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Sample records for national university medical

  1. [Autonomous National University of Mexico (UNAM) medical students' attitudes to research and learning: 1984-1994].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobigrot-Kleinman, D; Nobigrot-Streimbleinsky, M; Galván-Huerta, S C

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluates, after a 10-year period, the attitudes of medical students towards research and learning at the National University of Mexico (UNAM), and tries to determine the role that experiences obtained during academic years could play in orienting these attitudes. Results indicate that all four groups of participant students,--1st and 4th-5th grades, in 1984 and in 1994--show slightly positive attitudes towards research and learning. No significant attitude changes were observed after the 10-year period in students who enter medical school nor in those who begin clinical practice. Besides, it was found a significant correlation between these two attitudinal factors. Some possible explanations for these results are discussed, as well as some steps that could help to promote positive attitudes towards research and learning.

  2. Pediatric сlinic of Odessa National Medical University: the quality of emergency medical care for children

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    E.A. Starets

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of the article is to discuss the issue of improving the quality of emergency care for children with the most common diseases. Materials and methods. The quality of medical care includes 6 characteristics: 1 effectiveness — evidencebased health care results in improved health outcomes; 2 relevancy: health care is delivered in a manner that maximizes resource use and avoids wasting and provided in a setting where skills and resources are appropriate to medical need; 3 accessibility: health care is provided timely, reasonable and affordable; 4 acceptability/patient-centered: health care provided takes into account the preferences and aspirations of individual service users; 5 equity: health care provided does not vary in quality because of personal characteristics or socioeconomic status; 6 safety: health care provided minimizes risks and harm to service users and providers. Results. The Intensive Care Unit (ICU started working in the Pediatric Clinic of the Odessa National Medical University on February 1, 2017. The main task of ICU is the treatment of children with emergency conditions (who needs monitoring of breathing and cardiac activity, oxygen therapy, large-volume rehydration therapy, etc. The patients admit to the ICU according the results of triage. Triage is the process of rapidly screening of sick children soon after their addmission to hospital and in ICU, in order to identify those with emergency signs — obstruc-ted breathing or severe respiratory distress; central cyanosis; signs of shock; signs of severe dehydration; those with priority signs — very high temperature, severe pallor, respiratory distress etc. The local guidelines for the most common diseases in children have been developed in the Pediatric Clinic. These local guidelines are based on: 1 modern national guidelines; 2 WHO: Pocket book of hospital care for children: guidelines for the management of common childhood illnesses (2013; clinical

  3. How we implemented an integrated professionalism curriculum to 2nd year medical students at the National University of Ireland Galway Medical School, with examples from students' final output.

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    McNair, Antonia; Moran, Conor; McGrath, Erinn; Naqvi, Syed; Connolly, Claire; McKenna, Verna; Kropmans, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Since the introduction of professionalism in medical curricula worldwide, little evidence has been published to exemplify good educational practice. The Medical school at the National University of Ireland Galway teaches professionalism in an interdisciplinary manner, integrating the learning objectives of health informatics, understanding health & illness in society, medical law and ethics. Students work in small groups on clinical cases. Enquiry-based learning is used as the teaching method following a few introductory lectures on specific objectives. Students present their work in the format of a scientific essay. The latter is assessed by a board of reviewers. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate evidence of excellent professional output and illustrate the benefits to a fully integrated professionalism curriculum.

  4. The Australian National University

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    李琳

    2007-01-01

    The Australian National University was established by Federal Parliament in 1946 with a mission to bring credit to the nation and to be one of the world’s great universities.It was the country’s only full-time research university at the time,and had no undergraduate teaching responsibilities.

  5. Experiences with the implementation of a national teaching qualification in university medical centres and veterinary medicine in the Netherlands.

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    Molenaar, Willemina M Ineke; Zanting, Anneke

    2015-02-01

    In 2008, a compulsory national basic teaching qualification was introduced for all university teachers in the Netherlands. At that time all eight University Medical Centres (UMCs) and the only Faculty of Veterinary Medicine had adopted or were setting up teacher development programmes. This study explores how these programmes relate to each other and to the basic teaching qualification. To gather information on teacher development programmes in the UMCs and the Veterinary Medicine Faculty an online survey was filled out by teacher development representatives from each of them. The programmes had main features in common (e.g. competency based and portfolio assessment), but differed somewhat in contents according to the local situation. Importantly, they had all been formally accepted as equivalent to the basic teaching qualification. We consider the freedom to tailor the qualifications to the medical context as well as to the local situation of the UMCs and the Veterinary Medicine Faculty one of the major success factors and the well-established collaboration between teacher development representatives of the UMCs and the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine as another. Challenges for the future include embedding the teacher development programmes in the institutional organizations and maintaining and further developing the programmes and the competencies of the qualified teachers, e.g. in a senior qualification.

  6. Collaboration at the Departmental, School, National and International Levels at the International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur

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    Michael John Rathbone

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The nature, extent and definition of acollaboration varies between individuals, disciplines,departments and institutions. It depends upon suchfactors as the people involved, the nature of the researchproblem, the research environment, the institutionalculture and demographic factors. This paper willexamine the concept of collaborative research anddiscuss its place and position in an evolving university.

  7. [Diagnosis on the unique curriculum of the medical career at the National University of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara Guzmán, Rosalinda; Urrutia Aguilar, María Esther

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of the Plan Unico de Estudios of the medical career was the result of five years of collegiate work in which commissions consisting of academic staff of different departments from the faculty of medicine at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) participated. The most significant conclusions derived from this analysis are: to adjust the graduate’s profile in order to face the emerging health problems of the twenty-first century in our country; to update the academic curricula of the different subjects, including new ones; to create a nuclear curricula; as well as to strengthen the basic-clinic and the clinic-basic. With regard to the teaching/learning process, we acknowledged the need to develop self-cognitive and self-motivational skills in students as well as to consider a different evaluation for students and teachers.

  8. Trends in Glaucoma Medication Expenditures under Universal Health Coverage: A National Population-Based Longitudinal Survey in Taiwan

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    Shin-Lin Chiu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical care in Taiwan is well known for its low cost, high efficiency, high quality, excellent medical accessibility, and high equity. We investigate the trends in medication expenditures for glaucoma from 1997 to 2010. The results show that higher medical expenditures were incurred by patients who were aged ≥40 years, male patients, and patients in the highest salary population whereas lower medical expenditures were incurred by blue-collar workers. The medications with the most significant increases in expenditure were prostaglandin analogs (PGAs, α-agonists, and fixed combinations, whereas the medications with the most significant decreases in expenditure were β-blockers and cholinergic agonists. The number of trabeculectomies shows two downward break points in 1999 and 2000 when PGAs were listed and were reimbursed. These results suggest socioeconomic disparities in glaucoma care, as well as understanding of the changes in the expenditure of glaucoma medications under such universal health insurance coverage system.

  9. Reproductive biology, stem cells biotechnology and regenerative medicine: a 1-day national symposium held at Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences

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    Akyash, Fatemeh; Tahajjodi, Somayyeh Sadat; Sadeghian-Nodoushan, Fatemeh; Aflatoonian, Abbas; Abdoli, Ali-Mohammad; Nikukar, Habib; Aflatoonian, Behrouz

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes the proceedings of a 1 day national symposium entitled “Reproductive biology, stem cells biotechnology and regenerative medicine” held at Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran on 3rd March 2016. Here, we collected the papers that presented and discussed at this meeting by specialists that currently researched about the overlaps of the fields of reproductive biology and stem cells and their applications in regenerative medicine.

  10. [Longer working hours of pharmacists in the ward resulted in lower medication-related errors--survey of national university hospitals in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kazuo; Toyama, Akira; Satoh, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Awaya, Toshio; Tasaki, Yoshikazu; Yasuoka, Toshiaki; Horiuchi, Ryuya

    2011-04-01

    It is obvious that pharmacists play a critical role as risk managers in the healthcare system, especially in medication treatment. Hitherto, there is not a single multicenter-survey report describing the effectiveness of clinical pharmacists in preventing medical errors from occurring in the wards in Japan. Thus, we conducted a 1-month survey to elucidate the relationship between the number of errors and working hours of pharmacists in the ward, and verified whether the assignment of clinical pharmacists to the ward would prevent medical errors between October 1-31, 2009. Questionnaire items for the pharmacists at 42 national university hospitals and a medical institute included the total and the respective numbers of medication-related errors, beds and working hours of pharmacist in 2 internal medicine and 2 surgical departments in each hospital. Regardless of severity, errors were consecutively reported to the Medical Security and Safety Management Section in each hospital. The analysis of errors revealed that longer working hours of pharmacists in the ward resulted in less medication-related errors; this was especially significant in the internal medicine ward (where a variety of drugs were used) compared with the surgical ward. However, the nurse assignment mode (nurse/inpatients ratio: 1 : 7-10) did not influence the error frequency. The results of this survey strongly indicate that assignment of clinical pharmacists to the ward is critically essential in promoting medication safety and efficacy.

  11. The validity of Iran’s national university entrance examination (Konkoor) for predicting medical students’ academic performance

    OpenAIRE

    Farrokhi-Khajeh-Pasha Yasin; Nedjat Saharnaz; Mohammadi Aeen; Rad Elaheh; Majdzadeh Reza; Monajemi Farshid; Jamali Ehsan; Yazdani Shahryar

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background In Iran, admission to medical school is based solely on the results of the highly competitive, nationwide Konkoor examination. This paper examines the predictive validity of Konkoor scores, alone and in combination with high school grade point averages (hsGPAs), for the academic performance of public medical school students in Iran. Methods This study followed the cohort of 2003 matriculants at public medical schools in Iran from entrance through internship. The predictor ...

  12. The validity of Iran’s national university entrance examination (Konkoor for predicting medical students’ academic performance

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    Farrokhi-Khajeh-Pasha Yasin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Iran, admission to medical school is based solely on the results of the highly competitive, nationwide Konkoor examination. This paper examines the predictive validity of Konkoor scores, alone and in combination with high school grade point averages (hsGPAs, for the academic performance of public medical school students in Iran. Methods This study followed the cohort of 2003 matriculants at public medical schools in Iran from entrance through internship. The predictor variables were Konkoor total and subsection scores and hsGPAs. The outcome variables were (1 Comprehensive Basic Sciences Exam (CBSE scores; (2 Comprehensive Pre-Internship Exam (CPIE scores; and (3 medical school grade point averages (msGPAs for the courses taken before internship. Pearson correlation and regression analyses were used to assess the relationships between the selection criteria and academic performance. Results There were 2126 matriculants (1374 women and 752 men in 2003. Among the outcome variables, the CBSE had the strongest association with the Konkoor total score (r = 0.473, followed by msGPA (r = 0.339 and the CPIE (r = 0.326. While adding hsGPAs to the Konkoor total score almost doubled the power to predict msGPAs (R2 = 0.225, it did not have a substantial effect on CBSE or CPIE prediction. Conclusions The Konkoor alone, and even in combination with hsGPA, is a relatively poor predictor of medical students’ academic performance, and its predictive validity declines over the academic years of medical school. Care should be taken to develop comprehensive admissions criteria, covering both cognitive and non-cognitive factors, to identify the best applicants to become "good doctors" in the future. The findings of this study can be helpful for policy makers in the medical education field.

  13. The French language virtual medical university.

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    Morin, A; Benhamou, A C; Spector, M; Bonnin, A; Debry, C

    2004-01-01

    The work program of the French Language Virtual Medical University started about 2 years ago, and entered into a real active phase of development and implementation in 2002. Various national programs and organizational initiatives should accelerate and facilitate further appropriation of modem pedagogical approaches by knowledge providers and all users of the FSVMU, so as to advance on the way of virtual education. The French Language Virtual Medical University under the auspices of both the National Conference of Deans of Medical Schools and the International Conference of Deans of French-Speaking Medical Schools has been developed to create a major Internet portal for French-speaking distance medical learning and teaching. This construct should be representative of all medical schools in France and French-speaking countries. Contents will also be translated into English, Spanish and Arabic. All medical disciplines with their various levels of teaching are to be included. Cross-related fields are also going to be present in order to offer full range programs. The latter are intended to provide both initial and continuing education for medical students as well as all other categories of health professionals and medical and scientific research workers. To develop the appropriate technology and make such a portal, on one hand correspond to the specific educational requirements and proper training for health professionals, and on the other hand provide a general access to e-learning in all schools of medicine; in keeping with such goals, the following approaches should be stressed upon. To build a virtual space where individual patients, their families, patient associations as well as the general public, can obtain medical information of good quality for the purposes of both education and prevention. Providing such categories with reliable and validated sources of information, and offering an ethical basis for the increasing practice of e-medicine, represent in today

  14. National Medical Association

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    ... Regional Meetings CME Fall Workshop Approved CME Activities Journal CME Quiz Online CME Submit an Abstract Faculty and Invited Speakers Policies and Procedures CME Resource Links Contact CME Resources Journal of the NMA Programs Overview Programmatic Initiatives National ...

  15. [Kyongsong Imperial University Medical College].

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    Kee, C D

    1992-01-01

    Japan annexed Korea in 1910 and with the promulgation of the Chosen Kyoyuk Ryong (the Korea Education Decree) in 1911, it began to conduct education for the Korean people. However, this was only a matter of formality and a policy for liquidating the spirit of the Korean people. It finally resulted in the uprising of March 1, 1919 of the Korean people that has a cultural tradition of a high level. This event served as a cause of widely spread censure among the Korean people as well as the people of the whole world. Even in Japan voice of criticism rose high. Such being the situation, Japan amended the Korean educational law under the pretext of shifting to a so-called civil-rule policy. The Japanese authorities adopted the same educational system as was practiced in Japan proper, for primary and middle school education. As for higher education, they placed under a strict control the educational facilities already established by Korean people and foreign missionaries, suppressing even minor expansions of existing facilities. However, the movement by some Korean educators to establish a private university and efforts by some missionaries to integrate the existing educational organizations into a university made it inevitable for the Japanese authorities to set up a university of their own in Korea. Thus, they hurriedly established the Kyonsong Imperial University in which was included a medical college that was an indispensable organization for colonial education. They professed that the medical college was established for the purpose of providing equal opportunities and privileges to Korean and Japanese students, but, on the contrary, the operation of the college was done strictly under their colonial policy. The system of the Kyongsong Imperial University was enforced acording to the Japanese Imperial University Law, and all the faculty members and the administratial officials were Japanese. As for Koreans, a few graduates of the university was named nonpaid deputy

  16. Medical Physics Undergraduate Degree Courses at University.

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    Chadwick, Roy

    1989-01-01

    Described are the course, teaching/study, entry qualifications, and destination of graduates of four courses in medical physics from Exeter University, King's College London, University College London, and University College of Swansea. (YP)

  17. Implementation of Main Statements of Educational Plan in the Elective Course “Endodontic Techniques in Pediatric Dentistry” for the Sub-Interns at the Department of Pediatric Dentistry of Ivano-Frankivsk National Medical University

    OpenAIRE

    Kostyuk, I. R.

    2014-01-01

    The article demonstrates the method of implementation of the main statements of educational plan in the elective course “Endodontic techniques in Pediatric Dentistry” for the dental sub-interns at the Department of Pediatric Dentistry of Ivano-Frankivsk National Medical University. We have developed and adapted for use in higher medical institutions an educational-and-methodological complex based on the typical program that will provide training future European professionals. The practical le...

  18. Journal of Nanjing Medical University Instruction to Authors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Journal of Nanjing Medical University, a citation source of China Science and Technology papers,sponsored by Nanjing Medical University, was established in 1987. It is a bimonthly comprehensive medical English journal, published in China and abroad.And it has been embodied by many famous international Resource Indexes such as CA, AJ. The Journal publishes English articles, summaries, reviews and case reports concerning basic, clinical and preventive medicine from teachers and researchers in medical institutes and hospitals world-wide. Priority for publication will be given to those funded by national or provincial foundation and on prize-winning research projects.

  19. [Cooperation of medical and pharmaceutical sciences between private and national universities to educate professionals in the fields of drug development and rational pharmacotherapy].

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    Iwakawa, Seigo

    2012-01-01

    Cooperation in education and research in medical and pharmaceutical sciences between Kobe Pharmaceutical University and Kobe University was started in 2008 for training professionals in drug development and rational pharmacotherapy. Initially, we started a two-year pharmacy residency program. Our pharmacy residents can attend lectures at our universities, and they also help pharmacist preceptors educate undergraduate pharmacy students in practical training. As curricula for cooperative education of pharmacy, nursing and medical students, we developed two new elective subjects (early exposure to clinical training for first year students and IPW (inter-professional work) seminar for fifth year pharmacy students) to learn about the roles of health care professionals in a medical team. Cooperative research between faculty members and graduate students is also in progress. For faculty and staff developments, invited lectures by clinical pharmacy and medical professors from the United States on the clinical education system in pharmacy and medicine in the United States have been held. This systematic cooperation will contribute to the promotion of a new curriculum for inter-professional education in the health-science fields.

  20. Initiatives for Medical Education Research at the International Medical University

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    Ramesh Chandra Jutti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical Education research is a relativelynew field but one that is progressing rapidly worldwide.This article is an attempt to take stock of the currentstatus of Medical Education research in InternationalMedical University and to explore the various factorsthat have influenced its direction. It also shares some ofthe initiatives that have been instituted or intended tobe instituted at our university.

  1. Mashhad University of Medical Sciences

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    Ali Shoeibi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available     Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV types 1 and 2 belong to the Oncorna group of retroviridae, a large family of viruses, grouped initially by pathogenic features, but later revised on the basis of genome structure and nucleotide sequence. HTLV-I was the first discovered human retrovirus to be associated with a malignancy in 1980. The malignancy, first described by Uchiyama and co-workers in southwestern Japan, was named Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATL and characterized with cutaneous and respiratory involvement, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy and various metabolic abnormalities such as hypercalcemia. The HTLV-I has been known to be endemic to certain parts of Iran like the province of Khorasan in the northeast since 1990, with a 2.3% prevalence rate of infection. The main manifestations of HTLV-I infection are neurologic and hematologic (such as ATL disorders, but it has also other manifestations such as uveitis, arthritis, dermatitis, vitiligo and lymphocytic alveolitis. Its main neurologic manifestation is a chronic progressive myelopathy that is referred to HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy (HAM in Japan and Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (TSP in Caribbean. But other disorders such as peripheral neuropathy, polyradiculoneuropathy, myopathy, peripheral facial paresis, and so on have been reported too. In this review we wish to give some brief information on the different aspects (including epidemiology, pathogenesis and pathology, clinical findings, and treatment of HTLV-I infection according to our twenty-year researches. The department of neurology of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences has been a pioneer in researches on HTLV-I in the last twenty years.  

  2. The establishment of the School of Public Health at the State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center: the first nationally accredited school of public health in a public university in New York City.

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    Imperato, Pascal James; LaRosa, Judith H; Kavaler, Florence; Benker, Karen; Schechter, Leslie

    2011-02-01

    The State University of New York (SUNY), Downstate Medical Center initiated a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree program in July 2001 following planning efforts that began in 1995. Twelve students entered the program in June 2002, and currently some 110 MPH students and 12 Doctor of Public Health (DrPH) students are enrolled. This article describes the long and complex process of transforming the original MPH degree program, with its single focus on urban and immigrant health, with a student enrollment of 12 and 8 full-time faculty, into a school of public health with a large student enrollment of 122 students, 25 full-time faculty, five MPH degree tracks, and four DrPH degree tracks. The process of establishing the SUNY Downstate School of Public Health in 2009 from its inception as an MPH program in 2001 spanned a period of 8 years. This process was guided by a commitment to two basic principles. The first was to maintain the original 2005 program accreditation by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH). The second was to sequentially secure accreditation for all subsequent four MPH and four DrPH degree tracks through CEPH's procedure of substantive change approval. This policy assured continuous national CEPH accreditation of the original Urban and Immigrant Health MPH degree track and all added degree programs. The 5-year period following the initial CEPH accreditation of the MPH program in 2005 was one of intense development during which all of the essential elements for CEPH accreditation of a school of public health were put into place. This rapid development was made possible by the vision and full support of Downstate's president, John C. LaRosa, MD, FACP, and the dedicated efforts of many. This included the students, faculty, staff, and administrators of the School of Public Health, the school's Community Advisory Group, several external advisors, and many in the medical center's Central Administration, College of Medicine, School of Graduate

  3. Implementing Medical Teaching Policy in University Hospitals

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    Engbers, Rik; Fluit, Cornelia Cornelia R. M. G.; Bolhuis, Sanneke; de Visser, Marieke; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Within the unique and complex settings of university hospitals, it is difficult to implement policy initiatives aimed at developing careers in and improving the quality of academic medical teaching because of the competing domains of medical research and patient care. Factors that influence faculty in making use of teaching policy incentives have…

  4. [Education for medical teamwork in Shinshu University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamiya, Osamu

    2006-03-01

    Both students of health sciences (medical technology, nursing science, physical therapy, and occupational therapy) and medical students learn medical teamwork in the primary stage by joint practice in Shinshu University. The aim of this class is for students that will become medical staff to increase their necessary communication skills for medical teamwork in addition to understanding the mutual medical professional fields in a medical institution. The 242 students of the medical department (147 students of health sciences and 95 students of medicine) take 15 classes during their first term as freshers. One teacher takes charge of a group consisting of 14 students for tutorials by mutually cooperation between teachers of medicine and health sciences. Positive relationships are expected to develop in the group, raising sociality and ethics so that both students of health science and medicine experience interdisciplinary discussion in small groups as an ideal method for continuing health care in times of poor knowledge of medicine and health care.

  5. Implementing medical teaching policy in university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engbers, Rik; Fluit, Cornelia R M G; Bolhuis, Sanneke; de Visser, Marieke; Laan, Roland F J M

    2016-11-16

    Within the unique and complex settings of university hospitals, it is difficult to implement policy initiatives aimed at developing careers in and improving the quality of academic medical teaching because of the competing domains of medical research and patient care. Factors that influence faculty in making use of teaching policy incentives have remained underexplored. Knowledge of these factors is needed to develop theory on the successful implementation of medical teaching policy in university hospitals. To explore factors that influence faculty in making use of teaching policy incentives and to develop a conceptual model for implementation of medical teaching policy in university hospitals. We used the grounded theory methodology. We applied constant comparative analysis to qualitative data obtained from 12 semi-structured interviews conducted at the Radboud University Medical Center. We used a constructivist approach, in which data and theories are co-created through interaction between the researcher and the field and its participants. We constructed a model for the implementation of medical teaching policy in university hospitals, including five factors that were perceived to promote or inhibit faculty in a university hospital to make use of teaching policy incentives: Executive Board Strategy, Departmental Strategy, Departmental Structure, Departmental Culture, and Individual Strategy. Most factors we found to affect individual teachers' strategies and their use of medical teaching policy lie at the departmental level. If an individual teacher's strategy is focused on medical teaching and a medical teaching career, and the departmental context offers support and opportunity for his/her development, this promotes faculty's use of teaching policy incentives.

  6. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS)

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    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) is a national survey designed to meet the need for objective, reliable information about the provision and use of...

  7. National Medical School Matching Program: optimizing outcomes

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    Eltorai, Adam EM; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    The medical school admissions process is inefficient and costly to both applicants and medical schools. For the many rejected applicants, this process represents a costly, unproductive use of time. For medical schools, numerous applications are reviewed that ultimately do not yield matriculants, representing a substantial inefficiency. In order to streamline the process and reduce costs, we propose the development of a national medical school matching program. PMID:27445512

  8. Medical education quality assessment. Perspectives in University Policlinic context.

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    Maricel Castellanos González

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Quality has currently a central role within our National Health System, particularly in the formative process of human resources where we need professionals more prepared every day and ready to face complex tasks. We make a bibliographic review related to quality assessment of educational process in health system to analyze the perspectives of the new model of University Policlinic, formative context of Medical Sciences students.

  9. Knowledge Management within the Medical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauzina, Svetlana Ye; Tikhonova, Tatiana A; Karpenko, Dmitriy S; Bogopolskiy, Gennady A; Zarubina, Tatiana V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the work is studying the possibilities of ontological engineering in managing of medical knowledge. And also practical implementation of knowledge management system (KMS) in medical university. The educational process model is established that allows analyzing learning results within time scale. Glossary sub-system has been developed; ontologies of educational disciplines are constructed; environment for setup and solution of situational cases is established; ontological approach to assess competencies is developed. The possibilities of the system for solving situation tasks have been described. The approach to the evaluation of competence has been developed.

  10. Notes for contributors to Journal of Nanjing Medical University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Journal of Nanjing Medical University (English Edition) JNMU, sponsored by Nanjing Medical University, was established in 1987. It is a bimonthly comprehensive English medical journal published locally and abroad.Since 2007, Journal of Nanjing Medical University (English Edition )was granted Elsevier the full publishing and distribution rights worldwide for the Electronic Edition, excluding the People's Republic of China.

  11. Fasa University Medical School: a novel experience in medical education

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    HOSSAIN A. RONAGHY

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In early 1970`s a combination of a shortage and misdistribution of health services and growing public dissatisfaction about the health care available, along with increasing expectations, has put great strain on the mind of the staff of the Department of Medicine Shiraz University School of Medicine. The purpose of this report is to give an account of what was originally planned and what has happened since the start of Fasa Medical School in April 1978. Methods: This is a case report about an experience in medical education in Iran. At the time, two major problems were facing our country. The first was gross mal-distribution of these healthcare facilities, which were mostly concentrated in Tehran and big cities of Iran, and the second problem was continuous exodus of Iranian Medical graduates to the Western countries. Results: The main idea of creating Fasa Medical School was to create a system in which primary care in small villages are provided by VHW with the middle level health workers of “Behdar Roustaee” to be supported by local physicians who reside in small towns. Conclusion: For Fasa Medical School, education was emphasized on community based, student centered, and problem based medical education located in the community and based on teamwork and cooperation.

  12. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

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    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is designed to collect data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital...

  13. The Webometric Status of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

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    Taheri, Behjat; Ghazavi, Roghayeh; Zahed, Arash; Otroj, Zahra; Mazaheri, Elahe; Soleimanzade-Najafi, Nayere-Sadat

    2015-08-01

    Webometrics refers to the quantitative study of science production, application, structure and technology in the cyber environment. Impact analysis, website collaboration, and recognition of core websites are regarded as the most practical advantages of webometrics. Furthermore, webometrics is applied in ranking studies for universities and academic institutes. This serves as an internationally approved means of academic ranking worldwide. Our study aimed to evaluate the webometric status of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS) and its place in the Webometric Ranking of World Universities. We also tried to comment on how to improve the university's webometric rank at national, regional, and international levels. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study including all websites of Iranian universities. Census sampling was applied to cover all Iranian university websites. Then the websites were evaluated according to the latest criteria for the international webometric ranking methodology (Cyberometric Lab, July 2012) and their webometric rank at the international level as well as the changes in the rank between July 2012 and January 2013 were analyzed. The webometric rank of IUMS was compared with other medical universities at different levels as well. According to the findings, from July 2012 to January 2013, IUMS webometric rank improved by 707, 5 and 2 at international, national and ministerial levels, respectively. Moreover, the rank of IUMS for openness rose from 4477 to 193 during the mentioned period (∆ 4284). In excellence, the university rank did not change sensibly (1537 /1538). In the same period, the rank in presence shifted from 1137 to 1091. Meanwhile, growth in website impact was negative as the university impact rank declined from 3369 to 3393. It seems that impact as the most influential ranking indicator fails to grow proportionately as other factors of IUMS website. This is potentially due to the content language (Farsi) which is an

  14. [Physical anthropology studies at Keijo Imperial University Medical School].

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    Kim, Ock-Joo

    2008-12-01

    Medical research during the Japanese Colonial Period became systematic and active after the Keijo Imperial University Medical School was established in 1926. Various kinds of research were conducted there including pharmacological, physiological, pathological and parasitological research. The Keijo Imperial University was give a mission to study about Korea. Urgent topics for medical research included control of infectious diseases, hygiene and environmental health that might have affected colonizing bodies of the Japanese as well as the colonized. The bodies of Koreans had been studied by Japanese even before the establishment of the University. The Keijo Imperial University research team, however, organized several field studies for physical anthropology and blood typing research at the national scale to get representative sampling of the people from its north to its south of the Korean peninsula. In the filed, they relied upon the local police and administrative power to gather reluctant women and men to measure them in a great detail. The physical anthropology and blood typing research by the Japanese researchers was related to their eagerness to place Korean people in the geography of the races in the world. Using racial index R.I.(= (A%+AB%)/(B%+AB%)), the Japanese researchers put Koreans as a race between the Mongolian and the Japanese. The preoccupation with constitution and race also pervasively affected the medical practice: race (Japanese, Korean, or Japanese living in Korea) must be written in every kind of medical chart as a default. After the breakout of Chinese-Japanese War in 1937, the Keijo Imperial University researchers extended its physical anthropology field study to Manchuria and China to get data on physics of the people in 1940. The Japanese government and research foundations financially well supported the Keijo Imperial University researchers and the field studies for physical anthropology in Korea, Manchuria and China. The physical

  15. The National Center Test for University Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the National Center Test for University Admissions, a unified national test in Japan, which is taken by 500,000 students every year. It states that implementation of the Center Test began in 1990, with the English component consisting only of the written section until 2005, when the listening section was first implemented…

  16. National Institute of General Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CareerTrac Webinar for RISE and Bridges Program Directors Biomedical Beat : Science for the Public Fall 2017 Issue of Findings ... National Institutes of Health: NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health ® USA.gov National Institute of General Medical Sciences 45 Center Drive MSC 6200 Bethesda, MD 20892- ...

  17. Promoting the Medical University's Governance: Content Analysis of Decisions Made by the Medical University's Governing Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Haniye Sadat; Hadi, Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    Decisions made by the governing body of a university would overshadow university governance. This study aimed to analyze the quantity and quality of decisions made by the three governing bodies (Board of trustees, Board of Chancellors and University council) of a medical university in Isfahan, Iran. A mixed qualitative and quantitative approach was employed, with the quantitative part in cross-sectional format and the qualitative part in content analysis format. In the quantitative part, the number of meetings and resolutions of the governing bodies were collected through Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. In the qualitative part, the content of 3121 resolutions that were selected using stratified sampling method was analyzed. The results indicated the defensible numbers of meetings and resolutions of the boards of trustees and chancellors. The governing bodies' resolutions were mostly operational in domain, administrative (boards of trustees and chancellors) and educational (university council) in nature, financing (board of trustees) and providing services (board of chancellors and university council) in function with the aim of responsiveness. The share of specific and single-department resolutions was greater compared to others. Better monitoring and evaluation of the activity of governing bodies, redirecting the decisions made by governing bodies, reminding the position of the governing bodies and revising their duties and responsibilities are recommended for better governance of the medical university.

  18. An upcoming program for medical humanities education in Fudan University's School of Basic Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Cheng, Xunjia

    2017-05-23

    Ideal medical care requires professional skills as well as appropriate communication skills. However, traditional medical education in medical schools mostly emphasizes the former. To remedy this situation, medical humanities education will be incorporated into education for medical students at Fudan University. Comprehensive medical education that includes both medical skills and humanities may greatly improve medical care.

  19. Students of Tehran Universities of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghezelbash Sima

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Social anxiety is an important factor in peoples’ mental health. Good mental health while studying in university makes students able to deal effectively with numerous stressors that they experience. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the social anxiety of nursing students in grades one to four of medical universities in Tehran. Methods: In this analytic cross-sectional study, 400 students from universities of medical sciences in Tehran were recruited by stratified sampling with proportional allocation. Data were collected during the first semester in 2010. Students completed a two-part questionnaire including the Liebowitz social anxiety questionnaire and a demographic information form. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics methods and an analytical test by SPSS statistical software. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the total scores of social anxiety of first- to fourth-year students. The mean score of the avoidance of social interaction dimension in fourth-year students was significantly lower than in first year students (p<0.05. Conclusion: In regard to the relationship between social anxiety and interpersonal communication as an associated part of nursing care, decrease of social anxiety of students could play an important role in their mental health. According to the results of this study, it seems that the placement of students in the nursing education system does not produce any changes in their social anxiety.

  20. ON ENGLISH TEACHING METHOD OF MEDICAL UNIVERSITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QinDerong; ChangMingli

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines issues in Teaching College English toMedicine major students at the Shanxi Medical University.According to a questionnaire survey which I carried out at theend of English courses in 1999, quite a few students complainedthat they didn't make considerable progress in English study after2 years' learning. Through investigation, 1 found that one ofthe main reasons was the pressure of their medical subjects --There were so many subjects and heavy tasks for them that they didn't have enough time to learn English. Then how to improvetheir English level? Some feasible solutions therefore aresuggested here and applied into practice. Now, Generallyspeaking, the English level of the students has somewhatimproved, which is embodied in their performances of variousexaminations, such as CET Band 4, Band 6, the graduateentrance examination and all kinds of English competitions.

  1. Specific of adaptation foreign student with different health and physical preparedness level to employments on physical education in Kharkov National Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukavenko H.G.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The specific of adaptation of foreign students is considered to Ukrainian university reality. Researches were conducted with participation 762 students from 62 countries. Possibilities of teaching of all objects are rotined in English language. The results of questionnaire of students of the first course are presented. Attitude of students is exposed toward an object and their level of physical preparedness. Traditions and departmental of other countries teaching are rotined. Methods and facilities of reduction of adaptation period are presented the increase of level of physical and mental capacity.

  2. Medical students call for national standards in anatomical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farey, John E; Sandeford, Jonathan C; Evans-McKendry, Greg D

    2014-11-01

    The diminishing number of hours dedicated to formal instruction in anatomy has led to a debate within medical education as to the level required for safe clinical practice. We provide a review of the current state of anatomical education in Australian medical schools and state the case for national standards. In light of the review presented, council members of the Australian Medical Students' Association voted to affirm that consideration should be given to developing undergraduate learning goals for anatomy, providing a codified medical student position on the teaching of anatomy in Australian medical schools. Crucially, the position states that time-intensive methods of instruction such as dissection should be a rite of passage for medical students in the absence of evidence demonstrating the superiority of modern teaching methods. We believe the bodies with a vested interest in the quality of medical graduates, namely the Australian Medical Council, Medical Deans Australia & New Zealand, and the postgraduate colleges should collaborate and develop clear guidelines that make explicit the core knowledge of anatomy expected of medical graduates at each stage of their career with a view to safe clinical practice. In addition, Australian universities have a role to play in conducting further research into contemporary learning styles and the most efficacious methods of delivering anatomical education. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  3. NATIONAL IDENTITY IN THE VENEZUELAN UNIVERSITY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nércida Romer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The research had as main purpose to analyze the national identity in the Venezuelan University education. It was descriptive with descriptive transactional design. The population was 250 students of the IX and X semester of education at the UNERMB, Ciudad Ojeda. The results showed: in the objective test, they don’t know details of the national identity; It was detected in the interview that there is a sense of belonging. The recommendation is: in subjects related innovate strategies to give the student knowledge of national identity elements; promote educational and publicity campaigns about the care and conservation of geographical, biological and cultural heritage.

  4. THE MEDICAL COLLECTIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TARTU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomsalu, Maie; Pärnsalu, Liina; Tapfer, Helle; Mesila, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    In the year 1999, a new and modern building Biomedicum was finished addressed to preclinic subjects of the Medical Faculty of the University of Tartu; the institutions of anatomy as well as pathological anatomy and forensic medicine moved there. However; no place was planned to exhibit the collections of specimens. Many of the specimens which had so far only been used for learning purposes found their place in the Old Anatomical Theatre, in the hope that this could be transformed as a museum. The medical collections of the Medical Faculty were opened up for a broader audience in October 2005. With the support of the national programme "The collections of humanities and natural sciences", the medical study specimens, models, moulages, and literature related to them in danger of being destroyed were collected from several subdivisions and buildings of the Medical Faculty. In 2012, the medical exhibition moved to the premises of Science Centre AHHAA and in the same time a specifc educational study began to be developed.

  5. [Social conditions in which medical students from the faculty of medicine of the National University of Mexico (UNAM) perform their Social Service in rural areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamui-Sutton, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to describe the conditions in which medical students perform their Social Service, highlighting their experiences in areas such as: information before they move and the motivation to leave home; the perception of personal and environmental lack of safety; the institutional support that they receive during their work in the community and the financial support provided. The methodological design of the study included an exploratory phase, in which collective interviews were performed, using the focal group technique, with students who had been in rural areas. Three hundred sixty cases were considered, 72.8% corresponded to rural areas, and 27.7% to Mexico City. According to the findings, the following actions are proposed: give better information and improve the process of vacancy selection; increase the scholarship received by students in Social Service; establish legal, police, and community support mechanisms to guarantee the student's personal safety; pay attention to aspects such as the student's emotional and social situation, and design programs with gender perspective to enhance certainty and safety.

  6. 14 April 2014 - UK University College London Hospitals and National Health Service Foundation Trust Chairman R. Murley in the ATLAS cavern with CERN Head of Medical Applications S. Myers and Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton.

    CERN Multimedia

    Gadmer, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Mr Richard Murley Chairman Sir Robert Naylor Chief Executive University College London Hospitals (UCLH) – National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

  7. Medical waste management at the University of Port Harcourt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical waste management at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. ... medical waste management and training in, and use of personal protective equipment. ... storage, treatment, and final disposal at the UPTH was inadequate.

  8. Medical Care Cost Recovery National Database (MCCR NDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Medical Care Cost Recovery National Database (MCCR NDB) provides a repository of summary Medical Care Collections Fund (MCCF) billing and collection information...

  9. Scientific Production of Medical Universities in the West of Iran: a Scientometric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasolabadi, Masoud; Khaledi, Shahnaz; Khayati, Fariba; Kalhor, Marya Maryam; Penjvini, Susan; Gharib, Alireza

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to compare scientific production by providing quantitative evaluation of science output in five Western Iranian Medical Universities including Hamedan, Ilam, Kermanshah, Kurdistan and Lorestan University of Medical Sciences using scientometrics indicators based on data indexed in Scopus for period between the years 2010 to 2014. In this scientometric study data were collected using Scopus database. Both searching and analyzing features of Scopus were used to data retrieval and analysis. We used Scientometrics indicators including number of publications, number of citations, nationalization index (NI), Internationalization Index (INI), H-index, average number of citations per paper, and growth index. Five Western Iranian Universities produced over 3011 articles from 2010 to 2014. These articles were cited 7158 times with an average rate of 4.2 citations per article. H- Index of under study universities are varying from 14 to 30. Ilam University of Medical Sciences had the highest international collaboration with an INI of 0.33 compared to Hamedan and Kermanshah universities with INI of 0.20 and 0.16 respectively. The lowest international collaboration belonged to Lorestan University of Medical Sciences (0.07). The highest Growth Index belonged to Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences (69.7). Although scientific production of five Western Iranian Medical Universities was increasing, but this trend was not stable. To achieve better performance it is recommended that five Western Iranian Universities stabilize their budgeting and investment policies in research.

  10. University engagement and collaborative learning in nursing students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, Esmat; Abaszadeh, Abas; Maddah, Sadat Sayad Bagher

    2013-11-01

    Collaborative methods of learning in the university have been a successful and the main aspects of the students' engagement. The purpose of this study was to determine university engagement and collaborative learning in nursing students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This research was a descriptive correlation study on a total of 238 nursing students with different levels of education were asked to fill four subscales of the modified National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) tool with a total of 40 items. NSSE reliability was confirmed by Cronbach's alpha (r = 0.78). The NSSE instrument relies on a students' self-reports tool. Data were analyzed with descriptive and analytical statistics by SPSS version 16. Means scores of university engagement in nursing students was 96.6 ± 19. 07. There was a significant positive correlation in components including active and collaborative learning (ACL) level, students' level of academic challenge (LAC) as well as student faculty interaction (SFI), supportive campuses environment and enriching educational experiences (EEE)with total score of university engagement (P < 0. 05). Findings in this study showed that university engagement level in nursing students is moderate and there is a significant association between the model of teaching and ACL, and LAC and EEE.

  11. Scientific production of medical sciences universities in north of iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamian, Hasan; Firooz, Mousa Yamin; Vahedi, Mohammad; Aligolbandi, Kobra

    2013-01-01

    NONE DECLARED. The study of the scientific evidence citation production by famous databases of the world is one of the important indicators to evaluate and rank the universities. The study at investigating the scientific production of Northern Iran Medical Sciences Universities in Scopus from 2005 through 2010. This survey used scientometrics technique. The samples under studies were the scientific products of four northern Iran Medical universities. Viewpoints quantity of the Scientific Products Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences stands first and of Babol University of Medical Sciences ranks the end, but from the viewpoints of quality of scientific products of considering the H-Index and the number of cited papers the Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences is a head from the other universities under study. From the viewpoints of subject of the papers, the highest scientific products belonged to the faculty of Pharmacy affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medial Sciences, but the three other universities for the genetics and biochemistry. Results showed that the Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences as compared to the other understudies universities ranks higher for the number of articles, cited articles, number of hard work authors and H-Index of Scopus database from 2005 through 2010.

  12. Determining the Correlation Between Language Scores Obtained by Medical Students in their University Entrance and Comprehensive Medical Basic Sciences Exams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi M

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Some professors and educators in the field of English language believe that the high grades attained by medical students in their Comprehensive Medical Basic Sciences Exam (CMBSE are mainly a result of the students prior fluency in the language before entering medical colleges; they are of the opinion that these grades are not necessarily a result of the combined effort of the English teachers and students in language courses at the university. This research aims at determining the correlation between the level of fluency in English of medical students prior to university entrance and the grades obtained by them in their CMBSE after 3 terms of language courses at the university. Methods: Seven of the major and smaller universities of medical sciences were selected. The language scores of 2426 students admitted to these universities during the three academic years of 1999 to 2002 in both the National University Entrance Examination (NUEE and the Comprehensive Medical Basic Sciences Exam (CMBSE were obtained from their related universities and from the secretariat of the Council of Medical Basic Sciences Education respectively. The language scores of each student obtained in both NUEE and CMBSE were then matched. The related SPSS software was used to assess the level of correlation between these two groups of language scores for the students of each university, for each academic year and semester and also the overall score for the three years. Results: Overall a positive and moderately significant correlation was found between the NUEE language scores and those of the CMBSE of the students of the universities studied (P<0/001; R=443%. The level of correlation for the various universities studied differed (Max. 69%, min.27%. A comparison of the means of these two groups of scores also confirmed this correlation. Conclusion: students’ grades The NUEE language score was not the only factor affecting the student’s CMBSE

  13. Early radiology and the National Medical Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestreich, Alan E

    2011-01-01

    Both the discovery of the x-ray and the founding of the National Medical Association (NMA) occurred in 1895. Radiologists have participated importantly in the NMA since the lecture of Dr Marcus F. Wheatland at the 1909 Annual Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, which led to his election as president of the NMA for the following year. More recently, Dr Tracy M. Walton was president of the NMA in its centennial year. This article details early and continued participation in the NMA by radiologists, including the founding of the Section on Radiology in 1949, with its first chairman, Dr William E. Allen, Jr, longtime leader in radiology, the section, and the NMA.

  14. [Educational system for medical sciences at the University of Tsukuba--with special reference to medical technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Toshiko

    2006-03-01

    Three-year colleges for nursing, medical technology, and so on, have all been reorganized into four-year educational institutions in national universities. Since the reform, universities are not responsible for educating medical scientists except nurses. The new College of Nursing and Medical Technology in the University of Tsukuba has been developed along these lines. Here introduce some of its attempts and provide an opportunity to a better system. The Department has the following three characteristics: 1. Medical scientists are educated in the new Department, and the Department is closely cooperating with the School of Medicine. 2. There are courses for medical researchers concerning Molecular Pathology, Pathological Engineering and Environmental Pathology. 3. The qualification to apply to a national test for medical technologists is given to the students. Unfortunately, the system is not fully understood by the faculty or the students and does not work well because the Medical Technology Department and the Nursing Department are grouped together as a single institution. Moreover, this flaw in the system prevents the Medical Technology Department from actively promoting highly advanced medical sciences, such as organ transplantation, artificial organs, gene therapy, reproductive medicines, and so forth (Fig. 1). Few specialists exist who can bridge achievements in basic or advanced sciences and clinical application. Serious social problems about food safety, care systems, post-genome medicine, the youth, and so on, have to be dealt with, too. We are thus planning to separate the Department as the College of Medical Science (Fig. 2) and link it to the educational system in the master's and doctoral programs (Fig. 3). This model will successfully educate a new type of medical specialists.

  15. On the Bilingual Teaching Course of“Medical Literature Retrieval”in Medical Colleges and Universities of Nationality Areas%论民族地区医学高等院校《医学文献检索》课双语教学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    花拉

    2013-01-01

    As bilingual teaching is one of the important components of cultivating talents in various colleges and universities ,the model of three-language teaching ,a minority language and Chinese ,together with English , helps to adapt to the international environment of the national talent training .This paper ,on the basis of the teaching experiences on bilingual course of “medical literature retrieval”of Inner Mongolia Medical University ,sys‐tematically analyzes the necessity and the objective conditions of the course in higher medical colleges and universi ‐ties in minority areas .Furthermore ,constructive suggestions on bilingual teaching contents and means and checking methods are put forward as well .%  双语教学是各类高校培养人才的重要内容之一,少数民族地区的高校用母语和汉语甚至再加英语,用三种语言来授课,有助于培养能够适应国际环境的民族人才的培养。本文结合内蒙古医科大学《医学文献检索》课程的教学经验,系统分析民族地区高等医学院校开设《医学文献检索》课程双语教学的必要性及应具备的客观条件,进而对双语教学内容和手段以及考试方式等提出了建设性的建议。

  16. Establishing a national universal vaccination programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, R

    1995-01-01

    The collaborative efforts of healthcare providers, governmental policy and law makers and the public are often needed to provide the pressure necessary to establish a national universal vaccination programme. Key initiatives for those beginning to establish such a programme are the following: secure a scientific consensus or base of support; clarify relevance of the subject to all concerned; increase awareness of everyone (providers and consumers); recruit and involve influential people (angels) for support; seek out agendas within which to review the topic; generate cost-benefit data; encourage a consensus to be reached; identify legislative pathways to be used; convince politicians of the value of such a programme; request budgeting and funding; and, finally, follow up with surveillance studies to demonstrate the benefits of the programme.

  17. National University Consortium on Microwave Research (NUCOMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Robert J.; Agee, Forrest J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper introduces a new cooperative research program of national scale that is focused on crucial research issues in the development of high energy microwave sources. These have many applications in the DOD and industry. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), in coopertaion with the Phillips Laboratory, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the Army Research Laboratory, has established a tri-service research consortium to investigate novel high energy microwave sources. The program is part of the DODs 'Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative' and will be funded at a rate of $DLR3.0M per year for up to five years. All research performed under this program will be unclassified. Under its auspices, HPM scientists at nine US universities will be attacking twenty-two separate research projects under the leadership of Neville Luhmann at UC-Davis, Victor Granatstein at Maryland, Magne Kristiansen at Texas Tech, Edl Schamiloglu at New Mexico, John Nation at Cornell, Ned Birdsall at UC-Berkeley, George Caryotakis at Standord, Ronald Gilgenbach at Michigan, and Anthony Lin at UCLA. To facilitate the rapid transition of research results into the industrial community, formal collaborative subcontracts are already in place with James Benford at Physics International, Carter Armstrong at Northrop, and Glen Huffman at Varian Associates. Although this new program officially only came into existence in mid-March of this year, it builds on over a decade of microwave research efforts funded by the plasma physics office at AFOSR. It also is synergistic with the ongoing Tri-Service Vacuum Electronics Initiative led by Robert Parker of NRL as well as with the AFOSR's and Rome Laboratory's long standing Advanced Thermionic Research Initiative. An overview will be given of the broad spectrum of research objectives encompassed by NUCOMR. Areas of collaboration and technology transfer will be highlighted. The areas in which the three university consortia will conduct

  18. Are medical ethics universal or culture specific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Furqaan; Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    In our society and culture where family is of utmost importance,sometimes I wonder how much of a doctor’s duty is to the patient and how much is to the whole family.As a medical student,I remember being told by my professors that we should treat the patient as a whole and not focus on just one problem or organ system.Similarly when practicing medicine in Pakistan,one cannot treat the patient alone and ignore the family.How much should relatives’ wishes be taken into account when dealing with a patient? Don’t patients have a right to their medical information? When,how,and by whom can that right be waived? What role does culture play when debating medical ethics?

  19. Assessment of Medication Use among University Students in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dessalegn Asmelashe Gelayee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The extent, nature, and determinants of medication use of individuals can be known from drug utilization studies. Objectives. This study intended to determine medication consumption, sharing, storage, and disposal practices of university students in Northwest Ethiopia. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 404 university students selected through stratified random sampling technique. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaire and analyzed with SPSS version 20 statistical software. Pearson’s Chi-square test of independence was conducted with P<0.05 taken as statistically significant. Results. At 95.3% response rate, the prevalences of medication consumption and sharing were 35.3% (N=136 and 38.2% (N=147, respectively. One hundred (26% respondents admitted that they often keep leftover medications for future use while the rest (N=285, 74% discard them primarily into toilets (N=126, 44.2%. Evidence of association existed between medication taking and year of study (P=0.048, medication sharing and sex (P=0.003, and medication sharing and year of study (P=0.015. Conclusion. There is a high prevalence of medication consumption, medication sharing, and inappropriate disposal practices which are influenced by sex and educational status of the university students. Thus medication use related educational interventions need to be given to students in general.

  20. The international and national university rankings as an constituent of university`s competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.S. Shypulina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to define the importance of participation in World or National universities rankings for higher university institutions as an effective tool in development and improvement of higher education system in total. The results of the analysis. Today the educational market actively interact universities (enterprises that provide educational services and consumers (students who choose university and receive services. The main feature is the intangibility of educational services. Education is intangible and therefore difficult to assess its quality until purchased. Educational services require engineering experience of beneficiaries: university should make a clear image of what perception of reality and knowledge it wants to form for customer. It is important to develop together operational and contextual reinforcements of this impression. Educational services also feature inseparability of service provider. The process of providing educational services and consumption are almost always simultaneous. It should be mentioned that for a long time universities functioned as closed structures, the aim of which is fundamental and applied research and commercialization of their results. Nowadays new market realities show the necessity to provide new managerial forms of modern university. The top task of any university today is not only hiring students, but search for partners and providing of scientific research also. That is where international ratings help. International ratings become indicators of prestige. Relying on the rating results many decisions are made (i. e. decision on university to study, decision on scientific or business partnership. The most authoritative international university rankings are ARWU, QS World University Ranking and Times Higher Education. Ukrainian universities should focus on them in planning their foreign marketing policy. University rankings can be a competitive business

  1. STOMATOLOGICAL FACULTY OF SARATOV STATE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY CELEBRATES - 20 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Googe

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Stomatological faculty of SaratovState Medical University was founded in 1988. During 20 years scientific stomatologic school on the basis of all major directions was formed in our university. Greatamountof high professional scientific staff and practitioners was trained.

  2. Vocabulary Learning Strategies of Medical Students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddigh, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the use of vocabulary learning strategies among medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS) in Iran as an EFL context. A questionnaire was administered to 120 medical students (53 males, 67 females) to identify; 1) the effective types of vocabulary learning strategies used by the learners and 2)…

  3. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND OTHER LIFESTYLE HABITS OF MEDICAL STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COSTA RICA

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Jiménez Morgan; Jessenia Hernández-Elizondo

    2016-01-01

    Those engaged in medical sciences are social models. For this reason, their daily habits influence their professional practice and the primary prevention they carry out. The main purpose of this research was to determine whether this group of medicine training students, all from University of Costa Rica, met national and international recommendations regarding health and wellness regulations. In 2014, second semester, anonymous questionnaires were applied to all undergraduate medical students...

  4. Identifying challenges for academic leadership in medical universities in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Masiello, Italo

    2010-05-01

    CONTEXT The crucial role of academic leadership in the success of higher education institutions is well documented. Medical education in Iran has been integrated into the health care system through a complex organisational change. This has called into question the current academic leadership, making Iranian medical universities and schools a good case for exploring the challenges of academic leadership. OBJECTIVES This study explores the leadership challenges perceived by academic managers in medical schools and universities in Iran. METHODS A qualitative study using 18 face-to-face, in-depth interviews with academic managers in medical universities and at the Ministry of Health and Medical Education in Iran was performed. All interviews were recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis. RESULTS The main challenges to academic leadership could be categorised under three themes, each of which included three sub-themes: organisational issues (inefficacy of academic governance; an overly extensive set of missions and responsibilities; concerns about the selection of managers); managerial issues (management styles; mismatch between authority and responsibilities; leadership capabilities), and organisational culture (tendency towards governmental management; a boss-centred culture; low motivation). CONCLUSIONS This study emphasises the need for academic leadership development in Iranian medical schools and universities. The ability of Iranian universities to grow and thrive will depend ultimately upon the application of leadership skills. Thus, it is necessary to better designate authorities, roles of academic staff and leaders at governance.

  5. Medical Diplomacy: A Tool for Enabling National Security Strategy Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    Biosurveillance Coordinating Unit CDC Oversees the National Biosurveillance Strategy. Outlined in Homeland Security Presidential Directive-21...addresses global disease outbreaks National Biosurveillance System DHS National Biosurveillance Information Center Around-the-clock domestic... biosurveillance Medical countermeasures National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH Conduct and support research aimed at developing

  6. Current efforts in medical education to incorporate national health priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Manisha; Fellmeth, Gracia

    2017-08-03

    As a reflection on the Edinburgh Declaration, this conceptual synthesis presents six important challenges in relation to the role of medical education in meeting current national health priorities. This paper presents a conceptual synthesis of current efforts in medical education to incorporate national health priorities as a reflection on how the field has evolved since the Edinburgh Declaration. Considering that health needs vary from country to country, our paper focuses on three broad and cross-cutting themes: health equity, health systems strengthening, and changing patterns of disease. Considering the complexity of this topic, we conducted a targeted search to broadly sample and critically review the literature in two phases. Phase 1: within each theme, we assessed the current challenges in the field of medical education to meet the health priority. Phase 2: a search for various strategies in undergraduate and postgraduate education that have been tested in an effort to address the identified challenges. We conducted a qualitative synthesis of the literature followed by mapping of the identified challenges within each of the three themes with targeted efforts. We identified six important challenges: (i) mismatch between the need for generalist models of health care and medical education curricula's specialist focus; (ii) attitudes of health care providers contributing to disparities in health care; (iii) the lack of a universal approach in preparing medical students for 21st century health systems; (iv) the inability of medical education to keep up with the abundance of new health care technologies; (v) a mismatch between educational requirements for integrated care and poorly integrated, specialised health care systems; and (vi) development of a globally interdependent education system to meet global health challenges. Examples of efforts being made to address these challenges are offered. Although strategies for combatting these challenges exist, the

  7. Sleep quality in Zanjan university medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghoreishi A

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep has a major role in daily cycles and reconstruction of physical and mental abilities. Regarding the importance of this feature, we decided to determine sleep quality in medical students.Methods: A questionnaire containing demographic data, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was prepared. We distributed the questionnaires using a census method to every student at the Zanjan Faculty of Medicine. The completed questionnaires were collected and the data was analyzed using SPSS.Results: A total of 224 students answered the questionnaire, with 133 (59.4% students evaluated to have good sleep quality and 91 (40.6% poor sleep quality. Of these 91 students, 38% were female and 44.8% were male (p=0.307. The prevalence of poor sleep quality according to the four stages of medical training was 24.6% of those in basic sciences, 42.9% of those in physiopathology, 41.7% of externs, and 53.5% of interns (p=0.008. According to residential status, the prevalence of poor sleep quality was 61.5% among students living with their spouse, 44.6% for students living in their own private homes, 37.6% among students living in the dormitory, and 20.8% for those living with their parents (p=0.024. According to marital status, 35.8% of singles and 64.9% of married students had poor sleep quality (p=0.001. According to financial status, 57.9%, 46.9%, and 33.9% of those from low, moderate and high economic classes, respectively, were sleep deprived (p=0.049. Among those with average grades of under 16 and over 16 out of 20, 47.5% and 32%, respectively, were suffering from poor sleep quality (p=0.047. There was no obvious relationship between sleep quality and BMI, sex, or history of depression or anxiety.Conclusion: Poor sleep quality was significantly associated with lower grades, economic status, living arrangement and type of training. A large number of students quality of life and work may suffer because sleep deprivation.

  8. Educational needs of faculty members of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S Mazloomy Mahmoodabad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Identifying educational needs is an essential step in planning faculty development programs. It plays an important role in promoting the quality of education. The aim of this study was to determine and prioritize the educational needs of clinical and non clinical faculty members of Faculty of Medicne of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences. Methods: A questionnaire was developed for this cross-sectional study using the indices identified by reviewing the literature. The questionnaire was sent to all faculty members of Medical Faculty (n=260. The items were scored from 1 to 20 according to the importance of the educational needs. Data was analyzed by SPSS software. Results: Different areas of educational needs of the clinical faculty members were respectively prioritized as: familiarity with National Medical Universities Ranking Schemeresearch, personal development, administrative and executive activities, education, specialized activities outside the university and health services and health promotion. In the non clinical faculty members: research, familiarity with National Medical Universities Ranking Schemeeducation, personal development, specialized activities outside the university, administrative and executive activities. The first priority of education in the clinical faculty members was design, implementation and analysis of oral exams. In research domain priorities were data analysis skills and the first priority of education in the non clinical faculty members was how to foster critical thinking and reasoning in research and critical appraisal skills. Conclusion: Faculty members need all of the seven studiedmajor areas. It is recommended further research to determine the weight of these seven areas using a standard method.

  9. Self-Medication Practice with Nonprescription Medication among University Students: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedy Almasdy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review the literature relating to self-medicationpractice with nonprescription medication among universitystudents.Methods: A narrative review of studies on self-medicationpractice with nonprescription medication among universitystudent was performed. An extensive literature search wasundertaken using indexing services available at UniversitiSains Malaysia (USM library. The following keywords wereused for the search: self-care, self-medication, over-thecountermedicine, nonprescription medicine, minor illnesses,minor ailment, university population and communitypharmacy. Electronic databases searched were Science Direct,Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge, Inside Web, JSTOR, SpringerLink, Proquest, Ebsco Host and Google Scholar. Theseelectronic databases were searched for full text paperspublished in English.Results: Eleven studies were identified. In general, the reviewhas shown that self-medication practice with nonprescriptionmedication highly prevalence among university students. Thereasons for self-medication are vary among this populationand the main symptoms leading to self-medication areheadache or minor pain; fever, flu, cough, or cold; anddiarrhoea.The common medication is analgesic, antipyreticproducts, cough and cold remedies, anti allergy andvitamins or minerals. The sources of the medicines arepharmacy, home medicine cabinet, supermarket/shopand other person such as family, friend, neighbours andclassmates. The sources of drug information are familymember, previous experience, pharmacy salesman,doctor or nurse, advertisement and others. The reviewalso has shown that the self-medication practice couldhave many problems.Conclusions: The review provides insights about theself-medication practices among the university students.These practices were highly prevalence among universitystudents. The symptoms leading to self-medication arevary, thus the medication used and the medicationsources. It needs an adequate drug information

  10. 76 FR 4151 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Teleconference Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council... Transportation (DOT). Title: National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Teleconference Meeting. ACTION: National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); notice of Teleconference Meeting....

  11. 76 FR 15043 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC... (NHTSA), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice--National Emergency Medical Services... public. The purpose of NEMSAC is to provide a nationally recognized council of emergency medical...

  12. 75 FR 71791 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Meeting...). ACTION: National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory... public. The purpose of NEMSAC is to provide a nationally recognized council of emergency medical...

  13. The historic and national aspects of medical ethics and deontology.

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Researches of problems of medical ethics and deontology in activity of the medical worker presented. Historical and national aspects of the delivered problem are considered. They open diversity and complexity of realization of problems of formation of the person of the medical worker. The humanism in medicine makes its ethical basis and morals. The humanism serves moral development of the person of the medical worker. Without humanism the medicine loses the right on existence. Its scientific ...

  14. Coordination of Two On-Line Information Retrieval Services At the University of Minnesota Bio-Medical Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Jan; Foreman, Gertrude

    The Bio-Medical Library at the University of Minnesota has access to two on-line computer systems: the MEDLINE system (MEDLARS ON-LINE) of the National Library of Medicine and the State University of New York (SUNY) Biomedical Communication Network. MEDLINE consists of two files which provide coverage of the "Index Medicus" from 1970 to the…

  15. Implementation of an OSCE at Kaohsiung Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Sheng Huang

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE, a tool to objectively and fairly assess medical students' clinical competences, has become widely used in medical education worldwide. However, most medical schools in Taiwan have just begun to adopt this assessment method. In 2003, Kaohsiung Medical University (KMU established the first standardized patient (SP program in Taiwan and applied SPs with an OSCE. This study reports the process of the implementation of an OSCE at KMU, which includes collecting information, visiting leading clinical skills centers, consulting medical educators from other countries, holding international conferences, establishing an OSCE committee, writing cases, training SPs, administrating the OSCE, and receiving feedback from medical students. Most students were satisfied with the assessment and appreciated the learning experience. Based on the experience in 2003, the OSCE committee decided to incorporate the OSCE into the medical curriculum as a measure to assess medical students' clinical competences. In addition to assessing medical students' clinical competence, the OSCE can also be applied to other professional health education, such as dentistry, nursing, and pharmacy. We are currently sharing our experience with other colleges at KMU.

  16. Exploring University Students' Online Information Seeking about Prescription Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhalaf, Ahmad Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    This study explored university students' information seeking behaviors related to prescription medication (PM) information. Specifically, it examined the different sources students use for PM information, their use and perceptions of online sources, the types of PM information they seek, their concerns about, and methods they apply to verify the…

  17. Medical humanities and philosophy: is the universe expanding or contracting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempsey, William E

    2007-12-01

    The question of whether the universe is expanding or contracting serves as a model for current questions facing the medical humanities. The medical humanities might aptly be described as a metamedical multiverse encompassing many separate universes of discourse, the most prominent of which is probably bioethics. Bioethics, however, is increasingly developing into a new interdisciplinary discipline, and threatens to engulf the other medical humanities, robbing them of their own distinctive contributions to metamedicine. The philosophy of medicine considered as a distinct field of study has suffered as a result. Indeed, consensus on whether the philosophy of medicine even constitutes a legitimate field of study is lacking. This paper presents an argument for the importance of a broad conception of the philosophy of medicine and the central role it should play in organizing and interpreting the various fields of study that make up the metamedical multiverse.

  18. A national survey of medical student suicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jacklyn; Kumar, Shelley; Nelson, Elizabeth; Harris, Toi; Coverdale, John

    2014-10-01

    Because there is no current information on medical student suicides, the authors surveyed US medical schools about deaths by suicide of medical students from June 2006 to July 2011. In spring through summer of 2012, the authors sent electronic surveys to the 133 accredited US allopathic medical schools at the time, excluding Puerto Rican schools. The 15-item survey included questions about deaths by suicide and deaths by means other than suicide. In the case of a reported suicide, the survey obtained information regarding demographic characteristics and method of suicide. The 90 responding schools (response rate 69 %) reported a total of six suicides (four males, two females; five Caucasians, one Asian) from July 2006 to June 2011. Two deaths by suicide occurred in first year, two in second year, and two in third year. Two of the suicides occurred by gunshot, two by hanging, one by overdose, and for one, the cause of death was unknown. Three of the six students left a suicide note. Although the number and rate of suicides among medical students may be lower than a prior survey that was conducted more than 15 years ago, these data affirm the importance of suicide prevention programs for medical students.

  19. Content and technical evaluation of Type III Iranian medical universities\\' websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadejeh Shabankareh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Besides the role that universities websites have in reflection of universities’ educational and research activities, they have also significant importance in promotion of universities’ national and international ranking in webometrics ranking of world universities and also in webometric ranking of Islamic world Science Citation and subsequently obtaining national and international credibility and gaining student and funding. So, continuous evaluation of universities websites in different aspects, especially based on considering index of these ranking systems, is important. Therefore, present study aimed to review the situation of Type 3 Iranian medical universities’ websites based on content and technical features effecting on promotion of webometric rank. Materials and Methods : Present study is a survey with descriptive approach which descriptive the present situation of Type 3 Iranian medical universities’ websites. Data were collected using a researcher-made checklist which was consisted of two parts including content criteria effecting on webometric ranking (50 criteria and technical criteria of search engines optimization (52 criteria. Content evaluation of websites was done by researcher direct referring and observing. In order to evaluation of these websites, based on technical criteria of search engines optimization, automatic tools about website evaluation were used. Data were analyzed by SPSS20. Results: The finding of this study showed that, Gonabad, Bushehr & Shahrekord universities of medical sciences have the most accommodation with the research checklist.  Bam, Dezful & Jiroft universities of medical sciences have the least accommodation. According to research findings less than 50 percent of the research community, reached more than 50 percent of the criteria in checklist. Conclusion: Evaluation of studied websites indicated that whole websites are far from ideal situation. So type 3 medical universities

  20. Attitudes of undergraduate medical students of Addis Ababa University towards medical practice and migration, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deressa Wakgari

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The health care system of Ethiopia is facing a serious shortage of health workforce. While a number of strategies have been developed to improve the training and retention of medical doctors in the country, understanding the perceptions and attitudes of medical students towards their training, future practice and intent to migrate can contribute in addressing the problem. This study was carried out to assess the attitudes of Ethiopian medical students towards their training and future practice of medicine, and to identify factors associated with the intent to practice in rural or urban settings, or to migrate abroad. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in June 2009 among 600 medical students (Year I to Internship program of the Faculty of Medicine at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. A pre-tested self-administered structured questionnaire was used for data collection. Descriptive statistics were used for data summarization and presentation. Degree of association was measured by Chi Square test, with significance level set at p  Results Only 20% of the students felt ‘excellent’ about studying medicine; followed by ‘very good’ (19%, ‘good’ (30%, ‘fair’ (21% and ‘bad’ (11%. About 35% of respondents responded they felt the standard of medical education was below their expectation. Only 30% of the students said they would like to initially practice medicine in rural settings in Ethiopia. However, students with rural backgrounds were more likely than those with urban backgrounds to say they intended to practice medicine in rural areas (adjusted OR = 2.50, 95% CI = 1.18-5.26. Similarly, students in clinical training program preferred to practice medicine in rural areas compared to pre-clinical students (adjusted OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.12-2.99. About 53% of the students (57% males vs. 46% females, p = 0.017 indicated aspiration to emigrate following graduation, particularly to the

  1. Students' Perception of the National Open University of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    Hence the need for distance education (National Open University of Nigeria) ... have revolutionalized the techniques and method of instructional deliveries in ... significant proportion of the teaching is conducted by some one removed in.

  2. University psychiatry in Italy: organisation and integration of university clinics and the National Health Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Maria Furlan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In the Italian psychiatric system, community-based care has become increasingly important and widespread since the national reform of 1978. This report aims to provide an overview of the involvement of university medical schools in this process, considering their responsibility for teaching and training specialist practitioners and professionals. METHODS: The study was carried out between early 2010 and February 2011. An 18-items, self-administered, questionnaire was designed to investigate the number of faculty members that are responsible both for running a clinical ward and for providing community-based healthcare. RESULTS: Nine out of 53 faculty members (17% manage a Mental Health Department, 9 (17% manage a University Department, and 2 (3.8% manage both types of department. Less than half of the teachers have full responsibility (hospital and community; however the percentage reaches 73.2% if we include the hospital wards open to the community emergencies. The remaining 26.8% have no responsibility for community psychiatry. Moreover there were undoubtedly still too many universities with specialisation schools that are without an appropriate network of facilities enabling them to offer complex psychiatric training. DISCUSSION: As expected, there were several types of healthcare management that were not uniformly distributed throughout Italy and there were also marked differences between mental health care provision in the North, Centre, and South of Italy. The university involvement in clinical responsibility was great, but at the management level there was a lack of equality in terms of clinical care, which risks being reflected also on the institutional functions of teaching and research.

  3. Fitness and nutritional status of female medical university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, K; Mészáros, Zs; Mavroudes, M; Szmodis, M B; Zsidegh, M; Ng, N; Mészáros, J

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this comparison was to evaluate the nutritional status and cardio-respiratory fitness of future health professionals, namely university students engaged in medical studies. It was assumed that the lifestyle of such students would be reflected by healthy body composition and fitness performance indicators. Altogether 1,560 volunteer, female, university students of three institutions were investigated in 2008. Height, body weight, BMI, body fat content and 800 m run test means were compared.The height, weight and BMI means did not differ significantly but PE students recorded the lowest mean body fat (18.34% vs. 24.37 and 25.12%) and shortest mean running time (203 s vs. 239 and 243 s). Among the medical (11.23%) and technical university students (19.95%) statistically the same prevalence of obesity was observed.High body fat content and low running performance of medical students were in contrast with our hypothesis. Their prevalence of overweight/obesity and low fitness did not differ from that of relatively sedentary technical university students and the average Hungarian young adult population. Thus, it is questionable how young health professionals will promote the necessity and positive effects of regular physical activity if they do not apply them to their own lifestyle.

  4. Mental health status among Japanese medical students: a cross-sectional survey of 20 universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsu, Tadahiro; Kaneita, Yoshitaka; Osaki, Yoneatsu; Kokaze, Akatsuki; Ochiai, Hirotaka; Shirasawa, Takako; Nanri, Hinako; Ohida, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the mental health status of Japanese medical students and to examine differences based on gender, as well as on university type and location, using the results of a nationwide survey. Between December 2006 and March 2007, we conducted a questionnaire survey among fourth-year medical students at 20 randomly selected medical schools in Japan. The data from 1,619 students (response rate: 90.6%; male: 1,074; female: 545) were analyzed. We used the Japanese version of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) to measure mental health status. Poor mental health status (GHQ-12 score of 4 points or higher) was observed in 36.6% and 48.8% of the male and female medical students, respectively. The ratio of the age-adjusted prevalence of poor mental health status in female versus male medical students was 1.33 (95% confidence interval: 1.10-1.62). The universities were categorized into two groups based on the university type (national/public: 15 vs. private: 5) or location (in a large city: 7 vs. in a local city: 13 cities). The prevalence of poor mental health status in both men and women differed between these groups, although not significantly. The GHQ-12 scores in men significantly differed between the categorized groups of universities. These results suggest that adequate attention must be paid to the mental health of medical students, especially females, and that a system for providing mental health care for medical students must be established in the context of actual conditions at each university.

  5. Internet use and addiction among medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Haque M; Rahman NAA; Majumder MAA; Haque SZ; Kamal ZM; Islam Z; Haque ATME; Rahman NIA; Alattraqchi AG

    2016-01-01

    Mainul Haque,1 Nor Azlina A Rahman,2 Md Anwarul Azim Majumder,3 Seraj Zohurul Haque,4 Zubair M Kamal,5 Zakirul Islam,6 ATM Emdadul Haque,7 Nor Iza A Rahman,8 Ahmed Ghazi Alattraqchi8 1Unit of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Defense Health, National Defense University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, 2Department of Biomedical Science, Kulliyyah of Allied Health Sciences, Kuantan, Malaysia; 3Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences,...

  6. Are virtues national, supranational, or universal?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oudenhoven, Jan Pieter; de Raad, Boele; Timmerman, Marieke E; Askevis-Leherpeux, Françoise; Boski, Pawel; Carmona, Carmen; Choubisa, Rajneesh; Del Carmen Dominguez, Alejandra; Bye, Hege H; Kurylo, Anastacia; Lahmann, Cornelia; Mastor, Khairul; Selenko, Eva; Slezáčková, Alena; Smith, Ripley; Tip, Linda; Yik, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Many studies investigated cultural differences in values, most notably by Hofstede and Schwarz. Relatively few have focused on virtues, a related and important concept in contemporary social science. The present paper examines the similarities and differences between nations, or blocks of - cultural

  7. Are virtues national, supranational, or universal?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oudenhoven, Jan Pieter; de Raad, Boele; Timmerman, Marieke E; Askevis-Leherpeux, Françoise; Boski, Pawel; Carmona, Carmen; Choubisa, Rajneesh; Del Carmen Dominguez, Alejandra; Bye, Hege H; Kurylo, Anastacia; Lahmann, Cornelia; Mastor, Khairul; Selenko, Eva; Slezáčková, Alena; Smith, Ripley; Tip, Linda; Yik, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Many studies investigated cultural differences in values, most notably by Hofstede and Schwarz. Relatively few have focused on virtues, a related and important concept in contemporary social science. The present paper examines the similarities and differences between nations, or blocks of -

  8. Ivan Franko national university of Lviv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Malakhova

    2014-09-01

    In the article the features of tolerance as socio-cultural values of modern society. Tolerance is recognized as a significant public value, which is the basis of mutual understanding between people belonging to different cultures, nationalities and religions. Tolerance as a value foresees perception of cultural differences.

  9. Thoughts on the Italian National University Council (CUN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borghetti M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Italian National University Council (CUN is an elected body that represents the Italian academic system and formulates proposal and gives advice to the Minister of University. The opinion is expressed that the professors who are appointed to CUN should go on sabbatical leave from their universities over the period they are part of CUN, as an important condition for carrying out better their institutional job and preventing any potential conflict of interest.

  10. E-learning in Type 1 Medical Universities of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bagher ROKNI

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nowadays the Internet is the technological pedestal of organization in the information society and one of the main applications that the Internet offers is the Digital Library (DL. Each society, especially those that claim training of the public, predictably need implementation and endorsement these systems. The time of chalk and board is passed and the globalization and universal village demands a movement targeting to establish an information society. The university is said to be responsible for making "Human". In the era of information explosion, how can a university rely on a physical classroom, a tired teacher and some drowsy students listening to him? Internet "the sweet invention of man" is a bridge, between "slump" and "spurt". It is up to each authority in a university to design, employ, develop and evaluate a system embracing Internet, Multimedia, Network and so on to go parallel in modern era and to introduce the supreme system of E-learning in its program. Of different aspects of E-learning including computer networks, multimedia, search engines, electronic libraries, distance learning, and all that (Piskurich, 2003, most of the type 1 medical universities of Iran exploit, some how or another, all or some of them. These universities including Tehran, Iran, Shahid Beheshti, Mashhad, Isfahan, Tabriz, Shiraz, Ahwaz, and Kerman, at present encompass a powerful link with their audiences regarding digital libraries, search engine and authentic data bases. The present article is going to have a bird's eye view at various capacities of these universities in this regard.

  11. Motivation of university and non-university stakeholders to change medical education in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Ngoc Hoat; Nguyen, Lan Viet; van der Wilt, G J; Broerse, J; Ruitenberg, E J; Wright, E P

    2009-07-24

    Both university and non-university stakeholders should be involved in the process of curriculum development in medical schools, because all are concerned with the competencies of the graduates. That may be difficult unless appropriate strategies are used to motivate each stakeholder. From 1999 to 2006, eight medical schools in Vietnam worked together to change the curriculum and teaching for general medical students to make it more community oriented. This paper describes the factors that motivated the different stakeholders to participate in curriculum change and teaching in Vietnamese medical schools and the activities to address those factors and have sustainable contributions from all relevant stakeholders. Case study analysis of contributions to the change process, using reports, interviews, focus group discussions and surveys and based on Herzberg's Motivation Theory to analyze involvement of different stakeholders. Different stakeholders were motivated by selected activities, such as providing opportunities for non-university stakeholders to share their opinions, organizing interactions among university stakeholders, stimulating both bottom-up and top-down inputs, focusing on learning from each other, and emphasizing self-motivation factors. The Herzberg Motivation theory helped to identify suitable approaches to ensure that teaching topics, materials and assessment methods more closely reflected the health care needs of the community. Other medical schools undertaking a reform process may learn from this experience.

  12. Motivation of university and non-university stakeholders to change medical education in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruitenberg EJ

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both university and non-university stakeholders should be involved in the process of curriculum development in medical schools, because all are concerned with the competencies of the graduates. That may be difficult unless appropriate strategies are used to motivate each stakeholder. From 1999 to 2006, eight medical schools in Vietnam worked together to change the curriculum and teaching for general medical students to make it more community oriented. This paper describes the factors that motivated the different stakeholders to participate in curriculum change and teaching in Vietnamese medical schools and the activities to address those factors and have sustainable contributions from all relevant stakeholders. Methods Case study analysis of contributions to the change process, using reports, interviews, focus group discussions and surveys and based on Herzberg's Motivation Theory to analyze involvement of different stakeholders. Results Different stakeholders were motivated by selected activities, such as providing opportunities for non-university stakeholders to share their opinions, organizing interactions among university stakeholders, stimulating both bottom-up and top-down inputs, focusing on learning from each other, and emphasizing self-motivation factors. Conclusion The Herzberg Motivation theory helped to identify suitable approaches to ensure that teaching topics, materials and assessment methods more closely reflected the health care needs of the community. Other medical schools undertaking a reform process may learn from this experience.

  13. Techno-Nationalism and the Construction of University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Creso; Kretz, Andrew; Sigurdson, Kristjan

    2013-01-01

    Our historical study of Canada's main research university illuminates the overlooked influence of national identities and interests as forces shaping the institutionalization of technology transfer. Through the use of archival sources we trace the rise and influence of Canadian technological nationalism--a response to Canada's perceived…

  14. Techno-Nationalism and the Construction of University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Creso; Kretz, Andrew; Sigurdson, Kristjan

    2013-01-01

    Our historical study of Canada's main research university illuminates the overlooked influence of national identities and interests as forces shaping the institutionalization of technology transfer. Through the use of archival sources we trace the rise and influence of Canadian technological nationalism--a response to Canada's perceived dependency…

  15. Techno-Nationalism and the Construction of University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Creso; Kretz, Andrew; Sigurdson, Kristjan

    2013-01-01

    Our historical study of Canada's main research university illuminates the overlooked influence of national identities and interests as forces shaping the institutionalization of technology transfer. Through the use of archival sources we trace the rise and influence of Canadian technological nationalism--a response to Canada's perceived dependency…

  16. Demographic Survey Of The Spiritual Intelligence In Medical Faculty Of Qom University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Marziye Raisi; Hoda Ahmari Tehran; Saeede Heidari; Nahid Mehran

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Spiritual intelligence is a kind of ultimate intelligence that shows the conceptual and valuable issues and to solve the problems associated with it. the foundation of individual beliefs can have important role in various fields especially in the promotion and provision of psychic health . Thus, the aim of this study was to survey the rate of spiritual intelligence among the students of Medical Faculty of Qom University of Medical Sciences and the relation between t...

  17. Satisfaction of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences\\' alumni about the quality of medical education

    OpenAIRE

    S.J. Mirmohammadi; A. H Mehrparvar; M Bahaloo; M. H Davari

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In order to achieve acceptable quality in educations, the quality of learning should be assessed. opinion of alumni in assessment of the quality of education is important, This study aims to assess the quality of medical education in basic and clinical sciences according to the opinion of alumni of Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences during 2008-2012 Method: This cross-sectional study conducted on alumni graduated from 2008-2012. Data was collected using a questionnaire whic...

  18. 76 FR 63612 - National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation Meeting AGENCY: National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of... of the National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation (NCFMEA). For each...

  19. 78 FR 67463 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC) and Federal Interagency Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC) and Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services (FICEMS); Notice of Federal Advisory... Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice--National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council and...

  20. 78 FR 801 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC... to the public. The purpose of NEMSAC, a nationally recognized council of emergency medical services representatives and consumers, is to provide advice and recommendations regarding Emergency Medical Services...

  1. Medical student mentorship in a university setting as a strategy for a career in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Parul N; Fallat, Mary E

    2011-11-01

    Gender balance in surgery is a respectable and necessary goal. At the University of Louisville (UL) School of Medicine, we have compared percentages of UL medical student applicants to general surgery or surgical subspecialty residency programs, surgical residents, and surgical faculty with the rest of the nation. Although UL has at times paralleled or exceeded the nation in many of these categories, there is room for improvement and the comparison data allow for strategic planning initiatives. To promote gender balance among future generations of surgeons at UL, we recently implemented a mentoring program that pairs medical students with residents and faculty in surgery. We plan to track the success over time and correct any shortcomings of this program. Virginia Commonwealth University's commitment to gender balance in surgery is exemplary. As part of a more comprehensive vision to create a mentorship program for female medical students at the UL School of Medicine, we have recently recruited female surgical residents and faculty, whom we hope will provide the type of inspiration and guidance that will increase the number of women from UL who decide to train in general surgery and the surgical specialties. To understand why women across the nation are not generally at numerical parity in these fields, it is important to consider the length and intensity of the surgical residency programs in the context of the other goals and objectives that a woman might have for her future. This article does not address this broad topic but provides a perspective of how a medical school can evaluate and perhaps intervene to mentor medical students more effectively about the satisfaction derived from a career in surgery. As part of this project, we have evaluated each step of the path through medical school and a surgical residency by comparing data for our students, residency programs, and faculty with national data.

  2. 78 FR 90 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-02

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Intelligence University, Defense Intelligence Agency, Department of... a closed meeting of the National Intelligence University Board of Visitors has been scheduled...

  3. 78 FR 32241 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors; Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors; Notice of Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Intelligence University, Defense Intelligence Agency... given that a closed meeting of the National Intelligence University Board of Visitors has been...

  4. E-Readiness Assessment at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Fariba Salek Ranjbarzadesh; Mohammad Hossein Biglu; Susan Hassanzadeh; Naser Safaei; Parviz saleh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: E-readiness assessment is the evaluation of one’s ability to accept and use information technologies and their relevant applications. E-readiness assessment helps us identify and study the strengths and weaknesses and consequently find solutions and formulate strategies to improve e-readiness which is considered as a guarantee for the implementation of knowledge development programs. This study aimed to assess ereadiness at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: The cur...

  5. University of North Carolina's experience with state medical assistance teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Jeff; Murtaugh, Lisa; Hoffman, Randy

    2010-01-01

    Events in the last several years have shown a clear need for better preparation regarding disaster management. In an effort to improve this preparation, North Carolina implemented state medical assistant teams to provide alternative care facilities, decontamination facilities, and shelter assistance during times of disaster. This article explores these teams from the perspective of the University of North Carolina, which serves as a lead agency for one of these teams. Key components of the team, training provided, and lessons learned will be discussed.

  6. The need for national medical licensing examination in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzahrani Khalid

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical education in Saudi Arabia is facing multiple challenges, including the rapid increase in the number of medical schools over a short period of time, the influx of foreign medical graduates to work in Saudi Arabia, the award of scholarships to hundreds of students to study medicine in various countries, and the absence of published national guidelines for minimal acceptable competencies of a medical graduate. Discussion We are arguing for the need for a Saudi national medical licensing examination that consists of two parts: Part I (Written which tests the basic science and clinical knowledge and Part II (Objective Structured Clinical Examination which tests the clinical skills and attitudes. We propose this examination to be mandated as a licensure requirement for practicing medicine in Saudi Arabia. Conclusion The driving and hindering forces as well as the strengths and weaknesses of implementing the licensing examination are discussed in details in this debate.

  7. An Assessment of National EMT Certification Among Enlisted Military Medics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Stephen; Crowe, Remle; Bentley, Melissa; Kharod, Chetan; Walrath, Benjamin

    2017-03-01

    Navy Hospital Corpsmen (HMs) are the Navy equivalent to Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) both in-garrison and on the battlefield. In 2000, the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Education Agenda for the Future highlighted the need for a single certification agency to provide consistent evaluation of entry level competence for each nationally recognized EMS provider level. Administered by the National Registry of EMTs (NREMT), National EMT Certification is currently utilized by 46 states, the District of Columbia, four territories, and six federal organizations as part of their processes for granting licensure. Unlike the Air Force (USAF) and Army (USA), the Navy (USN) does not require National EMT Certification to perform the duties equivalent to a civilian EMT. Our objective is to describe the number of USN HMs, USAF medics, and USA combat medics who have obtained National EMT Certification from 2007 through 2014. Results from all USN HMs, USAF medics, and USA combat medics who tested between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2014 were queried from the NREMT database. Descriptive statistics were calculated based on a retrospective review of prospectively collected testing data. During the study period, 89,136 Military Service Members received their EMT certification from the NREMT. The breakdown of the total and percent of total is; USA Combat Medics (n = 69,761; 78.3%), USAF Medics (n = 16,195; 18.1%), and USN HMs (n = 3,180; 3.6%). Approximately 4,000 HMs graduate yearly from the Department of Defense Medical Education and Training Campus at Fort Sam Houston, Texas and 253 HMs obtained certification in 2014. About 6.3% (253/4,000) HMs obtained National EMT Certification in 2014, which is a nationally recognized standard for entry-level competence utilized by civilian EMTs and other branches of the military. More information about those HMs that obtain certification may help Commanders maximize the number of HMs obtaining certification. Mandating National EMT

  8. Frequency and risk factors associated with emergency medical readmissions in Galway University Hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, J

    2010-06-01

    Unplanned readmissions of medical hospital patients have been increasing in recent years. We examined the frequency and associates of emergency medical readmissions to Galway University Hospitals (GUH).

  9. Using Computer and Internet for Medical Literature Searching Among Medical Students in Hadramout University, Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Salim Bin Ghouth

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some researchers have observed that medical students used computer and internet for nonmedical purposes. Is this the case among medical students in a newly established medical college of Hadramout University in Yemen?Objectives: To assess the knowledge and usage of computer and internet among medical students of Hadramout University, find out the medical applications for which they use internet, and the factors that encourage the students to use computer and internet, with an emphasis on gender variations.Methods: In a cross-sectional study, data were collected from 102 randomly selected students from second to sixth year at the academic year 2005/2006 by using structured questionnaire of 23 items. Results: Seventy four students have computer at home (73%, 77 students use internet for general purposes (76.2% and lesser use internet for educational and research purposes, with significant gender variations. The students opined that accessibility of internet in the college (84.2% and training about online searching (74.3% were the most expected factors to improve using of internet for medical research.Conclusion: Incorporating online search of medical literature in curriculum planning is essential to improve the student skills in research.

  10. Medical students’ assessment preferences at King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek Tawfik Amin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tarek Tawfik Amin1, Feroze Kaliyadan2, Nouria Saab Al-Muhaidib31Community Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo, Egypt; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Dermatology Section; 3Vice Dean for Female Students, College of Medicine, King Faisal University, Saudi ArabiaObjective: To assess the preferred methods for assessment among medical students at both preclinical and clinical stages of medical education and the possible correlates that promote these preferences.Subjects and methods: All medical students from the third year onwards were surveyed. A self-administered anonymous questionnaire was designed to gather information on the preferred assessment method for course achievement. The preferred methods were also evaluated in relation to cognitive functions. Preference for specific exam format, in the form of multiple choices, short essay questions, or both, and the stated reasons for that preference, was also included in the questionnaire.Results: Out of 310 questionnaires distributed, 238 were returned. Written tests, projects, portfolios, and take home exams were the preferred modes for assessing students’achievements in a course; oral tests including a viva voce were the least preferred type of assessment. Questions that tested the domains of ‘understanding’ and ‘application’ were the most preferred type while those entailing ‘analysis’ were the least preferred. Multiple choice question format was the most preferred type of question (68.7% at both pre- and clinical stages.Conclusion: Students’ assessments at the College of Medicine, King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia, do not use the full range of cognitive domains. The emphasis on higher domains for medical students’ assessment incorporating critical thinking should increase as the students’ progress through their medical courses.Keywords: medical students, assessment, exams, multiple choices, essay

  11. The historic and national aspects of medical ethics and deontology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prikhoda Igor' Viktorovich

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Researches of problems of medical ethics and deontology in activity of the medical worker presented. Historical and national aspects of the delivered problem are considered. They open diversity and complexity of realization of problems of formation of the person of the medical worker. The humanism in medicine makes its ethical basis and morals. The humanism serves moral development of the person of the medical worker. Without humanism the medicine loses the right on existence. Its scientific and professional principles conflict to its basic purpose - to serve the person.

  12. 78 FR 24802 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC... nationally recognized council of emergency medical services representatives and consumers, is to advise and... (NHTSA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice--National Emergency...

  13. 76 FR 22166 - Renewal of Charter for the National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... of the National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council to provide advice and recommendations regarding emergency medical services (EMS) matters to the U.S. Department of Transportation, National... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Renewal of Charter for the National Emergency...

  14. Ready for university? A cross national study on students' perceived preparedness for university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, E.P.W.A.; van der Meer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Students' preparedness for higher education is seen as one of the main factors affecting first-year attrition or study success. In this paper we report on a cross-national study in which students' preparedness for university was measured before students commenced their study at a university in New Z

  15. Internet use and addiction among medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mainul Haque,1 Nor Azlina A Rahman,2 Md Anwarul Azim Majumder,3 Seraj Zohurul Haque,4 Zubair M Kamal,5 Zakirul Islam,6 ATM Emdadul Haque,7 Nor Iza A Rahman,8 Ahmed Ghazi Alattraqchi8 1Unit of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Defense Health, National Defense University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, 2Department of Biomedical Science, Kulliyyah of Allied Health Sciences, Kuantan, Malaysia; 3Department of Clinical Sciences, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Bradford, 4School of Medicine, University of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital & Medical School, Dundee, UK; 5Sleep Research Unit, Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada; 6Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Eastern Medical College, Comilla, Bangladesh; 7Department of Medical Education, Universiti Kuala Lumpur Royal College of Medicine Perak (UniKL RCMP, Ipoh, 8Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia Background: The use of Internet has now become indispensable, and the technology has revolutionized the medical education and practice worldwide. Currently, medical students and professionals have an enormous opportunity to keep them always updated with the exponential growth of knowledge because of potential progression of Internet throughout the world that enables them to become a lifelong learner. Internet addiction is a widespread phenomenon among students and academicians at universities in Malaysia. Students use the Internet for recreational purpose and personal and professional development. The Internet has become an integral part of day-to-day life of the university students, including medical students. The aim of the present study was to examine the Internet use and addiction among students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study in which a questionnaire, Internet Addiction Diagnostic Questionnaire, developed by the Center

  16. Comparisonof depression prevalence in medical students between the first and last years of Birjand University of Medical Sciences: Brief Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Rahmani Bidokhti

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: Apparently, prevalence of depression in medical students in Birjand university of Medical Sciences is high, although studying medicine is not significantly decisive in the occurrence of the problem.

  17. The United Nations University and Sustainable Mountain Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Itaru Yasui

    2005-01-01

    @@ The United Nations University (UNU) is an international community of scholars engaged in research, postgraduate training and knowledge dissemination on the pressing global problems of human survival, development and welfare that are concerns of the United Nations, its peoples and member states. UNU works through a global network of its own research and training centers and programmes, and of associated and collaborating institutions and scholars.

  18. Attitude, Knowledge and Skill of Medical Students Toward E-Learning Kerman University Of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okhovati M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available  Aims: According to the development of e-learning and its high efficiency on the development of Iran’s universities, level of knowledge and the attitude of the students to this modern method of education and indeed students’ skills in using it needed to be assessed to improve the quality and quantity of universities’ education. This study aimed to determine the attitude, knowledge and skill of medical students toward e-learning at Kerman University of Medical Sciences.  Instrument & Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study that was performed in 2013, 196 students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences were selected using proportional stratified sampling method. The research instrument was a valid and reliable questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient, ANOVA and independent T tests by SPSS 19 software.  Findings: The level of knowledge and skill of the students toward e-learning was “moderate” and their attitude was “high”. There were significant relationships between knowledge and skill (p=0.001 r=0.82 and also knowledge and attitude (p=0.001 r=0.37 but there was no significant relationship between skill and attitude (p=0.35 r=0.82. The scores of knowledge and skill were significantly different according to sex, but attitude had no significant difference with sex.  Conclusion: Kerman University of Medical Sciences’ students have a positive attitude to e-learning but according to their moderate knowledge and skills, performing this method of learning is not welcomed in this university.

  19. Reflections: Evolution of PBL in the International Medical University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hla-Yee-Yee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces the evolution of PBL inthe International Medical University over a periodof twenty years; since its inception in 1992 till 2012.It is a record of the reasons for the evolution, the peopleinvolved and the strategies adopted. The PBL in IMUhas metamorphosed over the years from a paper-basedcomplete case history into its present form of staggeredrelease of information, paper-based or otherwise (videos,web-based, newspaper cuttings, debates. Strategies toimprove student and facilitator buy-in, strengtheningof facilitator training, adoption of PBL templates,innovations to improve student participation arediscussed.

  20. University libraries and the indispensable changes in Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elinor Dulzaides Iglesias

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with some aspects related with university libraries as an ideal environment to articulate science, knowledge and culture and the need of reorganization of structures and functions within these institutions. We make reference to the changes in the Higher Educational System, which have an impact in other teaching levels. We discuss the new challenges in information and knowledge management and conditions in Medical Science field to adapt traditional methods to the new environment. We discuss how to support the required transformations to turn libraries into research and educational centres.

  1. Competencias médicas y su evaluación al egreso de la carrera de medicina en la Universidad Nacional de Cuyo (Argentina Medical competences and their assessment at the end of the undergraduate medical program at the National University of Cuyo (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Reta de Rosas

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Los alumnos de la Carrera de Medicina, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, deben aprobar para su egreso, una Prueba Global de Ciclo Clínico. Con el objeto de analizar qué evaluar y qué instrumentos utilizar, se diseñó este trabajo tomando como marco teórico la Educación Basada en Competencias, en la que el curriculum debe ajustar el proceso de aprendizaje a los resultados esperados. Se entrevistó a médicos, pacientes, enfermeros, empleadores, docentes y alumnos (N=147. Se definieron seis competencias médicas y 51 componentes en total. Con esta información se realizó una encuesta a docentes (N=50 y se evaluó la significatividad de las diferencias de las respuestas obtenidas. Esto permitió reestructurar y reducir a 27 los componentes de las competencias. Se realizó una última consulta con la técnica Delphi (N=40, con el objeto de elegir el instrumento para evaluar cada componente y el momento de la carrera para hacerlo. De los veintisiete, veinticuatro deberían evaluarse durante el ciclo clínico, dieciséis al finalizar la carrera y tres en primer año. Los instrumentos más elegidos fueron: observación del desempeño con pacientes, evaluación continua con retroalimentación y exámenes orales y escritos. A partir de estos resultados, se dispone de una definición de las competencias y sus componentes para el ejercicio profesional, una selección de los instrumentos y el momento de la carrera en que deben evaluarse, el aval de la comunidad educativa para ambos productos y una base para establecer un sistema de evaluación para todo el curriculum.In order to graduate, medical students at the National University of Cuyo have to pass a mandatory global clinical exam. This research project was designed to analyze what that exam should assess as well as the instruments to be used. The project employed the paradigm of Outcome-Based Education, which establishes that the curriculum must adjust the learning

  2. ASSESSMENT OF MEDICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT IN EDUCATIONAL HOSPITALS OF TEHRAN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Dehghani, K. Azam, F. Changani, E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The management of medical waste is of great importance due to its potential environmental hazards and public health risks. In the past, medical waste was often mixed with municipal solid waste and disposed in residential waste landfills or improper treatment facilities in Iran. In recent years, many efforts have been made by environmental regulatory agencies and waste generators to better managing the wastes from healthcare facilities. This study was carried in 12 educational hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The goals of this study were to characterize solid wastes generated in healthcare hospitals, to report the current status of medical waste management and to provide a framework for the safe management of these wastes at the considered hospitals. The methodology was descriptive, cross-sectional and consisted of the use of surveys and interviews with the authorities of the healthcare facilities and with personnel involved in the management of the wastes. The results showed that medical wastes generated in hospitals were extremely heterogeneous in composition. 42% of wastes were collected in containers and plastic bags. In 75% of hospitals, the stay-time in storage sites was about 12-24h. 92% of medical wastes of hospitals were collected by covered-trucks. In 46% of hospitals, transferring of medical wastes to temporary stations was done manually. The average of waste generation rates in the hospitals was estimated to be 4.42kg/bed/day.

  3. Accidental exposure to blood in medical interns of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, Batoul; Shahidzadeh-Mahani, Ali; Oveysi, Turadj; Akhlaghi, Hengameh

    2007-07-01

    Healthcare workers and medical students are at risk of exposure to blood-borne viruses such as HBV, HCV HIV, etc. Here we report the results of a survey of the frequency and causes of cutaneous blood exposure accidents (CBEA) among medical students. Anonymous questionnaires were randomly distributed to 200 interns in their second year of internship in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. A definite exposure was defined as injury by a sharp object causing obvious bleeding, whereas a possible exposure was defined as subtle or superficial injury due to contact with a contaminated instrument or needle but without bleeding, or contamination of an existing wound with blood or other body fluids. One hundred eighty-four subjects (92% of the original sample) responded to the questionnaire. We recorded 121 definite exposures and 259 possible exposures over a mean time interval of 14 months. Needles were the most common objects (41% of exposure episodes) causing CBEAs, while phlebotomy and suturing were the hospital procedures that accounted for the highest percentage of exposure episodes (30 and 28 percent, respectively). Only a minority of students regularly observed basic safety measures (wearing gloves, not recapping used needles and proper disposal of sharp objects). Considering the high incidence of blood exposure in medical interns at Tehran University of Medical Sciences and the ensuing risk of blood-borne infections, the subjects are likely to develop such infections during their internship period.

  4. Emotional Intelligence of Medical Residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Ghajarzadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, educators pay attention to emotional intelligence which is defined as the ability to monitor and explain one’s own and other’s emotional experience and feelings to differentiate between them as well as applying necessary information for determining thoughts and actions. The goal of this study was to determine emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. By means of two stage cluster sampling, 98 medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected. Participants were asked to fill valid and reliable Persian version of Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i questionnaire which had been developed due to Bar-On model. Seventy two filled-up questionnaires were returned (RR=73%. Mean EI score of all participants was 319.94 ± 32.4. Mean EI score was not significantly different between male and female also, single and married participants. EI did not differ significantly in residents in respect to their discipline. Mean responsibility subscale differ significantly between male and female participants (P=0.008. Multiple regression analysis showed that happiness subscale is a predictive factor for total EI score (B=-0.32, P=0.009. Responsibility subscale differed significantly between men and women participants and happiness subscale was a good predictor for emotional intelligence score. These factors should be considered in education of medical residents.

  5. Modernizing and Transforming Medical Education at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisasi, Esther; Kulanga, Ahaz; Muiruri, Charles; Killewo, Lucy; Fadhili, Ndimangwa; Mimano, Lucy; Kapanda, Gibson; Tibyampansha, Dativa; Ibrahim, Glory; Nyindo, Mramba; Mteta, Kien; Kessi, Egbert; Ntabaye, Moshi; Bartlett, John

    2014-01-01

    The Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University (KCMU) College and the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) are addressing the crisis in Tanzanian health care manpower by modernizing the college’s medical education with new tools and techniques. With a $10 million MEPI grant and the participation of its partner, Duke University, KCMU is harnessing the power of information technology (IT) to upgrade tools for students and faculty. Initiatives in eLearning have included bringing fiber-optic connectivity to the campus, offering campus-wide wireless access, opening student and faculty computer laboratories, and providing computer tablets to all incoming medical students. Beyond IT, the college is also offering wet laboratory instruction for hands-on diagnostic skills, team-based learning, and clinical skills workshops. In addition, modern teaching tools and techniques address the challenges posed by increasing numbers of students. To provide incentives for instructors, a performance-based compensation plan and teaching awards have been established. Also for faculty, IT tools and training have been made available, and a medical education course management system is now being widely employed. Student and faculty responses have been favorable, and the rapid uptake of these interventions by students, faculty, and the college’s administration suggests that the KCMU College MEPI approach has addressed unmet needs. This enabling environment has transformed the culture of learning and teaching at KCMU College, where a path to sustainability is now being pursued. PMID:25072581

  6. Emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Mohammadifar, Mehdi

    2013-04-06

    Nowadays, educators pay attention to emotional intelligence which is defined as the ability to monitor and explain one's own and other's emotional experience and feelings to differentiate between them as well as applying necessary information for determining thoughts and actions. The goal of this study was to determine emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. By means of two stage cluster sampling, 98 medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected. Participants were asked to fill valid and reliable Persian version of Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i) questionnaire which had been developed due to Bar-On model. Seventy two filled-up questionnaires were returned (RR=73%). Mean EI score of all participants was 319.94 ± 32.4. Mean EI score was not significantly different between male and female also, single and married participants. EI did not differ significantly in residents in respect to their discipline. Mean responsibility subscale differ significantly between male and female participants (P=0.008). Multiple regression analysis showed that happiness subscale is a predictive factor for total EI score (B=-0.32, P=0.009). Responsibility subscale differed significantly between men and women participants and happiness subscale was a good predictor for emotional intelligence score. These factors should be considered in education of medical residents.

  7. Vichy France and the continuity of medical nationalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evleth, D

    1995-04-01

    This paper reviews the rise of medical nationalism and protectionism in France from the end of the nineteenth century through to the 1940s, with an emphasis on the Vichy period. It presents this nationalism as part of a continuity, showing its beginnings well before the coming of the Vichy government, its extremes under this government, and its continuation after the fall of the Vichy government, although retreating from its more extreme positions.

  8. Self-citation of Medical and Non-medical Universities in Northern Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahani, Mohammad Ali; Yaminfirooz, Mousa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Self-citation is one of the main challenges in the evaluation of researchers’ scientific output. This study aimed at comparing the institutional self-citation among the universities located in Northern Iran. Methods: This study was conducted as a scientometric study. Research population included all scientific productions of 16 Northern Iran Universities with at least 100 indexed documents indexed in the Web of Science (WoS) by 2 June 2015. The citation analysis section of WoS was used for data collection. SPSS was applied for data analysis. Study hypotheses were tested with two independent sample t-test and paired sample t-test. Results: Producing 16,399 papers, northern Iran universities had 5.33% of contribution in Iran’s scientific production. They received 84,058 citations with 17% and 12% of self-citations belonged to the non-medical and medical universities, respectively. Testing hypotheses revealed that increase in received citations significantly increases the rate of self-citation and increase in scientific production does not necessarily increase the rate of self-citation. Conclusion: The rate of self-citation in the studied universities was not relatively high. However, investigating into the factors affecting the rate of and motives for self-citation needs further research. PMID:28077903

  9. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE MEDICAL PERSONNEL PROTECTION INTERLOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUDA,S.; GMUR,N.F.; LARSON,R.; THOMLINSON,W.

    1998-11-03

    This report is founded on reports written in April 1987 by Robert Hettel for angiography operations at the Stanford Synchrotron Research Laboratory (SSRL) and a subsequent report covering angiography operations at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS); BNL Informal Report 47681, June 1992. The latter report has now been rewritten in order to accurately reflect the design and installation of a new medical safety system at the NSLS X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF). Known originally as the Angiography Personnel Protection Interlock (APPI), this system has been modified to incorporate other medical imaging research programs on the same beamline and thus the name has been changed to the more generic Medical Personnel Protection Interlock (MPPI). This report will deal almost exclusively with the human imaging (angiography, bronchography, mammography) aspects of the safety system, but will briefly explain the modular aspects of the system allowing other medical experiments to be incorporated.

  10. Satisfaction of Iranian Medical Universities' faculty members towards holding Shahid Motahari Annual Educational Festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyyed Nasrollah; Mohseni Band Pey, Anoshiravan; Hosseini, Seyyed Ali; Karami Matin, Behzad; Mirzaei Alavijeh, Mehdi; Jalilian, Farzad

    2015-10-01

    Shahid Motahari Annual Educational Festival aims to improve the quality of medical education in the Islamic Republic of Iran, and has held since 2008. The present study was performed to determine the satisfaction level of Iranian medical universities' faculty members about holding Shahid Motahari Annual Educational Festival during the past six years, from 2008 to 2014. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 473 faculty members (FMs) including deputies and educational administrators, managers, and faculty members of medical education development centers, members of scientific committees, and faculty members who participated in Shahid Motahari Festival from 42 medical sciences universities in Iran. Data collection instruments were two reliable and valid questionnaires on the background and also participants' satisfaction towards Shahid Motahari Educational Festival. Data were analyzed using SPSS Software, version 14. Among all participants, 30 FMs (6.3%) were educational deputies, 36 FMs (7.6%) managers of medical education development centers, 226 FMs (56.2%) members of scientific committees, 29 FMs (6.1%) members of the national committees, 343 FMs (27.5%) attendees, and 264 FMs (55.8%) had participated for retraining. The total satisfaction level of the participants was 73.3% which shows a good satisfaction level. The results identified the main important strength points such as "proposals' review process at the country level" and weakness points such as "organizing the festival".

  11. Ljubljana University Library: National and University Library, Slovenia, in the period 1938 -1943

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Kodrič-Dačič

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the history of the National and University Library from the period 1938 to 1943. The period begins in 1938 when the former State Studium Library became a part of the University of King Alexander I and changed its name to University Library, and ends with the collapse of the fascist Italy in 1943. After more than 150 years the Library lost its independent status and became fully subordinated to the University. At the very beginning of the Second World War it moved into the new library building. It had to adapt to the war conditions and cope with the requirements of the Italian occupation authorities.

  12. The Haskell Indian Nations University Model for Elementary Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Karen Gayton

    1995-01-01

    A four-year teacher education program at Haskell Indian Nations University (Kansas) prepares American Indians and Alaska Natives to teach Native American children. In addition to the knowledge needed by all teachers, the program focuses on knowledge relevant to American Indians, such as foundations of Indian education, learning styles of Indian…

  13. The Haskell Indian Nations University Model for Elementary Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Karen Gayton

    1995-01-01

    A four-year teacher education program at Haskell Indian Nations University (Kansas) prepares American Indians and Alaska Natives to teach Native American children. In addition to the knowledge needed by all teachers, the program focuses on knowledge relevant to American Indians, such as foundations of Indian education, learning styles of Indian…

  14. 77 FR 46802 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC... medical services representatives and consumers to provide advice and recommendations regarding Emergency... of Emergency Medical Services, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., NTI-140, Washington, DC 20590,...

  15. 77 FR 27278 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC... services representatives and consumers to provide advice and recommendations regarding Emergency Medical... Transportation, Office of Emergency Medical Services, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., NTI-140, Washington, DC...

  16. 77 FR 9297 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC... council of emergency medical services (EMS) representatives and consumers to provide advice and..., Director, U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of Emergency Medical Services, 1200 New Jersey...

  17. 76 FR 64174 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory... emergency medical services representatives and consumers to provide advice and recommendations regarding Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to DOT's NHTSA. DATES: The meeting will be held on December 13, 2011,...

  18. 77 FR 12908 - Appointment/Reappointment to the National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... the National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC). SUMMARY: NHTSA is soliciting... nationally recognized council of emergency medical services (EMS) representatives and consumers to provide..., Office of Emergency Medical Services, Attn: NEMSAC, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., NTI-140, Washington,...

  19. The medical school curriculum at University Malaysia Sabah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, P; Osman, A

    2005-08-01

    The integrated curriculum at the newly established medical school at University Malaysia Sabah is examined from aspects of the objectives of the medical training in achieving development of the required skills and knowledge as well as personal and professional development. The teaching is spread over five years with an emphasis on basic medical sciences in the first two years although the students are exposed to clinical skills right from the onset. A gradual transition to emphasis on the acquisition of clinical skills occurs from the third year onwards. However, community medicine and professional development are incorporated into the programme from the first year and are carried over to the final year. Although there are examinations to be passed in all the courses taught every semester, with a Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 3.0 (65 percentile score) and the candidate has to pass all the examinations in that year to clear a particular year, two professional examinations are administered, one at the end of the Third Year (end of the Phase I of the Medical Programme) and another at the end of the Fifth or Final year (end of the Phase II of the Medical Programme). Programmes for Postings, Shadow House Officers (SHOP) and Population Health are also incorporated into the curriculum. Delivery of the courses involve Lectures, Self-Learning Packages (SLP), Small Group Discussions (SGD), Seminars, Debates, Dramas, Video clips, Special Study Modules (SSM), Computer-Aided Instruction (CAI), Problem-based Learning (PBL), Problem-solving Sessions (PSS) and Clinical Skills Learning (CSL). The examination involves elements of continuous assessment and final end of semester or end of phases I and II Professional Examinations. Practical may involve Objective Structured Practical Examinations (OSPE) and/or Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE). They may also involve viva voce and/or short and long case presentations and assessment of log book entries.

  20. Evaluation of board performance in Iran's universities of medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Haniye Sadat; Maleki, Mohammadreza; Ravaghi, Hamid; Farzan, Homayoun; Aminlou, Hasan; Hadi, Mohammad

    2014-10-01

    The critical role that the board plays in governance of universities clarifies the necessity of evaluating its performance. This study was aimed to evaluate the performance of the boards of medical universities and provide solutions to enhance its performance. The first phase of present study was a qualitative research in which data were collected through face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Data were analyzed by thematic approach. The second phase was a mixed qualitative and quantitative study, with quantitative part in cross-sectional format and qualitative part in content analysis format. In the quantitative part, data were collected through Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MoHME). In the qualitative part, the content of 2,148 resolutions that were selected by using stratified sampling method were analyzed. Participants believed that the boards had no acceptable performance for a long time.RESULTS also indicated the increasing number of meetings and resolutions of the boards in these 21 years. The boards' resolutions were mostly operational in domain and administrative in nature. The share of specific resolutions was more than the general ones. Given the current pace of change and development and the need to timely respond them, it is recommended to accelerate the slow pace of improvement process of the boards. It appears that more delegation and strengthening the position of the boards are the effective strategies to speed up this process.

  1. [Problems in career planning for novice medical technologists in Japanese national hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Shu; Tsutaya, Shoji; Akimoto, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Keiya; Yabaka, Hiroyuki

    2012-12-01

    Skills and knowledge regarding many different types of test are required for medical technologists (MTs) to provide accurate information to help doctors and other medical specialists. In order to become an efficient MT, specialized training programs are required. Certification in specialized areas of clinical laboratory sciences or a doctoral degree in medical sciences may help MTs to realize career advancement, a higher earning potential, and expand the options in their career. However, most young MTs in national university hospitals are employed as part-time workers on a three-year contract, which is too short to obtain certifications or a doctoral degree. We have to leave the hospital without expanding our future. We need to take control of our own development in order to enhance our employability within the period. As teaching and training hospitals, national university hospitals in Japan are facing a difficult dilemma in nurturing MTs. I hope, as a novice medical technologist, that at least university hospitals in Japan create an appropriate workplace environment for novice MTs.

  2. National Apprenticeship and Training Standards for Emergency Medical Technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Developed jointly by several professional organizations and government agencies, these national standards depict the essential skills, knowledge, and ability required of certified emergency medical technicians (EMT) to provide optimal prehospital care and transportation to the sick and injured. Topics covered include definitions of terms EMT's…

  3. U.S. medical resident familiarity with national tuberculosis guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amorosa Valerianna C

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of medical residents training at U.S. urban medical centers to diagnose and manage tuberculosis cases has important public health implications. We assessed medical resident knowledge about tuberculosis diagnosis and early management based on American Thoracic Society guidelines. Methods A 20-question tuberculosis knowledge survey was administered to 131 medical residents during a single routinely scheduled teaching conference at four different urban medical centers in Baltimore and Philadelphia. Survey questions were divided into 5 different subject categories. Data was collected pertaining to institution, year of residency training, and self-reported number of patients managed for tuberculosis within the previous year. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to detect differences in median percent of questions answered correctly based on these variables. Results The median percent of survey questions answered correctly for all participating residents was 55%. Medical resident knowledge about tuberculosis did not improve with increasing post-graduate year of training or greater number of patients managed for tuberculosis within the previous year. Common areas of knowledge deficiency included the diagnosis and management of latent tuberculosis infection (median percent correct, 40.7%, as well as the interpretation of negative acid-fast sputum smear samples. Conclusion Many medical residents lack adequate knowledge of recommended guidelines for the management of tuberculosis. Since experience during training influences future practice pattterns, education of medical residents on guidelines for detection and early management of tuberculosis may be important for future improvements in national tuberculosis control strategies.

  4. 76 FR 39977 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Teleconference Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council... nationally recognized council of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) representatives and consumers to provide... proper arrangements. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Drew Dawson, Director, Office of Emergency...

  5. 77 FR 32952 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Intelligence Agency, National Intelligence... a closed meeting of the Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board...

  6. Clinical education stressors in medical trainees in Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momayyezi, Mahdieh; Fallahzadeh, Hossein; Momayyezi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Stress is an important factor in the educational process. Teaching and learning are stressful processes. This stress can affect one's ability and change his/her performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate stressors of clinical education from the perspective of medical students in Yazd University of Medical Sciences. This descriptive-analytic study was conducted in Yazd University of Medical Science during year 2014-2015. The sample size was 170 medical students who were selected randomly. The data were collected by a questionnaire including four components: interpersonal relationship, educational environment, clinical experience and the unpleasant emotions. A significance level of 0.05 was considered for analysis. The statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, ANOVA and T-tests, using SPSS software, version 14. The results showed that the highest domain score belonged to interpersonal relationship (3.33±0.3) followed by unpleasant emotions domain (3.3±0.3). The lowest domain score of clinical education stressors was educational environment (3.12±0.1). The results showed that the mean score of interpersonal relationship domain was more in women than in men (peffective factor in all dimensions of clinical education stressors. So proper measures such as the promotion of scientific awareness of teachers and educational staff about factors that lead to stress and the best way to communicate with students should be taken to reduce the students' stress.

  7. Depression in Nursing Students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Rafati

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: University students are important parts of all educational systems. They are susceptible to different psychiatric disturbances, which in turn may cause considerable problems with their course programs. Depression is among the most important indices for investigation on human mental health status. This research was planed to study the prevalence and characteristics of depression and its consequences (suicidality, hopelessness, etc. in nursing students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: All undergraduate nursing students at Fatemeh College of Nursing and Midwifery were tested with Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results: This research revealed that 60% of students were depressed, 34% of them had mild depression, 18.4% moderate, 6% relatively severe and 1.6% severe depression. Mean score of BDI was not significantly different between female and male subjects (13.8 ± 9 in females vs. 15.2 ± 10 in males; total 14.1 ± 11 Conclusions: This research shows that there is still a high proportion of University students having depression, which necessitates considerable attention to their problems. Keywords: Nursing Students, Beck Depression Inventory, Depression.

  8. HOW MEDICAL UNDERGRADUATES PREPARE FOR UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION: LESSON FROM A TEACHING MEDICAL INSTITUTION IN SOUTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shib Sekhar Datta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical colleges in India conventionally follow a curriculum overfed with large volume of information expecting students will imbibe such curriculum unquestionably overlooking what and how they progress. There have been many attempts to improve the learning process of medical students, neglecting the process which students adopt towards such learning and prepare for their exams aiming better performance. Objective: To explore qualitatively the way medical undergraduates prepare for their university examination. Methods: Present qualitative research was undertaken among medical interns during Nov-2011 to March-2012. FGDs were conducted by trained moderator using semi-structured guidelines and note taker recorded each FGD. Content analysis of FGDs was primarily oriented towards behaviour of medical undergraduates during preparatory phase before their university examinations like study pattern, study material, eating behaviour, level of stress, addiction etc. Qualitative content analysis of textual level of data was undertaken using Atlas.ti.5.0 software package. Results: Students are serious about studies just before examinations and refer to notes prepared by seniors, small books with important topics, and self-made notes. Girls depend predominantly on self-made notes. Students primarily focus on important topics in each subject. Time-in-hand decides what they study and try to remember before exams. They become casual about their diet, clothing and self-care. Stress, fear and high academic expectation often drive them towards addictive substances. They often suffer from loneliness and seek empathy from opposite sex batch mates, seniors, teachers and family members and start believing in their fortune and examiners' will rather than actual preparation. Conclusion: Students' psychology and culture should be addressed in harmony with curriculum reform for better learning by medical undergraduates.

  9. Medication therapy management clinic: perception of healthcare professionals in a University medical center setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the overall perception and utilization of the pharmacist managed medication therapy management (MTM clinic services, by healthcare professionals in a large, urban, university medical care setting.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, anonymous survey sent to 195 healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, and pharmacists at The University of Illinois Outpatient Care Center to determine their perception and utilization of the MTM clinic. The survey consisted of 12 questions and was delivered through a secure online application. Results: Sixty-two healthcare professionals (32% completed the survey. 82% were familiar with the MTM clinic, and 63% had referred patients to the clinic. Medication adherence and disease state management was the most common reason for referral. Lack of knowledge on the appropriate referral procedure was the prominent reason for not referring patients to the MTM clinic. Of the providers that were aware of MTM services, 44% rated care as ‘excellent’, 44% as ‘good’, 5% as ‘fair’, and 0% stated ‘poor’. Strengths of MTM clinic identified by healthcare providers included in-depth education to patients, close follow-up, and detailed medication reconciliation provided by MTM clinic pharmacists. Of those familiar with MTM clinic, recommendations included; increase marketing efforts to raise awareness of the MTM clinic service, create collaborative practice agreements between MTM pharmacists and physicians, and ensure that progress notes are more concise.Conclusion: In a large, urban, academic institution MTM clinic is perceived as a valuable resource to optimize patient care by providing patients with in-depth education as it relates to their prescribed medications and disease states. These identified benefits of MTM clinic lead to frequent patient referrals specifically for aid with medication adherence and disease state management.

  10. Collision course: the privatization of graduate medical education at one university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasko, Stephen K; Ekarius, John C

    2007-03-01

    On December 18, 2003, Tenet Healthcare Corporation, an investor-owned hospital corporation, announced the closure of Medical College of Pennsylvania Hospital, a historic institution that was home to many of Drexel University College of Medicine's (DUCOM's) faculty, residents, and medical students. The authors summarize the steps that were taken and lessons learned to avoid a disruption in the education of over 200 residents. The authors highlight the response by the medical school; the concerns of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME); the interaction between the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the ACGME; the importance of the designated institutional official (DIO) in a crisis situation; and the role of residents as students versus employees when their employer wishes to move or "trade" them to another institution. Through the lens of the DUCOM experience, the authors explore the legal, political, and educational conflicts that occur when an investor-owned company or private hospital employs residents but another entity holds moral and academic accountability for their future. Finally, the authors outline five lessons learned: (1) the important role the ACGME plays as the educational conscience of graduate medical education (GME), (2) the dramatically different roles that the ACGME and the CMS play in regulating and funding the national GME system, (3) the need for constant communication with the affected residents, (4) the important role that the DIO plays in GME, and (5) the need for medical school leaders to remain focused on their educational mission and responsibilities to young physicians.

  11. Research performance of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 1385 (April 2006- March 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Aminpour

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: One of the frequently used measures of research performance of a country or a university is counting the related scientific production. In the present study the number of scientific production including research projects, books, journal articles and conference proceedings published under the name of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences were identified and then compared with those reported by Iranian Ministry of Health and Medical Education for the year
    1384. The purpose of this study was to identify one-year research performance of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and to show the growth rate of scientific production of this university from 1384 to 1385. METHODS: The present cross-sectional study was carried out by reviewing related official documents and running advanced searches in some of the most important databases. The time limitation was set on 1385 hijri shamsi, which is equal to the beginning of April 2006 till the end of March 2007.
    RESULTS: During the period of the study, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences published 56 books. The total number of approved research projects was 1080, most of which (61.67% were descriptive studies. A total of 721 journal articles published by the university researchers of which 146 papers were indexed by ISI, 26 papers were indexed by MEDLINE, 194 papers were indexed by EMBASE, Scopus, Biological Abstracts, Chemical Abstracts and CINAHL, 318 articles were indexed by other databases. Only 37 articles published via non-indexed journals. 74.2% of the articles appeared in domestic journals while only 25.8% published in foreign journals. The total number of national and
    international conference proceedings was 726. The findings showed a significant increase (nearly 100% in all kinds of scientific productions compared to those published in 1384 except the published books. CONCLUTIONS: The present study

  12. Characteristics of undergraduate medical thesis of a Peruvian public university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Castro Maldonado

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The undergraduate thesis rather than a requirement to graduate, are a way of doing research. Previous studies show a thesis published between 2.7% to 17.6% in indexed journals. Objective: Describe the characteristics of the undergraduate thesis of the Faculty of a medical school. Bibliometric study. 221 theses were reviewed, collecting: Year, number of authors, advisers, and references, study population, and national priorities for health research. A search was performed on Google Scholar to assess publication. Descriptive statistics were used. Results: Being lower production in the years 2008-2010 was observed. 91.6% had one advisor, 76% descriptive, 82.8% in hospital population, and 62.4% of adults. Theses displayed between 2010-2014 72.9% did not correspond to any national health research priority. Only 6.8% was based on literature of the last five years. Only 9 (4.1% were published in a scientific journal indexed. Conclusions: The undergraduate thesis were characterized as descriptive, hospital, adults, literature based on outdated and not in line with the national priorities for health research. The publication is low.

  13. [Clinical study of laparoscopic adrenalectomy in Sapporo Medical University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Masumori, Naoya; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Itoh, Naoki; Takahashi, Atsushi; Matsukawa, Masanori; Kunishima, Yasuharu; Kato, Ryuichi; Miyao, Noriomi; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to identify the surgical outcome and complications of laparoscopic adrenalectomy at Sapporo Medical University Hospital. One hundred fifty-six patients underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy due to primary aldosteronism in 64 (41.0%), Cushing's syndrome in 34 (21.8%), endocrinological non-functioning tumors in 27 (17.3%), pheochromocytoma in 23 (14.7%) and others. The median time of the surgery was 140 minutes (range 70 to 345) and the median volume of blood loss was 10 ml (0-1,200). From 1999, the operation time was around the median time of this study and from 2006, it was commonly below the median time of this study. There were 4 cases (2.6%) with complications; however, no severe cases occurred. In conclusion, laparoscopic adrenalectomy in our hospital has been performed safely as a standard treatment.

  14. [The assessment of health behaviours among Warsaw Medical University students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowska, Alicja; Szewczyńiski, Jerzy A

    2002-01-01

    Some health behaviours among 228 students of Warsaw Medical University (130 women and 98 men) using anonymous questionnaire were examined. Percentage of smokers among female and male students was similar (13.1% and 14.3% respectively). Among respondents the greatest frequency of drinking alcohol was from a few times weekly to a few times monthly. Male students drunk alcohol more often than female ones. Beer was prefered by men, wine and beer--by women. Only male students (10.2%) used drugs (amphetamine, marihuana). About 1/3 of respondents did not do any sports. Female students had better knowledge about objective factors of their health status (blood pressure, blood glucose and cholesterol level) compared to males ones.

  15. Organizational behavior of employees of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargahi, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Organizational behaviors are commonly acknowledged as fundamentals of organizational life that strongly influence both formal and informal organizational processes, interpersonal relationships, work environments, and pay and promotion policies. The current study aims to investigate political behavior tendencies among employees of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). This cross-sectional, descriptive and analytical study was conducted on 810 TUMS employees at the headquarters of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran during 2010-2011. The research tool for data collection was a researcher-tailored questionnaire on political behaviors. The validity of the questionnaire was confirmed by seven management professors, and its reliability was tested by a pilot study using test-retest method which yielded a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.71. The respondents were asked to fill the questionnaire and express their perceptions and tendencies to engage in organizational behaviors. The collected data was read to and analyzed by IBM SPSS environment and correlation analytical methods. Overall, 729 respondents filled and returned the questionnaire yielding a response rate of 90%. Most of the respondents indicated that they had no tendency to engage in political behavior. Moreover, we found that there was a significant correlation between sex, higher education degrees, tenure and the employees' tendency to engage in political behavior. The participants were not overtly political because of their personal belief, ethical values, and personal characters. Non-political and overtly political employees are both prejudicial for all organizations. Therefore, it seems that the medium rate of good political behavior is vital and prevalent in Iranian organizations.

  16. Principles of Pedagogy in Teaching in a Diverse Medical School: The University of Capetown South Africa Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Julia Johnson; Holland, Errol

    This paper describes a 2-month project developed by the Sage Colleges (New York) and the University of Capetown Medical School in South Africa to help the medical faculty at the Capetown Medical School teach its newly diverse student body. The program is intended to improve student retention and it emphasizes the need for faculty to assure…

  17. Satisfaction of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences\\' alumni about the quality of medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J. Mirmohammadi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In order to achieve acceptable quality in educations, the quality of learning should be assessed. opinion of alumni in assessment of the quality of education is important, This study aims to assess the quality of medical education in basic and clinical sciences according to the opinion of alumni of Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences during 2008-2012 Method: This cross-sectional study conducted on alumni graduated from 2008-2012. Data was collected using a questionnaire which validity and reliability was confirmed. The questions were asked from 183 individuals were interviewed by telephone in 2012. Results: Mean satisfaction score of quality of education was 3.86/5 and 3.18/5 for basic and clinical sciences, respectively. The average satisfaction score for regular presence of faculty members in classes was 4.11/5 and 3.98/5 for basic and clinical sciences, respectively. The difference between the two groups regarding the satisfaction from quality of education was not diufferent (P=0.237. However, this difference was significant for satisfaction from regular presence in classes and time spent for education (P<0.001. Conclusion: The condition of education in Yazd University of Medical Sciences was satisfactory from the alumni viewpoint and the satisfaction level was higher for basic sciences than clinical science education.

  18. Medicalization of global health 4: the universal health coverage campaign and the medicalization of global health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocalyn Clark

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Universal health coverage (UHC has emerged as the leading and recommended overarching health goal on the post-2015 development agenda, and is promoted with fervour. UHC has the backing of major medical and health institutions, and is designed to provide patients with universal access to needed health services without financial hardship, but is also projected to have ‘a transformative effect on poverty, hunger, and disease’. Multiple reports and resolutions support UHC and few offer critical analyses; but among these are concerns with imprecise definitions and the ability to implement UHC at the country level. A medicalization lens enriches these early critiques and identifies concerns that the UHC campaign contributes to the medicalization of global health. UHC conflates health with health care, thus assigning undue importance to (biomedical health services and downgrading the social and structural determinants of health. There is poor evidence that UHC or health care alone improves population health outcomes, and in fact health care may worsen inequities. UHC is reductionistic because it focuses on preventative and curative actions delivered at the individual level, and ignores the social and political determinants of health and right to health that have been supported by decades of international work and commitments. UHC risks commodifying health care, which threatens the underlying principles of UHC of equity in access and of health care as a collective good.

  19. Medicalization of global health 4: The universal health coverage campaign and the medicalization of global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jocalyn

    2014-01-01

    Universal health coverage (UHC) has emerged as the leading and recommended overarching health goal on the post-2015 development agenda, and is promoted with fervour. UHC has the backing of major medical and health institutions, and is designed to provide patients with universal access to needed health services without financial hardship, but is also projected to have 'a transformative effect on poverty, hunger, and disease'. Multiple reports and resolutions support UHC and few offer critical analyses; but among these are concerns with imprecise definitions and the ability to implement UHC at the country level. A medicalization lens enriches these early critiques and identifies concerns that the UHC campaign contributes to the medicalization of global health. UHC conflates health with health care, thus assigning undue importance to (biomedical) health services and downgrading the social and structural determinants of health. There is poor evidence that UHC or health care alone improves population health outcomes, and in fact health care may worsen inequities. UHC is reductionistic because it focuses on preventative and curative actions delivered at the individual level, and ignores the social and political determinants of health and right to health that have been supported by decades of international work and commitments. UHC risks commodifying health care, which threatens the underlying principles of UHC of equity in access and of health care as a collective good.

  20. Beginnings and development of English teaching in the medical university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trinidad Atiés Caballero

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Various authors have claimed the imperious necessity and significance of the acknowledgement and domain of the English language as a cultural means and way of communication among men. The present study aims an approximation to the teaching of this language in its diverse stages, starting from its beginnings up to its present situation in the Cuban Medical School. Here are stated the different approaches and methods that have engulfed the English teaching and its relations with the pedagogical and theoretical conceptions that have emerged, along with the criteria and judgments of the ones who dedicated their works to this field. Taking into consideration that the various pedagogical theories, the educational systems, the organization, the content and the teaching methods are determined by the conditions of the society's material life, whose development is influenced at a time; a revision and valorization of these conditions in different societies are carried out, as an important cause of the different pedagogical theories, methods and teaching approaches applied in the different schools, for example, in the Cuban Medical University.

  1. Photodynamic research at Baylor University Medical Center Dallas, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Aronoff, Billie L.; Judy, Millard M.

    1993-03-01

    We received our first CO2 laser at Baylor University Medical Center in December 1974, following a trip to Israel in January of that year. Discussion with the customs office of the propriety of charging an 18% import tax lasted for nine months. We lost that argument. Baylor has been using lasers of many types for many procedures since that time. About ten years ago, through the kindness of Tom Dougherty and Roswell Park, we started working with photodynamic therapy, first with hematoporphyrin I and later with dihematoporphyrin ether (II). In February 1984, we were invited to a conference at Los Alamos, New Mexico, U.S.A. on medical applications of the free electron laser as part of the Star Wars Program. A grant application from Baylor was approved that November, but funding did not start for many months. This funding contributed to the development of a new research center as part of Baylor Research Institute. Many of the projects investigated at Baylor dealt with applications of the free electron laser (FEL), after it became available. A staff was assembled and many projects are still ongoing. I would like to outline those which are in some way related to photodynamic therapy.

  2. Evaluation of Fiji National University Campus Information Systems

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    Kumar, Bimal Aklesh

    2011-01-01

    Fiji National University (FNU) has been encountering many difficulties with its current campus administrative systems. These difficulties include accessibility, scalability, performance, flexibility and integration. In order to address these difficulties, we developed a thin client web based campus information system. The newly designed system allows the students, academic and administration staff of the university to handle their day to day affairs with the university online. In this paper we describe three types of evaluation carried out to determine the suitability of newly developed system for FNU environment. User interface evaluation was carried out to assess user interface on a set of usability principles, usability evaluation to see the ease at which users can use the system and finally performance evaluation to verify and validate user response time required to complete various tasks. The result of each of these evaluations were analysed and the system was rectified as part of iterative design proces...

  3. Meeting the challenges of training more medical students: lessons from Flinders University's distributed medical education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Ian D; Worley, Paul S

    2010-07-05

    To use data from an evaluation of the Flinders University Parallel Rural Community Curriculum (PRCC) to inform four immediate challenges facing medical education in Australia as medical student numbers increase. Thematic analysis of data obtained from focus groups with medical students undertaking the PRCC, a year-long undergraduate clinical curriculum based in rural general practice; and individual interviews with key faculty members, clinicians, health service managers and community representatives from 13 rural general practices and one urban tertiary teaching hospital in South Australia. Data were collected in 2006 and re-analysed for this study in January 2009. Participants' views grouped around the themes of the four identified challenges: how to expand the venues for clinical training without compromising the quality of clinical education; how to encourage graduates to practise in under-served rural, remote and outer metropolitan regions; how to engage in a sustainable way with teaching in the private sector; and how to reverse the current decline in altruism and humanism in medical students during medical school. Participants' views supported the PRCC approach as a solution to the challenges facing Australian medical education. The enabling capacity of the PRCC's longitudinal integrated approach to clinical attachments was revealed as a key factor that was common to each of the four themes. The continuity provided by longitudinal integrated clinical attachments enables an expansion of clinical training sites, including into primary care and the private sector. This approach to clinical training also enables students to develop the skills and personal qualities required to practise in areas of need.

  4. Energy use baselining study for the National Naval Medical Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, G.B.; Halverson, M.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report provides an energy consumption profile for fourteen buildings at the National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) in Bethesda, Maryland. Recommendations are also made for viable energy efficiency projects funded with assistance from the servicing utility (Potomic Electric Power Company) in the form of rebates and incentives available in their Demand Side Management (DSM) program and through Shared Energy Savings (SES) projects. This report also provides estimates of costs and potential energy savings of the recommended projects.

  5. National Coal Board Medical Service annual report 1981-82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    Sections report on: medical examinations and consultations; protection from health hazards, such as pneumoconiosis and other prescribed diseases; problems such as vitamin D in miners' blood, Legionnaires' disease, rehabilitation and physiotherapy, high pressure injection injuries, pump packing; National Coal Board (Coal Products) Ltd.; injuries and treatment; and nursing service. A list of staff and their publications and a supplement on occupational toxicology are included.

  6. Knowledge of triage in the senior medical students in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOSSEIN MAHMOODIAN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Triage is a response to the problem of overcrowding in Emergency Departments (EDs and accuracy of decisions made by the triage unit affects the ultimate outcome of EDs. This study was conducted to evaluate the knowledge of triage among last year medical students in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This is a cross-sectional analytical study whose subjects were all the senior students of medicine (62 in the last year of medicine from January to June 2013 who attended emergency medicine course in the screen room of 2 University Hospitals. This questionnaire was designed in 3 sections including personal data, 15 questions on knowledge of triage and 10 case scenarios for triage decision making and completed by the students. Statistical analysis was performed in SPSS statistical software (version 14 using independent sample t-test, one way ANOVA, and Pearson correlation coefficient (p≤0.001. Results: The total mean score of the participants was 10.6±1.5, ranging from 7 to 13. 58(93.5% students had poor triage knowledge. In the scenario’s section, the percentage of correct triage by students was 49.2% and those of over and under triage were 28.1% and 22.7%, respectively. There was a significant relationship between the triage accuracy and level of triage (ESI 4 (p≤0.001. Conclusion: The level of knowledge of triage in the last year medical students was poor, although most of them had passed a course in the screen room. It is recommended that medical students’ educational courses should include sections on the knowledge of triage in emergency rooms.

  7. References from Brazilian medical journals in national publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Renan Kleber Costa; Botelho, Nara Macedo; Petroianu, Andy

    2013-01-01

    To assess whether there is a preference for international journal citation to the detriment of national ones in ten Brazilian medical journals, in two different periods. All references in the articles published in Arquivos Brasileiros de Oftalmologia, Revista Brasileira de Cirurgia Cardiovascular, Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira, São Paulo Medical Journal, Arquivos Brasileiros de Endocrinologia e Metabologia, Clinics, Jornal Brasileiro de Pneumologia, Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical, Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria e Acta Ortopédica Brasileira in the years 2011 and 2007 were analyzed, assessing the number of articles published in national and international journals. A total of 36,125 references from 1,462 articles published in the 10 aforementioned journals were analyzed. Of the total number, 4.242 (11.74%) were from Brazilian journals. There was no significant difference between the two analyzed periods. A total of 453 (30,98%) of the articles studied non-cited brazilian papers,and 81 (5.54%) articles had more Brazilian than international references. Of total references analyzed, 11.74% were related to articles published in Brazilian journals. This number, when compared to the percentage of Brazilian articles published in the medical area, demonstrates a good number of citations of national articles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Nutritional knowledge of medical students studying in clinical courses of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2012

    OpenAIRE

    H Mozaffari-Khosravi; Vaziri, N; A. Mohammadimanesh; Z. Naderi; H. Daneshbodi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nutrition is one of the important components of health promotion and disease prevention. However, nutrition literacy of medical students is unclear. This study aims to determine nutritional knowledge of medical students studying in clinical course of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 114 medical students in clinical course of Shahid Sadoughi hospital were randomly selected. Nutritional knowledge questionnaire was comp...

  9. The intercalated BSc (Med) Honours/MB ChB and integrated MB ChB/PhD tracks at the University of Cape Town: models for a national medical student research training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, A A; Futter, M; Mayosi, B M

    2014-02-01

    The Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Cape Town is addressing the shortage of clinician-scientists in South Africa by introducing two research training tracks in parallel with the professional MB ChB programme, namely the intercalated BSc (Med) Hons/MB ChB track and the integrated MB ChB/PhD track. The BSc (Med) Hons/MB ChB track is available to MB ChB students who have completed the first two years of study. The track comprises a course in Molecular Medicine given concurrently with the MB ChB third-year curriculum, followed by a BSc (Med) Hons as a 'year out' of MB ChB. Subsequently students may enroll into the integrated MB ChB/PhD track that enables them to undertake a PhD concurrently with MB ChB studies, which will be spread over additional years, or alternatively to undertake a PhD after completion of the MB ChB. These tracks, which were launched in 2011, represent an opportunity to train a new cadre of young African clinician-scientists at the undergraduate level.

  10. Evaluation of self-medication practices in acute diseases among university students in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Al Flaiti

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of self-medication among university students was very high. There is a need for intensive education and comprehensive awareness campaign to advocate for reduction in the prevalence of self-medication practices among students.

  11. Tobacco Smoking Habits Among First Year Medical Students, University of Prishtina, Kosovo: Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çuperjani, Frederik; Elezi, Shkëlzen; Lila, Albert; Daka, Qëndresë; Dakaj, Qëndrim; Gashi, Sanije

    2015-06-01

    Tobacco smoking remains the leading causes of preventable morbidity and mortality in the world, requiring intensified national and international public health response. World Health Organization (WHO) has urged health professional organizations to encourage and support their members to be models for not using tobacco products and promote tobacco-free culture. Healthcare students are the future authority of the health society, they are in a position to play a vital role and have impact on social norms related to smoking. To determine the prevalence of tobacco smoking among healthcare students of Medical Faculty, University of Prishtina in Kosovo, so that recommendations can be made for its cessation among healthcare providers and thereafter the community. Descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using self-administrated questionnaire prepared for this purpose. A total of 284 first year healthcare students of Medical Faculty, University of Prishtina in Kosovo were enrolled in the study. The data were analyzed using SPSS 22. All respondents completed the questionnaire, giving a response rate of 100% (general medicine=180, dentistry = 104). The prevalence of students who have ever smoked was 53.2%. However, only 8.9% (9.1% M vs. 8.7% F) of the general medicine students and 5.8% (4.8% M vs. 6.5% F) of dentistry students declared that smoke tobacco every day. Overall, the research shows that the prevalence of occasional smokers among medical students in Kosova is quite high.

  12. Canadian National Guidelines and Recommendations for Integrating Career Advising Into Medical School Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howse, Kelly; Harris, June; Dalgarno, Nancy

    2017-04-25

    Career planning, decision making about specialty choice, and preparation for residency matching are significant sources of stress for medical students. Attempts have been made to structure and formalize career advising by including it in accreditation standards. There is an expressed need for national guidelines on career advising for medical students. The Future of Medical Education in Canada Postgraduate (FMEC PG) Implementation Project was created to ensure Canadian medical trainees receive the best education possible. From this, a diverse sub-working group (SWG), representing different Canadian regions, was formed to review career advising processes across the country. The SWG developed, through a modified formal consensus methodology, a strategy for medical student career advising that is adaptable to all schools in alignment with existing accreditation standards. The SWG outlined five guiding principles and five essential elements for Canadian universities offering an MD degree with recommendations on how to integrate the elements into each school's career advising system. The five essential elements are a structured approach to career advising, information about available career options, elective guidance, preparation for residency applications, and social accountability. This Perspective endorses the view of the FMEC PG Implementation Project that national guidelines are important to ensure Canadian medical schools are consistently meeting accreditation standards by providing reliable and quality career advising to all medical students. The SWG's position, based on national and provincial feedback, is that these guidelines will stimulate discourse and action regarding the requirements and processes to carry out these recommendations nationwide and share across borders.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and

  13. Absenteeism among medical and health science undergraduate students at Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Desalegn, Anteneh Assefa; Berhan, Asres; Berhan, Yifru

    2014-01-01

    Student absenteeism is a major concern for university education worldwide. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and causes of absenteeism among undergraduate medical and health sciences students at Hawassa University...

  14. The value of a writing center at a medical university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariail, Jennie; Thomas, Suzanne; Smith, Tom; Kerr, Lisa; Richards-Slaughter, Shannon; Shaw, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    Students often enter graduate healthcare/biomedical schools with insufficient undergraduate instruction in effective writing, yet the ability to write well affects their career opportunities in health care and in scientific research. The present study was conducted to determine the value and effectiveness of instruction by faculty with expertise in teaching writing at a writing center at an academic health science center. Two separate sources of data were collected and analyzed. First, an anonymous campus-wide survey assessed students' satisfaction and utilization of the university's Writing Center. Second, a nonexperimental objective study was conducted comparing a subsample of students who used versus those who did not receive instruction at the Writing Center on quality of writing, as determined by an evaluator who was blind to students' utilization status. From the campus-wide survey, more than 90% of respondents who used the center (which was 26% of the student body) agreed that it was a valuable and effective resource. From the objective study of writing quality, students who used the Writing Center were twice as likely as students who did not to receive an A grade on the written assignment, and the blinded evaluator accurately estimated which students used the Writing Center based on the clarity of writing. The instruction at the Writing Center at our university is highly valued by students, and its value is further supported by objective evidence of efficacy. Such a center offers the opportunity to provide instruction that medical and other healthcare students increasingly need without requiring additions to existing curricula. By developing competency in writing, students prepare for scholarly pursuits, and through the process of writing, they engage critical thinking skills that can make them more attuned to narrative and more reflective and empathetic in the clinical setting.

  15. Comparison of Iranian National Medical Library with digital libraries of selected countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare-Farashbandi, Firoozeh; Najafi, Nayere Sadat Soleimanzade; Atashpour, Bahare

    2014-01-01

    University of California in classic services, Count Way Library of Medicine in digital services, and Library of Finland in public services. The results of this study show that among the digital libraries investigated, most provided similar public, digital, and classic services and The Iranian National Medical library has been somewhat successful in providing these services compared to other digital libraries. One can also conclude that the difference in services is at least in part due to difference in environments, information needs, and users. Iranian National Medical Library has been somewhat successful in providing library services in digital environment and needs to identify the services which are valuable to its users by identifying the users' needs and special characteristics of its environment.

  16. Debate: Limitations on universality: the "right to health" and the necessity of legal nationality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morley Christopher P

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The "right to health," including access to basic healthcare, has been recognized as a universal human right through a number of international agreements. Attempts to protect this ideal, however, have relied on states as the guarantor of rights and have subsequently ignored stateless individuals, or those lacking legal nationality in any nation-state. While a legal nationality alone is not sufficient to guarantee that a right to healthcare is accessible, an absence of any legal nationality is almost certainly an obstacle in most cases. There are millions of so-called stateless individuals around the globe who are, in effect, denied medical citizenship in their countries of residence. A central motivating factor for this essay is the fact that statelessness as a concept is largely absent from the medical literature. The goal for this discussion, therefore, is primarily to illustrate the need for further monitoring of health access issues by the medical community, and for a great deal more research into the effects of statelessness upon access to healthcare. This is important both as a theoretical issue, in light of the recognition by many of healthcare as a universal right, as well as an empirical fact that requires further exploration and amelioration. Discussion Most discussions of the human right to health assume that every human being has legal nationality, but in reality there are at least 11 to 12 million stateless individuals worldwide who are often unable to access basic healthcare. The examples of the Roma in Europe, the hill tribes of Thailand, and many Palestinians in Israel highlight the negative health impacts associated with statelessness. Summary Stateless individuals often face an inability to access the most basic healthcare, much less the "highest attainable standard of health" outlined by international agreements. Rather than presuming nationality, statelessness must be recognized by the medical community

  17. Evaluation of information literacy status among medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazrafkan, Leila; Hayat, Ali Asghar; Abbasi, Karim; Bazrafkan, Aghdas; Rohalamini, Azadeh; Fardid, Mozhgan

    2017-01-01

    The information literacy status and the use of information technology among students in the globalization age of course plans are very momentous. This study aimed to evaluate the information literacy status and use of information technology among medical students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2013. This was a descriptive-analytical study with cross-sectional method. The study population consisted of all medical students (physiopathology, externship and internship) studying at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The sample size (n=310) was selected by systematic random sampling. The tool of data gathering was LASSI questionnaire (assigned by America research association) with 48 closed items in five-point LIKERT scale. The questionnaire included two distinct parts of demographic questions and the information literacy skills based on the standards of information literacy capacities for academic education. The content validity was acquired by professors' and experts' comments. The reliability was also calculated by Cronbach'salpha (0.85). Data were analyzed in both descriptive (frequency- mean) and analytical level (t-test, analysis of variance) using SPSS 14 software. 60.3% of the participants were females, and the remaining (29.7%) were males. The mean score of information literacy and its five subgroups among the students weren't at a desirable level. The mean scores of information literacy for educational grades from the highest to lowest belonged to the internship, physiopathology and externship. The results showed that the highest average was related to the effective access ability to information among interns (9.27±3.57) and the lowest one was related to the ability of understanding legal and economical cases related with using information among externs (3.11±1.32).The results of ANOVA showed that there wasn't a significant difference between educational grades and information literacy. Finally, the result of independent t-test did not show a

  18. Evaluation of information literacy status among medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEILA BAZRAFKAN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The information literacy status and the use of information technology among students in the globalization age of course plans are very momentous. This study aimed to evaluate the information literacy status and use of information technology among medical students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study with crosssectional method. The study population consisted of all medical students (physiopathology, externship and internship studying at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The sample size (n=310 was selected by systematic random sampling. The tool of data gathering was LASSI questionnaire (assigned by America research association with 48 closed items in five-point LIKERT scale. The questionnaire included two distinct parts of demographic questions and the information literacy skills based on the standards of information literacy capacities for academic education. The content validity was acquired by professors’ and experts’ comments. The reliability was also calculated by Cronbach’s alpha (0.85. Data were analyzed in both descriptive (frequency- mean and analytical level (t-test, analysis of variance using SPSS 14 software. Results: 60.3% of the participants were females, and the remaining (29.7% were males. The mean score of information literacy and its five subgroups among the students weren’t at a desirable level. The mean scores of information literacy for educational grades from the highest to lowest belonged to the internship, physiopathology and externship. The results showed that the highest average was related to the effective access ability to information among interns (9.27±3.57 and the lowest one was related to the ability of understanding legal and economical cases related with using information among externs (3.11±1.32. The results of ANOVA showed that there wasn’t a significant difference between educational grades and information literacy

  19. [Tobacco smoking amongst students in the Medical Faculty of Wroclaw Medical University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpas, Donata; Jasińska, Ajicja; Wojtal, Mariola; Sochocka, Lucyna; Seń, Mariola

    2007-01-01

    The main aim of health promotion and diseases profilaxis is a struggle with smoking, which is a well known factor in many disorders, i.e. malignant carcinomas, noncarcinomatous diseases of respiratory system and cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the study was the analysis of the smoking level amongst the students of 6th year of the Medical Faculty of Wroclaw Medical University. Amongst 131 polled women--116 were non-smoking persons (88.5%), 15 smoking (11.5%). Amongst 55 polled men--43 these are non-smoking persons (78%), 12 smoking (22%). Out of smoking women, the most women (6) is smoking from 11 to 15 cigarettes per day, out of smoking men, the most (5 men)--6-10 cigarettes per day. Smoking women began smoking during the secondary school the most often. 8 of men began the smoking in the secondary school. The majority of examined didn't try to limit smoking. Respondents would expect the biggest support from close persons during giving up smoking Only 59% of women and 64% of men disagree definitely to smoking in their presence. In the consequence of above results surprising seems still high percentage of smokers amongst examined, scantiness of taking attempts of giving up smoking and indifference of non-smoking medical students towards smoking in their presence.

  20. Medical universities in Austria: impact of curriculum modernization on medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischka, Martin

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade medical education in Austria has seen more changes than in the whole of the previous century, with a complete overhaul of the structure of undergraduate curricula. Curricula now are organized in thematic, integrated modules, students have early patient encounters, the number of examinations has been drastically reduced, objective examinations have been introduced throughout the entire course as has skills training, and quality management is assured. As a consequence of the judgement of the European Court in 2005 against discrimination and in favour of equal treatment of EU citizens, free enrolment was abandoned and admission tests were introduced. In postgraduate training, licensing examinations are now obligatory. Crucial results from the point of view of students as well as with regard to the supply of manpower to the health care system are a sharp decrease in the formerly extremely long mean duration of study programmes and a sharp fall in drop-out rates. The now fully autonomous medical universities have the opportunity to intensify collaboration and to embark on a process of continuous renewal. Structural reform of undergraduate and postgraduate curricula will eventually ensure full equality of Austrian and other European medical qualifications.

  1. Medical universities in Austria: impact of curriculum modernization on medical education [

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lischka, Martin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] During the last decade medical education in Austria has seen more changes than in the whole of the previous century, with a complete overhaul of the structure of undergraduate curricula. Curricula now are organized in thematic, integrated modules, students have early patient encounters, the number of examinations has been drastically reduced, objective examinations have been introduced throughout the entire course as has skills training, and quality management is assured. As a consequence of the judgement of the European Court in 2005 against discrimination and in favour of equal treatment of EU citizens, free enrolment was abandoned and admission tests were introduced. In postgraduate training, licensing examinations are now obligatory. Crucial results from the point of view of students as well as with regard to the supply of manpower to the health care system are a sharp decrease in the formerly extremely long mean duration of study programmes and a sharp fall in drop-out rates. The now fully autonomous medical universities have the opportunity to intensify collaboration and to embark on a process of continuous renewal. Structural reform of undergraduate and postgraduate curricula will eventually ensure full equality of Austrian and other European medical qualifications.

  2. Quality of life of medical students in Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad; Majdzadeh, Reza; Pasalar, Parvin; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the quality of life (QOL) of Tehran University of Medical Sciences' (TUMS) medical students at different educational levels and specify the most important factors related to this quality. A sample of 242 medical students was selected randomly, given their number in three educational levels (basic sciences, physiopathology-stager and intern). The QOL was measured by WHOQOL-BREF. The students obtained average high score in two psychological and environmental health domains, and low score in physical health and social relationship domains. As the educational level of students increased their quality of life decreased at all four domains. At social relationship domain, the female students had overall better situation as compared to males (p=0.009). The female and male students had opposite condition at the level of basic sciences and internship, in a way that the female students earned higher marks at basic sciences level and the males at internship level (P= 0.008). The condition of female students in terms of environmental, physical and psychological health became static while their education rose. However, only environmental health of the male students reduced as their education level increased (P= 0.05). The students were of undesirable conditions in two domains of social relationship and physical health. Internship is a specific level in both groups which has a negative impact on the dimensions of quality of life and naturally needs more care for the students. Married status improved the students' QOL and could moderate the undesired effects of internship.

  3. Can dimensions of national culture predict cross-national differences in medical communication?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeuwesen, L.; Brink, A. van den; Hofstede, G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated at a country level how cross-national differences in medical communication can be understood from the first four of Hofstede's cultural dimensions, i.e. power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism/collectivism and masculinity/femininity, together with nati

  4. Medical Tourism and the Libyan National Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Taguri A

    2007-01-01

    recognized location of choice for quality healthcare and an integrated centre of excellence for clinical and wellness services, medical education and research [2]. An international medical travel conference (IMTC was held in December 2006 and some web sites such as ArabMedicare.com were established to accompany the needs of this growing market.In spite of the aforementioned rewards, medical tourism is not without risks [3]. Medical tourism can do harm to national health services of the host as well as the country of origin. Besides cultural and language issues, there are risks inherent in traveling as accidents, exposure to different infectious diseases, risks from traveling soon after surgery, impossibility of treating chronic disease after a single consultation, the non familiarity of how a certain specialty applies to other communities, the on-off consultations, the limited possibility for follow up, the absence of record of the consultation [3], and most importantly fraud and abuse.The total amount of money spent by Libyans on both forms of medical tourism is difficult to estimate. It ranges between $100-200 millions per year for treatment abroad, but the accurate figures are not available. The form of medical tourism where doctors rather than patients travel, gained a momentum with the increased role of private practice in health service delivery. There is a real threat from the growing market of medical tourism in the region on the public health oriented national health system in Libya. The two neighboring countries that are mostly visited by Libyans have a lower performance of National Health Service in comparison to Libyan National Health services with an objective assessment as revealed by infant mortality rate, life expectancy at birth, maternal mortality ratio and proportion of low birth weight [7]. Giving the non-popularity of tourism among the Libyan population, traveling in itself is an important event in one’s life. We should not deny that in many cases

  5. Systematic Education of Self-Medication at Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narui, Koji; Samizo, Kazuo; Inoue, Michiko; Watanabe, Kinzo

    2016-01-01

    The promotion of self-medication by pharmacies, with the aim of encouraging a patient's self-selection of proper OTC drug, is written about in the national action plan "Japan is Back". The subject of self-medication has been improved in the 2013 revised edition of "Model Core Curriculum for Pharmaceutical Education". At Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, the systematic education of self-medication was started from the onset of the six-year course in the third, fourth and fifth grade. We introduce here a new approach in our systematic education of self-medication. In the practice of the fourth grade, groups of around 5-6 students are formed. The pharmacy students assume various roles-of pharmacist, rater, observer, and chairman-and perform role-playing. We prepared a standardized patient (SP) showing various symptoms. The student of the role of pharmacist asks about the SP's symptoms, chooses an OTC drug suitable for the SP, and explains the OTC drug to the SP. After the role-playing, those in the roles of rater, observer, SP, and faculty give feedback to the student who played the role of pharmacist. Because we conduct this role-playing using SPs with a variety of symptoms, we can create a situation similar to a real drugstore.

  6. Ethnic Museum of the Central University for Nationalities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    THE Central University for Nationalities Ethnic Museum houses over 20,000 cultural relics relating to China’s 56 ethnic groups. The majority of these are traditional costumes and ornaments that examplify expertise on the part of ethnic minorities in weaving, dying, embroidery and tannage. Some are decades, and others centuries old. Exhibits such as the gifts to Chairman Mao Zedong and the central government in the early days of the People’s Republic from the Panchen Lama, Dalai Lama, and ethnic minorities across China are of great political and historical significance.

  7. Banned prints in the National and University Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozina Švent

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the formation and operation of the D-collection (a special collection of banned prints in the National and University Library (NUL. The functioning of the collection was constantly faced with different complications caused either by legislation or by librarians themselves, due to a too strict adherence to some unwritten rules ("better one more then one less". In the 50-years period, a unique collection of at that tirne banned prints was formed,complemented by over 17000 articles indexed from different periodicals.

  8. 民族地区高等医学院校学生干部激励机制探析--以右江民族医学院为例%Analysis of the Incentive Mechanism for Student Cadres in Medical Colleges in Minority Areas---Taking Youjiang Medical University for Nationalities as an Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄乙静; 陈国湘

    2013-01-01

    Cultivation of college student cadres can form good role models among students.It is of great significance to promote the efficiency and ordering of student management.Taking Youjiang Medical College for Nationalities as an example ,this paper analyzed the reasons why the cadres group in medical colleges of the minority areas lacking working enthusiasm ,and relative countermeasures were discussed.The problems will be solved mainly by the incentive mechanism consisting of the management system of student cadres ,the training system ,the construction system of working platforms for students ,the reward and pun‐ishment system ,and the spiritual incentive mechanism.%  高校学生干部的培养对在学生当中形成良好的示范作用、推进高效有序的学生管理有着重要的意义。本文以右江民族医学院为例分析了民族地区高等医学院校学生干部群体中工作积极性缺失的原因,并进行了对策探讨,即主要通过构建由学生干部管理制度、培训制度、学生工作平台建设制度、奖惩制度、精神激励机制等组成的激励体系来解决存在的问题。

  9. Mineral physics and mineral chemistry at the Australian National University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Ian

    Research at the Australian National University (ANU) in Canberra into the physics and chemistry of minerals is being actively carried out by a number of different research groups within the Research School of Earth Sciences (RSES), the Research School of Chemistry (RSC), and the Department of Geology. The research schools form part of the Institute of Advanced Studies, which is a national center for research and postgraduate training established by the Australian Government in 1946. The Institute of Advanced Studies seeks to ensure flexibility in its approach to research by maintaining an unusually high ratio (>1) of nontenured to tenured staff. Two types of nontenured appointment are available: postdoctoral fellowships of 1-2 yr duration and research fellowships tenable for 3-5 yr. The Department of Geology, as part of the Faculty of Science, is responsible for the provision of undergraduate education in geology, in addition to its role in research and postgraduate training.

  10. 78 FR 49332 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC... nationally recognized council of emergency medical services representatives and consumers, is to advise and... Transportation, Office of Emergency Medical Services, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., NTI-140, Washington, DC...

  11. How can university and national libraries achieve deeper collaboration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K. Follett

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Governments are placing great store in "the knowledge economy" as a key engine for economic and social development in a post-manufacturing world. One result is an acceptance for much increased expenditure on research and advanced teaching and there is much debate, at least in the UK, about how these matters should be organised. Since much of the research (excluding defence and virtually all the graduate teaching will be undertaken in the universities it follows that one key question in the UK is just what proportion and number of the 100 UK universities should be truly "research-intensive"? The trend, although it can be exaggerated, is towards greater concentration and last year I estimated (Follett, 2002 that the faculty in about 12 of the universities will spend on average 50% of their working year on research and graduate teaching, and 50% on undergraduate teaching. In another 30 universities faculty will spend about 25% of their annual working year on research and 75% on undergraduate teaching. In the remaining 60 universities the time available for research will be much smaller. A second key question relates to the "research infrastructure" needed to support the researchers. It is my contention that access to world-class "research information resources" - at a reasonable cost - is a pre-requisite for any nation's research base. In parallel, of course, the actual means of providing those "research information resources" is changing rapidly and the existing provision through "local" research libraries in individual universities or research institutes, often set alongside other services from the "national" library, is under both financial and technological strain: · Electronic provision of delivering research information "direct to the desk-top" has inverted the means of delivery. This has been developed most strongly in the natural sciences but is likely to develop in all areas of research. · The generation of primary research data on a

  12. Medical Residents’ Viewpoints on Clinical Training Status of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahtab Ordoei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical training is an important process in residency academic program in different fields. In this cross-sectional descriptive study, we identified the views of clinical residents about clinical training status at Yazd University of Medical Sciences at their second-year of residency or above. We used questionnaire as the instrument for collecting information and select all residents as the sample of study. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistical tests. Clinical training status was assessed to be at an intermediate level by residents, and the areas of evaluation method, resources and facilities, training system, performance, performance of personnel of therapeutic departments, and resident’s performance received the highest score, respectively. Areas of evaluation method and facilities were determined as strengths, and areas of the performance of therapeutic department’s personnel and residents as the weaknesses of clinical training.

  13. Effect of Facebook on the life of Medical University students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Facebook is a social networking service launched in February 2004, owned and operated by Facebook, Inc. As of June 2012, Facebook reports more than 1 billion active users. Objective of study was to evaluate the effect of Facebook on the social life, health and behavior of medical students. Methodology It was a cross sectional, observational and questionnaire based study conducted in Dow University OF Health Sciences during the period of January 2012 to November 2012. We attempted to interview all the participants who could be approached during the period of the study. Participants were MBBS students, while all students of other courses and programs were taken as exclusion criteria. Approximately 1050 questionnaires were distributed to participants. Fifty questionnaires were rejected due to incomplete answers, yielding 1000 usable responses for an approximate 95% response rate. Informed verbal consent was taken from each participant. Study was ethically approved by Institutional Review Board of Dow University of Health Sciences. All the data was entered and analyzed through SPSS 19. Result Out of total 1000 participants, males were 400 (40%) and females were 600 (60%). Participants were in the age group of 18–25 years with a mean age of 20.08 years. Most of the participants were using Facebook daily (N = 640, 64%) for around 3–4 hours (N = 401, 40.1%). Majority of them (N = 359, 35.9%) believed that they were equally active on Facebook and in real life while few believed their social life became worse after start using Facebook (N = 372, 37.2%). Most of the participants admitted that they were considered as shy in real world (N = 390, 39.0%) while in the world of Facebook they were considered as fun loving by their friends (N = 603, 60.3%). A large number of participants (N = 715, 75%) complained of mood swings. Conclusion Youngsters are willing to compromise their health, social life, studies for the sake of fun and

  14. Effect of Facebook on the life of Medical University students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Hassan; Patel, Hamza; Aslam, Hafiz Muhammad; Ansari, Iqra Qamar; Khan, Mariya; Iqbal, Noureen; Rasheed, Hira; Jabbar, Qamar; Khan, Saqib Raza; Khalid, Barira; Nadeem, Anum; Afroz, Raunaq; Shafiq, Sara; Mustafa, Arwa; Asad, Nazia

    2013-10-17

    Facebook is a social networking service launched in February 2004, owned and operated by Facebook, Inc. As of June 2012, Facebook reports more than 1 billion active users. Objective of study was to evaluate the effect of Facebook on the social life, health and behavior of medical students. It was a cross sectional, observational and questionnaire based study conducted in Dow University OF Health Sciences during the period of January 2012 to November 2012. We attempted to interview all the participants who could be approached during the period of the study. Participants were MBBS students, while all students of other courses and programs were taken as exclusion criteria. Approximately 1050 questionnaires were distributed to participants. Fifty questionnaires were rejected due to incomplete answers, yielding 1000 usable responses for an approximate 95% response rate. Informed verbal consent was taken from each participant. Study was ethically approved by Institutional Review Board of Dow University of Health Sciences. All the data was entered and analyzed through SPSS 19. Out of total 1000 participants, males were 400 (40%) and females were 600 (60%). Participants were in the age group of 18-25 years with a mean age of 20.08 years. Most of the participants were using Facebook daily (N = 640, 64%) for around 3-4 hours (N = 401, 40.1%). Majority of them (N = 359, 35.9%) believed that they were equally active on Facebook and in real life while few believed their social life became worse after start using Facebook (N = 372, 37.2%). Most of the participants admitted that they were considered as shy in real world (N = 390, 39.0%) while in the world of Facebook they were considered as fun loving by their friends (N = 603, 60.3%). A large number of participants (N = 715, 75%) complained of mood swings. Youngsters are willing to compromise their health, social life, studies for the sake of fun and entertainment or whatever satisfaction they get

  15. An Investigation of GEPT Test Anxiety for Medical University Students in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-huei; Lai, Ching-Ju; Liao, Hung-Chang

    2013-01-01

    This study examines whether or not different medical university students experience different levels of anxiety in taking the General English Proficiency Test (GEPT), and whether or not there are differences in GEPT test anxiety levels among medical university students with different genders and from different departments. This study uses a GEPT…

  16. [Evaluation of using statistical methods in selected national medical journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sych, Z

    1996-01-01

    The paper covers the performed evaluation of frequency with which the statistical methods were applied in analyzed works having been published in six selected, national medical journals in the years 1988-1992. For analysis the following journals were chosen, namely: Klinika Oczna, Medycyna Pracy, Pediatria Polska, Polski Tygodnik Lekarski, Roczniki Państwowego Zakładu Higieny, Zdrowie Publiczne. Appropriate number of works up to the average in the remaining medical journals was randomly selected from respective volumes of Pol. Tyg. Lek. The studies did not include works wherein the statistical analysis was not implemented, which referred both to national and international publications. That exemption was also extended to review papers, casuistic ones, reviews of books, handbooks, monographies, reports from scientific congresses, as well as papers on historical topics. The number of works was defined in each volume. Next, analysis was performed to establish the mode of finding out a suitable sample in respective studies, differentiating two categories: random and target selections. Attention was also paid to the presence of control sample in the individual works. In the analysis attention was also focussed on the existence of sample characteristics, setting up three categories: complete, partial and lacking. In evaluating the analyzed works an effort was made to present the results of studies in tables and figures (Tab. 1, 3). Analysis was accomplished with regard to the rate of employing statistical methods in analyzed works in relevant volumes of six selected, national medical journals for the years 1988-1992, simultaneously determining the number of works, in which no statistical methods were used. Concurrently the frequency of applying the individual statistical methods was analyzed in the scrutinized works. Prominence was given to fundamental statistical methods in the field of descriptive statistics (measures of position, measures of dispersion) as well as

  17. Effect of Brief Behavioral Intervention Program in Managing Stress in Medical Students from Two Southern California Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Bughi, Stephanie A.; Sumcad, Jennifer; Bughi, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The study aims to assess 1) the prevalence of stress among a group of third and fourth year medical students (MS) from two Southern California universities and 2) the effect of a brief behavioral intervention program (BBIP) on stress management among the students instructed on stress intervention techniques. The stress level was determined by using the General Well Being Scale (GWBS), a self-report questionnaire designed by the National Center for Health Statistics.1 The stress testing was do...

  18. An Evaluation of Graduates\\' Theses at Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Mozaffari Khosravi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Writing the thesis is one of the first experiences of university students. It is usually conducted satisfactorily under the advice an advisor. Yet, there are some problems in this regard. Objectives : The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the quality of the medical and dental theses at Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences. Methods and Materials : This was a qualitative observational study conducted on 30% of medical theses and all the dental theses at Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences during 1992-2002. The characteristics and features of the different parts of the theses were recorded in a questionnaire. Then, the quality score was calculated for each thesis. Results : In this study, 215 (76.2% volumes of theses of medical students and 67 (23.8% volumes of theses of dentistry students were studied and reviewed. Most of the theses studied (13.8% related to internal medicine, and least of them (1.8% related to pathology. The majority of the theses (92.7% were of experimental research type, and 2.5% included case studies.95.7% of the theses were appropriate regarding title characteristics. Almost 19% of them lacked the part "Statement of the Problem" and 43.2% were deficient in this part. 40.7% of the theses (52% of medical theses and 6% of dental theses lacked "Review of Literature". Only 51.6% of them (40.7% of medical theses and 86.4% of dental theses possessed a "Review of Literature" that was quite related to the thesis topic. In approximately 5.8% of the theses, there was no direct reference to the objectives. For 12.4% of theses, the objectives have been stated accurately while for 81.8% of them this was not the case. Regarding objectives, the medical theses were in a better state and showed a statistically significant correlation with the dental theses. Regarding the part "Results", in 6.9% of the theses, specific objectives have not been stated clearly. 82.6% reached completely to the preset

  19. Internet use and addiction among medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haque, Mainul; A. Rahman, Nor; Azim Majumder, Md. Anwarul; Haque, Seraj Zohurul; Kamal, Zubair M; Islam, Zakirul; Haque, ATM Emdadul; Rahman, Nor Azlina A; Alattraqchi, Ahmed Ghazi

    2016-01-01

    ... of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Defense Health, National Defense University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, 2Department of Biomedical Science, Kulliyyah of Allied Health Sciences, Kuantan, Malaysia...

  20. ON EXPERIENCE OF THE COLLABORATION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM PODIO IMPLEMENTATION IN THE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii V. Semenets

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Information Technologies role in the medical university management is analyzed. The importance of the application of the electronic document management in the medical universities is shown. The implementation capabilities of the electronic document management system within a cloud services are shown. A Podio collaboration and project management cloud service features overview is presented. The methodology of the Podio capabilities usage to the medical university task management solving is developed. An approaches to the Podio Workspaces and Applications development for the faculties collaboration and project management in the departments of the medical universities are presented. The examples of the Podio features usage to the work-flow automation of the information-analytical and hardware and software support departments of the Ternopil State Medical University named after I. Ja. Horbachevsky are shown.

  1. A Study of Medical Students\\' Viewpoints at Zahedan Medical University on the Effects of the Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Roudbari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The course "Health IV" and "consulting room" are two resources of learning about the method of preparing proposal and passing the final thesis for medical students at Zahedan University of Medical Sciences (ZUMS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the students' viewpoints on the effects of "Health IV" and consulting room on their final theses (pl. of thesis. Methods : The sample in this descriptive study included 155 medical students of ZUMS who had registered their theses at the school. The study was conducted during 2005-2006 and the data were collected using a questionnaire and analyzed via descriptive statistics of correlation and Chi-square test. Results : The findings of the study revealed that 38.1% of the students agreed or completely agreed with integrating the two courses "Research Methods" and "Health IV". Also, 43.9% of the subjects disagreed or completely disagreed with it. Approximately, 35% of the students used the services of the consulting room in writing their proposals. The effect of this service on the final thesis was low and very low in 10.3%, moderate in 12.3%, and high and very high in 20% of the students. About 25.8% of the subjects used the room services in conducting their theses, 61.3% did not use the services. The percent of the students who used the room in writing the proposal or doing their theses or did not use it at all was 85%. The effect of the room on conducting the thesis project was low and very low in 7.1%, moderate in 11.6%, and high and very high in 20%. Conclusion : The high amount of agreement with the complete integration of the "Research Methods" and "Health IV" needs more investigation. Also, the necessity of the consulting room should be revised by the manager and its continuation should be on the students' demands.

  2. Medical students' perceptions of the educational environment at an Iranian Medical Sciences University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazel Ismaeil

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Students' perceptions of their educational environment have a significant impact on their behavior and academic progress. The aim of this study was to assess the perceptions of medical students concerning their educational environment at Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences in Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study, questionnaires were distributed to 210 medical students and 182 were analyzed (response rate = 86.6%; twenty-eight questionnaires were excluded because they were incomplete or unreturned for analysis. Data were collected using a DREEM questionnaire which comprised 50 items based on the Likert scale (scores could range from 0 to 200. There were five domains to the questionnaire including students' perceptions of learning, students' perceptions of teachers, students' academic self-perceptions, students' perceptions of atmosphere and students' social self-perceptions. Data were analyzed using SPSS16 software. Results The mean age of the subjects was 21.7 years (SD = 2.7; 38.5% were male and 61.5% were female. Students' perceptions of learning, students' perceptions of teachers, students' academic self-perceptions, students' perceptions of atmosphere, students' social self-perceptions and total DREEM score were 21.2/48, 24.2/44, 15.8/32, 23.8/48, 14.5/28 and 99.6/200, respectively. There was no significant difference between male and female students in educational environment subscales, but there were significant differences between students enrolled on a basic sciences and pathophysiology course and those enrolled on a clinical course in terms of perceptions of learning, academic self-perceptions, perceptions of atmosphere and overall perceptions of educational environment (p Conclusion Overall, respondents assessed the educational environment as average. Therefore, improvements are required across all five domains of the educational environment.

  3. Antibiotics self-medication among medical and nonmedical students at two prominent Universities in Benghazi City, Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F Ghaieth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trivial use of antibiotics is a major reason for the spread of antibiotics resistance. The aim behind undertaking this investigation was to study the prevalence antibiotics self-medication among university students in Benghazi city. Methods: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional, survey was conducted at both Libyan International Medical University and Benghazi University. A total of 665 copies of questionnaires was distributed. A total of 363 forms were completed and returned (response rate 55%. Remaining responses were either with no antibiotics use history within the past 1 year or were provided incomplete. Results: Among the respondents, 45% were males and 55% females. Males practiced self-medication more compared to females. Approximately, 43% and 46% from medical and nonmedical students, respectively, were antibiotics self-medicated. A total of 153 students (42% out of total respondents administered antibiotics for symptoms related to respiratory problems, among which 74 students (48% took antibiotics based on doctor′s prescription. Among the respondents, 94 students (27% who had antibiotics, were covered under medical insurance, and 19 (29% of the medically insured students had antibiotics without doctor′s prescription. About 14% of students did not complete their antibiotics course. Of these, 57% were medical students, and 43% were nonmedical students. The rate of self-medication among higher classes was more as compared to lower classes. About 58% of students overdosed the antibiotic, while 15% had antibiotics for <3 days, for treatment of ailments such as acne, toothache, diarrhea, earache, and tonsillitis. About 75% of students purchased the antibiotics in consultation with a pharmacist. Conclusion: Self-medication is a frequent problem among university students in Benghazi city. There is a need for an immediate intervention to address this malpractice among both students and medical practitioners.

  4. Antibiotics self-medication among medical and nonmedical students at two prominent Universities in Benghazi City, Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaieth, Mohamed F; Elhag, Sara R M; Hussien, Mamoun E; Konozy, Emad H E

    2015-01-01

    Trivial use of antibiotics is a major reason for the spread of antibiotics resistance. The aim behind undertaking this investigation was to study the prevalence antibiotics self-medication among university students in Benghazi city. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional, survey was conducted at both Libyan International Medical University and Benghazi University. A total of 665 copies of questionnaires was distributed. A total of 363 forms were completed and returned (response rate 55%). Remaining responses were either with no antibiotics use history within the past 1 year or were provided incomplete. Among the respondents, 45% were males and 55% females. Males practiced self-medication more compared to females. Approximately, 43% and 46% from medical and nonmedical students, respectively, were antibiotics self-medicated. A total of 153 students (42%) out of total respondents administered antibiotics for symptoms related to respiratory problems, among which 74 students (48%) took antibiotics based on doctor's prescription. Among the respondents, 94 students (27%) who had antibiotics, were covered under medical insurance, and 19 (29%) of the medically insured students had antibiotics without doctor's prescription. About 14% of students did not complete their antibiotics course. Of these, 57% were medical students, and 43% were nonmedical students. The rate of self-medication among higher classes was more as compared to lower classes. About 58% of students overdosed the antibiotic, while 15% had antibiotics for <3 days, for treatment of ailments such as acne, toothache, diarrhea, earache, and tonsillitis. About 75% of students purchased the antibiotics in consultation with a pharmacist. Self-medication is a frequent problem among university students in Benghazi city. There is a need for an immediate intervention to address this malpractice among both students and medical practitioners.

  5. Quality of Ambulatory Education from the Viewpoint of the Clinical Medical Students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Niroumand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ambulatory education is an integral part of medical education. The present study was carried out to evaluate the quality of ambulatory education from the viewpoint of clinical medical students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, the study sample included medical externs externs and interns of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences that were selected through census sampling technique in the academic year 2012-2013. The instrument for data collection was a researcher-made questionnaire with acceptable validity and reliability. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS-16 software using descriptive statistics. Results: 65 (50% externs and 75 (65% interns participated in the study and 1588 questionnaires were completed via self-administered technique. The mean of the teachers’ quality of ambulatory education at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences was 22.6±5.2 and the mean for the clinics’ quality of physical environment was 19±5.13, indicating favorable and semi-favorable status, respectively. Qualitative evaluation of ambulatory education from the viewpoint of externs and interns showed a significant difference with more satisfaction from the part of the interns (p<0.001. Conclusion: The findings revealed that the teachers’ quality of ambulatory education at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences was favorable, but the physical condition of the clinics indicated a semi-favorable status.

  6. National prescribing trends for heart failure medications in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Brady S; Price, Jack F

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) in adults has changed considerably over the past decade, and these changes have coincided with a reduction in inpatient mortality. At this time, national trends in medication prescribing among children hospitalized with ADHF are unknown. The Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) database was queried to identify all patients ≤21 years of age who were admitted from 2001 to 2010 with ADHF and a diagnosis of cardiomyopathy. Patients were excluded for potential infectious or inflammatory etiologies of heart failure, congenital heart disease, cardiovascular surgery, acute heart transplant rejection, or isolated diastolic dysfunction. Only the index admission was used, and descriptive statistical methods were employed. A total of 1773 patients (55.8% male) met study criteria (mortality 6.9%). Median length of stay was 9 days (IQR 4-16 days). Vasopressor or inotropic agents were used in 63.6% of patients (milrinone in 82.9% of these) and diuretics in 90.1% (furosemide in 98.4% of these). At discharge, a beta-blocker was prescribed in 36.8% of patients (carvedilol in 77.1% of these), and an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor was prescribed in 69.6% (enalapril in 59.9% of these). A wide variability in prescribing practices over time and by pediatric hospital was noted, along with a trend for decreased inotrope use and an increase in beta-blocker discharge prescribing. This is the first national evaluation of prescribing trends in pediatric ADHF medication. A large degree of variability in medication use for ADHF and low rates of beta-blocker and ACE inhibitor use at discharge were identified. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND OTHER LIFESTYLE HABITS OF MEDICAL STUDENTS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COSTA RICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Jiménez Morgan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Those engaged in medical sciences are social models. For this reason, their daily habits influence their professional practice and the primary prevention they carry out. The main purpose of this research was to determine whether this group of medicine training students, all from University of Costa Rica, met national and international recommendations regarding health and wellness regulations. In 2014, second semester, anonymous questionnaires were applied to all undergraduate medical students from first year to seniors (n= 216. Based on this information, some personal data was gathered such as smoking habits, alcohol intake, fruit and vegetable consumption, and the amount of physical activities they practiced. According to this evidence, 52.91% drank alcohol beverages while the prevalence of active smokers was low (3.39%. Furthermore, although they accomplished the national and international standards related to fruit and vegetable consumption, 40% of the subjects did not exercise in any way. Among those who did exercise daily, 68.9% invested only 7.8 minutes per day. Among other findings, those who performed some physical activity at least once a week devoted more time to studying than to watching television. In brief, fitness and health promotion programs should target these future professionals to prevent risk factors such as overweight, obesity, and chronic diseases associated with a sedentary lifestyle. English translation by Jeannette Soto Segura

  8. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 6: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994 deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Medical University of South Carolina`s vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirements of EHAP. This report addresses the Department of Environmental Health Science, education and training initiative.

  9. Descriptive analysis of medication errors reported to the Egyptian national online reporting system during six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Zahraa Hassan Abdelrahman; Sabri, Nagwa Ali; Elmelegy, Ahmed Abdelsalam

    2016-03-01

    This study analyzes reports to the Egyptian medication error (ME) reporting system from June to December 2014. Fifty hospital pharmacists received training on ME reporting using the national reporting system. All received reports were reviewed and analyzed. The pieces of data analyzed were patient age, gender, clinical setting, stage, type, medication(s), outcome, cause(s), and recommendation(s). Over the course of 6 months, 12,000 valid reports were gathered and included in this analysis. The majority (66%) came from inpatient settings, while 23% came from intensive care units, and 11% came from outpatient departments. Prescribing errors were the most common type of MEs (54%), followed by monitoring (25%) and administration errors (16%). The most frequent error was incorrect dose (20%) followed by drug interactions, incorrect drug, and incorrect frequency. Most reports were potential (25%), prevented (11%), or harmless (51%) errors; only 13% of reported errors lead to patient harm. The top three medication classes involved in reported MEs were antibiotics, drugs acting on the central nervous system, and drugs acting on the cardiovascular system. Causes of MEs were mostly lack of knowledge, environmental factors, lack of drug information sources, and incomplete prescribing. Recommendations for addressing MEs were mainly staff training, local ME reporting, and improving work environment. There are common problems among different healthcare systems, so that sharing experiences on the national level is essential to enable learning from MEs. Internationally, there is a great need for standardizing ME terminology, to facilitate knowledge transfer. Underreporting, inaccurate reporting, and a lack of reporter diversity are some limitations of this study. Egypt now has a national database of MEs that allows researchers and decision makers to assess the problem, identify its root causes, and develop preventive strategies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University

  10. New frontiers in medical education: simulation technology at Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Ronald W; Schmid, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine is using a variety of medical simulation systems in the training of its medical students. The simulators allow students to learn and practice skills in a controlled environment, and they enable faculty to challenge students with a broader range of conditions than might ordinarily be encountered during medical training.

  11. Analysis of the Status Quo of Humanistic Quality-Oriented Education in Medical Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shulei; Li, Yamin

    2012-01-01

    With transformation of contemporary modern medical educational modes and improvement of requirement upon doctors' humanistic quality, it seems quite important to strengthen humanistic quality-oriented education in medical colleges and universities. Medical humanistic quality-oriented education in China started late, which determines that there are…

  12. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory SciDAC-2 Closeout Report Indiana University Component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottlieb, Steven Arthur [Indiana University; DeTar, Carleton [University of Utah; Tousaint, Doug [University of Arizona

    2014-07-24

    This is the closeout report for the Indiana University portion of the National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory project supported by the United States Department of Energy under the SciDAC program. It includes information about activities at Indian University, the University of Arizona, and the University of Utah, as those three universities coordinated their activities.

  13. Accreditation Role of the National Universities Commission and the Quality of the Educational Inputs into Nigerian University System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibijola; Yinka, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The Accreditation role of the National Universities Commission (NUC) and the quality of the educational inputs into Nigerian university system was investigated in this work, using a descriptive research of survey design. The population consisted of public Universities in South-West, Nigeria. The sample was made up of 300 subjects, consisting of 50…

  14. The Founding of the Brookhaven National Laboratory - Associated Universities, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    1948-01-15

    At the end of the war it became apparent that the teamwork of government and scientific institutions, which had been so effective in wartime work, must somehow be perpetuated in order to insure the continued progress of nuclear science in peace time. The enormous expense of the tools needed to pursue the next steps in this research -- nuclear reactors and high energy accelerators -- and the shortage of scientifically trained personnel pointed towards the establishment of a cooperative laboratory. Such a laboratory, using government funds, could carry out a comprehensive research program that would benefit the many interested research groups throughout the country. As a result of the wartime programs under the Manhattan District, centers of research in nuclear science were already active at the Radiation Laboratory in Berkeley, California, at Los Alamos in New Mexico, at the Clinton Laboratories in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and at the Argonne Laboratory in Chicago. No analogous nuclear research laboratories, however, had developed in the Northeast, and since so much of the nation's scientific talent and industrial activities are concentrated in the northeastern states, it was proposed that a new laboratory be established near New York City. As a result of this plan, the Brookhaven National Laboratory is now in operation at Upton, Long Island. The work of this Laboratory is performed under a contract between the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and a corporation, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) , formed by representatives of nine of the larger private universities in the northeast: Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, the University of Rochester, and Yale. The purpose of this laboratory is the advancement of knowledge in the fundamentals of nuclear science, the extension of its application to other fields, and the training of young scientists in these new subjects. This

  15. Seatbelt and child-restraint use in Kazakhstan: attitudes and behaviours of medical university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugmanova, Zhamilya S; Ussatayeva, Gainel; McNutt, Louise-Anne

    2015-04-01

    Traffic fatalities in Kazakhstan increased from 15 to more than 30 per 100 000 between 2001 and 2006. Mortality remains high compared with developed nations. Safety-restraint laws have been enacted, but little data exist regarding usage of seatbelts, particularly among children and passengers. This cross-sectional study surveyed medical university students about attitudes and behaviours regarding seatbelt and child safety-restraint usage. Seatbelts are widely used in the front seat (81%) but not in the back seat (79% 'never' or 'rarely' use a seatbelt in the back seat). Fewer than half reported 'always' or 'almost always' providing restraint for children under 7 years and 24% reported children secure the seatbelts themselves. Safety in the back seat merits attention. Adults generally do not buckle in the back seat despite a law requiring seatbelt use. Promotion of child safety restraints should be prioritised in prevention education for physicians and the community.

  16. Web archiving in the National and University Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Kavčič-Čolić

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The National and University Library (NUK of Slovenia has been investigating web archiving methods and techniques since 2001. Under the new Legal Deposit Law adopted in 2006, NUK is the responsible institution for harvesting and archiving the Slovenian web. In 2008 NUK started archiving the Slovenian web by making use of the web harvesting and access tools developed by the IIPC International Internet Preservation Consortium (IIPC. The paper presents the complexity of web harvesting and gives an overview of the international practice and NUK’s cooperation in the IIPC consortium. Special attention is given to the analysis of public sector web content,harvested since 2008. Main goals of future developement of the web archive are an increase of harvested Slovenian web sites, the development of a user interface for public access and development of improved methods for harvesting technically problematic content.

  17. SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE FOR FIJI NATIONAL UNIVERSITY CAMPUS INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bimal Aklesh Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Software Architecture defines the overview of the system which consists of various components and their relationships among the software. Architectural design is very important in the development of large scale software solution and plays a very active role in achieving business goals, quality and reusable solution. It is often difficult to choose the best software architecture for your system from the several candidate types available. In this paper we look at the several architectural types and compare them based on the key requirements of our system, and select the most appropriate architecture for the implementation of campus information systems at Fiji National University. Finally we provide details of proposed architecture and outline future plans for implementation of our system.

  18. Software Architecture for Fiji National University Campus Information Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Bimal Aklesh

    2011-01-01

    Software Architecture defines the overview of the system which consists of various components and their relationships among the software. Architectural design is very important in the development of large scale software solution and plays a very active role in achieving business goals, quality and reusable solution. It is often difficult to choose the best software architecture for your system from the several candidate types available. In this paper we look at the several architectural types and compare them based on the key requirements of our system, and select the most appropriate architecture for the implementation of campus information systems at Fiji National University. Finally we provide details of proposed architecture and outline future plans for implementation of our system.

  19. Self-reported study habits for enhancing medical students’ performance in the National Medical Unified Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Amr; Al Saadi, Tareq; Edris, Basel; Sawaf, Bisher; Zakaria, Mhd. Ismael; Alkhatib, Mahmoud; Turk, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    Background: The National Medical Unified Examination (NMUE) is currently required for graduation, joining postgraduate medical training, and practicing medicine in Syria. Objective: To investigate self-reported study habits that correlate with high performance on the NMUE. Methods: First through 3rd year residents at the three main hospitals in Damascus, Syria, were asked to complete a retrospective cross-sectional survey investigating their study habits and previous scores. Results: Significantly higher score was associated with >15 study h/day and allocating 1–40% of study time for practicing questions. Mean NMUE score was not significantly different in relation to preparation months for examination or for those who reported spending all their time studying alone compared with spending any amount of time in a group setting. Scores of 231–240 on the Syrian scientific high school exam correlated with significantly higher NMUE performance compared with fewer scores, except scores of 221–230. For every 10 point increase in medical school cumulative grades, the NMUE score increased 3.6 (95% confidence interval 2.5–4.8). Conclusion: The NMUE score was significantly affected by hours spent studying per day, number of practice questions completed, percentage of study time allocated for doing questions, Syrian scientific high school exam scores, and the cumulative medical school class grades. It was not significantly affected by preparation months or studying in a group setting. More studies are needed to further describe and investigate the factors that might affect performance in the NMUE. PMID:27144140

  20. Gymnastics - an emerging national university discipline - Johannes Lindhard's struggle to institutionalise gymnastics as a subject at the University of Copenhagen 1909-1940

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Frøslev; Bonde, Hans

    2011-01-01

    From 1909 to 1940 the medical professor Johannes Lindhard, struggled to establish gymnastics as a subject at the University of Copenhagen and in doing so, he faced a complex situation. He had to make sure that he did not lose his scientific integrity; that the intellectual authority in gymnastic...... matters was transferred to the university in a way that did not undermine the political support that had made it possible to add gymnastics to the subjects taught there; and that gymnastics gained scientific authority within the university. In striving to meet these demands, he managed to write five...... textbooks and conduct internationally acclaimed research into exercise as well as muscular physiology. Due to his central position in the institutionalisation of gymnastics at the university, he was given the opportunity of forging the emerging national discipline in ways that fitted his vision...

  1. Is Drop-Out from University Dependent on National Culture and Policy? The Case of Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troelsen, Rie; Laursen, Per F.

    2014-01-01

    National cultures are known to influence educational institutions and practices in many ways. It therefore seems reasonable to assume that drop-out from university is also influenced by differences in national cultures. In this article, we compare drop-out from Danish universities with drop-out from European universities. Based on Danish national…

  2. 78 FR 9899 - National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education, National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation... Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation (NCFMEA). Parts of this meeting will be open to the...

  3. 77 FR 13312 - National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation AGENCY: National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation, Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education... Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation (NCFMEA). Parts of this meeting will be open to the...

  4. 77 FR 49788 - National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    ... National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary Education, U.S. Department of Education, National Committee on Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation... Foreign Medical Education and Accreditation (NCFMEA). Parts of this meeting will be open to the...

  5. 77 FR 14590 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Correction to the Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC... Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Meeting on March 29, 2012, to alter the start time from 1 p.m... recognized council of emergency medical services (EMS) representatives and consumers to provide advice...

  6. Knowledge of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences regarding plagiarism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Gharedaghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people's ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  7. Knowledge of Medical Students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences Regarding Plagiarism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Gharedaghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people’s ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  8. Knowledge of medical students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences regarding plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi; Nourijelyani, Keramat; Salehi Sadaghiani, Mohammad; Yousefzadeh-Fard, Yashar; Gharedaghi, Azadeh; Javadian, Pouya; Morteza, Afsaneh; Andrabi, Yasir; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2013-07-13

    The core concept of plagiarism is defined as the use of other people's ideas or words without proper acknowledgement. Herein, we used a questionnaire to assess the knowledge of students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement. The questionnaire comprised 8 questions. The first six questions of the questionnaire were translations of exercises of a book about academic writing and were concerning plagiarism in preparing articles. Questions number 7 and 8 (which were concerning plagiarism in preparing Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows and copyright infringement, respectively) were developed by the authors of the present study. The validity of the questionnaire was approved by five experts in the field of epidemiology and biostatistics. A pilot study consisting of a test and retest was carried to assess the reliability of the questionnaire. The sampling method was stratified random sampling, and the questionnaire was handed out to 74 interns of TUMS during July and August 2011. 14.9% of the students correctly answered the first six questions. 44.6% of the students were adequately familiar with proper referencing in Microsoft PowerPoint slideshows. 16.2% of the students understood what constitutes copyright infringement. The number of correctly answered questions by the students was directly proportionate to the number of their published articles. Knowledge of students of TUMS regarding plagiarism and copyright infringement is quite poor. Courses with specific focus on plagiarism and copyright infringement might help in this regard.

  9. Japan's Higher Education Incorporation Policy: A Comparative Analysis of Three Stages of National University Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Shingo

    2013-01-01

    A number of countries with public higher education systems have implemented privatisation policies. In Japan, the national government introduced the National University Corporation Act (NUCA) in 2004 and changed the legal status of national universities from that of government-owned public institutions to independent administrative agencies. Its…

  10. Feasibility study of medical isotope production at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, C.D.; Miller, D.L.; Carson, S.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Regulatory Assessment Dept.] [and others

    1995-12-01

    In late 1994, Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, (SNL/NM), was instructed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (IPDP) to examine the feasibility of producing medically useful radioisotopes using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot Cell Facility (HCF). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) would be expected to supply the targets to be irradiated in the ACRR. The intent of DOE would be to provide a capability to satisfy the North American health care system demand for {sup 99}Mo, the parent of {sup 99m}Tc, in the event of an interruption in the current Canadian supply. {sup 99m}Tc is used in 70 to 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures in the US. The goal of the SNL/NM study effort is to determine the physical plant capability, infrastructure, and staffing necessary to meet the North American need for {sup 99}Mo and to identify and examine all issues with potential for environmental impact.

  11. Drug Use Pattern Among Medical Students in a Nigerian University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % (38/246), tobacco 15% ..... alcohol abuse found that people who are highly religious are less likely to use ... in Malaysia reported that 41.9% of the medical students .... Segal B. Adolescent initiation into drug-taking behavior:.

  12. Pattern of Medical Admissions at Enugu State University of Science ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ESUTTH are routinely admitted into any of the female and male medical wards ..... of electronic media for dissemination of information about the infection may also ... made data collection time consuming and laborious, and in some cases, to ...

  13. Nutritional and health status of medical students at a university in Northwestern Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Abdulkader R; Taha, Inass M; Al-Nozha, Omar M; Sultan, Intessar E

    2012-12-01

    To assess the nutrition and health status, nutrients intake, and physical activity among Saudi medical students. A cross-sectional survey using a questionnaire, anthropometric measurements, and laboratory assessments was conducted from January to May 2011 on 194 randomly selected Saudi medical students at Taibah University, Madinah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The adequacy of nutrient intake was compared with the recommended daily intake (RDI) per the National Research Council. Caloric intake was derived from carbohydrates (72.1%), fats (19.4%) and proteins (8.4%). Proteins and fats were obtained from a greater number of animal sources than of plant sources (5.3% versus 3.2% for proteins and 11.6% versus 7.8% for fats). There were low percentages of RDI of fibers (8.5%), most vitamins especially vitamin D (14.2%), and minerals (potassium (31.3%), zinc (40.7%), magnesium (24.5%), and calcium (47%). Overall, 34.5% of the students were overweight, and 10.3% were obese. Dyslipidemia was diagnosed in 24.7%, and 56.2% had high high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). There was a positive correlation between the median caloric intake and both the BMI (r=0.42, p=0.00) and hs-CRP (r=0.3, p=0.001). Inactivity was prevalent among the students (64.4%). This study showed deficiencies in several essential nutrients among medical students, and the prevalence of overweight status, obesity, and inactivity were relatively high. These results indicate the need to improve nutrition and promote healthy lifestyles among the medical students.

  14. [Jageillonian University medical students' relationship to awarding of the doctorate degree in all medical sciences in the period between wars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolski, S

    1997-01-01

    The Academic Schools Act of 1920 and the Ordinance of 1924 pertaining to doctorates provided that one could earn the degree only having submitted a disseration. The Austrian Act which was in force up to that moment had allowed to receive the degree without writing a thesis. Protests voiced by medical students extended validity of the Act. The Jagiellonian University medicals played an important role in delaying the Ordinance coming into force. Protesting against the newest regulations they organized public meetings, wrote memorials and filled petitions. The Jagiellonian University Faculty of Medicine granted doctorates without dissertation up to the end of December 1932. However some doctorates were granted even after that term.

  15. Medical teachers' perception of professional roles in the framework of the German National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM)-A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griewatz, Jan; Wiechers, Steffen; Ben-Karacobanim, Hadiye; Lammerding-Koeppel, Maria

    2016-11-01

    Based on CanMEDS and others, the German National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM) were recently consented. International studies recommend integrating national and cultural context when transferring a professional roles framework in different countries. Teachers' misconceptions may establish barriers in role understanding and implementation. The aim is to analyze medical teachers' rating and perception of NKLM roles in order to reveal differences to official definitions. A two-step sequential mixed methods design was used including a survey and focus groups with N = 80 medical teachers from four German universities. Most of the teachers highly valued the importance of the role "Medical Expert" and understood comprehensively. The Communicator and the Collaborator were rated fairly and perceived to a large extent. Other intrinsic roles like Health Advocate and Scholar showed more deficits in perception and less importance by the participants. This was seen generally problematic and should be considered carefully. Manager and professional showed one-sided weaknesses either in importance or perception. Medical teachers considered NKLM roles relevant for medical practice, although their role perception differed considerably. The value and risk matrix visualizes the specific role profile and offers strategic implications for NKLM communication and handling, thus supporting change management.

  16. Master's Level Graduate Training in Medical Physics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the master's degree program in medical physics developed at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Required courses for the program, and requirements for admission are included in the appendices. (HM)

  17. Satisfaction of Iranian Medical Universities' faculty members towards holding Shahid Motahari Annual Educational Festival

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hosseini, Seyyed Nasrollah; Mohseni Band Pey, Anoshiravan; Hosseini, Seyyed Ali; Karami Matin, Behzad; Mirzaei Alavijeh, Mehdi; Jalilian, Farzad

    2015-01-01

    ... in Shahid Motahari Festival from 42 medical sciences universities in Iran. Data collection instruments were two reliable and valid questionnaires on the background and also participants' satisfaction towards Shahid Motahari Educational Festival...

  18. Understanding Medical Words: A Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/medicalwords.html Understanding Medical Words: A Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine ... enable JavaScript. This tutorial teaches you about medical words. You'll learn about how to put together ...

  19. Self-medication among medical student in King Abdul-Aziz University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mooataz Mohammed Aashi

    2016-03-01

    Results: Paracetamol were the most frequently 117 (23.1% drug uses by medical students, followed by antihistaminic 48 (9.5%, antibiotic 33 (6.5%, NSAIDS 22 (4.3%, anti- anxiety 7 (1.4% and opioid 4 (0.8%. Most of them were self-medication (74%. Relief fever was the most common cause for seeking self-medication reported by medical student 103 (20.4%, most frequent side effects was nausea and vomiting 47 (9.3% Conclusions: There is an increase of self-medication in medical students of KAU especially paracetamol and NSAIDs use. We suggest increasing studies on the local irrational use of medications and increasing awareness on the importance of prescribed medications. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(3.000: 942-946

  20. Blended-learning strategy in the Altay State medical university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trukhacheva, Nina; Pupyrev, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    New educational technologies prove to be capable of solving many problems in the medical training. Students do not see e-Learning as replacing traditional instructor-led training but as a complement to it, forming part of a blended-learning strategy. Innovations in e-Learning technologies point toward a revolution in education, allowing learning to be individualized (adaptive learning), enhancing learners' interactions with others (collaborative learning), and transforming the role of the teacher. The integration of e-Learning into medical education can catalyze the shift towards applying adult learning theory, where educators will no longer serve mainly as the distributors of content, but will become more involved as facilitators of learning and assessors of competency. This survey analyzes possibilities to effectively use e-Learning in medical education, and what steps are to be made in that direction.

  1. The redesign of the medical informatics master of science course at the University of Amsterdam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Monique W M; Hasman, Arie

    2007-10-11

    The University of Amsterdam redesigned its former 4 years Medical Informatics university program into a Dutch 3 years BSc program and a 2 years English MSc program. The new MSc program is aimed at (international) baccalaureates in medical informatics, computer science, medicine, health sciences, and biology. Besides, health care professionals or professionals with a background in computer science may enter the program. We present our new MSc program shortly.

  2. Nutrition in medical education: reflections from an initiative at the University of Cambridge

    OpenAIRE

    Ball L; Crowley J; Laur C; Rajput-Ray M; Gillam S; Ray S

    2014-01-01

    Lauren Ball,1 Jennifer Crowley,2 Celia Laur,3 Minha Rajput-Ray,3 Stephen Gillam,4 Sumantra Ray3 1Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Allied Health Sciences, Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; 2Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 3Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, Medical Research Council Human Nutrition Research, Cambridge, UK; 4Department of Public Health and Primary C...

  3. The Medical Branch Library at the Johannes-Gutenberg-University Mainz

    OpenAIRE

    Geisel, Heike; Schweizer, Stefanus

    2009-01-01

    The Medical Library (Fachbibliothek Medizin (FBM)) was founded in 1969 as a Department of the Central University Library (Zentralbibliothek), and is located within the grounds of the University Medical Center in Mainz. The purpose of the library is to provide all services for students and staff of clinical and clinical-theoretical medicine. Traditional library services focus on media lending, including the textbook collection. In the digital domain, emphasis is on electronic journals and book...

  4. [The centralization of medical studies in universities under Napoleon I. History and consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichard, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    The so called "Loi du 19 ventose au XI" is two centuries old. It is a very important text of the French universitary story. It stands out the end of the Revolution in the medical studies. It enjoyed the most part of the contemporary people. But other arrangements of the law are more debatable. Thus, medical and surgical unity was already acquired before French Revolution. Furthermore, the absence of surgical practical training was a serious gap. At last, universitary Centralisation, which contrasts, with previous Decentralisation and the historical evolution of many countries, is an option with later pejorative consequences. Il was necessary to remind the events which consolidated centralisation (creation of School of medicine without autonomy in 1820, 1958 ordonnances, 1968 Revolution and after 1981, "internat national", "internat qualifiant", Lastly, the creation of C-NRS and INSERM took the leadership of research from University. Of course, other events hindered centralisation (Epic of "Internat des hôpitaux", 1871-1878 crisis, and 1910 campaign against agregation). But today, the faculties of Medicine have no real autonomy. The consequences are the standardization of the studies, the absence of competition and a poor overall result. The components of this result are not peculiar to centralisation. But this one prevents any reform. Is this logical reform really whished by the French people?

  5. Preventive medicine: self-assessment of knowledge, skills and attitudes of medical students at the Medical University of Vienna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsoi, Livia; Rieder, Anita; Stein, Katharina Viktoria; Hofhansl, Angelika; Dorner, Thomas Ernst

    2014-04-01

    Prevention and health promotion are gaining importance in modern medical curricula. Aim of this study was to evaluate the self-assessment of knowledge, skills and attitudes of medical students towards health promotion and prevention. In 2012, at the Medical University of Vienna, 27% of the 633 fourth-year medical students (50.3% male and 49.7% female; mean age: 24 years) completed a questionnaire. Results show a high assessment of prevention in most respondents. Knowledge gaps were detected on occupational health and mother-child pass examinations. However, almost all students reported sufficient knowledge on screening and risk assessment of developing cardiovascular diseases. Almost all respondents estimated to be able to identify risky behaviours. Overall, estimation towards prevention of tomorrow's physicians is very positive. However, only 40% believed to have been adequately trained on preventive medicine so far. Relevant preventive aspects were added to the medical curriculum in 2012-2013 with the new block 'Public Health'.

  6. Homophobia in Medical Students of the University of Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, R. W. M.; Au, K. P.; Chan, W. K.; Cheung, L. W. M.; Lam, C. Y. Y.; Liu, H. H. W.; Ng, L. Y.; Wong, M. Y.; Wong, W. C.

    2009-01-01

    Homosexuality is now accepted as a normal variant of human sexuality, but homophobia among healthcare professionals is well documented. Establishment of trustful doctor-patient relationships is impossible in the presence of homophobia. We were interested to examine the extent of homophobia among medical students, the future doctors. This article…

  7. Bacteriological Quality of Water Cooler Dispensers of Educational Settings in Zanjan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Hassanzadazar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Safe drinking water is one of the main factors in improving health status of the population. The aim of this study was assessment of the microbiological quality, determination of pH and residual chlorine in water coolers’ drinking water in educational centers of Zanjan University of medical Sciences in 2015 and comparing the results with the Iranian national standards. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, water samples of all used water cooler apparatuses were sampled and transferred rapidly to the laboratory. pH and residual free chlorine were measured by pH meter and Chlorine Residual Testing kit, respectively. Total coliforms, Escherichia coli, Mold and yeasts count were enumerated according to the Iranian national standards No. 1011, 3759, 5271 and 10899-1, respectively. Data were analyzed through the statistical soft wares. Results: The obtained results indicated that 44.44% of the samples were non-standard because of low residual chlorine. 44.44% and 27.8% of the taken water samples of water cooler dispensers were contaminated with mold or yeast and Escherichia coli, respectively. Conclusion: According to some microbial contamination in water samples of water cooler devices to ensure availability clean water to consumers (students and hospital’s visitors continuous monitoring, proper maintenance and regular inspection of the water cooler dispensers seems necessary.

  8. A view of environmental accounting in Japanese national university corporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omori, A. [Yokohama National Univ. (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    Recently, the Japanese government has enacted many laws and regulations relating to climate change and environmental conservation. As a part of these trends, the government promulgated the Promotion of Environmental Consideration Law in 2004, and enacted the law on April 1, 2005. The law requires Specified Corporations including 60 National University Corporations (NUCs) to publish environmental reports annually. With the preparation of the environmental report, many NUCs have included environmental accounting information. This paper clarifies the status quo of environmental accounting information disclosed in NUCs' environmental report, and examines future directions of environmental accounting in NUCs. In order to achieve these objectives, firstly, the contents of environmental report by NUCs are overviewed, and the disclosed information of environmental accounting is analyzed. Secondly, the necessity of the introduction of environmental accounting systems into NUCs is examined. Third, we examine the future directions of environmental accounting in NUCs taking UK experiences into account. Fourth, some obstacles of environmental accounting are presented, and finally, some general implications for public service providing organizations are provided based on the lessons learned from the Japanese NUCs practices.

  9. Geographical distribution of medical graduates from a public university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscarina da Silva Ezequiel

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: To evaluate the geographic distribution and career trajectory of medical graduates and the factors associated with their choice of practice location. Method: A cross-sectional study involving graduates from December 2001 to December 2010 was conducted. A self-administered questionnaire collected demographics and geographic information (place of birth, place of residence at the time of medical school admission, place of residency training and practice location, and reason for choosing the current location. Statistical analyses assessed trends in geographic distribution of graduates, and identified factors associated with location choice (through the population density of the location chosen for professional practice. Results: A total of 563 graduates completed the questionnaire. Of those, 4.3% (n=24 reported family medicine as their medical specialty, 19.9% (n=112 reported other primary care specialties (internal medicine, pediatrics, surgery and obstetrics-gynecology and the others chose subspecialties. Larger cities were more likely to be chosen for practice, particularly for newly-graduated doctors. Job invitations received during medical residency training increased the likelihood of choosing high-populated cities. In contrast, job invitations received during medical school increased the likelihood of choosing cities less populated. Amongst those in cities with lower population density, proximity to family members was an additional influencing factor; those who chose more densely populated cities did so because of better infrastructure and recreational options. Conclusion: Most of the physicians included in this study pursue subspecialties training and were practicing medicine in large cities. Knowing the multiple factors that influenced the choice of practice location can assist in planning future strategies to reduce physician workforce misdistribution.

  10. Universality, Correlations, and Rankings in the Brazilian Universities National Admission Examinations

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Roberto; Barbosa, Marcia C

    2015-01-01

    The scores obtained by students that have performed the ENEM exam, the Brazilian High School National Examination used to admit students at the Brazilian universities, is analyzed. The average high school's scores are compared between different disciplines through the Pearson correlation coefficient. The results show a very large correlation between the performance in the different subjects. Even thought the students' scores in the ENEM due to the standardization form a Gaussian, we show that the high schools' scores form a bimodal distribution that can not be used to evaluate and compare performance over time. We also show that this high schools distribution reflects the correlation between school performance and economic level of the students. The ENEM's scores are compared with a Brazilian non standardized exam, the entrance exam at the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. The comparison of the performance of the same individuals in both tests is compared showing that the two tests not only select di...

  11. Collaboration between schools of social work and university medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracht, N F; Briar, S

    1979-05-01

    Although the interface involving social work, medicine, and the other health professions occurs primarily in the day-to-day world of practice in hospitals and other health agencies, an equally important opportunity exists for interaction at the university level between schools of social work and schools for health professionals. This artice analyzes one school's effort to build effective interdisciplinary linkages.

  12. Measuring and Reporting Physician's Performance in a University Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazan-Fishman, Ana Lucia

    This paper describes a Patient Satisfaction survey and database used to measure and report on physician performance at the Ohio State University Health System (OSUHS). The OSUHS averages 6,000 inpatients in any given month, and more than 7,000 emergency patients and 70,000 outpatient encounters. Data from the Patient Satisfaction measures are…

  13. Factor Analysis of Teacher Professional Development in Chinese Military Medical Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Juan-Juan; Chen, Gang; Wang, Zhen-Wei; Liu, Wei-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: Teacher professional development potentially enhances teachers' professional morale, knowledge, skills and autonomy, which helps improve the quality of education. The military medical university is an important medical education institution in China; however, studies of teacher professional development within military…

  14. Factor Analysis of Teacher Professional Development in Chinese Military Medical Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Juan-Juan; Chen, Gang; Wang, Zhen-Wei; Liu, Wei-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose: Teacher professional development potentially enhances teachers' professional morale, knowledge, skills and autonomy, which helps improve the quality of education. The military medical university is an important medical education institution in China; however, studies of teacher professional development within military…

  15. Attitudes toward Psychiatry: A Survey of Medical Students at the University of Nairobi, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndetei, David M.; Khasakhala, Lincoln; Ongecha-Owuor, Francisca; Kuria, Mary; Mutiso, Victoria; Syanda, Judy; Kokonya, Donald

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The authors aim to determine the attitudes of University of Nairobi, Kenya, medical students toward psychiatry. Methods: The study design was cross-sectional. Self-administered sociodemographic and the Attitudes Toward Psychiatry-30 items (ATP-30) questionnaires were distributed sequentially to every third medical student in his or her…

  16. Teaching Medical Students about Quality and Cost of Care at Case Western Reserve University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headrick, Linda A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    At Case Western University (Ohio), medical students critically analyze the quality and cost of asthma care in the community by studying patients in primary care practices. Each writes a case report, listing all medical charges and comparing them with guidelines for asthma care. Several recommendations for improved care have emerged. (MSE)

  17. Opinions of medical students at the University of Cape Town on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    medical students at the University of Cape Town. Students from 1st to 5th year completed ... quently selected motivating factors were moral dissatisfaction ... both selection criteria and medical education; and the pro- ... sible effect of compulsory community service. .... prevent the departure of graduates to employment oppor-.

  18. Partnerships in Medical Education: An Exploration of Library Service Models for Postgraduate Medicine at Macquarie University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Macquarie University's new medical school, The Australian School of Advanced Medicine (ASAM), is developing a postgraduate program that incorporates a partnership with Macquarie University Library. The curriculum encompasses contemporary models of competency-based assessment, teamwork and lifelong learning that are integrated with research and…

  19. Research Notes: Open University and Distance Education Coordination: strategies to consolidate distance education at the National Autonomous University of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This case study describes three main strategies used from March 2002 to November 2003 at the Open University and Distance Education Coordination (CUAED) of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) to consolidate distance education at the University. The author explains how, in just 18 months, these three main strategies enabled the UNAM to emerge as model of distance education for other public and private institutions in Latin America.

  20. Prevalence of Depression Among Students of Urmia University of Medical Sciences (Iran)

    OpenAIRE

    Aghakhani, Nader; Sharif Nia, Hamid; Eghtedar, Samereh; Rahbar, Narges; Jasemi, Madineh; Mesgar Zadeh, Maryam

    2011-01-01

    Objective: A depressive disorder is an illness that involves the body, mood, thoughts and behaviors. This study was performed to identify the presence of depression among medical students of Urmia University of Medical Sciences. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 700 undergraduate medical and basic sciences students. Beck depression inventory (BDI) used for data gathering. Results: Mean score of BDI was 10.4 ± 0.8 and 52.6% of students scored under the depression th...

  1. To determine the level of satisfaction among medical students of a public sector medical university regarding their academic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzar Bushra

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An ongoing evaluation system is essential to determine if the academic system in place has worked to produce a better product, hence the objective of our study was to evaluate the satisfaction level among medical students regarding their academic teaching and assessment method and what measures will they suggest for the future to rectify the current situation. This questionnaire based cross sectional study was conducted in a public sector medical university from February to July 2010. A well structured questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 375 final year medical students. However 292 of the students provided informed consent and filled in the questionnaire which included their demographic profile as well as questions in line with the study objective. Data was entered in a Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version.16 and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Findings The male to female ratio in our study was 1:2. Most of the students (57.2% were dissatisfied with the quality of teaching in the university. Fifty-seven percent of the participants believed that the current standard of their institute were not at par with those of international medical universities. BCQ's were the mode of examination questions preferred by the majority of the students. Most of the students (66.1% wanted the university to conduct career planning seminars to help them plan their career. Conclusions These results suggest that the students of public sector medical universities are unsatisfied from current academic facilities and teaching activities. Students recommend increased emphasis on better lectures and practical training as well as a need to incorporate career planning sessions for the students to help plan them their future career paths.

  2. The Effectiveness of a Working Memory Training Regimen for Iranian University Students: Implications for Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Gholam Reza Kiany; Bahman Mehraban; Reza Ghafar Samar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Working memory is thought to serve as a part of memory structure where functions like temporary storage and manipulation of information take place. This study investigates the effectiveness of working memory training regimens with Iranian university students, while considering the implications for medical students. Methods: Thirty university students studying at different universities in Kermanshah took part in the study. They were divided into two groups as the experimental...

  3. Bone marrow transplantation at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, P J; Armitage, J O

    1993-08-01

    The bone marrow transplant program at UNMC is currently one of the most active programs in the country. The benefits to patients who are cured of disease by transplantation cannot be measured. The large volume of clinical and basic science research related to transplantation has enhanced the academic stature of UNMC. The combination of patient care, education, clinical research, and basic science research provides an excellent model for the operation of an academic medical institution.

  4. Japanese Approaches to Organizational Internationalization of Universities: A Case Study of Three National University Corporations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Yuki

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to develop an understanding of the internationalization processes at universities in Japan by exploring a strategic model in internationally oriented universities. Universities in Japan have experienced university reform since the 1990s. The role and system of Japanese universities have been re-examined due to an emerging global…

  5. Mistreatment of university students most common during medical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuutinen Matti

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study concerns the occurrence of various forms of mistreatment by staff and fellow students experienced by students in the Faculty of Medicine and the other four faculties of the University of Oulu, Finland. Methods A questionnaire with 51 questions on various forms of physical and psychological mistreatment was distributed to 665 students (451 females after lectures or examinations and filled in and returned. The results were analysed by gender and faculty. The differences between the males and females were assessed statistically using a test for the equality of two proportions. An exact two-sided P value was calculated using a mid-P approach to Fisher's exact test (the null hypothesis being that there is no difference between the two proportions. Results About half of the students answering the questionnaire had experienced some form of mistreatment by staff during their university studies, most commonly humiliation and contempt (40%, negative or disparaging remarks (34%, yelling and shouting (23%, sexual harassment and other forms of gender-based mistreatment (17% and tasks assigned as punishment (13%. The students in the Faculty of Medicine reported every form of mistreatment more commonly than those in the Faculties of Humanities, Education, Science and Technology. Experiences of mistreatment varied, but clear messages regarding its patterns were to be found in each faculty. Female students reported more instances of mistreatment than males and were more disturbed by them. Professors, lecturers and other staff in particular mistreated female students more than they mistreated males. About half of the respondents reported some form of mistreatment by their fellow students. Conclusion Students in the Faculty of Medicine reported the greatest amount of mistreatment. If a faculty mistreats its students, its success in the main tasks of universities, research, teaching and learning, will be threatened. The results

  6. Abortion, contraceptive use, and adolescent pregnancy among first-year medical students at a major public university in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Ortega, Adriana; De La Torre, Guadalupe García; Galván, Fernando; Cravioto, Patricia; Paz, Francisco; Díaz-Olavarrieta, Claudia; Ellertson, Charlotte; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2003-08-01

    If properly trained, medical students could become future opinion leaders in health policy and could help the public to understand the consequences of unwanted pregnancies and of abortions. The objective of this study was to analyze the frequency of unwanted pregnancies and induced abortions that had occurred among women who were first-year medical students at a major public university in Mexico City and to compare the experiences of those women with the experiences of the general population of Mexican females aged 15 to 24. In 1998 we administered a cross-sectional survey to all the first-year medical students at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, which is the largest university in Latin America. For this study we analyzed 549 surveys completed by female students. Out of the 549 women, 120 of them (22%) had been sexually active at some point. Among those 120 sexually active students, 100 of them (83%) had used a contraceptive method at some time, and 19 of the 120 (16%) had been pregnant. Of those 19 women who had been pregnant, 10 of them had had an illegal induced abortion (in Mexico, abortions are illegal except under a small number of extenuating circumstances). The reported abortion rate among the female medical students, 2%, was very low in comparison with the 11% rate for women of similar ages in the Mexican general population. The lower incidence of abortion among the female medical students indicates that when young Mexican women have access to medical information and are highly motivated to avoid unintended pregnancy and abortion, they can do so.

  7. Attitudes of undergraduate medical students of Addis Ababa University towards medical practice and migration, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Deressa Wakgari; Azazh Aklilu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The health care system of Ethiopia is facing a serious shortage of health workforce. While a number of strategies have been developed to improve the training and retention of medical doctors in the country, understanding the perceptions and attitudes of medical students towards their training, future practice and intent to migrate can contribute in addressing the problem. This study was carried out to assess the attitudes of Ethiopian medical students towards their trainin...

  8. HOW MEDICAL UNDERGRADUATES PREPARE FOR UNIVERSITY EXAMINATION: LESSON FROM A TEACHING MEDICAL INSTITUTION IN SOUTH INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Shib Sekhar Datta; Boratne, Abhijit V; Rajkumar Patil

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medical colleges in India conventionally follow a curriculum overfed with large volume of information expecting students will imbibe such curriculum unquestionably overlooking what and how they progress. There have been many attempts to improve the learning process of medical students, neglecting the process which students adopt towards such learning and prepare for their exams aiming better performance. Objective: To explore qualitatively the way medical undergraduates prepare ...

  9. National Unity and Ethnic Identity in a Vietnamese University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Linh T.; Walter, Pierre G.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the ways in which Vietnam's educational policies for ethnic minorities are enacted in the bachelor of arts (BA) program in ethnic minority cultures (EMC) at the Hanoi University of Culture (HUC). Hanoi University of Culture is one of only two universities in Vietnam that offer this program. Although the BA is…

  10. SU-E-P-19: A National Collaborative Academic Medical Physics Network: Structure, Activity and Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thwaites, D [University of Sydney, Camperdown, Sydney (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A national Australian inter-university medical physics (MP) group was formed in 2011/12, supported by Department of Health Better Access to Radiation Oncology BARO) seed funding. Core membership includes the six universities providing postgraduate MP courses. Objectives include increasing capacity, development and efficiency of national academic MP structures/systems and hence supporting education, clinical training and research, for the MP workforce support. Although the BARO scheme focuses on Radiation Oncology, the group has wider MP interests. Methods: Two further BARO seed grants were achieved: 1) for networked academic activities, including shared-resource teaching, eg using virtual reality systems; MP outreach to schools and undergraduates; developing web-based student and registrar education/resources, etc.; and 2) for conjoint ‘translational research’ posts between universities and partner hospitals, to clinically progress advanced RT technologies and to support students and registrars. Each university received 0.5 FTE post from each grant over 2 years (total: $1.75M) and leveraged local additional partner funds. Results: Total funding: $4–5M. Overall there have been 35 (mainly overseas) postholders bringing specific expertise, beginning in early 2013. Periods in Australia have been from 0.25–2 years (median=1). As well as the education activities, research projects include lung/spine SBRT, 4D RT, FFF beams, technology assessment, complex treatment planning, imaging for radiation oncology, DIR, adaptive breast, datamining, radiomics,etc. Observed positive impacts include: increased interest in MP courses, training support, translational research infrastructure and/or clinical practice in the hospitals involved, plus increased collaboration and effectiveness between the universities. Posts are continuing beyond grant end using leveraged funds, providing the basis for sustainability of some posts. Conclusion: The BARO-funded projects have

  11. [Geographical distribution of medical expenditure for the aged insured by National Health Insurance in secondary medical care areas in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Tanihara, S; Yanagawa, H

    1998-06-01

    To determine what factors affect medical expenditure for the aged insured by the National Health Insurance among secondary medical care areas. The original data of municipalities were combined and converted into the data of secondary medical areas. The original data included medical expenditure of the aged in 1994, medical supply factors per 100,000 population (numbers of doctors, numbers of general beds in hospitals, numbers of clinics, etc.) and socio-economic factors (income, proportion of employees for three sectors of industries, population density, average size of family, etc.). Medical expenditures for inpatients and outpatients were used separately as independent variables. The medical supply and socio-economic factors have been used as dependent variables. Multiple regression models were applied to clarify the differences in the contributing factors between inpatient and outpatient. 1. The maximum inpatient and outpatient medical expenditures for the aged are respectively 4 times and 2.6 times more expensive than minimum expenditures among secondary medical care areas. 2. The numbers of beds, income per capita, numbers of doctor, average size of family, proportion of employees for third level industry and income accounted for 57.4% of variance in inpatient medical expenditure of the aged. 3. The proportion of employees for first level industry, the numbers of beds and average members of family accounted for 21.4% of variance in outpatient medical expenditure of the aged. 4. Medical expenditure for inpatients related with medical supply and socioeconomic factors differently from that of outpatients.

  12. [The keys to success in French Medical National Ranking Examination: Integrated training activities in teaching hospital and medical school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillois, Pierre; Fourcot, Marie; Genty, Céline; Morand, Patrice; Bosson, Jean-Luc

    2015-12-01

    The National Ranking Examination (NRE) is the key to the choice of career and specialty for future physicians; it lets them choose their place of employment in a specialty and an hospital for their internship. It seems interesting to model the success factors to this exam for the medical students from Grenoble University. For each of the medical students at Grenoble University who did apply to the NRE in 2012, data have been collected about their academic background and personal details from the administration of the University. A simple logistic regression with success set as being ranked in the first 2000 students, then a polytomous logistic regression, have been performed. The 191 students in the models are 59% female, 25 years old in average (SD 1.8). The factors associated to a ranking in the first 2000 are: not repeating the PCEM1 class (odds ratio [OR] 2.63, CI95: [1.26; 5.56]), performing nurse practice during internships (OR=1.27 [1.00; 1.62]), being ranked in the first half of the class for S3 pole (OR=6.04 [1.21; 30.20] for the first quarter, OR=5.65 [1.15; 27.74] for the second quarter) and being in the first quarter at T5 pole (OR=3.42 [1.08; 10.82]). Our study finds four factors independently contributing to the success at NRE: not repeating PCEM1, performing nurse practice and being ranked in the top of the class at certain academic fields. The AUC is 0.76 and student accuracy is more than 80%. However, some items, for example repeating DCEM4 or participating in NRE mock exams, have no influence on success. A different motivation should be a part of the explanation… As these analysed data are mainly institutional, they are accurate and reliable. The polytomic logistic model, sharing 3 factors with the simple logistic model, replace a performing nurse practice factor's by a grant recipient factor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Transition from traditional to innovative teaching in and beyond pharmacology at Ziauddin Medical University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qamaruddin BARAKZAI

    2004-01-01

    Innovative teaching methodologies in different parts of the world are being practiced since last 3 decades. The aim of this review is to report the transition from traditional to innovative self learning process in Ziauddin Medical University, a new medical institute of Pakistan. Various problems encountered have been duly looked after by inducting faculty training programs and regular review sessions in which monitoring of the transition process was duly observed as well as further advancements were also planned. The University being a pioneer has attracted other institutions which have also planned to induct PBL in their curriculum.Vertical and horizontal integration has also inducted better understanding of subjects and fruitful advantages had been accomplished in subjects as pharmacology and pathology. In conclusion, the initial decision of the university to adapt innovative teaching methodologies along with following an integrated curriculum based on PBL and Community Oriented Medical Education system has now made ZMU a Novel institute amongst other medical institutes in the country.

  14. [THE CANCELED FACULTY: ON THE ISSUE OF ESTABLISHMENT OF MEDICAL FACULTY OF THE PETROGRAD UNIVERSITY DURING THE FIRST WORLD WAR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostovtsev, E A; Sidortchuk, I V

    2015-01-01

    The article considers history of attempts to organize medicalfaculty in the Petrograd university on the eve and during the First World War The actuality of issue is in both insufficient investigation of this page of history of national medicine and medical education and history of development of national medicine in the period of the First World War which centenary is observed this year On the basis of large spectrum of published and archive sources the article considers the prerequisites of organization of medical faculty in St. Petersburg-Petrograd The discussions around its organization, positioning and augmentation of its supporters and opponents are called to mind The attempt is cited concerning organization offaculty in context of existed relationship between professional and teaching staff corporation of the Petrograd university and authorities. The separate attention is paid to the issue of corporative aspiration of professorate which determined model of their behavior and in spite of all social politic alterations provide no permission to compromise with authorities. The similar behavior model continued and after the February Revolution and this became the cause of giving up the idea of organization of medical faculty after overthrow of czarism.

  15. Using TOSCE (Team Objective Structured Clinical Examination in the second national medical sciences olympiad in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Amini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Second National Medical Sciences Olympiad was done in Shiraz in August 2010 with aim of indentifying scientifically talented individuals, motivating students and orienting extracurricular activities. This Olympiad was done in 3 areas, basic sciences, clinical sciences and management. In clinical sciences, we used TOSCE (Team Objective Structured Clinical Examination. In this article we report the details of this exam and participants′ satisfaction. Materials and Methods: This Olympiad in Clinical Medical Sciences was held in 2 levels: Individual and team. In the team stage, 9 teams from 9 universities participated. We used TOSCE for measuring clinical competency of teams. Each team consisted of 3 students. We designed 12 stations based on emergency medicine in medical and surgical fields. The time considered for each station was 15 min, after doing this exam the view of students was measured using a valid and reliable questionnaire. Results: Most of the students believed that TOSCE was a useful examination for measuring competency. More than 50% of students reported that success in this exam needs clinical competency, team work and problem solving ability. Nearly, half (48.1% of students believed that 15 min is not enough for each station and they need more time. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that this kind of exam is useful for measuring clinical competency from students′ viewpoint .

  16. [Participation of the Mexican National Academy of Medicine in the accreditation of medical specialties and the certification of medical specialists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa de Los Reyes Sánchez, Víctor Manuel

    2014-01-01

    We present a brief biography of the prominent Mexican doctor Miguel Francisco Jiménez. Because of his great academic contributions and medical achievements, the Mexican National Academy of Medicine named its annual lecture to welcome its new members after him. We also provide insights on the inception of Medical Boards for certification and medical specialties, emphasizing the Mexican situation. The Mexican National Academy of Medicine has had an important role in the organization, development, and recognition of these boards by official health authorities. Finally, we explain how the Advisory Committee of The National Board for Medical Specialties (CONACEM) functions, and how it has become a relevant auxiliary body within the Federal Government.

  17. The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine summer medical program for high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jerome; Atkins, R Matthew; Tucker, Phebe; Monson, Angela; Corpening, Brian; Baker, Sherri

    2011-06-01

    To enhance diversity of applicants to University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, a Summer Medical Program for High School Students was started in 2009. This comprehensive pipeline program included sessions on applying to medical school, interaction with a panel of minority physicians and health care professionals role models, clinically oriented didactics taught by physician faculty, shadowing experiences in clinics and hospitals, and presentation of student research reports. Students' assessments in 2009 showed increased understanding of the medical school application process, the medical curriculum and the medical field, and an increase in students'likeliness to choose a medical career. Importance of long-term mentoring and follow-up with students to sustain their medical interests is discussed.

  18. [Medical tourism: changing a world trend into a national resource].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, Amitai; Toker, Asaf; Mor-Yossef, Shlomo

    2009-01-01

    Medical tourism is a new world trend that has great potential. Many countries, especially in the Far East, invest in this emerging industry in order to build a modern medical infrastructure that will attract foreigners and will create a new source of income, while improving the medical services provided to the local community. This article reviews relevant Literature and recent research on medical tourism. We suggest that israel adopt a health policy that will use local know-how to turn it into a world leader in medical tourism.

  19. Medical Student Performance on the National Board of Medical Examiners Emergency Medicine Advanced Clinical Examination and the National Emergency Medicine M4 Exams

    OpenAIRE

    Hiller, Katherine; House, Joseph; Lawson, Luan; Poznanski, Stacey; Morrissey, Thomas K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In April 2013, the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) released an Advanced Clinical Examination (ACE) in emergency medicine (EM). In addition to this new resource, CDEM (Clerkship Directors in EM) provides two online, high-quality, internally validated examinations. National usage statistics are available for all three examinations, however, it is currently unknown how students entering an EM residency perform as compared to the entire national cohort. This information m...

  20. Jewish Medical Students and Graduates at the Universities of Padua and Leiden: 1617–1740

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Collins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The first Jewish medical graduates at the University of Padua qualified in the fifteenth century. Indeed, Padua was the only medical school in Europe for most of the medieval period where Jewish students could study freely. Though Jewish students came to Padua from many parts of Europe the main geographical sources of its Jewish students were the Venetian lands. However, the virtual Padua monopoly on Jewish medical education came to an end during the seventeenth century as the reputation of the Dutch medical school in Leiden grew. For aspiring medieval Jewish physicians Padua was, for around three hundred years, the first, simplest, and usually the only choice.

  1. Evaluation of Randomly Selected Completed Medical Records Sheets in Teaching Hospitals of Jahrom University of Medical Sciences, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Parsa Mahjob

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Medical record documentation, often use to protect the patients legal rights, also providing information for medical researchers, general studies, education of health care staff and qualitative surveys is used. There is a need to control the amount of data entered in the medical record sheets of patients, considering the completion of these sheets is often carried out after completion of service delivery to the patients. Therefore, in this study the prevalence of completeness of medical history, operation reports, and physician order sheets by different documentaries in Jahrom teaching hospitals during year 2009 was analyzed. Methods and Materials: In this descriptive / retrospective study, the 400 medical record sheets of the patients from two teaching hospitals affiliated to Jahrom medical university was randomly selected. The tool of data collection was a checklist based on the content of medical history sheet, operation report and physician order sheets. The data were analyzed by SPSS (Version10 software and Microsoft Office Excel 2003. Results: Average of personal (Demography data entered in medical history, physician order and operation report sheets which is done by department's secretaries were 32.9, 35.8 and 40.18 percent. Average of clinical data entered by physician in medical history sheet is 38 percent. Surgical data entered by the surgeon in operation report sheet was 94.77 percent. Average of data entered by operation room's nurse in operation report sheet was 36.78 percent; Average of physician order data in physician order sheet entered by physician was 99.3 percent. Conclusion: According to this study, the rate of completed record papers reviewed by documentary in Jahrom teaching hospitals were not desirable and in some cases were very weak and incomplete. This deficiency was due to different reason such as medical record documentaries negligence, lack of adequate education for documentaries, High work

  2. Collaboration between the University of Michigan Taubman Health Sciences library and the University of Michigan Medical School Office of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Christine; Harris, Bethany; Mahraj, Katy; Schnitzer, Anna Ercoli; Rosenzweig, Merle

    2013-01-01

    Librarians have traditionally facilitated research development resulting in grants through performing biomedical literature searches for researchers. The librarians at the Taubman Health Sciences Library of the University of Michigan have taken additional steps forward by instituting a proactive approach to assisting investigators. To accomplish this, the librarians have taken part in a collaborative effort with the University of Michigan Medical School Office of Research. Through this partnership, both units have created and adopted various techniques intended to facilitate the submission of grants, thus allowing researchers more time to conduct their primary activities.

  3. The Effect of Stress on Medical Students in a Private Medical University in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagmohni Kaur Sidhu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Stress amongst medical students is oftenoverlooked. Intelligent students are not always the mostcomposed. This study aimed to look at both male andfemale students of three different ethnic groups and theeffects of stress in areas such as academic, social,financial and their everyday life. The Chinese studentsreported significantly less “academic stress” than theMalay students, and the Malay students reportedsignificantly less “financial stress” compared to theChinese and Indian students. Medical education can bea health hazard for medical students

  4. Publishing medical schools’ USMLE Step 1 scores: increase preclinical education accountability and national standards

    OpenAIRE

    Eltorai AE

    2013-01-01

    Adam EM Eltorai Brown University, Warren Alpert Medical School, Providence, RI, USA Medical education innovation is a field of active investigation.1,2 Whether it is problem-based learning, lectures, discussion groups, systems-based blocks, integrated courses, video-captured, pass-fail, or iPad-requiring, every medical school approaches preclinical education differently. Which combination of these methods is most effective?To answer this, I propose that medical schools ought to be required to...

  5. Dubna - A University Town Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    1994 marked the opening of the Dubna International University of Nature, Society and Man. It was established on the initiative of the JINR Directorate and supported by the Academy of Natural Sciences of Russia. An integral part of the University is the JINR University Centre which offers educational programmes in high energy physics, nuclear physics, nuclear methods in condensed matter physics, applied physics, and radio-biology.

  6. Global and National Prominent Universities: Internationalization, Competitiveness and the Role of the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a characterization of the internationalization of "global" European universities and discusses the role of the State in promoting greater internationalization and competitiveness levels of prominent national universities. The analysis supports previous arguments stating that global ranking of universities is…

  7. Global and National Prominent Universities: Internationalization, Competitiveness and the Role of the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a characterization of the internationalization of "global" European universities and discusses the role of the State in promoting greater internationalization and competitiveness levels of prominent national universities. The analysis supports previous arguments stating that global ranking of universities is…

  8. Global and National Prominent Universities: Internationalization, Competitiveness and the Role of the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a characterization of the internationalization of "global" European universities and discusses the role of the State in promoting greater internationalization and competitiveness levels of prominent national universities. The analysis supports previous arguments stating that global ranking of universities is strongly based on…

  9. Investigation on the governance model and effect of medical schools merged with comprehensive universities in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ge; Luo, Li

    2013-08-01

    This investigation analyzes the management of medical schools merged with comprehensive universities through internet search and research review to reveal management model and effect of the merger. The conclusion is safely reached that governance models are divided into two different patterns: centralized management and decentralized management. Eight universities, representing the two models, were selected and evaluated comprehensively. Among them, the universities that carried out decentralized management have greater development after the merger based on a quality comparison concerning freshmen, faculty, teaching, and research between the two patterns. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University.

  10. Prevalence of At-Risk Drinking among a National Sample of Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ameet Arvind; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Lindstrom, Richard W.; Wolf, Kenneth E.

    2009-01-01

    As limited research exists on medical students' substance use patterns, including over-consumption of alcohol, the objective of this study was to determine prevalence and correlates of at-risk drinking among a national sample of medical students, using a cross-sectional, anonymous, Web-based survey. A total of 2710 medical students from 36 U.S.…

  11. Assessing bone banking activities at University of Malaya medical centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd, Suhaili; Samsuddin, Sharifah Mazni; Ramalingam, Saravana; Min, Ng Wuey; Yusof, Norimah; Zaman, T Kamarul; Mansor, Azura

    2015-12-01

    The main advantage of establishing in-house bone banks is its ability to readily provide allograft bones for local surgeries. Bone procurement activities of our university bone bank during the 10 years of operation were reviewed. Socio-demographic data of donors, types of bone procured, cases of rejected bones and types of allograft bones transplanted are presented. From 179 potential donors, 73 % were accepted with 213 procured bones. Femoral head was the common bone transplanted (45 %), as it was also the most common procured (82 %). Bones were rejected mainly due to non-technical reasons (83 %) rather than positive results of microbiological (13 %) and serological (4 %) tests. Comprehensive data could not be obtained for further analysis due to difficulties in retrieving information. Therefore, quality assurance system was improved to establish more systematic documentations, as the basis of good banking practice with process control hence allowing traceability.

  12. Knowledge and Attitude Level of Students about Solid Waste Recycling; Kashan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazaheri Tehrani A.MSc,

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims Increasing of the population and development of urban areas, has led to solid waste generation increasing which is one of the problems and difficulties that put human and environmental health in danger. The aim of present study was to determine the knowledge and attitude level of Kashan University of Medical Sciences’ students about solid waste recycling. Instrument & Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out in the fall of 2012 at the Kashan University of Medical Sciences and all the 250 students studying at nursing, medical, and paramedical schools were participated in it. A researcher-made questionnaire consisting of 20 questions was used to determine the knowledge about and attitude toward solid waste recycling. Data was analyzed by ANOVA, Pearson correlation and independent T test. Findings The knowledge of students was the highest about the definition of recycling (84.4% and lowest about delivery of recycled materials to badgers (23.6%. Most medical (55.1% and paramedical (75.3% students had “weak” and most nursing students (47.1% had “moderate” knowledge about solid waste recycling. 69.2% of paramedical, 27.3% of medical and 25.5% of nursing students stated that “there is no information about recycling in the university courses”. Conclusion Most of the students of Kashan University of Medical Sciences have weak knowledge regarding to solid waste recycling and their knowledge are different among schools.

  13. The evolution of integrative medical education:the influence of the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victoria Maizes; Randy Horwitz; Patricia Lebensohn; Hilary McClafferty; James Dalen; Andrew Weil

    2015-01-01

    The University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine (AzCIM) was founded in 1994 with a primary focus of educating physicians in integrative medicine (IM). Twenty years later, IM has become an international y recognized movement in medicine. With 40% of United States’ medical schools having membership in the Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health it is foreseeable that al medical students and residents wil soon receive training in the principles and practices of IM. The AzCIM has the broadest range and depth of IM educational programs and has had a major influence on integrative medical education in the United States. This review describes the fel owship, residency and medical student programs at AzCIM as wel as other significant national drivers of IM education; it also points out the chal enges faced in developing IM initiatives. The field of IM has matured with new national board certification in IM requiring fel owship training. Al ied health professional IM educational courses, as wel as integrative health coaching, assure that al members of the health care team can receive training. This review describes the evolution of IM education and wil be helpful to academic centers, health care institutions, and countries seeking to introduce IM initiatives.

  14. 基本医疗权的法律属性刍议%Legal Attribute of Basic Medical Right University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王裔端; 沈春明

    2011-01-01

    Citizens' basic medical right is "Universal Declaration of Human Rights" and international law documents confirm and security of an important right. The main body is its own citizens, compulsory undertaker is the national, and the object is the national positive behavior; It has the natural human rights, democracy and the rule of law. The contents include of distribution of medical resources, the right to health care, emergency treatment of rights and medical informed consent, the right Citizens' basic medical right is legal attribute, is the a component basic human rights.%公民基本医疗权是《世界人权宣言》等国际法文件确认和保障的一项重要权利.其主体是本国公民,义务承担者是国家,客体是国家的积极行为;它具有人权的自然性、民主性和法治性;其内容包括医疗资源的分配权、医疗照顾权、紧急救治权利和医疗知情同意权;公民的基本医疗权是具有法律属性的,是基本人权的一个组成部分.

  15. Satisfaction of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences\\' alumni about the quality of medical education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S.J. Mirmohammadi; A. H. Mehrparvar; M. Bahaloo; M. H. Davari

    2013-01-01

    .... opinion of alumni in assessment of the quality of education is important, This study aims to assess the quality of medical education in basic and clinical sciences according to the opinion of alumni...

  16. Perception of the Medical Students on Their Future Career in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Barikani, Ameneh; Afaghi, Mahsa; Barikani, Firooze; Afaghi, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Young physicians have many recruitment barriers in Iran. Therefore, for planning purpose, assessment of the attitudes of medical intern students towards their future career is important. Methods: This cross-sectional study assessed the view points of 300 medical students through a self administered questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS software with P value < 0.05. Results: Two hundred and forty students (80%) of the students had responded to the questionnaire. Among them...

  17. Perceptions of personal health risks by medical and non-medical workers in a university medical center : a survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Listyowardojo, Tita Alissa; Nap, Raoul E.; Johnson, Addie

    2010-01-01

    Background: Health care workers (HCWs) are faced with many work-related choices which may depend on how they perceive risk, such as whether or not to comply with safety regulations. Little research has investigated risk perception in medical workers in comparison with non-medical workers and the ext

  18. Perceptions of personal health risks by medical and non-medical workers in a university medical center : a survey study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Listyowardojo, Tita Alissa; Nap, Raoul E.; Johnson, Addie

    2010-01-01

    Background: Health care workers (HCWs) are faced with many work-related choices which may depend on how they perceive risk, such as whether or not to comply with safety regulations. Little research has investigated risk perception in medical workers in comparison with non-medical workers and the ext

  19. Attitude to the subject of chemistry in undergraduate nursing students at Fiji National University and Federation University, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen; Wakeling, Lara; Peck, Blake; Naiker, Mani; Hill, Dolores; Naidu, Keshni

    2015-01-01

    Attitude to the subject of chemistry was quantified in first-year undergraduate nursing students, at two geographically distinct universities. A purpose-designed diagnostic instrument (ASCI) was given to students at Federation University, Australia (n= 114), and at Fiji National University, Fiji (n=160). Affective and cognitive sub-scales within ASCI showed reasonable internal consistency. Cronbach's alpha for the cognitive sub-scale was 0.786 and 0.630, and 0.787 and 0.788 for affective sub-scale for the Federation University and Fiji National University students, respectively. Mean (SD) score for the cognitive sub-scale was 10.5 (5.6) and 15.2 (4.1) for students at Federation University and Fiji National University, respectively (Pchemistry in undergraduate nursing students using ASCI may have utility in assessing the impact of novel teaching strategies used in the education of nursing students in areas of bioscience and chemistry. However, geographically distinct populations of undergraduate nurses may show very different attitudes to chemistry.

  20. [Two research projects on infectious diseases conducted in Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana by Tokyo Medical and Dental University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ido, Eiji; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2013-01-01

    Ghana-Tokyo Medical and Dental University Research Collaboration Center has been established since 2008 when our Program was chosen together with the Program in the Philippines proposed by Tohoku University as an additional small-scale research center of the Overseas Research Program on Emerging and Reemerging Diseases that is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of the Japanese Government and started in 2005. This 5-year government-supported Program has changed its name to develop into a more active world-level program called Japan Initiative for Global Research Network on Infectious Diseases (J-GRID) and entered the second 5-year phase in 2010, and our Program is playing an important role among other research centers located in Asia and Africa. Currently, two research projects are carried out in parallel in Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research by Tokyo Medical and Dental University: one is a J-GRID project and the other is the one of Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS) which is a joint project between Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST). This special article is describing what these two projects are all about.

  1. Internationalizing Medical Education: The Special Track Curriculum 'Global Health' at Justus Liebig University Giessen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipper, Michael; Baumann, Adrian; Hofstetter, Christine; Korte, Rolf; Krawinkel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Internationalizing higher education is considered to be a major goal for universities in Germany and many medical students aspire to include international experiences into their academic training. However, the exact meaning of "internationalizing" medical education is still poorly defined, just as is the possible pedagogic impact and effects. Against this background, this article presents the special track curriculum on global health (in German: Schwerpunktcurriculum Global Health, short: SPC) at Justus Liebig University Giessen, which was established in 2011 as a comprehensive teaching program to integrate international perspectives and activities systematically into the clinical years of the medical curriculum. The report of the structure, content, didactic principles and participants' evaluations of the SPC is embedded into a larger discussion of the pedagogic value of a broad and interdisciplinary perspective on "global health" in medical education, that explicitly includes attention for health inequities, social determinants of health and the cultural dimensions of medicine and health abroad and "at home" (e.g. in relation to migration). We conclude that if properly defined, the emerging field of "global health" represents a didactically meaningful approach for adding value to medical education through internationalizing the curriculum, especially in regard to themes that despite of their uncontested value are often rather weak within medical education. The concrete curricular structures, however, have always to be developed locally. The "SPC" at Giessen University Medical School is only one possible way of addressing these globally relevant issues in one particular local academic setting.

  2. Internationalizing Medical Education: The Special Track Curriculum 'Global Health' at Justus Liebig University Giessen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knipper, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Internationalizing higher education is considered to be a major goal for universities in Germany and many medical students aspire to include international experiences into their academic training. However, the exact meaning of “internationalizing” medical education is still poorly defined, just as is the possible pedagogic impact and effects. Against this background, this article presents the special track curriculum on global health (in German: , short: at Justus Liebig University Giessen, which was established in 2011 as a comprehensive teaching program to integrate international perspectives and activities systematically into the clinical years of the medical curriculum. The report of the structure, content, didactic principles and participants’ evaluations of the SPC is embedded into a larger discussion of the pedagogic value of a broad and interdisciplinary perspective on “global health” in medical education, that explicitly includes attention for health inequities, social determinants of health and the cultural dimensions of medicine and health abroad and “at home” (e.g. in relation to migration. We conclude that if properly defined, the emerging field of “global health” represents a didactically meaningful approach for adding value to medical education through internationalizing the curriculum, especially in regard to themes that despite of their uncontested value are often rather weak within medical education. The concrete curricular structures, however, have always to be developed locally. The “SPC” at Giessen University Medical School is only one possible way of addressing these globally relevant issues in one particular local academic setting.

  3. [Medical surveillance in university: organizational difficulties, legal problems, scientific e technical specificities. Experience of University of Milan Bicocca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orso, M I; Giuliani, C; Assini, R; Riva, M A; Cesana, G

    2012-01-01

    Our research describes activities of Occupational Health carried out during last year in University of Milan Bicocca by Occupational Doctors. We describe results of medical surveillance in 1153 employees or students exposed to occupational risks for health and safety. We report results obtained, technical difficulties, organizational problems, and preventive actions decided to improve functionality of our activity. Students seem to be less protected and consequently seem to have higher professional safety and health risks.

  4. Universality, correlations, and rankings in the Brazilian universities national admission examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Roberto; Lamb, Luis C.; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the scores obtained by students who have taken the ENEM examination, The Brazilian High School National Examination which is used in the admission process at Brazilian universities. The average high schools scores from different disciplines are compared through the Pearson correlation coefficient. The results show a very large correlation between the performance in the different school subjects. Even though the students' scores in the ENEM form a Gaussian due to the standardization, we show that the high schools' scores form a bimodal distribution that cannot be used to evaluate and compare students performance over time. We also show that this high schools distribution reflects the correlation between school performance and the economic level (based on the average family income) of the students. The ENEM scores are compared with a Brazilian non standardized exam, the entrance examination from the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. The analysis of the performance of the same individuals in both tests shows that the two tests not only select different abilities, but also lead to the admission of different sets of individuals. Our results indicate that standardized tests might be an interesting tool to compare performance of individuals over the years, but not of institutions.

  5. RDA Implementation at the National Autonomous University of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiberto Felipe Martínez Arellano

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM [National Autonomous University of Mexico] is the largest and most important educational institution in Mexico and Latin America. It serves more than 340,000 graduate, bachelor and high school students. It offers 41 graduate programs and 118 undergraduate ones. Moreover, the Biblioteca Nacional de México (BNM [National Library of Mexico] is into the UNAM structure, playing the role of safeguarding and preserving the bibliographical memory of Mexico, which is integrated by more than 1,250,000 books and documents that are sheltered into this library. Moreover, the Sistema Bibliotecario y de Información de la UNAM (SIBIUNAM [UNAM Library and Information System] is composed of 135 libraries with a collection of approximately 1,700.000 book titles and 6,000.000 volumes, which is coordinated by the Dirección General de Bibliotecas de la UNAM [UNAM General Directorate of Libraries]. Additionally, in the UNAM organization is placed the Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliotecológicas y de la Información (IIBI [Institute of Research in Library and Information Sciences], where theoretical and applied research projects are carried out in several research areas, being one of them the information organization, and within this one, cataloging standards are approached. This article addresses the challenges that the adoption of the new RDA cataloging standard has represented for these three UNAM organizations, as well as the actions developed in each one of them. The Biblioteca Nacional México (BNM experiences on RDA implementation are shared. Some problematic situations, as well as the solution for these ones, are presented. It is also included the BNM participation in forums, to communicate the work that was done on cataloging using the new code. It also is addressed the updating and training of staff, participation in cooperative cataloging programs and the RDA analysis in work teams, as well as the

  6. A Dual Hesitant Fuzzy Multigranulation Rough Set over Two-Universe Model for Medical Diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Li, Deyu; Yan, Yan

    2015-01-01

    In medical science, disease diagnosis is one of the difficult tasks for medical experts who are confronted with challenges in dealing with a lot of uncertain medical information. And different medical experts might express their own thought about the medical knowledge base which slightly differs from other medical experts. Thus, to solve the problems of uncertain data analysis and group decision making in disease diagnoses, we propose a new rough set model called dual hesitant fuzzy multigranulation rough set over two universes by combining the dual hesitant fuzzy set and multigranulation rough set theories. In the framework of our study, both the definition and some basic properties of the proposed model are presented. Finally, we give a general approach which is applied to a decision making problem in disease diagnoses, and the effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated by a numerical example.

  7. Medical education reform in wuhan university, china: a preliminary report of an international collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Renslow; Dong, Hongmei; Yunfeng, Zhou; Stern, Scott; Jiong, Yang; Matlin, Karl; Baoping, Yu; Husain, Aliya N; Morgan, Ivy; Cooper, Brian; Juan, Feng; Mehta, Sujata

    2013-01-01

    In 2008 Wuhan University Medical School in China proposed to reform its curriculum by adapting the curriculum of the University of Chicago Medical School. An assessment of Wuhan University Medical School's traditional curriculum conducted in 2009 informed the reform directions, which included course integration, use of clinical cases, improved relevance of basic sciences to clinical medicine, reduction of lecture time, increase in group and independent learning, and the use of formative assessments. Fifty student volunteers per year were chosen to participate in the reform, and the rest remained in the traditional curriculum. A student survey was conducted in 2011 to evaluate the reform by comparing the attitudes of those in the reform and standard curricula. The reform met the needs of the school, was generally well received, improved satisfaction in reform participants, and had a positive impact on students. Areas needing improvement were also identified.

  8. Sleep Hygiene Practices and Their Relation to Sleep Quality in Medical Students of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Yazdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Poor quality of sleep is a distressing and worrying condition that can disturb academic performance of medical students. Sleep hygiene practices are one of the important variables that affect sleep quality. The objective of this study was to assess association between sleep hygiene practices and sleep quality of medical students in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive-correlational study, a total of 285 medical students completed a self-administered questionnaire. Demographic data, sleep-wake schedule in weekday and weekend, and sleep duration were collected. Students' sleep quality was assessed by Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. Data were analyzed by SPSS Ver 13. Results: Overall, 164 (57.5 of students had poor sleep quality. Mean global PSQI score and average score of four subscales were significantly higher in male than female. Regression analysis showed that male students (β=-0.85, P<0.05, students at senior level (β=-0.81, P<0.05, married students (β=-0.45, P<0.05, and those with improper sleep hygiene practices slept worse. Conclusion: The findings of this study showed that the prevalence of poor sleep quality in medical students is high. Improper sleep hygiene behaviors might be a reason for poor quality of sleep in medical students.

  9. Student-Life Stress Level and its Related Factors among Medical Students of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Nikanjam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Student-life stress can lead to various negative consequences such as physical illness, mental disorders or exhaustion. The present study was conducted to evaluate the level of student life stress and its related factors among medical students of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study applied multistage random sampling to select 500university students at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences during 2015. The data collection tool used in this study was a self-report questionnaire containing two parts: a section on subjects' demographic details and another section for Student-Life Stress Inventory (SLSI. Data were analyzed in SPSS20-using descriptive and inferential statistics, such as independent t-test, Pearson’s correlation test and one-way ANOVA. Results: This study revealed that %57of the students had moderate levels of stress. The most important stressors included self-impose and pressure, and also the most important reactions to stressors included cognitive appraisal and emotional reactions, respectively. There was a significant association between exam stressors and branch, educational level, and mother's and father's education level (P< 0.05. Conclusions: According to the high level of stress in students and the recognition of demographic factors, effective educational interventions can be conducted to reduce stress.

  10. Perception of the medical students on their future career in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barikani, Ameneh; Afaghi, Mahsa; Barikani, Firooze; Afaghi, Ahmad

    2012-06-25

    Young physicians have many recruitment barriers in Iran. Therefore, for planning purpose, assessment of the attitudes of medical intern students towards their future career is important. This cross-sectional study assessed the view points of 300 medical students through a self administered questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS software with P value < 0.05. Two hundred and forty students (80%) of the students had responded to the questionnaire. Among them, 67.5% were female with mean age of 21.7±2.4. The main factors for deciding to study in medicine were their interest (64.1%), family pressure (13.5%) and social prestige of medical career (9.8%). The mean score of attitudes was 2.3±0.6. In total, 24.5% of students demonstrated not having interest in studying medicine. The most important cause of their interest change was long duration of education (24.4%) and cost of studying in medicine (13.8%). In total, 88.6% of students had negative viewpoint towards their medical career in future. In general, the attitude of medical students toward their future career was negative.

  11. Viewpoints of students of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Mojahed

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Academic advisors have been proven important in students’ success. Insufficient guidance and counseling can delay professional and educational achievements. Proper counseling can provide opportunities for educational success and also positive change students’ behavioral models. This study was accomplished with the purpose of assigning the function of advisors from the viewpoint of the students. Methods: This descriptive study was done on 385 students of Shahid Sadoughi University. Randomized stratified sampling was used. The data were collected by completing the self-reported questionnaire and then were analyzed by SPSS software. Advisors’ functions in each of the items were evaluated. The significance level of 0.05 was considered. Results: The majority of samples were from Nursing, Midwifery, and Public Health School and a few from Faculty of Medicine. The majority of students (41.8% agreed to have the same advisor from the first term to the last. Also the results showed that the functions of advisors were poor in the areas of constant supervision and monitoring of students’ educational status (35.8%, preparing the timetable for performing the personal or group counseling (41.8% and providing counseling sessions according to the timetable (42.3%. But their functions were fair in the areas of acceptable guidance of students in the educational problems (35.1%, and the advisor’s familiarity to educational regulations (43.9%. It is necessary to note that the advisor's ability in making the intimate relationship with students (37.1%, and the advisors’ motivation and tendency to guidance and counseling (30.1% were the two items evaluated excellent by students. Conclusion: It is necessary that advisors make the students familiar with educational regulations at the first semester of higher education. Also, the policies and regulations for advisors will clarify their activities and will help them to perform better.

  12. Accreditation status of hospital pharmacies and their challenges of medication management: A case of south Iranian largest university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, Omid; Dorosti, Hesam; Talebzadeh, Alireza; Bastani, Peivand

    2016-01-01

    Considering the importance of accreditation for hospital pharmacies, this study was to determine the challenges of medication management in hospital pharmacies affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The study was a mix-method research conducted in two qualitative and quantitative phases during the years 2014-2015 in Shiraz, Iran. National Accreditation Standard checklist for hospitals was used for data collection in the first phase, and Delphi method was applied in three rounds to achieve the most challenges of medication management and the related solutions. Results indicated a medium status of accreditation for all three dimensions in the above hospital pharmacies (3.53, 42.15 and 7, respectively). Lack of clinical pharmacists, nonparticipation of the pharmacy director in annual budgeting, lack of access to patient information, discontinuity of pharmaceutical care for patients discharged, defects in pharmacy staff training, lack of legislation in support of pharmacists and lack of adequate access to physicians' prescriptions, shortages in reporting medication errors, and lack of evidence related to microbial contamination are the most challenges extracted from the second phase. It seems that the studied hospital pharmacies encounter numerous problems regarding accreditation, pharmaceutical care as well as appropriate medication management and supply chain. Attempts to solve these problems can play an important role in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of pharmacies in Iran.

  13. Accreditation status of hospital pharmacies and their challenges of medication management: A case of south Iranian largest university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Barati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of accreditation for hospital pharmacies, this study was to determine the challenges of medication management in hospital pharmacies affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The study was a mix-method research conducted in two qualitative and quantitative phases during the years 2014–2015 in Shiraz, Iran. National Accreditation Standard checklist for hospitals was used for data collection in the first phase, and Delphi method was applied in three rounds to achieve the most challenges of medication management and the related solutions. Results indicated a medium status of accreditation for all three dimensions in the above hospital pharmacies (3.53, 42.15 and 7, respectively. Lack of clinical pharmacists, nonparticipation of the pharmacy director in annual budgeting, lack of access to patient information, discontinuity of pharmaceutical care for patients discharged, defects in pharmacy staff training, lack of legislation in support of pharmacists and lack of adequate access to physicians' prescriptions, shortages in reporting medication errors, and lack of evidence related to microbial contamination are the most challenges extracted from the second phase. It seems that the studied hospital pharmacies encounter numerous problems regarding accreditation, pharmaceutical care as well as appropriate medication management and supply chain. Attempts to solve these problems can play an important role in improving the efficiency and effectiveness of pharmacies in Iran.

  14. Perspectives in medical education - 4. A "global" dimension to reform at Keio University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R Harsha

    2007-03-01

    Keio University School of Medicine is awakening to the realization that it will achieve international recognition as a center of excellence in medical education and healthcare only by inculcating clinical skills and critical thinking in its medical graduates. A new "global" perspective identifies the traditional failure of Japanese medical education to provide its graduates with clinical skills training as the root cause of a number of deficiencies. These include (i) the reluctance of Japanese medical graduates to seek global experience; (ii) the absence of interest in the global healthcare marketplace for Japanese medical graduates as potential recruits; (iii) the failure to incorporate globally accepted innovations, like problem-based learning, in Japanese medical education; (iv) the failure to follow globally accepted standards of clinical practice in Japan; (v) the lack of instruction in general internal medicine in Japan; and (vi) the neglect of evidence-based medicine in Japanese healthcare practice. Keio University is embarking on an ambitious effort that commits both the will and resources necessary to reform medical education at Keio in accordance with global norms. The initiatives currently underway include (i) incorporating PBL into the curriculum to foster active learning, (ii) implementing measures to promote interactive teaching techniques among the faculty, and (iii) granting recognition to teachers through new promotion policies. Wider implementation of these initiatives across the country will enable Japanese healthcare and Japanese physicians to occupy their rightful place of respect in the global healthcare market, comparable to the widespread international recognition given to Japanese medical researchers.

  15. Maryland State Police Aviation Division. A model emergency medical system for our nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Richard F; Wish, John R

    2004-01-01

    This collective review has the following purposes. First we will describe each of the components of the Maryland State Police Aviation Division. We will then provide detailed information about the Atlas and Database of Air Medical Services (ADAMS) compiled by the center for transportation and injury research (Buffalo, New York) in alliance with the Association of Air Medical Services (Alexandria, Virginia) that provides a unique opportunity for each state to evaluate the comprehensive nature of their air medical services. The concept "the golden hour" has been molded into the world's premier public service aviation unit, which has proudly served the citizens of Maryland for over 24 years. This effort was initially made possible through a cooperative effort between the Maryland State Police Aviation Division and Dr. R Adams Cowley at the University of Maryland Hospital as a public service to the citizens of the state. This arrangement added a unique, economical, and life-saving component to the regionalized Emergency Medical Services and Critical Care system coordinated by the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIESS). The Maryland State Police Aviation Division has four components: (1) aircraft, (2) state troopers, (3) system communications (SYSCOM) center, and (4) level I adult and pediatric trauma centers, as well as a regional burn center. ADAMS is a compilation of information of Air Medical Services in the United States to respond to traumas and other emergencies. Specifically, ADAMS provides descriptive and geographic information on Air Medical Service base locations, communication centers, rotor wing (RW) assets, and the major hospitals and transports that receive scene transports. The database includes all types of provider organizations including nonprofit, commercial, and public service (fire, police) air medical service providers, as well as several military units that routinely provide transport in remote areas. ADAMS provides

  16. Preparation for shipment of spent TRIGA fuel elements from the research reactor of the Medical University of Hannover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampel, Gabriele; Cordes, Harro [Medical University of Hannover, D-30625 Hannover (Germany); Ebbinghaus, Kurt; Haferkamp, Dirk [NOELL-KRC, D-97064 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    In the early seventies a research reactor of type TRIGA Mark I was installed in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Medical University of Hannover (MHH) for the production of isotopes with short decay times for medical use. Since new production methods have been developed, the reactor has become obsolete and the MHH decided to decommission it. Probably in the second quarter of 1999 all 76 spent TRIGA fuel elements will be shipped to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), USA, in one cask of type GNS 16. Due to technical reasons within the MHH a special Mobile Transfer System, which is being developed by the company Noell-KRC, will be used for reloading the fuel elements and transferring them from the reactor to the cask GNS 16. A description of the main components of this system as well as the process for transferring the fuel elements follows. (author)

  17. Medical University of South Carolina Environmental Hazards Assessment Program. Volume 5: Annual report, July 1, 1993--June 30, 1994 deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Medical University of South Carolina`s vision is to become the premier national resource for medical information and for environmental/health risk assessment. A key component to the success of the many missions of the Environmental Hazards Assessment Program (EHAP) is timely access to large volumes of data. This study documents the results of the needs assessment effort conducted to determine the information access and processing requirement of EHAP. The following topics are addressed in this report: environmental medicine and risk communication: curriculum and a professional support network-Department of Family Medicine; environmental hazards assessment and education program in pharmacy graduate education in risk assessment; and graduate education risk assessment.

  18. Cases from the Osler Medical Service at Johns Hopkins University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habas, Allison B; Kim, Yuli; Jefferson, Brian K

    2003-12-01

    A 50-year-old African American woman presented with bilateral lower extremity pain, a history of falls during the past several months, and personality and behavior changes. She had been in good health until approximately 5 months before admission, when she began to fall with increasing frequency, often while going down a flight of stairs. She described these falls as her "legs giving out" and feeling very heavy and unsteady. There was no head trauma or loss of consciousness. Her daughter noticed that her gait had become somewhat unsteady during the last several months. Her family also noted a change in her personality at this time. Previously, she had been a very tidy person who took great care with her appearance, who was working as a customer service representative. However, she had become less social and very withdrawn. She had been observed putting on dirty clothes after showering, as well as eating constantly. The patient denied any fevers, chills, night sweats, headaches, vision changes, or tinnitus. She also denied any rashes, muscle pain, or intolerance to heat or cold. There was no history of seizure disorder or depression. Her past medical history was notable only for hypertension and being a passenger in a motor vehicle crash 1 year before admission. She denied any alcohol, tobacco, or illicit drug use, and had no travel history other than coming to the United States, as she was originally from Trinidad. On physical examination, she was a moderately obese African American woman with a flat affect, psychomotor slowing, and alopecia of the scalp. She was alert and oriented to person, place, and time, but had a score of 26 out of 30 on the Mini-Mental State Examination. She lost points only for recall; she had no difficulty with serial 7s. Her cranial nerves were intact and her speech was fluent, although sparse, and she did not make any paraphasic errors. Her muscle strength was 5/5 in both the upper and lower extremities. Reflexes were 2+ in the upper

  19. Medical students' knowledge, abilities and access characteristics to the internet at a peruvian university

    OpenAIRE

    Horna, Pedro; Facultad de Medicina Alberto Hurtado, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia; Sociedad Científica de Estudiantes de Medicina Cayetano Heredia – SOCEMCH; Curioso, Walter; Facultad de Medicina Alberto Hurtado, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia; Sociedad Científica de Estudiantes de Medicina Cayetano Heredia – SOCEMCH; Guillén, Carlos; Facultad de Medicina Alberto Hurtado, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia; Sociedad Científica de Estudiantes de Medicina Cayetano Heredia – SOCEMCH; Torres, Carla; Facultad de Medicina Alberto Hurtado, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia; Sociedad Científica de Estudiantes de Medicina Cayetano Heredia – SOCEMCH; Kawano, Jorge; Facultad de Medicina Alberto Hurtado, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia; Sociedad Científica de Estudiantes de Medicina Cayetano Heredia – SOCEMCH

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To study the knowledge abilities and access characteristics to the Internet in undergraduate medical students from a Peruvian University. Methods: Development and application of a questionnaire to medical students, report of the results and nested case-control analysis of data to identify variables related to the ability to surf the Internet. Results: The students enter the Internet mainly from home. The most visited websites were those from web mail services and entertainment sit...

  20. Dysmenorrhea among female medical students in King Abdulaziz University: Prevalence, Predictors and outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Nahla Khamis; AlGhamdi, Manar Saleh; Al-Shaibani, Alanoud Nawaf; AlAmri, Fatima Ali; Alharbi, Huda Abdulrahman; Al-Jadani, Arwa Kheder; Alfaidi, Raghad Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, predictors and outcome of dysmenorrhea among female medical students in King Abdulaziz University (KAU), Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 435 medical students at KAU, Jeddah selected through stratified random sample method. A pre-constructed, validated, self-administered questionnaire was used to collect personal and socio-demographic information. Data about menstrual history, stress, smoking were also collected...

  1. ATTITUDES OF MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY GRADUATES TOWARDS THE INTERNSHIP TRAINING PERIOD AT KING FAISAL UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    Bashawri, Layla A.M.; Mirghani A Ahmed; Bahnassy, Ahmed A.L.; Al-Salim, Jawaher A.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this present survey was to look into the attitudes of medical laboratory technology (MLT) graduates towards the internship training period of the MLT Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Faisal University. Material and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was designed and distributed for this purpose. The study period was from December 1st 2002 – 31st December 2004. Two-hundred questionnaires were distributed to recent graduates, and 115 wer...

  2. Absenteeism among medical and health science undergraduate students at Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Desalegn, Anteneh Assefa; Berhan, Asres; Berhan, Yifru

    2014-01-01

    Background Student absenteeism is a major concern for university education worldwide. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and causes of absenteeism among undergraduate medical and health sciences students at Hawassa University. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study using a pretested self-administered structured questionnaire from May-June 2013. The primary outcome indicator was self-reported absenteeism from lectures in the semester preceding the study period. The stud...

  3. Knowledge and Attitude Level of Students about Solid Waste Recycling; Kashan University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Mazaheri Tehrani A.1 MSc,; Hosseindoost Gh. MSc,; Miranzadeh M.B.* PhD

    2016-01-01

    Aims Increasing of the population and development of urban areas, has led to solid waste generation increasing which is one of the problems and difficulties that put human and environmental health in danger. The aim of present study was to determine the knowledge and attitude level of Kashan University of Medical Sciences’ students about solid waste recycling. Instrument & Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out in the fall of 2012 at the Kashan University of Medi...

  4. Medical Tourism and the Libyan National Health Services

    OpenAIRE

    El Taguri, Adel

    2007-01-01

    Medical tourism is a term that is used frequently by the media and travel agencies as a catchall phrase to describe a process where people travel to other countries to obtain medical, dental, and/or surgical care [1,2]. Leisure aspects of traveling are usually included on such a medical travel trip [1]. The term is also used to describe a situation where doctors travel to other places to deliver services to endogenous populations [3].Many factors have led to the recent increase in popularity ...

  5. The Arabian Gulf University College of Medicine and Medical Sciences: a successful model of a multinational medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, Hossam; Anderson, M Brownell

    2006-12-01

    In the late 1970s, leaders of the Arabian [corrected] Gulf countries proposed a novel idea of a joint educational and cultural venture: establishing a new regional university based in the Kingdom of Bahrain that would be managed as a multinational consortium of Gulf countries including Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and Bahrain. It was intended to promote higher education and research in the Gulf region; to serve the development needs of the region; to reflect the unique economic, social, and cultural attributes of the Gulf communities and their environments; and to respond to the health care needs of the member countries. Since its inception in 1982, the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences (CMMS) at Arabian Gulf University (AGU) has adopted the educational philosophy of problem-based learning (PBL) and self-directed, student-centered education. The curriculum is integrated, with early introduction of education to foster clinical skills and professional competencies. The strategic alliance with the health care systems in Bahrain and other Gulf regions has created a successful model of efficient and effective initialization of health care resources in the community. The experience that has accumulated at the AGU-CMMS from introducing innovative medical education has allowed it to take a leadership position in medical education in the Gulf region. The original goals of this unique experiment have been realized along with unanticipated outcomes of spearheading changes in medical education in the Gulf region. Old and new medical schools have adopted several characteristics of the AGU educational program. Several elements contributed to its success: a clear vision of providing quality medical education and realizing and sustaining this vision by a supportive leadership at the university and college levels; an alliance with the regional health care systems; a dedicated faculty who have been able to work as a team while continually

  6. Developing a Performance Evaluation Model of Trustees Boards in Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haniye Sadat Sajadi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The critical role of the boards of trustee in the governance of universities clarifies the necessity of evaluating its performance. Despite the importance of such evaluation, evidence demonstrated few studies have been done on the model of board performance evaluation especially in Iran. Aim: This study was aimed to develop a model to evaluate the board performance in Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences. Methodology: The present study was a mix qualitative-quantitative study. The participants were all stakeholders of board performance evaluation. The study, firstly, focused on the world experiences about the models of the board performance evaluation in the universities. Then, this study tried to investigate the current and proposed model of the board performance evaluation in the Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences. Hence, data were collected through interviews, observation and relevant document analysis and analyzed using framework approach. After that, the clustering and rating of the proposed dimensions and indicators of the board performance evaluation was done using the concept mapping method. Finally, the study concentrated on the expert consensus about the initial proposed model of the board performance evaluation. A model was proposed to evaluate the board performance in Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences, which had eight parts and sixty-four indicators proposing for the board performance evaluation. This study helped to develop a valid model to evaluate the board performance evaluation in a special kind of university. Such model can be used to produce useful tool for evaluating the performance of the board.

  7. A Strategy for Improving the National Medical and Public Health Surge Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-19

    Goiania , Brazil in 1987 when two men brought home some glowing, blue pieces of metal they had taken out of a discarded Cesium-137 radiotherapy machine...Medicine 13 (January 2004): 5. 51 University of Cincinnati, “The Radiological Accident in Goiania : An Overview of Dosimetric and Medical Aspects...University of Cincinnati. “The Radiological Accident in Goiania : An Overview of Dosimetric and Medical Aspects.” Briefing slides available from <http

  8. Survey of Medical Literature Borrowed from the National Lending Library for Science and Technology *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, David N.; Bower, Cathryn A.

    1969-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a four-week questionnaire survey carried out at the National Lending Library (N.L.L.), Great Britian, to discover which types of organizations were the principal users of medical literature, what types of literature were used, and which were the main sources of references to medical publications. Industrial organizations and universities accounted for the majority (62 percent) of the loans, most of which were English-language periodicals published since 1960. For the whole sample, citation lists in periodical articles were the principal sources of references, although for literature published in the last fifteen months, abstracting and indexing journals were the main sources. Of the latter, Index Medicus proved to be the most fruitful source of references. By asking whether the item requested was really useful to their work, a measure of the reliability of the different sources of references was obtained. Appendixes include the questionnaire, a list of the most frequently borrowed journals, and a list of abstracting and indexing journals used as sources of references. PMID:5782264

  9. Comparing adults who use cannabis medically with those who use recreationally: Results from a national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lewei A; Ilgen, Mark A; Jannausch, Mary; Bohnert, Kipling M

    2016-10-01

    Cannabis has been legalized for medical use in almost half of the states in the U.S. Although laws in these states make the distinction between medical and recreational use of cannabis, the prevalence of people using medical cannabis and how distinct this group is from individuals using cannabis recreationally is unknown at a national level. Data came from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). All adults endorsing past year cannabis use who reported living in a state that had legalized medical cannabis were divided into recreational cannabis use only and medical cannabis use. Demographic and clinical characteristics were compared across these two groups. 17% of adults who used cannabis in the past year used cannabis medically. There were no significant differences between those who used medically versus recreationally in race, education, past year depression and prevalence of cannabis use disorders. In adjusted analyses, those with medical cannabis use were more likely to have poorer health and lower levels of alcohol use disorders and non-cannabis drug use. A third of those who reported medical cannabis use endorsed daily cannabis use compared to 11% in those who reported recreational use exclusively. Adults who use medical and recreational cannabis shared some characteristics, but those who used medical cannabis had higher prevalence of poor health and daily cannabis use. As more states legalize cannabis for medical use, it is important to better understand similarities and differences between people who use cannabis medically and recreationally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [The School of Medical Sciences of the University of Santiago de Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardones Restat, F

    1997-07-01

    The Medical Sciences School of the University of Santiago de Chile, is an institution inserted in the occidental culture and therefore on its conceptions and traditions. It subscribes the Principles defined in the Universal Declaration of the Human Rights of the United Nations and especially the importance of the human person, as an entity irrepetible, different to others. The human rights are over the institutions, the society and the laws of science. The Faculty considers the family as the cell or natural and fundamental element for the development of the human being in the society. It defines its historic mission as the search of the truth and the achievement of a society in pro of the welfare and health of the people in a frame of excellence, justice, humanism, efficiency and participation. As an expression of the cultural patrimony it should create and transfer knowledge. As guarantor of the ethical principles it should protect the dignity that emanates from the transcendent nature of the person and its moral principles and therefore its right to life, justice, freedom, equality, health, education, and happiness. As a paradigm of progress it must be involved in modernization and should impulse the development. As an entity committed with Society it should participate in the search of solutions for politics and programs looking for a higher level of life and a better model of health. The profile of our graduated students will identify them due to their profound spirit of welfare of the person, his family, his community, ethical sense, solidarity, justness and humanity, their orientation to the community and the environment with a solid professional formation in the strategy of Primary Health Care. They will provide education in health for the whole family in order to improve a better way of life. They will be trained to detect and solve the risks of individual, communities and environment. Research is also a priority of the Faculty in order to contribute to

  11. Features of Medical Student's Theses at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences during a Five-Year Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazdan Hamzavi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Most of the studies conducted in Iranian medical schools are carried out as student's theses on which a lot of time and energy is spent. The purpose of the present study was to determine the characteristics of medical student's theses at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences during a five year period (2004-2008.Methods: In this descriptive, cross-sectional study a checklist consisting of 21 questions was designed. The data were gathered from all medical student's theses during 2004-2008 (n=189 using a consensus method of data collection. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software.Results: In terms of type, most of the theses were descriptive cross-sectional (33.3%, descriptive (29.1%, and descriptive-analytical (18.5%. The highest number of theses belonged to clinical psychiatry (18.5% and obstetrics and gynecology (17.5% departments. Other departments, especially basic science departments had the lowest number of theses because clinical teachers constituted 86.2% of the supervisors. The duration of the thesis completion was between 2 and 24 months. Using hospital records and inpatients files were the methods mostly used for data collection and as data sources. Furthermore, we could not find an appropriate assessment and scoring system of theses in place.Conclusion: Medical student's theses lacked appropriate quality therefore this issue should be seriously taken into consideration by educational managers.

  12. Internet use and addiction among medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mainul; Rahman, Nor Azlina A; Majumder, Md Anwarul Azim; Haque, Seraj Zohurul; Kamal, Zubair M; Islam, Zakirul; Haque, ATM Emdadul; Rahman, Nor Iza A; Alattraqchi, Ahmed Ghazi

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of Internet has now become indispensable, and the technology has revolutionized the medical education and practice worldwide. Currently, medical students and professionals have an enormous opportunity to keep them always updated with the exponential growth of knowledge because of potential progression of Internet throughout the world that enables them to become a lifelong learner. Internet addiction is a widespread phenomenon among students and academicians at universities in Malaysia. Students use the Internet for recreational purpose and personal and professional development. The Internet has become an integral part of day-to-day life of the university students, including medical students. The aim of the present study was to examine the Internet use and addiction among students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia. Methods This was a cross-sectional study in which a questionnaire, Internet Addiction Diagnostic Questionnaire, developed by the Center for Internet Addiction, USA, was used. One hundred forty-nine medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin participated in this study. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Results The mean scores were 44.9±14.05 and 41.4±13.05 for male and female participants, respectively, which indicated that both the genders were suffering from mild Internet addiction. Conclusion This study shows almost similar level of Internet usage among medical students irrespective of their socioeconomic background, with no statistically significant (p>0.05) differences, except among the years of study (p=0.007). Overall, from the research data and having worked with this cohort very closely, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin medical students can be labeled as wonted and recurring users of the Internet. Nevertheless, it is very difficult to define as Internet addicts or pathological users of the Internet because of small sample size and cross-sectional study. PMID

  13. Internet use and addiction among medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mainul; Rahman, Nor Azlina A; Majumder, Md Anwarul Azim; Haque, Seraj Zohurul; Kamal, Zubair M; Islam, Zakirul; Haque, Atm Emdadul; Rahman, Nor Iza A; Alattraqchi, Ahmed Ghazi

    2016-01-01

    The use of Internet has now become indispensable, and the technology has revolutionized the medical education and practice worldwide. Currently, medical students and professionals have an enormous opportunity to keep them always updated with the exponential growth of knowledge because of potential progression of Internet throughout the world that enables them to become a lifelong learner. Internet addiction is a widespread phenomenon among students and academicians at universities in Malaysia. Students use the Internet for recreational purpose and personal and professional development. The Internet has become an integral part of day-to-day life of the university students, including medical students. The aim of the present study was to examine the Internet use and addiction among students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia. This was a cross-sectional study in which a questionnaire, Internet Addiction Diagnostic Questionnaire, developed by the Center for Internet Addiction, USA, was used. One hundred forty-nine medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin participated in this study. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. The mean scores were 44.9±14.05 and 41.4±13.05 for male and female participants, respectively, which indicated that both the genders were suffering from mild Internet addiction. This study shows almost similar level of Internet usage among medical students irrespective of their socioeconomic background, with no statistically significant (p>0.05) differences, except among the years of study (p=0.007). Overall, from the research data and having worked with this cohort very closely, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin medical students can be labeled as wonted and recurring users of the Internet. Nevertheless, it is very difficult to define as Internet addicts or pathological users of the Internet because of small sample size and cross-sectional study.

  14. An overview of intravenous-related medication administration errors as reported to MEDMARX, a national medication error-reporting program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Rodney W; Becker, Shawn C

    2006-01-01

    Medication errors can be harmful, especially if they involve the intravenous (IV) route of administration. A mixed-methodology study using a 5-year review of 73,769 IV-related medication errors from a national medication error reporting program indicates that between 3% and 5% of these errors were harmful. The leading type of error was omission, and the leading cause of error involved clinician performance deficit. Using content analysis, three themes-product shortage, calculation errors, and tubing interconnectivity-emerge and appear to predispose patients to harm. Nurses often participate in IV therapy, and these findings have implications for practice and patient safety. Voluntary medication error-reporting programs afford an opportunity to improve patient care and to further understanding about the nature of IV-related medication errors.

  15. Publishing medical schools’ USMLE Step 1 scores: increase preclinical education accountability and national standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eltorai AE

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Adam EM Eltorai Brown University, Warren Alpert Medical School, Providence, RI, USA Medical education innovation is a field of active investigation.1,2 Whether it is problem-based learning, lectures, discussion groups, systems-based blocks, integrated courses, video-captured, pass-fail, or iPad-requiring, every medical school approaches preclinical education differently. Which combination of these methods is most effective?To answer this, I propose that medical schools ought to be required to publish their average United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE Step 1 scores annually. In doing so, the most effective education methods will emerge.

  16. [Innovative activity of dental faculty staff of Omsk State Medical University: results, problems and prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, A I; Gudinova, Zh V

    2015-01-01

    The article summarizes innovative activity in Omsk State Medical University (OSMU) and contains the review of innovative developments of staff of dental faculty of OSMU (a line of gels for caries prevetion, the DENTEST diagnostic unit, technology of tooth shape modular restoration, personified therapy.of patients with periodontal disease, caries diagnosis and periodontontal disease prognosis software, a set of the training materials on esthetic modeling of teeth, personification of clinical approaches in oral bioaesthetic rehabilitation, etc.). The analysis of the factors stimulating and complicating innovative detail in medical school, problems of introduction of medical innovations, lack of system of an assessment of medical technologies in Russia, regulations of the organization of innovative activity in medical schools is carried out, the prospects of their solution connected with decision-making at the state level are formulated.

  17. Critical limits (alert values) for physician notification: universal or medical center specific limits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, G

    1998-01-01

    The concept of critical limits (alert values), defined as an imminent life threatening laboratory result requiring immediate physician notification, has been widely adopted as a standard of good laboratory practice. Although virtually all laboratories have tests with critical limits, surveys have shown that there is no universal alert value list. Recently, nine VA medical centers in the New England region, which now constitute one consolidated entity, were surveyed with the objective of summarizing critical limits. Universal (100 percent) critical limit tests for clinical chemistry were: Calcium; mean low/high, 6.5/12.4 mg/dL: Glucose 48/432 mg/dL: Potassium 2.8/6.1 mmol/L: Sodium 121/159 mmol/L. Universal hematology tests included: Hematocrit 22.2/59.7 percent: Platelet count 61K/983K: white blood count 1.9K/29K. Although there was universal agreement that abnormal coagulation tests (PT, PTT) should be included on the hematology critical limit list, there was wide variation in the reporting of coagulation tests (seconds and INR) and patient therapeutic status (anticoagulant or no-anticoagulant). Universal alert values for microbiology were: Positive blood culture: Positive cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) culture: Positive CSF Gram stain. There was no universal agreement regarding critically high (potentially toxic) therapeutic drugs, with two medical centers declining to notify physicians of any abnormally high therapeutic drug level. No other qualitative critical limits for other laboratory sections, such as physician notification of an unexpected malignancy (surgical pathology) were universal. Medical center specific critical limits, designed to meet the clinical needs of each facility, are the norm in the nine medical centers. Laboratories do need periodically to review their critical limit lists with appropriate clinical input to avoid including critical limits for laboratory tests not required for urgent physician notification and patient evaluation and treatment.

  18. Developing a model of proper governance for removing interaction barriers between universities of medical sciences andindustries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shiva madahian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and goal: The interaction between university and industry, due to its highly constructive and positive effects on technical, economic and social changes, was traditionally at the center of policy makers’ and planners’ attention. The aim of the present study was to explain barriers and challenges existing in the interaction between medical sciences universities and industry. Method: This present descriptive-correlational study used measuring method fto investigate the interaction among Medical Sciences University (School of Public Health. 1468 individuals participated in this study. Using Morgan scale, 321 people were selected as the sample. Two questionnaires were prepared by the researcher. The proper governance questionnaire contains political, economic, social, legal and cultural dimensions composed of 69 questions. The barriers between university and industry questionnaire covering 3 dimensions of individual interaction barriers, organizational interaction barriers and environmental interaction barriers is composed of 40 questions. Data analysis was done using SPSS, version 21. Results: Based on factor analysis of the data, the main dimension of proper governance respectively was cultural factors and among various factors of barriers between university and industry, environmental interaction dimension was considered as the most important one. Moreover, the results showed that there was a direct and meaningful relationship between dimensions of proper governance and interaction between university and industry variable. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, considering culture and cultural differences can help improve the interaction between university and industry.

  19. Prevalence and Predictors of Anxiety and Depression among Female Medical Students in King Abdulaziz University Jeddah Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical education & medical profession are among the most challenging and most stressful ones. Anxiety and depression represents an escalating public health problem among medical students. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence & predictors of anxiety and depression among female medical students in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.Methods: A cross- sectional study was carried out during 2010-2011. A stratified random sample method was used to select 450 medical students. A confidential, anonymous & self administered questionnaire included Standardized Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale was used.Results: The mean scores for anxiety and depression were 9.32 ± 3.77 & 6.59 ± 3.62, respectively. There is a positive correlation between anxiety & depression scores (r= 0.52, P< 0.001. Prevalence of morbid anxiety and depression were 34.9% and 14.7%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the first predictor of morbid anxiety was depression (adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR = 3.28; 95% Confidence Interval (CI: 1.85-5.82, P < 0.001. Students complained from condensed academic course, had academic and emotional failures during the 6 months preceded the study were about 2 times more prone to anxiety. Predictors of depression were having anxiety, nationality (being non-Saudi & having emotional failure.Conclusion: Medical students encountered high rates of anxiety & depression compared to others. Academic problems and major life events were the main predictors. Enhancing faculty preventive & curative mental health services is recommended. Initiation of stress management courses & enhancing academic advising services are required since the start of medical education.

  20. Music Students’ National Values Cultivation in the Educational Process of a University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the problem of music students’ national values cultivation in the educational process of a university. The author proves that music students’ national values cultivation in the educational process of a university will be efficient if the following pedagogical conditions are realized: the use of forms and methods of education, aimed at the identification of the personally significant qualities of the future music teachers with the national values; involvement of music students in the individual creative activity, focused on the spiritual personality development; implementation of a special course, contributing to music students’ national values cultivation into the educational process

  1. Dubna - A University Town Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    On the initiative of the JINR Directorate, which was supported by the Academy of Natural Sciences of Russia, the International University of Nature, Society and Man, was set up in 1991. Then, the JINR University Centre was established, where senior students of the leading Russian Physics institutes finish their education under the supervision of JINR scientists and attend practical studies in the JINR Laboratories. This new JINR development concept envisages a gradual conversion to an international centre which will integrate fundamental science, technological studies and education.

  2. Dubna - A University Town Exhibition Science Bringing Nations Together

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    On the initiative of the JINR Directorate, which was supported by the Academy of Natural Sciences of Russia, the International University of Nature, Society and Man, was set up in 1991. Then, the JINR University Centre was established, where senior students of the leading Russian Physics institutes finish their education under the supervision of JINR scientists and attend practical studies in the JINR Laboratories. This new JINR development concept envisages a gradual conversion to an international centre which will integrate fundamental science, technological studies and education.

  3. Self-medication among non-healthcare students of the University of Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleiman Ibrahim Sharif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of the following study is to estimate the prevalence of self-medication among university students and evaluate factors associated with the practice. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted during May, 2012 using a pre-validated questionnaire distributed to 250 students of the 4 years of study at the college of business administration. Data were analyzed using PASW Statistics for Windows, Version 18.0. Chicago: SPSS Inc and results are expressed as counts and percentages. Chi-square test was used to evaluate significant association among the study variables and P < 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. Results: The response rate was 80% and all respondents were Arabs with 114 (57% females and 86 (43% males. Self-medication was practiced by 118 (59% students and most (88.1% of them obtained medications from pharmacies. About 21 (11% respondents self-medicated with antibiotics. Only 34 (17% and 16 (8% of respondents were aware of bacterial resistance and rational drug use respectively. The most common reasons for self-medication were seeking quick relief (134, 67%, physician′s advice of self-management (100, 50%, illness is minor (91, 45.5%. Common reasons against self-medication include risk of misdiagnosis of illness (160, 80%, risk of using the wrong medication (154, 77%, risk of adverse effects (140, 70%. Self-medication was practiced for headache or mild pain, eye and ear symptoms, gastric problems, cold, fever and allergy. Conclusion: Self-medication among non-healthcare students is common with high prevalence. Knowledge of students of reasons for and against self-medication was adequate, but awareness of respondents of rational drug use and risk of bacterial resistance in response to misuse was poor. Orientation courses/workshops directed to university students would be beneficial.

  4. Pattern of self-medication with analgesics among Iranian University students in central Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Sarahroodi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-medication is defined as the use of drugs for the treatment of self-diagnosed disorders. It is influenced by factors such as education, family, society, law, availability of drugs and exposure to advertisements. This study was performed to evaluate self-medication with analgesics and its pattern among different groups of Iranian University Students. Materials and Methods: A randomized, cross-sectional, multicenter study was conducted from December 2009 to February 2010. The target population of this study was 564 students out of 10,000 students attending four medical and non-medical science universities in Qom state. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16, and analysis was conducted with descriptive analysis procedures. Results: 76.6% of the students had used analgesics in self-medication in the previous 3 months. The frequency of analgesic use in the study period was once in 19.2% of the participants, twice in 22.2%, three times in 16.3% and more than three times in 35.5% of the participants, although 6.8% of them were not sure when they were used. Of all the respondents, 49.8% reported headache as the problem. This was the most common problem, after which came Dysmenorrhea,headache and stomach ache. Bone and joint pains were other problems that led to the use of analgesics. The most commonly used source of information for self-medication with analgesics was advice from friends and family (54.7%, previously prescribed medications (30.1%, their medical knowledge (13.3% and recommendation of a pharmacist (1.9%. Conclusion: Self-medication with analgesics is very high among Iranian students in Qom city. This could be an index for other parts of the Iranian community. Because the source of information about analgesics is inappropriate, we would recommend education courses about analgesics and self-medication on the radio and television for the entire population.

  5. [Medical pedagogy and special didactics in graduate courses at the medical school of the University of São Paulo, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcondes, E; Vanzolini, M E; Basile, M A; Fujimura, I; Pasqualucci, C A

    1992-01-01

    Graduate courses of medical pedagogy and special didactics at S. Paulo University Medical School are analysed. The authors present objectives, subject matters and methodologies of both courses, as well as their evaluation by the graduate students. After an initial rejection, the evaluation became very positive (67% in medical pedagogy and 82% in special didactics). Some future perspectives are discussed.

  6. Relationship between Eating Disorders, Stress and Depression in Medical Students of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences & Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afarin Ahmadian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: Nowadays eating disorders are considered as one of the main psychological disorders. These types of disorder result in physical and mental health problems and affect the individuals’ quality of life. This study has aimed to survey eating disorders and its relation with depression and stress in medical students of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences. Methodology: In a descriptive study, 340 university students were chosen by the use of simple random sampling and also three questionnaires had been used: 1 Eating attitude questionnaire (EAT-26, revised Beck depression inventory (BDI and Students stressors questionnaire by Pouladi. Collected information was analyzed by the use of SPSS software and statistical tests. Findings: Based on research results 9.41% of students had eating disorder, 12.5% had average depression, 33.4% had severe depression, 12.5% had average stress and 31.3% had high stress. Relative frequency of eating disorder in medical students was the same based on gender, age, living conditions and marital status. Also there was a significant relation between relative frequency of eating disorder, depression severity and stress. Conclusion: Study findings showed that there was a relation between eating disorder, depression severity and stress; thus necessity of paying more attention to some mental symptoms such as depression and stress helps clinicians diagnose and cure eating disorders.

  7. Experience of developing and implementing a motivation induction course for konyang university medical college freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Beag Ju; Lee, Keumho; Kim, Kunil; Song, Daun; Hur, Yera

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to develop a new course for Konyang University College of Medicine freshmen to motivate them with regard to their vision and medical professionalism and experience various learning methods of medical education. The course was developed by 4 faculty members through several intensive meetings throughout the winter of 2010. A 4-credit course was designed for 61 freshmen of Konyang University College of Medicine to provide structured guidance and an introduction to their medical education and increase their motivation with regard to their studies and school life. The course lasted for 4 weeks (February 28 to March 25), and every session of the program was evaluated by the students. The 'motivation induction course' consisted of the following sessions: university-wide: 'leadership camp' and 'special lectures for future vision;' college-wide: 'major immersion session,' 'Enneagram workshop,' 'STRONG workshop,' 'medical professionalism,' and 'team-based learning.' The group results were presented in a poster and by oral presentation and were awarded prizes for the best performance. Special features included: group discussion session on medical ethics, which used scenarios that were developed by a medical humanity course committee and visiting all departments and mentors of the medical college to fulfill their curiosity of their future major or workplace. Overall, the course was evaluated as satisfactory (M=4.22, SD=0.81). Although there was some dissatisfaction, the overall experience of the "motivation induction course" was a success. The course will continue to be valuable for freshmen in adapting to medical school and its culture and in defining one's view of a good doctor.

  8. Understanding the Use of Educational Technology among Faculty, Staff, and Students at a Medical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Annan, Dustin L.; Carson, Nancy E.; Freeland, Melissa; Hodge, Ashley B.; Seif, Gretchen A.; Zoller, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A college of health professions at a medical university located in the southeastern United States is striving to increase the use of educational technology among faculty, staff, and students. A strategic planning group was formed and charged with enhancing the use of educational technology within the college. In order to understand the current…

  9. Thirty years of heart transplantation at the university medical centre Utrecht

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sammani, Arjan; Wind, A. M.; Kirkels, J. H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074708074; Klöpping, C; Buijsrogge, M. P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/24420098X; Ramjakhan, F Z; Asselbergs, F. W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/270752137; de Jonge, N|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/091457106

    Purpose To analyse patient demographics, indications, survival and donor characteristics for heart transplantation (HTx) during the past 30 years at the University Medical Centre Utrecht (UMCU). Methods Data have been prospectively collected for all patients who underwent HTx at the UMCU from 1985

  10. Impact of 5 years of Lean Six Sigma in a university medical center

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.C. Niemeijer; A. Trip; L.J. de Jong; K.W. Wendt; R.J.M.M. Does

    2012-01-01

    Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is an originally industry-based methodology for cost reduction and quality improvement. In more recent years, LSS was introduced in health care as well. This article describes the experiences of the University Medical Center Groningen, the second largest hospital in the Netherla

  11. Psychological Type and Undergraduate Student Achievement in Pharmacy Course in Military Medical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ru; Shan, Shou-qin; Tian, Jian-quan

    2007-01-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was given to 264 students in an undergraduate Pharmacy course at a military medical university. Selected MBTI personality types were compared for achievement in the course using a t-test to compare total points earned. High grades were earned by students stronger in the traits of introversion (I) and judgment…

  12. A Comprehensive Wellness Program for Veterinary Medical Education: Design and Implementation at North Carolina State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth; Flammer, Keven; Borst, Luke; Huckle, Jeffrey; Barter, Hillary; Neel, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Research in veterinary medical education has illustrated the challenges students face with respect to mental and emotional wellness, lack of attention to physical health, and limited opportunities to meaningfully engage with persons from different backgrounds. In response, the North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine has…

  13. National Astronomy Day: Bringing the Universe to Your Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendrich, Jean; Brown, Mark

    2012-01-01

    How do teachers help students realize their place in the universe? How do they teach the relationship among the Earth, Moon, stars, and galaxies during daylight hours? Most teachers assume that astronomy is a difficult subject to teach in the classroom and that without a planetarium little can be learned. In this article, the authors discuss…

  14. A University's Dilemma in the Age of National Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColm, Greg; Dorn, Sherman

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the events surrounding the University of South Florida's (USF) involvement with Sami Al-Arian, who was a professor at USF prior to accusations of involvement in the Palestinian Islamic Jihad (PIJ). The seeds of the Al-Arian controversy were planted in the early 1990s when USF--an ambitious but underfunded…

  15. National Astronomy Day: Bringing the Universe to Your Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendrich, Jean; Brown, Mark

    2012-01-01

    How do teachers help students realize their place in the universe? How do they teach the relationship among the Earth, Moon, stars, and galaxies during daylight hours? Most teachers assume that astronomy is a difficult subject to teach in the classroom and that without a planetarium little can be learned. In this article, the authors discuss…

  16. University Supports for Open Access: A Canadian National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greyson, Devon; Vezina, Kumiko; Morrison, Heather; Taylor, Donald; Black, Charlyn

    2009-01-01

    The advent of policies at research-funding organizations requiring grantees to make their funded research openly accessible alters the life cycle of scholarly research. This survey-based study explores the approaches that libraries and research administration offices at the major Canadian universities are employing to support the…

  17. Bedside ultrasound education in Canadian medical schools: A national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Steinmetz

    2016-04-01

    Results:  Approximately half of the 13 responding medical schools had integrated bedside ultrasound teaching into their undergraduate curriculum. The most common trends in undergraduate ultrasound teaching related to duration (1-5 hours/year in 50% of schools, format (practical and theoretical in 67% of schools, and logistics (1:4 instructor to student ratio in 67% of schools. The majority of responding vice-deans indicated that bedside ultrasound education should be integrated into the medical school curriculum (77%, and cited a lack of ultrasound machines and infrastructure as barriers to integration. Conclusions: This study documents the current characteristics of undergraduate ultrasound education in Canada.

  18. Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge : Medical Monitoring Program : July 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document outlines the medical surveillance procedures for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staff at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge. This...

  19. HIN3/396: Experience of Creation of the National (Regional) Telematics Medical Corporate Network in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorov, O; Ponomarenko, V; Kalnish, V

    1999-01-01

    Introduction Ukraine has an extensive experience on creating and maintaining National Medical Networks. A variety of examples include: The National Register of the persons suffered from the Chernobyl disaster: Net of the Sanitary and Epidemiological Service of the Ministry of Health. The National Medical Network for monitoring oncology patients: this links Regional Oncology Dispensaries with Institute of Oncology. Ukraine has a membership to "EuroTransplant" and National Medical Network in this effort has linked Regional Centres with the National Informational Centre on Transplantation. Regional databases from Regional Venereologic Dispensaries, used for monitoring diseases, have been extended to include cases of AIDS. The Telemedical Cardiology Centre in Kharkiv, with trans-telephone ECG. All equipment, including portable ECG amplifiers and modems, is developed in the Ukraine. Teleconsulting Medical Centres, in Kiev, for the analysis of MRI images. The centre "Patholog", in which oncologists - cytologists carry out work. The Ukrainian Association of Computer Medicine (UACM) has created (http: //www.uacm.cit-a.net) WWW- server , which has become a nucleus of the Corporate medical network permitting to exchange the information to 78 institutional members and over 900 individual members. The UACM has created affiliate Web - EHTO-UKRAINE server on national language (http://www.ehto-ukr.cit-ua.net). Ukraine took part in the "Telemedecine Medical Care Networks within the Baltic Region" programme. Also, Ukraine started the Ukrainian- American project on the monitoring of birth defects. Methods The National Telematics Medical Corporate Network 'UkrMedNet' is under construction on the basis of existing the HealthNet and some other autonomous medical networks, with the newest of telecommunication technologies, used in Internet. This project also envisages the integration of all existing separate medical nets, universities and R&D institutes into one 'UkrMedNet', as well as

  20. The effective factors on the academic progress of the students of Tehran University of Medical Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudbari, Masoud; Ahmadi, Azadeh; Roudbari, Soudeh; Sedghi, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    To examine factors influencing the academic performance of students at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted between 2008 and 2009 at the Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Data was obtained from the education office of the university and SPSS version 15 was used for data analysis. Of the 670 students in the study, 230 (34.3%) were boys and 440 (65.6%) were girls.The highest mean score of courses belonged to the Psychiatry Institute (18.68) and the lowest was in the School of Medicine (15.20). Twenty nine per cent of students had failed course and 8.4% had failed semester. The variables gender, level of education, and school are the most important factors affecting the educational progress of students. Overall, students' failure ratios varied significantly between schools and educational levels.

  1. Testing and Validation for Internet Attitude Scale among male and female students at Isfahan University and University of Medical Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Zaki

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The advent of the third millennium witnessed the culmination of two decades of interest expressed by social researchers about the importance, status and utilization of ICT, particularly the Net, concerning scientific production in the areas of theory-formation and research. Part of this scientific output dealt with measurement of internet attitude. The present paper attempts to test, measure and validate internet attitude scales. It offers the findings of a survey conducted among 200 students, both male and female, at Isfahan University and Isfahan University of Medical Science. Standard Dinev and Koufteros questionnaire was used. It measures two kinds of attitude towards internet use and self-efficacy. Using factor analysis, the present paper investigated the reliability of two sets of questionnaires. Both possessed appropriate internal consistency. Construct Validity was confirmed using factor analysis. The statements incorporated within the research instrument could be distinguished and therefore offers a suitable tool for evaluating internet attitude.

  2. Medical School Education in Hypertension Management: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Marvin; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The management of patients with primary hypertension remains a significant problem for the medical profession. In spite of this, specific programs for education in hypertensive vascular disease have been poorly organized. A survey to determine the level of training in this discipline is discussed. (MLW)

  3. National Imperative to Establish a Domestic Medical Intelligence Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Quality Reports Human and Veterinarian Health Surveillance Indicators Coordination with other TEW Cells Exploring Medical and Public Health...and territorial governments, animal shelters, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, veterinarians , and other sources...General medicine/family practice 63 • Hematology • Infectious disease • Internal medicine • Nephrology • Nuclear medicine o In-vivo

  4. 76 FR 30370 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group; Biomedical Research and Research Training Review Subcommittee A. Date: June 28, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications... disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and personal...

  5. Assessment of academic libraries in Mazandran, Goleston and Babol Medical Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehteram Sadat Ilali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 3 August, 2009; Accepted 13 Jan, 2010AbstractBackground and purpose: Libraries have a specific place in universities and have also an important role in students' education and research. The aim of this study was to evaluate the situation of academic libraries in Mazandaran, Babol and Golestan Universities of Medical Sciences.Materials and methods: This study is a descriptive survey in 25 academic libraries in Mazandaran, Golestan and Babol medical Universities. The tool of the survey was a standard questionnaire (ACRL, and the libraries were assessed using of checklist and interview.Results: Thirteen librarians (53% hold a BSc degree, one (4% with an MSc degree and two (8% had an AA degree. Regarding to prediction and design of the libraries structure, only 40% (10 libraries had prior programs. Related to budget, 40% relied on resources from the deputy for research, 12% on faculty current budget and 8% on hospital current budget, (40% of others libraries did not have a planned budget. 12 libraries (45% were open 6 days a week, 10 libraries (40% 5 days a week and 3 libraries (12% provided services every day. 39665 references were held at central library of Babol Medical Sciences University and less than 1016 at 5 Azar Hospital in Golestan Medical Sciences University. Fifteen libraries (60% had access to Medline and Elsevier databases and 10 Libraries (40% did not have any access.Conclusion: University libraries must be standardized to meet the need of the students and staff.Key words: School libraries, therapeutic and teaching hospitals, standards, ACRL, IranJ Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 20(74: 85-89 (Persian

  6. Research priorities in medical education at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences: categories and subcategories in the Iranian context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PARISA NABEIEI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Research in education is a globally significant issue without a long history. Due to the importance of the issue in Health System Development programs, this study intended to determine research priorities in medical education, considering their details and functions. By determining barriers existing in research in education progress, it is tried to make research priorities more functional by recommending acceptable strategies. Methods: This is a qualitative-descriptive study in two descriptive phases. The goal of these phases was to determine research priorities subcategories in medical education by Nominal Group Technique (NGT and two rounds of Delphi method. Through the first phase, subcategories of research priorities were determined, using Nominal Group Technique under medical education experts’ supervision. Through two rounds of Delphi, a questionnaire was constructed based on the subcategories. Eventually, research priorities were determined based on their highest score (scores more than 7 out of 10. Results: In the first phase (NGT, 35 priorities in 5 major fields of medical education were presented. In the second phase, priorities were scored, using Delphi method. Medical Ethics and professionalism gained the highest scores (7.63±1.26 and educational evaluation the lowest (7.28±1.52. In this stage, 7 items were omitted but 2 of them were added again after experts’ revision in the third round of Delphi. Conclusion: According to the results of the present study and based on previous studies, it really seems that the fields of “Learning and Teaching Approaches” and “Medical Ethics and Professionalism” were more important. Because of financial and resource limitations in our country and the importance of research priorities, it is recommended to frequently study “research priorities determination program” at universities.

  7. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices towards Medication Use among Health Care Students in King Saud University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah T. Eissa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health sciences students are expected to have appropriate knowledge and attitudes toward medication use. However, literary evidence of such expertise among health sciences students of King Saud University is unknown. This study was completed to assess the knowledge about medicines and behavior of health science students towards safe use of medications. It also aims to assess the health knowledge, attitude and practices of the students. Methods: This cross-sectional study used a questionnaire consisting of 24 questions. This was administered by the researcher between October and December 2009 in the colleges of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, applied medical science and nursing of the King Saud University. The survey consisted of three parts: Ten questions assessed the students’ knowledge on drug safety (Part 1. Four questions assessed student attitude toward medication consultations by the pharmacist (Part 2 and ten questions involved medication use practices and consultation with pharmacists (Part 3. A stratified sampling method was used to select participants. Results: Pharmacy students had better medication knowledge compared to other health sciences students especially regarding antihypertensive drugs, antibiotics, paracetamol and antacids (p<0.05. Pharmacy students showed a positive attitude regarding the trustworthiness of a pharmacist to give a consultation. Nearly all other health science students showed a negative attitude about dispensing and consultation concerning nutritional supplements by a pharmacist. All health sciences students had a similar perception toward medication use and practice. Conclusion Pharmacy students had better knowledge about medication practice compared to other health sciences students. All other health sciences students lacked the appropriate attitude and practice related to the safe use of medications.

  8. Introduction of a learning management system for medical education at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handels, Heinz

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Connected with the introduction of a learning management system at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf three different learning management systems were evaluated. Based on the purposes and demands of modern medical education the systems WebCT CE 4.0, ILIAS 3.6 and Moodle 1.5.3 were testet and evaluated.This comparison led to an installation of the learning management system Moodle, which is now used by pilot projects and is getting prepared for normal student access in autumn 2006. First experiences under practical conditions are denoted. Finally prospective subjects like the concept of support and further options of use, even in the research domain, are discussed.

  9. [Educational program in the Medical Science Course, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitasato, Hidero; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Ohbu, Makoto; Obata, Fumiya; Ogawa, Zensuke; Sato, Yuichi; Hattori, Manabu; Saito-Taki, Tatsuo; Hara, Kazuya; Okano, Tetsuroh; Kubo, Makoto; Maruyama, Hiroko; Tsuchiya, Benio; Okazaki, Toshio; Ishii, Naohito; Nishimura, Yukari; Takada, Nobukazu; Abe, Michiko; Hachimura, Kazuo; Tanigawa, Kozo; Katagiri, Masato

    2008-07-01

    The aim of education in the Medical Laboratory Science course, Kitasato University School of Allied Health Sciences, is to bring up train students who have Kitasato spirit, for careers in laboratory medicine of hospital or scientific staff of medical companies or as researchers. General and enlightening education concerning "Kitasato spirit" and professional education composed of major subjects was carried out in the first and during the 2nd and two third of 3rd grade, respectively. Medical practice and research training were alternatively carried out for 6 months between November of the 3rd year and November of the 4th year, in order to gain practical experience. Two problem-based learning (PBL) tutorial courses, "Infectious Diseases Course" and "Team Medical Care--Interprofessional Collaborations" were also carried out at the end of the 3rd and beginning of the 4th years, respectively, in order to convert a memory to knowledge. Team medical care course enrolls 1000 students at the School of Allied Health Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy and Kitasato College Applied Clinical Dietetics Course, is now one of special courses available at our university. This attempt is thought to result in a way of thinking that recognizes the importance of co-operation as a team member and personal contributions to actual team medical care.

  10. Nutritional knowledge of medical students studying in clinical courses of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mozaffari-Khosravi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutrition is one of the important components of health promotion and disease prevention. However, nutrition literacy of medical students is unclear. This study aims to determine nutritional knowledge of medical students studying in clinical course of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 114 medical students in clinical course of Shahid Sadoughi hospital were randomly selected. Nutritional knowledge questionnaire was completed. Each correct answer had one score and wrong answers had no score. Results: Of 114 students, 69 students (60.5% were female and 45 students (39.5% were male with the mean age of 24.1±1.5 year. The mean score of students in basic nutrition, nutrition in the life cycle and diet therapy was 4.6±2.2, 6.2±3.2 and 6.2±3.8, respectively. There was significant association between the score of nutrition course and nutritional knowledge score in all of the fields. Conclusion: The average of scores was low. Improving the nutrition courses, especially clinical aspects, during clinical education and presence of nutritionist in treatment teams will be helpful.

  11. A fundamental, national, medical disaster management plan: an education-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djalali, Ahmadreza; Hosseinijenab, Vahid; Hasani, Azadeh; Shirmardi, Kianoush; Castrén, Maaret; Ohlén, Gunnar; Panahi, Farzad

    2009-01-01

    During disasters, especially following earthquakes, health systems are expected to play an essential role in reducing mortality and morbidity. The most significant naturally occurring disaster in Iran is earthquakes; they have killed >180,000 people in the last 90 years. According to the current plan in 2007, the disaster management system of Iran is composed of three main work groups: (1) Prevention and risk management, (2) Education, and (3) Operation. This organizational separation has resulted in lack of necessary training programs for experts of specialized organizations, e.g., the Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MOHME).The National Board of MOHME arranged a training program in the field of medical disaster management. A qualified training team was chosen to conduct this program in each collaborating center, based on a predefined schedule. All collaborating centers were asked to recall 5-7 experts from each member university. Working in medical disaster management field for greater than or equal to 2 years was an inclusion criterion. The training programs lasted three days, consisted of all relevant aspects of medical disaster management, and were conducted over a six-month period (November 2007-April 2008). Pre-test and post-tests were used to examine the participants' knowledge regarding disaster management; the mean score on the pretest was 67.1 +/-11.6 and 88.1 +/-6.2, respectively. All participants were asked to hold the same training course for their organizations in order to enhance knowledge of related managers, stakeholders, and workers, and build capacity at the local and provincial levels. The next step was supposed to be developing a comprehensive medical disaster management plan for the entire country. Establishing nine disaster management regional collaborating centers in the health system of Iran has provided an appropriate base for related programs to be rapidly and easily accomplished throughout the country. This tree-shaped model is

  12. Electronic Media Learning Materials of Indira Gandhi National Open University, India: An Analytical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, V. Manoj; Ghosh, Chinmoy Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) in 1985 has been a milestone in the growth of higher education in India. A very special feature of the University is that a composite of several instructional methods in practice are aimed at giving effective support to distance learners. Self-instructional print materials are…

  13. Nutrition in medical education: reflections from an initiative at the University of Cambridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Lauren; Crowley, Jennifer; Laur, Celia; Rajput-Ray, Minha; Gillam, Stephen; Ray, Sumantra

    2014-01-01

    Landmark reports have confirmed that it is within the core responsibilities of doctors to address nutrition in patient care. There are ongoing concerns that doctors receive insufficient nutrition education during medical training. This paper provides an overview of a medical nutrition education initiative at the University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, including 1) the approach to medical nutrition education, 2) evaluation of the medical nutrition education initiative, and 3) areas identified for future improvement. The initiative utilizes a vertical, spiral approach during the clinically focused years of the Cambridge undergraduate and graduate medical degrees. It is facilitated by the Nutrition Education Review Group, a group associated with the UK Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, and informed by the experiences of their previous nutrition education interventions. Three factors were identified as contributing to the success of the nutrition education initiative including the leadership and advocacy skills of the nutrition academic team, the variety of teaching modes, and the multidisciplinary approach to teaching. Opportunities for continuing improvement to the medical nutrition education initiative included a review of evaluation tools, inclusion of nutrition in assessment items, and further alignment of the Cambridge curriculum with the recommended UK medical nutrition education curriculum. This paper is intended to inform other institutions in ongoing efforts in medical nutrition education.

  14. Should Undergraduate Lectures be Compulsory? The Views of Dental and Medical Students from a UK University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Daud

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Formal lectures have been a traditional part of medical and dental education, but there is debate as to their compulsory status. This study was designed to explore dental and medical students’ views on compulsory lectures and the use of Video-Recorded Lectures (VRL. A cross-sectional study of University of Bristol students in Years 2 to 4 was conducted using an online questionnaire. The majority of both dental (76% and medical (66% students felt lectures should be non-compulsory. The most common learning resources used by both dental and medical students were live lectures, lecture handouts and VRL. The majority of both dental (84% and medical (88% students used VRL. Most students attended lectures all of the time both before and after the introduction of VRL, even though most dental and medical students believe lectures should be non-compulsory. VRL is a popular learning resource. These findings tie-in with General Dental Council and General Medical Council recommendations that encourage self-directed learning. Dental and Medical schools should offer a range of learning resources and make use of current technology, including the use of VRL.

  15. [Reliability and validity of assessment of educational outcomes obtained by students of Medical Rescue at Medical University of Warsaw].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panczyk, Mariusz; Stachacz, Grzegorz; Gałązkowski, Robert; Gotlib, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    In the interest of preservation of high degree of objectivity of information about students' educational outcomes, a system of assessment needs to meet criteria of appropriate reliability and validity. Analysis of reliability and validity of the system of assessment of students' educational outcomes for courses followed by an examination and covered by a curriculum in Medical Rescue at Medical University of Warsaw (MU W). A retrospective study enrolling a group of 421 students of eight subsequent full education cycles. Detailed data concerning grades for fourteen courses followed by an examination in the entire course of studies were collected. Reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficient) and criteria validity (Spearman's rank correlation) were assessed. Internal consistency was estimated using a multiple regression model. The levels of assessment reliability for the general university, pre-clinical, and clinical scopes amounted to alpha: 0.42, 0.53, and 0.70, respectively. The strongest positive correlations between the results of pre-clinical and clinical trainings were found for the Anatomy course (r ≈ 0.30). Only in the case of the Pharmacology course it was found that students' achievements in this field were significantly correlated with all other courses of clinical training. The influence of educational outcomes in particular areas of clinical training on the final grade for the entire course of studies was diverse (β regression between 0.04 and 0.11). While the Pharmacology course had the strongest impact on final results, the Surgery course had the least influence on students' final grades (β = 0.04). 1. Sufficient reliability of the system of assessment of educational outcomes in Medical Rescue showed good precision and repeatability of assessment. 2. A low level of validity was caused by a failure to keep the appropriateness of the assessment of educational outcomes in several clinical courses. 3. Prognostic and diagnostic validity of methods used for

  16. Evaluation of self-medication practices in acute diseases among university students in Oman

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marwa Al Flaiti; Khaloud Al Badi; Wefaq Othman Hakami; Shah Alam Khan

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the practices of university students towards self-medication to treat minor ailments inMuscat andSohar region ofSultanate ofOman.Methods:A cross sectional study was conducted inOctober2013-January2014.A total of450 university students were randomly selected and their verbal consent was obtained.The data were collected through the self-administered, close ended, pretested questionnaire and was analyzed statistically bySPSS version19.0.Results:Overall204 males(45.3%) and246 females(56.7%) participated in the study.The mean age of respondents was22.3 years.Ninety-four percent of respondents reported practicing self-medication and165(36.7%) participants admitted of having purchased drugs without prescription more than four times over the last six months.Headache, fever, cough and cold were the most common ailments which prompted respondents to seek self-medication. Analgesics, cough preparations and antibiotics were the most common classes of drugs used in self-medication.The majority of respondents practiced self-medication either because their illness was not serious or they had prior experience with the drug.The majority of respondents had good medicationknowledge which they reported to acquire from reading drug leaflet or from pharmacists’ advice.Conclusion:The prevalence of self-medication among university students was very high.There is a need for intensive education and comprehensive awareness campaign to advocate for reduction in the prevalence of self-medication practices among students.

  17. Marriage and Family Therapists and Psychotropic Medications: Practice Patterns from a National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Barbara Couden; Doherty, William J.

    2005-01-01

    A national sample of marriage and family therapists (MFTs) was used to describe practice patterns of MFTs whose clients use psychotropics and to compare medicated and nonmedicated clients. Marriage and Family Therapists (n = 283) reported on 195 medicated and 483 nonmedicated adult clients. Clients (n = 375) rated their improvement and…

  18. Medical abortion practices : a survey of National Abortion Federation members in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, Melanie M. J.; Jones, Heidi E.; O'Connell, Katharine; Lichtenberg, E. Steve; Paul, Maureen; Westhoff, Carolyn L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about clinical implementation of medical abortion in the United States following approval of mifepristone as an abortifacient by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000. We collected information regarding medical abortion practices of National Abortion Federation

  19. Emergency Medical Technician-Ambulance: National Standard Curriculum. Instructor's Lesson Plans (Third Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This set of instructor's lesson plans is one of three documents prepared for the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) National Standard Curriculum. It contains detailed outlines of course content and guidance for teaching each course lesson. The training course contains 33 lessons covering all emergency medical techniques currently considered to be…

  20. Emergency Medical Technician-Ambulance: National Standard Curriculum. Student Study Guide (Third Edition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This student study guide is one of three documents prepared for the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT), National Standard Curriculum. The course is designed to develop skills in symptom recognition and in all emergency care procedures and techniques currently considered to be within the responsibilities of an EMT providing emergency medical care…

  1. Medical abortion practices : a survey of National Abortion Federation members in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, Melanie M. J.; Jones, Heidi E.; O'Connell, Katharine; Lichtenberg, E. Steve; Paul, Maureen; Westhoff, Carolyn L.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about clinical implementation of medical abortion in the United States following approval of mifepristone as an abortifacient by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000. We collected information regarding medical abortion practices of National Abortion Federation (

  2. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module X. Medical Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on medical emergencies is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Ten units of study are presented: (1) diabetic emergencies; (2) anaphylactic reactions; (3) exposure to environmental extremes; (4) alcoholism and drug abuse; (5) poisoning and…

  3. Surgent University : The Establishment and Evaluation of a National Online Clinical Teaching Repository for Surgical Trainees and Students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to develop a new teaching strategy for medical students while creating a national online repository system (Surgent University). Then, the potential of this e-learning modality to facilitate learning of clinical surgery was evaluated. Methods. An online repository and Internet-based interface was designed and hosted on the medical education Web site, www.surgent.ie. Participation was by medical students across 3 Irish universities. Student use of the repository was quantitatively assessed over an 8-week period. They were then invited to complete an anonymous survey assessing the effectiveness of the online repository. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 15, with P < .05 considered significant. Results. Over the study period, the online repository received 6105 uploaded facts by 182 final-year medical students from 3 different universities. The repository Web pages were accessed 54 061 times with 4609 individual searches of the repository. Of the 60 participating students invited to provide survey-based feedback, there were 40 respondents, giving a 66.7% response rate. Of those surveyed, 70% (n = 28) rated the online repository as highly beneficial and 75% (n = 30) as highly relevant. Overall, 87.5% (n = 35) felt that it should be continued, and 70% (n = 28) felt that it should be expanded beyond surgery to include other hospital specialties. Those finding the program interface user-friendly were more likely to find it beneficial (P = .031) and relevant to their ongoing education (P = .002). Conclusions. A user-friendly interface allows for high levels of usage, whereas a "student-centered" structure ensures that the facts uploaded are beneficial and relevant to medical students\\' education.

  4. Predictors of dietary supplement usage among medical interns of Tehran university of medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoudeh, Gity; Kabiri, Sanaz; Yeganeh, Haleh Sadrzadeh; Koohdani, Fariba; Khajehnasiri, Farahnaz; Khosravi, Shahla

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of dietary supplement-use and its relationship with demographics and lifestyle of medical interns. The study sample comprised 356 interns aged 23 to 25 years. Participants completed a questionnaire on dietary supplement-use during the month preceding the study, information on demographic characteristics and lifestyle was also obtained. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression were employed to assess the correlates of dietary supplement-use. The prevalence of dietary supplement-use was about 33% (males 20.4% and females 43.2%, pnutritional status (39.3%) and reducing hair loss (23.4%). The decision to use dietary supplement was mostly driven by the interns themselves (56% in males, 61% in females). In the univariable analysis, men who exercised once or twice a week were less likely to use supplements compared to those who reported doing exercise more than twice weekly (OR=0.35, 95% CI 0.12-0.98). Females who reported their health status to be 'excellent' were more likely to use supplements compared to those who described their health status as 'moderate/poor/very poor' (OR=2.53, 95% CI 1.15-5.56) as were women who mentioned their breakfast consumption status as 'always' (OR=2.69, 95% CI 1.47-4.92). In the multivariable analysis, only breakfast consumption was significantly related with dietary supplement-use in females (OR=2.20, 95% CI 1.11-4.38). In conclusion, dietary supplement-use among medical interns, especially among females, was relatively very common. Dietary supplement-use was related to a healthier lifestyle.

  5. Methylphenidate use among medical students at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Givon Cohen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Methylphenidate is a psychotropic agent commonly used for the treatment of attention deficit disorder with or without hyperactivity and narcolepsy in children and adults. The awareness to attention deficit disorder as well as the non-medical use of methylphenidate for cognitive enhancement has increased during the past years. Objectives: To evaluate the medical and non-medical use of methylphenidate among medical students in the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Materials and Methods: Medical students were asked to report methylphenidate use, symptoms and diagnosis of attention deficit disorder using a structured questionnaire. Results: A total of 229 students participated in the study, out of which 105 (45.9% were in the pre-clinical years of medical school. Twenty-two students (9.6% were previously diagnosed with attention deficit disorder. Lifelong use of methylphenidate was reported by 39 (17% students, while 31 students (13.5% reported using methylphenidate during the preceding 12 month. In the beginning of medical school, only 7% of the students used methylphenidate, most of them began using it during pre-clinical academic years. Discussion: High rates of attention deficit disorder compared to the general population were reported by medical students. The rate of methylphenidate use is similar to recent report from a US medical school, and is considerably higher than in college students population. Conclusions: Many medical students are using methylphenidate without a medical indication. Further study is needed to evaluate the effect of methylphenidate on academic performance of healthy adults.

  6. Medical students' experiences of diseases in internal medicine in university and community hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebar-Krieger, HMJ; Bender, W; Kreeftenberg, HG; Stewart, RE; Sleijfer, DT

    2002-01-01

    Because medical students in The Netherlands should achieve common national objectives, it is important to know whether clinical experiences in different hospitals are comparable. The research questions were: (1) Do students achieve learning experiences of the required diseases during the internship

  7. Experience with multimodality telepathology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Pantanowitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several modes of telepathology exist including static (store-and-forward, dynamic (live video streaming or robotic microscopy, and hybrid technology involving whole slide imaging (WSI. Telepathology has been employed at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC for over a decade at local, national, and international sites. All modes of telepathology have been successfully utilized to exploit our institutions subspecialty expertise and to compete for pathology services. This article discusses the experience garnered at UPMC with each of these teleconsultation methods. Static and WSI telepathology systems have been utilized for many years in transplant pathology using a private network and client-server architecture. Only minor clinically significant differences of opinion were documented. In hematopathology, the CellaVision® system is used to transmit, via email, static images of blood cells in peripheral blood smears for remote interpretation. While live video streaming has remained the mode of choice for providing immediate adequacy assessment of cytology specimens by telecytology, other methods such as robotic microscopy have been validated and shown to be effective. Robotic telepathology has been extensively used to remotely interpret intra-operative neuropathology consultations (frozen sections. Adoption of newer technology and increased pathologist experience has improved accuracy and deferral rates in teleneuropathology. A digital pathology consultation portal (https://pathconsult.upmc.com/ was recently created at our institution to facilitate digital pathology second opinion consults, especially for WSI. The success of this web-based tool is the ability to handle vendor agnostic, large image files of digitized slides, and ongoing user-friendly customization for clients and teleconsultants. It is evident that the practice of telepathology at our institution has evolved in concert with advances in technology and user experience

  8. Experience with multimodality telepathology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Wiley, Clayton A; Demetris, Anthony; Lesniak, Andrew; Ahmed, Ishtiaque; Cable, William; Contis, Lydia; Parwani, Anil V

    2012-01-01

    Several modes of telepathology exist including static (store-and-forward), dynamic (live video streaming or robotic microscopy), and hybrid technology involving whole slide imaging (WSI). Telepathology has been employed at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) for over a decade at local, national, and international sites. All modes of telepathology have been successfully utilized to exploit our institutions subspecialty expertise and to compete for pathology services. This article discusses the experience garnered at UPMC with each of these teleconsultation methods. Static and WSI telepathology systems have been utilized for many years in transplant pathology using a private network and client-server architecture. Only minor clinically significant differences of opinion were documented. In hematopathology, the CellaVision(®) system is used to transmit, via email, static images of blood cells in peripheral blood smears for remote interpretation. While live video streaming has remained the mode of choice for providing immediate adequacy assessment of cytology specimens by telecytology, other methods such as robotic microscopy have been validated and shown to be effective. Robotic telepathology has been extensively used to remotely interpret intra-operative neuropathology consultations (frozen sections). Adoption of newer technology and increased pathologist experience has improved accuracy and deferral rates in teleneuropathology. A digital pathology consultation portal (https://pathconsult.upmc.com/) was recently created at our institution to facilitate digital pathology second opinion consults, especially for WSI. The success of this web-based tool is the ability to handle vendor agnostic, large image files of digitized slides, and ongoing user-friendly customization for clients and teleconsultants. It is evident that the practice of telepathology at our institution has evolved in concert with advances in technology and user experience. Early and

  9. The Research of the Crisis Pre-Warning Management System under the Particularity of Nationalities Universities and Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui

    2009-01-01

    The nationalities universities and colleges set up the crisis pre-warning management system, not only related to the management of our nationalities universities and colleges and their growth, but also related to the country's national unity plan in some way. However, because of minority students in the particularity of the national cultural…

  10. Reconsidering the Cut Score of Korean National Medical Licensing Examination

    OpenAIRE

    Duck Sun Ahn; Sowon Ahn

    2007-01-01

    After briefly reviewing theories of standard setting we analyzed the problems of the current cut scores. Then, we reported the results of need assessment on the standard setting among medical educators and psychometricians. Analyses of the standard setting methods of developed countries were reported as well. Based on these findings, we suggested the Bookmark and the modified Angoff methods as alternative methods for setting standard. Possible problems and challenges were discussed when these...

  11. Teaching medical information retrieval and application courses in Chinese universities: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Adam W; Li, Hong-Mei

    2010-12-01

    An important aspect of Chinese academic health science libraries is their involvement in teaching medical information retrieval courses as part of the medical curriculum. Health science librarians in China have a more formal teaching role than is generally found in Western countries, including many full-time teaching positions. This article provides a case study of Kunming Medical University Library, where courses are provided as credit units at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. The teaching practices of Chinese health science libraries are compared with teaching experiences reported in Western countries. It is noted that Chinese government's educational policy is similar to that of the United States in promoting the role of the library in teaching subjects as part of the medical curriculum. In China, this has lead to the development of teaching departments within health science libraries and the appointment of full and part-time teacher librarians.

  12. [Computerized medical register of venous thromboembolic disease at the Grenoble University Hospital Center: description and evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michoud, E; Bosson, J L; Pichot, O; Vidal, F; Rossignol, S; Schwartzmann, J; Carpentier, P H

    1994-01-01

    The number of vascular exams for venous thromboembolic disease increases dramatically in the vascular medicine unit at the Grenoble University Hospital (France). In order to improve the efficiency and the homogeneity of all the medical staff involved, a computerized register has been created. It automatically provides a letter for the prescriber of the consultation. This database, working on a computer network, has three main functions: office automation (medical folder, report), education, and clinical research. The office automation evaluation is performed after a 6 month experience, comparing 100 medical reports about venous thrombosis assisted by the computer to 100 medical reports written before the installation of the system. The introduction of digitized register is real, still this evaluation has induced some modification in the system in order to be more efficient.

  13. Drug use prevalence among students of universities of medical sciences in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Taremian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of drug use among students of universities of Medical Sciences in Tehran. Method: Four thousands of medical students (both sexes in academic year 1388-89 in different level of education, B.A., M.Sc. and Ph.D. were selected by random stratified sampling method. These students were selected from Iran, Tehran and Shahid Beheshti Universities of Medical Sciences considering their sex and level of education. We used drug use prevalence questionnaire. Findings: The most prevalent drug of abuse in life time period was qalyan (classical pipe, followed by cigarette, and alcohol. The least frequent drug of abuse was Shisheh, followed by heroine krack. As we expected, drugs morphine, ritalin and tramadol were placed in forth, fifth and sixth of prevalent drugs. Use of different substances was significantly more prevalent in male students. Conclusion: Using soft drugs (qalyan, cigarette and alcohol was more prevalent than hard drugs (hashish, taryak, heroine kerack among Universities Medical Sciences of Tehran. Similar to drug use pattern in society, use of all of drugs were more prevalent in male students. We should pay special attention to use of drugs such as tramadol, ritalin, petedin and morphine.

  14. Strategies to Improve Students’ Educational Achievement Motivation at Guilan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdokht Taheri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In view of the fact that motivation is linked directly to the learning process and educational achievement, this study endeavored to identify strategies to improve students’ educational achievement motivation at Guilan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: To conduct this descriptive-analytical study, 368 students from Guilan University of Medical Sciences were selected using simple random sampling from 2013-2014. All of the Guilan University of Medical Sciences’ students met the general eligibility criteria except guest students. The questionnaire included five domains of economic, socio-cultural, educational, geo-regional, and personality factors in educational achievement motivation. Through using descriptive and inferential statistics (Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests, the compiled data were analyzed at the significance level of 0.05. Results: Data analysis revealed that socio-cultural factors have the maximum score (64.14 ± 9.92 and geo-regional factors have the minimum score (19.01±3.63 on the participants’ educational achievement motivation. What is more, a significant difference was revealed between educational field and educational effective factors as well as educational level and educational effective factors (p<0.011, p<0.004, respectively. Conclusion: Given that the socio-cultural factors had the maximum score on the students’ educational achievement motivation, it is recommended that university officials take these factors into account, and attempt to plan to provide appropriate strategies to enhance their students’ motivation, specifically their educational achievement motivation.

  15. Psychotropic Medication Treatment of Adolescents: Results from the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olfson, Mark; He, Jian-ping; Merikangas, Kathleen Ries

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the 12-month prevalence of psychotropic medication use among adolescents, and the match between mental disorder diagnoses and past-year antidepressant and stimulant use. Method: Data are from the National Comorbidity Survey--Adolescent Supplement (2002-2004), a nationally representative survey of 10,123 adolescents aged 13 to…

  16. 76 FR 6803 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given of the following...

  17. 76 FR 10039 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, 45 Center..., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences... Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and...

  18. 76 FR 13196 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Institutes of Health, Natcher Building, 45 Center..., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences... Support; 93.821, Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and...

  19. 77 FR 5816 - National Institute of General Medical Sciences Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ...; Review of R24 Grant Applications. Date: February 10, 2012. Time: 12 PM to 2 PM. Agenda: To review and... Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National..., Cell Biology and Biophysics Research; 93.859, Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological...

  20. Psychotropic Medication Treatment of Adolescents: Results from the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olfson, Mark; He, Jian-ping; Merikangas, Kathleen Ries

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the 12-month prevalence of psychotropic medication use among adolescents, and the match between mental disorder diagnoses and past-year antidepressant and stimulant use. Method: Data are from the National Comorbidity Survey--Adolescent Supplement (2002-2004), a nationally representative survey of 10,123 adolescents aged 13 to…

  1. The Effect of Instructing Cognitive and Metacognitive Strategies on the Academic Progress of Ilam Medical University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolhosseini, Amir; Keikhavani, Sattar; Hasel, Kourosh Mohammadi

    2011-01-01

    This study reviewed the effect of instructing cognitive and metacognitive strategies on the academic progress of Medical Sciences of Ilam University students. The research is quasi-experimental including a pre-test and a post-test. The population of the research includes the students of Medical Sciences of Ilam University. The sample includes 120…

  2. Developing eLearning Technologies to Implement Competency Based Medical Education: Experiences from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagunwa, Thomas; Lwoga, Edda

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the practical experience of developing an eLearning technology as a tool to implement Competency-based Medical Education (CBME) in Tanzania medical universities, with a specific focus on Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences. The paper provides a background to eLearning and the early attempt to adopt it in 2006 at…

  3. National Association of Medical Examiners position paper on the medical examiner release of organs and tissues for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinckard, J Keith; Wetli, Charles V; Graham, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    The medical examiner community plays a key role in the organ and tissue procurement process for transplantation. Since many, if not most, potential organ or tissue donors fall under medicolegal jurisdiction, the medical examiner bears responsibility to authorize or deny the procurement of organs or tissues on a case-by-case basis. This responsibility engenders a basic dichotomy for the medical examiner's decision-making process. In cases falling under his/her jurisdiction, the medical examiner must balance the medicolegal responsibility centered on the decedent with the societal responsibility to respect the wishes of the decedent and/or next of kin to help living patients. Much has been written on this complex issue in both the forensic pathology and the transplantation literature. Several studies and surveys of medical examiner practices, as well as suggested protocols for handling certain types of cases, are available for reference when concerns arise that procurement may potentially hinder medicolegal death investigation. It is the position of the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME) that the procurement of organs and/or tissues for transplantation can be accomplished in virtually all cases, without detriment to evidence collection, postmortem examination, determination of cause and manner of death, or the conducting of criminal or civil legal proceedings. The purpose of this position paper is to review the available data, the arguments for and against medical examiner release, and to encourage the release of organs and tissues in all but the rarest of circumstances.

  4. Explaining Differences in Subjective Well-Being Across 33 Nations Using Multilevel Models: Universal Personality, Cultural Relativity, and National Income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cecilia; Cheung, Mike W-L; Montasem, Alex

    2016-02-01

    This multinational study simultaneously tested three prominent hypotheses--universal disposition, cultural relativity, and livability--that explained differences in subjective well-being across nations. We performed multilevel structural equation modeling to examine the hypothesized relationships at both individual and cultural levels in 33 nations. Participants were 6,753 university students (2,215 men; 4,403 women; 135 did not specify), and the average age of the entire sample was 20.97 years (SD = 2.39). Both individual- and cultural-level analyses supported the universal disposition and cultural relativity hypotheses by revealing significant associations of subjective well-being with Extraversion, Neuroticism, and independent self-construal. In addition, interdependent self-construal was positively related to life satisfaction at the individual level only, whereas aggregated negative affect was positively linked with aggregate levels of Extraversion and interdependent self-construal at the cultural level only. Consistent with the livability hypothesis, gross national income (GNI) was related to aggregate levels of negative affect and life satisfaction. There was also a quadratic relationship between GNI and aggregated positive affect. Our findings reveal that universal disposition, cultural self-construal, and national income can elucidate differences in subjective well-being, but the multilevel analyses advance the literature by yielding new findings that cannot be identified in studies using individual-level analyses alone. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF RESEARCH PROJECT ACTIVITIES PERFORMED AT MEDICAL UNIVERSITIES IN BULGARIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav Garov

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are five Bulgarian medical universities in the cities of Sofia, Plovdiv, Varna, Pleven and Stara Zagora. A major priority of medical universities is to encourage research activities mainly aimed at preparation and implementation of research projects. Projects are managed by the participating organizations called “beneficiaries”. Beneficiaries develop projects, apply for finances and if approved they implement those projects.Aim: The purpose of our study is to examine the organizational structure of research project activities on the macro level and on the micro level in Bulgarian medical universities.Material and methods: In order to define the separate elements of the organizational structure and to analyze the relations and interaction between them we have applied a documentary and sociological approach. Results: During the last six years there was a significant increase in the number and the overall annual financial value of the projects performed at medical universities in Bulgaria. The reasons for such increase are: managers realizing the advantages of and benefits from the implementation of research projects ensuring high quality modernization of research units’ equipment and facilities; access to innovative technologies; development of interdisciplinary relations, etc. Benefits arising from improved results motivate us to consider as appropriate some additional investments aimed at increasing the number of team members and further optimization of the currently existing structures (research centers in charge of research with the purpose of achieving even better results in this particular field. Conclusion: The role of research project activities in medical universities’ research field is of vital importance for the educational institutions’ success. Taking into consideration the changed conditions, European possibilities and the highly competitive environment, realizing this aspect will be essential for the

  6. Patenting of university and non-university public research organisations in Germany: evidence from patent applications for medical research results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Tinnemann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patents are one of the most important forms of intellectual property. They grant a time-limited exclusivity on the use of an invention allowing the recuperation of research costs. The use of patents is fiercely debated for medical innovation and especially controversial for publicly funded research, where the patent holder is an institution accountable to public interest. Despite this controversy, for the situation in Germany almost no empirical information exists. The purpose of this study is to examine the amount, types and trends of patent applications for health products submitted by German public research organisations. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a systematic search for patent documents using the publicly accessible database search interface of the German Patent and Trademark Office. We defined keywords and search criteria and developed search patterns for the database request. We retrieved documents with application date between 1988 and 2006 and processed the collected data stepwise to compile the most relevant documents in patent families for further analysis. We developed a rationale and present individual steps of a systematic method to request and process patent data from a publicly accessible database. We retrieved and processed 10194 patent documents. Out of these, we identified 1772 relevant patent families, applied for by 193 different universities and non-university public research organisations. 827 (47% of these patent families contained granted patents. The number of patent applications submitted by universities and university-affiliated institutions more than tripled since the introduction of legal reforms in 2002, constituting almost half of all patent applications and accounting for most of the post-reform increase. Patenting of most non-university public research organisations remained stable. CONCLUSIONS: We search, process and analyse patent applications from publicly accessible databases

  7. FAIR USE VS COPYRIGHT NON-COMPLIANCE AMONG THE ACADEMIC COMMUNITY IN UNIVERSITIES OF DEVELOPING NATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DR. SABUJ KUMAR CHAUDHURI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to assess whether the copyrighted resources in the universities arebeing used following fair use principle or not and if there is any copyright management policyin the universities to manage the access to those resources .Quantitative data regarding the useof resources in the library collected through online (using survey monkey web platform andoffline were computed through statistical software (MINITAB version 13.CopyrightResources are not used complying fair use principles in the universities of West Bengal andthere is no copyright management policy in any university of West Bengal. Considering similar economic conditions, the findings are equally applicable in other developing nations. Study was conducted among the universities of West Bengal. However result of the study is applicable to universities in all eveloping nations. This study can inform the entire academic community regarding fair use and can make university or appropriate authority feel the need to design and develop balanced and well-defined copyright management policy for the universities. There is close relation in between fair use and economic condition of that country. The unique context of fair use of copyrighted resources in the universities of West Bengal can add to the body of literature related with intellectual property rights in the universities and form the basis, for further comprehensive study.

  8. Easing the transition: the final year of medical education at Maastricht University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Akker, Marjan; Dornan, Tim; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; oude Egbrink, Mirjam G A; Snoeckx, Luc H E H

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript describes the final year of medical education at Maastricht University as it has been operating since 2006. At the time external drivers for the development of a new structure of the final year were: the desire to prepare medical students for lifelong learning, the CanMEDs that were increasingly acknowledged to state the final attainment level of medical education and an increasing recognition of the importance of learning by participating actively and by taking more responsibility. Internal drivers were students' evaluations and our wish to improve instructional design and quality control. The main aim of this new final year is to better prepare students for the transition from the medical master programme to one of the postgraduate training programmes to become a medical specialist. The final year of the medical master programme consists of two 18-weeks participation electives, one in health care and one in research. Students have a higher level of autonomy and responsibility during this final year compared to the preceding medical clerkships to enhance the transition. Portfolios are the key element in examination of SCIP and HELP. Student evaluations of the final year show high scores on coaching and instructiveness. Despite some differences between departments overall scores are very high. Suggestions to improve include the availability of work places and time for education and coaching.

  9. First-trimester medical abortion practices in Canada: National survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Edith R; Hayden, Althea S; Jones, Heidi E; White, Katharine O'Connell; Steven Lichtenberg, E; Paul, Maureen; Norman, Wendy V

    2016-04-01

    To understand the current availability and practice of first-trimester medical abortion (MA) in Canada. Using public sources and professional networks, abortion facilities across Canada were identified for a cross-sectional survey on medical and surgical abortion. English and French surveys were distributed by surface or electronic mail between July and November 2013. Canada. A total of 94 abortion facilities were identified. Descriptive statistics on MA practice and facility and provider characteristics, as well as comparisons of MA practice by facility and provider characteristics using χ(2) and t tests. A total of 78 of 94 (83.0%) facilities responded. Medical abortion represented 3.8% of first-trimester abortions reported (2706 of 70 860) in 2012. Among the facilities offering MA, 45.0% performed fewer than 500 first-trimester abortions a year, while 35.0% performed more than 1000. More MAs were performed in private offices or ambulatory health centres than in hospitals. Sixty-two physicians from 28 of 78 facilities reported providing first-trimester MA; 87.1% also provided surgical abortion. More than three-quarters of MA physicians were female and 56.5% were family physicians. A preponderance (85.2%) of providers offered methotrexate with misoprostol. Nearly all physicians (90.3%) required patients to have an ultrasound before MA, and 72.6% assessed the completion of the abortion with ultrasonography. Most physicians (74.2%) offered MA through 49 days after the onset of the last menstrual period, and 21.0% offered MA through 50 to 56 days; 37.1% reported providing MA to patients who lived more than 2 hours away. Four physicians from 1 site provided MA via telemedicine. In Canada, MA provision using methotrexate and misoprostol is consistent with best-practice guidelines, but MA is rare and its availability is unevenly distributed. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  10. The impact of the National Treatment Purchase Fund on numbers of core urology training cases at University Hospital Galway.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harney, T J

    2011-06-01

    Since the National Treatment Purchase Fund (NTPF) scheme was introduced in 2002, public patients waiting longer than three months for investigations and treatment are offered care in the private medical sector. Our aim was to assess the impact of the NTPF scheme on the number of training cases performed at University Hospital Galway (UHG). The number and type of urological procedures performed in the private medical sector under the NTFP scheme in 2008 were obtained from the UHG waiting list office. The number of these procedures performed on public patients by trainees at UHG in 2008 was determined retrospectively by reviewing theatre records. A significant number of core urology procedures were performed in the private sector via the NTPF scheme. Cancer centre designation and implementation of the EWTD will also place further pressures on urological training opportunities in Ireland.

  11. National Coal Board Medical Service annual report 1980-1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Sections report on: medical examinations and consultations; protection from health hazards such as pneumoconiosis and other prescribed diseases; problems such as vitamin D in the blood of miners, Legionaires' disease, Perthe's disease, rehabilitation and physiotherapy, chemical hazards, public health and hygiene, noise, and the use of visual display units; diseases from coal products such as in coke and tar manufacture; first aid services, morphia, and nursing service; and back pain in the mining industry. A list of staff and their publications is also included.

  12. National electronic medical records integration on cloud computing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Hebah; El-Masri, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Few Healthcare providers have an advanced level of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) adoption. Others have a low level and most have no EMR at all. Cloud computing technology is a new emerging technology that has been used in other industry and showed a great success. Despite the great features of Cloud computing, they haven't been utilized fairly yet in healthcare industry. This study presents an innovative Healthcare Cloud Computing system for Integrating Electronic Health Record (EHR). The proposed Cloud system applies the Cloud Computing technology on EHR system, to present a comprehensive EHR integrated environment.

  13. Investigation of the Relationship Between Mental Health and Organizational Employees’ work Fatigue and Deputyships of Yasouj Medical Science University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mahmoodi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Peoples’ mental health in improvement of society’s national and ideal aims have the main and most importance such as thriftiness in material and spiritual costs. Work fatigue is the result of severe decrease of person’s capabilities sources that counter with long –time stress, especially work stress. This study was designed with the aim of investigating the relationship between mental health and work fatigue at Yasuj University of Medical Sciences. Method of investigation: The present co-operation – descriptive study was conducted on 274 participants from 961 organization employees and deputyships of Yasuj University of Medical Sciences in 2013-2014 who were chosen randomly. In order to collect data, Maslach questionnaire of mental health condition and work fatigue was used. Data were analysed with statistical tests of the interconnection index Pearson and Friedman’s test. Findings: There was no significant relationship between mental health and work fatigue dimensions (p<0/05. A meaningful relationship was observed between studied models after usage. High attention and metamorphosis of personality had the least importance. Conclusion: When employees have full mental health and job satisfaction, the ability to achieve maximum efficiency in the organization is reachable.

  14. AN ASSESSMENT OF PERSONALITY ASPECTS OF THE STUDENTS OF TEHRAN UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Nikpour

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study a base-scale is prepared for the evaluation of the personality grounds of the Tehran University of Medical Science students. Such a scoring scale may be useful to help the medical science students in career development, psychosocial consultations, and appropriate supportive care plans. A sample of 205 female and male students resident in dormitories were evaluated using “Bernreuter” personality questionnaires and computer programs prepared in this center. The percentiles of each scale is scored and represented in a systematic framework. Considering the normal distribution of the results using their means and standard deviations, the important percentages in each scale is tabulated.

  15. The new University of Colorado medical school curriculum: a pediatric perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deterding, Robin R; Wong, Shale; Faries, Glenn; Glover, Jacqueline J; Garrington, Timothy P; Wang, Michael; Anderson, Marsha S; Krugman, Richard D

    2007-11-01

    The University of Colorado School of Medicine has developed an innovative 4-year undergraduate curriculum. As a strong advocate for education and curriculum reform, Dr M. Douglas Jones Jr. created an environment for pediatrics to flourish in this new curriculum. Pediatric content has increased in all years of the curriculum, and pediatric faculty have had greater opportunities to teach and seek career development in medical education. In this report, we review the process that led to curriculum reform, provide an overview of the new curriculum design, and highlight examples of the positive impact this process has had on education in pediatrics. We hope that sharing our experience, may benefit others in medical education.

  16. The first anatomy professors in the medical school of the University of Athens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piagkou, Maria; Androutsos, Georgios; Demesticha, Theano; Lappas, Dimitrios; Karamanou, Marianna; Piagkos, Giannoulis; Skandalakis, Panayiotis; Piagkos, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this historical review is to add new elements to the international literature in relation to the birth and progress of the science of anatomy in modern Greece. Step by step, it outlines the efforts of prominent Greek anatomists to establish the course of the basic science of anatomy in the newly founded Medical School, the laborious effort to collect cadaveric material to compile museum anatomical collections and to gradually build the foundations of modern anatomy science at the Medical School of the Athenian University.

  17. [Attitudes of pharmacy and dentistry students of Poznan Medical University towards smoking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniowska, Katarzyna; Cieślewicz, Artur; Szałek, Edyta; Jabłecka, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the attitude of students of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Division of Dentistry (Poznan University of Medical Sciences) towards smoking. Information was collected using a self-completion questionnaire for students. 114 students of the 5th year of Faculty of Pharmacy and 60 students of 4th year of Division of Dentistry took part in the survey. Most of the students were non-smokers (77% in the Faculty of Pharmacy and 72% in the Division of Dentistry). The main reason for abandoning smoking in both groups was knowledge on the dangers of addiction obtained in medical studies.

  18. How Medical Statistics has been established at the University of Freiburg: a historical perspective

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    Schumacher, Martin

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution gives an outline on the reasons why the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Freiburg established an Institute of Medical Statistics and Documentation about fourty years ago as one of the first in Germany. It will be shown that the Professor of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene at that time initiated and promoted this development being himself motivated by the successful implementation of a vaccine against poliomyelitis through rigorous design, conduct and statistical analysis of a large scale field trial.

  19. Weighing the views of a university hospital and medical school regarding an HMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, T J; Matthews, C W; Segadelli, L J

    1983-09-01

    After 14 years of study, the University of Michigan decided to terminate development of a health maintenance organization (HMO). The process was long and difficult because of the university's need to consider the HMO from the university's perspective of both an employer and a provider. As an employer, the university's early view was favorable and then declined when employee interest was found to be weak and the HMO's impact on the rapidly rising cost of the university's health insurance benefit was determined to be modest. As a provider, the university's view was mixed. In regard to its hospitals, the university's judgment was positive largely because it hoped that HMO incentives might help the hospitals remain viable in the health care delivery environment that was becoming increasingly competitive. From the Medical School's point of view, an HMO was felt not to be desirable because it could put in jeopardy the professional fee revenue used by the school to help underwrite its academic programs, which are the primary source of faculty pride and recognition.

  20. Students' attitudes and practices towards drug and alcohol use at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodati, A R; Shakurie, S K; Nazari, M; Raufie, M B

    2007-01-01

    This questionnaire survey examined attitudes and practices towards alcohol and drug use among male university students living in a dormitory at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Islamic Republic of Iran. Of 173 students, about one third (32%) had tried alcohol or drugs at least once in the last 6 months: 16% had tried alcohol, 6% cannabis, 6% opium and 2% heroin. Sixteen students (9%) reported they were abusing alcohol and 16 (9%) other illicit drugs, with 2 using drugs by injection. Many students believed that smoking and drug and alcohol use in the dormitory created disruption and an unpleasant atmosphere.

  1. Board of Undergraduate Courses: a Means to Improve Academic Quality in Medical Universities

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    Norma Mur Villar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Improving the quality of the service provided to the society by the University of Medical Sciences and its participation in solving health problems is undoubtedly, the most important challenge facing this institution. In order to disseminate the results of the meeting of the board of undergraduate courses as a means to achieve academic quality, the main results derived from such meeting are presented. The board of undergraduate courses contributes to systematically foster a culture of quality in the university, particularly in professional training. Methodological guidelines for conducting the board meeting are discussed.

  2. Survey of Professional Skill Among Medical Residents of Tabriz University of Medical Science For Breaking Bad News

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    Bagher Matloubi-Sisi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of knowledge on scientific behaving with patients during giving bad news involves most of physicians even experienced physicians. Interestingly, this hurts physicians mind and in some cases causes sadness and depression or reaction on dealing with patient. In a cross sectional-descriptive study, 203 clinical assistant were included in study from 2009 to 2010 at Tabriz university of medical sciences. Comments of residents about giving bad news were registered on valid and reliable questionnaire. State of awareness by considering positive answers of statistical population were categorized into three groups; first group: weak awareness (true questions fewer than 50%, second group: medium awareness (true questions between 50 to75%, and third group: good awareness (true questions more than 75%. Validity of questionnaire was assessed by evaluating contents and reliability using Cronbach's alpha. Stratified sampling was used based on academic year. Mean age of residents was 32.01±3.25 years between the ranges of 26 to 43 years. Females were 76 individuals (37.4% and 127 individuals (62.6% males. Mean of physicians work experience was 2.1-2.9 (0-15 years range at general period. Among residents, internal medicine residents agree on considering patients education before giving bad news much than other majors residents (P=0.004. Mean score for residents' awareness about patients' right for knowing disease were 4.81±1.58 (min=0, max=7; the mean for female residents was 4.9±1.49 and 4.75±1.64 for male residents. There is statistically significant differences between majors.Present study, has shown that the knowledge of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences residents about breaking bad news are low. It seems that holding workshops about breaking bad news are necessary for educating medical students and residents. Keywords: Breaking bad news; residents; knowledge; attitude

  3. Documentation of Medical Records in Hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2014: a Quantitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni; Asgari, Zolaykha; Siamian, Hasan; Farahabadi, Ebrahim Bagherian; Gorji, Alimorad Heidari; Motamed, Nima; Fallahkharyeki, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Documentation of patient care in medical record formats is always emphasized. These documents are used as a means to go on treating the patients, staff in their own defense, assessment, care, any legal proceedings and medical science education. Therefore, in this study, each of the data elements available in patients’ records are important and filling them indicates the importance put by the documenting teams, so it has been dealt with the documentation the patient records in the hospitals of Mazandaran province. Method: This cross-sectional study aimed to review medical records in 16 hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences (MazUMS). In order to collection data, a check list was prepared based on the data elements including four forms of the admission, summary, patients’ medical history and progress note. The data recording was defined as “Yes” with the value of 1, lack of recording was defined as “No” with the value of 2, and “Not applied” with the value of 0 for the cases in which the mentioned variable medical records are not applied. Results: The overall evaluation of the documentation was considered as 95-100% equal to “good”, 75-94% equal to “average” and below -75% equal to “poor”. Using the stratified random sample volume formula, 381 cases were reviewed. The data were analyzed by the SPSS version 19 and descriptive statistics. Results: The results showed that %62 of registration and all the four forms were in the “poor” category. There was no big difference in average registration among the hospitals. Among the educational groups Gynecology and Infectious were equal and had the highest average of documentation of %68. In the data categories, the highest documentation average belonged to the verification, %91. Conclusion: According to the overall assessment in which the rate of documentation was in the category “week”, we should make much more efforts to reach better conditions. Even if a data

  4. Reasons of absence from clinical foundation classes from the viewpoints of medical students of Semnan University of Medical Sciences

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    abedin vakili

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Absence of students from classes can reduce the quality of education and increase the failure rate. The present study aims to assess the reasons of absence from classes in basic sciences from the viewpoints of medical students of Semnan University of Medical Sciences in 2011. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed using a questionnaire with the participation of medical students who undertook basic sciences' course and BSc. students who studied in year two of the course. A questionnaire containing demographic data and factors influencing on students' absence including teacher, student, educational processing and physical conditions of classrooms was designed. Students completed the questionnaire before starting of lectures in classrooms. Results: The results showed that 39% of students were absent two hours and 22.4% were absent for four hours per course credit and 38.6% said they were not aim to be absent except in emergency situation. at all.   Inappropriate teaching was identified as the main reason for absence (3.53 / 4±1.1 followed by inadequate sleep the night before the class (3.45 / 4±1.33 lack of scholarship in teaching (3.43 / 4±1.21 and lack of self-interest to the field (1.76 / 4±1.13. Conclusion: Education planners should consider factors influencing on absence of students. In faculty recruitment, academic proficiency and scholarship of teaching should also be considered. Moreover, emotional status of students should be noticed.

  5. Effect of an Integrated Case-based Nutrition Curriculum on Medical Education at Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afaghi, Ahmad; Mohamadi, Ali Akbar Haj Agha; Sarchami, Ramin; Ziaee, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nutrition education is identified as an important part of medical education by organizations. Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, school of medicine (QUMS SOM), has a required basic nutrition course of 36 hr in second year of medical school, but education experts reports show that the course does not provide required therapeutic skills for graduate student. Method: We decided to organize an 8-hr diet therapy work shop in order to develop a patient experience clinical based case study teaching to enhance clinical skills at QUMS SOM. Results: Students’ perception score about adequacy of nutrition instruction increased from 20% (at baseline) to 70% (after intervention). The mean nutrition knowledge score of total students in clinical nutrition were different between before and one month after integration (8.3±2.5, 13.4±3.2, P curriculum at QUMS was appropriate method to enhance student’s perception about nutrition integration and to increase and translate the knowledge to clinical practice. PMID:22980104

  6. [Suggestions of reshaping medical education (The Hungarian medical elite at universities and the Hungarian Academy of Sciences) 1947-1948].

    Science.gov (United States)

    N Szabó, József

    2017-03-01

    This study is part of the monograph entitled Scientific Elites and Politics (1945-1948) to be published soon. The relationships of political parties with several elite groups, such as groups of agronomic, human, economic, legal, technical and natural sciences, as well as the roles of these elites in scientific life, have been looked into and published in renowned periodicals. Using new sources, different specialist groups' and political powers' suggestions of reshaping medical education in 1947 and 1948, are presented. The medical elite's situation at universities and the Hungarian Academy of Sciences is also outlined. The study renders an account of the entire post-war medical elite. It will be stated who and based on what scientific achievement became member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, who was appointed to professor and who became a habilitated doctor. This study, which is a desideratum of research, may not only interest researchers but is aimed at a broader readership, including physicians. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(11), 432-437.

  7. The situation analysis of the international relations management and inter-university collaboration in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during the years 2005-2010

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    Alireza Farajollahi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nowadays, with the development of science and communication, collaboration with other countriesand universities seems inevitable to universities. The aim of this study was to analyze the situation of internationalrelations management and inter-university collaboration (IRM-IUC in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (TUMS,Iran, during the years 2005-2010. METHODS: In this descriptive study, one checklist was used for analysis of the inter-university collaboration management and another one for the situation analysis of international relations management which included 4 sections itself. There were a total of 56 questions designed and developed through literature review and the expert panel.RESULTS: The results indicated the poor performance of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in the international relations management and inter-university collaboration fields. Most of the reviewed items had not been adequatelypaid attention to in the management of international relations and only one out of 14 evaluated items was considered inthe field of inter-university collaboration. CONCLUSIONS: In line with the overall globalization process, education and research have also become globalizedprocesses, and as a result, it is necessary for universities to develop effective ties and relationships with otherorganizations. However, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences has not been doing quite optimally in this regard. Thus,it is suggested that, based on the shortcomings pointed out in this study, new appropriate plans and policies be set todevelop fruitful and effective relations and correspondences with other universities and countries.

  8. Undergraduate educational environment, perceived preparedness for postgraduate clinical training, and pass rate on the National Medical Licensure Examination in Japan

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    Ishida Yasushi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the views of newly graduating physicians on their preparedness for postgraduate clinical training, and evaluated the relationship of preparedness with the educational environment and the pass rate on the National Medical Licensure Examination (NMLE. Methods Data were obtained from 2429 PGY-1 physicians-in-training (response rate, 36% using a mailed cross-sectional survey. The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM inventory was used to assess the learning environment at 80 Japanese medical schools. Preparedness was assessed based on 6 clinical areas related to the Association of American Medical Colleges Graduation Questionnaire. Results Only 17% of the physicians-in-training felt prepared in the area of general clinical skills, 29% in basic knowledge of diagnosis and management of common conditions, 48% in communication skills, 19% in skills associated with evidence-based medicine, 54% in professionalism, and 37% in basic skills required for a physical examination. There were substantial differences among the medical schools in the perceived preparedness of their graduates. Significant positive correlations were found between preparedness for all clinical areas and a better educational environment (all p 0.05. Conclusion Different educational environments among universities may be partly responsible for the differences in perceived preparedness of medical students for postgraduate clinical training. This study also highlights the poor correlation between self-assessed preparedness for practice and the NMLE.

  9. Prevalence of ADHD among the Students Residing in Dormitory of Ardabil University of Medical Sciences

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    Fariba Sadeghi Movahed

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a heredity and psychological disorder that often continues to adulthood and causes great number of emotional, social, educational and occupational problem for college students. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of ADHD among students residing in the dormitory of Ardabil University of Medical Sciences.   Methods: In this cross sectional study, all students in the dormitory of Ardabil University of Medical Sciences were included. They filled the Self reporting Conner’s ADHD questionnaires. Data were extracted and analyzed with SPSS.   Results: During this study, the prevalence of ADHD was 8.6 percent. The males show more involvement rate than females. The students with ADHD showed more incidences of smoking and psychotropic drug consumption.   Conclusion: Due to the high prevalence of ADHD among the college students, early diagnosis and treatment of ADHD seems to be necessary.

  10. National Medical Care System May Impede Fostering of True Specialization of Radiation Oncologists: Study Based on Structure Survey in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numasaki, Hodaka [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Shibuya, Hitoshi [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Nishio, Masamichi [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Hokkaido Cancer Center, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Ikeda, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Sakai Municipal Hospital, Sakai, Osaka (Japan); Sekiguchi, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke' s International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kamikonya, Norihiko [Department of Radiology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Hyogo (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko [Oncology Center, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Tago, Masao [Department of Radiology, Teikyo University School of Medicine University Hospital, Mizonokuchi, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Ando, Yutaka [Department of Medical Informatics, Heavy Ion Medical Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tsukamoto, Nobuhiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Terahara, Atsuro [Department of Radiology, Toho University Omori Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Radiology, Kyushu University Hospital at Beppu, Oita (Japan); Mitsumori, Michihide [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nishimura, Tetsuo [Division of Radiation Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, Shizuoka (Japan); Hareyama, Masato [Department of Radiology, Sapporo Medical University, Hokkaido (Japan); Teshima, Teruki, E-mail: teshima@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the actual work environment of radiation oncologists (ROs) in Japan in terms of working pattern, patient load, and quality of cancer care based on the relative time spent on patient care. Methods and Materials: In 2008, the Japanese Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology produced a questionnaire for a national structure survey of radiation oncology in 2007. Data for full-time ROs were crosschecked with data for part-time ROs by using their identification data. Data of 954 ROs were analyzed. The relative practice index for patients was calculated as the relative value of care time per patient on the basis of Japanese Blue Book guidelines (200 patients per RO). Results: The working patterns of RO varied widely among facility categories. ROs working mainly at university hospitals treated 189.2 patients per year on average, with those working in university hospitals and their affiliated facilities treating 249.1 and those working in university hospitals only treating 144.0 patients per year on average. The corresponding data were 256.6 for cancer centers and 176.6 for other facilities. Geographically, the mean annual number of patients per RO per quarter was significantly associated with population size, varying from 143.1 to 203.4 (p < 0.0001). There were also significant differences in the average practice index for patients by ROs working mainly in university hospitals between those in main and affiliated facilities (1.07 vs 0.71: p < 0.0001). Conclusions: ROs working in university hospitals and their affiliated facilities treated more patients than the other ROs. In terms of patient care time only, the quality of cancer care in affiliated facilities might be worse than that in university hospitals. Under the current national medical system, working patterns of ROs of academic facilities in Japan appear to be problematic for fostering true specialization of radiation oncologists.

  11. Hypertension in the National University of Distance Education’s personnel

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of Arterial Hypertension (AHT) has increased worldwide and preventive measures areinsufficient since only one third of the population is being treated. AHT is the primary cause of morbidity andmortality in the world. In this article is presented the first study on hypertension levels of personnel of aDistance Education university based on the analysis of all medical consultations in the Costa Rican StateUniversity for Distance Education (Universidad Estatal a Distancia-UNED) as...

  12. Ethnic Differences And Motivation Based On Maslow’s Theory At a MedicaL University

    OpenAIRE

    Jagmohni Kaur Sidhu

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Motivation in Malaysia is to a largeextent influenced by the value system amongst allMalaysians. Being able to motivate employees is one ofthe important keys to the success of the organization.In this paper, an attempt was made to look into theneeds of employees in organizations and in particular,the needs based on Maslow’s theory on motivation. Subjects and Methods: Employees which consisted ofboth academic and administrative employees of theInternational Medical University (...

  13. Barriers and challenges in researches by Iranian students of medical universities

    OpenAIRE

    Zohreh Anbari; Abolfazl Mohammadbeigi; Rahmatollah Jadidi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health sciences research (HSR) is an essential part of improving health care which plays a critical role in the field of medicine and clinical practice. The aim of the current study was to assess barriers to the research by students of medical sciences as well as to find out effective strategies for management of student researches in Iranian universities. Materials and Methods: This study utilized a hybrid design with quantitative and qualitative analytical approaches conduct...

  14. ON EXPERIENCE OF THE ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION IN THE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Semenets; V. Yu. Kovalok

    2015-01-01

    An importance of the application of the electronic document management to the Ukraine healthcare is shown. The electronic document management systems market overview is presented. Example of the usage of the open-source electronic document management system in the Ternopil State Medical University by I. Ya. Horbachevsky is shown. The implementation capabilities of the electronic document management system within a cloud services are shown. The electronic document management features of the Mi...

  15. An evaluation of University of Cape Town medical students’ community placements in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia S. Naidu; Virginia Zweigenthal; James Irlam; Leslie London; Johannah Keikelame

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fourth-year medical students at the University of Cape Town (UCT) work closely with stakeholders in community teaching sites to conduct community-based research projects and follow-up health promotion interventions during their Public Health training.Objectives: This study evaluated the placements as a learning experience from the perspectives of past students and community stakeholders.Methods: A total of 32 projects were randomly selected out of 232 projects undertaken during 20...

  16. Substance use and its predictors among undergraduate medical students of Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Azazh Aklilu; Deressa Wakgari

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Substance use remains high among Ethiopian youth and young adolescents particularly in high schools and colleges. The use of alcohol, khat and tobacco by college and university students can be harmful; leading to decreased academic performance, increased risk of contracting HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. However, the magnitude of substance use and the factors associated with it has not been investigated among medical students in the country. This study was co...

  17. Knowledge Management Components from the Viewpoint of Departments’ Chairmen Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences

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    Faraji Khiavi F

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Knowledge management is one of the most important success instruments for organizations in the competitive conditions and information era. Setting knowledge management in the organizational system of Medical Sciences’ Universities is required in order to achieve and use the latest research and scientific achievements. So this study aimed to determine the knowledge management components from the viewpoint of the departments’ chairmen of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences. Instrument & Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional research was performed in the society of department chairmen of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences (60 persons in 2012 and all of them were studied by census method. Data gathering instrument was a standard questionnaire with 2 parts demographic data and knowledge management. Data were analyzed by SPSS 17 software using descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests like Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Findings: The situation of knowledge creation dimension (2.84±0.70 was estimated relatively not appropriate, while knowledge sharing (3.00±0.74, knowledge transfer (3.11±0.61, knowledge application (3.11±0.64, knowledge assessment (3.10±0.77 and general knowledge management (3.01±0.58 were estimated relatively appropriate. There was a significant relationship between samples’ age and the application of knowledge dimension (p=0.009. Conclusion: Knowledge management status seems relatively appropriate from the viewpoint of the departments’ chairmen of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences.

  18. On-campus physicians witnessing changes in medical problems faced by university students.

    OpenAIRE

    Thorne, S

    1996-01-01

    Most Canadian universities offer on-campus health services for their students. Ten years ago minor health problems such as infections, cuts and bruises were the common causes of visits to student health centres, but today medical staff report that students are seeking help for more serious problems such as sexually transmitted diseases, stress, sports injuries, eating disorders and asthma and allergies. Many are also seeking psychiatric counselling.

  19. The Factors Influencing Academic Affairs Services Management at the National University of Laos and Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Romania

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    Sounieng VONGKHAMCHANH

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims are to investigate the attitude levels of staff’s and students’ on the motivation, effectiveness towards the academic affairs services management at the faculty of Economics and Business Management, DongDok campus in the National University of Laos, and the faculty of Economic Sciences and faculty of Sciences, Sibiu campus in Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Romania. There were 220 participants, five groups; presidents, deans, heads of departments, lecturers and students. The five-point Likert scale rating questionnaires were used to collect data. The SPSS version 20 was used to perform the needed analysis for reaching the proposed aims. In this regard, univariate and bivariate statistics were computed; Pearson Chi-Square Test, ANOVA, scale reliability and validity analysis were undertaken. The research goals are to improve the academic affairs services management systems in the two mentioned universities. Therefore, the results advised the university committee boards, the governments, the national, international donors, curriculum developers, staff and students to use them for the educational purposes.

  20. Medical students’ perception of the learning environment at King Saud University Medical College, Saudi Arabia, using DREEM Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Mona M; Sattar, Kamran; Alnassar, Sami; Alsaif, Faisal; Alswat, Khalid; Alghonaim, Mohamed; Alhaizan, Maysoon; Al-furaih, Nawaf

    2017-01-01

    Background The students’ perception of the learning environment is an important aspect for evaluation and improvement of the educational program. The College of Medicine at King Saud University (KSU) reformed its curriculum in 2009 from a traditional to a system-oriented hybrid curriculum. Objective The objective of the present study was to determine the perception of the second batch (reformed curriculum) of medical graduates about the educational environment at the College of Medicine, KSU, using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) scale. Methods The fifth year medical students were asked to evaluate the educational program after graduation in May 2014. The questionnaire was distributed to the graduate students electronically. The DREEM questionnaire consisted of 50 items based on Likert’s scale; and five domains, namely, students’ perceptions of learning, perceptions of teachers, academic self-perceptions, perceptions of atmosphere, and social self-perceptions. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Results A total of 62 students participated in the study. The score for students’ perception of learning among medical students ranged from 2.93 to 3.64 (overall mean score: 40.17). The score for students’ perception of teachers ranged from 2.85 to 4.01 (overall mean score: 33.35). The score for students’ academic self-perceptions ranged from 3.15 to 4.06 (overall mean score: 28.4). The score for students’ perception of atmosphere ranged from 2.27 to 3.91 (overall mean score: 41.32). The score for students’ social self-perceptions ranged from 2.85 to 4.33 (overall mean score: 24.33). The general perceptions of the students in all five sub-scales were positive. Conclusion The overall student’s perception about the educational environment was satisfactory. This study was important to evaluate the students’ perception of the learning environment among medical graduates of the reformed curriculum and provided guidance on areas of

  1. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, October 1976-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A.

    1979-01-01

    DOE Contract No. EY-76-S-02-4078 was started in October 1976 to set up an investigative radiochemical facility at the Yale Medical Center which would bridge the gap between current investigation with radionuclides at the Yale School of Medicine and the facilities in the Chemistry Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. To facilitate these goals, Dr. Mathew L. Thakur was recruited who joined the Yale University faculty in March of 1977. This report briefly summarizes our research accomplishments through the end of June 1979. These can be broadly classified into three categories: (1) research using indium-111 labelled cellular blood components; (2) development of new radiopharmaceuticals; and (3) interaction with Dr. Alfred Wolf and colleagues in the Chemistry Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  2. [Quality of medical records in Naples (Italy) 2nd University School of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agozzino, E; Esposito, S; Parmeggiani, C; Piro, A; Grippo, N; Di Palma, M A

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate and improve the quality of medical-record keeping, in clinics and surgery departments. The evaluation involved 66 Operative Units (O.U.) of the "2nd University Hospital" in Naples (Italy). 10 medical records for each O.U. were randomly selected, for a total of 660. The quality was evaluated in all sections of medical records using the criteria of completeness, clarity and traceability of the data. The most critical issues are: unclear handwriting in almost all sections, in the whole scarse presence of a discharge letter (17.0%) in surgery (1.4%), almost total absence of the physicians signature in the clinical diary (2.3%). The completeness of medical records (presence of patient's history, physical examination, informed consent) is significantly higher in the surgery departments. The medical records are significantly righter in the clinic departments. In general, a poor quality of medical-record keeping was detected. This indicates the need to improve the quality by involving the staff in the importance of correct compilation.

  3. The analysis of the medical university students’ health condition and lifestyle

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    OLGA KHURS

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Significant psychophysiological burdens and unhealthy lifestyle constitute the risk factors leading to students’ health deterioration. Purpose: The purpose of the research was the analysis of students’ health condition and lifestyle in medical university. Material and methods: The objects of the research were 100 third year students of the Faculties of General Medicine and Pediatrics of Grodno State Medical University. For the study of students’ orientation on healthy lifestyle, a special scale-type questionnaire was developed and used. Results: According to the respondents’ opinions it has been detected that the basic factors influencing the state of health are the lifestyle and the living conditions. The students activity is evaluated as very low as well as their rational nutrition. The majority of them smoke and drink alcohol. Conclusions: The peculiarities of studying at a medical university accompanied by imbalanced nutrition might lead to the deterioration of health in the students which are doctors to be. The results ought to lead to the optimization of prophylaxis programs and entire alteration of the students’ lifestyles.

  4. Attitudes toward active euthanasia among medical students at two German universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Katri Elina; Klein, Eva; Jaspers, Birgit; Klaschik, Eberhard

    2008-06-01

    There has been an ongoing debate about a legalisation of active euthanasia (AE) in Germany. Palliative care education in German medical schools seeks to foster and cultivate a negative attitude toward AE, but little is known about its effectiveness in this respect. The aim of this study was to assess attitudes toward AE among students with and without palliative medicine tuition (PMT). The link to an anonymised online questionnaire was sent out to 1,092 third, fifth and sixth year medical students (YMS) in August-November 2006 at two German universities: university one (U1) with compulsory and additional optional PMT and university two (U2) without any PMT. Thirteen questions addressed active, passive or indirect euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (statistic: mean +/- SD (range), Wilcoxon, Whitney U Test, significance p circumstances that lack dignity'. Of all students, 21.1% at U1 and 37.2% at U2 could imagine to perform AE in patients, even though 72.6% at U1 and 78.2% at U2 think its legalisation would promote misuse. The high proportion of pro-AE attitudes gives reason to reconsider both 'standard' and palliative medicine tuition for medical students.

  5. Knowledge and Attitudes of Sana'a University Medical Students towards Premarital Screening

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    Hafiz A. Al-Nood

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the knowledge and attitudes of Sana’a University medical students towards premarital screening (PMS. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among the students of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sana’a University, during the academic year 2012/2013. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 516 Yemeni students. The questionnaire was composed of three parts; the first part was about socio-demographic data, the second part was about the students’ knowledge about PMS and the third part was about their attitudes towards the PMS. Results: Most of the respondents (92% knew that PMS reduces hereditary and sexually-transmitted diseases, believed that it is important to carry out and agreed to do it. Making PMS mandatory and legal prevention of marriage in case of positive results were accepted by 82% and 62% of the respondents, respectively. Conclusions: Although the majority of Sana’a University medical students favored PMS and had a fair knowledge about most of its aspects, a small proportion of them refused its mandating or legally preventing at-risk marriages. These negative attitudes could be reversed by health education of medical students on PMS.

  6. Study on attitudes of students of Islamic Azad University Tehran Medical Branch toward food safety, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri, Ali; Poursadeghiyan, Mohsen; Baneshi, Mohammad Mehdi; Biglari, Hamed; Yari, Ahmad Reza; Khammar, Alireza

    2017-05-01

    Given the importance of high-quality healthy food for humans, contamination control is the most important concern for healthy staff. To determine the attitudes of students at Islamic Azad University (Tehran Medical Branch) toward food safety. This cross-sectional and analytic-descriptive study was conducted on 326 students of Azad University of Medical Sciences in 2016. A self-made questionnaire consisting of 40 questions was used. The reliability of the questionnaire was confirmed using internal consistency method (Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.80). After collecting data, we use descriptive statistical indexes (mean and standard deviation) among demographic variables and the level of knowledge to describe and analyze the data. The participants' attitudes and operation are measured by Spearman tests, and the analytical results are given using SPSS version 20. According to the findings, 55.3, 30 and 14.7 percent of students had high, moderate and low attitude scores toward food safety, respectively. In addition, male and female students had equal attitudes toward food safety, and no significant relationship between sex and attitude was observed a significant difference (p>0.05), but between educational levels (p=0.008) and ages (p=0.001) of students significance was a positive correlation. Due to the low attitudes score of about half of the students of Islamic Azad University Tehran Medical Branch toward food safety, it can be claimed, food safety training in this community is required.

  7. How patient-physician encounters in critical medical situations affect trust: results of a national survey

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    Hall Mark A

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients' trust in physicians and in the medical profession is vital for a successful patient-physician relationship. Trust is especially salient in critical medical situations, such as serious side-effects, hospitalizations, and diagnoses of serious medical conditions, but most trust studies have been done with the general population or in routine primary care settings. This study examines the association between patient-physician encounters in such critical medical situations and patients' trust in their physician and in the medical profession in general. Methods A random national telephone survey was conducted using validated multi-item questionnaire measuring trust and satisfaction with physicians and with the medical profession. A seven item questionnaire measured the patient-physician encounters in critical medical situations. A total of 1117 subjects aged 20 years and older with health insurance were included for analyses. Spearman rank order correlations were used to determine the association of encounter variables with trust in physicians and the medical profession. Results Prescription of medications by primary care physicians that patients believed might have side effects was negatively correlated with trust in physician (ρ = -0.12, p Conclusion Hospitalization, perceived seriousness of condition, and concerns about the risks of medications were found to be associated with patient trust in physicians or the medical profession. These findings highlight the salience of trust in serious physician-patient encounters and the role that patient vulnerability plays in determining patient trust.

  8. Educational Status of Dental Basic Science Course and its Correlation with Students' Educational Background in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

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    Mozafar Khazaei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Basic science course plays a pivotal role in the academic achievement of the students. The scientific background and educational performance of the students are also influential in this period. The aim of the present study was to investigate the educational status of dental basic science course in the first three admissions (2009-2011 and its association with students’ educational background in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, all dental students admitted to school of dentistry in 2009-2011 years were included. The students’ academic background (scores, grade point average, score of comprehensive basic sciences examination (CBSE were recorded. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and independent t-test. Results: Kermanshah dental students admitted to university in 2009-2011 were mostly female (59.2%, belonged to regions 2 and 3 (81.6% of university entrance exam, had sciences diploma (89.8% and their grade point average of diploma was nearly 18. There was a significant difference between the three groups of students admitted to university in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Arabic, English language and Theology lessones of entrane exam (P<0.05. The students’ failure rate was 1.5% in university coureses. They all (100% passed CBSE and were ranked second nationally in the year. There was no significant difference between male and female students in terms of age, diploma grade point average, grade point average of basic sciences and score of CBSE. Conclusion: Basic science courses of dentistry in Kermanshah enjoyed a rather constant status and students had a good academic level in these courses.

  9. Neuroscience curriculum changes and outcomes: medical university of South Carolina, 2006 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Kenton R; Cooper, S Lewis; Wong, Jeffrey G

    2012-07-01

    To develop future neurologists and translational neuroscientists, we created a neurosciences pathway throughout our medical school curriculum that included early exposure to clinical neurosciences decision-making and added variety to the choices of later clinical neurosciences experiences. Our curricular innovation had 3 parts: (1) integrating basic neurosciences content into an explicit clinical context in a College of Medicine (COM) first year of medical school; (2) expanding pathophysiological principles related to neurosciences in COM second year of medical school; and (3) creating a variety of 3-week clinical neurosciences selectives in COM third year of medical school and 4-week electives/externships for interested learners in COM fourth year of medical school. These new changes were evaluated (1) by comparing national standardized examinations including Neurology Subject examination scores for students choosing clinical neurosciences selectives; (2) by student satisfaction Graduate Questionnaires; and (3) by the total number of our graduates matching in US neurosciences disciplines. Students taking neuroscience selectives demonstrated a nonsignificant trend toward higher Step 2 Clinical Knowledge scores. The students' Neurology Subject examination scores were comparable with those scores reported nationally for other US COM third year of medical school students on 4-week rotations. Student-reported satisfaction in clinical neurology teaching improved from 43.9% (before) to 81.8% (after). The percentage of students matching into clinical neuroscience disciplines rose from 2% (before) to 6% (after). Our neurosciences curricular innovation increased graduating student satisfaction scores, had a mild positive impact on Step 2 Clinical Knowledge scores, and increased the number of students choosing careers in the clinical neurosciences. This model may be a consideration for other medical schools who wish to integrate neurosciences teaching throughout their

  10. Interdisciplinary Medication Adherence Program: The Example of a University Community Pharmacy in Switzerland

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    Mélanie Lelubre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Community Pharmacy of the Department of Ambulatory Care and Community Medicine (Policlinique Médicale Universitaire, PMU, University of Lausanne, developed and implemented an interdisciplinary medication adherence program. The program aims to support and reinforce medication adherence through a multifactorial and interdisciplinary intervention. Motivational interviewing is combined with medication adherence electronic monitors (MEMS, Aardex MWV and a report to patient, physician, nurse, and other pharmacists. This program has become a routine activity and was extended for use with all chronic diseases. From 2004 to 2014, there were 819 patient inclusions, and 268 patients were in follow-up in 2014. This paper aims to present the organization and program’s context, statistical data, published research, and future perspectives.

  11. The Medical Humanities Program at the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magwood, Bryan; Casiro, Oscar; Hennen, Brian

    2003-10-01

    The current Medical Humanities Program at the University of Manitoba has evolved from a series of voluntary sessions into an integral element of the curriculum since its inception as the Human Values Program in 1986. With strong academic and financial support, the Medical Humanities Program has greatly benefited from dedicated leadership and a commitment to ongoing curricular review and redevelopment. The current Medical Humanities Program comprises six distinct components: Clinical Ethics; History of Medicine; Law; Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Palliative Care; and Human Values. Each of these components is compulsory and the first five are tested through examinations and assignments. Human Values sessions are designed to be experiential and to explore the human side of medicine as well as the intersections between medicine and the arts, literature, social psychology, and spirituality. The authors outline the origins and evolution of this successful program and describe its current components, student and faculty opinions, funding, advantages, disadvantages, and anticipated growth.

  12. Assessment of Depression among Medical Students of Private University in Bhopal, India

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    Anshuman Sharma, Sanjay Kumar Gupta, Neeraj Khare, Sanjay S Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available "Introduction: Medical students repeatedly experience different stresses which render them more vulnerable to psychological problems that may affect their emotional, psychosocial and physical health. Objectives of the study were to determine the prevalence of depression and associated factors leading to depression among medical students at People’s University. Method: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Peoples University using Theoretical Depressive Experiences Questionnaire (TDEQ there were 440 students participated in the study with duration of 1 month. Results: The participation rate was 90% (396 students. The mean age of participants was 21 ± 2 years, and more than half (62% i.e. 246 students were males. The prevalence of depression among students was 31 % (123 students. Conclusions: Symptoms of moderate severity were the predominant among students with the studied psychological illnesses. A substantial proportion of medical students had ongoing psychiatric problems that were associated with multiple social, behavioural, and educational factors. Interventions addressing the mental health of medical students should be initiated."

  13. Barriers and challenges in researches by Iranian students of medical universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbari, Zohreh; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Jadidi, Rahmatollah

    2015-01-01

    Health sciences research (HSR) is an essential part of improving health care which plays a critical role in the field of medicine and clinical practice. The aim of the current study was to assess barriers to the research by students of medical sciences as well as to find out effective strategies for management of student researches in Iranian universities. This study utilized a hybrid design with quantitative and qualitative analytical approaches conducted on 627 students in six schools of medical sciences in two universities in Central Province in Iran from April to December, 2012. Questionnaires were distributed among researcher and non-researcher students to find barriers to the research. These barriers were approved and validated by similar studies and strategies using the Delphi technique on 36 students. The most important barriers among researcher students were institutional barriers (3.3 ± 1.3), but in non-researcher students they were individual barriers (3.6 ± 1.7). The majority of barriers to involvement in the research among researcher students appeared to be time, lack of access to electronic resources and prolongation of the process of buying equipment. In addition, the greatest barriers among non-researcher students included the lack of time, scientific writing skills, and access to trained assistants. The results showed the issue of attitudes towards compulsory research as a component of critical scholarship in the curriculum of medical courses. Moreover, employment of the research experts can be helpful for research training in schools of medical sciences.

  14. Predictors of medication use in the Roma population in Spain: a population-based national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Pérez, M; Hernández Barrera, V; López de Andrés, A; Jiménez-Trujillo, I; Jiménez-García, R; Carrasco-Garrido, P

    2015-05-01

    To describe the prevalence of prescribed and self-medicated use of medication in the Spanish Roma population, and identify the associated factors. Descriptive cross-sectional study. Data from the first National Health Survey conducted on the Roma population in Spain were used. The sample comprised 1000 Spanish Roma adults of both sexes aged ≥16 years. Answers (yes/no) to the question, 'In the last two weeks have you taken the following medicines [in reference to a list of medicines that might be used by the population] and were they prescribed for you by a doctor?' were used to ascertain 'medication use'. 'Self-medication' referred to use of these medicines without medical prescription. Using multivariate logistic regression models, odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to identify associated factors. The overall prevalence of medication use in the Roma population for both sexes was 69.1%, and 38.7% was self-medicated. Females reported higher use of medication than males (75.1% vs 62.3%); however, self-medication was higher among males. Analgesics and antipyretics were used most often (35.8%). Among males, the variables that were independently and significantly associated with a higher probability of medication use were: age; negative perception of health; presence of chronic disease (OR 2.81; 95% CI 1.67-4.73); and medical visits (OR 4.51; 95% CI 2.54-8.01). The variables were the same among females, except for age. A high percentage of the Spanish Roma population use medication, and a significant proportion of them self-medicate. The presence of chronic diseases, a negative perception of health and medical consultations were associated with increased use of medication in the study population. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. HIV testing during the Canadian immigration medical examination: a national survey of designated medical practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Jennifer M; Li, Alan; Owino, Maureen; English, Ken; Mascarenhas, Lyndon; Tan, Darrell H S

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing is mandatory for individuals wishing to immigrate to Canada. Since the Designated Medical Practitioners (DMPs) who perform these tests may have varying experience in HIV and time constraints in their clinical practices, there may be variability in the quality of pre- and posttest counseling provided. We surveyed DMPs regarding HIV testing, counseling, and immigration inadmissibility. A 16-item survey was mailed to all DMPs across Canada (N = 203). The survey inquired about DMP characteristics, knowledge of HIV, attitudes and practices regarding inadmissibility and counseling, and interest in continuing medical education. There were a total of 83 respondents (41%). Participants frequently rated their knowledge of HIV diagnostics, cultural competency, and HIV/AIDS service organizations as "fair" (40%, 43%, and 44%, respectively). About 25%, 46%, and 11% of the respondents agreed/strongly agreed with the statements "HIV infected individuals pose a danger to public health and safety," "HIV-positive immigrants cause excessive demand on the healthcare system," and "HIV seropositivity is a reasonable ground for denial into Canada," respectively. Language was cited as a barrier to counseling, which focused on transmission risks (46% discussed this as "always" or "often") more than coping and social support (37%). There was a high level of interest (47%) in continuing medical education in this area. There are areas for improvement regarding DMPs' knowledge, attitudes, and practices about HIV infection, counseling, and immigration criteria. Continuing medical education and support for DMPs to facilitate practice changes could benefit newcomers who test positive through the immigration process.

  16. Evaluation of Student's Satisfaction toward Online Registration in Urmia University of Medical Sciences

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    Zakieh Rostamzadeh Khameneh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: in All field of education survey of student satisfaction viewpoint has important role in motivate them to study and improve the quality of teaching is effective. One of University educational services, is internet Registration. This study with thisaim, done to assess the UrmiaMedical Science University Students satisfaction of register online Methods: this descriptive study performed by sectional method with Stratified sampling at Urmia University of Medical Sciences, School of Medicine and Public Health. Data were collected through a questionnaire and analyzed using spss statistical software. Findings: In this study, the satisfaction of 121 students (72.72% female and 28.28% male were examined, it was determined that 92.2 percent willing to register online and 80.3 percent were registration process were satisfied. Also, 54.1 percent of the students have suggested that facilities applications in the university, including a computer and internet were average. Many of the students had trouble with controlling the prerequisite and replenishment. Conclusion: The data showed that students werecontent with online registration and more willing to promote it. Therefore, it is suggested to increase the educational opportunities available, including computers and the Internet to improve the quality of educational services and the satisfaction of the students provided.

  17. Information-seeking behavior of cardiovascular disease patients in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Maryam; Soleymani, Mohammad Reza; Afshar, Mina; Shahrzadi, Leila; Zadeh, Akbar Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Patients, as one of the most prominent groups requiring health-based information, encounter numerous problems in order to obtain these pieces of information and apply them. The aim of this study was to determine the information-seeking behavior of cardiovascular patients who were hospitalized in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences hospitals. This is a survey research. The population consisted of all patients with cardiovascular disease who were hospitalized in the hospitals of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences during 2012. According to the statistics, the number of patients was 6000. The sample size was determined based on the formula of Cochran; 400 patients were randomly selected. Data were collected by researcher-made questionnaire. Two-level descriptive statistics and inferential statistics were used for analysis. The data showed that the awareness of the probability to recover and finding appropriate medical care centers were the most significant informational needs. The practitioners, television, and radio were used more than the other informational resources. Lack of familiarity to medical terminologies and unaccountability of medical staff were the major obstacles faced by the patients to obtain information. The results also showed that there was no significant relationship between the patients' gender and information-seeking behavior, whereas there was a significant relationship between the demographic features (age, education, place of residence) and information-seeking behavior. Giving information about health to the patients can help them to control their disease. Appropriate methods and ways should be used based on patients' willingness. Despite the variety of information resources, patients expressed medical staff as the best source for getting health information. Information-seeking behavior of the patients was found to be influenced by different demographic and environmental factors.

  18. Assessment of the interns’ ability based on Dundee model in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

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    MITRA AMINI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of medical profession and the role of the physician in society is no secret to anyone. Skills and competencies in clinical practice are necessary for the medical profession. In fact, in patient care, doctors require practical skills in addition to scientific knowledge. This study examines the potentials of medical school students in three areas of doing the right thing, doing the right thing in an intermediate range, and doing the right thing by the right person. Methods: This study was done in a descriptive-analytical and sectional model. The population of this study was all interns of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences who were passing internship at Internal Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Emergency wards. About 100 persons were selected were selected by simple randomization. In order to collect data, a questionnaire with 12 questions was designed in two parts. The questionnaire was approved by 7 Faculty members of Clinical Medicine and Medical Education, and its reliability was approved by test-retest method on 20 medical students in the form of a pilot study and through Cronbach’s alpha (82%. Collected data were analyzed by SPSS software version 14 using descriptive statistical methods. Results: Results showed that within the inner circle, interns evaluated their skills in surgery, internal medicine, and gynecology wards, intermediate and at other wards as weak. Also within the center circle, interns evaluated adequate educational evidence-based training in the field of medicine, and sufficiency of educational training in the field of clinical decision making and clinical care as suitable. Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that medical interns’ skills in performing most medical skills are moderate. So teaching students by new educational methods and workshop techniques, using experienced teachers will be effective. The use of clinical skills training centers and objective

  19. Medical students’ knowledge, attitude, and practice of complementary and alternative medicine: a pre- and post-exposure survey in Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia

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    Al Mansour MA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed Abdullah Al Mansour,1 Abdullah MN Al-Bedah,2 Mohammed Othman AlRukban,3 Ibrahim S Elsubai,2 Elsadiq Yousif Mohamed,4 Ahmed Tawfik El Olemy,2 Asim AH Khalil,2 Mohamed KM Khalil,2 Meshari Saleh Alqaed,2 Abdullah Almudaiheem,2 Waqas Sami Mahmoud,4 Khalid Altohami Medani,4 Naseem Akhtar Qureshi2 1College of Medicine, Majmaah University, Al Majma’ah, 2National Center of Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Ministry of Health, 3Department of Family Medicine and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, 4Department of Community Medicine and Public Health, College of Medicine, Majmaah University, Al Majma’ah, Saudi Arabia Background: Evidently, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is a recognized medical practice that efficiently uses multiple treatment therapies and techniques in the prevention and management of a variety of human disorders. Many medical schools have integrated CAM curriculum in medical education system worldwide. Research in knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP of diverse health professionals exposed to CAM courses is important from many perspectives including improvement in KAP and teaching skills of faculty, together with capacity building and curriculum development.Objective and setting: This pre- and post-design cross-sectional study aimed to assess CAM-KAP of two intakes of medical students in Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia.Methods: The second-year medical students of the first (year 2012–2013 and second (year 2013–2014 intake (n=26 and 39, respectively were selected for this study. A reliable, 16-item self-administered questionnaire was distributed among all the students for answering before and after the 48-hour CAM course. The data were analyzed using appropriate statistical test of significance.Results: Medical students’ knowledge and attitude toward CAM significantly improved across some subitems of CAM questionnaire with a positive trend in the rest of its items

  20. The epidemiology and type of medication errors reported to the National Poisons Information Centre of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Nicola

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Medication errors are widely reported for hospitalised patients, but limited data are available for medication errors that occur in community-based and clinical settings. Epidemiological data from poisons information centres enable characterisation of trends in medication errors occurring across the healthcare spectrum. AIM: The objective of this study was to characterise the epidemiology and type of medication errors reported to the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC) of Ireland. METHODS: A 3-year prospective study on medication errors reported to the NPIC was conducted from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2009 inclusive. Data on patient demographics, enquiry source, location, pharmaceutical agent(s), type of medication error, and treatment advice were collated from standardised call report forms. Medication errors were categorised as (i) prescribing error (i.e. physician error), (ii) dispensing error (i.e. pharmacy error), and (iii) administration error involving the wrong medication, the wrong dose, wrong route, or the wrong time. RESULTS: Medication errors were reported for 2348 individuals, representing 9.56% of total enquiries to the NPIC over 3 years. In total, 1220 children and adolescents under 18 years of age and 1128 adults (>\\/= 18 years old) experienced a medication error. The majority of enquiries were received from healthcare professionals, but members of the public accounted for 31.3% (n = 736) of enquiries. Most medication errors occurred in a domestic setting (n = 2135), but a small number occurred in healthcare facilities: nursing homes (n = 110, 4.68%), hospitals (n = 53, 2.26%), and general practitioner surgeries (n = 32, 1.36%). In children, medication errors with non-prescription pharmaceuticals predominated (n = 722) and anti-pyretics and non-opioid analgesics, anti-bacterials, and cough and cold preparations were the main pharmaceutical classes involved. Medication errors with prescription medication predominated for

  1. Turning Microscopy in the Medical Curriculum Digital: Experiences from The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences at University of Copenhagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainer, Ben; Mortensen, Niels Werner; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Sørensen, Allan Have; Olsen, Jørgen; Saxild, Hans Henrik; Johansen, Flemming Fryd

    2017-01-01

    Familiarity with the structure and composition of normal tissue and an understanding of the changes that occur during disease is pivotal to the study of the human body. For decades, microscope slides have been central to teaching pathology in medical courses and related subjects at the University of Copenhagen. Students had to learn how to use a microscope and envisage three-dimensional processes that occur in the body from two-dimensional glass slides. Here, we describe how a PathXL virtual microscopy system for teaching pathology and histology at the Faculty has recently been implemented, from an administrative, an economic, and a teaching perspective. This fully automatic digital microscopy system has been received positively by both teachers and students, and a decision was made to convert all courses involving microscopy to the virtual microscopy format. As a result, conventional analog microscopy will be phased out from the fall of 2016.

  2. Prevalence and Predictors of Anxiety and Depression among Female Medical Students in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    IBRAHIM, Nahla; AL-KHARBOUSH, Dania; EL-KHATIB, Lamis; AL-HABIB, Ahd; ASALI, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medical education & medical profession are among the most challenging and most stressful ones. Anxiety and depression represents an escalating public health problem among medical students. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence & predictors of anxiety and depression among female medical students in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out during 2010–2011. A stratified random sample method was used to sel...

  3. Cooperative Science: A National Study of University and Industry Researchers. Assessment of the Industry/University Cooperative Research Projects Program (IUCR). Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elmima C.; Tornatzky, Louis G.

    This report presents data from a national study of 118 Industry/University Cooperative Research (IUCR) projects supported by the National Science Foundation. Questionnaire responses were gathered from 226 industry and university scientists working on these projects. The purpose of the study was to describe how IUCR projects develop, how they are…

  4. Drug and Alcohol Use by Canadian University Athletes: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, John C.; Gauvin, Lise

    1996-01-01

    Using a stratified random sampling procedure, 754 student athletes were surveyed regarding drug and alcohol use in eight different sports from eight universities across Canada. Provides statistics of substances athletes reported using, including pain medications, weight loss products, anabolic steroids, smokeless tobacco products, alcohol,…

  5. Assessing medical students' performance in core competencies using multiple admission programs for colleges and universities: From the perspective of multi-source feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Tseng Fang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since 1994, Taiwanese medical universities have employed the multiple application method comprising "recommendations and screening" and "admission application." The purpose of this study is to examine whether medical students admitted using different admission programs gave different performances. Methods: To evaluate the six core competencies for medical students proposed by Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME, this study employed various assessment tools, including student opinion feedback, multi-source feedback (MSF, course grades, and examination results.MSF contains self-assessment scale, peer assessment scale, nursing staff assessment scale, visiting staff assessment scale, and chief resident assessment scale. In the subscales, the CronbachÊs alpha were higher than 0.90, indicating good reliability. Research participants consisted of 182 students from the School of Medicine at Chang Gung University. Results: Regarding studentsÊ average grade for the medical ethics course, the performance of students who were enrolled through school recommendations exceeded that of students who were enrolled through the National College University Entrance Examination (NCUEE p = 0.011, and all considered "teamwork" as the most important. Different entry pipelines of students in the "communication," "work attitude," "medical knowledge," and "teamwork" assessment scales showed no significant difference. The improvement rate of the students who were enrolled through the school recommendations was better than that of the students who were enrolled through the N CUEE in the "professional skills," "medical core competencies," "communication," and "teamwork" projects of self-assessment and peer assessment scales. However, the students who were enrolled through the NCUEE were better in the "professional skills," "medical core competencies," "communication," and "teamwork" projects of the visiting staff assessment scale and the

  6. 41 CFR 102-36.460 - Do we report excess medical shelf-life items held for national emergency purposes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... items held for national emergency purposes? When the remaining shelf life of any medical materials or supplies held for national emergency purposes is of too short a period to justify their continued retention... medical shelf-life items held for national emergency purposes? 102-36.460 Section 102-36.460...

  7. Electronic Media Learning Materials Of Indira Gandhi National Open University, India: An Analytical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Manoj Roy. V.; Chinmoy Kumar GHOSH

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) in 1985 has been a milestone in the growth of higher education in India. A very special feature of the University is that a composite of several instructional methods in practice are aimed at giving effective support to distance learners. Self-instructional print materials are the mainstay of the courseware. Besides this, at the support centres, the learners attend a few face-to-face counselling sessions and get access to...

  8. Electronic Media Learning Materials Of Indira Gandhi National Open University, India: An Analytical Study

    OpenAIRE

    V, Manoj Roy.; Chinmoy Kumar GHOSH

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) in 1985 has been a milestone in the growth of higher education in India. A very special feature of the University is that a composite of several instructional methods in practice are aimed at giving effective support to distance learners. Self-instructional print materials are the mainstay of the courseware. Besides this, at the support centres, the learners attend a few face-to-face counselling sessions and get access to...

  9. The resident as teacher: Medical students' perception in a Spanish university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal Bello, D; García de Tena, J; Jaenes Barrios, B; Martínez Lasheras, B; de Arriba de la Fuente, G; Rodríguez Zapata, M

    2014-10-01

    Residents play an important but scanty assessed role in medical students teaching. The aim of this study was to assess the perception of medical students about residents' teaching activity. Autofilled survey provided to medical students of the University of Alcalá (Spain) in the final year in their school of medicine. Student opinion about care and teaching abilities of residents and physicians was evaluated using a 5-point Likert scale. 104 surveys were collected. A 69,9% of students consider that as much as 50% of their knowledge came from rounds with residents. Students believe that resident teaching lacks enough academical acknowledgment (94.2%); they estimate necessary to acquire teaching skills during residency (82,7%), and they would like to provide tutoring other medical students (88,5%). Students rated residents better than physicians on relational and motivational abilities. There is a positive view about resident as a teacher among medical students, which suggests the need to improve the resident's teaching skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. [E-learning in ENT: Usage in University Medical Centers in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiherr von Saß, Peter; Klenzner, Thomas; Scheckenbach, Kathrin; Chaker, Adam

    2017-01-18

    E-learning is an essential part of innovative medical teaching concepts. The challenging anatomy and physiology in ENT is considered particularly suitable for self-assessed and adaptive e-learning. Usage and data on daily experience with e-learning in German ENT-university hospitals are currently unavailable and the degree of implementation of blended learning including feed-back from medical students are currently not known. We investigated the current need and usage of e-learning in academic ENT medical centers in Germany. We surveyed students and chairs for Otorhinolaryngology electronically and paperbased during the summer semester 2015. Our investigation revealed an overall heterogenous picture on quality and quantity of offered e-learning applications. While the overall amount of e-learning in academic ENT in Germany is rather low, at least half of the ENT-hospitals in medical faculties reported that e-learning had improved their own teaching activities. More collaboration among medical faculties and academic ENT-centers may help to explore new potentials, overcome technical difficulties and help to realize more ambitious projects.

  11. Discharge against medical advice from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: 10 years experience at a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim K Al-Turkistani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Discharging patients against medical advice is a problem of every age-group. However, because of their physiological vulnerability, the risk for the neonatal population is greater when discharged against medical advice (DAMA. This article is a study of the prevalence of the problem, the possible causes and/or risk factors. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 10 years of medical records of neonates discharged against medical advice from a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU at a university hospital. Results: The overall prevalence of DAMA was 1.6%. Most of the 51 infants who were taken out of hospital against medical advice (AMA were term (72.5% with a mean gestational age of 37.78 ± 2.5 weeks, of normal birth weight, with a mean of 2736 ± 661 g, Saudis (96%, those delivered vaginally (69%, and those that were provisionally diagnosed with transient tachypnea of newborn (TTN and/or query sepsis (49%. There was no difference between males and females (M/F = 1.2. There was an association between DAMA and the timing of DAMA (27.5% of DAMA at weekends and 67% of DAMA from May to October. Conclusion: DAMA of neonates is particularly critical. The causes and risk factors are many and difficult to predict. In addition to several other factors, its prevalence is influenced negatively by some socio-cultural beliefs.

  12. Medical problems among dental patients at the school of dentistry, the university of the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bayaty, H F; Murti, P R; Naidu, R S; Matthews, R; Simeon, D

    2009-12-01

    This study ascertained demographic information and prevalence rates of medical problems among 571 new and consecutive dental patients attending the emergency clinic of the School of Dentistry, The University of the West Indies. Patients were interviewed by specially trained and calibrated dental students and interns. Various medical problems of patients were recorded in individual open-ended case sheets, maintaining their privacy and confidentiality. This information was then transcribed into a specially designed and pretested form. The data were entered into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and analyzed using the SPSS statistical package to obtain the prevalence rates of medical conditions, which were then cross-tabulated with gender, age, ethnicity, and other variables. Significance of differences, if any, was evaluated by chi-square test. In all, 303 medical conditions were encountered in 239 individuals, giving a prevalence rate of 42 percent. Hypertension (12.6 percent), diabetes (6.1 percent), asthma (5.8 percent), arthritis (4.7 percent), and various allergies (8.3 percent) constituted an important segment of the problems. Gender, ethnic, and age differences were also evident for some diseases. In this study-which was the first of this kind in the West Indies-vital information on medical problems among dental patients was obtained by interviews conducted by dental students and interns, forming an important part of their dental education.

  13. Good Neighbors: Shared Challenges and Solutions Toward Increasing Value at Academic Medical Centers and Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Gerard P

    2015-12-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) and universities are experiencing increasing pressure to enhance the value they offer at the same time that they are facing challenges related to outcomes, controlling costs, new competition, and government mandates. Yet, rarely do the leaders of these academic neighbors work cooperatively to enhance value. In this Perspective the author, a former university regional campus president with duties in an AMC as an academic physician, shares his insights into the shared challenges these academic neighbors face in improving the value of their services in complex environments. He describes the successes some AMCs have had in generating revenues from new clinical programs that reduce the overall cost of care for larger populations. He also describes how several universities have taken a comprehensive approach to reduce overhead and administrative costs. The author identifies six themes related to successful value improvement efforts and provides examples of successful strategies used by AMCs and their university neighbors to improve the overall value of their programs. He concludes by encouraging leaders of AMCs and universities to share information about their successes in value improvements with each other, to seek additional joint value enhancement efforts, and to market their value improvements to the public.

  14. The Supervisory Role of the National Universities Commission and the Management of Universities in the South-South Zone of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoroma, N. S.

    2007-01-01

    Issues such as financial autonomy, academic autonomy and administrative autonomy are crucial to the effective management of university education globally. For many years Nigerian universities have complained of being impeded in these areas because of the supervisory role of the National Universities Commission (NUC) which tend to encroach on their…

  15. Medical emergencies in the imaging department of a university hospital: event and imaging characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tonder, F C; Sutherland, T; Smith, R J; Chock, J M E; Santamaria, J D

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to describe the characteristics of medical emergencies that occurred in the medical imaging department (MID) of a university hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A database of 'Respond Medical Emergency Team (MET)' and 'Respond Blue' calls was retrospectively examined for the period June 2003 to November 2010 in relation to events that occurred in the MID. The hospital medical imaging database was also examined in relation to these events and, where necessary, patients' notes were reviewed. Ethics approval was granted by the hospital ethics review board. There were 124 medical emergency calls in the MID during the study period, 28% Respond Blue and 72% Respond MET. Of these 124 calls, 26% occurred outside of usual work hours and 12% involved cardiac arrest. The most common reasons for the emergency calls were seizures (14%) and altered conscious state (13%). Contrast anaphylaxis precipitated the emergency in 4% of cases. In 83% of cases the emergency calls were for patients attending the MID for diagnostic imaging, the remainder being for a procedure. Of the scheduled imaging techniques, 45% were for computed tomography. The scheduled imaging was abandoned due to the emergency in 12% of cases. When performed, imaging informed patient management in 34% of cases in diagnostic imaging and in all cases in the context of image-guided procedures. Medical emergency calls in the MID often occurred outside usual work hours and were attributed to a range of medical problems. The emergencies occurred in relation to all imaging techniques and imaging informed patient management in many cases. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Outpatients flow management and ophthalmic electronic medical records system in university hospital using Yahgee Document View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Gochi, Akira; Hirakawa, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Tadashi; Kohno, Yoshihisa

    2010-10-01

    General electronic medical records systems remain insufficient for ophthalmology outpatient clinics from the viewpoint of dealing with many ophthalmic examinations and images in a large number of patients. Filing systems for documents and images by Yahgee Document View (Yahgee, Inc.) were introduced on the platform of general electronic medical records system (Fujitsu, Inc.). Outpatients flow management system and electronic medical records system for ophthalmology were constructed. All images from ophthalmic appliances were transported to Yahgee Image by the MaxFile gateway system (P4 Medic, Inc.). The flow of outpatients going through examinations such as visual acuity testing were monitored by the list "Ophthalmology Outpatients List" by Yahgee Workflow in addition to the list "Patients Reception List" by Fujitsu. Patients' identification number was scanned with bar code readers attached to ophthalmic appliances. Dual monitors were placed in doctors' rooms to show Fujitsu Medical Records on the left-hand monitor and ophthalmic charts of Yahgee Document on the right-hand monitor. The data of manually-inputted visual acuity, automatically-exported autorefractometry and non-contact tonometry on a new template, MaxFile ED, were again automatically transported to designated boxes on ophthalmic charts of Yahgee Document. Images such as fundus photographs, fluorescein angiograms, optical coherence tomographic and ultrasound scans were viewed by Yahgee Image, and were copy-and-pasted to assigned boxes on the ophthalmic charts. Ordering such as appointments, drug prescription, fees and diagnoses input, central laboratory tests, surgical theater and ward room reservations were placed by functions of the Fujitsu electronic medical records system. The combination of the Fujitsu electronic medical records and Yahgee Document View systems enabled the University Hospital to examine the same number of outpatients as prior to the implementation of the computerized filing system.

  17. Absenteeism among medical and health science undergraduate students at Hawassa University, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalegn, Anteneh Assefa; Berhan, Asres; Berhan, Yifru

    2014-04-14

    Student absenteeism is a major concern for university education worldwide. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence and causes of absenteeism among undergraduate medical and health sciences students at Hawassa University. We conducted a cross-sectional study using a pretested self-administered structured questionnaire from May-June 2013. The primary outcome indicator was self-reported absenteeism from lectures in the semester preceding the study period. The study included all regular undergraduate students who were enrolled in the University for at least one semester. The data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. The association between class absenteeism and socio-demographic and behavioral correlates of absenteeism was determined by bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results were reported as crude odds ratios (COR), adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). 1200 students consented and filled the questionnaire. Of these students, 43.7% had missed three or more lectures and 14.1% (95% CI = 12.2-16.2) missed more than 8 lectures in the preceding semester. There was a significant association between missing more than 8 lectures and age of students, chosen discipline (medicine), and social drug use. The main reasons reported for missing lectures were preparing for another examination, lack of interest, lecturer's teaching style, and availability of lecture material. At Hawassa University College of Medicine and Health Science student habits and teacher performance play a role in absenteeism from lectures. A university culture that promotes discipline and integrity especially among medical and older students discourages social drug use will likely improve motivation and attendance. Training in teaching methodologies to improve the quality and delivery of lectures should also help increase attendance.

  18. Predictors of self-reported academic performance among undergraduate medical students of Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gedefaw A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abel Gedefaw,1 Birkneh Tilahun,2 Anteneh Asefa3 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, 3School of Public and Environmental Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia Background: This study was conducted to identify predictors of self-reported academic performance in undergraduate medical students at Hawassa University. Methods: An analytical cross-sectional study involving 592 undergraduate medical students was conducted in November 2012. The academic performance of the study subjects was measured by self-reported cumulative grade point average (GPA using a self-administered questionnaire. Data were entered and analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 16 software. Pearson's bivariate correlations, multiple linear regression, and multiple logistic regression were used to identify predictors of academic performance. Results: The self-reported academic performance of students had been decreasing as the academic years progressed, with the highest and lowest performance being in the premedicine (mean GPA 3.47 and clinical I (mean GPA 2.71 years, respectively. One hundred and fifty-eight (26.7% of the participants had ever been delayed, 37 (6.2% had ever re-sat for examination, and two (0.3% had ever been warned due to academic failure. The overall variation in self-reported academic performance of the students was 32.8%. Participant age alone explained 21.9% of the variation. On the other hand, university entrance examination results, substance use at university, and medicine as first choice by students were identified as predictors of variation in self-reported academic performance, accounting for 6.9%, 2.7%, and <1% of the variation, respectively. Students who had never used tobacco, alcohol, or khat after starting university were twice as likely to score a self-reported cumulative GPA above 3.0 (adjusted odds ratio 1.95, 95

  19. A comparison of attitudes toward euthanasia among medical students at two Polish universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, Wojciech; Gottwald, Leszek; Majkowicz, Mikolaj; Kazmierczak-Lukaszewicz, Sylwia; Forycka, Maria; Cialkowska-Rysz, Aleksandra; Kotlinska-Lemieszek, Aleksandra

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study conducted upon completion of obligatory palliative medicine courses among 588 medical students at two universities was to compare their attitudes toward euthanasia. Four hundred ninety-two (84.97 %) students were Catholics; 69 (11.73 %) declared they would practice euthanasia, 303 (51.53 %) would not, and 216 students (36.73 %) were not sure. The idea of euthanasia legalisation was supported by 174 (29.59 %) respondents, opposed by 277 (47.11 %), and 137 (23.30 %) were undecided. Five hundred fifty-six (94.56 %) students did not change their attitudes toward euthanasia after palliative medicine courses. Students from the two universities were found to have different opinions on practicing euthanasia, euthanasia law and possible abuse which might follow euthanasia legalisation, but they shared similar views on the choice of euthanasia if they themselves were incurably ill and the legalisation of euthanasia. Gender and religion influenced students' answers. Differences observed between medical students at the two universities might be related to gender and cultural differences.

  20. New Methods of Evaluation for Postgraduate Training in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Jalilian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Revered editor evaluation of medical students in specialized medical fields has great importance in determining the necessary competence to learning clinical environments and necessary ability for functioning in the real environment (1. New specialized medical evaluation focuses on ways that confirm the clinical competence assistant that can point to the students’ experience booklet (log book; assay exams; Multiple Choice Question (MCQ; Objective Structural Clinical Examination (OSCE; observation with check list or rating scale; self-assessment and assessment by peers rating scale general; Portfolio; Direct Observation of Procedure Skill (DOPS; Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX; 360-degree comprehensive assessment of Clinical Skills based on Records assistants (CSR; Objective Structural Practical Examination (OSPE (2. This descriptive-analytical study was performed to evaluate the use of modern methods of evaluation among eleven postgraduate departments in Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Data collection tool was a checklist that was prepared by researchers and was completed by clinical group managers. Data were analyzed with SPSS-16 software, Chi-square test and analysis of variance. In total of 11 studied groups, 106 full-time board faculty members, 14 co-education, 221 residents were working. The most modern methods to evaluate in %100 of groups were OSCE and MCQ, DOPS in %80 of groups, and Mini-CEX and CSR in% 27 of groups. Assay exams were used in infectious and pathology groups as the use of other modern methods of evaluation was not observed in all groups. Statistically, the most important reasons for the lack of significant new methods of evaluation were: internal decision of the department (P=0.002, unfamiliarity of team members with modern methods of evaluation (P=0.06, and the adequacy of other methods of evaluation according to the decision of the department (P<0.001. Other cited reasons such as lack of

  1. [Competency-based medical education: National Catalogue of Learning Objectives in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadmon, M; Bender, M J; Adili, F; Arbab, D; Heinemann, M K; Hofmann, H S; König, S; Küper, M A; Obertacke, U; Rennekampff, H-O; Rolle, U; Rücker, M; Sader, R; Tingart, M; Tolksdorf, M M; Tronnier, V; Will, B; Walcher, F

    2013-04-01

    Competency-based medical education is a prerequisite to prepare students for the medical profession. A mandatory professional qualification framework is a milestone towards this aim. The National Competency-based Catalogue of Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM) of the German Medical Faculty Association (MFT) and the German Medical Association will constitute a basis for a core curriculum of undergraduate medical training. The Surgical Working Group on Medical Education (CAL) of the German Association of Surgeons (DGCH) aims at formulating a competency-based catalogue of learning objectives for surgical undergraduate training to bridge the gap between the NKLM and the learning objectives of individual medical faculties. This is intended to enhance the prominence and visibility of the surgical discipline in the context of medical education. On the basis of different faculty catalogues of learning objectives, the catalogue of learning objectives of the German Association of Orthopedics and Orthopedic Surgery and the Swiss Catalogue of Learning Objectives representatives of all German Surgical Associations cooperated towards a structured selection process of learning objectives and the definition of levels and areas of competencies. After completion the catalogue of learning objectives will be available online on the webpage of the DGCH.

  2. Monograph support provided by the National Library of Medicine and its regional medical libraries in the medical behavioral sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, J D; Griffith, B C

    1988-01-01

    The National Library of Medicine's (NLM) monographic resources in the medical behavioral sciences (MBS) were examined to assess NLM's ability to support the needs of researchers writing in this area. A sample of 239 representative monographs derived from citations in MBS-related articles published in 61 journals in 1981 were evaluated. These monographs were limited to works published between 1978 and 1981, inclusive. The subject distribution of the sample included fourteen of the twenty-one main classes in the LC classification, although BF (psychology), H (social sciences), and R (medicine) constituted 80.3% of the sample. The study revealed that NLM held 48.5% of the sample. The holdings of ten research medical libraries, including six of the seven regional medical libraries, were also evaluated in order to gauge NLM's ability to support that element of the medical library network. The holding rates of these libraries ranged widely (9.6% to 36%), although NLM was found to have far more extensive holdings overall, and when assessed against classes BF, H, and R. Overall, NLM could have supplied from 28.8% to 44.5% of the monographs not held by the medical libraries. In only a few cases were the ten medical libraries able to provide access to monographs not held by NLM. The findings of the study indicate that, regardless of NLM's indication of support to the MBS area, the holdings of more general research and academic libraries are essential to support the monograph needs of MBS researchers. PMID:3224221

  3. Predictive value of grade point average (GPA), Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), internal examinations (Block) and National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) scores on Medical Council of Canada qualifying examination part I (MCCQE-1) scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Banibrata; Ripstein, Ira; Perry, Kyle; Cohen, Barry

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether the pre-medical Grade Point Average (GPA), Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), Internal examinations (Block) and National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) scores are correlated with and predict the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination Part I (MCCQE-1) scores. Data from 392 admitted students in the graduating classes of 2010-2013 at University of Manitoba (UofM), College of Medicine was considered. Pearson's correlation to assess the strength of the relationship, multiple linear regression to estimate MCCQE-1 score and stepwise linear regression to investigate the amount of variance were employed. Complete data from 367 (94%) students were studied. The MCCQE-1 had a moderate-to-large positive correlation with NBME scores and Block scores but a low correlation with GPA and MCAT scores. The multiple linear regression model gives a good estimate of the MCCQE-1 (R2 =0.604). Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that 59.2% of the variation in the MCCQE-1 was accounted for by the NBME, but only 1.9% by the Block exams, and negligible variation came from the GPA and the MCAT. Amongst all the examinations used at UofM, the NBME is most closely correlated with MCCQE-1.

  4. Investigating the Relationship between Mental Health and Academic Achievement of Dental Students of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abdolreza Gilavand; Mohammad Shooriabi

    2016-01-01

    .... So, this research has been performed aiming at investigation of the relationship between mental health and academic achievement of dental students of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences (AJUMS...

  5. Ephemera publications as legal deposit in National and University library, Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Potočnik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Slovenian production of all categories of library resources has been considerably increased over the last decade and ephemera comprise a large portion of the national output. The article explores some definitions of ephemera especially those given in the 2006 Legal Deposit Act, and describes ephemera as a special collection of national importance. The development of this special collection at the National and University Library, Slovenia is discussed and some important milestones are presented. Statistical data to illustrate the acquisitions of ephemera are provided. An innovative approach to cataloguing ephemera - the so called "collection cataloguing" is proposed.

  6. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the University of Minnesota National Lacustrine Core Repository (LacCore)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Lacustrine Core Repository (LacCore), operated by the University of Minnesota is a partner in the Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples...

  7. Reluctant Partners in Modernization: The National Autonomous University of Mexico and Its Links with Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanos-Lomnitz, Heriberta

    1997-01-01

    Analyzes interviews with 44 Mexicans representative of industry, government, and the National Autonomous University of Mexico concerning modernization, industrialization, and technology transfer in the context of higher education. Although all supported an active role for higher education in technology transfer in public statements, they were…

  8. Cooperative Science: A National Study of University and Industry Researchers. Case Studies. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elmima C.; And Others

    This report presents nine case studies of Industry/University Cooperative Research (IUCR) projects supported during 1978-1980 by the National Science Foundation. The intent of this document is to provide readers with a qualitative picture of cooperative science as practiced under the IUCR program. The information presented in this report is…

  9. Education, Revolution and Evolution: The Palestinian Universities as Initiators of National Struggle 1972-1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelkovitz, Ido

    2014-01-01

    Since the concept of nationalism first emerged on the world stage, universities have played a key role in its collective formation and dissemination to the masses. Established under challenging circumstances and subjected to the Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip in the wake of the 1967 war, Palestinian institutions of higher…

  10. Assessing Learners' Satisfication towards Support Services Delivery in National Open University Nigeria: Implications for Counselling Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okopi, Fidel; Ofole, Ndidi

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at determining the level of students' satisfaction of learner support services in the study centres of NOUN--National Open University of Nigeria and whether the support services offered at the study centres have significant influence on the level of students' satisfaction. A descriptive survey of ex-post facto research design was…

  11. Administering Examinations for Quality Control in Distance Education: The National Open University of Nigeria Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibara, E. C.

    2008-01-01

    Examination is an important tool for evaluating students learning outcome and require proper planning to meet high standards. This paper therefore examines the processes leading to administration of face-to-face examination in distance education with focus on the National Open University of Nigeria. It highlighted some procedures such as test…

  12. Investigating Learning English Strategies and English Needs of Undergraduate Students at the National University of Laos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souriyavongsa, Thongma; Abidin, Mohamad Jafre Zainol; Sam, Rany; Mei, Leong Lai; Aloysius, Ithayaraj Britto

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate learning English strategies and the requirement of English needs of the undergraduate students at the National University of Laos (NUOL). The study employed a survey design which involved in administering questionnaires of rating scales, and adapting the items from (Barakat, 2010; Chengbin, 2008; Kathleen A, 2010;…

  13. Establishment of the Slovenian Universities' Repositories and of the National Open Science Portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Ojsteršek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe paper presents the legal, organisational and technical perspectives regarding the implementation of the Slovenian national open access infrastructure for electronic theses and dissertations as well as for research publications. The infrastructure consists of four institutional repositories and a national portal that aggregates content from the university repositories and other Slovenian archives in order to provide a common search engine, recommendation of similar publications, and similar text detection. We have developed the software which is integrated with the universities' information and authentication systems and with the COBISS.SI. During the project the necessary legal background was defined and processes for mandatory submission of electronic theses and dissertations as well as of research publications were designed. The processes for data exchange between the institutional repositories and the national portal, and the processes for similar text detection and recommendation system were established. Bilingual web and mobile applications, a recommendation system and the interface suitable for persons with disabilities are provided to the users from around the world. The repositories are an effective promotion tool for universities and their researchers. It is expected that they will improve the recognition of Slovenian universities in the world. The complex national open access infrastructure with similar text detection support and integration with other systems will enable the storage of almost eighty percent of peer-reviewed scientific papers, annually published by Slovenian researchers. The majority of electronic theses and dissertations yearly produced at the Slovenian higher education institutions will also be accessible.

  14. Gender and Higher Education in Different National Spaces: Female Palestinian Students Attending Israeli and Jordanian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Rabia-Queder, Sarab; Arar, Khaled

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the higher education experience among Palestinian Arab females in two national spaces and seeks to determine whether studying at an Arab institution of higher learning in a nearby Arab country can alleviate the emotional and economic difficulties that affect Palestinian women at Israeli universities. What can institutions of…

  15. Adapting on Demand Examination System in National Open University of Nigeria End of Semester Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonkwo, Charity Akuadi

    2011-01-01

    Teaching-learning process is incomplete without effective and meaningful assessment of students learning outcomes. This applies to both conventional modes of education as well as to open and distance learning modes. So far, conduct of examinations at the National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN), has been cumbersome and be-decked with "hydra…

  16. Nation Building and the University in Developing Countries: The Case of Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmat, Sharom

    1980-01-01

    The part the university plays in the building of a nation in the post-independence period is described and illustrated by means of a detailed study of Malaysia. The impact of economic, socio-cultural, and political factors are analyzed and the objectives of higher education in contemporary Malaysia are articulated. (Author/MLW)

  17. The Practices of Students' Generic Skills among Economics Students at National University of Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadiyanto; Suratno

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine students' generic skills practices (communication, IT, numeracy, learning how to learn, problem solving, working with others, and subject-specific competencies) at National University of Indonesia (UI). Survey design with quantitative method was applied in this study. Questionnaires were distributed to 355 students at…

  18. Education, Revolution and Evolution: The Palestinian Universities as Initiators of National Struggle 1972-1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelkovitz, Ido

    2014-01-01

    Since the concept of nationalism first emerged on the world stage, universities have played a key role in its collective formation and dissemination to the masses. Established under challenging circumstances and subjected to the Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip in the wake of the 1967 war, Palestinian institutions of higher…

  19. Student Expectations of Tertiary Institutions: A Case Study of the Fiji National University (FNU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shana Nigar

    2012-01-01

    Education is a human right and Fiji's tertiary education board recently declared that all tertiary institutions in Fiji must abide by the framework in order to meet student-customers' needs. The Fiji National University's (FNU's) destiny to be Fiji's leading higher education provider could be a reality if students and staff's expectations are…

  20. Evaluation of the Undergraduate Physics Programme at Indira Gandhi National Open University: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Arundhati; Vijayshri; Garg, Suresh

    2009-01-01

    The undergraduate science programme was launched at the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) in 1991-92 with an enrolment of 1,210 students. The programme was well received, and enrolments increased over the years. However, the success rates have not kept pace with enrolment. In this paper, the authors report the results of an evaluation…