, Yuri L.; Kusumi, Akihiro; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2017-04-01

    The location and number of neurotransmitter receptors are dynamically regulated at postsynaptic sites. However, currently available methods for visualizing receptor trafficking require the introduction of genetically engineered receptors into neurons, which can disrupt the normal functioning and processing of the original receptor. Here we report a powerful method for visualizing native α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) which are essential for cognitive functions without any genetic manipulation. This is based on a covalent chemical labelling strategy driven by selective ligand-protein recognition to tether small fluorophores to AMPARs using chemical AMPAR modification (CAM) reagents. The high penetrability of CAM reagents enables visualization of native AMPARs deep in brain tissues without affecting receptor function. Moreover, CAM reagents are used to characterize the diffusion dynamics of endogenous AMPARs in both cultured neurons and hippocampal slices. This method will help clarify the involvement of AMPAR trafficking in various neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders.

  9. Comparing the rheology of native spider and silkworm spinning dope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, C.; Terry, A. E.; Porter, D.; Vollrath, F.

    2006-11-01

    Silk production has evolved to be energetically efficient and functionally optimized, yielding a material that can outperform most industrial fibres, particularly in toughness. Spider silk has hitherto defied all attempts at reproduction, despite advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind its superb mechanical properties. Spun fibres, natural and man-made, rely on the extrusion process to facilitate molecular orientation and bonding. Hence a full understanding of the flow characteristics of native spinning feedstock (dope) will be essential to translate natural spinning to artificial silk production. Here we show remarkable similarity between the rheologies for native spider-dragline and silkworm-cocoon silk, despite their independent evolution and substantial differences in protein structure. Surprisingly, both dopes behave like typical polymer melts. This observation opens the door to using polymer theory to clarify our general understanding of natural silks, despite the many specializations found in different animal species.

  10. Aerococcus viridans Native Valve Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwan Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerococcus viridans is an infrequent human pathogen and few cases of infective endocarditis have been reported. A case involving a 69-year-old man with colon cancer and hemicolectomy 14 years previously, without recurrence, is reported. A diagnosis of native mitral valve endocarditis was established on the basis of clinical presentation, characteristic echocardiographic findings and pathological specimen examination after urgent valve replacement. A viridans endocarditis appears to be particularly virulent, requiring a surgical approach in four of 10 cases reported and death in one of nine. Given the aggressive nature of A viridans endocarditis and the variable time to diagnosis (a few days to seven months, prompt recognition of symptoms and echocardiography, in addition to blood cultures, should be performed when symptoms persist.

  11. Speaking C++ as a native

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroustrup, Bjarne

    2001-08-01

    C++ supports several styles ("multiple paradigms") of programming. This allows great flexibility, notational convenience, maintainability, and close-to-optimal performance. Programmers who don't know the basic native C++ styles and techniques "speak" C++ with a thick accent, limiting themselves to relatively restrictive pidgin dialects. Here, I present language features such as classes, class hierarchies, abstract classes, and templates, together with the fundamental programming styles they support. In particular, I show how to provide generic algorithms, function objects, access objects, and delayed evaluation as needed to build and use flexible and efficient libraries. The aim is to give an idea of what's possible to provide, and some understanding of the fundamental techniques of modern C++ libraries.

  12. Evaluation of immunological responses to recombinant Porin A protein (rPoA) from native strains of Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A and B using OMV as an adjuvant in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrough, Parviz; Bouzari, Saeid; Mousavi, Seyed Fazlollah; Asadi Karam, Mohammad Reza; Vaziri, Farzam; Fateh, Abolfazl; Behrouzi, Ava; Malekan, Mohammadali; Siadat, Seyed Davar

    2017-09-20

    Neisseria meningitidis is one of the main causes of sepsis and meningitis, which are two serious life-threatening diseases in both children and adolescents. Porin A (porA) from both serogroup A and B were cloned into the pET28a plasmid and expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. BALB/c mice were subcutaneously injected three times with 25 μg of the recombinant PorA. Specific total IgG antibodies and isotypes were evaluated using ELISA assay. Opsonophagocytic assay (OPA) and Serum Bactericidal assay (SBA) were performed. Results showed that vaccinated mice exhibited higher levels of anti-Porin A (p OMV of strain CSBPI G-245 and complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvant were used. Results demonstrated that Porin A could be a valuable target for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies against N. meningitidis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Turkish Students' Perspectives on Speaking Anxiety in Native and Non-Native English Speaker Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozavli, Ebubekir; Gulmez, Recep

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal the effect of FLA (foreign language anxiety) in native/non-native speaker of English classrooms. In this study, two groups of students (90 in total) of whom 38 were in NS (native speaker) class and 52 in NNS (non-native speaker) class taking English as a second language course for 22 hours a week at Erzincan…

  14. Influence of native and non-native multitalker babble on speech recognition in noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandni Jain

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess speech recognition in noise using multitalker babble of native and non-native language at two different signal to noise ratios. The speech recognition in noise was assessed on 60 participants (18 to 30 years with normal hearing sensitivity, having Malayalam and Kannada as their native language. For this purpose, 6 and 10 multitalker babble were generated in Kannada and Malayalam language. Speech recognition was assessed for native listeners of both the languages in the presence of native and nonnative multitalker babble. Results showed that the speech recognition in noise was significantly higher for 0 dB signal to noise ratio (SNR compared to -3 dB SNR for both the languages. Performance of Kannada Listeners was significantly higher in the presence of native (Kannada babble compared to non-native babble (Malayalam. However, this was not same with the Malayalam listeners wherein they performed equally well with native (Malayalam as well as non-native babble (Kannada. The results of the present study highlight the importance of using native multitalker babble for Kannada listeners in lieu of non-native babble and, considering the importance of each SNR for estimating speech recognition in noise scores. Further research is needed to assess speech recognition in Malayalam listeners in the presence of other non-native backgrounds of various types.

  15. Comparison of native and non-native phone imitation by English and Spanish speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, Anne J; Viswanathan, Navin; Aivar, M Pilar; Manuel, Sarath

    2013-01-01

    Experiments investigating phonetic convergence in conversation often focus on interlocutors with similar phonetic inventories. Extending these experiments to those with dissimilar inventories requires understanding the capacity of speakers to imitate native and non-native phones. In the present study, we tested native Spanish and native English speakers to determine whether imitation of non-native tokens differs qualitatively from imitation of native tokens. Participants imitated a [ba]-[pa] continuum that varied in VOT from -60 ms (prevoiced, Spanish [b]) to +60 ms (long lag, English [p]) such that the continuum consisted of some tokens that were native to Spanish speakers and some that were native to English speakers. Analysis of the imitations showed two critical results. First, both groups of speakers demonstrated sensitivity to VOT differences in tokens that fell within their native regions of the VOT continuum (prevoiced region for Spanish and long lag region for English). Secondly, neither group of speakers demonstrated such sensitivity to VOT differences among tokens that fell in their non-native regions of the continuum. These results show that, even in an intentional imitation task, speakers cannot accurately imitate non-native tokens, but are clearly flexible in producing native tokens. Implications of these findings are discussed with reference to the constraints on convergence in interlocutors from different linguistic backgrounds.

  16. Vowel perception: Effects of non-native language versus non-native dialect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.; Smits, R.; Cooper, N.

    2005-01-01

    Three groups of listeners identified the vowel in CV and VC syllables produced by an American English talker. The listeners were (a) native speakers of American English, (b) native speakers of Australian English (different dialect), and (c) native speakers of Dutch (different language). The syllable

  17. Native- and Non-Native Speaking English Teachers in Vietnam: Weighing the Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkinshaw, Ian; Duong, Oanh Thi Hoang

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines a common belief that learners of English as a foreign language prefer to learn English from native-speaker teachers rather than non-native speakers of English. 50 Vietnamese learners of English evaluated the importance of native-speakerness compared with seven qualities valued in an English language teacher: teaching…

  18. Risk to native Uroleucon aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) from non-native lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aphids in the genus Uroleucon Mordvilko (Hemiptera: Aphididae) are native herbivores that feed on goldenrod (Solidago spp.) and other Asteraceae in North America. The aphids are potential prey for a wide variety of natural enemies, including native and non-native species of lady beetles (Coleoptera...

  19. Native American History in a Box: A New Approach to Teaching Native American Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Emory C.; Hitt, Austin M.; Schipper, Jason A.; Jones, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Native American History in a Box curriculum which is designed to introduce elementary and middle-level students to Native American cultures. The curriculum consists of a five day unit addressing the following concepts pertaining to Native American Nations: settlements, tools, sustenance, pottery, and contact with…

  20. Vowel perception: Effects of non-native language versus non-native dialect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.; Smits, R.; Cooper, N.

    2005-01-01

    Three groups of listeners identified the vowel in CV and VC syllables produced by an American English talker. The listeners were (a) native speakers of American English, (b) native speakers of Australian English (different dialect), and (c) native speakers of Dutch (different language). The

  1. Comparison of native and non-native phone imitation by English and Spanish speakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie J Olmstead

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Experiments investigating phonetic convergence in conversation often focus on interlocutors with similar phonetic inventories. Extending these experiments to those with dissimilar inventories requires understanding the capacity of speakers to imitate native and non-native phones. In the present study, we tested native Spanish and native English speakers to determine whether imitation of non-native tokens differs qualitatively from imitation of native tokens. Participants imitated a [ba] -[pa] continuum that varied in VOT from -60 ms (prevoiced, Spanish [b] to +60 ms (long lag, English [p] such that the continuum consisted of some tokens that were native to Spanish speakers and some that were native to English speakers. Analysis of the imitations showed two critical results. First, both groups of speakers demonstrated sensitivity to VOT differences in tokens that fell within their native regions of the VOT continuum (prevoiced region for Spanish and long lag region for English. Secondly, neither group of speakers demonstrated such sensitivity to VOT differences among tokens that fell in their non-native regions of the continuum. These results show that, even in an intentional imitation task, speakers cannot accurately imitate non-native tokens, but are clearly flexible in producing native tokens. Implications of these findings are discussed with reference to the constraints on convergence in interlocutors from different linguistic backgrounds.

  2. Dynamic force microscopy imaging of native membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienberger, Ferry; Stroh, Cordula; Kada, Gerald; Moser, Rosita; Baumgartner, Werner; Pastushenko, Vassili; Rankl, Christian; Schmidt, Ute; Mueller, Harald; Orlova, Elena; LeGrimellec, Christian; Drenckhahn, Detlev; Blaas, Dieter; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2003-10-15

    We employed magnetic ACmode atomic force microscopy (MACmode AFM) as a novel dynamic force microscopy method to image surfaces of biological membranes in their native environments. The lateral resolution achieved under optimized imaging conditions was in the nanometer range, even when the sample was only weakly attached to the support. Purple membranes (PM) from Halobacterium salinarum were used as a test standard for topographical imaging. The hexagonal arrangement of the bacteriorhodopsin trimers on the cytoplasmic side of PM was resolved with 1.5 nm lateral accuracy, a resolution similar to images obtained in contact and tapping-mode AFM. Human rhinovirus 2 (HRV2) particles were attached to mica surfaces via nonspecific interactions. The capsid structure and 2 nm sized protein loops of HRV2 were routinely obtained without any displacement of the virus. Globular and filamentous structures on living and fixed endothelial cells were observed with a resolution of 5-20 nm. These examples show that MACmode AFM is a favorable method in studying the topography of soft and weakly attached biological samples with high resolution under physiological conditions.

  3. Differential allocation to photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic nitrogen fractions among native and invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Jennifer L; Glenwinkel, Lori A; Sack, Lawren

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are expected to cluster on the "high-return" end of the leaf economic spectrum, displaying leaf traits consistent with higher carbon assimilation relative to native species. Intra-leaf nitrogen (N) allocation should support these physiological differences; however, N biochemistry has not been examined in more than a few invasive species. We measured 34 leaf traits including seven leaf N pools for five native and five invasive species from Hawaii under low irradiance to mimic the forest understory environment. We found several trait differences between native and invasive species. In particular, invasive species showed preferential N allocation to metabolism (amino acids) rather than photosynthetic light reactions (membrane-bound protein) by comparison with native species. The soluble protein concentration did not vary between groups. Under these low irradiance conditions, native species had higher light-saturated photosynthetic rates, possibly as a consequence of a greater investment in membrane-bound protein. Invasive species may succeed by employing a wide range of N allocation mechanisms, including higher amino acid production for fast growth under high irradiance or storage of N in leaves as soluble protein or amino acids.

  4. Differential allocation to photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic nitrogen fractions among native and invasive species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Funk

    Full Text Available Invasive species are expected to cluster on the "high-return" end of the leaf economic spectrum, displaying leaf traits consistent with higher carbon assimilation relative to native species. Intra-leaf nitrogen (N allocation should support these physiological differences; however, N biochemistry has not been examined in more than a few invasive species. We measured 34 leaf traits including seven leaf N pools for five native and five invasive species from Hawaii under low irradiance to mimic the forest understory environment. We found several trait differences between native and invasive species. In particular, invasive species showed preferential N allocation to metabolism (amino acids rather than photosynthetic light reactions (membrane-bound protein by comparison with native species. The soluble protein concentration did not vary between groups. Under these low irradiance conditions, native species had higher light-saturated photosynthetic rates, possibly as a consequence of a greater investment in membrane-bound protein. Invasive species may succeed by employing a wide range of N allocation mechanisms, including higher amino acid production for fast growth under high irradiance or storage of N in leaves as soluble protein or amino acids.

  5. Native MS and ECD Characterization of a Fab-Antigen Complex May Facilitate Crystallization for X-ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Cui, Weidong; Wecksler, Aaron T.; Zhang, Hao; Molina, Patricia; Deperalta, Galahad; Gross, Michael L.

    2016-07-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) and top-down electron-capture dissociation (ECD) combine as a powerful approach for characterizing large proteins and protein assemblies. Here, we report their use to study an antibody Fab (Fab-1)-VEGF complex in its near-native state. Native ESI with analysis by FTICR mass spectrometry confirms that VEGF is a dimer in solution and that its complex with Fab-1 has a binding stoichiometry of 2:2. Applying combinations of collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), ECD, and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) allows identification of flexible regions of the complex, potentially serving as a guide for crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis.

  6. Reading Native American Literature: A Teacher's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Bruce A.

    2004-01-01

    High school and college teachers interested in offering units or courses on Native American literature have often had to carve out new teaching strategies because ready resources and guides are scarce. In "Reading Native American Literature: A Teacher's Guide," Bruce A. Goebel offers innovative and practical suggestions about how to introduce…

  7. Support for Native Americans with Developmental Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Wylie; Rife, Christine

    This report addresses the high incidence of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and fetal alcohol effects (FAE) among Native Americans and suggests that there is a lack of comprehensive effort to provide outreach services to the Native American population in Illinois. The report begins with an overview of American Indian history and the migration of…

  8. Native grasses for rehabilitating Hunter Valley minesites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huxtable, C. [NSW Department of Land and Water Conservation, NSW (Australia)

    1998-04-01

    Introduced plant species, particularly grasses, have long been used to rehabilitate mined land in Australia. Interest in using native species spawned a research project in the Hunter Valley which has demonstrated the suitability of certain native species for rehabilitation and put forward guidelines to enhance the chance of their successful establishment. 4 photos., 1 tab.

  9. The Native Speaker: Membership Has Its Privileges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siskin, H. Jay

    This paper responds to Claire Kramsch's essay on the demise of the notion of the idealized native speaker as the model for second language learning and implications for second languages and cultures education. In her essay, Kramsch forcefully argues against the native speaker construct and exhorts teachers and learners not to abandon their unique…

  10. Stennis Space Center celebrates Native American culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Famie Willis (left), 2009-2010 Choctaw Indian Princess, displays artifacts during Native American Heritage Month activities at Stennis Space Center on Nov. 24. The celebration featured various Native American cultural displays for Stennis employees to view. Shown above are (l to r): Willis, Elaine Couchman of NASA Shared Services Center, John Cecconi of NSSC and Lakeisha Robertson of the Environmental Protection Agency.

  11. How Digital Native Learners Describe Themselves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Eight university students from the "digital native" generation were interviewed about the connections they saw between technology use and learning, and also their reactions to the popular press claims about their generation. Themes that emerged from the interviews were coded to show patterns in how digital natives describe themselves.…

  12. Can We Teach Digital Natives Digital Literacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wan

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much debate about the concept of digital natives, in particular the differences between the digital natives' knowledge and adoption of digital technologies in informal versus formal educational contexts. This paper investigates the knowledge about educational technologies of a group of undergraduate students…

  13. Theoretical Perspectives of How Digital Natives Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivunja, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Marck Prensky, an authority on teaching and learning especially with the aid of Information and Communication Technologies, has referred to 21st century children born after 1980 as "Digital Natives". This paper reviews literature of leaders in the field to shed some light on theoretical perspectives of how Digital Natives learn and how…

  14. Brain Hemispheric Functions and the Native American.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Allen Chuck

    1982-01-01

    Uses brain research conducted by Dr. Roger Sperry to show that traditional Native Americans are more dominant in right hemisphere thinking, setting them apart from a modern left hemisphere-oriented society (especially emphasized in schools). Describes some characteristics of Native American thinking that illustrate a right hemisphere orientation…

  15. Substance Abuse among Native-American Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncher, Michael S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Reviews social epidemiological data on substance abuse among Native American youth and discusses culturally relevant etiological factors. Highlights strategies for identification of high-risk youth, concentrating on theoretical and methodological aspects appropriate for Native American populations. Issues of sensitive technology transfer and…

  16. Staphylococcus saprophyticus causing native valve endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garduño, Eugenio; Márquez, Irene; Beteta, Alicia; Said, Ibrahim; Blanco, Javier; Pineda, Tomás

    2005-01-01

    Coagulase negative staphylococci are a rare cause of native valve endocarditis. Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus infrequently reported as a human pathogen, and most of the cases reported are urinary tract infections. We describe a case of native valve endocarditis attributed to this organism. The patient needed valve replacement due to heart failure.

  17. Spatial arrangement overrules environmental factors to structure native and non-native assemblages of synanthropic harvestmen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Muster

    Full Text Available Understanding how space affects the occurrence of native and non-native species is essential for inferring processes that shape communities. However, studies considering spatial and environmental variables for the entire community - as well as for the native and non-native assemblages in a single study - are scarce for animals. Harvestmen communities in central Europe have undergone drastic turnovers during the past decades, with several newly immigrated species, and thus provide a unique system to study such questions. We studied the wall-dwelling harvestmen communities from 52 human settlements in Luxembourg and found the assemblages to be largely dominated by non-native species (64% of specimens. Community structure was analysed using Moran's eigenvector maps as spatial variables, and landcover variables at different radii (500 m, 1000 m, 2000 m in combination with climatic parameters as environmental variables. A surprisingly high portion of pure spatial variation (15.7% of total variance exceeded the environmental (10.6% and shared (4% components of variation, but we found only minor differences between native and non-native assemblages. This could result from the ecological flexibility of both, native and non-native harvestmen that are not restricted to urban habitats but also inhabit surrounding semi-natural landscapes. Nevertheless, urban landcover variables explained more variation in the non-native community, whereas coverage of semi-natural habitats (forests, rivers at broader radii better explained the native assemblage. This indicates that some urban characteristics apparently facilitate the establishment of non-native species. We found no evidence for competitive replacement of native by invasive species, but a community with novel combination of native and non-native species.

  18. An Analysis of Student Evaluations of Native and Non Native Korean Foreign Language Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Damron

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of native and non-native teaching assistants and part-time teachers (both referred to as TAs in this article, students completed 632 evaluations of Ko-rean Language TAs from 2005 to 2008, and these evaluations were compiled for an analysis of variants (ANOVA. The evaluations were categorized into three groups of TAs: native Korean-speaking female, native Korean-speaking male, and non-native male; non-native females would have been included in the study, but there were not enough non-native female teachers to have a reliable sample. In an effort to encourage more self-examined teaching practices, this study addresses the greatest strengths and weaknesses of each group. Results revealed several significant differences between the ratings of the groups: native female TAs rated lowest overall, and non-native male TAs rated highest overall. The most prominent differences be-tween groups occurred in ratings of amount students learned, TAs’ preparedness, TAs’ active involvement in students’ learning, TAs’ enthusiasm, and TAs’ tardiness. This study reviews students’ written comments on the evaluations and proposes possible causes of these findings, concluding that differences in ratings are based on both teaching patterns associated with each group of TAs and student re-sponse bias that favors non-native male speakers. Teaching patterns include a tendency for native (Korean female TAs to teach using a lecture format and non-native male TAs to teach using a discussion format; for native TAs to have difficulty adapting to the language level of the students; and for a more visible enthusiasm for Korean culture held by non-native TAs. Causes for bias may include “other-ing” females and natives, TA selection procedures, and trends in evaluating TAs based on language level.

  19. Native and Non-native English Teachers' Perceptions of their Professional Identity: Convergent or Divergent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia Tajeddin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available There is still a preference for native speaker teachers in the language teaching profession, which is supposed to influence the self-perceptions of native and nonnative teachers. However, the status of English as a globalized language is changing the legitimacy of native/nonnative teacher dichotomy. This study sought to investigate native and nonnative English-speaking teachers’ perceptions about native and nonnative teachers’ status and the advantages and disadvantages of being a native or nonnative teacher. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire and a semi-structured interview. A total of 200 native and nonnative teachers of English from the UK and the US, i.e. the inner circle, and Turkey and Iran, the expanding circle, participated in this study. A significant majority of nonnative teachers believed that native speaker teachers have better speaking proficiency, better pronunciation, and greater self-confidence. The findings also showed nonnative teachers’ lack of self-confidence and awareness of their role and status compared with native-speaker teachers, which could be the result of existing inequities between native and nonnative English-speaking teachers in ELT. The findings also revealed that native teachers disagreed more strongly with the concept of native teachers’ superiority over nonnative teachers. Native teachers argued that nonnative teachers have a good understanding of teaching methodology whereas native teachers are more competent in correct language. It can be concluded that teacher education programs in the expanding-circle countries should include materials for teachers to raise their awareness of their own professional status and role and to remove their misconception about native speaker fallacy.

  20. A phase 1 study of a meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccine made from a group B strain with deleted lpxL1 and synX, over-expressed factor H binding protein, two PorAs and stabilized OpcA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, P B; Biggs-Cicatelli, S; Moran, E E; Schmiel, D H; Pinto, V B; Burden, R E; Miller, L B; Moon, J E; Bowden, R A; Cummings, J F; Zollinger, W D

    2011-02-04

    This phase I clinical trial assessed the safety and immunogenicity of a native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV) vaccine prepared from an lpxL1(-) synX(-) mutant of strain 8570(B:4:P1.19,15:L8-5) of Neisseria meningitidis. Additional mutations enhance the expression of factor H binding protein variant 1 (fHbp v.1), stabilize expression of OpcA and introduce a second PorA (P1.22,14). Thirty-six volunteers were assigned to one of four dose groups (10, 25, 50 and 75 mcg, based on protein content) to receive three intramuscular injections at six week intervals with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant. Specific local and systemic adverse events were solicited by diary and at visits on days 2, 7, and 14 after each vaccination. Blood chemistries, complete blood count, and coagulation studies were measured on each vaccination day and again 2 and 14 days later. Blood for ELISA and serum bactericidal assays was drawn two and six weeks after each vaccination. The proportion of volunteers who developed a fourfold or greater increase in bactericidal activity to the wild type parent of the vaccine strain at two weeks after the third dose was 27 out of 34 (0.79, 95% C.I. 0.65-0.93). Against four other group B strains the response rate ranged from 41% to 82% indicating a good cross reactive antibody response. Depletion assays show contributions to bactericidal activity from antibodies to lipooligosaccharide (LOS), fHbp v.1 and OpcA. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Nativization processes in L1 Esperanto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, B K

    2001-10-01

    The artificial language Esperanto is spoken not only as a second language, by its proponents, but also as a native language by children of some of those proponents. The present study is a preliminary description of some characteristics of the Native Esperanto (NE) of eight speakers, ranging in age from six to fourteen years. As such, it is the first of its kind--previous works on NE are either theoretical treatises or individual case studies. We find, at least for the eight subjects studied, both bilingualism and nativization effects, differentiating native from non-native Esperanto speech. Among these effects are loss or modification of the accusative case, phonological reduction, attrition of the tense/aspect system, and pronominal cliticization. The theoretical ramifications are discussed, particularly with regard to universals of language acquisition and the effects of expressive requirements of language.

  2. The new digital natives cutting the chord

    CERN Document Server

    Dingli, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    The first generation of Digital Natives (DNs) is now growing up.  However, these digital natives were rather late starters since; their exposure to computers started when they could master the mouse and the penetration of computers in educational institutions was still very low. Today, a new breed of digital natives is emerging.  This new breed includes those individuals who are being introduced from their first instances to the world of wireless devices. One year olds manage to master the intuitive touch interfaces of their tablets whilst sitting comfortably in their baby bouncers. The controller-less interfaces allow these children to interact with a machine in a way which was unconceivable below. Thus, our research investigated the paradigm shift between the different generations of digital natives. We analysed the way in which these two generations differ from each other and we explored how the world needs to change in order to harness the potential of these new digital natives.

  3. Native Generations: A campaign addressing infant mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives in urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutman, Shira; Loughran, Julie; Tanner, Leah; Randall, Leslie L

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the development and evaluation of Native Generations, a campaign addressing high rates of infant mortality (IM) among American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) in urban areas. Campaign development included reviews of literature and previous campaigns, an advisory council, and focus groups. Campaign messages are strength-based, encouraging AI/AN caregivers to utilize available Native-specific resources, including health care, support services, and programming as IM protective factors. The primary campaign material is an 11-minute video. Pilot survey data indicate the video may help increase awareness of IM and Native-specific resources, and increase connection to Native identity, culture, and community.

  4. Unique structural modulation of a non-native substrate by cochaperone DnaJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Satyam; Kumar, Vignesh; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Maiti, Souvik; Mapa, Koyeli

    2013-02-12

    The role of bacterial DnaJ protein as a cochaperone of DnaK is strongly appreciated. Although DnaJ unaccompanied by DnaK can bind unfolded as well as native substrate proteins, its role as an individual chaperone remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that DnaJ binds a model non-native substrate with a low nanomolar dissociation constant and, more importantly, modulates the structure of its non-native state. The structural modulation achieved by DnaJ is different compared to that achieved by the DnaK-DnaJ complex. The nature of structural modulation exerted by DnaJ is suggestive of a unique unfolding activity on the non-native substrate by the chaperone. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the zinc binding motif along with the C-terminal substrate binding domain of DnaJ is necessary and sufficient for binding and the subsequent binding-induced structural alterations of the non-native substrate. We hypothesize that this hitherto unknown structural alteration of non-native states by DnaJ might be important for its chaperoning activity by removing kinetic traps of the folding intermediates.

  5. Ink-native electrophoresis: an alternative to blue-native electrophoresis more suitable for in-gel detection of enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Keisuke; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Kameshita, Isamu; Ishida, Atsuhiko

    2013-09-15

    Blue-native electrophoresis (BNE) is a useful technique for analyzing protein complexes, but the Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) dye used in BNE often hampers in-gel detection of enzymatic activity. Here we report an improved method, termed ink-native electrophoresis (INE), in which Pelikan 4001 fountain pen ink is used as a charge-shifting agent instead of CBB. INE is more suitable than BNE for in-gel detection of protein kinase activity after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and its performance in protein complex separation is comparable to that of conventional BNE. INE may provide a powerful tool to isolate and analyze various protein complexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fusion-protein-assisted protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobe, Bostjan; Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon J

    2015-07-01

    Fusion proteins can be used directly in protein crystallization to assist crystallization in at least two different ways. In one approach, the `heterologous fusion-protein approach', the fusion partner can provide additional surface area to promote crystal contact formation. In another approach, the `fusion of interacting proteins approach', protein assemblies can be stabilized by covalently linking the interacting partners. The linker connecting the proteins plays different roles in the two applications: in the first approach a rigid linker is required to reduce conformational heterogeneity; in the second, conversely, a flexible linker is required that allows the native interaction between the fused proteins. The two approaches can also be combined. The recent applications of fusion-protein technology in protein crystallization from the work of our own and other laboratories are briefly reviewed.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of Bos taurus coreanae (Korean native cattle).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Zhang, Yuan Qing; He, Dong Chang; Yang, Xiao Ming; Li, Bo; Wang, Dong Cai; Guang, Jin; Xu, Fang; Li, Jun Ya; Gao, Xue; Gao, Hui Jiang; Zhang, Lu Pei; Zhang, Xi Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Korean native cattle is one of the famous native breeds in Korean. In the present work, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Korean native cattle for the first time. The total length of the mitogenome was 16,339 bp with the base composition of 33.4% for A, 27.2% for T, 26.0% for C, and 13.4% for G, and an A-T (60.6%)-rich feature was detected. It harbored 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 non-coding control region (D-loop region). The arrangement of all genes was identical to the typical mitochondrial genomes of cattle. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Korean native cattle would serve as an important data set of the germplasm resources for further study.

  8. Native bees and plant pollination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, H.S.

    2004-01-01

    Bees are important pollinators, but evidence suggests that numbers of some species are declining. Decreases have been documented in the honey bee, Apis mellifera (which was introduced to North America), but there are no monitoring programs for the vast majority of native species, so we cannot be sure about the extent of this problem. Recent efforts to develop standardized protocols for bee sampling will help us collect the data needed to assess trends in bee populations. Unfortunately, diversity of bee life cycles and phenologies, and the large number of rare species, make it difficult to assess trends in bee faunas. Changes in bee populations can affect plant reproduction, which can influence plant population density and cover, thus potentially modifying horizontal and vertical structure of a community, microclimate near the ground, patterns of nitrogen deposition, etc. These potential effects of changes in pollination patterns have not been assessed in natural communities. Effects of management actions on bees and other pollinators should be considered in conservation planning.

  9. Non-Gradient Blue Native Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoting; Wu, Jinzi; Jin, Zhen; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2017-02-02

    Gradient blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) is a well established and widely used technique for activity analysis of high-molecular-weight proteins, protein complexes, and protein-protein interactions. Since its inception in the early 1990s, a variety of minor modifications have been made to this gradient gel analytical method. Here we provide a major modification of the method, which we call non-gradient BN-PAGE. The procedure, similar to that of non-gradient SDS-PAGE, is simple because there is no expensive gradient maker involved. The non-gradient BN-PAGE protocols presented herein provide guidelines on the analysis of mitochondrial protein complexes, in particular, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLDH) and those in the electron transport chain. Protocols for the analysis of blood esterases or mitochondrial esterases are also presented. The non-gradient BN-PAGE method may be tailored for analysis of specific proteins according to their molecular weight regardless of whether the target proteins are hydrophobic or hydrophilic. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Fluency in native and nonnative English speech

    CERN Document Server

    Götz, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    This book takes a new and holistic approach to fluency in English speech and differentiates between productive, perceptive, and nonverbal fluency. The in-depth corpus-based description of productive fluency points out major differences of how fluency is established in native and nonnative speech. It also reveals areas in which even highly advanced learners of English still deviate strongly from the native target norm and in which they have already approximated to it. Based on these findings, selected learners are subjected to native speakers' ratings of seven perceptive fluency variables in or

  11. Preformed Seeds Modulate Native Insulin Aggregation Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Colina; Yang, Mu; Long, Fei; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2015-12-10

    Insulin aggregates under storage conditions via disulfide interchange reaction. It is also known to form aggregates at the site of repeated injections in diabetes patients, leading to injection amyloidosis. This has fueled research in pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry as well as in academia to understand factors that modulate insulin stability and aggregation. The main aim of this study is to understand the factors that modulate aggregation propensity of insulin under conditions close to physiological and measure effect of "seeds" on aggregation kinetics. We explored the aggregation kinetics of insulin at pH 7.2 and 37 °C in the presence of disulfide-reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT), using spectroscopy (UV-visible, fluorescence, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and microscopy (scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy) techniques. We prepared insulin "seeds" by incubating disulfide-reduced insulin at pH 7.2 and 37 °C for varying lengths of time (10 min to 12 h). These seeds were added to the native protein and nucleation-dependent aggregation kinetics was measured. Aggregation kinetics was fastest in the presence of 10 min seeds suggesting they were nascent. Interestingly, intermediate seeds (30 min to 4 h incubation) resulted in formation of transient fibrils in 4 h that converted to amorphous aggregates upon longer incubation of 24 h. Overall, the results show that insulin under disulfide reducing conditions at pH and temperature close to physiological favors amorphous aggregate formation and seed "maturity" plays an important role in nucleation dependent aggregation kinetics.

  12. Enhancement of native and phosphorylated TDP-43 immunoreactivity by proteinase K treatment following autoclave heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Fumiaki; Tanji, Kunikazu; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Wakabayashi, Koichi

    2011-08-01

    TDP-43 is a major disease protein in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP). To evaluate the effectiveness of proteinase K (PK) treatment in antigen retrieval for native and phosphorylated TDP-43 protein, we examined the temporal cortex and spinal cord from patients with sporadic ALS and FTLD-TDP and control subjects. PK treatment following heat retrieval enhanced the immunoreactivity for native TDP-43 in controls as well as for native and phosphorylated TDP-43 in ALS and FTLD-TDP. A significant number of TDP-43-positive neuropil threads were demonstrated in lesions, in which routine immunohistochemistry revealed that the predominant inclusions are cytoplasmic. This retrieval method is the best of immunohistochemical techniques for demonstrating TDP-43 pathology, especially in the neuropil. © 2010 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  13. Nonverbal Communications in Native North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Allan Ross

    1975-01-01

    This article describes several types of native American nonspeech communications systems, including the Plains sign language, distance signaling of various kinds, picture writing and whistle speech. See FL 508 188 for availability. (CLK)

  14. Native Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data represent predicted current distributions of all native freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are available for...

  15. Management Recommendations: Native Adaptive Management Program (NPAM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Management recommendations are a product of the decision support tool for the Native Adaptive Management Program (NPAM). The provides tall and mixed grass management...

  16. Advancing Efforts to Energize Native Alaska (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-04-01

    This brochure describes key programs and initiatives of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs to advance energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy infrastructure projects in Alaska Native villages.

  17. 75 FR 8105 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Native Claims Settlement Act will be issued to NANA Regional Corporation, Inc., Successor in Interest to... these lands will also be conveyed to NANA Regional Corporation, Inc. when the surface estate is...

  18. Nonverbal Communications in Native North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Allan Ross

    1975-01-01

    This article describes several types of native American nonspeech communications systems, including the Plains sign language, distance signaling of various kinds, picture writing and whistle speech. See FL 508 188 for availability. (CLK)

  19. Decision Policy: Native Prairie Adaptive Management (NPAM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A decision support for the Native Adaptive Management Program (NPAM). The documents provide tall and mixed grass decision policies in relation to the management...

  20. Epistemologies in the Text of Children's Books: Native- and non-Native-authored books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Morteza; Bang, Megan; Medin, Douglas; Marin, Ananda; Leddon, Erin; Waxman, Sandra

    2013-09-01

    An examination of artifacts provides insights into the goals, practices, and orientations of the persons and cultures who created them. Here, we analyze storybook texts, artifacts that are a part of many children's lives. We examine the stories in books targeted for 4-8-year-old children, contrasting the texts generated by Native American authors versus popular non-Native authors. We focus specifically on the implicit and explicit 'epistemological orientations' associated with relations between human beings and the rest of nature. Native authors were significantly more likely than non-Native authors to describe humans and the rest of nature as psychologically close and embedded in relationships. This pattern converges well with evidence from a behavioral task in which we probed Native (from urban inter-tribal and rural communities) and non-Native children's and adults' attention to ecological relations. We discuss the implications of these differences for environmental cognition and science learning.

  1. Intraguild predation and native lady beetle decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary M Gardiner

    Full Text Available Coccinellid communities across North America have experienced significant changes in recent decades, with declines in several native species reported. One potential mechanism for these declines is interference competition via intraguild predation; specifically, increased predation of native coccinellid eggs and larvae following the introduction of exotic coccinellids. Our previous studies have shown that agricultural fields in Michigan support a higher diversity and abundance of exotic coccinellids than similar fields in Iowa, and that the landscape surrounding agricultural fields across the north central U.S. influences the abundance and activity of coccinellid species. The goal of this study was to quantify the amount of egg predation experienced by a native coccinellid within Michigan and Iowa soybean fields and explore the influence of local and large-scale landscape structure. Using the native lady beetle Coleomegilla maculata as a model, we found that sentinel egg masses were subject to intense predation within both Michigan and Iowa soybean fields, with 60.7% of egg masses attacked and 43.0% of available eggs consumed within 48 h. In Michigan, the exotic coccinellids Coccinella septempunctata and Harmonia axyridis were the most abundant predators found in soybean fields whereas in Iowa, native species including C. maculata, Hippodamia parenthesis and the soft-winged flower beetle Collops nigriceps dominated the predator community. Predator abundance was greater in soybean fields within diverse landscapes, yet variation in predator numbers did not influence the intensity of egg predation observed. In contrast, the strongest predictor of native coccinellid egg predation was the composition of edge habitats bordering specific fields. Field sites surrounded by semi-natural habitats including forests, restored prairies, old fields, and pasturelands experienced greater egg predation than fields surrounded by other croplands. This study shows

  2. Should Australia Export its Native Birds?

    OpenAIRE

    Kingwell, Ross S.

    1994-01-01

    Commercial export from Australia of native birds, wild or captive bred, is prohibited. This paper firstly describes the current legislation and regulations that restrict the export of native birds and discusses why governments have adopted such a regulatory approach to bird species preservation. Secondly, the paper reviews the debate concerning the export ban, pointing out strengths and weaknesses in arguments and indicating the important role of CITES. Lastly, the paper outlines a new case f...

  3. Functional characterization on native starch of Peruvian native potatoes (Solanum phureja)

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, P.; Málaga, A.; Betalleluz, I.; Ibarz, A; C. Velezmoro

    2015-01-01

    There are many varieties of native potatoes grown in different regions of Peru, usually for farmers´ consumption. However, the possibility of a commercial use has led this work in order to give them added value. To evaluate the possibility of use of native starch from these potatoes, as an ingredient in the food industry, it was presented as objective to determine the physicochemical, functional and viscoelastic native potato starches obtained from Pampacorral properties (Cuzco, Peru): Puka A...

  4. Apology Strategy in English By Native Speaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezia Kemala Sari

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This research discussed apology strategies in English by native speaker. This descriptive study was presented within the framework of Pragmatics based on the forms of strategies due to the coding manual as found in CCSARP (Cross-Cultural Speech Acts Realization Project.The goals of this study were to describe the apology strategies in English by native speaker and identify the influencing factors of it. Data were collected through the use of the questionnaire in the form of Discourse Completion Test, which was distributed to 30 native speakers. Data were classified based on the degree of familiarity and the social distance between speaker and hearer and then the data of native will be separated and classified by the type of strategies in coding manual. The results of this study are the pattern of apology strategies of native speaker brief with the pattern that potentially occurs IFID plus Offer of repair plus Taking on responsibility. While Alerters, Explanation and Downgrading appear with less number of percentage. Then, the factors that influence the apology utterance by native speakers are the social situation, the degree of familiarity and degree of the offence which more complicated the mistake tend to produce the most complex utterances by the speaker.

  5. The online application of binding condition B in native and non-native pronoun resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Clare; Trompelt, Helena; Felser, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that anaphor resolution in a non-native language may be more vulnerable to interference from structurally inappropriate antecedents compared to native anaphor resolution. To test whether previous findings on reflexive anaphors generalize to non-reflexive pronouns, we carried out an eye-movement monitoring study investigating the application of binding condition B during native and non-native sentence processing. In two online reading experiments we examined when during processing local and/or non-local antecedents for pronouns were considered in different types of syntactic environment. Our results demonstrate that both native English speakers and native German-speaking learners of English showed online sensitivity to binding condition B in that they did not consider syntactically inappropriate antecedents. For pronouns thought to be exempt from condition B (so-called "short-distance pronouns"), the native readers showed a weak preference for the local antecedent during processing. The non-native readers, on the other hand, showed a preference for the matrix subject even where local coreference was permitted, and despite demonstrating awareness of short-distance pronouns' referential ambiguity in a complementary offline task. This indicates that non-native comprehenders are less sensitive during processing to structural cues that render pronouns exempt from condition B, and prefer to link a pronoun to a salient subject antecedent instead.

  6. The Native Comic Book Project: native youth making comics and healthy decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Michelle; Manuelito, Brenda; Nass, Carrie; Chock, Tami; Buchwald, Dedra

    2012-04-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives have traditionally used stories and drawings to positively influence the well-being of their communities. The objective of this study was to describe the development of a curriculum that trains Native youth leaders to plan, write, and design original comic books to enhance healthy decision making. Project staff developed the Native Comic Book Project by adapting Dr. Michael Bitz's Comic Book Project to incorporate Native comic book art, Native storytelling, and decision-making skills. After conducting five train-the-trainer sessions for Native youth, staff were invited by youth participants to implement the full curriculum as a pilot test at one tribal community site in the Pacific Northwest. Implementation was accompanied by surveys and weekly participant observations and was followed by an interactive meeting to assess youth engagement, determine project acceptability, and solicit suggestions for curriculum changes. Six youths aged 12 to 15 (average age = 14) participated in the Native Comic Book Project. Youth participants stated that they liked the project and gained knowledge of the harmful effects of commercial tobacco use but wanted better integration of comic book creation, decision making, and Native storytelling themes. Previous health-related comic book projects did not recruit youth as active producers of content. This curriculum shows promise as a culturally appropriate intervention to help Native youth adopt healthy decision-making skills and healthy behaviors by creating their own comic books.

  7. The online application of binding condition B in native and non-native pronoun resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare ePatterson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that anaphor resolution in a non-native language may be more vulnerable to interference from structurally inappropriate antecedents compared to native anaphor resolution. To test whether previous findings on reflexive anaphors generalise to non-reflexive pronouns, we carried out an eye-movement monitoring study investigating the application of binding condition B during native and non-native sentence processing. In two online reading experiments we examined when during processing local and/or non-local antecedents for pronouns were considered in different types of syntactic environment. Our results demonstrate that both native English speakers and native German-speaking learners of English showed online sensitivity to binding condition B in that they did not consider syntactically inappropriate antecedents. For pronouns thought to be exempt from condition B (so-called 'short-distance pronouns', the native readers showed a weak preference for the local antecedent during processing. The non-native readers, on the other hand, showed a preference for the matrix subject even where local coreference was permitted, and despite demonstrating awareness of short-distance pronouns' referential ambiguity in a complementary offline task. This indicates that non-native comprehenders are less sensitive during processing to structural cues that render pronouns exempt from condition B, and prefer to link a pronoun to a salient subject antecedent instead.

  8. Organotypic pancreatoids with native mesenchyme develop Insulin producing endocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavuzzo, Marissa A; Yang, Diane; Borowiak, Malgorzata

    2017-09-07

    Replacement of lost beta cells in patients with diabetes has the potential to alleviate them of their disease, yet current protocols to make beta cells are inadequate for therapy. In vitro screens can reveal the signals necessary for endocrine maturation to improve beta cell production, however the complexities of in vivo development that lead to beta cell formation are lost in two-dimensional systems. Here, we create three-dimensional organotypic pancreatic cultures, named pancreatoids, composed of embryonic day 10.5 murine epithelial progenitors and native mesenchyme. These progenitors assemble in scaffold-free, floating conditions and, with the inclusion of native mesenchyme, develop into pancreatoids expressing markers of different pancreatic lineages including endocrine-like cells. Treatment of pancreatoids with (-)-Indolactam-V or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, two protein kinase C activators, leads to altered morphology which otherwise would be overlooked in two-dimensional systems. Protein kinase C activation also led to fewer Insulin+ cells, decreased Ins1 and Ins2 mRNA levels, and increased Pdx1 and Hes1 mRNA levels with a high number of DBA+ cells. Thus, organotypic pancreatoids provide a useful tool for developmental studies, and can further be used for disease modeling, small molecules and genetic screens, or applied to human pluripotent stem cell differentiation for beta-like cell formation.

  9. Local Transient Unfolding of Native State PAI-1 Associated with Serpin Metastability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trelle, Morten B; Madsen, Jeppe Buur; Andreasen, Peter A.;

    2014-01-01

    The metastability of the native fold makes serpin (serine protease inhibitor) proteins prone to pathological conformational change, often by insertion of an extra β-strand into the central β-sheet A. How this insertion is made possible is a hitherto unresolved question. By the use of advanced hyd...

  10. 13 native human interferon-alpha species assessed for immunoregulatory properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heron, I; Hokland, M; Berg, K

    1983-01-01

    Human leukocytes treated with Sendai virus yield interferon predominantly of the alpha-type (HuIFN-alpha). Successful attempts to purify these "native" species have been performed and the final analysis, which included an SDS-PAGE disclosed 13 stained and separated IFN-proteins in the molecular w...

  11. Insights into the mechanism and catalysis of the native chemical ligation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erik C B; Kent, Stephen B H

    2006-05-24

    Native chemical ligation of unprotected peptide segments involves reaction between a peptide-alpha-thioester and a cysteine-peptide, to yield a product with a native amide bond at the ligation site. Peptide-alpha-thioalkyl esters are commonly used because of their ease of preparation. These thioalkyl esters are rather unreactive so the ligation reaction is catalyzed by in situ transthioesterification with thiol additives. The most common thiol catalysts used to date have been either a mixture of thiophenol/benzyl mercaptan, or the alkanethiol MESNA. Despite the use of these thiol catalysts, ligation reactions typically take 24-48 h. To gain insight into the mechanism of native chemical ligaton and in order to find a better catalyst, we investigated the use of a number of thiol compounds. Substituted thiophenols with pK(a) > 6 were found to best combine the ability to exchange rapidly and completely with thioalkyl esters, and to then act as effective leaving groups in reaction of the peptide-thioester with the thiol side chain of a cysteine-peptide. A highly effective and practical catalyst was (4-carboxylmethyl)thiophenol ('MPAA'), a nonmalodorous, water-soluble thiol. Use of MPAA gave an order of magnitude faster reaction in model studies of native chemical ligation and in the synthesis of a small protein, turkey ovomucoid third domain (OMTKY3). MPAA should find broad use in native chemical ligation and in the total synthesis of proteins.

  12. Gifted Native American Students: Underperforming, Under-Identified, and Overlooked

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Marcia; Fugate, C. Matthew

    2012-01-01

    There has been limited focus among researchers on the nature and needs of gifted Native American students in the past 30 years, and the work that has been done frequently generalizes findings across Native American cultures. This article reviews recent literature on Native American youth and on gifted Native American students; examines the current…

  13. 45 CFR 670.20 - Designation of native birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designation of native birds. 670.20 Section 670.20... CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates § 670.20 Designation of native birds. The following are designated native birds: Albatross...

  14. 20 CFR 632.11 - Designation of Native American grantees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Designation of Native American grantees. 632... INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Designation Procedures for Native American Grantees § 632.11 Designation of Native American grantees. (a) When designations are required and...

  15. 45 CFR 670.19 - Designation of native mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designation of native mammals. 670.19 Section 670... CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates § 670.19 Designation of native mammals. The following are designated native mammals: Pinnipeds: Crabeater seal—Lobodon...

  16. Game-Theory-Based Search Engine to Automate the Mass Assignment in Complex Native Electrospray Mass Spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tseng, Y.H.; Uetrecht, C.; Yang, S.C.; Barendregt, A.; Heck, A.J.R.; Peng, W.P.

    2013-01-01

    Electrospray ionization coupled to native mass spectrometry (MS) has evolved into an important tool in structural biology to decipher the composition of protein complexes. However, the mass analysis of heterogeneous protein assemblies is hampered because of their overlapping charge state distributio

  17. An invasive non-native mammal population conserves genetic diversity lost from its native range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, A J; Holland, O J; McDonald, R A; Clout, M N; Gleeson, D M

    2015-05-01

    Invasive, non-native species are one of the major causes of global biodiversity loss. Although they are, by definition, successful in their non-native range, their populations generally show major reductions in their genetic diversity during the demographic bottleneck they experience during colonization. By investigating the mitochondrial genetic diversity of an invasive non-native species, the stoat Mustela erminea, in New Zealand and comparing it to diversity in the species' native range in Great Britain, we reveal the opposite effect. We demonstrate that the New Zealand stoat population contains four mitochondrial haplotypes that have not been found in the native range. Stoats in Britain rely heavily on introduced rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus as their primary prey and were introduced to New Zealand in a misguided attempt at biological control of rabbits, which had also been introduced there. While invasive stoats have since decimated the New Zealand avifauna, native stoat populations were themselves decimated by the introduction to Britain of Myxoma virus as a control measure for rabbits. We highlight the irony that while introduced species (rabbits) and subsequent biocontrol (myxomatosis) have caused population crashes of native stoats, invasive stoats in New Zealand, which were also introduced for biological control, now contain more genetic haplotypes than their most likely native source. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A Corpus-Based Study of Adverbial Connectors in Native and Non-native Students’ Writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    WANG, Yan-jun; Li, Rui

    2016-01-01

    , this paper firstly makes a comparison to the usage of adverbial connectors in their writings of the native students and non-native students and then exposes a distinctive gap between these two types of writings in usage of adverbial connectors. In order to help Chinese second-language learners acquire...

  19. Patterns of English phoneme confusions by native and non-native listeners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, A.; Weber, A.C.; Smits, R.; Cooper, N.

    2004-01-01

    Native American English and non-native (Dutch) listeners identified either the consonant or the vowel in all possible American English CV and VC syllables. The syllables were embedded in multispeaker babble at three signal-to-noise ratios (0, 8, and 16 dB). The phoneme identification performance of

  20. Micropollutant degradation via extracted native enzymes from activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krah, Daniel; Ghattas, Ann-Kathrin; Wick, Arne; Bröder, Kathrin; Ternes, Thomas A

    2016-05-15

    A procedure was developed to assess the biodegradation of micropollutants in cell-free lysates produced from activated sludge of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This proof-of-principle provides the basis for further investigations of micropollutant biodegradation via native enzymes in a solution of reduced complexity, facilitating downstream protein analysis. Differently produced lysates, containing a variety of native enzymes, showed significant enzymatic activities of acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase and β-glucuronidase in conventional colorimetric enzyme assays, whereas heat-deactivated controls did not. To determine the enzymatic activity towards micropollutants, 20 compounds were spiked to the cell-free lysates under aerobic conditions and were monitored via LC-ESI-MS/MS. The micropollutants were selected to span a wide range of different biodegradabilities in conventional activated sludge treatment via distinct primary degradation reactions. Of the 20 spiked micropollutants, 18 could be degraded by intact sludge under assay conditions, while six showed reproducible degradation in the lysates compared to the heat-deactivated negative controls: acetaminophen, N-acetyl-sulfamethoxazole (acetyl-SMX), atenolol, bezafibrate, erythromycin and 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxycarbamazepine (10-OH-CBZ). The primary biotransformation of the first four compounds can be attributed to amide hydrolysis. However, the observed biotransformations in the lysates were differently influenced by experimental parameters such as sludge pre-treatment and the addition of ammonium sulfate or peptidase inhibitors, suggesting that different hydrolase enzymes were involved in the primary degradation, among them possibly peptidases. Furthermore, the transformation of 10-OH-CBZ to 9-CA-ADIN was caused by a biologically-mediated oxidation, which indicates that in addition to hydrolases further enzyme classes (probably oxidoreductases) are present in the native lysates. Although the

  1. High Efficient Expression, Purification, and Functional Characterization of Native Human Epidermal Growth Factor in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Yu, Jieying; Lin, Jinglian; Wu, Shaomin; Li, Shan; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) is a small, mitotic growth polypeptide that promotes the proliferation of various cells and is widely applied in clinical practices. However, high efficient expression of native hEGF in Escherichia coli has not been successful, since three disulfide bonds in monomer hEGF made it unable to fold into correct 3D structure using in vivo system. To tackle this problem, we fused Mxe GyrA intein (Mxe) at the C-terminal of hEGF followed by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) and 10x His-tag to construct a chimeric protein hEGF-Mxe-SUMO-H10. The fusion protein was highly expressed at the concentration of 281 mg/L and up to 59.5% of the total cellular soluble proteins. The fusion protein was purified by affinity chromatography and 29.4 mg/L of native hEGF can be released by thiol induced N-terminal cleavage without any proteases. The mitotic activity in Balb/c 3T3 cells is proliferated by commercial and recombinant hEGF measured with methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay which indicated that recombinant hEGF protein stimulates the cell proliferation similar to commercial protein. This study significantly improved the yield and reduced the cost of hEGF in the recombinant E. coli system and could be a better strategy to produce native hEGF for pharmaceutical development.

  2. High Efficient Expression, Purification, and Functional Characterization of Native Human Epidermal Growth Factor in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human epidermal growth factor (hEGF is a small, mitotic growth polypeptide that promotes the proliferation of various cells and is widely applied in clinical practices. However, high efficient expression of native hEGF in Escherichia coli has not been successful, since three disulfide bonds in monomer hEGF made it unable to fold into correct 3D structure using in vivo system. To tackle this problem, we fused Mxe GyrA intein (Mxe at the C-terminal of hEGF followed by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO and 10x His-tag to construct a chimeric protein hEGF-Mxe-SUMO-H10. The fusion protein was highly expressed at the concentration of 281 mg/L and up to 59.5% of the total cellular soluble proteins. The fusion protein was purified by affinity chromatography and 29.4 mg/L of native hEGF can be released by thiol induced N-terminal cleavage without any proteases. The mitotic activity in Balb/c 3T3 cells is proliferated by commercial and recombinant hEGF measured with methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay which indicated that recombinant hEGF protein stimulates the cell proliferation similar to commercial protein. This study significantly improved the yield and reduced the cost of hEGF in the recombinant E. coli system and could be a better strategy to produce native hEGF for pharmaceutical development.

  3. No More Mad-Dog Concept Nativism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Japola DesVergnes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available According to Jerry Fodor, there are two possibilities with respect to the origin of concepts: a concept is either innate, or it is acquired from experience by means of the process of ‘concept learning.’ Fodor’s view in his 1975 and 1980 is that the empiricist method of concept acquisition, forming and testing hypotheses about objects that fall under a concept, can only work for complex concepts. He claims that we must possess some concepts in order to form hypotheses, so none of our simple (or primitive concepts can be learned. If we have them—then they must be innate. In his 2008 Fodor contends furthermore that no new concepts at all, neither primitive, nor complex, can be learned, and so that all concepts must be innate. I argue that Fodor’s famous mad-dog concept nativism should be rejected because it could only work together with what I call neural nativism, and the latter turns out to be scientifically untenable. In addition, I suggest that one’s position in the empiricism/nativism debate should be a function of one’s account of the architecture of the mind, which, in Fodor’s case, only implies architectural nativism, and so, the existence of innate mechanisms. It neither obviously requires, nor precludes, representational—or concept—nativism.

  4. Diabetic retinopathy in native and non-native Sarawakians--findings from the Diabetic Eye Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallika, P S; Aziz, S; Goh, P P; Lee, P Y; Cheah, W L; Chong, M S; Tan, A K

    2012-08-01

    This study aims to determine the risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR) among natives and non-natives Sarawakians who were seen at 3 public hospitals and one health clinic in Sarawak. It is a cross sectional study where data on patients with DM were collected by staff at these healthcare facilities and entered into the web-based Diabetic Eye Registry. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to determine the association factors for DR. DR was significantly less associated with natives (24.4%) compared to non-native Sarawakians (34.1%) (p < 0.001). The odds of getting DR was higher in patients whose duration of DM was more than 20 years (OR = 2.6), who have renal impairment (OR = 1.7) and non-natives (OR = 1.4).

  5. Teaching computers to fold proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Ole; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    2004-01-01

    A new general algorithm for optimization of potential functions for protein folding is introduced. It is based upon gradient optimization of the thermodynamic stability of native folds of a training set of proteins with known structure. The iterative update rule contains two thermodynamic averages...

  6. Decoding speech perception by native and non-native speakers using single-trial electrophysiological data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Brandmeyer

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs are systems that use real-time analysis of neuroimaging data to determine the mental state of their user for purposes such as providing neurofeedback. Here, we investigate the feasibility of a BCI based on speech perception. Multivariate pattern classification methods were applied to single-trial EEG data collected during speech perception by native and non-native speakers. Two principal questions were asked: 1 Can differences in the perceived categories of pairs of phonemes be decoded at the single-trial level? 2 Can these same categorical differences be decoded across participants, within or between native-language groups? Results indicated that classification performance progressively increased with respect to the categorical status (within, boundary or across of the stimulus contrast, and was also influenced by the native language of individual participants. Classifier performance showed strong relationships with traditional event-related potential measures and behavioral responses. The results of the cross-participant analysis indicated an overall increase in average classifier performance when trained on data from all participants (native and non-native. A second cross-participant classifier trained only on data from native speakers led to an overall improvement in performance for native speakers, but a reduction in performance for non-native speakers. We also found that the native language of a given participant could be decoded on the basis of EEG data with accuracy above 80%. These results indicate that electrophysiological responses underlying speech perception can be decoded at the single-trial level, and that decoding performance systematically reflects graded changes in the responses related to the phonological status of the stimuli. This approach could be used in extensions of the BCI paradigm to support perceptual learning during second language acquisition.

  7. In vitro palmitoylation of native bovine brain G_oα

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨胜于; 黄有国

    2000-01-01

    The native Goα was purified from bovine brain cortex and palmitoylated in vitro. The in vitro palmitoylation site was the same as that in vivo. The internal palmitoylation of purified native Goα was found to be largely maintained. The apparent palmitoylation ratio was significantly increased after the Goα was treated with DTT. The GTPγS binding characteristic of Goα was not influenced by palmitoylation, however, the affinity for LUVs was increased dramatically. The in vitro palmitoylation model of Goα provides a better basis for studying the functional role of G protein palmitoylation in signal transduction.

  8. Native Pig and Chicken Breed Database: NPCDB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyeon-Soo; Kim, Dae-Won; Chun, Se-Yoon; Sung, Samsun; Kim, Hyeon-Jeong; Cho, Seoae; Kim, Heebal; Oh, Sung-Jong

    2014-10-01

    Indigenous (native) breeds of livestock have higher disease resistance and adaptation to the environment due to high genetic diversity. Even though their extinction rate is accelerated due to the increase of commercial breeds, natural disaster, and civil war, there is a lack of well-established databases for the native breeds. Thus, we constructed the native pig and chicken breed database (NPCDB) which integrates available information on the breeds from around the world. It is a nonprofit public database aimed to provide information on the genetic resources of indigenous pig and chicken breeds for their conservation. The NPCDB (http://npcdb.snu.ac.kr/) provides the phenotypic information and population size of each breed as well as its specific habitat. In addition, it provides information on the distribution of genetic resources across the country. The database will contribute to understanding of the breed's characteristics such as disease resistance and adaptation to environmental changes as well as the conservation of indigenous genetic resources.

  9. Managing the Sacred Lands of Native America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne T. Ornelas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This research paper is a review of ten years of sacred lands management and policy in the United States. The author reports from the unique position of having been involved in national and international meetings with communities of indigenous peoples and intergovernmental stakeholders during this time. Discussion includesan historical overview of such topics as environmental justice and the 2001 Native American Sacred Lands Forum, one of the first national meetings in the United States to specifically address the sacred lands of Native Americans. Further discussion draws attention to the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007 as a gateway to better sacred lands management and policy for Native Americans in the future.

  10. Native Mutant Huntingtin in Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, Ellen; Valencia, Antonio; Li, Xueyi; Aronin, Neil; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Young, Anne B.; Wexler, Nancy; DiFiglia, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by polyglutamine expansion in the N terminus of huntingtin (htt). Analysis of human postmortem brain lysates by SDS-PAGE and Western blot reveals htt as full-length and fragmented. Here we used Blue Native PAGE (BNP) and Western blots to study native htt in human postmortem brain. Antisera against htt detected a single band broadly migrating at 575–850 kDa in control brain and at 650–885 kDa in heterozygous and Venezuelan homozygous HD brains. Anti-polyglutamine antisera detected full-length mutant htt in HD brain. There was little htt cleavage even if lysates were pretreated with trypsin, indicating a property of native htt to resist protease cleavage. A soluble mutant htt fragment of about 180 kDa was detected with anti-htt antibody Ab1 (htt-(1–17)) and increased when lysates were treated with denaturants (SDS, 8 m urea, DTT, or trypsin) before BNP. Wild-type htt was more resistant to denaturants. Based on migration of in vitro translated htt fragments, the 180-kDa segment terminated ≈htt 670–880 amino acids. If second dimension SDS-PAGE followed BNP, the 180-kDa mutant htt was absent, and 43–50 kDa htt fragments appeared. Brain lysates from two HD mouse models expressed native full-length htt; a mutant fragment formed if lysates were pretreated with 8 m urea + DTT. Native full-length mutant htt in embryonic HD140Q/140Q mouse primary neurons was intact during cell death and when cell lysates were exposed to denaturants before BNP. Thus, native mutant htt occurs in brain and primary neurons as a soluble full-length monomer. PMID:22375012

  11. Native Darag Chicken Menu Variations: Its Acceptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Rosario Clarabel C. Contreras

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional native chicken delicacies like lechon and adobo are very common dishes in a rural Filipino folks’ dining table. As the family economic standing improves, meat becomes a main item in a family diet, dishes like fried chicken and chicken nuggets have also become part of the family choices of chicken dishes in their meal. Intensification of the production of native Darag chicken would lead to optimization of food technological output for the university which will hopefully be a potential one town-one product (OTOP of the municipality.

  12. A Machine Learning Approach for Hot-Spot Detection at Protein-Protein Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo, Rita; Fieldhouse, Robert; Melo, André; Correia, João D G; Cordeiro, Maria Natália D S; Gümüş, Zeynep H; Costa, Joaquim; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238; de Sousa Moreira, Irina|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412025000

    2016-01-01

    Understanding protein-protein interactions is a key challenge in biochemistry. In this work, we describe a more accurate methodology to predict Hot-Spots (HS) in protein-protein interfaces from their native complex structure compared to previous published Machine Learning (ML) techniques. Our model

  13. Elucidation of differential mineralisation on native and regenerated silk matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midha, Swati; Tripathi, Rohit; Geng, Hua; Lee, Peter D; Ghosh, Sourabh

    2016-11-01

    Bone mineralisation is a well-orchestrated procedure triggered by a protein-based template inducing the nucleation of hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocrystals on the matrix. In an attempt to fabricate superior nanocomposites from silk fibroin, textile braided structures made of natively spun fibres of Bombyx mori silkworm were compared against regenerated fibroin (lyophilized and films) underpinning the influence of intrinsic properties of fibroin matrices on HA nucleation. We found that native braids could bind Ca(2+) ions through electrostatic attraction, which initiated the nucleation and deposition of HA, as evidenced by discrete shift in amide peaks via ATR-FTIR. This phenomenon also suggests the involvement of amide linkages in promoting HA nucleation on fibroin. Moreover, CaCl2-SBF immersion of native braids resulted in preferential growth of HA along the c-axis, forming needle-like nanocrystals and possessing Ca/P ratio comparable to commercial HA. Though regenerated lyophilized matrix also witnessed prominent peak shift in amide linkages, HA growth was restricted to (211) plane only, albeit at a significantly lower intensity than braids. Regenerated films, on the other hand, provided no crystallographic evidence of HA deposition within 7days of SBF immersion. The present work sheds light on the primary fibroin structure of B. mori which probably plays a crucial role in regulating template-induced biomineralisation on the matrix. We also found that intrinsic material properties such as surface roughness, geometry, specific surface area, tortuosity and secondary conformation exert influence in modulating the extent of mineralisation. Thus our work generates useful insights and warrants future studies to further investigate the potential of bone mimetic, silk/mineral nanocomposite matrices for orthopaedic applications.

  14. Simultaneous determination of protein structure and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B.; DePristo, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    We present a protocol for the experimental determination of ensembles of protein conformations that represent simultaneously the native structure and its associated dynamics. The procedure combines the strengths of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-for obtaining experimental information at ...

  15. Native low density lipoprotein promotes lipid raft formation in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jian; Ping, Ling-Yan; Duong, Duc M; Gao, Xiao-Yan; He, Chun-Yan; Wei, Lei; Wu, Jun-Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Oxidized low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) has an important role in atherogenesis; however, the mechanisms underlying cell‑mediated LDL oxidation remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether native‑LDL induced lipid raft formation, in order to gain further insight into LDL oxidation. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that lipid rafts were aggregated or clustered in the membrane, which were colocalized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) upon native LDL stimulation; however, in the presence of methyl‑β‑cyclodextrin (MβCD), LDL‑stimulated aggregation, translocation, and colocalization of lipid rafts components was abolished.. In addition, lipid raft disruptors MβCD and filipin decreased malondialdehyde expression levels. Density gradient centrifugation coupled to label‑free quantitative proteomic analysis identified 1,449 individual proteins, of which 203 were significantly upregulated following native‑LDL stimulation. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the lipid rafts revealed that the expression levels of translocation proteins were upregulated. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that native‑LDL induced lipid raft clustering in macrophages, and the expression levels of several proteins were altered in the stimulated macrophages, which provided novel insights into the mechanism underlying LDL oxidation.

  16. Proficient beyond borders: assessing non-native speakers in a native speakers’ framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Fleckenstein

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background English language proficiency is considered a basic skill that students from different language backgrounds are expected to master, independent of whether they are native or non-native speakers. Tests that measure language proficiency in non-native speakers are typically linked to the common European framework of reference for languages. Such tests, however, often lack the criteria to define a practically relevant degree of proficiency in English. We approach this deficit by assessing non-native speakers’ performance within a native speakers’ framework. Method Items from two English reading assessments—the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA and the National Assessment (NA for English as a foreign language in Germany—were administered to N = 427 German high school students. Student abilities were estimated by drawing plausible values in a two-dimensional Rasch model. Results Results show that non-native speakers of English generally underperformed compared to native speakers. However, academic track students in the German school system achieved satisfactory levels of proficiency on the PISA scale. Linking the two scales showed systematic differences in the proficiency level classifications. Conclusion The findings contribute to the validation and international localization of NA standards for English as a foreign language. Practical implications are discussed with respect to policy-defined benchmarks for the successful participation in a global English-speaking society.

  17. Invasive prey indirectly increase predation on their native competitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castorani, Max C N; Hovel, Kevin A

    2015-07-01

    Ecological theory predicts that invasive prey can interact with native prey directly by competing for shared resources or indirectly by changing the abundance or behavior of shared native predators. However, both the study and management of invasive prey have historically overlooked indirect effects. In southern California estuaries, introduction of the Asian nest mussel Arcuatula senhousia has been linked to profound changes in native bivalve assemblages, but the mechanisms of these interactions remain unclear. We performed three field experiments to assess the mechanisms of competition between Arcuatula and native bivalves, and evaluated the potential for Arcuatula to indirectly mediate native predator-prey dynamics. We found that Arcuatula reduces the diversity, abundance, and size of native bivalve recruits by preemptively exploiting space in surface sediments. When paired with native shallow-dwelling clams (Chione undatella and Laevicardium substriatum), Arcuatula reduces adult survival through overgrowth competition. However, Arcuatula also attracts native predators, causing apparent competition by indirectly increasing predation of native clams, especially for poorly defended species. Therefore, invasive prey can indirectly increase predation rates on native competitors by changing the behavior of shared native predators, but the magnitude of apparent competition strongly depends on the vulnerability of natives to predation. Interestingly, our results indicate that the vulnerability of invasive prey to predation can greatly exacerbate impacts on their native competitors. Our findings suggest that consideration of both direct and indirect effects of invasive prey, as well as native predator-prey relationships, should lead to more effective invasive species management.

  18. Nanodisc-Tm: Rapid functional assessment of nanodisc reconstituted membrane proteins by CPM assay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ashok, Yashwanth; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are generally unstable in detergents. Therefore, biochemical and biophysical studies of membrane proteins in lipidic environments provides a near native-like environment suitable for membrane proteins...

  19. The vowel inherent spectral change of English vowels spoken by native and non-native speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Su-Hyun; Liu, Chang

    2013-05-01

    The current study examined Vowel Inherent Spectral Change (VISC) of English vowels spoken by English-, Chinese-, and Korean-native speakers. Two metrics, spectral distance (amount of spectral shift) and spectral angle (direction of spectral shift) of formant movement from the onset to the offset, were measured for 12 English monophthongs produced in a /hvd/ context. While Chinese speakers showed significantly greater spectral distances of vowels than English and Korean speakers, there was no significant speakers' native language effect on spectral angles. Comparisons to their native vowels for Chinese and Korean speakers suggest that VISC might be affected by language-specific phonological structure.

  20. Overview of Native-speaker English Teacher Versus Non-native-speaker English Teacher

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xu

    2015-01-01

    As much more non-native-speaker English teachers teach alongside native-speaker English teachers, either in China or any other non-English-speaking country, research on the differences between native-speaker English teacher and non-na⁃tive-speaker English teacher is necessary. This paper offers an overview of such difference between the two groups of English teachers in terms of their strengths and weaknesses, teaching styles and approaches. The conclusion suggests that cooperation and communication be emphsised and that the two groups of teachers communicate more and exchange their ideas on how to teach the same group of students more effectively.

  1. Native Americans with Disabilities: Postsecondary Education Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Deborah J.; Eadens, Daniel W.

    2017-01-01

    This correlation study examined relationships between special education and standardized testing variables of 100 Arizona secondary school districts with Native American populations, and the archival records for postsecondary outcomes between 2012 and 2014 of students with disabilities, using archival data collected by the Arizona Department of…

  2. 50 CFR 216.23 - Native exceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... without a permit, if such taking is: (1) By Alaskan Natives who reside in Alaska for subsistence, or (2... complete, true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief. I understand that this information is... (including illegal takings and net entanglements but excluding all legally harvested whales) and all...

  3. Nativization, Linguistic Theory, and Deaf Language Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, James Paul; Goodhart, Wendy

    1985-01-01

    Considers the acquisition of language by deaf children of deaf parents and by deaf children of hearing parents in the light of such linguistic theories as Andersen's "nativization-denativization" and Bickerton's "bioprograms." Findings both support the theories and bring to light complexities that the theories do not exactly explain. (SED)

  4. Native American Languages as Heritage Mother Tongues

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Teresa L.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines current efforts to revitalise, stabilise, and maintain Indigenous languages in the USA. Most Native American languages are no longer acquired as a first language by children. They are nonetheless languages of identity and heritage, and in this sense can and should be considered mother tongues. The article begins with a…

  5. Stylized Figures: Inspired by Native American Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Susie B.

    2013-01-01

    Teaching elementary-level art in the Pacific Northwest makes it natural for the author to develop a lesson based on Native American art of the area. The designs of the Northwest Indians can sometimes be a bit too sophisticated for the students to grasp, however, and it can be frustrating when developing such a project. Over a Labor Day weekend,…

  6. Influence of Family on Native American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    "Native American"* postsecondary education students encounter several barriers to academic persistence including cultural assimilation issues, limited access to career information services, and an individual sense of duty and responsibility to remain tied to traditional spiritual values and beliefs systems, joined with family pressure to…

  7. Non-natives: 141 scientists object

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simberloff, D.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Supplementary information to: Non-natives: 141 scientists object Full list of co-signatories to a Correspondence published in Nature 475, 36 (2011); doi: 10.1038/475036a. Daniel Simberloff University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. dsimberloff@utk.edu Jake Alexander Institute of Integrative

  8. Interpreting Native American Literature: An Archetypal Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevillano, Mando

    1986-01-01

    Compares two approaches to discussing Indian literature and religion. Demonstrates Jungian archetypal approach as transcultural method of analyzing Indian literature. Relates and analyzes Hopi traditional story. Emphasizes accessibility of Native American literature to the non-Indian while supporting multicultural plurality of interpretations.…

  9. Will HTML5 Kill the Native App?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredette, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    For colleges and universities today, the question is no longer whether to develop a campus app or not. Instead, the debate has shifted to the best--and most cost-efficient--way to make campus applications accessible to the myriad devices and operating systems out there. Schools have a few options: They can develop multiple native app versions;…

  10. Digital Natives: Where Is the Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsper, Ellen Johanna; Eynon, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Generational differences are seen as the cause of wide shifts in our ability to engage with technologies and the concept of the digital native has gained popularity in certain areas of policy and practice. This paper provides evidence, through the analysis of a nationally representative survey in the UK, that generation is only one of the…

  11. Will HTML5 Kill the Native App?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredette, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    For colleges and universities today, the question is no longer whether to develop a campus app or not. Instead, the debate has shifted to the best--and most cost-efficient--way to make campus applications accessible to the myriad devices and operating systems out there. Schools have a few options: They can develop multiple native app versions;…

  12. Influence of Family on Native American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    "Native American"* postsecondary education students encounter several barriers to academic persistence including cultural assimilation issues, limited access to career information services, and an individual sense of duty and responsibility to remain tied to traditional spiritual values and beliefs systems, joined with family pressure to…

  13. Nativism Does Not Equal Universal Grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe-Quintero, Kate

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on nativist theories of language learning and how they apply to second-language acquisition (SLA). The article is seeking a nativism that goes beyond the scope of Universal Grammar and explains the human cognitive capacity for language learning, the learning of all language structures found in natural languages, and SLA. (95 references)…

  14. Two Native American Near-Death Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorer, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses two tales of near-death experiences from the Chippewas in Michigan during the 1820s with reference to local origin, influence of White American culture, and universality. One tale has autoscopic, specifically Native American elements while the other contains elements of the transcendental type. (Author/NRB)

  15. Native American Rights Fund: 1982 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Native American Rights Fund, Boulder, CO.

    The 1982 annual report of the Native American Rights Fund (NARF), a non-profit organization specializing in the protection of Indian rights, explains the organization, its structure, its priorities, its activities, and its financial status. Opening statements by the chairman, Roger Jim, and the executive director, John Echohawk, note that despite…

  16. THE EQUIVALENCE THEORY OF NATIVE SPACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-Tian Luh

    2001-01-01

    In this paper some equivalence definitions are given for native spaces which were introduced by Madych and Nelson and have become influential in the theory of radial basis functions. The abstract elements in na tive spaces are interpreted. Moreaver, Weinrich and Iske's theonies are unified.

  17. Non-natives: 141 scientists object

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simberloff, D.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Supplementary information to: Non-natives: 141 scientists object Full list of co-signatories to a Correspondence published in Nature 475, 36 (2011); doi: 10.1038/475036a. Daniel Simberloff University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. dsimberloff@utk.edu Jake Alexander Institute of Integrative

  18. American Indian-Alaska Native Youth Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Robert W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 13,454 rural Native American adolescents. Found 2 percent reported poor physical health and high rates of health-compromising behaviors, which were significantly correlated with physical or sexual abuse, suicide attempts, substance abuse, poor school performance, and poor nutrition. Academic risk was strongly associated with physical,…

  19. Native American Culture: An Interdisciplinary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troisi, Andrea

    1995-01-01

    Provides suggestions for a literature-based approach when integrating Native American culture into the middle school curriculum. Recommends resources in the following subjects: language arts, mathematics, physical education, health, home and career skills, technology, art, music, and second language. (AEF)

  20. Native Culture Issues in Cross-cultural Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万欣

    2012-01-01

      The bi-direction of cross-cultural communication determines culture teaching should include both target culture and native culture. Currently, however, mere emphasis of target culture with ignoring native culture has resulted in“two-skin”phenomenon and“aphasia of Chinese culture”. Therefore, this paper aims to underline native culture teaching, to explore proper techniques for native culture teaching, to achieve integration of target culture and native culture, to enhance students’expressive competence in native culture and finally to carry out effective cross-cultural communication.

  1. Positive effects of non-native grasses on the growth of a native annual in a southern california ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pec, Gregory J; Carlton, Gary C

    2014-01-01

    Fire disturbance is considered a major factor in the promotion of non-native plant species. Non-native grasses are adapted to fire and can alter environmental conditions and reduce resource availability in native coastal sage scrub and chaparral communities of southern California. In these communities persistence of non-native grasses following fire can inhibit establishment and growth of woody species. This may allow certain native herbaceous species to colonize and persist beneath gaps in the canopy. A field manipulative experiment with control, litter, and bare ground treatments was used to examine the impact of non-native grasses on growth and establishment of a native herbaceous species, Cryptantha muricata. C. muricata seedling survival, growth, and reproduction were greatest in the control treatment where non-native grasses were present. C. muricata plants growing in the presence of non-native grasses produced more than twice the number of flowers and more than twice the reproductive biomass of plants growing in the treatments where non-native grasses were removed. Total biomass and number of fruits were also greater in the plants growing in the presence of non-native grasses. Total biomass and reproductive biomass was also greater in late germinants than early germinants growing in the presence of non-native grasses. This study suggests a potential positive effect of non-native grasses on the performance of a particular native annual in a southern California ecosystem.

  2. Positive Effects of Non-Native Grasses on the Growth of a Native Annual in a Southern California Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pec, Gregory J.; Carlton, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Fire disturbance is considered a major factor in the promotion of non-native plant species. Non-native grasses are adapted to fire and can alter environmental conditions and reduce resource availability in native coastal sage scrub and chaparral communities of southern California. In these communities persistence of non-native grasses following fire can inhibit establishment and growth of woody species. This may allow certain native herbaceous species to colonize and persist beneath gaps in the canopy. A field manipulative experiment with control, litter, and bare ground treatments was used to examine the impact of non-native grasses on growth and establishment of a native herbaceous species, Cryptantha muricata. C. muricata seedling survival, growth, and reproduction were greatest in the control treatment where non-native grasses were present. C. muricata plants growing in the presence of non-native grasses produced more than twice the number of flowers and more than twice the reproductive biomass of plants growing in the treatments where non-native grasses were removed. Total biomass and number of fruits were also greater in the plants growing in the presence of non-native grasses. Total biomass and reproductive biomass was also greater in late germinants than early germinants growing in the presence of non-native grasses. This study suggests a potential positive effect of non-native grasses on the performance of a particular native annual in a southern California ecosystem. PMID:25379790

  3. Structural Characterization of a Thrombin-Aptamer Complex by High Resolution Native Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiang; Loo, Rachel R. Ogorzalek; Loo, Joseph A.

    2017-09-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) has evolved as an invaluable tool for the characterization of intact native proteins and non-covalently bound protein complexes. Here we report the structural characterization by high resolution native top-down MS of human thrombin and its complex with the Bock thrombin binding aptamer (TBA), a 15-nucleotide DNA with high specificity and affinity for thrombin. Accurate mass measurements revealed that the predominant form of native human α-thrombin contains a glycosylation mass of 2205 Da, corresponding to a sialylated symmetric biantennary oligosaccharide structure without fucosylation. Native MS showed that thrombin and TBA predominantly form a 1:1 complex under near physiological conditions (pH 6.8, 200 mM NH4OAc), but the binding stoichiometry is influenced by the solution ionic strength. In 20 mM ammonium acetate solution, up to two TBAs were bound to thrombin, whereas increasing the solution ionic strength destabilized the thrombin-TBA complex and 1 M NH4OAc nearly completely dissociated the complex. This observation is consistent with the mediation of thrombin-aptamer binding through electrostatic interactions and it is further consistent with the human thrombin structure that contains two anion binding sites on the surface. Electron capture dissociation (ECD) top-down MS of the thrombin-TBA complex performed with a high resolution 15 Tesla Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer showed the primary binding site to be at exosite I located near the N-terminal sequence of the heavy chain, consistent with crystallographic data. High resolution native top-down MS is complementary to traditional structural biology methods for structurally characterizing native proteins and protein-DNA complexes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Small mammal use of native warm-season and non-native cool-season grass forage fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan L Klimstra,; Christopher E Moorman,; Converse, Sarah J.; Royle, J. Andrew; Craig A Harper,

    2015-01-01

    Recent emphasis has been put on establishing native warm-season grasses for forage production because it is thought native warm-season grasses provide higher quality wildlife habitat than do non-native cool-season grasses. However, it is not clear whether native warm-season grass fields provide better resources for small mammals than currently are available in non-native cool-season grass forage production fields. We developed a hierarchical spatially explicit capture-recapture model to compare abundance of hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus), white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus), and house mice (Mus musculus) among 4 hayed non-native cool-season grass fields, 4 hayed native warm-season grass fields, and 4 native warm-season grass-forb ("wildlife") fields managed for wildlife during 2 summer trapping periods in 2009 and 2010 of the western piedmont of North Carolina, USA. Cotton rat abundance estimates were greater in wildlife fields than in native warm-season grass and non-native cool-season grass fields and greater in native warm-season grass fields than in non-native cool-season grass fields. Abundances of white-footed mouse and house mouse populations were lower in wildlife fields than in native warm-season grass and non-native cool-season grass fields, but the abundances were not different between the native warm-season grass and non-native cool-season grass fields. Lack of cover following haying in non-native cool-season grass and native warm-season grass fields likely was the key factor limiting small mammal abundance, especially cotton rats, in forage fields. Retention of vegetation structure in managed forage production systems, either by alternately resting cool-season and warm-season grass forage fields or by leaving unharvested field borders, should provide refugia for small mammals during haying events.

  5. Phenotypic traits variation among native diploid, native tetraploid and invasive tetraploid Senecio inaequidens DC. (Asteraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monty, A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Senecio inaequidens DC. is a rapidly spreading plant invader in Europe. In its native range, it occurs at two co-existing diploid and tetraploid cytotypes. To date, only tetraploids are reported in Europe, even though invasive diploids were recorded in other parts of the world. We compared native diploid and both native and invasive tetraploid populations in common gardens in Europe for a suite of life history traits. Diploids were able to develop, showed high biomass production and produced more flower heads than tetraploids. In contrast, winter survival was null for diploids. It was low for native tetraploids, but reached 40% in invasive tetraploids. Results suggested that diploid cytotype tends to an annual life form when grown in Western Europe, with earlier and more abundant flowering. In contrast, the tetraploid cytotype was mainly perennial which may enhance its invasiveness.

  6. Mental health status in pregnancy among native and non-native Swedish-speaking women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wangel, Anne-Marie; Schei, Berit; Ryding, Elsa Lena

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe mental health status in native and non-native Swedish-speaking pregnant women and explore risk factors of depression and posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms. DESIGN AND SETTING: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted at midwife-based antenatal clinics in South......OBJECTIVES: To describe mental health status in native and non-native Swedish-speaking pregnant women and explore risk factors of depression and posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms. DESIGN AND SETTING: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted at midwife-based antenatal clinics...... in Southern Sweden. SAMPLE: A non-selected group of women in mid-pregnancy. METHODS: Participants completed a questionnaire covering background characteristics, social support, life events, mental health variables and the short Edinburgh Depression Scale. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Depressive symptoms during...

  7. Probing RNA native conformational ensembles with structural constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Rasmus; van den Bedem, Henry; Bernauer, Julie

    2016-01-01

    analysis-based exploration, our procedure diffuses faster through the experimental ensemble while also accessing conformational substates to greater precision. Our results suggest that conformational sampling with a highly reduced but fully atomistic representation of noncoding RNA expresses key features......Noncoding ribonucleic acids (RNA) play a critical role in a wide variety of cellular processes, ranging from regulating gene expression to post-translational modification and protein synthesis. Their activity is modulated by highly dynamic exchanges between three-dimensional conformational...... substates, which are difficult to characterize experimentally and computationally. Here, we present an innovative, entirely kinematic computational procedure to efficiently explore the native ensemble of RNA molecules. Our procedure projects degrees of freedom onto a subspace of conformation space defined...

  8. Trophic consequences of non-native pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus for native pond fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Copp, G. H.; Britton, J R; Guo, Z.; Edmonds-Brown, V; Pegg, Josie; L. VILIZZI; Davison, P.

    2017-01-01

    Introduced non-native fishes can cause considerable adverse impacts on freshwater ecosystems. The pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus, a North American centrarchid, is one of the most widely distributed non-native fishes in Europe, having established self-sustaining populations in at least 28 countries, including the U.K. where it is predicted to become invasive under warmer climate conditions. To predict the consequences of increased invasiveness, a field experiment was completed over a summer peri...

  9. Increased Abundance of Native and Non-Native Spiders With Habitat Fragmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Bolger, Douglas T.; Beard, Karen H.; Suarez, Andrew; Case, Ted

    2008-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and invasive species often contribute to the decline of native taxa. Since the penetration of non-native species into natural habitat may be facilitated by habitat fragmentation, it is important to examine how these two factors interact. Previous research documented that, in contrast to most other arthropod taxa, spiders increased in density and morphospecies richness with decreasing fragment area and increasing fragment age (time since insularization) in urban habitat f...

  10. Food sources of dominant macrozoobenthos between native and non-native mangrove forests: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luzhen; Yan, Ting; Xiong, Yiyi; Zhang, Yihui; Lin, Guanghui

    2017-03-01

    The macrozoobenthos is an important link of the food web in coastal wetlands. Diet-habitat relationships may significantly depend on qualitative differences and seasonal availability of food sources. Increasing interest has been shown in food web structure altered by non-native plants. In particular, however, a non-native mangrove species from Bangladesh, Sonneratia apetala, has been widely planted in China, but little is known about its possible impact on food sources of macrozoobenthos living in these non-native mangrove forests. Therefore, in this study, we used fatty acid analysis to compare the food sources of one littorinid snail and two grapsid crab species between two native mangrove forests and one non-native S. apetala plantation in the Zhanjiang Mangrove National Nature Reserve of China. We found that the sediment of all three forests had high diatom and bacteria signals, but low mangrove leaf signals, while the opposite patterns were detected in the three macrozoobenthos. Specifically, the gastropod Littoraria melanostoma relied mainly on mangrove leaves and brown algae as food sources, with significant differences among the three mangrove forests, and showed significant seasonal variation in its diet. The grapsidae species (Perisesarma bidens and Parasesarma plicatum) mainly grazed on mangrove litter, brown and green algae, and occasionally consumed diatoms and bacteria, also showing significant seasonal variation in their diet. Overall, Principle Components Analysis (PCA) of the fatty acid profiles showed a significant overlapping in food sources among the macrozoobenthos living in the non-native and native mangrove forests, but significant seasonal variations in their food sources. This suggests that the planting of non-native S. apetala near original mangrove forests has had little effect on the feeding behavior of macrozoobenthos some 10 years after planting.

  11. Native interface of the SAM domain polymer of TEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowie James U

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TEL is a transcriptional repressor containing a SAM domain that forms a helical polymer. In a number of hematologic malignancies, chromosomal translocations lead to aberrant fusions of TEL-SAM to a variety of other proteins, including many tyrosine kinases. TEL-SAM polymerization results in constitutive activation of the tyrosine kinase domains to which it becomes fused, leading to cell transformation. Thus, inhibitors of TEL-SAM self-association could abrogate transformation in these cells. In previous work, we determined the structure of a mutant TEL-SAM polymer bearing a Val to Glu substitution in center of the subunit interface. It remained unclear how much the mutation affected the architecture of the polymer, however. Results Here we determine the structure of the native polymer interface. To accomplish this goal, we introduced mutations that block polymer extension, producing a heterodimer with a wild-type interface. We find that the structure of the wild-type polymer interface is quite similar to the mutant structure determined previously. With the structure of the native interface, it is possible to evaluate the potential for developing therapeutic inhibitors of the interaction. We find that the interacting surfaces of the protein are relatively flat, containing no obvious pockets for the design of small molecule inhibitors. Conclusion Our results confirm the architecture of the TEL-SAM polymer proposed previously based on a mutant structure. The fact that the interface contains no obvious potential binding pockets suggests that it may be difficult to find small molecule inhibitors to treat malignancies in this way.

  12. Photophysics in single light-harvesting complexes II: from micelle to native nanodisks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, J. Michael; Scheidelaar, Stefan; van Roon, Henny; Dekker, Jan P.; Killian, J. Antoinette; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-02-01

    Most photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes of algae and higher plants are integral membrane proteins and are thus usually isolated in the presence of detergent to provide a hydrophobic interface and prevent aggregation. It was recently shown that the styrene maleic acid (SMA) copolymer can be used instead to solubilize and isolate protein complexes with their native lipid environment into nanodisk particles. We isolated LHCII complexes in SMA and compared their photophysics with trimeric LHCII complexes in β-DM detergent micelles to understand the effect of the native environment on the function of light-harvesting antennae. The triplet state kinetics and the calculated relative absorption cross section of single complexes indicate the successful isolation of trimeric complexes in SMA nanodisks, confirming the trimeric structure as the likely native configuration. The survival time of complexes before they photobleach is increased in SMA compared to detergent which might be explained by a stabilizing effect of the co-purified lipids in nanodisks. We furthermore find an unquenched fluorescence lifetime of 3.5 ns for LHCII in SMA nanodisks which coincides with detergent isolated complexes and notably differs from 2 ns typically found in native thylakoid structures. A large dynamic range of partially quenched complexes both in detergent micelles and lipid nanodisks is demonstrated by correlating the fluorescence lifetime with the intensity and likely reflects the conformational freedom of these complexes. This further supports the hypothesis that fluorescence intermittency is an intrinsic property of LHCII that may be involved in excess energy dissipation in native light-harvesting.

  13. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Facts Heart Disease is the first and stroke ...

  14. 36 CFR 51.83 - Sale of Native Handicrafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... includes any person so defined either or both of whose adoptive parents are not Alaska Natives. It also... whose father or mother is (or, if deceased, was) regarded as an Alaska Native by any village or...

  15. Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Native Hawaiian/ ... times more likely to be diagnosed with chronic liver disease in 2006. American Samoans were 8 times ...

  16. Native Electrophoresis and Western Blot Analysis (NEWeB): Methods and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoussopoulos, Ioannis N; Tsagris, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Native Electrophoresis and Western Blot Analysis (NEWeB) has been developed for the study of plant virus characteristics, among others, virus particle-protein interactions, electrophorotype formation, and strain separation. The method is based on the property of electrophoretic mobility of virus particles (VP) and proteins and combines the analytical capacity of electrophoresis with the specificity of western blot. One of its advantages is that it deals with entire VP that can be studied in cause and effect or in time-interval experiments. Some of the most interesting approaches include VP structural studies, VP interaction with host or viral proteins, and also the characterization of VP-protein complexes. In this protocol, NEWeB is used to demonstrate the interaction of Plum pox virus particles with the helper component, a virus encoded protein. It is expected that the method could be used in analogous studies of other viruses or large protein complexes, where similar principles apply.

  17. Non-native speech perception in adverse conditions: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Lecumberri, M.L.; Cooke, M.P.; Cutler, A.

    2010-01-01

    If listening in adverse conditions is hard, then listening in a foreign language is doubly so: non-native listeners have to cope with both imperfect signals and imperfect knowledge. Comparison of native and non-native listener performance in speech-in-noise tasks helps to clarify the role of prior l

  18. 77 FR 66527 - National Native American Heritage Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-06

    ... marred by violence and tragic mistreatment. For centuries, Native Americans faced cruelty, injustice, and... opportunities for Native American students. It aims to preserve Native languages, cultures, and histories while offering a competitive education that prepares young people to succeed in college and careers. And...

  19. Recruitment of Native American Parents: Ideas for Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodluck, Charlotte

    Recruitment of Native Americans to be foster or adoptive parents for Native American children involves careful planning, preparation, and work. In addition to making standard administrative decisions and maintaining required records, social workers must be sensitive to the attitudes, lifestyle, and culture of Native Americans recruited as adoptive…

  20. 76 FR 18759 - Improving Communications Services for Native Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ..., communication adoption opportunities, and incentives for Native Nations. The Commission also seeks government-to... committed to ensuring that all Americans have access to emerging services and technologies, with Native... communications issues affecting Native Nations and Americans living on Tribal lands--the lands of...

  1. Cultural Strengths to Persevere: Native American Women in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Stephanie J.; Lindley, Lorinda S.

    2013-01-01

    Beginning with an overview of historical perspectives of Native American women, this article includes some discussion of values and practices of contemporary Native American women, data pertaining to Native American women's participation in higher education, and an introduction of familial cultural capital, community cultural wealth, Native…

  2. How Scholarship Defames the Native Voice...and Why.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Lynn, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    The emergence of the Native voice in academia has provided much outstanding scholarship rising out of analysis of oral histories and textual authority of Native peoples. In the 1990s, however, attempts to discredit Native scholarship included the claim that "I, Rigoberta Menchu" was a willful fraud, debates over the Bering Strait theory…

  3. The Native Forum at the 2000 Sundance Film Festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Christine

    2000-01-01

    This article describes films included in the Native Forum of the 2000 Sundance Film Festival. The forum was created to give Native filmmakers a chance to express a Native point of view, with the hope that such a forum will eventually become unnecessary. The article includes background information, plot summaries, comments, and contact information…

  4. The Future in the Past of Native and Indigenous Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrior, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the author talks about some of the issues of the beginnings of Native and Indigenous studies and suggests that one looks more precisely at what people mean when they talk about those beginnings. The author is not a big fan of Native people emerging vaguely from the mists of time, but he is always tracing a history of Native studies…

  5. Native American Student Resiliency within Southwestern Tribal Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralez, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the degree to which Native American culture impacts the resiliency of Native American students earning degrees at three tribal colleges in the southwestern part of the United States. This study was a qualitative case study that was based on the following research question: "How does Native American…

  6. Preparing Non-Native English-Speaking ESL Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sarah J.

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the challenges that non-native English-speaking teacher trainees face as they begin teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) in Western, English-speaking countries. Despite a great deal of training, non-native speaker teachers may be viewed as inadequate language teachers because they often lack native speaker competence…

  7. When the Teacher Is a Non-native Speaker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pèter Medgyes

    2005-01-01

    @@ In "When the Teacher is a Non-native Speaker," Medgyes examines the differences in teaching behavior between native and non-native teachers of English, and then specifies the causes of those differences. The aim of the discussion is to raise the awareness of both groups of teachers to their respective strengths and weaknesses, and thus help them become better teachers.

  8. Native-Speakerism in ELT: Plus ca Change...?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Alan

    2007-01-01

    In ELT, the over-representation of the "native-speaker" (NS) point of view at the expense of the "non-native-speaker" (NNS) one--"native-speakerism"--has long been a significant problem. However, this paper argues that the current main applied linguistics attempt to remedy the situation--the use of a "critical theory" (CT) approach--rather than…

  9. Negation in Near-Native French: Variation and Sociolinguistic Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated how adult second language (L2) speakers of French with near-native proficiency realize verbal negation, a well-known sociolinguistic variable in contemporary spoken French. Data included 10 spontaneous informal conversations between near-native speakers of French and native speakers (NSs) closely acquainted with them.…

  10. Irrigation to enhance native seed production for Great Basin restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton C. Shock; Erik B. G. Feibert; Nancy L. Shaw; Myrtle P. Shock; Lamont D. Saunders

    2015-01-01

    Native shrublands and their associated grasses and forbs have been disappearing from the Great Basin as a result of grazing practices, exotic weed invasions, altered fire regimes, climate change and other human impacts. Native forb seed is needed to restore these areas. The irrigation requirements for maximum seed production of four key native forb species (Eriogonum...

  11. 21 CFR 1307.31 - Native American Church.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Persons § 1307.31 Native American Church. The listing of peyote as a controlled substance in Schedule I does not apply to the nondrug use of peyote in bona fide religious ceremonies of the Native American... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Native American Church. 1307.31 Section 1307.31...

  12. Wrapper Generator using Java Native Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S.Vairale

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide a complete automated solution to the wrapping and compilation of legacy code in order to facilitate the use of native libraries in effective ways through Java NativeInterface. Legacy codes are those libraries, command line applications or other types of systems that were developed in technologies older than currently used in modern computing environments. Modern software engineering concepts, like software as a service, allow the extension of the legacy code lifetime and the reduction of software maintenance costs. The transformation of a legacy code into a service is not straightforward task, especially when the initial code was designed with a rich user interface. This paper describes a process for the semi-automatic conversion of numerical and scientific routines written in the C programming language into computational services that can be used within a distributed serviceoriented architecture such as that being adopted for Grid computing.

  13. Techno-anthropology and the digital natives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Anders Kristian

    2013-01-01

    The ethnographic field guide was a short-lived genre in the annals of anthropology. In this chapter I experimentally attempt to revive it. The original guides provided the ethnographer with a set of practical pointers on how to organise fieldwork, set up camp, maintain relations, and negotiate ac...... access in a particular geographical region of the world. The present field guide attempts to do so while entertaining (and eventually discarding) the idea that the World Wide Web has similar areal qualities and constitutes a field in which the techno-anthropologist can go to do work...... of digital natives, and that maintaining relations with these natives presents a challenge of its own. I argue that these challenges must be taken seriously, and that techno-anthropology could be ideally suited to do just that....

  14. Franz Boas and Native American biological variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantz, R L

    1995-06-01

    The contributions to physical anthropology with which Franz Boas is usually credited are in the areas of growth, plasticity of head and body form, and biometric genetics. Such a listing of Boas's contributions overlooks the tremendous amount of research he did with biological variability of Native American populations. The rediscovery of his anthropometric data documents the tremendous investment in time, money, and effort Boas devoted to the topic and provides the opportunity to rediscover his insights into a subject that is of continuing interest. The design of his massive anthropometric survey of native North Americans reveals a concern for population analyses and a rejection of the typological framework of the time. If Boas's ideas had been adopted at the turn of the century, the development of physical anthropology in America might have been much different.

  15. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amarnath Chtterjee; Ashutosh Kumar; Jeetender Chugh; Sudha Srivastava; Neel S Bhavesh; Ramakrishna V Hosur

    2005-01-01

    In the post-genomic era, as more and more genome sequences are becoming known and hectic efforts are underway to decode the information content in them, it is becoming increasingly evident that flexibility in proteins plays a crucial role in many of the biological functions. Many proteins have intrinsic disorder either wholly or in specific regions. It appears that this disorder may be important for regulatory functions of the proteins, on the one hand, and may help in directing the folding process to reach the compact native state, on the other. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has over the last two decades emerged as the sole, most powerful technique to help characterize these disordered protein systems. In this review, we first discuss the significance of disorder in proteins and then describe the recent developments in NMR methods for their characterization. A brief description of the results obtained on several disordered proteins is presented at the end.

  16. Proofreading market viability for Native English Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Lamson, Cody

    2012-01-01

    Author or authors Cody Lamson Year of entry 2007 Title of report Proofreading market viability in for Native English Solutions Number of pages and appendices 47 Teacher(s) or supervisor(s) Mervi Riikonen The research was conducted in order to discover what needs to be done in order to succeed in the proofreading and editing market. If it is worth the time and money to enter the market, what should be done in order to be successful? The reseach was do...

  17. Telemedical Education: Training Digital Natives in Telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathipati, Akhilesh S; Azad, Tej D; Jethwani, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Telemedicine plays an important role in the delivery of medical care, and will become increasingly prominent going forward. Current medical students are among the first generation of "digital natives" who are well versed in the incorporation of technology into social interaction. These students are well positioned to apply advances in communications to patient care. Even so, providers require training to effectively leverage these opportunities. Therefore, we recommend introducing telemedicine training into medical school curricula and propose a model for incorporation.

  18. Non-natives: 141 scientists object

    OpenAIRE

    Simberloff, D.; van der Putten, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    Supplementary information to: Non-natives: 141 scientists object Full list of co-signatories to a Correspondence published in Nature 475, 36 (2011); doi: 10.1038/475036a. Daniel Simberloff University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. Jake Alexander Institute of Integrative Biology, Zurich, Switzerland. Fred Allendorf University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, USA. James Aronson CEFE/CNRS, Montpellier, France. Pedro M. Antunes Algoma University, Sault Ste. Marie, Onta...

  19. Native vs photoinduced chemiluminescence in dimethoate determination

    OpenAIRE

    Catalá Icardo, Mónica; López Paz, José Luis; CHOVES BARÓN, CRISTINA; Pena Badena, A.

    2012-01-01

    The determination of dimethoate using either its native chemiluminescent (CL) properties or its photoinduced chemiluminescence obtained by irradiation with a 15W low-pressure mercury lamp was studied. Thereby, two flow injection systems (FIA) with and without irradiation were exhaustively optimized and their analytical characteristics studied. Better sensitivity and selectivity was found in absence of irradiation, due to the enhancing effect of hexadecylpyridinium chloride (HPC), which acted ...

  20. Native valve Escherichia coli endocarditis following urosepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, D; Ramakrishnan, S; Patro, K C; Devaraj, S; Krishnamurthy, V; Kothari, Y; Satyaki, N

    2013-05-01

    Gram-negative organisms are a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Escherichia coli, the most common cause of urinary tract infection and gram-negative septicemia involves endocardium rarely. In this case report, we describe infection of native mitral valve by E. coli following septicemia of urinary tract origin in a diabetic male; subsequently, he required prosthetic tissue valve replacement indicated by persistent sepsis and congestive cardiac failure.

  1. Trophic Strategies of a Non-Native and a Native Amphibian Species in Shared Ponds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olatz San Sebastián

    Full Text Available One of the critical factors for understanding the establishment, success and potential impact on native species of an introduced species is a thorough knowledge of how these species manage trophic resources. Two main trophic strategies for resource acquisition have been described: competition and opportunism. In the present study our objective was to identify the main trophic strategies of the non-native amphibian Discoglossus pictus and its potential trophic impact on the native amphibian Bufo calamita. We determine whether D. pictus exploits similar trophic resources to those exploited by the native B. calamita (competition hypothesis or alternative resources (opportunistic hypothesis. To this end, we analyzed the stable isotope values of nitrogen and carbon in larvae of both species, in natural ponds and in controlled laboratory conditions. The similarity of the δ15N and δ13C values in the two species coupled with isotopic signal variation according to pond conditions and niche partitioning when they co-occurred indicated dietary competition. Additionally, the non-native species was located at higher levels of trophic niches than the native species and B. calamita suffered an increase in its standard ellipse area when it shared ponds with D. pictus. These results suggest niche displacement of B. calamita to non-preferred resources and greater competitive capacity of D. pictus in field conditions. Moreover, D. pictus showed a broader niche than the native species in all conditions, indicating increased capacity to exploit the diversity of resources; this may indirectly favor its invasiveness. Despite the limitations of this study (derived from potential variability in pond isotopic signals, the results support previous experimental studies. All the studies indicate that D. pictus competes with B. calamita for trophic resources with potential negative effects on the fitness of the latter.

  2. Security Awareness of the Digital Natives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Gkioulos

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Young generations make extensive use of mobile devices, such as smartphones, tablets and laptops, while a plethora of security risks associated with such devices are induced by vulnerabilities related to user behavior. Furthermore, the number of security breaches on or via portable devices increases exponentially. Thus, deploying suitable risk treatments requires the investigation of how the digital natives (young people, born and bred in the digital era use their mobile devices and their level of security awareness, in order to identify common usage patterns with negative security impact. In this article, we present the results of a survey performed across a multinational sample of digital natives with distinct backgrounds and levels of competence in terms of security, to identify divergences in user behavior due to regional, educational and other factors. Our results highlight significant influences on the behavior of digital natives, arising from user confidence, educational background, and parameters related to usability and accessibility. The outcomes of this study justify the need for further analysis of the topic, in order to identify the influence of fine-grained semantics, but also the consolidation of wide and robust user-models.

  3. Native Pig and Chicken Breed Database: NPCDB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon-Soo Jeong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous (native breeds of livestock have higher disease resistance and adaptation to the environment due to high genetic diversity. Even though their extinction rate is accelerated due to the increase of commercial breeds, natural disaster, and civil war, there is a lack of well-established databases for the native breeds. Thus, we constructed the native pig and chicken breed database (NPCDB which integrates available information on the breeds from around the world. It is a nonprofit public database aimed to provide information on the genetic resources of indigenous pig and chicken breeds for their conservation. The NPCDB (http://npcdb.snu.ac.kr/ provides the phenotypic information and population size of each breed as well as its specific habitat. In addition, it provides information on the distribution of genetic resources across the country. The database will contribute to understanding of the breed’s characteristics such as disease resistance and adaptation to environmental changes as well as the conservation of indigenous genetic resources.

  4. Invasive mutualists erode native pollination webs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo A Aizen

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant-animal mutualisms are characterized by weak or asymmetric mutual dependences between interacting species, a feature that could increase community stability. If invasive species integrate into mutualistic webs, they may alter web structure, with consequences for species persistence. However, the effect of alien mutualists on the architecture of plant-pollinator webs remains largely unexplored. We analyzed the extent of mutual dependency between interacting species, as a measure of mutualism strength, and the connectivity of 10 paired plant-pollinator webs, eight from forests of the southern Andes and two from oceanic islands, with different incidences of alien species. Highly invaded webs exhibited weaker mutualism than less-invaded webs. This potential increase in network stability was the result of a disproportionate increase in the importance and participation of alien species in the most asymmetric interactions. The integration of alien mutualists did not alter overall network connectivity, but links were transferred from generalist native species to super-generalist alien species during invasion. Therefore, connectivity among native species declined in highly invaded webs. These modifications in the structure of pollination webs, due to dominance of alien mutualists, can leave many native species subject to novel ecological and evolutionary dynamics.

  5. Invasive knotweed affects native plants through allelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrell, Craig; Gerber, Esther; Krebs, Christine; Parepa, Madalin; Schaffner, Urs; Bossdorf, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that many plant invaders interfere with native plants through allelopathy. This allelopathic interference may be a key mechanism of plant invasiveness. One of the most aggressive current plant invaders is the clonal knotweed hybrid Fallopia × bohemica, which often forms monocultures in its introduced range. Preliminary results from laboratory studies suggest that allelopathy could play a role in this invasion. We grew experimental communities of European plants together with F. × bohemica. We used activated carbon to test for allelopathic effects, and we combined this with single or repeated removal of Fallopia shoots to examine how mechanical control can reduce the species' impact. Addition of activated carbon to the soil significantly reduced the suppressive effect of undamaged F. × bohemica on native forbs. The magnitude of this effect was similar to that of regular cutting of Fallopia shoots. Regular cutting of Fallopia shoots efficiently inhibited the growth of rhizomes, together with their apparent allelopathic effects. The ecological impact of F. × bohemica on native forbs is not just a result of competition for shared resources, but it also appears to have a large allelopathic component. Still, regular mechnical control successfully eliminated allelopathic effects. Therefore, allelopathy will create an additional challenge to knotweed management and ecological restoration only if the allelochemicals are found to persist in the soil. More research is needed to examine the mechanisms underlying Fallopia allelopathy, and the long-term effects of soil residues.

  6. Protein Folding:. Physics on Products of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Nobuhiro

    2001-09-01

    Proteins are self-assembling molecular systems. A polypeptide chain of a protein molecule folds into a globular three-dimensional structure, which is specific to the amino acid sequence of the chain. A protein molecule is in the "native state" when folded into its specific three-dimensional structure. Only in the native state, a protein molecule carries out its biological function. This extraordinary self-assembly ability of proteins can be explained based on the three generally accepted empirical observations in proteins: (1) Two-state character; Folding and unfolding transitions in small globular proteins are generally of the two-state character. (2) Consistency principle; Various components of intra-molecular interactions responsible for stabilizing the native state of globular proteins are consistent to each other in their native state. (3) Principle of marginal stability; The native folded states of globular proteins are generally only marginally stable against their unfolded states. Deduction of the self-assembly ability from the three observations is a problem of physical nature. Very sophisticated theories have been developed recently as to this point. I shall give a very simple and intuitive discussion on this point. Asking why protein molecules show the three observations is another problem. Observation (1) can be derived from the globularity of native states. Observations (2) and (3) can be understood only by considering the evolutionary history of protein molecules, i.e., only polypeptide chains with very specific amino acid sequences selected during the history of evolution show properties of observations (2) and (3). Here we see a case where the mechanism of an extraordinary ability of biopolymers is elucidated in terms of physics, and physics expects that only a very small fraction of amino acid sequences have such an ability. Nature has left the job of finding able sequences to the history of evolution.

  7. Isolation and Characterization of Native Microalgae from the Peruvian Amazon with Potential for Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianela Cobos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel production from microalgae triacylglycerols is growing, because this feedstock is a more sustainable and advantageous alternative. In this study, we isolated and identified fourteen strains of native microalgae from the Peruvian Amazon. These strains showed great heterogeneity in biomass productivity, lipid productivity and lipid content, and thus, three of them (Acutodesmus obliquus, Ankistrodesmus sp. and Chlorella lewinii were selected for further evaluation under culture of nitrogen-sufficient (+N and nitrogen-deficient (−N Chu medium No. 10. These microalgae species showed modifications in biomolecule content (protein, lipid and carbohydrate with a pronounced increase of lipids and carbohydrate and a decrease of protein content under stress culture. Furthermore, the fatty acid profile was peculiar for each species, and these patterns showed evident changes, particularly in the proportion of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. The results of this research suggest that the isolated native microalgae, from the Peruvian Amazon, could be suitable candidates for biodiesel production

  8. Descriptions of Difficult Conversations between Native and Non-Native English Speakers: In-Group Membership and Helping Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ray; Faux, William V., II

    2011-01-01

    This study illustrated the perceptions of native English speakers about difficult conversations with non-native English speakers. A total of 114 native English speakers enrolled in undergraduate communication courses at a regional state university answered a questionnaire about a recent difficult conversation the respondent had with a non-native…

  9. Tolerance of native and non-native fish species to chemical stress: a case study for the River Rhine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Fedorenkova; J.A. Vonk; A.M. Breure; A.J. Hendriks; R.S.E.W. Leuven

    2013-01-01

    Freshwater ecosystems can be impacted by invasive species. Non-native species can become invasive due to their high tolerance to environmental stressors (e.g., pollution and habitat modifications). Yet, tolerance of native and non-native fish species exposed simultaneously to multiple chemical stres

  10. Higher dropout rate in non-native patients than in native patients in rehabilitation in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloots, Maurits; Scheppers, Emmanuel F.; van de Weg, Frans B.; Bartels, Edien A.; Geertzen, Jan H.; Dekker, Joost; Dekker, Jaap

    2009-01-01

    Dropout from a rehabilitation programme often occurs in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain of non-native origin. However, the exact dropout rate is not known. The objective of this study was to determine the difference in dropout rate between native and non-native patients with chronic

  11. Communicative Functions of the Nurse-Patient Relationship: Observations of Native and Non-Native Nurses in United States Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Jo Linda

    A study compared the nurse-patient communication of native and non-native English-speaking nurses. Examination of the literature on nurse-patient relationships and a brief survey of native nurses yielded an instrument for observation of nurses. Ten nurses were observed for 3 hourse each. Transcripts of the observations of the five non-native…

  12. Self-Control, Native Traditionalism, and Native American Substance Use: Testing the Cultural Invariance of a General Theory of Crime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Gregory D.; Wood, Peter B.; Dunaway, R. Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Using a sample of White and Native American high school students, the authors provide a test of (a) self-control theory's invariance thesis and (b) native traditionalism as an explanation of Native American substance use. Self-control significantly influenced all forms of substance use when controlling for race and in race-specific analyses.…

  13. Modulation of legume defense signaling pathways by native and non-native pea aphid clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Sanchez-Arcos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum is a complex of at least 15 genetically different host races that are native to specific legume plants, but can all develop on the universal host plant Vicia faba. Despite much research it is still unclear why pea aphid host races (biotypes are able to colonize their native hosts while other host races are not. All aphids penetrate the plant and salivate into plant cells when they test plant suitability. Thus plants might react differently to the various pea aphid host races. To find out whether legume species vary in their defense responses to different pea aphid host races, we measured the amounts of salicylic acid (SA, the jasmonic acid-isoleucine conjugate (JA-Ile, other jasmonate precursors and derivatives, and abscisic acid (ABA in four different species (Medicago sativa, Trifolium pratense, Pisum sativum, V. faba after infestation by native and non-native pea aphid clones of various host races. Additionally, we assessed the performance of the clones on the four plant species. On M. sativa and T. pratense, non-native clones that were barely able to survive or reproduce, triggered a strong SA and JA-Ile response, whereas infestation with native clones led to lower levels of both phytohormones. On P. sativum, non-native clones, which survived or reproduced to a certain extent, induced fluctuating SA and JA-Ile levels, whereas the native clone triggered only a weak SA and JA-Ile response. On the universal host V. faba all aphid clones triggered only low SA levels initially, but induced clone-specific patterns of SA and JA-Ile later on. The levels of the active JA-Ile conjugate and of the other JA-pathway metabolites measured showed in many cases similar patterns, suggesting that the reduction in JA signaling was due to an effect upstream of OPDA. ABA levels were downregulated in all aphid clone-plant combinations and were therefore probably not decisive factors for aphid-plant compatibility. Our results

  14. Non-native educators in English language teaching

    CERN Document Server

    Braine, George

    2013-01-01

    The place of native and non-native speakers in the role of English teachers has probably been an issue ever since English was taught internationally. Although ESL and EFL literature is awash, in fact dependent upon, the scrutiny of non-native learners, interest in non-native academics and teachers is fairly new. Until recently, the voices of non-native speakers articulating their own concerns have been even rarer. This book is a response to this notable vacuum in the ELT literature, providing a forum for language educators from diverse geographical origins and language backgrounds. In additio

  15. High-level expression of the native barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor in Pichia pastoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micheelsen, Pernille Ollendorff; Ostergaard, Peter Rahbek; Lange, Lene

    2008-01-01

    An expression system for high-level expression of the native Hordeum vulgare alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI) has been developed in Pichia pastoris, using the methanol inducible alcohol oxidase 1 (AOX1) promoter. To optimize expression, two codon-optimized coding regions have been design...... and characterized by Edman degradation, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and insoluble blue starch assay, and was shown to possess the same characteristics as wild-type protein purified from barley grains....

  16. Conservation of the oligomeric state of native VDAC1 in detergent micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clémençon, Benjamin; Fine, Michael; Hediger, Matthias A

    2016-08-01

    The voltage-dependent anion-selective channel (VDAC) is an intrinsic β-barrel membrane protein located within the mitochondrial outer membrane where it serves as a pore, connecting the mitochondria to the cytosol. The high-resolution structures of both the human and murine VDACs have been resolved by X-ray diffraction and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) in 2008. However, the structural data are not completely in line with the findings that were obtained after decades of research on biochemical and functional analysis of VDAC. This discrepancy may be related to the fact that structural biology studies of membrane proteins reveal specific static conformations that may not necessarily represent the physiological state. For example, overexpression of membrane proteins in bacterial inclusion bodies or simply the extraction from the native lipid environment using harsh purification methods (i.e. chaotropic agents) can disturb the physiological conformations and the supramolecular assemblies. To address these potential issues, we have developed a method, allowing rapid one step purification of endogenous VDAC expressed in the native mitochondrial membrane without overexpression of recombinant protein or usage of harsh chaotropic extraction procedures. Using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae isoform 1 of VDAC as a model, this method yields efficient purification, preserving VDAC in a more physiological, native state following extraction from mitochondria. Single particle analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated conservation of oligomeric assembly after purification. Maintenance of the native state was evaluated using functional assessment that involves an ATP-binding assay by micro-scale thermophoresis (MST). Using this approach, we were able to determine for the first time the apparent KD for ATP of 1.2 mM.

  17. The residential segregation of mixed-nativity married couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iceland, John; Nelson, Kyle Anne

    2010-11-01

    This article examines the ways in which mixed-nativity marriage is related to spatial assimilation in metropolitan areas of the United States. Specifically, we examine the residential patterns of households with a mixed-nativity-and, in some cases, interracial-marriage to determine whether they are less segregated from the native-born than entirely foreign-born households. Using restricted-use data from the 2000 census, we find that compared with couples in which both spouses are foreign-born, mixed-nativity couples tend to be less segregated from various native-born racial and ethnic groups. Further, among both foreign-born Asians and Hispanics, those with a native-born non-Hispanic white spouse are considerably less segregated from native-born white households than from other foreign-born Asian and Hispanic households. We also find that even though nativity status matters for black couples in a manner consistent with assimilation theory, foreign-born and mixed-nativity black households still each display very high levels of segregation from all other native-born racial/ethnic groups, reaffirming the power of race in determining residential patterns. Overall, our findings provide moderate support for spatial assimilation theory and suggest that cross-nativity marriages often facilitate the residential integration of the foreign-born.

  18. 78 FR 22292 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Notice of Nomination...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... National Park Service Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Notice of.... SUMMARY: The National Park Service is soliciting nominations for one member of the Native American Graves... nominations submitted by Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, and traditional Native...

  19. 77 FR 65406 - Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Notice of Nomination...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... National Park Service Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Review Committee: Notice of.... SUMMARY: The National Park Service is soliciting nominations for one member of the Native American Graves... nominations submitted by Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, and traditional Native...

  20. The association of low-molecular-weight hydrophobic compounds with native casein micelles in bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, M; Mohan, M S; Campagna, S R; Jurat-Fuentes, J L; Harte, F M

    2015-08-01

    The agreed biological function of the casein micelles in milk is to carry minerals (calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus) from mother to young along with amino acids for growth and development. Recently, native and modified casein micelles were used as encapsulating and delivery agents for various hydrophobic low-molecular-weight probes. The ability of modified casein micelles to bind certain probes may derive from the binding affinity of native casein micelles. Hence, a study with milk from single cows was conducted to further elucidate the association of hydrophobic molecules into native casein micelles and further understand their biological function. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic extraction followed by ultraperformance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry analysis were performed over protein fractions obtained from size exclusion fractionation of raw skim milk. Hydrophobic compounds, including phosphatidylcholine, lyso-phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and sphingomyelin, showed strong association exclusively to casein micelles as compared with whey proteins, whereas hydrophilic compounds did not display any preference for their association among milk proteins. Further analysis using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry detected 42 compounds associated solely with the casein-micelles fraction. Mass fragments in tandem mass spectrometry identified 4 of these compounds as phosphatidylcholine with fatty acid composition of 16:0/18:1, 14:0/16:0, 16:0/16:0, and 18:1/18:0. These results support that transporting low-molecular-weight hydrophobic molecules is also a biological function of the casein micelles in milk.