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Sample records for national transuranic program

  1. National Transuranic Program Charter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The National Transuranic Program Plan and Charter describes the functional elements of the National TRU Program, organizational relationships, programmatic responsibilities, division of work scope among the various DOE organizations that comprise the program, and program baselines against which overall progress will be measured. The charter defines the authorities and responsibilities of various organizations involved in the management of TRU waste throughout the DOE complex

  2. National transuranic program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    As a result of various program initiatives, the U.S. generated and will continue to generate waste contaminated with radioactive materials. Because of increased awareness of the risks and special requirements to safely manage long-lived alpha-emitting radionuclides, a new category of radioactive waste, transuranic (TRU) waste, was adopted in 1970. Heads of Field Elements can determine that other alpha-contaminated wastes, peculiar to a specific site, must be managed as transuranic wasteclose quotes. TRU waste is generated and stored at various DOE sites around the country. In December 1993, the National Transuranic Program Office (NTPO) was established as part of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) to integrate and coordinate the diverse organizational elements that contribute to the complex-wide management of TRU waste. Numerous sites with small TRU waste inventories are also part of the national TRU waste system. The majority of TRU waste is also contaminated with hazardous materials and is thus considered mixed waste. Mixed waste must be managed in compliance with all federal, state, and local regulations that are applicable to the radioactive and/or hazardous component of the waste. Each generator site is responsible for the management of its respective waste. Sites must plan and implement programs to minimize, characterize, package, treat, store, ship, and dispose of all TRU waste; construct required waste management facilities and equipment; obtain permits; perform site-specific National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analyses; conduct environmental studies; perform laboratory analyses; and certify that waste meets appropriate disposal facility criteria. Due to the toxicity and long half-lives of TRU radionuclides, TRU waste must be disposed in a manner that offers greater confinement than shallow land burial

  3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Certification Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.H.; Bates, L.D.; Box, W.D.; Aaron, W.S.; Setaro, J.A.

    1988-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has requested that all DOE facilities handling defense transuranic (TRU) waste develop and implement a program whereby all TRU waste will be contained, stored, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in accordance with the requirements set forth in the DOE certification documents WIPP-DOE-069, 114, 120, 137, 157, and 158. The program described in this report describes how Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) intends to comply with these requirements and the techniques and procedures used to ensure that ORNL TRU wastes are certifiable for shipment to WIPP. This document describes the program for certification of newly generated (NG) contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste. Previsions have been made for addenda, which will extend the coverage of this document to include certification of stored CH-TRU and NG and stored remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste, as necessary. 24 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Incinerator development program for processing transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedahl, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    In the fall of 1981, two short-term tests were conducted on a controlled air and a rotary kiln incinerator to assess their potential for processing transuranic (TRU) contaminated waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The primary purpose of the test program was a proof-of-principle verification that the incinerators could achieve near-complete combustion of the combustible portion of the waste, while mixed with high percentages of noncombustible and metal waste materials. Other important test objectives were to obtain system design information including off-gas and end-product characteristics and incinerator operating parameters. Approximately 7200 kg of simulated (non-TRU) waste from the INEL were processed during the two tests

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory transuranic waste characterization and certification program - an overview of capabilities and capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, P.S.Z.; Sinkule, B.J.; Janecky, D.R.; Gavett, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has full capability to characterize transuranic (TRU) waste for shipment to and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for its projected opening. LANL TRU waste management operations also include facilities to repackage both drums of waste found not to be certifiable for WIPP and oversized boxes of waste that must be size reduced for shipment to WIPP. All characterization activities and repackaging are carried out under a quality assurance program designed to meet Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) requirements. The flow of waste containers through characterization operations, the facilities used for characterization, and the electronic data management system used for data package preparation and certification of TRU waste at LANL are described

  6. Mobile/Modular Deployment Project-Enhancing Efficiencies within the National Transuranic Waste Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triay, I.R.; Basabilvazo, G.B.; Countiss, S.; Moody, D.C.; Behrens, R.G.; Lott, S.A.

    2002-01-01

    In 1999, the National Transuranic (TRU) Waste Program (NTP) achieved two significant milestones. First, the Waste Isolation Plant (WIPP) opened in March for the permanent disposal of TRU waste generated by, and temporarily stored at, various sites supporting the nation's defense programs. Second, the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, issued by the New Mexico Environment Department, for WIPP became effective in November. While the opening of WIPP brought to closure a number of scientific, engineering, regulatory, and political challenges, achieving this major milestone led to a new set of challenges-how to achieve the Department of Energy's (DOE's) NTP end-state vision: All TRU waste from DOE sites scheduled for closure is removed All legacy TRU waste from DOE sites with an ongoing nuclear mission is disposed 0 All newly generated TRU waste is disposed as it is generated The goal is to operate the national TRU waste program safely, cost effectively, in compliance with applicable regulations and agreements, and at full capacity in a fully integrated mode. The existing schedule for TRU waste disposition would achieve the NTP vision in 2034 at an estimated life-cycle cost of $16B. The DOE's Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) seeks to achieve this vision early-by at least 10 years- while saving the nation an estimated $48 to $6B. CBFO's approach is to optimize, or to make as functional as possible, TRU waste disposition. That is, to remove barriers that impede waste disposition, and increase the rate and cost efficiency of waste disposal at WIPP, while maintaining safety. The Mobile/Modular Deployment Project (MMDP) is the principal vehicle for implementing DOE's new commercial model of using best business practices of national authorization basis, standardization, and economies of scale to accelerate the completion of WIPP's mission. The MMDP is one of the cornerstones of the National TRU Waste System Optimization Project (1). The objective of the MMDP is to increase TRU

  7. Stored Transuranic Waste Management Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, T.L.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1970, INEL has provided interim storage capacity for transuranic (TRU)-contaminated wastes generated by activities supporting US national defense needs. About 60% of the nation's current inventory of TRU-contaminated waste is stored at INEL, awaiting opening of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the designated federal repository. A number of activities are currently underway for enhancing current management capabilities, conducting projects that support local and national TRU management activities, and preparing for production-level waste retrieval, characterization, examination, certification, and shipment of untreated TRU waste to WIPP in April 1998. Implementation of treatment capability is planned in 2003 to achieve disposal of all stored TRU-contaminated waste by a target date of December 31, 2015, but no later than December 31, 2018

  8. Defense Transuranic Waste Program Strategy Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP) Strategy Document presents the general strategy for managing transuranic (TRU) waste materials generated during defense and research activities regulated by the US Department of Energy. The Strategy Document includes discussion of objectives and activities relating to the entire Defense Transuranic Waste Program. However, the primary focus is on the specific management responsibilities of the Transuranic Waste Lead Organization (TLO). The document also includes an updated summary of progress on TLO-managed activities over the past year

  9. Transuranic waste management program and facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, T.L. Jr.; Cook, L.A.; Stallman, R.M.; Hunter, E.K.

    1986-01-01

    Since 1954, defense-generated transuranic (TRU) waste has been received at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Prior to 1970, approximately 2.2 million cubic feet of transuranic waste were buried in shallow-land trenches and pits at the RWMC. Since 1970, an additional 2.1 million cubic feet of waste have been retrievably stored in aboveground engineered confinement. A major objective of the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Waste Management Program is the proper management of defense-generated transuranic waste. Strategies have been developed for managing INEL stored and buried transuranic waste. These strategies have been incorporated in the Defense Waste Management Plan and are currently being implemented with logistical coordination of transportation systems and schedules for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) is providing nondestructive examination and assay of retrievably stored, contact-handled TRU waste. Construction of the Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP) was recently completed, and PREPP is currently undergoing system checkout. The PRFPP will provide processing capabilities for contact-handled waste not meeting WIPP-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). In addition, ongoing studies and technology development efforts for managing the TRU waste such as remote-handled and buried TRU waste, are being conducted

  10. Transuranic Waste Management Program and Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, T.L. Jr.; Cook, L.A.; Stallman, R.M.; Hunter, E.K.

    1986-02-01

    Since 1954, defense-generated transuranic (TRU) waste has been received at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Prior to 1970, approximately 2.2 million cubic feet of transuranic waste were buried in shallow-land trenches and pits at the RWMC. Since 1970, an additional 2.1 million cubic feet of waste have been retrievably stored in aboveground engineered confinement. A major objective of the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Waste Management Program is the proper management of defense-generated transuranic waste. Strategies have been developed for managing INEL stored and buried transuranic waste. These strategies have been incorporated in the Defense Waste Management Plan and are currently being implemented with logistical coordination of transportation systems and schedules for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) is providing nondestructive examination and assay of retrievably stored, contact-handled TRU waste. Construction of the Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP) was recently completed, and PREPP is currently undergoing system checkout. The PREPP will provide processing capabilities for contact-handled waste not meeting WIPP-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). In addition, ongoing studies and technology development efforts for managing the TRU waste such as remote-handled and buried TRU waste, are being conducted

  11. Defense transuranic waste program strategy document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This document summarizes the strategy for managing transuranic (TRU) wastes generated in defense and research activities regulated by the US Department of Energy. It supercedes a document issued in July 1980. In addition to showing how current strategies of the Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP) are consistent with the national objective of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere, this document includes information about the activities of the Transuranic Lead Organization (TLO). To explain how the DTWP strategy is implemented, this document also discusses how the TLO coordinates and integrates the six separate elements of the DTWP: (1) Waste Generation Site Activities, (2) Storage Site Activities, (3) Burial Site Activities, (4) Technology Development, (5) Transportation Development, and (6) Permanent Disposal. Storage practices for TRU wastes do not pose short-term hazards to public health and safety or to the environment. Isolation of TRU wastes in a deep-mined geologic repository is considered the most promising of the waste disposal alternatives available. This assessment is supported by the DOE Record of Decision to proceed with research and development work at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico - a deep-mined geologic research and development project. In support of the WIPP research project and the permanent disposal of TRU waste, the DTWP strategy for the near term will concentrate on completion of procedures and the design and construction of all facilities necessary to certify newly-generated (NG) and stored TRU wastes for emplacement in the WIPP. In addition, the strategy involves evaluating alternatives for disposing of some transuranic wastes by methods which may allow for on-site disposal of these wastes and yet preserve adequate margins of safety to protect public health and the environment

  12. Annual technology assessment and progress report for the Buried Transuranic Waste Studies Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.G.; Low, J.O.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents FY-87 activities for the Buried Transuranic (TRU) Waste Studies Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This program investigates techniques to provide long-term confinement of buried TRU waste, as well as methods of retrieval. The confinement method of in situ grouting was examined in a simulated shallow-land buried TRU waste pit constructed adjacent to the RWMC TRU waste burial pits. The in situ grouting technique involved an experimental dyanmic compaction process which simultaneously grouts and compacts the waste. The simulated waste pit consisted of regions of randomly dumped drums, stacked boxes, and stacked drums, thus representing the various conditions of buried waste at the RWMC. Simulated waste and airborne tracers were loaded into the various simulated buried waste containers. Pregrouting and post-grouting data, such as hydraulic conductivity, were obtained to assess the hydrological integrity of the grouted waste material. In addition, post-grouting destructive examinations were performed and the results analyzed. Retrieval and processing of the TRU buried waste is also being examined at the INEL. At a conceptual level, retrieval of TRU buried waste involves a movable containment building to confine airborne particulate, heavy equipment to remove the waste, processing equipment, and equipment to control the air quality within the building. Studies were performed in FY-87 to identify containment building requirements such as type, mobility, and ventilation. An experimental program to demonstrate the retrieval technique using existing INEL heavy equipment has also been identified. 11 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs

  13. INTERNATIONAL UNION OF OPERATING ENGINEERS NATIONAL HAZMAT PROGRAM - HANDSS-55 TRANSURANIC WASTE REPACKAGING MODULE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Transuranic waste generated at the Savannah River Site from nuclear weapons research, development, and production is currently estimated to be over 10,000 cubic meters. Over half of this amount is stored in 55-gallon drums. The waste in drums is primarily job control waste and equipment generated as the result of routine maintenance performed on the plutonium processing operations. Over the years that the drums have been accumulating, the regulatory definitions of materials approved for disposal have changed. Consequently, many of the drums now contain items that are not approved for disposal at DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The HANDSS-55 technology is being developed to allow remote sorting of the items in these drums and then repackaging of the compliant items for disposal at WIPP

  14. Overview of DOE's transuranic waste program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, M.H.; Detamore, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has assigned to Albuquerque Operations the Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP) responsibility for long-range planning and management for defense transuranic (TRU) waste. The Transuranic Waste Lead Organization (TLO) has divided the Program into seven elements that support its primary goal of ending interim storage and achieving permanent disposal. These elements include waste generation site activities, storage site activities, burial site activities, technology development, transportation, institutional activities and permanent disposal. This paper briefly discusses these seven elements and how they are integrated to provide for successful achievement of the primary goal

  15. Overview of DOE's Transuranic Waste Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, M.H.; Detamore, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has assigned to Albuquerque Operations the Defense Transuranic Waste Program responsibility for long-range planning and management of defense transuranic (TRU) waste. The Transuranic Waste Lead Organization (TLO) has divided the Program into seven elements which support it's primary goal of ending interim storage and achieving permanent disposal. These are: waste generation site activities, storage site activities, burial site activities, technology development, transportation, institutional activities, and permanent disposal. This paper will briefly discuss these seven elements and how they are integrated to provide for successful achievement of the primary goal

  16. Implementation plans for buried transuranic waste and stored special-case waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullock, M.G.; Rodriguez, R.R.

    1987-05-01

    This document presents the current implementation plans for buried transuranic waste and stored special-case waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information contained in this report was also included in several Department of Energy (DOE) planning documents for the Defense Transuranic Waste Program. This information can be found in the following DOE documents: Comprehensive Implementation Plan for the DOE Defense Buried TRU Waste Program; Defense Waste Management Plan for Buried Transuranic-Contaminated Waste, Transuranic-Contaminated Waste, Transuranic-Contaminated Soil, and Difficult-to-Certify Transuranic Waste; and Defense Special-Case Transuranic Waste Implementation Plan. 11 refs

  17. Annual technology assessment and progress report for the Buried Transuranic Waste Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, J.O.

    1985-12-01

    An improved-confinement technology as applied to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) shallow-land-buried transuranic (TRU) waste is being investigated. An improved-confinement technology, in situ grouting, is being demonstrated in a 2-year engineering feasibility test at the INEL. Grout formulation and development were completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee to support the in situ grouting test. Three grout formulations have been adapted to the arid, unsaturated soil conditions at the INEL: ordinary particulate grout; microfine penetration grout; soil grout. Three test trenches were constructed north of the INEL's Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). Nonradioactive waste forms closely resembling TRU waste buried at the INEL have been fabricated and are ready for emplacement into these test trenches. A literature search for a simulated (analog) TRU tracer was completed as well as a chemical characterization of the INEL soil. Data developed from the chemistry characterization and literature search have been inputed into the selection and laboratory testing of the TRU analog tracers. Simulated TRU tracers will be loaded into waste forms prior to emplacement into the test trenches. Test trench data acquisition instrumentation will be installed during waste form emplacement. Instrumentation will monitor for moisture movement and tracer detection. Plans for test completion in FY-1986 are also shown. Various buried waste improved-confinement technologies performed by other Department of Energy sites were assessed for applicability to the INEL buried TRU waste. Primary demonstrations were performed at the Hanford site in Washington and at ORNL. This report also includes information on accomplishments of related activities at the INEL such as the program for Environmental Surveillance of the Radioactive Waste Management complex as well as the Subsurface Migration Studies. 18 refs., 11 figs., 12 tabs

  18. Buried Transuranic Waste Studies Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: Annual technology assessment and progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, J.O.; Allman, D.W.; Shaw, P.G.; Sill, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    In-situ grouting, an improved-confinement technology that could be applied to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) shallow-land-buried transuranic (TRU) waste, is being investigated by EG and G Idaho, Inc. In situ grouting has been demonstrated as the culmination of a two-year engineering feasibility test at the INEL. In situ stabilization and hydrologic isolation of a simulated buried TRU waste trench at an arid site were performed using an experimental dynamic compaction in situ grouting process developed by Rockwell Hanford Operations (RHO). A series of laboratory evaluations relative to the grout permeation characteristics of microfine particulate cements with INEL-type soil was performed prior to the grouting operations. In addition, an extensive pre-grouting hydrologic assessment of the test trench was performed to support the performance assessment analysis. Laboratory testing of various chemical materials yielded a suitable hydrologic tracer for use in the hydrologic monitoring phase of the experiment. Various plutonium transport laboratory evaluations were performed to assess the plutonium retention capabilities of a microfine grout/INEL-soil waste product similar to that expected to result if the grout is injected in situ into the INEL test trench. The test trench will be hydrologically assessed in FY 1987 to determine if the RHO grouting system attained the performance acceptance criteria of the experiment. The report includes a technology assessment of buried waste technologies developed by other DOE sites. Field demonstrations at ORNL and Hanford are reported under this technology assessment. Also included is information on activities related to buried waste management at the INEL. These include environmental surveillance of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex and the Subsurface Migration Studies Program

  19. Transuranic waste management program waste form development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, W.S.; Crisler, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    To ensure that all technology necessary for long term management of transuranic (TRU) wastes is available, the Department of Energy has established the Transuranic Waste Management Program. A principal focus of the program is development of waste forms that can accommodate the very diverse TRU waste inventory and meet geologic isolation criteria. The TRU Program is following two approaches. First, decontamination processes are being developed to allow removal of sufficient surface contamination to permit management of some of the waste as low level waste. The other approach is to develop processes which will allow immobilization by encapsulation of the solids or incorporate head end processes which will make the solids compatible with more typical waste form processes. The assessment of available data indicates that dewatered concretes, synthetic basalts, and borosilicate glass waste forms appear to be viable candidates for immobilization of large fractions of the TRU waste inventory in a geologic repository

  20. Annual technology assessment and progress report for the buried transuranic waste program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berreth, P.D.

    1984-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for developing and implementing methods for the safe and environmentally acceptable disposal of radioactive waste. In 1983, DOE formulated a comprehensive plan to manage transuranic (TRU) defense waste. The DOE plan for buried TRU waste is to monitor it, take remedial actions as necessary, and reevaluate its safety periodically. The DOE strategy reflects concern that, based on present technology, retrieval and processing of buried waste may be risky and costly. To implement the DOE plan, EG and G Idaho, Inc., prime contractor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), has developed a strategy for long-term management of the 2 million cubic feet of INEL buried TRU waste. That strategy involves four main activities: (a) environmental monitoring, (b) remedial action if necessary, (c) assimilation of data from both special studies and ongoing waste management activities, and (d) selection of a long-term management alternative in 1995. This report, submitted as the first in a series of annual reports, summarizes the buried TRU waste activities performed in fiscal year (FY) 1984 at the INEL in response to the DOE plan. Specifically, technologies applicable to buried waste confinement, retrieval, certification, and processing have been assessed, a long-range plan to conduct buried wasted studies over the next ten years has been prepared, and retrieval and soil management alternatives have been evaluated. 17 references, 7 figures, 1 table

  1. Supplement analysis of transuranic waste characterization and repackaging activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    This supplement analysis has been prepared to describe new information relevant to waste retrieval, handling, and characterization at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and to evaluate the need for additional documentation to satisfy the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The INEL proposes to characterize and repackage contact-handled transuranic waste to support the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Test Phase. Waste retrieval, handling and processing activities in support of test phase activities at the WIPP were addressed in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) for the WIPP. To ensure that test-phase wastes are properly characterized and packaged, waste containers would be retrieved, nondestructively examined, and transported from the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) to the Hot-Fuel Examination Facility for headspace gas analysis, visual inspections to verify content code, and waste acceptance criteria compliance, then repackaging into WIPP experimental test bins or returned to drums. Following repackaging the characterized wastes would be returned to the RWMC. Waste characterization would help DOE determine WIPP compliance with US Environmental Protection Agency regulations governing disposal of transuranic waste and hazardous waste. Additionally, this program supports onsite compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, compliance with the terms of the No-Migration Variance at WIPP, and provides data to support future waste shipments to WIPP. This analysis will help DOE determine whether there have been substantial changes made to the proposed action at the INEL, or if preparation of a supplement to the WIPP Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE, 1980) and SEIS (DOE, 1990a) is required. This analysis is based on current information and includes details not available to the SEIS

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory transuranic waste quality assurance project plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This Transuranic (TRU) Waste Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) serves as the quality management plan for the characterization of transuranic waste in preparation for certification and transportation. The Transuranic Waste Characterization/Certification Program (TWCP) consists of personnel who sample and analyze waste, validate and report data; and provide project management, quality assurance, audit and assessment, and records management support, all in accordance with established requirements for disposal of TRU waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility. This QAPjP addresses how the TWCP meets the quality requirements of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and the technical requirements of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). The TWCP characterizes and certifies retrievably stored and newly generated TRU waste using the waste selection, testing, sampling, and analytical techniques and data quality objectives (DQOs) described in the QAPP, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Certification Plan (Certification Plan), and the CST Waste Management Facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria and Certification [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC)]. At the present, the TWCP does not address remote-handled (RH) waste

  3. Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-30

    This quality assurance plan identifies the data necessary, and techniques designed to attain the required quality, to meet the specific data quality objectives associated with the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report specifies sampling, waste testing, and analytical methods for transuranic wastes.

  4. Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This quality assurance plan identifies the data necessary, and techniques designed to attain the required quality, to meet the specific data quality objectives associated with the DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report specifies sampling, waste testing, and analytical methods for transuranic wastes

  5. The transuranic waste management program at Savannah River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ambrosia, J.

    1986-01-01

    Defense transuranic waste at the Savannah River site results from the Department of Energy's national defense activities, including the operation of production reactors, fuel reprocessing plants, and research and development activities. TRU waste has been retrievably stored at the Savannah River Plant since 1974 awaiting disposal. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, now under construction in New Mexico, is a research and development facility for demonstrating the safe disposal of defense TRU waste, including that in storage at the Savannah River Plant. The major objective of the TRU Program at SR is to support the TRU National Program, which is dedicated to preparing waste for, and emplacing waste in, the WIPP. Thus, the SR Program also supports WIPP operations. The SR site specific goals are to phase out the indefinite storage of TRU waste, which has been the mode of waste management since 1974, and to dispose of the defense TRU waste. This paper describes the specific activities at SR which will provide for the disposal of this TRU waste

  6. Storage of transuranic contaminated solid wastes at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehmann, George

    1975-01-01

    The storage method for low-level transuranic wastes employed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is discussed in detail. The techniques used for wastes containing greater than ten nanocuries of transuranic material per gram of waste as well as the technique for lesser concentrations of transuranic wastes are described. The safety, efficiency and adequacy of these storage methods are presented

  7. Transuranic waste management at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphrey, Betty [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bland, Jesse John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-01-01

    This paper documents the history of the TRU program at Sandia, previous and current activities associated with TRU material and waste, interfaces with other TRU waste generator sites and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP), and paths forward for TRU material and waste. This document is a snapshot in time of the TRU program and should be updated as necessary, or when significant changes have occurred in the Sandia TRU program or in the TRU regulatory environment. This paper should serve as a roadmap to capture past TRU work so that efforts are not repeated and ground is not lost due to future inactivity and personnel changes.

  8. Overall strategy and program plan for management of radioactively contaminated liquid wastes and transuranic sludges at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeese, L.E.; Berry, J.B.; Butterworth, G.E. III; Collins, E.D.; Monk, T.H.; Patton, B.D.; Snider, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    The use of hydrofracture was terminated after 1984, and LW concentrate has been accumulated and stored since that time. Currently, the volume of stored LW concentrate is near the safe fill limit for the 11 storage tanks in the active LW system, and significant operational constraints are being experienced. The tanks that provide the storage capacity of the active LW system contain significant volumes of TRU sludges that have been designated remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) wastes because of associated quantities of other radioisotopes, including 90 Sr and 137 Cs. Thirty-three additional tanks, which are inactive, also contain significant volumes of TRU waste and radioactive LW. A lack of adequate storage volume for LW jeopardizes ORNL's ability to ensure continued conduct of research and development (RandD) activities that generate LW because an unexpected operational incident could quickly deplete the remaining storage volume. Accordingly, a planning team comprised of staff members from the ORNL Nuclear and Chemical Waste Programs (NCWP) was created for developing recommended actions to be taken for management of LW. A program plan is presented which outlines work required for the development of a disposal method for each of the likely future waste streams associated with LW management and the disposal of the bulk of the resulting solid waste on the ORR. 8 refs., 20 figs., 12 tabs

  9. ACCELERATION OF LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY TRANSURANIC WASTE DISPOSITION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Leary, Gerald A.

    2007-01-01

    One of Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) most significant risks is the site's inventory of transuranic waste retrievably stored above and below-ground in Technical Area (TA) 54 Area G, particularly the dispersible high-activity waste stored above-ground in deteriorating facilities. The high activity waste represents approximately 50% (by activity) of the total 292,000 PE-Ci inventory remaining to be disposed. The transuramic waste inventory includes contact-handled and remote-handled waste packaged in drums, boxes, and oversized containers which are retrievably stored both above and below-ground. Although currently managed as transuranic waste, some of the inventory is low-level waste that can be disposed onsite or at approved offsite facilities. Dispositioning the transuranic waste inventory requires retrieval of the containers from above and below-ground storage, examination and repackaging or remediation as necessary, characterization, certification and loading for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad New Mexico, all in accordance with well-defined requirements and controls. Although operations are established to process and characterize the lower-activity contact-handled transuranic waste containers, LAN L does not currently have the capability to repack high activity contact-handled transuranic waste containers (> 56 PE-Ci) or to process oversized containers with activity levels over 0.52 PE-Ci. Operational issues and compliance requirements have resulted in less than optimal processing capabilities for lower activity contact-handled transuranic waste containers, limiting preparation and reducing dependability of shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Since becoming the Los Alamos National Laboratory contract in June 2006, Los Alamos National Security (LANS) L.L.C. has developed a comprehensive, integrated plan to effectively and efficiently disposition the transuranic waste inventory, working in concert with the Department of

  10. FY85 Program plan for the Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    The Defense TRU Waste Program (DTWP) is the focal point for the Department of Energy in national planning, integration, and technical development for TRU waste management. The scope of this program extends from the point of TRU waste generation through delivery to a permanent repository. The TRU program maintains a close interface with repository development to ensure program compatibility and coordination. The defense TRU program does not directly address commercial activities that generate TRU waste. Instead, it is concerned with providing alternatives to manage existing and future defense TRU wastes. The FY85 Program Plan is consistent with the Defense TRU Waste Program goals and objectives stated in the Defense Transuranic Waste Program Strategy Document, January 1984. The roles of participants, the responsibilities and authorities for Research and Development (R and D), the organizational interfaces and communication channels for R and D and the establishment of procedures for planning, reporting, and budgeting of all R and D activities meet requirements stated in the Technical Management Plan for the Transuranic Waste Management Program. The Program Plan is revised as needed. The work breakdown structure is reflected graphically immediately following the Administration section and is described in the subsequent narrative. Detailed budget planning (i.e., programmatic funding and capital equipment) is presented for FY85; outyear budget projections are presented for future years

  11. Impact of dynamic certification requirements on the Nuclear Materials Technology Division's transuranic waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balkey, J.J.; Montoya, A.J.; Wieneke, Ronald E.

    2002-01-01

    The issuance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit in August of 2000, specifically the attachment I3 Waste Analysis Plan (WAP),had a profound impact upon transuranic (TRU) waste certification at Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Plutonium Facility. Program certification was lost until Laboratory internal program documents could be amended to meet the new WAP requirements, waste management personnel could be retrained to incorporate the changes into waste operations and the entire program successfully pass subsequent Carlsbad Field Ofice (CBFO) audit. This action resulted in the suspension of transuranic waste shipments from LANL to WIPP. In addition the changes unnecessarily increased the complexity of TRU waste program activities in waste handling.

  12. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of transuranic wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical and chemical characterization data for transuranic radioactive wastes and transuranic radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program (PSPI). Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 139 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 39,380 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 19,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats Plant generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification

  13. The Transuranic Waste Program's integration and planning activities and the contributions of the TRU partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, T.C.; O'Neal, W.; Petersen, C.A.; McDonald, C.E.

    1994-02-01

    The Technical Support Division, EM-351 manages the integration and planning activities of the Transuranic Waste Program. The Transuranic Waste Program manager provides transuranic waste policy, guidance, and issue resolution to Headquarters and the Operations Offices. In addition, the program manager is responsible for developing and implementing an integrated, long-range waste management plan for the transuranic waste system. A steering committee, a core group of support contractors, and numerous interface working groups support the efforts of the program manager. This paper provides an overview of the US Department of Energy's transuranic waste integration activities and a long-range planning process that includes internal and external stakeholder participation. It discusses the contributions and benefits provided by the Transuranic Partnership, most significantly, the integration activities and the body of data collected and assembled by the Partnership

  14. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Retireval Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, G.M.; Christensen, D.V.; Stanford, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the status of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) project for remediation of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste from Pads 1, 2, and 4. Some of the TRU waste packages retrieved from Pad I are anticipated to be part of LANL's initial inventory to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in April 1998. The TRU Waste Inspectable Storage Project (TWISP) was initiated in February 1993 in response to the New Mexico Environment Department's (NMED's) Consent Agreement for Compliance Order, ''New Mexico Hazardous Waste Agreement (NMHWA) 93-03.'' The TWISP involves the recovery of approximately 16,865 TRU and TRU-mixed waste containers currently under earthen cover on Pads 1, 2, and 4 at Technical Area 54, Area G, and placement of that waste into inspectable storage. All waste will be moved into inspectable storage by September 30, 2003. Waste recovery and storage operations emphasize protection of worker safety, public health, and the environment

  15. Transuranic-waste program at EG and G Idaho, Inc. Annual technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, K.B.

    1982-11-01

    This report summarizes the objectives and accomplishments of Transuranic (TRU) Waste Program conducted at EG and G Idaho, Inc., during FY 1982. The TRU Waste Program included: (1) Preparation of a revised draft of the Recommendation of a Long-Term Strategy (RLTS) document; (2) Preparation of environmental documentation, including a technical report, Environmental and Other Evaluations of Alternatives for Management of Defense Transuranic Waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, IDO-10103, as well as two environmental evaluations; (3) Preparation of a certification plan and procedures; (4) A nondestructive examination (NDE) project, which includes development of real-time radiography for waste certification, and container integrity equipment for waste container certification; (5) Development of an assay system; (6) Completion of a conceptual design for the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) and SWEPP Support; and (7) Gas-generation analyses and tests. These TRU waste projects were funded at $1640K

  16. Systems Engineering in the Development and Implementation of the Savannah River Site Transuranic Waste Disposition Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayfich, R.R.

    1999-01-01

    The use of systems engineering facilitated the strategic planning and implementation of the Savannah River Site (SRS) transuranic waste disposal program. This application represented the first SRS use of systems engineering in the pre-program planning stages during the development of a comprehensive strategic plan for the disposal of transuranic waste at the Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The use of systems engineering focused the efforts of the technical experts to devise a three initiative plan for the disposal of transuranic waste where previous efforts failed. Continued application of systems engineering facilitated the further development and implementation of the first initiative outlined in the strategic plan, i.e., set-up the program and process to begin to characterize and ship waste to the WIPP.This application of systems engineering to the transuranic waste program represented the first opportunity at the SRS for a comprehensive usage of systems engineering at all program levels. The application was initiated at the earliest possible point in the program development, i.e., strategic planning, and successively was used in detailed development and implementation of the program. Systems engineering successfully focused efforts to produce a comprehensive plan for the disposal of SRS transuranic waste at the WIPP, and facilitated development of the SRS capability and infrastructure to characterize, certify, and ship waste

  17. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) transuranic performance demonstration program sample packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mccoy, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Transuranic Performance Demonstration Program (TPDP) sample packaging is used to transport highway route controlled quantities of weapons grade (WG) plutonium samples from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) to the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility and back. The purpose of these shipments is to test the nondestructive assay equipment in the WRAP facility as part of the Nondestructive Waste Assay PDP. The PDP is part of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) National TRU Program managed by the U. S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office, Carlsbad, New Mexico. Details of this program are found in CAO-94-1045, Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay for the TRU Waste Characterization Program (CAO 1994); INEL-96/0129, Design of Benign Matrix Drums for the Non-Destructive Assay Performance Demonstration Program for the National TRU Program (INEL 1996a); and INEL-96/0245, Design of Phase 1 Radioactive Working Reference Materials for the Nondestructive Assay Performance Demonstration Program for the National TRU Program (INEL 1996b). Other program documentation is maintained by the national TRU program and each DOE site participating in the program. This safety analysis report for packaging (SARP) provides the analyses and evaluations necessary to demonstrate that the TRU PDP sample packaging meets the onsite transportation safety requirements of WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, for an onsite Transportation Hazard Indicator (THI) 2 packaging. This SARP, however, does not include evaluation of any operations within the PFP or WRAP facilities, including handling, maintenance, storage, or operating requirements, except as they apply directly to transportation between the gate of PFP and the gate of the WRAP facility. All other activities are subject to the requirements of the facility safety analysis reports (FSAR) of the PFP or WRAP facility and requirements of the PDP

  18. Proceedings of the second FY87 meeting of the National Working Group for Reduction in Transuranic Waste Arisings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    The Second FY87 Meeting of the National Working Group for Reduction in Transuranic Waste Arisings (NWGRTWA) was held at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Tuesday and Wednesday, July 28--29, 1987. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss (1) modeling programs for waste reduction, (2) proposed FY88 and out-year tasks including the SRL Pu incineration, immobilization improvement, erbia coating technology, and (3) improvements in up-stream recovery operations to effect waste reduction. In addition, tours were made of the LLNL Waste Operations, the Laser Fusion (NOVA), and the Magnetic Fusion (MFTF)

  19. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory code assessment of the Rocky Flats transuranic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This report is an assessment of the content codes associated with transuranic waste shipped from the Rocky Flats Plant in Golden, Colorado, to INEL. The primary objective of this document is to characterize and describe the transuranic wastes shipped to INEL from Rocky Flats by item description code (IDC). This information will aid INEL in determining if the waste meets the waste acceptance criteria (WAC) of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The waste covered by this content code assessment was shipped from Rocky Flats between 1985 and 1989. These years coincide with the dates for information available in the Rocky Flats Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS). The majority of waste shipped during this time was certified to the existing WIPP WAC. This waste is referred to as precertified waste. Reassessment of these precertified waste containers is necessary because of changes in the WIPP WAC. To accomplish this assessment, the analytical and process knowledge available on the various IDCs used at Rocky Flats were evaluated. Rocky Flats sources for this information include employee interviews, SWIMS, Transuranic Waste Certification Program, Transuranic Waste Inspection Procedure, Backlog Waste Baseline Books, WIPP Experimental Waste Characterization Program (headspace analysis), and other related documents, procedures, and programs. Summaries are provided of: (a) certification information, (b) waste description, (c) generation source, (d) recovery method, (e) waste packaging and handling information, (f) container preparation information, (g) assay information, (h) inspection information, (i) analytical data, and (j) RCRA characterization.

  20. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant transuranic wastes experimental characterization program: executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1978-11-01

    A general overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant transuranic wastes experimental characterization program is presented. Objectives and outstanding concerns of this program are discussed. Characteristics of transuranic wastes are also described. Concerns for the terminal isolation of such wastes in a deep bedded salt facility are divided into two phases, those during the short-term operational phase of the facility, and those potentially occurring in the long-term, after decommissioning of the repository. An inclusive summary covering individual studies, their importance to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, investigators, general milestones, and comments are presented

  1. Transuranic waste examination quality assurance at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Since 1954, defense-generated transuranic (TRU) waste has been received at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A major objective of the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Waste Management Programs is the proper management of the defense-generated TRU waste. The Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) is providing nondestructive examination and assay of retrievably stored contact handled TRU waste in order to certify it to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Acceptance Crtieria (WIPP-WAC). SWEPP's capabilities for certifying contact handled waste containers include weighing, real-time radiographic examination, fissile material assay examination, container integrity examination, radiological surveys and labeling of waste containers. These processes involve not only instrument accuracy but also a wide range of technician interpretation from moderate on the assay to 100% on the radiograph. This, therefore, requires a variety of quality assurance techniques to ensure that the examinations and certifications are being performed correctly. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the methods utilized by SWEPP for checking on the examination process and to ensure that waste certifications are being properly performed. Included is the application of the quality assurance techniques to each examination system, the management of the data generated by the examination, and the verifications to ensure accurate certification. 1 ref

  2. Transuranic Solid Waste Management Programs. Progress report, July--December 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    Progress is reported for three transuranic solid waste management programs funded at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory by the Energy Research and Development Administration Division of Waste Management and Transportation. Under the Transuranic Waste Research and Development Program, a completed evaluation of stainless steel drums showed that although the material has superior corrosion-resistant properties, its higher cost makes a thorough investigation of other container systems mandatory. A program to investigate more economical, nonmetallic containers is proposed. Preliminary fire tests in mild steel drums have been completed with fire propagation not appearing to be a problem unless container integrity is lost. Investigation of the corrosion of mild steel drums and the evaluation of potential corrosion inhibitors, in a variety of humid environments, continues. Experimental results of both laboratory and field investigations on radiolysis of transuranic elements in hydrogenous waste are discussed. Progress in the development of instrumentation for monitoring and segregating low-level wastes is described. New plans and developments for the Transuranic-Contaminated Solid Waste Treatment Development Facility are presented. The current focus is on a comparison of all alternative waste reduction systems toward a relative Figure of Merit with universal application. Drawings, flowsheets, and building layouts are included, and the proposed incinerator device is detailed. The release mechanisms, inter- and intraregional transport mechanisms, and exhumation studies relevant to the Evaluation of Transuranic-Contaminated Radioactive Waste Disposal Areas Program are defined and analyzed. A detailed description is given of the formulation of the computer simulation scheme for the intraregional biological transport model

  3. Transuranic waste program at EG and G Idaho, Inc. Annual technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.H.; Tolman, C.R.

    1980-12-01

    This document summarizes the objectives and technical achievements of the transuranic (TRU) waste research and development program conducted at EG and G Idaho, Inc., during fiscal year 1980. The TRU waste activities covered in this report include: INEL TRU Waste EIS (Environmental Impact Statement), including preparation of the EIS, Support Studies, and the Public Participation Program; INEL TRU Waste Projects, including System Analysis, Stored Waste projects, and Buried Waste projects; and Waste Management Materials Studies, including Process Control and Durability studies

  4. Long-range plan for buried transuranic waste studies at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, J.O.

    1985-12-01

    This document presents a plan to perform detailed studies of alternatives considered for the long-term management of buried transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The studies will provide the technical basis for DOE to make a decision on the future management of that waste. Although the waste is currently being handled in an acceptable manner, new solutions are continually being researched to improve management techniques. Three alternatives are being considered: (a) leave the waste as is; (b) improve in situ confinement of the waste; and (c) retrieve, process, and certify the waste for disposal at a federal repository. Fourteen studies are described in this plan for Alternatives 2 and 3. The leave-as-is alternative involves continuing present procedures for managing the buried waste. An ongoing environmental surveillance program, a low-level-waste stabilization program, and enhanced subsurface migration studies begun in FY-1984 at the INEL will provide data for the decision-making process for the INEL buried TRU waste. These ongoing studies for the leave-as-is alternative are summarized in this plan in limited detail. The improved-confinement alternative involves leaving the waste in place, but providing additional protection against wind, water penetration, erosion, and plant and animal intrusion. Several studies proposed under this alternative will examine special techniques to immobilize or encapsulate the buried waste. An in situ grouting study was implemented at the INEL starting in FY-1985 and will be completed at the end of FY-1986 with the grouting of a simulated INEL buried TRU waste trench. Studies of the third alternative will investigate improved retrieval, processing, and certification techniques. New equipment, such as industrial manipulators and excavating machinery, will be tested in the retrieval studies. Processing and certification studies will examine rapidly changing or new technologies

  5. Transuranic solid waste management programs. Progress report, July--December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    Progress is reported for three transuranic solid waste management programs funded at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) Division of Fuel Cycle and Production (NFCP). Under the Transuranic Waste Research and Development Program, continued studies have shown the potential attractiveness of fiber drums as an acceptable substitute for the current mild steel storage containers. Various fire retardants have been evaluated, with one indicating significant ability to inhibit fire propagation. Continued radiolysis studies, under laboratory and field conditions, continue to reaffirm earlier LASL results indicating no significant hazard from radiolytic reactions, assuming no change in current allowable loadings. Care must be exercised to differentiate between radiolytic and chemical reactions. Other efforts have identified a modification of chemical processing to reduce the amounts of plutonium requiring retrievable storage. Studies are also in progress to enhance the sensitivity of the LASL MEGAS assay system. The Transuranic-Contaminated Solid Waste Treatment Development Facility building was 72 percent complete as of December 31, 1975, which is in accord with the existing schedule. Procurement of process components is also on schedule. Certain modifications to the facility have been made, and various pre-facility experiments on waste container handling and processing have been completed. The program for the Evaluation of Transuranic-Contaminated Radioactive Waste Disposal Areas continued development of various computer modules for simulation of radionuclide transport within the biosphere. In addition, program staff contributed to an ERDA document on radioactive waste management through the preparation of a report on burial of radioactive waste at ERDA-contractor and commercial sites

  6. Transuranic solid waste management programs. Progress report, July--December 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    Progress is reported for three transuranic solid waste management programs funded at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) Division of Fuel Cycle and Production (NFCP). Under the Transuranic Waste Research and Development Program, continued studies have shown the potential attractiveness of fiber drums as an acceptable substitute for the current mild steel storage containers. Various fire retardants have been evaluated, with one indicating significant ability to inhibit fire propagation. Continued radiolysis studies, under laboratory and field conditions, continue to reaffirm earlier LASL results indicating no significant hazard from radiolytic reactions, assuming no change in current allowable loadings. Care must be exercised to differentiate between radiolytic and chemical reactions. Other efforts have identified a modification of chemical processing to reduce the amounts of plutonium requiring retrievable storage. Studies are also in progress to enhance the sensitivity of the LASL MEGAS assay system. The Transuranic-Contaminated Solid Waste Treatment Development Facility building was 72 percent complete as of December 31, 1975, which is in accord with the existing schedule. Procurement of process components is also on schedule. Certain modifications to the facility have been made, and various pre-facility experiments on waste container handling and processing have been completed. The program for the Evaluation of Transuranic-Contaminated Radioactive Waste Disposal Areas continued development of various computer modules for simulation of radionuclide transport within the biosphere. In addition, program staff contributed to an ERDA document on radioactive waste management through the preparation of a report on burial of radioactive waste at ERDA-contractor and commercial sites.

  7. IMPROVEMENTS IN HANFORD TRANSURANIC (TRU) PROGRAM UTILIZING SYSTEMS MODELING AND ANALYSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UYTIOCO EM

    2007-01-01

    Hanford's Transuranic (TRU) Program is responsible for certifying contact-handled (CH) TRU waste and shipping the certified waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hanford's CH TRU waste includes material that is in retrievable storage as well as above ground storage, and newly generated waste. Certifying a typical container entails retrieving and then characterizing it (Real-Time Radiography, Non-Destructive Assay, and Head Space Gas Sampling), validating records (data review and reconciliation), and designating the container for a payload. The certified payload is then shipped to WIPP. Systems modeling and analysis techniques were applied to Hanford's TRU Program to help streamline the certification process and increase shipping rates

  8. Research and development program for transuranic-contaminated waste within the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    This overview examines the research and development program that has been established within the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) to develop the technology to treat transuranic-contaminated waste. Also considered is the waste expected within the total nuclear fuel cycle

  9. Trasax '90: An integrated transportation emergency response exercise program involving transuranic waste shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouba, S.; Everitt, J.

    1991-01-01

    Over the last five years, the US Department of Energy (DOE), and several states and numerous local governments have been preparing for the transportation of transuranic (TRU) waste to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico, near Carlsbad. Seven western states, represented by the Western Governors' Association (WGA), submitted a report to the US Congress that discussed the concerns of their constituents related to the transportation of TRU waste through their communities. One of the three major concerns identified was emergency preparedness. Initial funding to resolve concerns identified in the WGA report to Congress was provided by the US Department of Transportation. Upon receiving funding, lead states were assigned responsibilities to devise programs aimed at increasing public confidence in the areas of most concern. The responsibility for emergency response readiness, as demonstrated through a program of training and responding to simulated accident scenarios, was accepted by the state of Colorado. The state of Colorado laid out an exercise program which expanded upon the DOE training programs already offered to emergency responders along Colorado's designated TRU-waste transportation corridor. The ongoing program included a full-scale field exercise staged in Colorado Springs and dubbed, ''TRANSAX '90.''

  10. Long-range plan for buried transuranic waste studies at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berreth, P.D.; Fischer, D.K.; Suckel, R.A.

    1984-11-01

    This document presents a plan to perform detailed studies of alternatives considered for the long-term management of buried transuranic waste at the INEL. The studies will provide the technical basis for DOE to make a decision on the future management of that waste. Although the waste is currently being handled in an acceptable manner, new solutions are continually being researched to improve handling techniques. Three alternatives are being considered: (a) leave the waste as is; (b) improve in situ confinement of the waste; (c) retrieve, process, and certify the waste for disposal at a federal repository. Fifteen studies are described in this plan for the latter two alternatives. The leave-as-is alternative involves continuing present procedures for managing the buried waste. An ongoing environmental surveillance program, a low-level-waste stabilization program, and enhanced subsurface migration studies begun in FY-1984 at the INEL will provide data for the decision-making process for INEL buried TRU waste. These ongoing studies for the leave-as-is alternative are summarized in this plan in limited detail. The improved-confinement alternative involves leaving the waste in place, but providing additional protection against wind water penetration, erosion, and plant and animal intrusion. Several studies proposed will examine special techniques to immobilize or encapsulate the buried waste. Studies of the third alternative will investigate improved retrieval, processing and certification techniques. New equipment, such as industrial manipulators and excavating machinery, will be tested in the retrieval studies. Processing and certification studies will examine rapidly changing or new technologies. 19 references, 8 figures, 4 tables

  11. Risk evaluations of transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T.H.; Keneshea, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 75% of the defense low-level transuranic (TRU) waste stored in the United States and 25% of the buried TRU waste is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Studies have been performed to identify and evaluate technical alternatives for the long-term management of this waste. (The alternatives range from leaving the waste in place as is to reviewing, processing, and shipping it to an offsite geological repository.) Among the evalations that have been performed were preliminary risk evaluations. The dose commitment and risk of hypothetical, near-term, accidental or uncontrolled releases of radionuclides have been evaluated for each alternative. The following potential causes of radionuclide release have been studied: process and handling accidents, shipping accidents, natural events (e.g., earthquakes), man-caused events (e.g., airplane crashes), and future intrusion by individuals or small populations after loss of societal control over the waste. The hypothetical releases have been evaluated, in terms of dose commitment and (if pertinent) probability and risk, for all operational steps making up each concept. The dominant scanerios in terms of near-term risk are (1) lava flow up through or over the waste, leading to airbone releases; (2) an explosion or a criticality accident in the waste-processing facility; and (3) a tornado strike or a fire during waste retrieval. The dominant long-term releases are (1) volcanic action; and (2) intrusion of people on the waste site.Although substantial dose commitments to individual members of the public were calculated for the lava flow and intrusion scenarios, no prompt health effects would be expected from the exposures. The effects would be in the form of a slightly increased likelihood of latent cancer induction

  12. Transuranic waste characterization sampling and analysis plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is located approximately 25 miles northwest of Santa Fe, New Mexico, situated on the Pajarito Plateau. Technical Area 54 (TA-54), one of the Laboratory's many technical areas, is a radioactive and hazardous waste management and disposal area located within the Laboratory's boundaries. The purpose of this transuranic waste characterization, sampling, and analysis plan (CSAP) is to provide a methodology for identifying, characterizing, and sampling approximately 25,000 containers of transuranic waste stored at Pads 1, 2, and 4, Dome 48, and the Fiberglass Reinforced Plywood Box Dome at TA-54, Area G, of the Laboratory. Transuranic waste currently stored at Area G was generated primarily from research and development activities, processing and recovery operations, and decontamination and decommissioning projects. This document was created to facilitate compliance with several regulatory requirements and program drivers that are relevant to waste management at the Laboratory, including concerns of the New Mexico Environment Department

  13. Complications Associated with Long-Term Disposition of Newly-Generated Transuranic Waste: A National Laboratory Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orchard, B.J.; Harvego, L.A.; Carlson, T.L.; Grant, R.P.

    2009-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a multipurpose national laboratory delivering specialized science and engineering solutions for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sponsorship of INL was formally transferred to the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE) by Secretary Spencer Abraham in July 2002. The move to NE, and designation as the DOE lead nuclear energy laboratory for reactor technology, supports the nation's expanding nuclear energy initiatives, placing INL at the center of work to develop advanced Generation IV nuclear energy systems; nuclear energy/hydrogen coproduction technology; advanced nuclear energy fuel cycle technologies; and providing national security answers to national infrastructure needs. As a result of the Laboratory's NE mission, INL generates both contact-handled and remote-handled transuranic (TRU) waste from ongoing operations. Generation rates are relatively small and fluctuate based on specific programs and project activities being conducted; however, the Laboratory will continue to generate TRU waste well into the future in association with the NE mission. Currently, plans and capabilities are being established to transfer INL's contact-handled TRU waste to the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Plant (AMWTP) for certification and disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Remote-handled TRU waste is currently placed in storage at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). In an effort to minimize future liabilities associated with the INL NE mission, INL is evaluating and assessing options for the management and disposition of all its TRU waste on a real-time basis at time of generation. This paper summarizes near-term activities to minimize future re handling of INL's TRU waste, as well as, potential complications associated with the long-term disposition of newly-generated TRU waste. Potential complications impacting the disposition of INL newly-generated TRU waste include, but are not limited to: (1

  14. Improved practices for packaging transuranic waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LA-UR-09-03293) - 16280

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Kapil K.; Carson, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    Transuranic (TRU) waste leaving the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is packaged using LANL's waste acceptance criteria for onsite storage. Before shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico, each payload container is subject to rigorous characterization to ensure compliance with WIPP waste acceptance criteria and Department of Transportation regulations. Techniques used for waste characterization include nondestructive examination by WIPP-certified real-time radiography (RTR) and nondestructive assay (NDA) of containers, as well as headspace gas sampling to ensure that hydrogen and other flammable gases remain at safe levels during transport. These techniques are performed under a rigorous quality assurance program to confirm that results are accurate and reproducible. If containers are deemed problematic, corrective action is implemented before they are shipped to WIPP. A defensive approach was used for many years to minimize the number of problematic drums. However, based on review of data associated with headspace gas sampling, NDA and RTR results, and enhanced coordination with the entities responsible for waste certification, many changes have been implemented to facilitate packaging of TRU waste drums with higher isotopic loading at the Plutonium Facility at an unprecedented rate while ensuring compliance with waste acceptance criteria. This paper summarizes the details of technical changes and related administrative coordination activities, such as information sharing among the certification entities, generators, waste packagers, and shippers. It discusses the results of all such cumulative changes that have been implemented at the Plutonium Facility and gives readers a preview of what LANL has accomplished to expeditiously certify and dispose of newly generated TRU waste. (authors)

  15. TRU partnership-benefits to the national TRU program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippis, J.; Lott, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Because increased regulatory authority has been given to the states, the management of transuranic (TRU) wastes varies considerably. One effective tool for facilitating better communications, coordination, and cooperation among the generator/storage sites is the formation of topic specific interface working groups. The National TRU Program supports these groups, and in 1994, a policy was adopted to manage these interface working groups

  16. Status of microwave process development for RH-TRU [remote-handled transuranic] wastes at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, T.L.; Youngblood, E.L.; Berry, J.B.; Mattus, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Handling and Packaging Plant is developing a microwave process to reduce and solidify remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) liquids and sludges presently stored in large tanks at ORNL. Testing has recently begun on an in-drum microwave process using nonradioactive RH-TRU surrogates. The microwave process development effort has focused on an in-drum process to dry the RH-TRU liquids and sludges in the final storage container and then melt the salt residues to form a solid monolith. A 1/3-scale proprietary microwave applicator was designed, fabricated, and tested to demonstrate the essential features of the microwave design and to provide input into the design of the full-scale applicator. The microwave fields are uniform in one dimension to reduce the formation of hot spots on the microwaved wasteform. The final wasteform meets the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, a federal repository for defense transuranic wastes near Carlsbad, New Mexico. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  17. Rotary kiln incinerator engineering tests on simulated transuranic wastes from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattengill, M.G.; Brunner, F.A.; Fasso, J.L.; Mitchel, S.R.; Praskac, R.T.

    1982-09-01

    Nine rotary kiln incineration tests were performed at Colorado School of Mines Research Institute on simulated transuranic waste materials. The rotary kiln incinerator used as 3 ft ID and 30 ft long and was included in an incineration system that also included an afterburner and a baghouse. The purpose of the incineration test program was to determine the applicability and operating characteristics of the rotary kiln with relation to the complete incineration of the simulated waste materials. The results of the study showed that the rotary kiln did completely incinerate the waste materials. Off-gas determinations showed emission levels of SO 2 , NO/sub x/, H 2 SO 4 , HC1, particulate loading, and hydrocarbons, as well as exhaust gas volume, to be within reasonable controllable ranges in a production operation. Included in the report are the results of materials and energy balances, based upon data collected, and design recommendations based upon the data and upon observations during the incineration operation

  18. Measurements of fission and activation products for Oak Ridge National Laboratory transuranic waste characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, L.K.; Miller, L.F.; Downing, D.J.

    1997-06-01

    It is beyond the current nondestructive analysis (NDA) state-of-the-art to accurately measure important alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides in the presence of typically-occurring background levels of neutron and photon radiation associated with remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste; in addition, it is not economically feasible to perform destructive analyses (DA) that employ radiochemical techniques on representative random samples from each waste container designated for disposal. Techniques that utilize gamma spectroscopy cannot measure purely alpha-emitting radionuclides, and they are difficult for measurements of photon-emitting radionuclides in large containers with energies below about one hundred keV. The methodology presented in this report combines gamma spectroscopy measurements of waste canisters with radiochemical analyses of smear samples and with statistical analyses to obtain estimates of alpha-emitting radionuclides in waste containers. This approach, with some additional research, is expected to provide an effective and practical technique for characterization of TRU radioactive waste to meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance criteria (WAC) and for segregating waste at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC). The objectives of this report are to determine if a waste container generated from ORNL/REDC can be classified as TRU and to provide an appropriate method of estimating the initial TRU concentration in this container

  19. Processing and certification of defense transuranic waste at the INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, T.L. Jr.; Cargo, C.H.; McKinley, K.B.; Smith, T.H.; Anderson, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    Since 1970, defense-generated transuranic waste has been placed into 20-year retrievable storage at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A major objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Waste Management Program is to remove all retrievably stored transuranic waste form the INEL. To support this objective, the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) and the Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP) are currently being constructed. SWEPP will certify waste, using nondestructive examination techniques, for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). PREPP will process uncertifiable waste into a certifiable waste form. 3 references

  20. C-tank transfers: Transuranic sludge removal from the C-1, C-2, and W-23 waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, T.L.; Lay, A.C.; Taylor, S.A.; Moore, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Two fluidic pulse jet mixing systems were used to successfully mobilize remote-handled transuranic sludge for retrieval from three 50,000-gal horizontal waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results of this operation indicate that the pulse jet system should be considered for mixing and bulk retrieval of sludges in other vertical and horizontal waste tanks at ORNL and at other U.S. Department of Energy sites

  1. Mobile/portable transuranic waste characterization systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory and a model for their use complex-wide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derr, E.D.; Harper, J.R.; Zygmunt, S.J.; Taggart, D.P.; Betts, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has implemented mobile and portable characterization and repackaging systems to characterize transuranic (TRU) waste in storage for ultimate shipment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM. These mobile systems are being used to characterize and repackage waste to meet the full requirements of the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and the WIPP Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). Mobile and portable characterization and repackaging systems are being used to supplement the capabilities and throughputs of existing facilities. Utilization of mobile systems is a key factor that is enabling LANL to (1) reduce its TRU waste work-off schedule from 36 years to 8.5 years; (2) eliminate the need to construct a $70M+ TRU waste characterization facility; (3) have waste certified for shipment to WIPP when WIPP opens; (4) continue to ship TRU waste to WIPP at the rate of 5000 drums per year; and (5) reduce overall costs by more than $200M. Aggressive implementation of mobile and portable systems throughout the Department of Energy complex through a centralized-distributed services model will result in similar advantages complex-wide

  2. Transuranic solid waste management research programs. Progress report, January--June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-03-01

    Tests continued to evaluate less costly fiber drums as alternate storage containers for low-level wastes. Tests completed to date indicated that the factory-applied fire retardants were not satisfactory; however, investigations of more promising coatings have been undertaken. The fiber drums were more satisfactory in other aspects. Expanded laboratory and field radiolysis experiments were performed. These were accompanied by investigations of H 2 diffusion through common waste packaging materials and through Los Alamos soil. Radiolysis studies were also initiated on wastes typical of Mound Laboratory. All results to date show that while H 2 is being slowly generated, the quantities are not excessive and should diffuse rapidly away. Construction of the TDF facility began and was 14 percent complete at the end of this reporting period. The incinerator was received, installed and checked out, and is operational. Additional specifications were developed and equipment procurement continued. Progress is reported on development of a system for evaluating radioactively contaminated solid waste burial sites. Source term data are summarized for some Los Alamos areas along with waste composition and configuration considerations. Physical and biotic transport pathways are discussed and development of modeling methods for projecting the environmental fate of transuranic materials is detailed

  3. Transuranic solid waste management research programs. Progress report, January--June 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-03-01

    Tests continued to evaluate less costly fiber drums as alternate storage containers for low-level wastes. Tests completed to date indicated that the factory-applied fire retardants were not satisfactory; however, investigations of more promising coatings have been undertaken. The fiber drums were more satisfactory in other aspects. Expanded laboratory and field radiolysis experiments were performed. These were accompanied by investigations of H/sub 2/ diffusion through common waste packaging materials and through Los Alamos soil. Radiolysis studies were also initiated on wastes typical of Mound Laboratory. All results to date show that while H/sub 2/ is being slowly generated, the quantities are not excessive and should diffuse rapidly away. Construction of the TDF facility began and was 14 percent complete at the end of this reporting period. The incinerator was received, installed and checked out, and is operational. Additional specifications were developed and equipment procurement continued. Progress is reported on development of a system for evaluating radioactively contaminated solid waste burial sites. Source term data are summarized for some Los Alamos areas along with waste composition and configuration considerations. Physical and biotic transport pathways are discussed and development of modeling methods for projecting the environmental fate of transuranic materials is detailed.

  4. Systematic evaluation of options to avoid generation of noncertifiable transuranic (TRU) waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boak, J.M.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; Triay, I.; Gruetzmacher, K.; Montoya, A.

    1998-03-01

    At present, >35% of the volume of newly generated transuranic (TRU) waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory is not certifiable for transport to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Noncertifiable waste would constitute 900--1,000 m 3 of the 2,600 m 3 of waste projected during the period of the Environmental Management (EM) Accelerated Cleanup: Focus on 2006 plan (DOE, 1997). Volume expansion of this waste to meet thermal limits would increase the shipped volume to ∼5,400 m 3 . This paper presents the results of efforts to define which TRU waste streams are noncertifiable at Los Alamos, and to prioritize site-specific options to reduce the volume of certifiable waste over the period of the EM Accelerated Cleanup Plan. A team of Los Alamos TRU waste generators and waste managers reviewed historic generation rates and thermal loads and current practices to estimate the projected volume and thermal load of TRU waste streams for Fiscal Years 1999--2006. These data defined four major problem TRU waste streams. Estimates were also made of the volume expansion that would be required to meet the permissible wattages for all waste. The four waste streams defined were: (1) 238 Pu-contaminated combustible waste from production of Radioactive Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) with 238 Pu activity which exceeds allowable shipping limits by 10--100X. (2) 241 Am-contaminated cement waste from plutonium recovery processes (nitric and hydrochloric acid recovery) are estimated to exceed thermal limits by ∼3X. (3) 239 Pu-contaminated combustible waste, mainly organic waste materials contaminated with 239 Pu and 241 Am, is estimated to exceed thermal load requirements by a factor of ∼2X. (4) Oversized metal waste objects, (especially gloveboxes), cannot be shipped as is to WIPP because they will not fit in a standard waste box or drum

  5. The value of assessments in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Waste Certification Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, E.M.

    1995-05-01

    This paper will discuss the value of assessments in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Waste Certification Programs by: introducing the organization and purpose of the LLNL Waste Certification Programs for transuranic, low-level, and hazardous waste; examining the differences in internal assessment/audit requirements for these programs; discussing the values and costs of assessments in a waste certification program; presenting practical recommendations to maximize the value of your assessment programs; and presenting improvements in LLNL's waste certification processes that resulted from assessments

  6. Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosure at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This Transuranic Storage Area Retrieval Enclosure Preliminary Safety Analysis Report was completed as required by DOE Order 5480.23. The purpose of this document is to construct a safety basis that supports the design and permits construction of the facility. The facility has been designed to the requirements of a Radioactive Solid Waste Facility presented in DOE Order 6430.1A

  7. National Diabetes Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Tips About WIN NIDDK Information Clearinghouses National Diabetes Education Program Together with more than 200 partners ... type 2 diabetes. Learn more about NDEP . National Diabetes Month You are the center of your diabetes ...

  8. National Toxicology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NTP? NTP develops and applies tools of modern toxicology and molecular biology to identify substances in the ... depend on for decisions that matter. The National Toxicology Program provides the scientific basis for programs, activities, ...

  9. National School Lunch Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Agriculture, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The National School Lunch Program is a federally assisted meal program operating in over 101,000 public and non-profit private schools and residential child care institutions. It provides nutritionally balanced, low-cost or free lunches to more than 30.5 million children each school day in 2008. In 1998, Congress expanded the National School Lunch…

  10. Environmental and other evaluations of alternatives for management of defense transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1 of 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for developing and implementing methods for the safe and environmentally acceptable disposal of radioactive wastes. In connection with this responsibility, the DOE is formulating a program for the long-term management of transuranic (TRU) waste buried and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This report has been prepared to document the results of environmental and other evaluations for three decisions that the DOE is considering: (1) the selection of a general method for the long-term management of the buried TRU waste; (2) the selection of a method for processing the stored waste and for processing the buried waste, if it is retrieved; (3) the selection of a location for the waste-processing facility. This document pertains only to the contact-handled TRU waste buried in pits and trenches and the contact-handled TRU waste held in aboveground storage at the INEL. A decision has previously been made on a method for the long-term management of the stored waste; it will be retrieved and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The WIPP is also used in this report as a reference repository for evaluation purposes for the buried waste. This report is contained in two volumes. Volume I is arranged as follows: the summary is an overview of the analyses contained in this document. Section 1 is a statement of the underlying purpose and need to which the report is responding. Section 2 describes the alterntives. Section 3 describes the affected environment at the INEL and the WIPP sites. Section 4 analyzes the environmental effects of each alternative. The appendices in Volume II contain data and discussions supporting the material presented in Volume I

  11. A model for a national low level waste program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenhorn, James A.

    2009-01-01

    A national program for the management of low level waste is essential to the success of environmental clean-up, decontamination and decommissioning, current operations and future missions. The value of a national program is recognized through procedural consistency and a shared set of resources. A national program requires a clear waste definition and an understanding of waste characteristics matched against available and proposed disposal options. A national program requires the development and implementation of standards and procedures for implementing the waste hierarchy, with a specitic emphasis on waste avoidance, minimization and recycling. It requires a common set of objectives for waste characterization based on the disposal facility's waste acceptance criteria, regulatory and license requirements and performance assessments. Finally, a national waste certification program is required to ensure compliance. To facilitate and enhance the national program, a centralized generator services organization, tasked with providing technical services to the generators on behalf of the national program, is necessary. These subject matter experts are the interface between the generating sites and the disposal facility(s). They provide an invaluable service to the generating organizations through their involvement in waste planning prior to waste generation and through championing implementation of the waste hierarchy. Through their interface, national treatment and transportation services are optimized and new business opportunities are identified. This national model is based on extensive experience in the development and on-going management of a national transuranic waste program and management of the national repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The Low Level Program at the Savannah River Site also successfully developed and implemented the waste hierarchy, waste certification and waste generator services concepts presented below. The Savannah River Site

  12. The waste isolation pilot plant. Permanent isolation of defense transuranic waste in deep geologic salt. A national solution and international model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, Jose; Van Luik, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is located about 42 kilometers from the city of Carlsbad, New Mexico. It is an operating deep geologic repository in bedded salt 657 meters below the surface of the Chihuahuan desert. Since its opening in March of 1999, it has received about 12,000 shipments totaling about 91,000 cubic meters of defense related transuranic (TRU) wastes. Twenty-two sites have been cleaned up of their defense-legacy TRU waste. The WIPP's shipping program has an untarnished safety record and its trucks and trailers have safely traveled the equivalent of about 60 round-trips to the Moon. WIPP received, and deserved, a variety of safety accolades over its nearly 15 year working life. In February of 2014, however, two incidents resulted in a major operational suspension and reevaluation of its safety systems, processes and equipment. The first incident was an underground mining truck fire, followed nine days later by an airborne radiation release incident. Accident Investigation Board (AIB) reports on both incidents point to failures of plans, procedures and persons. The AIB recommendations for recovery from both these incidents are numerous and are being carefully implemented. One major recommendation is to no longer have different maintenance and safety requirements for nuclear handling equipment and mining equipment. Maintenance and cleanliness of mining equipment was cited as a contributing cause to the underground fire, and the idea that there can be lesser rigor in taking care of mining equipment, when it is being operated in the same underground space as the waste handling equipment, is not tenable. At some point in the future, the changes made in response to these two incidents will be seen as a valuable lesson learned on behalf of future repository programs. WIPP will once again be seen as a ''pilot'' in the nautical sense, in terms of 'showing the way' - the way to a national and international radioactive waste

  13. The waste isolation pilot plant. Permanent isolation of defense transuranic waste in deep geologic salt. A national solution and international model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Jose; Van Luik, Abraham [US Department of Energy, Carlsbad, NM (United States). Carlsbad Field Office

    2015-07-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is located about 42 kilometers from the city of Carlsbad, New Mexico. It is an operating deep geologic repository in bedded salt 657 meters below the surface of the Chihuahuan desert. Since its opening in March of 1999, it has received about 12,000 shipments totaling about 91,000 cubic meters of defense related transuranic (TRU) wastes. Twenty-two sites have been cleaned up of their defense-legacy TRU waste. The WIPP's shipping program has an untarnished safety record and its trucks and trailers have safely traveled the equivalent of about 60 round-trips to the Moon. WIPP received, and deserved, a variety of safety accolades over its nearly 15 year working life. In February of 2014, however, two incidents resulted in a major operational suspension and reevaluation of its safety systems, processes and equipment. The first incident was an underground mining truck fire, followed nine days later by an airborne radiation release incident. Accident Investigation Board (AIB) reports on both incidents point to failures of plans, procedures and persons. The AIB recommendations for recovery from both these incidents are numerous and are being carefully implemented. One major recommendation is to no longer have different maintenance and safety requirements for nuclear handling equipment and mining equipment. Maintenance and cleanliness of mining equipment was cited as a contributing cause to the underground fire, and the idea that there can be lesser rigor in taking care of mining equipment, when it is being operated in the same underground space as the waste handling equipment, is not tenable. At some point in the future, the changes made in response to these two incidents will be seen as a valuable lesson learned on behalf of future repository programs. WIPP will once again be seen as a ''pilot'' in the nautical sense, in terms of 'showing the way' - the way to a national and international radioactive waste

  14. National Pediatric Program Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The book of the National Pediatric Program Update, issued by the Argentina Society of Pediatrics, describes important issues, including: effective treatment of addictions (drugs); defects of the neural tube; and the use of radiation imaging in diagnosis. [es

  15. National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP) is designed to provide high-resolution elevation and imagery data along U.S....

  16. Analogs for transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weimer, W.C.; Laul, J.C.; Kutt, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental approach is being used to estimate the long-term environmental and biogeochemical behaviors of selected transuranic elements. The objective of this research is to estimate the effect that long-term (hundreds of years) environmental weathering has on the behavior of the transuranic elements americium and curium. This is achieved by investigating the actual behavior of naturally occurring rare earth elements, especially neodymium, that serve as transuranic analogs. Determination of the analog element behavior provides data that can be used to estimate the ultimate availability to man of transuranic materials released into the environment

  17. Generation IV national program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preville, M.; Sadhankar, R.; Brady, D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines the Generation IV National Program. This program involves evolutionary and innovative design with significantly higher efficiencies (∼50% compared to present ∼30%) - sustainable, economical, safe, reliable and proliferation resistant - for future energy security. The Generation IV Forum (GIF) effectively leverages the resources of the participants to meet these goals. Ten countries signed the GIF Charter in 2001

  18. National Geospatial Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.

    2011-01-01

    The National Geospatial Program (NGP; http://www.usgs.gov/ngpo/) satisfies the needs of customers by providing geospatial products and services that customers incorporate into their decisionmaking and operational activities. These products and services provide geospatial data that are organized and maintained in cost-effective ways and developed by working with partners and organizations whose activities align with those of the program. To accomplish its mission, the NGP— organizes, maintains, publishes, and disseminates the geospatial baseline of the Nation's topography, natural landscape, and manmade environment through The National Map

  19. National Hansen's Disease (Leprosy) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caring and Curing Since 1894 National Hansen's Disease (Leprosy) Program Caring and Curing Since 1894 A genetic ... Louisiana New York Texas The National Hansen's Disease (Leprosy) Program The National Hansen's Disease Program is the ...

  20. Certification document for newly generated contact-handled transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, W.D.; Setaro, J.

    1984-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has requested that all national laboratories handling defense waste develop and augment a program whereby all newly generated contact-handled transuranic (TRU) waste be contained, stored, and then shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in accordance with the requirements set forth in WIPP-DOE-114. The program described in this report delineates how Oak Ridge National Laboratory intends to comply with these requirements and lists the procedures used by each generator to ensure that their TRU wastes are certifiable for shipment to WIPP

  1. Environmental and other evaluations of alternatives for management of defense transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    Appendices to this report contain the following information: INEL history of Waste Management; text of communications between Idaho and the federal government on long-term management; agency and public response to a proposed environmental impact statement; updated estimates on radiological releases from the slagging-pyrolysis incinerator; modeling studies of subsurface migration of radionuclides; nonradiological emissions and their environmental effects; methods for calculating radiological consequences; analysis of abnormal events in conceptual retrieval and processing operations; environmental contamination by accidental releases; hazards to waste management workers; environmental and other effects of rail and truck shipment of wastes; effects of hypothetical worst-case shipping accidents in urban areas; environmental and other effects of processing INEL transuranic waste at the offsite geological repository; and regulations applicable to INEL TRU waste management

  2. Radiological Characterization Methodology for INEEL-Stored Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH TRU) Waste from Argonne National Laboratory-East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuan, P.; Bhatt, R.N.

    2003-01-01

    An Acceptable Knowledge (AK)-based radiological characterization methodology is being developed for RH TRU waste generated from ANL-E hot cell operations performed on fuel elements irradiated in the EBR-II reactor. The methodology relies on AK for composition of the fresh fuel elements, their irradiation history, and the waste generation and collection processes. Radiological characterization of the waste involves the estimates of the quantities of significant fission products and transuranic isotopes in the waste. Methods based on reactor and physics principles are used to achieve these estimates. Because of the availability of AK and the robustness of the calculation methods, the AK-based characterization methodology offers a superior alternative to traditional waste assay techniques. Using the methodology, it is shown that the radiological parameters of a test batch of ANL-E waste is well within the proposed WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria limits

  3. Long-term management plan INEL transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, J.D.

    1978-12-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory stores large quantities of transuranic-contaminated waste at its Radioactive Waste Management Complex. This report presents a 10-year plan for management of this transuranic waste and includes descriptions of projects involving nuclear waste storage, retrieval, processing, systems analysis, and environmental science. Detailed project schedules and work breakdown charts are provided to give the reader a clear view of transuranic waste management objectives

  4. FY-1981 project status for the Transuranic Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedetti, R.L.; Tait, T.D.

    1981-11-01

    The primary objective of the Transuranic Waste Treatment Facility (TWTF) Project is to provide a facility to process low-level transuranic waste stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) into a form acceptable for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This report provides brief summary descriptions of the project objectives and background, project status through FY-1981, planned activities for FY-1982, and the EG and G TWTF Project office position on processing INEL transuranic waste

  5. Foreign programs for the storage of spent nuclear power plant fuels, high-level waste canisters and transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, K.M.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1984-04-01

    The various national programs for developing and applying technology for the interim storage of spent fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and TRU wastes are summarized. Primary emphasis of the report is on dry storage techniques for uranium dioxide fuels, but data are also provided concerning pool storage

  6. National HTGR safety program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, D.E.; Kelley, A.P. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the National HTGR Program in the US with emphasis on the safety and licensing strategy being pursued. This strategy centers upon the development of an integrated approach to organizing and classifying the functions needed to produce safe and economical nuclear power production. At the highest level, four plant goals are defined - Normal Operation, Core and Plant Protection, Containment Integrity and Emergency Preparedness. The HTGR features which support the attainment of each goal are described and finally a brief summary is provided of the current status of the principal safety development program supporting the validation of the four plant goals

  7. Risk assessment of the retrieval of transuranic waste: Pads 1, 2, and 4, Technical Area-54, Area G Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbert, K.A.; Lyon, B.F.; Hutchison, J.; Holmes, J.A.; Legg, J.L.; Simek, M.P.; Travis, C.C.; Wollert, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    The Risk Assessment for the Retrieval of Transuranic Waste is a comparative risk assessment of the potential adverse human health effects resulting from exposure to contaminants during retrieval and post-retrieval aboveground storage operations of post-1970 earthen-covered transuranic waste. Two alternatives are compared: (1) Immediate Retrieval and (2) Delayed Retrieval. Under the Immediate Retrieval Alternative, retrieval of the waste is assumed to begin immediately, Under the Delayed Retrieval Alternative, retrieval is delayed 10 years. The current risk assessment is on Pads 1, 2, and 4, at Technical Area-54, Area-G, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Risks are assessed independently for three scenarios: (1) incident-free retrieval operations, (2) incident-free storage operations, and (3) a drum failure analysis. The drum failure analysis evaluates container integrity under both alternatives and assesses the impacts of potential drum failures during retrieval operations. Risks associated with a series of drum failures are potentially severe for workers, off-site receptors, and general on-site employees if retrieval is delayed 10 years and administrative and engineering controls remain constant. Under the Delayed Retrieval Alternative, an average of 300 drums out of 16,647 are estimated to fail during retrieval operations due to general corrosion, while minimal drums are predicted to fail under the Immediate Retrieval Alternative. The results of the current study suggest that, based on risk, remediation of Pads 1, 2, and 4 at LANL should not be delayed. Although risks from incident-free operations in the Delayed Retrieval Alternative are low, risks due to corrosion and drum failures are potentially severe

  8. National nuclear scientific program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Matausek, M.V.; Neskovic, N.

    2001-01-01

    National scientific program of the Vinca Institute Nuclear Reactors And Radioactive Waste comprises research and development in the following fields: application of energy of nuclear fission, application of neutron beams, analyses of nuclear safety and radiation protection. In the first phase preparatory activities, conceptual design and design of certain processes and facilities should be accomplished. In the second phase realization of the projects is expected. (author)

  9. Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan required each US Department of Energy (DOE) site that characterizes transuranic waste to be sent the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan that addresses applicable requirements specified in the QAPP

  10. 2. Transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Methods of sample collection, sample storage, sample procedures and radioanalytical procedures for transuranic elements in marine environment are reviewed and recommended. Alpha spectrometry and scintillation techniques are used for measurement of isotopic content. Separation processes for samples are described

  11. OXIDATION OF TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.L.

    1959-02-17

    A method is reported for oxidizing neptunium or plutonium in the presence of cerous values without also oxidizing the cerous values. The method consists in treating an aqueous 1N nitric acid solution, containing such cerous values together with the trivalent transuranic elements, with a quantity of hydrogen peroxide stoichiometrically sufficient to oxidize the transuranic values to the hexavalent state, and digesting the solution at room temperature.

  12. Economic comparison of centralizing or decentralizing processing facilities for defense transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.M.

    1980-07-01

    This study is part of a set of analyses under direction of the Transuranic Waste Management Program designed to provide comprehensive, systematic methodology and support necessary to better understand options for national long-term management of transuranic (TRU) waste. The report summarizes activities to evaluate the economics of possible alternatives in locating facilities to process DOE-managed transuranic waste. The options considered are: (1) Facilities located at all major DOE TRU waste generating sites. (2) Two or three regional facilities. (3) Central processing facility at only one DOE site. The study concludes that processing at only one facility is the lowest cost option, followed, in order of cost, by regional then individual site processing

  13. A summary of the environmental restoration program retrieval demonstration project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQuary, J.

    1991-02-01

    This report provides a summary of the Environmental Restoration Program's Retrieval Demonstration Project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This project developed concepts for demonstrating facilities and equipment for the retrieval of buried transuranic mixed waste at the INEL. Included is a brief assessment of the viability, cost effectiveness, and safety of retrieval based on the developed concept. Changes made in Revision 1 reflect editorial changes only. 31 refs., 1 fig

  14. Quality assurance on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Buried Waste Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, T.L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the clean-up of an Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site utilized for disposal of transuranic contaminated waste from 1954 until 1970. The author presents requirements of the environmental protection statutes that have generated quality assurance requirements in addition to those historically implemented as a part of facility design, construction and operation. A hierarchy of program guidance quality documentation and procedures is discussed. Data qualification and computer database management are identified as requirements

  15. Accident analysis for transuranic waste management alternatives in the U.S. Department of Energy waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nabelssi, B.; Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Tompkins, M.; Jackson, R.

    1995-01-01

    Preliminary accident analyses and radiological source term evaluations have been conducted for transuranic waste (TRUW) as part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) effort to manage storage, treatment, and disposal of radioactive wastes at its various sites. The approach to assessing radiological releases from facility accidents was developed in support of the Office of Environmental Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS). The methodology developed in this work is in accordance with the latest DOE guidelines, which consider the spectrum of possible accident scenarios in the implementation of various actions evaluated in an EIS. The radiological releases from potential risk-dominant accidents in storage and treatment facilities considered in the EM PEIS TRUW alternatives are described in this paper. The results show that significant releases can be predicted for only the most severe and extremely improbable accidents sequences

  16. Dosimetry of incorporated transuranic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loessner, V.

    1983-01-01

    Modern in vivo and in vitro techniques for detecting transuranic radionuclides within the human body are described with special emphasis on multiparameter measuring methods developed at the National Board of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection. Furthermore, problems related to calibration and interpretation of measuring data are discussed and new methods presented for the calculation of committed dose equivalents on the basis of data from ICRP Publication 30. Also included is an introductory chapter on radiobiological fundamentals of intake, translocation and metabolism of these nuclides. (author)

  17. Transuranic Computational Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas

    2018-02-26

    Recent developments in the chemistry of the transuranic elements are surveyed, with particular emphasis on computational contributions. Examples are drawn from molecular coordination and organometallic chemistry, and from the study of extended solid systems. The role of the metal valence orbitals in covalent bonding is a particular focus, especially the consequences of the stabilization of the 5f orbitals as the actinide series is traversed. The fledgling chemistry of transuranic elements in the +II oxidation state is highlighted. Throughout, the symbiotic interplay of experimental and computational studies is emphasized; the extraordinary challenges of experimental transuranic chemistry afford computational chemistry a particularly valuable role at the frontier of the periodic table. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. An evaluation of the concept of transuranic burning using liquid metal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodwell, E.; Shaw, R.A.; Williams, R.F.

    1991-03-01

    The evaluation investigates the potential benefits to radioactive waste disposal of separating the transuranic elements from spent reactor fuel before the spent fuel is disposed of in geologic repositories. The evaluation addresses the question whether the benefits to radioactive waste disposal would justify processing the fuel to separate the transuranics, plus a liquid metal reactor (LMR) deployment program to transmute the separated transuranics. The evaluation concludes that adoption of a process-before-disposal policy for all the spent fuel from the light water reactors (LWRs) would accrue only modest benefits with respect to the accumulation of uranium mill tailings, the national inventory of transuranics and the licensing of a geologic repository. It is likely that this process-before-disposal policy would incur a large cost penalty, encounter major institutional difficulties, multiply licensing hurdles, and amplify political and public opposition to the overall nuclear power program. However, plutonium from spent LWR fuel is projected to be substantially more economic than enriched uranium, as fissile material for startup of LMRs when LMR deployment becomes economically justified. At that time, the LMR would fulfill its role as a reactor system that would protect the nation from diminishing energy resources. Development tasks towards defining and developing the most cost-effective LMR and associated fuel cycle remain very important. 29 refs., 3 figs., 18 tabs

  19. Intercalibration of transuranic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukai, R.; Ballestra, S.; Thein, M.

    1982-01-01

    One of the major objectives of the coordinated research programme on Transuranic Cycling Behaviour in the Marine Environment has been to achieve the comparability of the measurement results among the laboratories from different countries participating in the programme. In order to fulfil this objective, the intercalibration exercises of transuranic measurements using sea water and sediment samples were organized by the Monaco Laboratory within the duration of the programme in 1979-1981. The sediment and sea water samples were collected respectively by the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre of India and the Hydrographic Institute of the Federal Republic of Germany. In the present report the results of these intercalibration exercises are surveyed

  20. National nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa A, D.

    1980-01-01

    The basic concepts of the Nuclear program that Mexico plans are presented, to develop pointing out that it constitutes an outstanding event within the history of the country, that will result in an equilibrated profit of the resources of oil exploitation consolidating each step of its technical evolution; all of this represents a challenge since it establishes a qualitative transformation in the very roots of the National economy. Being certain that oil is a non renovable natural resource, the author points out that Mexican Government has emphasized the promotion of the research of alternate resource of energy in the future. According to this panorama, the quidelines that Mexico must undertake regarding production, distribution and consumption of nuclear energy, will point primarily to a global program, which will avoid the imports of equipment and technicians, to achieve maximum advantages for the Country. It stresses the fact that this program cannot start from zero; since first, Mexico, has to import foreign technology, which once assimilated, will give to the Mexican technicians the starting point to establish the proper solution to the foreseen objectives. Therefore, any kind of International cooperation must tend to accelerate the nuclear development and to obtain the transference to technology, within a frame of respect to Mexican sovereignity. The conclusion is that the task at which Mexico aims must be based on the existing human potentiality and on the one that will be prepared in the future, and also on the knowledge and adequate exploitation of the uranium reserves, having the ININ a prominent role of creating the necessary human infrastructure, the development of a Mexican nuclear energy can be achieved in a medium term. (author)

  1. Hanford site transuranic waste sampling plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    This sampling plan (SP) describes the selection of containers for sampling of homogeneous solids and soil/gravel and for visual examination of transuranic and mixed transuranic (collectively referred to as TRU) waste generated at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The activities described in this SP will be conducted under the Hanford Site TRU Waste Certification Program. This SP is designed to meet the requirements of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (CAO-94-1010) (DOE 1996a) (QAPP), site-specific implementation of which is described in the Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Characterization Program Quality Assurance Project Plan (HNF-2599) (Hanford 1998b) (QAPP). The QAPP defines the quality assurance (QA) requirements and protocols for TRU waste characterization activities at the Hanford Site. In addition, the QAPP identifies responsible organizations, describes required program activities, outlines sampling and analysis strategies, and identifies procedures for characterization activities. The QAPP identifies specific requirements for TRU waste sampling plans. Table 1-1 presents these requirements and indicates sections in this SP where these requirements are addressed

  2. Transuranic waste characterization sampling and analysis methods manual. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suermann, J.F.

    1996-04-01

    This Methods Manual provides a unified source of information on the sampling and analytical techniques that enable Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with the requirements established in the current revision of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program (the Program) and the WIPP Waste Analysis Plan. This Methods Manual includes all of the testing, sampling, and analytical methodologies accepted by DOE for use in implementing the Program requirements specified in the QAPP and the WIPP Waste Analysis Plan. The procedures in this Methods Manual are comprehensive and detailed and are designed to provide the necessary guidance for the preparation of site-specific procedures. With some analytical methods, such as Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry, the Methods Manual procedures may be used directly. With other methods, such as nondestructive characterization, the Methods Manual provides guidance rather than a step-by-step procedure. Sites must meet all of the specified quality control requirements of the applicable procedure. Each DOE site must document the details of the procedures it will use and demonstrate the efficacy of such procedures to the Manager, National TRU Program Waste Characterization, during Waste Characterization and Certification audits

  3. Supplement Analysis for Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory -- Modification of Management Methods for Transuranic Waste Characterization at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) adequately addresses the environmental effects of a waste management proposal for installing and operating modular units for the characterization of transuranic (TRU) waste1 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area (TA)-54, Area G, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. Council on Environmental Quality regulations at Title 40, Section 1502.9 (c) of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9[c]) require federal agencies to prepare a supplement to an EIS when an agency makes substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns or there are circumstances or information relevant to concerns and bearing on the proposed action or its impacts. This SA is prepared in accordance with Section 10 CFR 1021.314(c) of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) regulations for NEPA implementation stating that ''When it is unclear whether or not an EIS supplement is required, DOE shall prepare a Supplement Analysis.'' This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of the waste management program evaluated in the SWEIS with those of a proposal that would change the approach of a portion of this management program. It also provides an explanation of any differences between the proposed action and activities described in the previous SWEIS analysis. DOE proposes to expedite the shipment of legacy TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The Cerro Grande Fire in 2000 and events of September 11, 2001, have focused attention on the potential risk to the public and the credible security hazard posed by the amount of plutonium stored above ground at LANL and the increased necessity to safeguard our nation's nuclear waste. The safest place for defense-generated TRU waste has been determined to be DOE

  4. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudin, M.J.; Garcia, R.S.

    1992-02-01

    This volume serves as an introduction to the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series. This report includes discussions of radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha-emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than five years). Each report includes information regarding radiological and chemical characteristics of specific radionuclides. Information is also included discussing waste streams and waste forms that may contain each radionuclide, and radionuclide behavior in the environment and in the human body. Not all radionuclides commonly found at low-level radioactive waste sites are included in this report. The discussion in this volume explains the rationale of the radionuclide selection process

  5. In situ vitrification program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loehr, C.A.; Merrill, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    A program to demonstrate the viability of in situ vitrification (ISV) technology in remediating a buried mixed transuranic (TRU) waste site is under way at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The application of the technology to buried waste is being evaluated as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) feasibility study. The ISV thermal treatment process converts contaminated soil into a chemically inert and stable glass and crystalline product. The process uses joule heating, accomplished by applying electric potential to electrodes that are placed in the soil to initiate and maintain soil melting. Organic contaminants in the soil are destroyed or removed while inorganic contaminants, including radionuclides, are incorporated into the stable, glass-like product or volatilized. Off-gases are collected in a confinement hood over the melt area and processed through an off-gas treatment system. The paper illustrates and describes the ISV process

  6. In-Situ Grouting Treatability Study for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Subsurface Disposal Area-Transuranic Pits and Trenches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G. G.; Jessmore, J. J.; Sehn, A. L.; Miller, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    At the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) treatability study is being performed to examine the technology of in situ grouting for final in situ disposal of buried mixed transuranic (TRU) waste. At the INEEL, there is over 56,000 cubic meters of waste commingled with a similar amount of soil in a shallow (3-5 m) land burial referred to as Waste Area Group 7-13/14. Since this buried waste has been declared on the National Priorities List under CERCLA, it is being managed as a superfund site. Under CERCLA, options for this waste include capping and continued monitoring, retrieval and ex situ management of the retrieved waste, in situ stabilization by vitrification or grouting, in situ thermal dissorption, or some combination of these options. In situ grouting involves injecting grout at high pressures (400 bars) directly into the waste to create a solid monolith. The in situ grouting process is expected to both stabilize the waste against subsidence and provide containment against migration of waste to the Snake River Plain Aquifer lying 150-200 m below the waste. The treatability study involves bench testing, implementability testing, and field testing. The bench testing was designed to pick three grouts from six candidate grouts for the implementability field testing in full scale which were designed to down-select from those three grouts to one grout for use in a full-scale field demonstration of the technology in a simulated test pit. During the bench testing, grouts were evaluated for durability using American Nuclear Society 16.1 Leach Protocol as well as evaluating the effect on physical parameters such as hydraulic conductivity and compressive strength due to the presence of interferences such as soil, organic sludge, and nitrate salts. During full-scale implementability testing, three grouts were evaluated for groutability and monolith formation

  7. National Kidney Disease Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Living Tips About WIN NIDDK Information Clearinghouses National Kidney Disease Education Program Improving the understanding, detection, and ... Group Learn more about Working Groups Learn about Kidney Disease Find information for people with or at ...

  8. Transuranic elements in terrestrial animals and the environment: an introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    This discussion provides background information to the session on the ''Transuranic Elements in Terrestrial Animals.'' Briefly outlined are some of the historical events leading to the introduction and dispersion of the transuranic elements into the biosphere, to the establishment of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG), and to the studies conducted by the Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory (EMSL-LV) and the University of Nevada-Las Vegas involving the transuranics distributed by the ''safety shots'' and the nuclear weapons testing program at the Nevada Test Site and the Tonopah Test Range. These studies are described in relation to the overall objectives of the NAEG program. Other potential sources of the transuranic radionuclides are also discussed

  9. Polymer solidification national program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1993-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed several new and innovative polymer processes for the solidification of low-level radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes streams. Polyethylene and modified sulfur cement solidification technologies have undergone steady, gradual development at BNL over the past nine years. During this time they have progressed through each of the stages necessary for logical technology maturation: from process conception, parameter optimization, waste form testing, evaluation of long-term durability, economic analysis, and scale-up feasibility. This technology development represents a significant investment which can potentially provide DOE with both short- and long-term savings

  10. Los Alamos transuranic waste size reduction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briesmeister, A.; Harper, J.; Reich, B.; Warren, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    To facilitate disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste, Los Alamos National Laboratory designed and constructed the Size Reduction Facility (SRF) during the period 1977 to 1981. This report summarizes the engineering development, installation, and early test operations of the SRF. The facility incorporates a large stainless steel enclosure fitted with remote handling and cutting equipment to obtain an estimated 4:1 volume reduction of gloveboxes and other bulky metallic wastes

  11. Los Alamos transuranic waste size reduction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briesmeister, A.; Harper, J.; Reich, B.; Warren, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    A transuranic (TRU) Waste Size Reduction Facility (SRF) was designed and constructed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory during the period of 1977 to 1981. This paper summarizes the engineering development, installation, and early test operations of the SRF. The facility incorporates a large stainless steel enclosure fitted with remote handling and cutting equipment to obtain an estimated 4:1 volume reduction of gloveboxes and other bulky metallic wastes

  12. Product traceability and quality as applied to the united states transuranic and high-level waste repository programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, S.Y.; Orrell, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    As with any repository program, predictions of the performance of a site over very long time frames may often meet with skepticism from the public and decision-makers, such as regulatory and governmental agencies. Experience at the WIPP and the YMP indicate that demonstrating the defensibility of data, conceptual models, computer codes, and numerical analyses is critical. Five overarching principles have been found to be the basis of a technically and publicly acceptable repository. The principles are traceability, transparency, reproducibility, retrievability, and reviews. - Traceability allows one to understand the source and justification of data and other input that generate conclusions. - Transparency allows one to follow the logic, calculations, and other operations that produce results. - Reproducibility allows one to reconstruct the results without recourse to the originator of the information. - Retrievability allows one to retrieve documentation that demonstrate these overarching principles. - Reviews ensure that the work is technically acceptable, complete, and accurate. This paper discusses how these principles are applied to the WIPP and the YMP. By setting up quality assurance and management controls (e.g., procedures, audits, peer reviews) these principles are implemented. Without successfully applying these principles the WIPP would not have gone from research to industrial maturity. The YMP is ensuring that these are implemented for activities that support licensing. Any repository program concerned with demonstrating defensibility to the public and regulators would do well by incorporating traceability, transparency, reproducibility, retrievability, and reviews into their program. (authors)

  13. Expert system for transuranic waste assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoolalian, M.L.; Gibbs, A.; Kuhns, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Transuranic wastes are generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as a result of routine production of nuclear materials. These wastes contain Pu-238 and Pu-239 and are placed into lined 55-gallon waste drums. The drums are placed on monitored storage pads pending shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. A passive-active neutron (PAN) assay system is used to determine the mass of the radioactive material within the waste drums. Assay results are used to classify the wastes as either low-level or transuranic (TRU). During assays, the PAN assay system communicates with an IBM-AT computer. A Fortran computer program, called NEUT, controls and performs all data analyses. Unassisted, the NEUT program cannot adequately interpret assay results. To eliminate this limitation, an expert system shell was used to write a new algorithm, called the Transuranic Expert System (TRUX), to drive the NEUT program and add decision making capabilities for analysis of the assay results. The TRUX knowledge base was formulated by consulting with human experts in the field of neutron assay, by direct experimentation on the PAN assay system, and by observing operations on a daily basis. TRUX, with its improved ability to interpret assay results, has eliminated the need for close supervision by a human expert, allowing skilled technicians to operate the PAN assay system. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  14. Expert system for transuranic waste assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoolalian, M.L.; Gibbs, A.; Kuhns, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    Transuranic wastes are generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as a result of routine production of nuclear materials. These wastes contain Pu-238 and Pu-239 and are placed into lined 55-gallon waste drums. The drums are placed on monitored storage pads pending shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. A passive-active neutron (PAN) assay system is used to determine the mass of the radioactive material within the waste drums. Assay results are used to classify the wastes as either low-level or transuranic (TRU). During assays, the PAN assay system communicates with an IBM-AT computer. A Fortran computer program, called NEUT, controls and performs all data analyses. Unassisted, the NEUT program cannot adequately interpret assay results. To eliminate this limitation, an expert system shell was used to write a new algorithm, called the Transuranic Expert System (TRUX), to drive the NEUT program and add decision making capabilities for analysis of the assay results. The TRUX knowledge base was formulated by consulting with human experts in the field of neutron assay, by direct experimentation on the PAN assay system, and by observing operations on a daily basis. TRUX, with its improved ability to interpret assay results, has eliminated the need for close supervision by a human expert, allowing skilled technicians to operate the PAN assay system. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  15. Transuranic elements and nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, V.T.

    1974-01-01

    The contamination of oceans and marine life by transuranic elements (elements of atomic number greater than 92) is the main concern of this paper. Wastes of three different types, low-level, intermediate-level, and high-level, are considered. Fallout of Pu and other transuranics is discussed as it affects marine biogeochemistry and geochemistry. Different paths of absorption or uptake under various conditions of release are pointed out in some detail. The transfer of radioactivity to mammals from marine sources is considered in some detail. Waste disposal practices at Windscale are reviewed. It is concluded that the problems associated with transuranic wastes in oceans and marine life are very complex. Monitoring of waste release and uptake is concluded to not be enough. Each situation of release of transuranics to the environment should be treated as an experiment and milked for all the information that it can reveal. The tremendous expenditure of money and manpower necessary for such an undertaking is stressed

  16. Alternative disposal options for transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.G.

    1994-01-01

    Three alternative concepts are proposed for the final disposal of stored and retrieved buried transuranic waste. These proposed options answer criticisms of the existing U.S. Department of Energy strategy of directly disposing of stored transuranic waste in deep, geological salt formations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The first option involves enhanced stabilization of stored waste by thermal treatment followed by convoy transportation and internment in the existing WIPP facility. This concept could also be extended to retrieved buried waste with proper permitting. The second option involves in-state, in situ internment using an encapsulating lens around the waste. This concept applies only to previously buried transuranic waste. The third option involves sending stored and retrieved waste to the Nevada Test Site and configuring the waste around a thermonuclear device from the U.S. or Russian arsenal in a specially designed underground chamber. The thermonuclear explosion would transmute plutonium and disassociate hazardous materials while entombing the waste in a national sacrifice area

  17. Documentation of acceptable knowledge for LANL Plutonium Facility transuranic waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, A.J.; Gruetzmacher, K.; Foxx, C.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1998-01-01

    Characterization of transuranic waste from the LANL Plutonium Facility for certification and transportation to WIPP includes the use of acceptable knowledge as specified in the WIPP Quality Assurance Program Plan. In accordance with a site-specific procedure, documentation of acceptable knowledge for retrievably stored and currently generated transuranic waste streams is in progress at LANL. A summary overview of the transuranic waste inventory is complete and documented in the Sampling Plan. This document also includes projected waste generation, facility missions, waste generation processes, flow diagrams, times, and material inputs. The second part of acceptable knowledge documentation consists of assembling more detailed acceptable knowledge information into auditable records and is expected to require several years to complete. These records for each waste stream must support final assignment of waste matrix parameters, EPA hazardous waste numbers, and radionuclide characterization. They must also include a determination whether waste streams are defense waste streams for compliance with the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act. The LANL Plutonium Facility's mission is primarily plutonium processing in basic special nuclear material (SNM) research activities to support national defense and energy programs. It currently has about 100 processes ranging from SNM recovery from residues to development of plutonium 238 heat sources for space applications. Its challenge is to characterize and certify waste streams from such diverse and dynamic operations using acceptable knowledge. This paper reports the progress on the certification of the first of these waste streams to the WIPP WAC

  18. Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Qualit Assurance Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan required each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site that characterizes transuranic waste to be sent the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan that addresses applicable requirements specified in the quality assurance project plan (QAPP)

  19. Remote-handled transuranic waste study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a research and development facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes generated from the Nation's defense activities. The WIPP disposal inventory will include up to 250,000 cubic feet of TRU wastes classified as remote handled (RH). The remaining inventory will include contact-handled (CH) TRU wastes, which characteristically have less specific activity (radioactivity per unit volume) than the RH-TRU wastes. The WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA), Public Law 102-579, requires a study of the effect of RH-TRU waste on long-term performance. This RH-TRU Waste Study has been conducted to satisfy the requirements defined by the LWA and is considered by the DOE to be a prudent exercise in the compliance certification process of the WIPP repository. The objectives of this study include: conducting an evaluation of the impacts of RH-TRU wastes on the performance assessment (PA) of the repository to determine the effects of Rh-TRU waste as a part of the total WIPP disposal inventory; and conducting a comparison of CH-TRU and RH-TRU wastes to assess the differences and similarities for such issues as gas generation, flammability and explosiveness, solubility, and brine and geochemical interactions. This study was conducted using the data, models, computer codes, and information generated in support of long-term compliance programs, including the WIPP PA. The study is limited in scope to post-closure repository performance and includes an analysis of the issues associated with RH-TRU wastes subsequent to emplacement of these wastes at WIPP in consideration of the current baseline design. 41 refs

  20. Making transuranic assay measurements using modern controllers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuckertz, T.H.; Caldwell, J.T.; Medvick, P.A.; Kunz, W.E.; Hastings, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes methodology and computer-controlled instrumentation developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory that accurately performs nondestructive assays of large containers bearing transuranic wastes and nonradioactive matrix materials. These assay systems can measure fissile isotopes with 1-mg sensitivity and spontaneous neutron-emitting isotopes at a 10-mg sensitivity. The assays are performed by neutron interrogation, detection, and counting in a custom assay chamber. An International Business Machines Personal Computer (IBM-PC) is used to control the CAMAC-based instrumentation system that acquires the assay data. 6 refs., 7 figs

  1. Hydrothermal processing of transuranic contaminated combustible waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelow, S.J.; Worl, L.; Harradine, D.; Padilla, D.; McInroy, R.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments at Los Alamos National Laboratory have demonstrated the usefulness of hydrothermal processing for the disposal of a wide variety of transuranic contaminated combustible wastes. This paper provides an overview of the implementation and performance of hydrothermal treatment for concentrated salt solutions, explosives, propellants, organic solvents, halogenated solvents, and laboratory trash, such as paper and plastics. Reaction conditions vary from near ambient temperatures and pressure to over 1000degC and 100 MPa pressure. Studies involving both radioactive and non-radioactive waste simulants are discussed. (author)

  2. Treatment strategies for transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Swanson, J.L.; Ross, W.A.; Allen, R.P.; Yasutake, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of treatment options or strategies for transuranic wastes expected to be generated at a commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Six potential options were analyzed, ranging from no treatment to maximum volume reduction and high quality waste forms. Economics for the total management of these (treatment, transportation, disposal) indicate life-cycle savings for extensive treatment are as high as $1.7 billion for 70,000 MTU. Evaluations of the waste processing and waste forms support the selection of a number of the extensive waste treatments. It is concluded that there are significant incentives for extensive treatment of transuranic wastes

  3. Treatment strategies for transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Ross, W.A.; Swanson, J.L.; Allen, R.P.; Yasutake, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of treatment options or strategies for transuranic wastes expected to be generated at a commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Six potential options were analyzed, ranging from no treatment to maximum volume reduction and high quality waste forms. Economics for the total management of these wastes (treatment, transportation, disposal) indicate life-cycle savings for extensive treatment are as high as $1.7 billion for 70,000 MTU. Evaluations of the waste processing and waste forms support the selection of a number of the extensive waste treatments. It is concluded that there are significant incentives for extensive treatment of transuranic wastes

  4. Structural analysis of the TRansUranic PACkage Transporter (TRUPACT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamoreaux, G.H.; Sutherland, S.H.; Duffey, T.A.

    1981-07-01

    The TRansUranic PACkage Transporter (TRUPACT) is a Type B container under development at the Transportation Technology Center, Sandia National Laboratory, for use in the transportation of contact-handled transuranic waste. This report describes the numerical analyses of the container's response to end-on, side-on, and center of gravity over corner impacts on an unyielding surface following a 9 m free fall. The results of the analyses are compared to available experimental data. In general, the analytical predictions and experimental comparisons confirm the validity of the TRUPACT design concept

  5. Contact-handled transuranic transportation system structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamoreaux, G.H.; Romesberg, L.E.; Sutherland, S.H.; Duffey, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    The Transuranic Package Transporter (TRUPACT) is a Type B overpack being developed for contact-handled transuranic waste. End-on, side-on, and corner impacts of the loaded TRUPACT due to a 9 m drop onto an unyielding surface have been analyzed. In each case the analyses progressed from simplified hand approaches to successively more complex finite element calculations. The first analysis of each series represents the hand calculations which were carried out to obtain initial thicknesses of foam. The remaining analyses were performed using the dynamic and nonlinear analysis capabilities of ADINA, a structural analysis finite element computer program

  6. Transuranic contaminated waste form characterization and data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McArthur, W.C.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1980-07-01

    This report outlines the sources, quantities, characteristics and treatment of transuranic wastes in the United States. This document serves as part of the data base necessary to complete preparation and initiate implementation of transuranic wastes, waste forms, waste container and packaging standards and criteria suitable for inclusion in the present NRC waste management program. No attempt is made to evaluate or analyze the suitability of one technology over another. Indeed, by the nature of this report, there is little critical evaluation or analysis of technologies because such analysis is only appropriate when evaluating a particular application or transuranic waste streams. Due to fiscal restriction, the data base is developed from a myriad of technical sources and does not necessarily contain operating experience and the current status of all technologies. Such an effort was beyond the scope of this report

  7. Transuranic waste form characterization and data base. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Transuranic Waste Form Characterization and Data Base (Volume 1) provides a wide range of information from which a comprehensive data base can be established and from which standards and criteria can be developed for the present NRC waste management program. Supplementary information on each of the areas discussed in Volume 1 is presented in Appendices A through K (Volumes 2 and 3). The structure of the study (Volume 1) is outlined and appendices of Volumes 2 and 3 correlate with each main section of the report. The Executive Summary reviews the sources, quantities, characteristics and treatment of transuranic wastes in the United States. Due to the variety of potential treatment processes for transuranic wastes, the end products for long-term storage may have corresponding variations in quantities and characteristics

  8. Containment of transuranic contamination at the early waste retrieval project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harness, J.L.; McKinney, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    On July 26, 1976, while retrieving buried transuranic waste under the Early Waste Retrieval Program, a corroded 55-gallon 17H drum was retrieved. When uprighted, several liters of liquid escaped from the drum. This liquid was contaminated with transuranics, principally Pu-239, Am-241, and some Pu-238. As a result of the spread of this contamination in the Operating Area Confinement, six working days were required to decontaminate the area. At no time did the contamination escape the interior of the Operating Area Confinement building, and no contamination to personnel resulted from this occurrence, nor was a hazard presented to the general public. The facility was designed and constructed to contain the transuranic contamination resulting from such an occurrence. Proper prior planning and personnel training prevented the contamination occurrence from becoming a major event. This report details the occurrence, the recovery, and the information obtained from this event

  9. Characterization of transuranic solid wastes from a plutonium processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulkin, R.

    1975-06-01

    Transuranic-contaminated wastes generated in the processing areas of the Plutonium Chemistry and Metallurgy Group at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) were studied in detail to identify their chemical and physical composition. Nondestructive Assay (NDA) equipment was developed to measure transuranic activity at the 10-nCi/g level in low-density residues typically found in room-generated waste. This information will supply the Waste Management Program with a more positive means of identifying concerns in waste storage and the challenge of optimizing the system of waste form, packaging, and environment of the storage area for 20-yr retrievable waste. A positive method of measuring transuranic activity in waste at the 10-nCi/g level will eliminate the need for administrative control in a sensitive area, and will provide the economic advantage of minimizing the volume of waste stored as retrievable waste. (U.S.)

  10. Transuranic contaminated waste form characterization and data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McArthur, W.C.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1980-07-01

    This report outlines the sources, quantities, characteristics and treatment of transuranic wastes in the United States. This document serves as part of the data base necessary to complete preparation and initiate implementation of transuranic wastes, waste forms, waste container and packaging standards and criteria suitable for inclusion in the present NRC waste management program. No attempt is made to evaluate or analyze the suitability of one technology over another. Indeed, by the nature of this report, there is little critical evaluation or analysis of technologies because such analysis is only appropriate when evaluating a particular application or transuranic waste streams. Due to fiscal restriction, the data base is developed from a myriad of technical sources and does not necessarily contain operating experience and the current status of all technologies. Such an effort was beyond the scope of this report.

  11. Dismantling of transuranic contaminated facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, P.

    1985-01-01

    The dismantling of transuranic contaminated facilities raises specific problems. A large part of these problems relates to the management of the waste resulting from dismantling. From the experience gained in the different centers CEA and COGEMA it appears that there are industrial solutions in the group CEA and that an engineering company such as SGN can export them [fr

  12. Intercomparison of transuranics in sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, K.

    1981-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a recent intercomparison of transuranic analyses in Nordic sediments undertaken by five laboratories. Five different samplers were tested to determine their consistency and utility. Plutonium and americium were determined in all the samples and the analysis of variance is discussed. (author)

  13. Transuranic behaviour in marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, V.T.

    1982-01-01

    This document summarizes the following specific studies concerning the transuranic behaviour in marine environment: 1. Radionuclides in deep sea amphipods; 2. Actinides, 55 Fe and 137 Cs in N. pacific water columns; 3. Vertical profile of artificial radionuclide concentrations in the central Arctic Ocean; 4. Bioturbation and the distributions of fallout radionuclides in Pacific Ocean sediments

  14. Developing an institutional strategy for transporting defense transuranic waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero, J.V.; Kresny, H.S.

    1986-01-01

    In late 1988, the US Department of Energy (DOE) expects to begin emplacing transuranic waste materials in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), an R and D facility to demonstrate the safe disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from defense program activities. Transuranic wastes are production-related materials, e.g., clothes, rags, tools, and similar items. These materials are contaminated with alpha-emitting transuranium radionuclides with half-lives of > 20 yr and concentrations > 100 nCi/g. Much of the institutional groundwork has been done with local communities and the State of New Mexico on the siting and construction of the facility. A key to the success of the emplacement demonstration, however, will be a qualified transportation system together with institutional acceptance of the proposed shipments. The DOE's Defense Transuranic Waste Program, and its contractors, has lead responsibility for achieving this goal. The Joint Integration Office (JIO) of the DOE, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, is taking the lead in implementing an integrated strategy for assessing nationwide institutional concerns over transportation of defense transuranic wastes and in developing ways to resolve or mitigate these concerns. Parallel prototype programs are under way to introduce both the new packaging systems and the institutional strategy to interested publics and organizations

  15. Analyses for some transuranic and natural radionuclides in the environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    There is considerable present and expected future interest in the contamination of the environment with transuranic elements, particularly plutonium and americium. In addition, the alpha-emitting natural radionuclides are the usual standard of comparison for such transuranic element contamination. The present paper reviews the quality of data available for evaluating the distribution of transuranic elements and some natural radioactive elements in the environment. The overall quality cannot be documented for most programs and the data that are available indicate that the quality is poor. The fact that a few programs maintain high quality analyses indicates that the cause is poor analytical work rather than poor methods of analysis. (author)

  16. Optimizing transuranic waste management-challenges and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triay, I.R.; Wu, C.F.; Moody, D.C.; Jennings, S.G.

    2002-01-01

    The opening of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste in March of 1999, the granting of the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit in November 1999, and over two years of operational experience have demonstrated the Department of Energy's (DOE'S) capability in closing the nuclear energy cycle. While these achievements resolved several scientific, engineering, regulatory and political issues, the DOE has identified a new set of challenges that represent opportunities for improving programmatic efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and operational safety in managing the nation's TRU waste. The DOE has recognized that the complex administrative and regulatory requirements for characterization, transportation and disposal of TRU waste are costly (1). A review by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) states that these requirements lead to inefficient waste characterization, handling and transportation operations that in turn can lead to unnecessary radiation exposure to workers without a commensurate decrease in risk to the public and the environment (2). This paper provides an overview of the status of the WJPP repository, explains the principles of the proposed commercial business approach, and describes some of the proposed major enhancements of the TRU waste transportation systems. The DOE is developing a remote-handled (RH) waste program to enable emplacement of RH waste at WPP. This program includes appropriate facility modifications and regulatory changes (3).

  17. Mobile/portable transuranic waste characterization systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory and a model for their use complex-wide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derr, E.D.; Harper, J.R.; Zygmunt, S.J.; Taggart, D.P.; Betts, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has implemented mobile and portable characterization and repackaging systems to characterize TRU waste in storage for ultimate shipment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM. These mobile systems are being used to characterize and repackage waste to meet the full requirements of the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) and the WIPP Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP). Mobile and portable characterization and repackaging systems are being used to supplement the capabilities and throughputs of existing facilities. Utilization of mobile systems is a key factor that is enabling LANL to: (1) reduce its TRU waste work-off schedule from 36 years to 8.5 years; (2) eliminate the need to construct a $70M+ TRU waste characterization facility; (3) have waste certified for shipment to WIPP when WIPP opens; (4) continue to ship TRU waste to WIPP at the rate of 5000 drums per year; and, (5) reduce overall costs by more than $200M. Aggressive implementation of mobile and portable systems throughout the DOE complex through a centralized-distributed services model will result in similar advantages complex-wide

  18. Analog elements for transuranic chemistries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weimer, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The analytical technique for measuring trace concentrations of the analog rare earth elements has been refined for optimal detection. The technique has been used to determine the rare earth concentrations in a series of geological and biological materials, including samples harvested from controlled lysimeter investigations. These studies have demonstrated that any of the trivalent rare earth elements may be used as analog elements for the trivalent transuranics, americium and curium

  19. Transuranic elements in marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, V.T.

    1975-04-01

    Transuranic elements are present in marine environments as a result of worldwide fallout, close-in fallout, the SNAP-9A burnup, pipeline disposal of reprocessing wastes, neutron capture by uranium in one-pass cooling-water reactors and the B-52 crash in Thule, Greenland. Distributions and movements of 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 241 Am, and 137 Cs from these introductions in the Atlantic Ocean are being studied partly because the transuranic elements themselves are geochemically interesting, partly because they appear to serve as tracers for specific oceanographic processes, and partly because of concern that man is faced with the problem of disposal of rapidly increasing amounts of transuranics as radioactive waste, and that we must be able, soon, to predict the fates and the effects of those amounts that reach the coastal waters or the deep oceans. Plutonium and americium are widely distributed in the oceans as a result of man's activities. Both appear to be more mobile than expected, and Pu shows little behavior in these environments that had been predicted from laboratory studies. Although their associations with biological material seem to be most striking for rooted plants or Sargassum, it is too premature to dismiss the possibility of their being a real hazard to marine life

  20. Transuranic Behavior in Soils and Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildung, R.E.; Garland, T.R.; Cataldo, D.A.; Rogers, J.E.; McFadden, K.M.; McNair, V.M.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The principal objectives of these investigations are to determine (1) the potential for alteration of transuranic solubility through formation of transuranic complexes in soil and the role of the soil microflora in this process, (2) the extent of uptake nd translocation by plants and the sites of plant deposition of transuranics or their complexes, (3) the bond types and chemical forms of transuranics or their metabolites in microbes, plant tissues and soils, (4) the influence of soil properties, environmental conditions and cropping on these processes, and (5) the retention of airborne pollutants by plant foliage and their subsequent absorption by leaves and transport to seeds and roots

  1. Processing of transuranic waste at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daugherty, B.A.; Gruber, L.M.; Mentrup, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    Transuranic wastes at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) have been retrievably stored on concrete pads since early 1972. This waste is stored primarily in 55-gallon drums and large carbon steel boxes. Higher activity drums are placed in concrete culverts. In support of a National Program to consolidate and permanently dispose of this waste, a major project is planned at SRP to retrieve and process this waste. This project, the TRU Waste Facility (TWF), will provide equipment and processes to retrieve TRU waste from 20-year retrievable storage and prepare it for permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) geological repository in New Mexico. This project is an integral part of the SRP Long Range TRU Waste Management Program to reduce the amount of TRU waste stored at SRP. The TWF is designed to process 15,000 cubic feet of retrieved waste and 6200 cubic feet of newly generated waste each year of operation. This facility is designed to minimize direct personnel contact with the waste using state-of-the-art remotely operated equipment

  2. Hanford transuranic analytical capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, C.B.

    1995-01-01

    With the current DOE focus on ER/WM programs, an increase in the quantity of waste samples that requires detailed analysis is forecasted. One of the prime areas of growth is the demand for DOE environmental protocol analyses of TRU waste samples. Currently there is no laboratory capacity to support analysis of TRU waste samples in excess of 200 nCi/gm. This study recommends that an interim solution be undertaken to provide these services. By adding two glove boxes in room 11A of 222S the interim waste analytical needs can be met for a period of four to five years or until a front end facility is erected at or near the 222-S facility. The yearly average of samples is projected to be approximately 600 samples. The figure has changed significantly due to budget changes and has been downgraded from 10,000 samples to the 600 level. Until these budget and sample projection changes become firmer, a long term option is not recommended at this time. A revision to this document is recommended by March 1996 to review the long term option and sample projections

  3. RETRIEVING SUSPECT TRANSURANIC WASTE FROM THE HANFORD BURIAL GROUNDS PROGRESS PLANS AND CHALLENGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FRENCH, M.S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the scope and status of the program for retrieval of suspect transuranic (TRU) waste stored in the Hanford Site low-level burial grounds. Beginning in 1970 and continuing until the late 1980's, waste suspected of containing significant quantities of transuranic isotopes was placed in ''retrievable'' storage in designated modules in the Hanford burial grounds, with the intent that the waste would be retrieved when a national repository for disposal of such waste became operational. Approximately 15,000 cubic meters of waste, suspected of being TRU, was placed in storage modules in four burial grounds. With the availability of the national repository (the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), retrieval of the suspect TRU waste is now underway. Retrieval efforts, to date, have been conducted in storage modules that contain waste, which is in general, contact-handled, relatively new (1980's and later), is stacked in neat, engineered configurations, and has a relatively good record of waste characteristics. Even with these optimum conditions, retrieval personnel have had to deal with a large number of structurally degraded containers, radioactive contamination issues, and industrial hazards (including organic vapors). Future retrieval efforts in older, less engineered modules are expected to present additional hazards and difficult challenges

  4. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    2000-01-01

    As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In

  5. Transuranic behavior in soils and plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildung, R.E.; Garland, T.R.; Cataldo, D.A.; Rogers, J.E.; McFadden, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    The principal objective of this study is to gather information about soil, plant, and foliar interaction factors that influence the availability of transuranics to agricultural plants and animals. This paper discusses plant processes which influence transport across the plant root membrane and foliar surfaces, and the form and sites of deposition of transuranic elements in mature plants

  6. Transuranic element behavior in soils and plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildung, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The principal objective of this study is to define soil, plant, and foliar interaction processes that influence the availability of transuranic elements to agricultural plants and animals as a basis for improved modeling and dose-assessment. Major areas of emphasis are: (1) soil and soil-microbial processes that influence the concentration and form of transuranic elements in soil solutions and availability to the plant root with time; (2) deposition and plant interception of airborne submicronic particles containing transuranic elements and their susceptibility to leaching; (3) plant processes that influence transport across plant root membrane and foliar surfaces, as well as the form and sites of deposition of transuranic elements in mature plants; and (4) the integrated effect of soil and plant processes on transuranic element availability to, and form in, animals that consume plants

  7. National Waste Terminal Storage Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerby, C.D.

    1976-01-01

    Objective of this program is to provide facilities (Federal repositories) in various deep geologic formations at several locations in USA for the safe disposal of commercial radioactive waste from power reactors. The four types of containerized waste are described. The steps for developing the repositories are outlined

  8. Root uptake of transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    The uptake of elements by plant roots is one of the important pathways of entry of many elements into the food chain of man. Data are cited showing plutonium concentration ratios, plant/soil, ranging from 10 -10 to 10 -3 . Concentration ratios for americium range from 10 -7 to 10 +1 . Limited experiments with curium and neptunium indicate that root uptake of curium is similar to that of americium and that plant uptake of neptunium is substantially larger than that of curium and americium. The extreme ranges of concentration ratios cited for plutonium and americium are due to a number of causes. Experimental conditions such as very intensive cropping will lead to abnormally high concentration ratios. In some experiments, addition of chelating agents markedly increased plant root uptake of transuranic elements. Particle size and composition of the source material influenced uptake of the transuranics by plants. Translocation within the plant, and soil factors such as pH and organic matter content, all affect concentration ratios

  9. National Status and Trends: Mussel Watch Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Mussel Watch is the longest running continuous chemical contaminant monitoring program in U.S. coastal and Great Lakes waters and was created in response to concerns...

  10. National Estuary Program Study Area Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — There are 28 National Estuary Programs (NEPs) in the U.S.that implement habitat protection and restoration projects with their partners. This work takes place within...

  11. National Cardiac Device Surveillance Program Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The National Cardiac Device Surveillance Program Database supports the Eastern Pacemaker Surveillance Center (EPSC) staff in its function of monitoring some 11,000...

  12. Get Your Automotive Program Nationally Certified!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Patricia A.

    2000-01-01

    Automotive programs that nationally certified enhance student recruitment and give students better employment opportunities. Technicians who earn the Automotive Service Excellence credential have joined the ranks of professionals in the automotive service industry. (Author/JOW)

  13. Department of Transportation -- Exemption for using the Transuranic Package Transporter-I (TRUPACT-I) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49, Part 107, Subpart B -- Exemptions, 107-103 Application for Exemption)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyacke, M.J.; Macdonald, R.J.

    1992-08-01

    Exemption from specific regulations is being sought for the Transuranic Package Transporter Model I (TRUPACT-I) container. The design has successfully undergone extensive testing of a quarter-scale model and a full-scale prototype of the container. Results from the analysis and testing are in the TRUPACT-1 Safely Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), GA-Al8695/SAND 87-7104 (TTC0735), April 1987 (see Attachment 1). The container was never certified or used because of questions raised during the certification process. Two features of the container design failed to satisfy the regulations for Type B packaging. First, the design utilizes a venting system to control internal and external pressures; this venting system is not allowed by the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Parts 71(h) and 71.51(b) [10 CFR 71.(h) and 71.51(b)]. Second, the maximum quantity fissile material proposed to be hauled in TRUPACT-I exceeded the limits in 10 CFR 71.63(b) for a single-containment container. To correct these design deficiencies, the vents would be plugged during transport, and the maximum quantity of fissile material would be limited to the allowables for a single-containment container. An engineering analysis showed that the container could safely transport radioactive material within the boundaries of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) with the vent system plugged (see Attachment 2). However, some of the requirements for determining pressure on a container need to be changed (i.e., exempted) to reflect conditions unique to the INEL. The following are the requirements needing to be changed for INEL conditions, variances being sought, and justifications for the variances

  14. Design considerations for incineration of transuranic-contaminated solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory has established a development program to evaluate alternate production-level (100-200 lb/hr throughput) volume reduction processes for transuranic-contaminated solid waste. The first process selected for installation and study is based on controlled-air incineration. Design considerations leading to selection of feed preparation, incineration, residue removal, and off-gas cleanup components and their respective radioactive containment provisions will be presented

  15. National Toxic Substance Incidents Program (NTSIP)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-02-03

    This podcast gives an overview of the three components of the National Toxic Substance Incidents Program: state surveillance, national database, and response teams.  Created: 2/3/2011 by Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.   Date Released: 2/3/2011.

  16. National Reform Programs in Local Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelholt, Morten; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    . In particular, we emphasize the practices in which national strategic formulations are legitimized and accepted or abandoned by the actors involved. Building on a case study conducted over a two-year time span, we show how a local actor engages with and promotes a national reform program by evoking a discourse...

  17. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-level Waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-06-30

    The DOE proposes to construct, operate, and decontaminate/decommission a TRU Waste Treatment Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The four waste types that would be treated at the proposed facility would be remote-handled TRU mixed waste sludge, liquid low-level waste associated with the sludge, contact-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids, and remote-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids. The mixed waste sludge and some of the solid waste contain metals regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and may be classified as mixed waste. This document analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with five alternatives--No Action, the Low-Temperature Drying Alternative (Preferred Alternative), the Vitrification Alternative, the Cementation Alternative, and the Treatment and Waste Storage at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Alternative.

  18. A summary of the environmental restoration program Retrieval Demonstration Project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQuary, J.

    1991-01-01

    This document summarizes the of retrieval techniques developed to excavate buried transuranic (TRU) mixed waste from the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The SDA is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). 31 refs., 1 fig

  19. Remote-handled transuranic system assessment appendices. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    Volume 2 of this report contains six appendices to the report: Inventory and generation of remote-handled transuranic waste; Remote-handled transuranic waste site storage; Characterization of remote-handled transuranic waste; RH-TRU waste treatment alternatives system analysis; Packaging and transportation study; and Remote-handled transuranic waste disposal alternatives.

  20. Remote-handled transuranic system assessment appendices. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    Volume 2 of this report contains six appendices to the report: Inventory and generation of remote-handled transuranic waste; Remote-handled transuranic waste site storage; Characterization of remote-handled transuranic waste; RH-TRU waste treatment alternatives system analysis; Packaging and transportation study; and Remote-handled transuranic waste disposal alternatives

  1. Transuranic package transporter (TRUPACT) system design status and operational support equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johanson, N.W.; Meyer, R.J.; Romesberg, L.E.; Pope, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    A program was initiated in the late 1970's at Sandia National Laboratories to develop an efficient, safe, reliable, and cost-effective transportation packaging system for the carriage of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. It is anticipated that eventually a family of TRUPACT (TRansUranic PACKage Transporter) systems having varied dimensions and weight/volume capacities will be needed by the DOE to transport different CH-TRU waste forms. Each TRUPACT system will be a Type B packaging. Large quantities of CH-TRU wastes having many different forms, isotopic contents, and contained in a variety of waste containers have been, are being, and will continue to be produced and stored for ultimate disposal. Packaging design is being closely coordinated with facility designs to ensure the rapid and economic integration of the TRUPACT system. The first packaging developed for transport by truck or rail (bimodal) is designated TRUPACT-I and will become operational in 1984. This paper provides an overview of progress on the TRUPACT-I design and details of equipment to be used for interfacing with users

  2. Hanford site implementation plan for buried, transuranic-contaminated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The GAO review of DOE's Defense Waste Management Plan (DWMP) identified deficiencies and provided recommendations. This report responds to the GAO recommendations with regard to the Hanford Site. Since the issuance of the DWMP, an extensive planning base has been developed for all high-level and transuranic waste at the Hanford Site. Thirty-three buried sites have been identified as possibly containing waste that can be classified as transuranic waste. Inventory reports and process flowsheets were used to provide an estimate of the radionuclide and hazardous chemical content of these sites and approximately 370 additional sites that can be classified as low-level waste. A program undertaken to characterize select sites suspected of having TRU waste to refine the inventory estimates. Further development and evaluation are ongoing to determine the appropriate remedial actions, with the objectives of balancing long-term risks with costs and complying with regulations. 18 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs

  3. A transuranic aerosol measurement system: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevo, C.T.; Kaifer, R.C.; Rueppel, D.W.; Delvasto, R.M.; Biermann, A.H.; Phelps, P.L.

    1986-10-01

    We have completed the design, fabrication, and assembly of a computer-based prototype system for the measurement of transuranic aerosols in the workplace and environment. This system (called WOTAMS for Workplace Transuranic Aerosol Measurement System) incorporates two detectors: (1) an in-line solid-state alpha detector that sends out an alarm the moment a transuranic release occurs, and (2) an in-vacuum detector that increases off-line-analysis sensitivity. The in-line sensitivity of the system is better than 5.0 MPC-h, and the in-vacuum sensitivity exceeds 0.5 MPC-h. 5 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  4. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria with in which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP

  5. Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-09-09

    The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria within which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

  6. Characterization of transuranic elements at environmental levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgington, D.N.

    1981-01-01

    This paper summarizes current understanding of transuranic speciation in natural waters. Several predictive models describing the behaviour of these elements in both marine and fresh-water systems illustrate the importance of this information. (author)

  7. Some design aspects of transuranic field studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, R.O.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss some design aspects of transuranic field studies. Some of the principal steps in the design of such studies are given and illustrated using examples. This is followed by a review of sampling designs that have been used at nuclear detonation and safety-shot sites on the Nevada Test Site and elsewhere for estimating spatial pattern and total amounts in soil. Some design aspects of ecosystem-type transuranic studies for estimating total amounts as well as movement of transuranics between ecosystem components are also discussed. Acceptance sampling using either attributes or measurements is considered as a possible approach for deciding whether to clean up a contaminated site. Three general guidelines for the design of efficient transuranic studies are presented

  8. National waste terminal storage program bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asher, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    In February 1976, the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) announced a greatly expanded waste management program for defense and commercial radioactive waste. In that announcement, ERDA indicated that the Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) of ERDA would have lead responsibility for overall coordination of the expanded commercial geologic disposal program and that an Office of Waste Isolation (OWI) would be created within Union Carbide Corporation-Nuclear Division (UCC-ND) with the responsibility for program management of that activity. This bibliography lists many of the documents authored since 1958 by UCC-ND's technical personnel, consultants, and subcontractors as part of the geologic waste disposal programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the current National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program. Future editions will contain new documents as well as other prior-year documents which, because of our schedule, we were unable to identify, locate, and include in this first edition. Longer-range plans include broadening the scope of coverage to include documents authored by other NWTS Program participants. This edition, as well as future editions, will list only those documents that have been processed through ERDA's Technical Information Center for public availability from the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, Virginia. Full reference and citation information appears only once, with various indexes provided for the convenience of the user. Report references are arranged by issuing organization with sequencing according to document numbers; references to journal articles and conference proceedings are arranged by issue date

  9. Transuranic contaminated waste functional definition and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1980-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine the problem(s) of TRU waste classification and to document the development of an easy-to-apply standard(s) to determine whether or not this waste package should be emplaced in a geologic repository for final disposition. Transuranic wastes are especially significant because they have long half-lives and some are rather radiotoxic. Transuranic radionuclides are primarily produced by single or multiple neutron capture by U-238 in fuel elements during the operation of a nuclear reactor. Reprocessing of spent fuel elements attempts to remove plutonium, but since the separation is not complete, the resulting high-activity liquids still contain some plutonium as well as other transuranics. Likewise, transuranic contamination of low-activity wastes also occurs when the transuranic materials are handled or processed, which is primarily at federal facilities involved in R and D and nuclear weapons production. Transuranics are persistent in the environment and, as a general rule, are strongly retained by soils. They are not easily transported through most food chains, although some reconcentration does take place in the aquatic food chain. They pose no special biological hazard to humans upon ingestion because they are weakly absorbed from the gastrointestional tract. A greater hazard results from inhalation since they behave like normal dust and fractionate accordingly

  10. NIST commitment to national MQA programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caswell, R.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The program of the Ionizing Radiation Division, Physics Laboratory is discussed, especially relating to standards, calibrations, and measurement quality assurance (MQA). The NIST program is {open_quotes}vertically integrated,{close_quotes} meaning that activities extend from fundamental research to measurement research to supplying services and data. Typical methods NIST uses to assure the quality of the national standards are presented. Some of the programs in x-ray, gamma-ray, electron, neutron, and radioactivity research which support MQA are presented. Examples are given of MQA activities.

  11. NIST commitment to national MQA programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caswell, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    The program of the Ionizing Radiation Division, Physics Laboratory is discussed, especially relating to standards, calibrations, and measurement quality assurance (MQA). The NIST program is open-quotes vertically integrated,close quotes meaning that activities extend from fundamental research to measurement research to supplying services and data. Typical methods NIST uses to assure the quality of the national standards are presented. Some of the programs in x-ray, gamma-ray, electron, neutron, and radioactivity research which support MQA are presented. Examples are given of MQA activities

  12. Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington TRU Solutions

    2006-12-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: • A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. • A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is “3.” The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR

  13. Transuranic element pathways to man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.G.

    1976-01-01

    Transfer to man of transuranic element contamination may occur by the inhalation or ingestion pathways. The measurements of globally dispersed fall-out radioactivity have provided pertinent data on the environmental behaviour of plutonium. Additional data may eventually become available for americium. From the measured and inferred concentrations of fall-out plutonium, the inhalation intake has been determined and the ICRP Task Group lung model used to estimate deposition in the lung and transfer to other body organs. The computed body burden reached a maximum of 4pCi in 1964 and is currently about 2.5pCi. A complete diet sampling has been conducted to determine ingestion intake. Plutonium concentration in food ranged from 0.01pCi/kg in shellfish to undetected (less than 0.0003pCi/kg) in milk. Annual intake in total diet is estimated to have been 1.6pCi in 1972. Low uptake by the gastrointestinal tract makes contribution to organ burdens from ingestion negligible. Long-term pathway considerations include plant uptake from the cumulative deposit in soil and resuspension. Downward movement in soil may limit the significance of these long-term pathway components. (author)

  14. Hanford transuranic storage corrosion review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.L.; Divine, J.R.

    1980-12-01

    The rate of atmospheric corrosion of the transuranic (TRU) waste drums at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Project, near Richland, Washington, was evaluated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The rate of corrosion is principally contingent upon the effects of humidity, airborne pollutants, and temperature. Results of the study indicate that actual penetration of barrels due to atmospheric corrosion will probably not occur within the 20-year specified recovery period. Several other US burial sites were surveyed, and it appears that there is sufficient uncertainty in the available data to prevent a clearcut statement of the corrosion rate at a specific site. Laboratory and site tests are recommended before any definite conclusions can be made. The corrosion potential at the Hanford TRU waste site could be reduced by a combination of changes in drum materials (for example, using galvanized barrels instead of the currently used mild steel barrels), environmental exposure conditions (for example, covering the barrels in one of numerous possible ways), and storage conditions

  15. Transuranics Laboratory, achievements and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco, C.; Anton, M. P.

    2004-01-01

    The Marine and Aquatic Radioecology Group (MARG) was established in 1985 with the main scope of analysing the consequences of the Palomares accident in the adjacent Mediterranean ecosystem. From then on and up to now , this Group has extended its investigations to other European marine environments, such as the Spanish Mediterranean margin, the Artic and the Atlantic. The main research of long-lived radionuclides (plutonium, americium and Cs-137) determining the orography influence, riverine inputs and their geo-chemical associations. This group is currently accomplishing new challenges on the radioecology field such as the development of techniques for transuranics speciation to determine their geo-chemical association to the main sediment compounds. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides distribution on salt-marsh areas affected by dry-wet periods is being studied as well as the possibilities of fusing crossed techniques for dating recent sediments (pollen, anthropogenic, ''210 Pb, etc). The Laboratory performance description, the procedures used, calculations, challenges and gaps are described in this report. (Author) 22 refs

  16. Implications of Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, Steven J.; Hoffman, Edward A.; Bays, Samuel E.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretically, the transuranic conversion ratio (CR), i.e. the transuranic production divided by transuranic destruction, in a fast reactor can range from near zero to about 1.9, which is the average neutron yield from Pu239 minus 1. In practice, the possible range will be somewhat less. We have studied the implications of transuranic conversion ratio of 0.0 to 1.7 using the fresh and discharge fuel compositions calculated elsewhere. The corresponding fissile breeding ratio ranges from 0.2 to 1.6. The cases below CR=1 ('burners') do not have blankets; the cases above CR=1 ('breeders') have breeding blankets. The burnup was allowed to float while holding the maximum fluence to the cladding constant. We graph the fuel burnup and composition change. As a function of transuranic conversion ratio, we calculate and graph the heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; whether the material is 'attractive' for direct weapon use using published criteria; the uranium utilization and rate of consumption of natural uranium; and the long-term radiotoxicity after fuel discharge. For context, other cases and analyses are included, primarily once-through light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup (UOX-51). For CR 1, heat, gamma, and neutron emission decrease with recycling. The uranium utilization exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. At the system equilibrium, heat and gamma vary by somewhat over an order of magnitude as a function of CR. Isotopes that dominate heat and gamma emission are scattered throughout the actinide chain, so the modest impact of CR is unsurprising. Neutron emitters are preferentially found among the higher actinides, so the neutron emission varies much stronger with CR, about three orders of magnitude.

  17. Applying national survey results for strategic planning and program improvement: the National Diabetes Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffey, Susan; Piccinino, Linda; Gallivan, Joanne; Lotenberg, Lynne Doner; Tuncer, Diane

    2015-02-01

    Since the 1970s, the federal government has spearheaded major national education programs to reduce the burden of chronic diseases in the United States. These prevention and disease management programs communicate critical information to the public, those affected by the disease, and health care providers. The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), the leading federal program on diabetes sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), uses primary and secondary quantitative data and qualitative audience research to guide program planning and evaluation. Since 2006, the NDEP has filled the gaps in existing quantitative data sources by conducting its own population-based survey, the NDEP National Diabetes Survey (NNDS). The NNDS is conducted every 2–3 years and tracks changes in knowledge, attitudes and practice indicators in key target audiences. This article describes how the NDEP has used the NNDS as a key component of its evaluation framework and how it applies the survey results for strategic planning and program improvement. The NDEP's use of the NNDS illustrates how a program evaluation framework that includes periodic population-based surveys can serve as an evaluation model for similar national health education programs.

  18. Defense Remote Handled Transuranic Waste Cost/Schedule Optimization Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, G.D.; Wolaver, R.W.; Carson, P.H.

    1986-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide the DOE information with which it can establish the most efficient program for the long management and disposal, in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), of remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste. To fulfill this purpose, a comprehensive review of waste characteristics, existing and projected waste inventories, processing and transportation options, and WIPP requirements was made. Cost differences between waste management alternatives were analyzed and compared to an established baseline. The result of this study is an information package that DOE can use as the basis for policy decisions. As part of this study, a comprehensive list of alternatives for each element of the baseline was developed and reviewed with the sites. The principle conclusions of the study follow. A single processing facility for RH TRU waste is both necessary and sufficient. The RH TRU processing facility should be located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Shielding of RH TRU to contact handled levels is not an economic alternative in general, but is an acceptable alternative for specific waste streams. Compaction is only cost effective at the ORNL processing facility, with a possible exception at Hanford for small compaction of paint cans of newly generated glovebox waste. It is more cost effective to ship certified waste to WIPP in 55-gal drums than in canisters, assuming a suitable drum cask becomes available. Some waste forms cannot be packaged in drums, a canister/shielded cask capability is also required. To achieve the desired disposal rate, the ORNL processing facility must be operational by 1996. Implementing the conclusions of this study can save approximately $110 million, compared to the baseline, in facility, transportation, and interim storage costs through the year 2013. 10 figs., 28 tabs

  19. The National Geothermal Energy Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The continuous demand for energy and the concern for shortages of conventional energy resources have spurred the nation to consider alternate energy resources, such as geothermal. Although significant growth in the one natural steam field located in the United States has occurred, a major effort is now needed if geothermal energy, in its several forms, is to contribute to the nation's energy supplies. From the early informal efforts of an Interagency Panel for Geothermal Energy Research, a 5-year Federal program has evolved whose objective is the rapid development of a commercial industry for the utilization of geothermal resources for electric power production and other products. The Federal program seeks to evaluate the realistic potential of geothermal energy, to support the necessary research and technology needed to demonstrate the economic and environmental feasibility of the several types of geothermal resources, and to address the legal and institutional problems concerned in the stimulation and regulation of this new industry.

  20. Technology status report: Transuranic contamination control at INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.G.

    1991-09-01

    This report summarizes proposed FY-92 work at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in the field of contamination control during transuranic waste handling operations. The proposed work is both applied research and demonstration testing. The INEL needs for contamination control applied research and demonstration testing are listed along with a description of past accomplishments. The INEL proposal is compared to other proposals for contamination control work that are under consideration for funding by the Department of Energy. Benefits of this work and impacts of not sponsoring this work are also given. 21 refs

  1. Molten salt/metal extractions for recovery of transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, L.S.; Basco, J.K.; Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1992-01-01

    The integral fast reactor (EFR) is an advanced reactor concept that incorporates metallic driver and blanket fuels, an inherently safe, liquid-sodium-cooled, pool-type, reactor design, and on-site pyrochemical reprocessing (including electrorefining) of spent fuels and wastes. This paper describes a pyrochemical method that is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory to recover transuranic elements from the EFR electrorefiner process salt. The method uses multistage extractions between molten chloride salts and cadmium metal at high temperatures. The chemical basis of the salt extraction method, the test equipment, and a test plan are discussed

  2. Methods for removing transuranic elements from waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, S.A.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Connor, C.; Sedlet, J.; Srinivasan, B.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1994-11-01

    This report outlines a treatment scheme for separating and concentrating the transuranic (TRU) elements present in aqueous waste solutions stored at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The treatment method selected is carrier precipitation. Potential carriers will be evaluated in future laboratory work, beginning with ferric hydroxide and magnetite. The process will result in a supernatant with alpha activity low enough that it can be treated in the existing evaporator/concentrator at ANL. The separated TRU waste will be packaged for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

  3. National NIF Diagnostic Program Interim Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, B

    2002-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has the mission of supporting Stockpile Stewardship and Basic Science research in high-energy-density plasmas. To execute those missions, the facility must provide diagnostic instrumentation capable of observing and resolving in time events and radiation emissions characteristic of the plasmas of interest. The diagnostic instrumentation must conform to high standards of operability and reliability within the NIF environment. These exacting standards, together with the facility mission of supporting a diverse user base, has led to the need for a central organization charged with delivering diagnostic capability to the NIF. The National NIF Diagnostics Program (NNDP) has been set up under the aegis of the NIF Director to provide that organization authority and accountability to the wide user community for NIF. The funds necessary to perform the work of developing diagnostics for NIF will be allocated from the National NIF Diagnostics Program to the participating laboratories and organizations. The participating laboratories and organizations will design, build, and commission the diagnostics for NIF. Restricted availability of funding has had an adverse impact, unforeseen at the time of the original decision to projectize NIF Core Diagnostics Systems and Cryogenic Target Handing Systems, on the planning and initiation of these efforts. The purpose of this document is to provide an interim project management plan describing the organizational structure and management processes currently in place for NIF Core Diagnostics Systems. Preparation of a Program Execution Plan for NIF Core Diagnostics Systems has been initiated and a current draft is provided as Attachment 1 to this document. The National NIF Diagnostics Program Interim Management Plan provides a summary of primary design criteria and functional requirements, current organizational structure, tracking and reporting procedures, and current planning estimates of project scope

  4. Transuranic biokinetic parameters for marine invertebrates--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, T P

    2002-04-01

    A catalogue of biokinetic parameters for the transuranic elements plutonium, americium, curium, neptunium, and californium in marine invertebrates is presented. The parameters considered are: the seawater-animal concentration factor (CF); the sediment-animal concentration ratio (CR); transuranic assimilation efficiency; transuranic tissue distribution and transuranic elimination rates. With respect to the seawater-animal CF, authors differ considerably on how they define this parameter and a seven-point reporting system is suggested. Transuranic uptake from sediment by animals is characterised by low CRs. The assimilation efficiencies of transuranic elements in marine invertebrates are high compared to vertebrates and mammals in general and the distribution of transuranics within the body tissue of an animal is dependent on the uptake path. The elimination of transuranics from most species examined conformed to a standard biphasic exponential model though some examples with three elimination phases were identified.

  5. TRANSURANIC METAL HALIDES AND A PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION THEREOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, S.

    1951-03-20

    Halides of transuranic elements are prepared by contacting with aluminum and a halogen, or with an aluminum halide, a transuranic metal oxide, oxyhalide, halide, or mixture thereof at an elevated temperature.

  6. Planning a transportation system for US Defense Transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, K.V.; Hurley, J.D.; Smith, L.J.; McFadden, M.H.; Raudenbush, M.H.; Fedie, M.L.

    1983-05-01

    The development and planning of a transportation system for US Department of Energy (USDOE) Defense Transuranic (TRU) waste has required the talents and expertise of many people. Coordination activities, design activities, fabrication, research and development, operations, and transportation are but a few of the areas around which this system is built. Due to the large number of organizations, regulations and personalities the planning task becomes extremely complex. The intent of this paper is to discuss the steps taken in planning this system, to identify the various organizations around which this system is designed, and to discuss program progress to date, scheduling, and future plans. 9 figures, 1 table

  7. Planning a transportation system for US defense transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, K.V.; Hurley, J.D.; Smith, L.J.; McFadden, M.H.; Raudenbush, M.H.; Fedie, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    The development and planning of a transportation system for US Department of Energy (USDOE) Defense Transuranic (TRU) waste has required the talents and expertise of many people. Coordination activities, design activities, fabrication, research and development, operations, and transportation are but a few of the areas around which this system is built. Due to the large number of organizations, regulations and personalities the planning task becomes extremely complex. The intent of this paper is to discuss the steps taken in planning this system, to identify the various organizations around which this system is designed, and to discuss program progress to date, scheduling, and future plans

  8. Review of monitoring instruments for transuranics in fuel fabrication and reprocessing plants. A progress report to the physical and technological programs, Division of Biomedical and Environmental Research, U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordas, J.F.; Phelps, P.L.

    A comprehensive review of the monitoring instruments for transuranic elements released from nuclear fuel fabrication and reprocessing plants has been compiled. The extent of routine operational releases has been reviewed for the light water reactor (LWR) fuel cycle (including plutonium recycle), the breeder reactor fuel cycle, and the high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel cycle. The stack monitoring instrumentation presently in use at the various fabrication and reprocessing plants around the country is discussed. Sampling difficulties and the effectiveness of the entire sampling system are reviewed, as are the measurement problems for alpha-emitting, long-lived, transuranic aerosols, 129 I, 106 Ru, and tritium oxide. The potential problems in the HTGR fuel cycle such as the measurement of releases of alpha-emitting aerosols and of gaseous releases of 220 Rn and 14 C are also considered

  9. Operational and engineering developments in the management of low-level radioactive waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, E.W.; McKinney, J.D.; Wehmann, G.

    1979-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a site for shallow land disposal and storage of solid radioactive waste. It is currently operated for ERDA by EG and G Idaho, Inc. The facility has accepted radioactive waste since July 1952. Both transuranic and non-transuranic wastes are handled at the complex. This document describes the operational and engineering developments in waste handling and storage practices that have been developed during the 25 years of waste handling operations. Emphasis is placed on above-ground transuranic waste storage, subsurface transuranic waste retrieval, and beta/gamma compaction disposal. The proposed future programs for the RWMC including a Molten Salt Combustion Facility and Production Scale Retrieval Project are described

  10. Behaviour of transuranic nuclides in coastal environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, K.C.; Mathew, E.; Matkar, V.M.; Dey, N.N.; Abani, M.C.; Chhapgar, B.F.; Mullay, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    In view of the nuclear technological developments, the potential for contamination of marine environment with transuranic nuclides has increased. In this context it is necessary to know not only the current levels of these artificial nuclides but there is also a need to understand the physico-chemical, biological and geochemical behaviour of transuranics to evaluate their significance in the marine environment. Studies on these aspects have been carried out in the coastal environment of the west coast of India, near Bombay. The results obtained and conclusions drawn from the various investigations carried out are given in this document

  11. Review of monitoring instruments for transuranics in fuel fabrication and reprocessing plants. A progress report to the physical and technological programs, Division of Biomedical and Environmental Research, U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordas, J.F.; Phelps, P.L.

    1977-01-01

    A comprehensive review of the monitoring instruments for transuranic elements released from nuclear fuel fabrication and reprocessing plants has been compiled. The extent of routine operational releases has been reviewed for the light water reactor (LWR) fuel cycle (including plutonium recycle), the breeder reactor fuel cycle, and the high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel cycle. The stack monitoring instrumentation that is presently in use at the various fabrication and reprocessing plants around the country is examined. Sampling difficulties including the inlet-probe arrangement and the effectiveness of the entire sampling system are discussed, as are the measurement problems for alpha-emitting, long-lived, transuranic aerosols, 129 I, 106 Ru, and tritium oxide. The potential problems in the HTGR fuel cycle such as the measurement of releases of alpha-emitting aerosols and of gaseous releases of 220 Rn and 14 C are also considered. Monitoring requirements range from the detection of low-level, routine releases to high-level accidental releases. Both first and second kinds of detection errors are considered in a discussion of adequate detection limits. The presently deployed monitors are critically examined in this light and the drawbacks and limitations of each are noted. Prototype instrumentation is studied, including Argonne's mechanical separation technique, Battelle's mass separation by surface ionization method, and in particular, LLL's transuranic aerosol measurement system. The potentials, sensitivities, advantages, and limitations of each system are enumerated. The additional potential uses of the LLL system are also discussed

  12. Soil Sampling Plan for the transuranic storage area soil overburden and final report: Soil overburden sampling at the RWMC transuranic storage area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanisich, S.N.

    1994-12-01

    This Soil Sampling Plan (SSP) has been developed to provide detailed procedural guidance for field sampling and chemical and radionuclide analysis of selected areas of soil covering waste stored at the Transuranic Storage Area (TSA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The format and content of this SSP represents a complimentary hybrid of INEL Waste Management--Environmental Restoration Program, and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) sampling guidance documentation. This sampling plan also functions as a Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP). The QAPP as a controlling mechanism during sampling to ensure that all data collected are valid, reliabile, and defensible. This document outlines organization, objectives and quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) activities to achieve the desired data quality goals. The QA/QC requirements for this project are outlined in the Data Collection Quality Assurance Plan (DCQAP) for the Buried Waste Program. The DCQAP is a program plan and does not outline the site specific requirements for the scope of work covered by this SSP

  13. National Ignition Facility Project Site Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dun, C

    2003-01-01

    This Safety Program for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) presents safety protocols and requirements that management and workers shall follow to assure a safe and healthful work environment during activities performed on the NIF Project site. The NIF Project Site Safety Program (NPSSP) requires that activities at the NIF Project site be performed in accordance with the ''LLNL ES and H Manual'' and the augmented set of controls and processes described in this NIF Project Site Safety Program. Specifically, this document: (1) Defines the fundamental NIF site safety philosophy. (2) Defines the areas covered by this safety program (see Appendix B). (3) Identifies management roles and responsibilities. (4) Defines core safety management processes. (5) Identifies NIF site-specific safety requirements. This NPSSP sets forth the responsibilities, requirements, rules, policies, and regulations for workers involved in work activities performed on the NIF Project site. Workers are required to implement measures to create a universal awareness that promotes safe practice at the work site and will achieve NIF management objectives in preventing accidents and illnesses. ES and H requirements are consistent with the ''LLNL ES and H Manual''. This NPSSP and implementing procedures (e.g., Management Walkabout, special work procedures, etc.,) are a comprehensive safety program that applies to NIF workers on the NIF Project site. The NIF Project site includes the B581/B681 site and support areas shown in Appendix B

  14. Management of transuranic wastes throughout the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, L.T.; Christensen, H.; De Jonghe, P.; Frejaville, G.; Lavie, J.M.; Thackrah, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    Transuranic (TRU) wastes are those radioactive wastes, except spent fuel and high-level wastes, that are contaminated with sufficient long-lived, alpha-emitting nuclides that the decay to innocuous levels in engineered storage structures or shallow-land burial sites cannot be used as a disposal method. This class of waste is produced principally during spent fuel reprocessing, recycle fuel fabrication, and weapons material production. At least ten countries are involved in operations producing this class of waste, which represents a small fraction of the alpha-emitting nuclides in the world's inventory and of the total volume of radioactive wastes produced in nuclear activities. No consensus has been reached on a numerical definition; definitions in use vary from >0.03 to >1000 nCi transuranium radionuclides per gram of waste (TRU/g). The definitions are presently used to separate wastes going to sea dumping or shallow-land burial from those requiring greater isolation. All countries emphasize plutonium recovery and volume reduction in their plans for treating TRU wastes. Incineration is the most prevalent treatment in use. When fixation is used, cement and bitumen are the preferred fixation media. All high-concentration TRU wastes are now being placed in interim storage. No TRU wastes are presently being disposed except the low-concentration wastes being dumped at sea by Belgium and the United Kingdom and those being injected into geologic strata by the United States (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and the USSR. All countries prefer and are planning to use deep geologic repositories for final disposal of TRU wastes. According to present schedules, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility in the United States, with a scheduled startup date of 1989, will be the first operating repository since the closure of the Federal Republic of Germany's Asse Salt Mine in 1977

  15. Induction melting of simulated transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenaglia, R.D.; McCall, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    Coreless induction melting was investigated as a method to melt and consolidate waste material representative of the transuranic waste (TRU) stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Waste material was introduced onto the surface of a molten cast iron bath in a coreless induction furnace. Waste metallics were incorporated into the bath. Noncombustibles formed a slag which was poured or skimmed from the bath surface. Stack sampling was performed to characterize the off-gas and particulate matter evolved. Experimental melting tests were performed for a variety of types of wastes including metallics, chemical sludge, soil, concrete, and glass. Each test also included a representative level of combustible materials consisting of paper, wood, cloth, polyvinyl chloride and polyethylene. Metallic wastes were readily processed by induction melting with a minimum of slag production. Test waste consisting primarily of chemical sludge provided fluid slags which could be poured from the bath surface. Processing of wastes consisting of soil, concrete, or glass was limited by the inability to achieve fluid slags. It appears from test results that coreless induction melting is a feasible method to process INEL-type waste materials if two problems can be resolved. First, slag fluidity must be improved to facilitate the collection of slags formed from soil, concrete, or glass containing wastes. Secondly, refractory life must be further optimized to permit prolonged processing of the waste materials. The use of a chrome-bearing high-alumina refractory was found to resist slag line attach much better than a magnesia refractory, although some attack was still noted

  16. Collaborative Potential between National Estuary Programs ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estuaries are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, providing unique habitat for freshwater and marine species as well as valuable social and economic benefits. The wealth of ecosystem goods and services from estuaries has led to growth and development of human communities in adjacent areas and an increase in human activities that can adversely affect water quality and critical habitat. Managing for sustainable estuaries requires a balance of environmental concerns with community social and economic values. This has created an opportunity to leverage Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) scientific knowledge and tools with National Estuary Program (NEP) planning and management expertise to address environmental challenges in important estuarine ecosystems. The non-regulatory National Estuary Program (NEP) was outlined in the Clean Water Act to provide stakeholders an opportunity to monitor and manage ‘nationally significant’ estuaries. Currently there are 28 estuaries in the NEP, broadly distributed across the Atlantic, Pacific and Gulf Coasts, and in Puerto Rico. The local NEP management conferences must address a variety of environmental issues, from water quality and natural resources to coastal and watershed development. While the underlying objectives of each NEP are quite similar, each has unique landscapes, land uses, waterbodies, habitats, biological resources, economies and social culture. Consequently, the effects and severity of anthr

  17. Controlled-air incineration of transuranic-contaminated solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borduin, L.C.; Draper, W.E.; Koenig, R.A.; Neuls, A.S.; Warner, C.L.

    1976-01-01

    A controlled-air incinerator and an associated high-energy aqueous off-gas cleaning system are being installed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) Transuranic Waste Treatment Development Facility (TDF) for evaluation as a low-level transuranic-contaminated (TRU) solid waste volume reduction process. Program objectives are: (1) assembly and operation of a production scale (45 kg/hr) operation of ''off-the-shelf'' components representative of current incineration and pollution control technology; (2) process development and modification to meet radioactive health and safety standards, and (3) evaluation of the process to define the advantages and limitations of conventional technology. The results of the program will be the design specifications and operating procedures necessary for successful incineration of TRU waste. Testing, with nonradioactive waste, will begin in October 1976. This discussion covers commercially available incinerator and off-gas cleaning components, the modifications required for radioactive service, process components performance expectations, and a description of the LASL experimental program

  18. 75 FR 82037 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; President's National Security Telecommunications...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2010-0050] National Protection and Programs Directorate; President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee AGENCY: National Protection... Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The President's National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC...

  19. Environmental Programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Patricia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-11

    Summary of this project is: (1) Teamwork, partnering to meet goals - (a) Building on cleanup successes, (b) Solving legacy waste problems, (c) Protecting the area's environment; (2) Strong performance over the past three years - (a) Credibility from four successful Recovery Act Projects, (b) Met all Consent Order milestones, (c) Successful ramp-up of TRU program; (3) Partnership between the National Nuclear Security Administration's Los Alamos Site Office, DOE Carlsbad Field Office, New Mexico Environment Department, and contractor staff enables unprecedented cleanup progress; (4) Continued focus on protecting water resources; and (5) All consent order commitments delivered on time or ahead of schedule.

  20. National Earthquake Hazards Program at a Crossroads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    The U.S.National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program, which turns 25 years old on 1 October 2003, is passing through two major transitions, which experts said either could weaken or strengthen the program. On 1 March, a federal government reorganization placed NEHRP's lead agency,the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA),within the new Department of Homeland Security (DHS). A number of earthquake scientists and engineers expressed concern that NEHRP, which already faces budgetary and organizational challenges, and lacks visibility,could end up being marginalized in the bureaucratic shuffle. Some experts, though,as well as agency officials, said they hope DHS will recognize synergies between dealing with earthquakes and terrorist attacks.

  1. Nevada National Security Site Radiation Protection Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-04-30

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, “Occupational Radiation Protection,” establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This RPP section consists of general statements that are applicable to the NNSS as a whole. The RPP also includes a series of appendices which provide supporting detail for the associated NNSS Tennant Organizations (TOs). Appendix H, “Compliance Demonstration Table,” contains a cross-walk for the implementation of 10 CFR 835 requirements. This RPP does not contain any exemptions from the established 10 CFR 835 requirements. The RSPC and TOs are fully compliant with 10 CFR 835 and no additional funding is required in order to meet RPP commitments. No new programs or activities are needed to meet 10 CFR 835 requirements and there are no anticipated impacts to programs or activities that are not included in the RPP. There are no known constraints to implementing the RPP. No guides or technical standards are adopted in this RPP as a means to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  2. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's isotope enrichment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracy, J.G.; Aaron, W.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Isotope Enrichment Program (IEP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for the production and distribution of ∼225 enriched stable isotopes from 50 multi-isotopic elements. In addition, ORNL distributes enriched actinide isotopes and provides extensive physical- and chemical-form processing of enriched isotopes to meet customer requirements. For more than 50 yr, ORNL has been a major provider of enriched isotopes and isotope-related services to research, medical, and industrial institutions throughout the world. Consolidation of the Isotope Distribution Office (IDO), the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory (IRML), and the stable isotope inventories in the Isotope Enrichment Facility (IEF) have improved operational efficiencies and customer services. Recent changes in the IEP have included adopting policies for long-term contracts, which offer program stability and pricing advantages for the customer, and prorated service charges, which greatly improve pricing to the small research users. The former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Loan Program has been converted to a lease program, which makes large-quantity or very expensive isotopes available for nondestructive research at a nominal cost. Current efforts are being pursued to improve and expand the isotope separation capabilities as well as the extensive chemical- and physical-form processing that now exists. The IEF's quality management system is ISO 9002 registered and accredited in the United States, Canada, and Europe

  3. Economic evaluation of volume reduction for Defense transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.M.

    1982-03-01

    The economics of volume reduction of retrievably stored and newly generated DOE transuranic wastes are evaluated by comparing the costs of reduction of the wastes with the savings possible in transportation and disposal. A general approach to the comparison of TRU waste volume reduction costs and cost savings is developed, an initial set of cost data is established, conclusions to support selecting technologies and facilities for the disposal of DOE transuranic waste are developed. Section I outlines the analysis which considers seven types of volume reduction from incineration and compaction of combustibles to compaction, size reduction, shredding, melting, and decontamination of metals. The study considers the volume reduction of contact-handled, newly generated and retrievably stored DOE transuranic wastes. Section II of this report describes the analytical approach, assumptions, and flow of waste material through sites. Section III presents the waste inventories, disposal and transportation savings, and volume reduction techniques and costs. Section IV contains the results and conclusions of the study. The major conclusions drawn from the study are: For DOE sites with a small amount of waste requiring disposal ( 3 /year) the cost of volume reduction is greater than the transportation and disposal savings from volume reduction provided the waste requires little additional preparation to meet transportation and disposal criteria. Wastes that do not meet these criteria require site specific economic analysis outside the general evaluations of this study. For Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, incineration and metal shredding are cost-effective, provided a facility is to be constructed as a consequence of repackaging the fraction of stored waste which may require repackaging and immobilizing chemical process waste to meet disposal criteria

  4. National Research Council Research Associateships Program with Methane Hydrates Fellowships Program/National Energy Technology Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basques, Eric O. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-03-20

    This report summarizes work carried out over the period from July 5, 2005-January 31, 2014. The work was carried out by the National Research Council Research Associateships Program of the National Academies, under the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) program. This Technical Report consists of a description of activity from 2005 through 2014, broken out within yearly timeframes, for NRC/NETL Associateships researchers at NETL laboratories which includes individual tenure reports from Associates over this time period. The report also includes individual tenure reports from associates over this time period. The report also includes descriptions of program promotion efforts, a breakdown of the review competitions, awards offered, and Associate's activities during their tenure.

  5. Distribution of transuranic nuclides in Mediterranean ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestra, S.; Thein, M.; Fukai, R.

    1982-01-01

    For the comprehensive understanding of the behaviour of transuranic elements in the marine environment, the knowledge on the distribution of these elements in various components of marine ecosystems is essential. Since the Mediterranean Sea is considered a sufficiently self-contained system, our approach for studying the processes controlling the transuranic cycling in the sea has been to follow, step by step, the redistribution of plutonium and americium in different components of the marine environment, taking Mediterranean ecosystems as examples. While the studies in the past years have supplied quantitative information on the inputs of plutonium and americium into the Mediterranean from atmospheric fallout and rivers as well as on their behaviour in the Mediterranean water column, only scattered data have been made available so far on the occurrence of the transuranic nuclides in the Mediterranean marine biota or sediments. In order to fill up this information gap, biological and sediment samples were collected from the northwestern Mediterranean region during 1975-1978 for the transuranic measurements. The results of these determinations are given in the present report

  6. Sampling soils for transuranic nuclides: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, E.B.; Essington, E.H.

    1976-01-01

    A review of the literature pertinent to the sampling of soils for radionuclides is presented; emphasis is placed on transuranic nuclides. Sampling of soils is discussed relative to systems of heterogeneous distributions and varied particle sizes encountered in certain environments. Sampling methods that have been used for two different sources of contamination, global fallout, and accidental or operational releases, are included

  7. 76 FR 33277 - Proposed Approval of the Central Characterization Project's Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... disposal of TRU radioactive waste. As defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) of 1992 (Pub. L. 102... certification of the WIPP's compliance with disposal regulations for TRU radioactive waste [63 Federal Register... radioactive remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste characterization program implemented by the Central...

  8. 76 FR 39857 - Alaska Coastal Management Program Withdrawal From the National Coastal Management Program Under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration Alaska Coastal Management Program Withdrawal From the National Coastal Management Program Under the Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) AGENCY: Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management (OCRM), National Ocean Service (NOS...

  9. Plans for Managing Hanford Remote Handled Transuranic (TRU) Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCKENNEY, D.E.

    2001-01-01

    The current Hanford Site baseline and life-cycle waste forecast predicts that approximately 1,000 cubic meters of remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste will be generated by waste management and environmental restoration activities at Hanford. These 1,000 cubic meters, comprised of both transuranic and mixed transuranic (TRUM) waste, represent a significant portion of the total estimated inventory of RH-TRU to be disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A systems engineering approach is being followed to develop a disposition plan for each RH-TRU/TRUM waste stream at Hanford. A number of significant decision-making efforts are underway to develop and finalize these disposition plans, including: development and approval of a RH-TRU/TRUM Waste Project Management Plan, revision of the Hanford Waste Management Strategic Plan, the Hanford Site Options Study (''Vision 2012''), the Canyon Disposal Initiative Record-of-Decision, and the Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement (SW-EIS). Disposition plans may include variations of several options, including (1) sending most RH-TRU/TRUM wastes to WIPP, (2) deferrals of waste disposal decisions in the interest of both efficiency and integration with other planned decision dates and (3) disposition of some materials in place consistent with Department of Energy Orders and the regulations in the interest of safety, risk minimization, and cost. Although finalization of disposition paths must await completion of the aforementioned decision documents, significant activities in support of RH-TRU/TRUM waste disposition are proceeding, including Hanford participation in development of the RH TRU WIPP waste acceptance criteria, preparation of T Plant for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel sludge, sharing of technology information and development activities in cooperation with the Mixed Waste Focus Area, RH-TRU technology demonstrations and deployments, and

  10. Transportation system (TRUPACT) for contact-handled transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romesberg, L.E.; Pope, R.B.; Burgoyne, R.M.

    1982-04-01

    Contact-handled transuranic defense waste is being, and will continue to be, moved between a number of locations in the United States. The DOE is sponsoring development of safe, efficient, licensable, and cost-effective transportation systems to handle this waste. The systems being developed have been named TRUPACT which stands for TRansUranic PACkage Transporter. The system will be compatible with Type A packagings used by waste generators, interim storage facilities, and repositories. TRUPACT is required to be a Type B packaging since larger than Type A quantities of some radionuclides (particularly plutonium) may be involved in the collection of Type A packagings. TRUPACT must provide structural and thermal protection to the waste in hypothetical accident environments specified in DOT regulations 49CFR173 and NRC regulations 10CFR71. Preliminary design of the systems has been completed and final design for a truck system is underway. The status of the development program is reviewed in this paper and the reference design is described. Tests that have been conducted are discussed and long-term program objectives are reviewed

  11. Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization QA Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    2000-01-01

    The Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) has been prepared for waste characterization activities to be conducted by the Transuranic (TRU) Project at the Hanford Site to meet requirements set forth in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, 4890139088-TSDF, Attachment B, including Attachments B1 through B6 (WAP) (DOE, 1999a). The QAPjP describes the waste characterization requirements and includes test methods, details of planned waste sampling and analysis, and a description of the waste characterization and verification process. In addition, the QAPjP includes a description of the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) requirements for the waste characterization program. Before TRU waste is shipped to the WIPP site by the TRU Project, all applicable requirements of the QAPjP shall be implemented. Additional requirements necessary for transportation to waste disposal at WIPP can be found in the ''Quality Assurance Program Document'' (DOE 1999b) and HNF-2600, ''Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan.'' TRU mixed waste contains both TRU radioactive and hazardous components, as defined in the WLPP-WAP. The waste is designated and separately packaged as either contact-handled (CH) or remote-handled (RH), based on the radiological dose rate at the surface of the waste container. RH TRU wastes are not currently shipped to the WIPP facility

  12. USACE National Coastal Mapping Program Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, C.

    2017-12-01

    The Joint Airborne Lidar Bathymetry Technical Center of Expertise (JALBTCX) formed in 1998 to support the coastal mapping and charting requirements of the USACE, NAVO, NOAA and USGS. This partnership fielded three generations of airborne lidar bathymeters, executed operational data collection programs within the U.S. and overseas, and advanced research and development in airborne lidar bathymetry and complementary technologies. JALBTCX executes a USACE Headquarters-funded National Coastal Mapping Program (NCMP). Initiated in 2004, the NCMP provides high-resolution, high-accuracy elevation and imagery data along the sandy shorelines of the U.S. on a recurring basis. NCMP mapping activities are coordinated with Federal mapping partners through the Interagency Working Group on Ocean and Coastal Mapping and the 3D Elevation Program. The NCMP, currently in it's third cycle, is performing operations along the East Coast in 2017, after having completed surveys along the Gulf Coast in 2016 and conducting emergency response operations in support of Hurricane Matthew. This presentation will provide an overview of JALBTCX, its history in furthering airborne lidar bathymetry technology to meet emerging mapping requirements, current NCMP operations and data products, and Federal mapping coordination activities.

  13. Transuranic (Tru) waste volume reduction operations at a plutonium facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournoyer, Michael E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nixon, Archie E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dodge, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fife, Keith W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Arnold M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garcia, Vincent E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA 55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through use of a variety of gloveboxes (the glovebox, coupled with an adequate negative pressure gradient, provides primary confinement). Size-reduction operations on glovebox equipment are a common activity when a process has been discontinued and the room is being modified to support a new customer. The Actin ide Processing Group at TA-55 uses one-meter-long glass columns to process plutonium. Disposal of used columns is a challenge, since they must be size-reduced to get them out of the glovebox. The task is a high-risk operation because the glass shards that are generated can puncture the bag-out bags, leather protectors, glovebox gloves, and the worker's skin when completing the task. One of the Lessons Learned from these operations is that Laboratory management should critically evaluate each hazard and provide more effective measures to prevent personnel injury. A bag made of puncture-resistant material was one of these enhanced controls. We have investigated the effectiveness of these bags and have found that they safely and effectively permit glass objects to be reduced to small pieces with a plastic or rubber mallet; the waste can then be easily poured into a container for removal from the glove box as non-compactable transuranic (TRU) waste. This size-reduction operation reduces solid TRU waste generation by almost 2% times. Replacing one-time-use bag-out bags with multiple-use glass crushing bags also contributes to reducing generated waste. In addition, significant costs from contamination, cleanup, and preparation of incident documentation are avoided. This effort contributes to the Los Alamos

  14. Transuranic (Tru) waste volume reduction operations at a plutonium facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Nixon, Archie E.; Dodge, Robert L.; Fife, Keith W.; Sandoval, Arnold M.; Garcia, Vincent E.

    2010-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA 55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through use of a variety of gloveboxes (the glovebox, coupled with an adequate negative pressure gradient, provides primary confinement). Size-reduction operations on glovebox equipment are a common activity when a process has been discontinued and the room is being modified to support a new customer. The Actin ide Processing Group at TA-55 uses one-meter-long glass columns to process plutonium. Disposal of used columns is a challenge, since they must be size-reduced to get them out of the glovebox. The task is a high-risk operation because the glass shards that are generated can puncture the bag-out bags, leather protectors, glovebox gloves, and the worker's skin when completing the task. One of the Lessons Learned from these operations is that Laboratory management should critically evaluate each hazard and provide more effective measures to prevent personnel injury. A bag made of puncture-resistant material was one of these enhanced controls. We have investigated the effectiveness of these bags and have found that they safely and effectively permit glass objects to be reduced to small pieces with a plastic or rubber mallet; the waste can then be easily poured into a container for removal from the glove box as non-compactable transuranic (TRU) waste. This size-reduction operation reduces solid TRU waste generation by almost 2% times. Replacing one-time-use bag-out bags with multiple-use glass crushing bags also contributes to reducing generated waste. In addition, significant costs from contamination, cleanup, and preparation of incident documentation are avoided. This effort contributes to the Los Alamos National

  15. Transuranic (TRU) waste volume reduction operations at a plutonium facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Nixon, Archie E.; Fife, Keith W.; Sandoval, Arnold M.; Garcia, Vincent E.; Dodge, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Programmatic operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility (TA-55) involve working with various amounts of plutonium and other highly toxic, alpha-emitting materials. The spread of radiological contamination on surfaces, airborne contamination, and excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone are prevented through use of a variety of gloveboxes (the glovebox, coupled with an adequate negative pressure gradient, provides primary confinement). Size-reduction operations on glovebox equipment are a common activity when a process has been discontinued and the room is being modified to support a new customer. The Actinide Processing Group at TA-55 uses one-meter or longer glass columns to process plutonium. Disposal of used columns is a challenge, since they must be size-reduced to get them out of the glovebox. The task is a high-risk operation because the glass shards that are generated can puncture the bag-out bags, leather protectors, glovebox gloves, and the worker's skin when completing the task. One of the Lessons Learned from these operations is that Laboratory management should critically evaluate each hazard and provide more effective measures to prevent personnel injury. A bag made of puncture-resistant material was one of these enhanced controls. We have investigated the effectiveness of these bags and have found that they safely and effectively permit glass objects to be reduced to small pieces with a plastic or rubber mallet; the waste can then be easily poured into a container for removal from the glovebox as non-compactable transuranic (TRU) waste. This size-reduction operation reduces solid TRU waste volume generation by almost 2½ times. Replacing one-time-use bag-out bags with multiple-use glass crushing bags also contributes to reducing generated waste. In addition, significant costs from contamination, cleanup, and preparation of incident documentation are avoided. This effort contributes to the Los Alamos

  16. Transuranic waste baseline inventory report. Revision No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    The Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Report (TWBIR) establishes a methodology for grouping wastes of similar physical and chemical properties from across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) transuranic (TRU) waste system into a series of open-quotes waste profilesclose quotes that can be used as the basis for waste form discussions with regulatory agencies. The purpose of Revisions 0 and 1 of this report was to provide data to be included in the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) performance assessment (PA) processes for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Revision 2 of the document expanded the original purpose and was also intended to support the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) requirement for providing the total DOE TRU waste inventory. The document included a chapter and an appendix that discussed the total DOE TRU waste inventory, including nondefense, commercial, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB)-contaminated, and buried (predominately pre-1970) TRU wastes that are not planned to be disposed of at WIPP

  17. Assessment of gas flammability in transuranic waste container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, M.J.; Loehr, C.A.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Spangler, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    The Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package [Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) SARP] set limits for gas generation rates, wattage limits, and flammable volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in transuranic (TRU) waste containers that would be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Based on existing headspace gas data for drums stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), over 30 percent of the contact-handled TRU waste drums contain flammable VOC concentrations greater than the limit. Additional requirements may be imposed for emplacement of waste in the WIPP facility. The conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the facility required that flame tests be performed if significant levels of flammable VOCs were present in TRU waste containers. This paper describes an approach for investigating the potential flammability of TRU waste drums, which would increase the allowable concentrations of flammable VOCS. A flammability assessment methodology is presented that will allow more drums to be shipped to WIPP without treatment or repackaging and reduce the need for flame testing on drums. The approach includes experimental work to determine mixture lower explosive limits (MLEL) for the types of gas mixtures observed in TRU waste, a model for predicting the MLEL for mixtures of VOCS, hydrogen, and methane, and revised screening limits for total flammable VOCs concentrations and concentrations of hydrogen and methane using existing drum headspace gas data and the model predictions

  18. Results of the national audits radiotherapy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Samper, Jose Luis; Alert Silva, Jose; Alfonso Laguardia, Rodolfo

    2009-01-01

    The National Audit Programme in Radiotherapy in Cuba works regularly 8 years visiting each country's radiotherapy service at least once every two years, during the visit involving two physicists and an oncologist radiation therapist. This paper presents the main features of the program and its main . Early detection deficiencies in the work of the Radiation Therapy Services to may cause radiological risk situations for both patients and workers and the general public. Help with their comments to the continuous improvement of quality treatments. During audit visits is reviewed throughout the process of radiation from that the patient comes to the monitoring service. This is done by dividing the audits into three groups or aspects Clinical Aspects, Aspects of Safety and Quality Control Aspects of the equipment. Methodological guidelines have been established for conducting audits and they serve as standards of quality in radiation therapy, these guidelines also allow quantification of the . It has identified the main gaps in services that affect quality treatments. After each visit, leave recommendations may be directed to service itself, to the direction of the provincial hospital or health. We believe that the National Audit Programme in Radiotherapy is a efficient tool in controlling the quality of treatments given and at the same time with its recommendations to help improve services of continuous quality. (author)

  19. Test plan for preparing the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory for field deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.

    1994-04-01

    This plan describes experimental work that will be performed during fiscal year 1994 to prepare the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) for routine field use by US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management programs. The RTML is a mobile, field-deployable laboratory developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) that provides a rapid, cost-effective means of characterizing and monitoring radioactive waste remediation sites for low-level radioactive contaminants. Analytical instruments currently installed in the RTML include an extended-range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer; two, large-area, ionization chamber alpha spectrometers; and four alpha continuous air monitors. The RTML was field tested at the INEL during June 1993 in conjunction with the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration's remote retrieval demonstration. The major tasks described in this test plan are to (a) evaluate the beta detectors for use in screening soil samples for 90 Sr, (b) upgrade the alpha spectral analysis software programs, and (c) upgrade the photon spectral analysis software programs

  20. Historical review of transuranic analytical methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessman, R.A.; Leventhal, L.

    1977-01-01

    The methods used for the analysis of the transuranic elements neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium are reviewed. Particular attention is given to those procedures suitable for low-level environmental and biological assessment. The preparation of such samples, derived from a variety of sources and incorporated in different masses and volumes of soils, water, vegetation, and biological matrices, is described. A comprehensive discussion of matrix dissolution and equilibration techniques indicates that complete dissolution employing tracer techniques is to be preferred. Leaching of large soil samples is satisfactory for worldwide fallout. Individual and sequential separation and purification procedures, including precipitation, extraction, and ion exchange methods, are described. Sample preparation techniques for radiometric assay, such as stippling, evaporation, and plating, are reviewed. For both tracer and nuclide assay, electroplating provides the thin samples suitable for alpha pulse height analysis. Past and current counting methods for the transuranic alpha, beta, and gamma emitters are reviewed

  1. Measurements of transuranic elements in the Mediterranean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballestra, S.; Holm, E.; Fukai, R.

    1976-01-01

    In order to supplement the baseline data on the distribution of transuranic elements in the Mediterranean, which have already been reported, further measurements were carried out on sea water samples collected during 1974-75 cruises. In 1974 profile collections were conducted at a station approximately 50 km south of Monaco in addition to surface sampling at a few stations, while surface waters were taken from several stations covering wider regions of the western Mediterranean during the 1975 cruises. The measurement of 238 Pu as well as 241 Am were for the first time successful on the 1975 samples. These data are considered valuable as the basis for understanding transuranic biogeochemistry in the Mediterranean environment

  2. Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.

    1992-01-01

    The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal.

  3. Distribution of transuranic elements in bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, P W

    1992-01-01

    The transport, retention, and excretion of transuranic elements from the body have been widely studied for many years. A summary of the results is given with an emphasis on the distribution of these elements in bone. Implications of these studies for understanding the relationships between lead in blood and lead in bone are presented. The expected distribution of lead at various bone sites is also considered.

  4. 75 FR 1566 - National Industrial Security Program Directive No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office 32 CFR Part 2004 [NARA-09-0005] RIN 3095-AB34 National Industrial Security Program Directive No. 1 AGENCY... the National Industrial Security Program Directive No. 1. This correction assigns a Federal Docket...

  5. Leaching of transuranics observed in lysimeter experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erikson, A.; Fredriksson, L.

    1994-01-01

    A lysimeter installation, primarily designed for studies on plant uptake of transuranics from a number of Swedish soils, has been used also for studies on leaching of nuclides with drainage water from contaminated top soil layers in lysimeter vessels through 65 cm subsoil layers. Interception by ion exchanging resins simulated the nuclide transfer to a field drainage system. The study dealt with the contamination of agricultural land. The results obtained in the experiments have to be interpreted cautiously with regard to their bearing on field conditions. Also, the experimental period has been short when compared with the expected ecological half time of transuranic elements in the environment. However, the results indicate that over a first decade the leaching to drainage systems of transuranics in equilibrium with soil environments is of the same order as that of the crop uptake. The ranges assessed for leaching with an excess precipitation of 200 mm from a deposit in the plough layer to the drainage system during a decade are: for plutonium - 0.003-0.8%, for americium - 0.004-0.006% and for neptunium - 0.03-0.06%. The values for plutonium and americium are very similar except for the organic soil used which held the former nuclide very loosely bound. The leaching of neptunium seems to be ten times that for the other nuclides. It is higher on sandy soils than on organic and clay soils. (author)

  6. Transuranic waste: long-term planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, K.C.

    1985-07-01

    Societal concerns for the safe handling and disposal of toxic waste are behind many of the regulations and the control measures in effect today. Transuranic waste, a specific category of toxic (radioactive) waste, serves as a good example of how regulations and controls impact changes in waste processing - and vice versa. As problems would arise with waste processing, changes would be instituted. These changes improved techniques for handling and disposal of transuranic waste, reduced the risk of breached containment, and were usually linked with regulatory changes. Today, however, we face a greater public awareness of and concern for toxic waste control; thus, we must anticipate potential problems and work on resolving them before they can become real problems. System safety analyses are valuable aids in long-term planning for operations involving transuranic as well as other toxic materials. Examples of specific system safety analytical methods demonstrate how problems can be anticipated and resolution initiated in a timely manner having minimal impacts upon allocation of resource and operational goals. 7 refs., 1 fig

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Special Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Program Master's Fellowship Program Wounded Warrior Career Development Program Careers Special Programs Special career opportunities for select individuals Join Sandia's workforce while receiving support and Laboratories' Affirmative Action Plan. Learn more about MFP. Wounded Warrior Career Development Program U.S

  8. FAA National Aviation Safety Inspection Program. Annual Report FY90

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    This report was undertaken to document, analyze, and place : into national perspective the findings from the 1990 National : Aviation Safety Inspection Program (NASIP). This report is the : fifth in a series of annual reports covering the results of ...

  9. COMPLETION OF THE TRANSURANIC GREATER CONFINEMENT DISPOSAL BOREHOLE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colarusso, Angela; Crowe, Bruce; Cochran, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Classified transuranic material that cannot be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico is stored in Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes in the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site. A performance assessment was completed for the transuranic inventory in the boreholes and submitted to the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group. The performance assessment was prepared by Sandia National Laboratories on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office using an iterative methodology that assessed radiological releases from the intermediate depth disposal configuration against the regulatory requirements of the 1985 version of 40 CFR 191 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The transuranic materials are stored at 21 to 37 m depth (70 to 120 ft) in large diameter boreholes constructed in the unsaturated alluvial deposits of Frenchman Flat. Hydrologic processes that affect long- term isolation of the radionuclides are dominated by extremely slow upward rates of liquid/vapor advection and diffusion; there is no downward pathway under current climatic conditions and there is no recharge to groundwater under future ''glacial'' climatic conditions. A Federal Review Team appointed by the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group reviewed the Greater Confinement Disposal performance assessment and found that the site met the majority of the regulatory criteria of the 1985 and portions of the 1993 versions of 40 CFR 191. A number of technical and procedural issues required development of supplemental information that was incorporated into a final revision of the performance assessment. These issues include inclusion of radiological releases into the complementary cumulative distribution function for the containment requirements associated with drill cuttings from inadvertent human intrusion, verification of mathematical models used in the performance

  10. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    A process is described for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). 2 figs

  11. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.

    1989-03-21

    A process is described for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). 2 figs.

  12. Cryofracture as a tool for preprocessing retrieved buried and stored transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.G.; Winberg, M.R.; Ancho, M.L.; Osborne, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes important features of an experimental demonstration of applying the Cryofracture process to size-reduce retrieved buried and stored transuranic-contaminated wastes. By size reducing retrieved buried and stored waste, treatment technologies such as thermal treatment can be expedited. Additionally, size reduction of the waste can decrease the amount of storage space required by reducing the volume requirements of storage containers. A demonstration program was performed at the Cryofracture facility by Nuclear Remedial Technologies for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Cryofracture is a size-reducing process whereby objects are frozen to liquid nitrogen temperatures and crushed in a large hydraulic press. Material s at cryogenic temperatures have low ductility and are easily size-reduced by fracturing. Six 55-gallon drums and six 2 x 2 x 8 ft boxes containing simulated waste with tracers were subjected to the Cryofracture process. Data was obtained on (a) cool-down time, (b) yield strength of the containers, (c) size distribution of the waste before and after the Cryofracture process, (d) volume reduction of the waste, and (e) sampling of air and surface dusts for spread of tracers to evaluate potential contamination spread. The Cryofracture process was compared to conventional shredders and detailed cost estimates were established for construction of a Cryofracture facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

  13. Advancing prion science: guidance for the National Prion Research Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erdtmann, Rick; Sivitz, Laura

    2004-01-01

    ...€™s National Prion Research Program (NPRP). Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), also called prion diseases, are invariably fatal neurodegenerative infectious diseases that include bovine spongiform encephalopathy...

  14. Management of remote-handled defense transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebra, M.A.; Pierce, G.D.; Carson, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    Transuranic (TRU) wastes generated by defense-related activities are scheduled for emplacement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico beginning in October 1988. After five years of operation as a research and development facility, the WIPP may be designated as a permanent repository for these wastes, if it has been demonstrated that this deep, geologically stable formation is a safe disposal option. Defense TRU wastes are currently stored at various Department of Energy (DOE) sites across the nation. Approximately 2% by volume of currently stored TRU wastes are defined, on the basis of dose rates, as remote-handled (RH). RH wastes continue to be generated at various locations operated by DOE contractors. They require special handling and processing prior to and during emplacement in the WIPP. This paper describes the strategy for managing defense RH TRU wastes

  15. Test plan for demonstration of Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This plan describes tests to demonstrate the capability of the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) to monitor airborne alpha-emitting radionuclides and analyze soil, smear, and filter samples for alpha- and gamma-emitting radionuclides under field conditions. The RTML will be tested during June 1993 at a site adjacent to the Cold Test Pit at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Measurement systems installed in the RTML that will be demonstrated include two large-area ionization chamber alpha spectrometers, an x-ray/gamma-ray spectrometer, and four alpha continuous air monitors. Test objectives, requirements for data quality, experimental apparatus and procedures, and safety and logistics issues are described

  16. National Security Education Program: Background and Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuenzi, Jeffrey J; Riddle, Wayne C

    2005-01-01

    ... knowledgeable about the languages and cultures of foreign nations, especially those which are of national security concern and have not traditionally been the focus of American interest and study...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2010-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2011-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  19. 77 FR 47913 - The National Center for Mobility Management Under FTA's National Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... Management Under FTA's National Research Program AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), as the primary staff agency to the Federal... transportation service delivery. FTA, under its National Research Program, plans to fund a National Center for...

  20. Hydrogen explosion testing with a simulated transuranic drum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dykes, K.L.; Meyer, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    Transuranic (TRU) waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently stored onsite for future retrieval and permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Some of the TRU waste is stored in vented 210-liter (55-gallon) drums and consists of gloves, wipes, plastic valves, tools, etc. Gas generation caused by radiolysis and biodegradation of these organic waste materials may produce a flammable hydrogen-air mixture (>4% v/v) in the multi-layer plastic waste bags. Using a worst case scenario, a drum explosion test program was carried out to determine the hydrogen concentration necessary to cause removal of the drum lid. Test results indicate an explosive mixture up to 15% v/v of hydrogen can be contained in an SRS TRU drum without total integrity failure via lid removal

  1. Integration of long-range planning for management of defense transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, K.V.; McFadden, M.H.; Raudenbush, M.H.; Smith, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    As described in The Defense Waste Management Plan, the defense TRU program goal is to achieve permanent disposal and to end interim storage. TRU waste is currently stored at six Department of Energy (DOE) sites, and new waste is generated at several more sites. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project is well defined, and it has been necessary to integrate the activities of other parts of the TRU program in support of DOE Headquarters policy and the WIPP schedules and technical requirements. The strategy is described in the Defense Transuranic Waste Program Strategy Document. More detailed, quantitative plans have been developed through the use of several system models, with a Long-Range Master Plan for Defense Transuranic Waste Management as the focal point for coordination of proposed plans with all the parties involved

  2. A data automation system at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, S.E.; Schneider, C.M.; Pickrell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has developed an automated computer program, Data Review Expert System (DRXS), for reviewing nondestructive assay (NDA) data. DRXS significantly reduces the data review time needed to meet characterization requirements for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is in the process of developing a computer program, Software System Logic for Intelligent Certification (SSLIC), to automate other tasks associa ted with characterization of Transuranic Waste (TRU) samples. LANL has incorporated a version of DRXS specific to LANL's isotopic data into SSLIC. This version of SSLIC was audited by the National Transuranic Program on October, 24, 2001. This paper will present the results of the audit, and discuss future plans for SSLIC including the integration on the INEELLANL developed Rule Editor.

  3. 78 FR 79567 - National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ... Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in Schools as Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids... interim rule entitled National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for..., 2013 / Rules and Regulations [[Page 79567

  4. Environmental Programs: National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2001-05-01

    Major NREL environmental programs and initiatives include: integrated energy and environmental strategies; implementation of air pollution programs and climate change programs; Green Power Network; environmental and economic impacts and benefits of energy efficiency and renewable energy (EERE) technologies; technology transfer between developed and developing countries; greenhouse gas emission reduction projects; climate change action plans with developing countries and development of life cycle assessments.

  5. Small Business Programs - The National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshal Office of the Joint Surgeon PARC Small Business Programs Chaplain Diversity NGB-GOMO Resources Legislative Liaison Small Business Programs Social Media State Websites Videos Featured Videos On Every Front ARNG Readiness Home : Leadership : Joint Staff : Special Staff : Small Business Programs Small Business

  6. National investment programs and sustainable development

    OpenAIRE

    Szyja, Paulina

    2014-01-01

    In situation of economic crisis many countries, for example the United States, members of European Union prepared anti-crisis programs to conduct investments. In most cases, they concentrated on modernization of transport or energy infrastructure. In Poland it would have been presented program "Polish Investments". The main purposes of the article is presentation of public investments programs and their role in sustainable development.

  7. Innovative technologies for the remediation of transuranic- contaminated landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostelnik, K.M.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a comprehensive research,development, demonstration, testing and evaluation program to provide innovative technology systems to achieve its environmental management responsibilities. The Office of Technology Development (OTD) is responsible for this research in support of the Offices of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management efforts. In fiscal year (FY) 1992 the OTD established the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID). The BWID mission was to support the development of emerging technologies for their application to the remediation of DOE buried waste site. During FY95, the BWID program was transitioned into a larger program which will focus its attention to DOE Landfills and Contaminated Soils. There search and activities formerly referred to as the BWID will now be associated with the Transuranic-contaminated Arid Landfill Stabilization Program.(TALS). The TALS Program supports these buried waste remediation efforts by seeking out the best talent to solve the technology challenges as identified in baseline remediation strategies. Experts from throughout the DOE complex, universities, private sector, and the international community are being included in this program to solve these challenges and ensure implementation and commercialization of innovative technologies

  8. Graphical programming at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, M.J.; Palmquist, R.D.; Desjarlais, L.

    1993-09-01

    Sandia has developed an advanced operational control system approach, called Graphical Programming, to design, program, and operate robotic systems. The Graphical Programming approach produces robot systems that are faster to develop and use, safer in operation, and cheaper overall than altemative teleoperation or autonomous robot control systems. Graphical Programming also provides an efficient and easy-to-use interface to traditional robot systems for use in setup and programming tasks. This paper provides an overview of the Graphical Programming approach and lists key features of Graphical Programming systems. Graphical Programming uses 3-D visualization and simulation software with intuitive operator interfaces for the programming and control of complex robotic systems. Graphical Programming Supervisor software modules allow an operator to command and simulate complex tasks in a graphic preview mode and, when acceptable, command the actual robots and monitor their motions with the graphic system. Graphical Programming Supervisors maintain registration with the real world and allow the robot to perform tasks that cannot be accurately represented with models alone by using a combination of model and sensor-based control

  9. 75 FR 57658 - National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Correcting Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... [Docket No. APHIS-2006-0093] RIN 0579-AC04 National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Correcting Amendment..., Docket No. APHIS-2006-0093), and effective on February 1, 2010, we amended the National Veterinary... Veterinary Accreditation Program, VS, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 200, Riverdale, MD 20737; (301) 851-3401...

  10. Statistics and sampling in transuranic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhardt, L.L.; Gilbert, R.O.

    1980-01-01

    The existing data on transuranics in the environment exhibit a remarkably high variability from sample to sample (coefficients of variation of 100% or greater). This chapter stresses the necessity of adequate sample size and suggests various ways to increase sampling efficiency. Objectives in sampling are regarded as being of great importance in making decisions as to sampling methodology. Four different classes of sampling methods are described: (1) descriptive sampling, (2) sampling for spatial pattern, (3) analytical sampling, and (4) sampling for modeling. A number of research needs are identified in the various sampling categories along with several problems that appear to be common to two or more such areas

  11. The national standards program for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittemore, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    In 1970 a standards committee called ANS-15 was established by the American Nuclear Society (ANS) to prepare appropriate standards for research reactors. In addition, ANS acts as Secretariat for a national standards committee N17 which is responsible to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) for the national consensus efforts for standards related to research reactors. To date ANS-15 has completed or is working on 14 standards covering all aspects of the operation of research reactors. Of the 11 research reactor standards submitted to the ANSI N17 Committee since its inception, six have been issued as National standards, and the remaining are still in the process of review. (author)

  12. 75 FR 14454 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; National Infrastructure Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ..., National Infrastructure Advisory Council. [FR Doc. 2010-6633 Filed 3-24-10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 9110-9P-P ... Directorate; National Infrastructure Advisory Council AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate... Infrastructure Advisory Council (NIAC) will meet on Tuesday, April 13, 2010, at the National Press Club's...

  13. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration: National Weather Service Modernization and Weather Satellite Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Willemssen, Joel

    2000-01-01

    ...). At your request, we will discuss the status of the National Weather Service (NWS) systems modernization and the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) program...

  14. Plutonium and other transuranics in small vertebrates: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, W.G.; Moor, K.S.; Naegle, S.R.

    1977-01-01

    The published data relevant to transuranics in small vertebrates inhabiting terrestrial environments is reviewed. Experimental results indicate that atomic size and valence state affect rates of absorption, transportation, and excretion of transuranics in living systems. Whereas there is a marked tendency for transuranics to hydrolyze to insoluble colloidal products at physiological pH, complexing agents and chelation enhance solubility and transportability. The natural modes of uptake of transuranics by vertebrates include absorption from the gut, the intact or damaged skin, and inhalation. Absorption from the gut into the bloodstream is very low. Potential hazards may exist if complexing or chelating agents are present, if absorption is continuous, or if exposure involves young animals. The intact skin provides an effective barrier to absorption of transuranics. Relatively high levels of absorption may occur when transuranics are administered subcutaneously or intramuscularly, particularly with increased acidity and solubility of the compounds. Inhalation is probably the most hazardous natural route of uptake. Insoluble transuranic compounds are retained in the lung and soluble compounds are transported rapidly via the blood to bone, liver, and other organs. Deposition of plutonium in mammalian gonads resulting in a decrease in spermatogenesis, ovarian damage, and reduced fecundity is documented. The current knowledge of the behavior of transuranics in terrestrial environments is limited. Plutonium and americium uptake by small mammals has been documented. Plutonium body burdens were related to depressed leukocyte count on a statistical basis. Reduced rodent populations in areas of high plutonium concentrations illustrate the problems of evaluating uptake by mobile animals

  15. Pre-1970 transuranic solid waste at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, W.O.

    1995-01-01

    The document is based on a search of pre-1970 Hanford Solid Waste Records. The available data indicates seven out of thirty-one solid waste burial sites used for pre-1970 waste appear to be Transuranic (TRU). A burial site defined to be TRU contains >100 nCi/gm Transuranic nuclides

  16. Distribution of transuranic nuclides in soils: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essington, E.H.; Fowler, E.B.

    1976-01-01

    The literature is reviewed to ascertain the degree of movement and the distribution patterns for transuranic and uranium nuclides in soils. Typical plutonium and uranium profiles are presented and an attempt is made to identify unique characteristics causing deviation from an ideal distribution pattern. By far most of the distribution observations are with plutonium and little is reported for uranium and other transuranic nuclides

  17. Project Management Plan for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental Test Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, M.J.; Sayer, D.L.

    1993-11-01

    EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) are participating in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL's) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP). The purpose of the INEL WET is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data on transuranic (TRU) waste to be stored at WIPP. The waste characterization data collected will be used to support the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA), development of the disposal No-Migration Variance Petition (NMVP), and to support the WIPP disposal decision. The PA is an analysis required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 191 (40 CFR 191), which identifies the processes and events that may affect the disposal system (WIPP) and examines the effects of those processes and events on the performance of WIPP. A NMVP is required for the WIPP by 40 CFR 268 in order to dispose of land disposal restriction (LDR) mixed TRU waste in WIPP. It is anticipated that the detailed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste characterization data of all INEL retrievably-stored TRU waste to be stored in WIPP will be required for the NMVP. Waste characterization requirements for PA and RCRA may not necessarily be identical. Waste characterization requirements for the PA will be defined by Sandia National Laboratories. The requirements for RCRA are defined in 40 CFR 268, WIPP RCRA Part B Application Waste Analysis Plan (WAP), and WIPP Waste Characterization Program Plan (WWCP). This Project Management Plan (PMP) addresses only the characterization of the contact handled (CH) TRU waste at the INEL. This document will address all work in which EG ampersand G Idaho is responsible concerning the INEL WETP. Even though EG ampersand G Idaho has no responsibility for the work that ANL-W is performing, EG ampersand G Idaho will keep a current status and provide a project coordination effort with ANL-W to ensure that the INEL, as a whole, is effectively and

  18. In situ grouting of buried transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, B.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This task is a demonstration and evaluation of the in situ hydrologic stabilization of buried transuranic waste at a humid site via grout injection. Two small trenches, containing buried transuranic waste, were filled with 34,000 liters of polyacrylamide grout. Initial field results have indicated that voids within the trenches were totally filled by the grout and that the intratrench hydraulic conductivity was reduced to below field-measurable values. The grout was also completely contained within the two trenches as no grout constituents were observed in the 12 perimeter ground water monitoring wells. Polyacrylamide grout was selected for field demonstration over polyacrylate grout because of its superior performance in laboratory degradation studies. Also supporting the selection of polyacrylamide was the difficulty of controlling the set time of the acrylate polymerization process in the presence of potassium ferricyanide. Based on preliminary degradation monitoring, polyacrylamide was estimated to have a microbiological half-life of 115 years in the test soil. However, this calculated value is likely to be conservatively low because microbial degradation of the grout set accelerator or residual monomer may be contributing most to the measured microbial respiration. Addition work, using 14 C-labeled acrylate and acrylamide grouts, is being carried out to more accurately estimate the grouts' microbiological half-life

  19. Geochemistry of transuranic elements at Bikini Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schell, W.R.; Lowman, F.G.; Marshall, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    The distribution of transuranic and other radionuclides in the marine environment at Bikini Atoll was studied to better understand the geochemical cycling of radionuclides produced by nuclear testing between 1946 and 1958. The reef areas, which are washed continually by clean ocean water, have low levels of radionuclide concentrations. Radionuclides are contained in fallout particles of pulverized coral. In the water these particles may dissolve, be transported by currents within the Atoll, or enter the North Equatorial Current by tidal exchange of water in the lagoon. The transuranic elements are distributed widely in sediments over the northwest quadrant of the Atoll, which suggests that this area serves as a settling basin for particles. The distribution of plutonium in the water column indicates that plutonium in the sediments is released to the bottom waters and then is transported and diluted by the prevailing currents. Upon interaction with the lagoon environment, plutonium occurs in several physicochemical states. Laboratory tests and field studies at Bikini show that approximately 15% of the plutonium is associated with the colloidal fraction

  20. Hanford site transuranic waste certification plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREAGER, T.M.

    1999-01-01

    As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A, ''Radioactive Waste Management, and the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant' (DOE 1996d) (WIPP WAC). The WIPP WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WIPP WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their management of TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter41 (TRUPACT-11). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-I1 requirements in the ''Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package'' (NRC 1997) (TRUPACT-I1 SARP)

  1. Dewitt Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund National Library Power Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Annual (SLMA), 1993

    1993-01-01

    Describes the National Library Power Program, a collaborative effort sponsored by the Dewitt Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund in cooperation with local education funds and public school districts that was designed to create public elementary and middle school library programs that are central to the education program of the school. (LRW)

  2. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2013-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2014-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1.

  4. Risk perception on management of nuclear high-level and transuranic waste storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, Lawrence A. [Colorado Christian Univ., Lakewood, CO (United States)

    1994-08-15

    The Department of Energy`s program for disposing of nuclear High-Level Waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste has been impeded by overwhelming political opposition fueled by public perceptions of actual risk. Analysis of these perceptions shows them to be deeply rooted in images of fear and dread that have been present since the discovery of radioactivity. The development and use of nuclear weapons linked these images to reality and the mishandling of radioactive waste from the nations military weapons facilities has contributed toward creating a state of distrust that cannot be erased quickly or easily. In addition, the analysis indicates that even the highly educated technical community is not well informed on the latest technology involved with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. It is not surprising then, that the general public feels uncomfortable with DOE`s management plans for with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. Postponing the permanent geologic repository and use of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) would provide the time necessary for difficult social and political issues to be resolved. It would also allow time for the public to become better educated if DOE chooses to become proactive.

  5. DOE assay methods used for characterization of contact-handled transuranic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, F.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Caldwell, J.T. (Pajarito Scientific Corp., Los Alamos, NM (United States))

    1991-08-01

    US Department of Energy methods used for characterization of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste prior to shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are described and listed by contractor site. The methods described are part of the certification process. All CH-TRU waste must be assayed for determination of fissile material content and decay heat values prior to shipment and prior to storage on-site. Both nondestructive assay (NDA) and destructive assay methods are discussed, and new NDA developments such as passive-action neutron (PAN) crate counter improvements and neutron imaging are detailed. Specifically addressed are assay method physics; applicability to CH-TRU wastes; calibration standards and implementation; operator training requirements and practices; assay procedures; assay precision, bias, and limit of detection; and assay limitation. While PAN is a new technique and does not yet have established American Society for Testing and Materials. American National Standards Institute, or Nuclear Regulatory Commission guidelines or methods describing proper calibration procedures, equipment setup, etc., comparisons of PAN data with the more established assay methods (e.g., segmented gamma scanning) have demonstrated its reliability and accuracy. Assay methods employed by DOE have been shown to reliable and accurate in determining fissile, radionuclide, alpha-curie content, and decay heat values of CH-TRU wastes. These parameters are therefore used to characterize packaged waste for use in certification programs such as that used in shipment of CH-TRU waste to the WIPP. 36 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Risk perception on management of nuclear high-level and transuranic waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dees, L.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy's program for disposing of nuclear High-Level Waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste has been impeded by overwhelming political opposition fueled by public perceptions of actual risk. Analysis of these perceptions shows them to be deeply rooted in images of fear and dread that have been present since the discovery of radioactivity. The development and use of nuclear weapons linked these images to reality and the mishandling of radioactive waste from the nations military weapons facilities has contributed toward creating a state of distrust that cannot be erased quickly or easily. In addition, the analysis indicates that even the highly educated technical community is not well informed on the latest technology involved with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. It is not surprising then, that the general public feels uncomfortable with DOE's management plans for with nuclear HLW and TRU waste disposal. Postponing the permanent geologic repository and use of Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) would provide the time necessary for difficult social and political issues to be resolved. It would also allow time for the public to become better educated if DOE chooses to become proactive

  7. DOE assay methods used for characterization of contact-handled transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, F.J.; Caldwell, J.T.

    1991-08-01

    US Department of Energy methods used for characterization of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste prior to shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are described and listed by contractor site. The methods described are part of the certification process. All CH-TRU waste must be assayed for determination of fissile material content and decay heat values prior to shipment and prior to storage on-site. Both nondestructive assay (NDA) and destructive assay methods are discussed, and new NDA developments such as passive-action neutron (PAN) crate counter improvements and neutron imaging are detailed. Specifically addressed are assay method physics; applicability to CH-TRU wastes; calibration standards and implementation; operator training requirements and practices; assay procedures; assay precision, bias, and limit of detection; and assay limitation. While PAN is a new technique and does not yet have established American Society for Testing and Materials. American National Standards Institute, or Nuclear Regulatory Commission guidelines or methods describing proper calibration procedures, equipment setup, etc., comparisons of PAN data with the more established assay methods (e.g., segmented gamma scanning) have demonstrated its reliability and accuracy. Assay methods employed by DOE have been shown to reliable and accurate in determining fissile, radionuclide, alpha-curie content, and decay heat values of CH-TRU wastes. These parameters are therefore used to characterize packaged waste for use in certification programs such as that used in shipment of CH-TRU waste to the WIPP. 36 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs

  8. Long-lived legacy: Managing high-level and transuranic waste at the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. Background paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The document focuses on high-level and transuranic waste at the DOE nuclear weapons complex. Reviews some of the critical areas and aspects of the DOE waste problem in order to provide data and further analysis of important issues. Partial contents, High-Level Waste Management at the DOE Weapons Complex, are as follows: High-Level Waste Management: Present and Planned; Amount and Distribution; Current and Potential Problems; Vitrification; Calcination; Alternative Waste Forms for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Technologies for Pretreatment of High-Level Waste; Waste Minimization; Regulatory Framework; Definition of High-Level Waste; Repository Delays and Contingency Planning; Urgency of High-Level Tank Waste Treatment; Technologies for High-Level Waste Treatment; Rethinking the Waste Form and Package; Waste Form for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Releases to the Atmosphere; Future of the PUREX Plant at Hanford; Waste Minimization; Tritium Production; International Cooperation; Scenarios for Future HLW Production. Partial contents of Chapter 2, Managing Transuranic Waste at the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex, are as follows: Transuranic Waste at Department of Energy Sites; Amount and Distribution; Waste Management: Present and Planned; Current and Potential Problems; Three Technologies for Treating Retrievably Stored Transuranic Waste; In Situ Vitrification; The Applied Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Plan (RDDT ampersand E); Actinide Conversion (Transmutation); Waste Minimization; The Regulatory Framework; Definition of, and Standards for, Disposal of Transuranic Waste; Repository Delays; Alternative Storage and Disposal Strategies; Remediation of Buried Waste; The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant; Waste Minimization; Scenarios for Future Transuranic Waste Production; Conditions of No-Migration Determination

  9. National Hispanic Bilingual Engineering Program (NHBEP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, M.

    2000-10-31

    This report describes program goals, activities, processes, benefits for the profession of engineering and for the project participants, coordination, and impact of NHBEP throughout the three years of implementation.

  10. Nevada National Security Site Radiation Protection Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Managers' Council, Radiological Control

    2018-03-12

    This is a shared document required by 10 CFR 835 for all contractors conducting radiological work at the Nevada National Security Site. Please record the Author as "Radiological Control Managers' Council" for consistency with previous RPPs and Rad Con Manuals.

  11. National Syrian Program for Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.; Takriti, S.

    2009-06-01

    A national plan for radioactive waste management has been presented. It includes identifying, transport, recording, classifying, processing and disposal. It is an important reference for radioactive waste management for those dealing with radioactive waste, and presents a complete protection to environemnt and people. (author)

  12. Applied programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    This document overviews the areas of current research at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Technology transfer and the user facilities are discussed. Current topics are presented in the areas of applied physics, chemical science, material science, energy efficiency and conservation, environmental health and mathematics, biosystems and process science, oceanography, and nuclear energy. (GHH)

  13. Medical Effects of a Transuranic "Dirty Bomb".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durakovic, Asaf

    2017-03-01

    The modern military battlefields are characterized by the use of nonconventional weapons such as encountered in the conflicts of the Gulf War I and Gulf War II. Recent warfare in Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Balkans has introduced radioactive weapons to the modern war zone scenarios. This presents the military medicine with a new area of radioactive warfare with the potential large scale contamination of military and civilian targets with the variety of radioactive isotopes further enhanced by the clandestine use of radioactive materials in the terrorist radioactive warfare. Radioactive dispersal devices (RDDs), including the "dirty bomb," involve the use of organotropic radioisotopes such as iodine 131, cesium 137, strontium 90, and transuranic elements. Some of the current studies of RDDs involve large-scale medical effects, social and economic disruption of the society, logistics of casualty management, cleanup, and transportation preparedness, still insufficiently addressed by the environmental and mass casualty medicine. The consequences of a dirty bomb, particularly in the terrorist use in urban areas, are a subject of international studies of multiple agencies involved in the management of disaster medicine. The long-term somatic and genetic impact of some from among over 400 radioisotopes released in the nuclear fission include somatic and transgenerational genetic effects with the potential challenges of the genomic stability of the biosphere. The global contamination is additionally heightened by the presence of transuranic elements in the modern warzone, including depleted uranium recently found to contain plutonium 239, possibly the most dangerous substance known to man with one pound of plutonium capable of causing 8 billion cancers. The planning for the consequences of radioactive dirty bomb are being currently studied in reference to the alkaline earths, osteotropic, and stem cell hazards of internally deposited radioactive isotopes, in particular

  14. Critical evaluation of the limit of transuranic contamination of low level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodger, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    The suggested limit for transuranics of 10 nanocuries/gram as a break point at which wastes should go to a national repository is seriously questioned. It is shown that insofar as protection of water supplies is concerned, the key to the problem is $sup 90$Sr, not transuranics, and in any case, the limit should be based on a site-determined inventory, not on concentration. Concentration is only important as a protection for future stumblers who might dig into the waste. Calculations are presented to show that for this purpose the limit should be higher by several orders of magnitude. The 10 nanocurie/gram should be used as a definition of complete innocuousness. 4 refs

  15. 75 FR 39266 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; National Infrastructure Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Infrastructure Disruptions VII. New Business VIII. Closing Remarks IX. Adjournment Procedural While this meeting... Directorate; National Infrastructure Advisory Council AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate... Infrastructure Advisory Council (NIAC) will meet on Tuesday, July 13, 2010, at the National Press Club's Ballroom...

  16. 77 FR 12623 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... discuss National [[Page 12624

  17. Selected charts: National Waste Terminal Storage Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Staff members of the Office of Waste Isolation on October 21, 1977 reviewed the status of the OWI Waste Management Program for Commissioner E.E. Varanini III, State of California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission, and members of his staff. Copies of the viewgraphs and 35-mm slides shown at the briefing are compiled

  18. Active sites environmental monitoring Program - Program Plan: Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, C.M.; Hicks, D.S.; Ashwood, T.L.; Cunningham, G.R.

    1994-05-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of active low-level-waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Several changes have recently occurred in regard to the sites that are currently used for waste storage and disposal. These changes require a second set of revisions to the ASEMP program plan. This document incorporates those revisions. This program plan presents the organization and procedures for monitoring the active sites. The program plan also provides internal reporting levels to guide the evaluation of monitoring results

  19. National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) Residential Historical Claims

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) aims to reduce the impact of flooding—a burden not covered by homeowner’s insurance—by providing insurance to homeowners,...

  20. National Nanotechnology Initiative Investments by Agency and Program Component Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President — Data represents National Nanotechnology Initiative investments by agency and program component area (PCA) from FY 2001 through FY 2010 (requested). While this data...

  1. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) National Coastal Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) National Coastal Database contains estuarine and coastal data that EMAP and Regional-EMAP have collected...

  2. National Program of Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Samper, J. L.; Dominguez Hung, L.; Morales Lopez, J. L.; Alfonso Laguardia, R.; Garcia Yip, F.

    2001-01-01

    It tries on the establishment of a Quality Assurance Nacional System, a Quality Assurance Committee implemented in Cuba, and a Quality Auditory National Program implemented in Cuba to control and assure radiotherapy quality

  3. Program Spotlight: National Outreach Network's Community Health Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Outreach Network of Community Health Educators located at Community Network Program Centers, Partnerships to Advance Cancer Health Equity, and NCI-designated cancer centers help patients and their families receive survivorship support.

  4. Labeling of Pesticide Products under the National Organic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    This notice describes how registrants can obtain EPA approval of label language indicating that all ingredients in a pesticide product and all uses of that pesticide meet the criteria defined in the USDA National Organic Program Rule.

  5. The National Agriculture Imagery Program Change 2002-2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The National Agriculture Imagery Program Change 2002-2017 is a web mapping application hosted on the ArcGIS online FSA Organizational Subscription. This web...

  6. Physical Properties of Hanford Transuranic Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, John C.

    2010-03-25

    The research described herein was undertaken to provide needed physical property descriptions of the Hanford transuranic tank sludges under conditions that might exist during retrieval, treatment, packaging and transportation for disposal. The work addressed the development of a fundamental understanding of the types of systems represented by these sludge suspensions through correlation of the macroscopic rheological properties with particle interactions occurring at the colloidal scale in the various liquid media. The results of the work have advanced existing understanding of the sedimentation and aggregation properties of complex colloidal suspensions. Bench scale models were investigated with respect to their structural, colloidal and rheological properties that should be useful for the development and optimization of techniques to process the wastes at various DOE sites.

  7. Dry separation technology of transuranic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tadashi

    1999-01-01

    The separation principle of transuranic elements (TRU) by a dry method, the separation technique of TRU from a high level waste solution and a dry recycle technology of LWR and FBR fuel cycle are explained. The dry method used molten salt and liquid metal. TRU and the rare earth elements in the molten salt (LiCl-KCl, LiCl-KCl/Cd and LiCl-KCl/Bi system) were separated by two methods such as the electrolytic refining and the reduction-extraction method. The former method separated 98% U, Np and Pu, but low Am. The latter method was able to separate more than 99.9% Np and Pu and 99.7% Am. (S.Y.)

  8. Los Alamos Transuranic Waste Size Reduction Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.; Warren, J.

    1987-06-01

    The Los Alamos Transuranic (TRU) Waste Size Reduction Facility (SRF) is a production oriented prototype. The facility is operated to remotely cut and repackage TRU contaminated metallic wastes (e.g., glove boxes, ducting and pipes) for eventual disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The resulting flat sections are packaged into a tested Department of Transportation Type 7A metal container. To date, the facility has successfully processed stainless steel glove boxes (with and without lead shielding construction) and retention tanks. We have found that used glove boxes generate more cutting fumes than do unused glove boxes or metal plates - possibly due to deeply embedded chemical residues from years of service. Water used as a secondary fluid with the plasma arc cutting system significantly reduces visible fume generation during the cutting of used glove boxes and lead-lined glove boxes. 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. Recovery of transuranics from process residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.; Gray, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    Process residues are generated at both the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) and the Savannah River Plant (SRP) during aqueous chemical and pyrochemical operations. Frequently, process operations will result in either impure products or produce residues sufficiently contaminated with transuranics to be nondiscardable as waste. Purification and recovery flowsheets for process residues have been developed to generate solutions compatible with subsequent Purex operations and either solid or liquid waste suitable for disposal. The ''scrub alloy'' and the ''anode heel alloy'' are examples of materials generated at RFP which have been processed at SRP using the developed recovery flowsheets. Examples of process residues being generated at SRP for which flowsheets are under development include LECO crucibles and alpha-contaminated hydraulic oil

  10. Los Alamos Transuranic Waste Size Reduction Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.; Warren, J.

    1987-01-01

    The Los Alamos Transuranic (TRU) Waste Size Reduction Facility (SRF) is a production oriented prototype completed in 1981 and later modified during 1986 to enhance production. The facility is operated to remotely cut (with a plasma arc torch) and repackage TRU contaminated metallic wastes (e.g., glove boxes, ducting and pipes) for eventual disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The resulting flat sections are packaged into a tested Department of Transportation Type 7A metal container. To date, the facility has successfully processed stainless steel glove boxes (with and without lead shielding construction) and retention tanks. It was found that used glove boxes generate more cutting fumes than do unused glove boxes or metal plates - possibly due to deeply embedded chemical residues from years of service. Water used as a secondary fluid with the plasma arc cutting system significantly reduces visible fume generation during the cutting of used glove boxes and lead-lined glove boxes

  11. Review of the WIPP draft application to show compliance with EPA transuranic waste disposal standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neill, R.H.; Chaturvedi, L.; Clemo, T.M.

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of the New Mexico Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) is to conduct an independent technical evaluation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project to ensure the protection of the public health and safety and the environment. The WIPP Project, located in southeastern New Mexico, is being constructed as a repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes generated by the national defense programs. The EEG was established in 1978 with funds provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to the State of New Mexico. Public Law 100-456, the National Defense Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1989, Section 1433, assigned EEG to the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and continued the original contract DE-AC04-79AL10752 through DOE contract DE-AC04-89AL58309. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1994, Public Law 103-160, continues the authorization. EEG performs independent technical analyses of the suitability of the proposed site; the design of the repository, its planned operation, and its long-term integrity; suitability and safety of the transportation systems; suitability of the Waste Acceptance Criteria and the generator sites' compliance with them; and related subjects. These analyses include assessments of reports issued by the DOE and its contractors, other federal agencies and organizations, as they relate to the potential health, safety and environmental impacts from WIPP. Another important function of EEG is the independent environmental monitoring of background radioactivity in air, water, and soil, both on-site and off-site

  12. Review of the WIPP draft application to show compliance with EPA transuranic waste disposal standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neill, R.H.; Chaturvedi, L.; Clemo, T.M. [and others

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of the New Mexico Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) is to conduct an independent technical evaluation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project to ensure the protection of the public health and safety and the environment. The WIPP Project, located in southeastern New Mexico, is being constructed as a repository for the disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes generated by the national defense programs. The EEG was established in 1978 with funds provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to the State of New Mexico. Public Law 100-456, the National Defense Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1989, Section 1433, assigned EEG to the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and continued the original contract DE-AC04-79AL10752 through DOE contract DE-AC04-89AL58309. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1994, Public Law 103-160, continues the authorization. EEG performs independent technical analyses of the suitability of the proposed site; the design of the repository, its planned operation, and its long-term integrity; suitability and safety of the transportation systems; suitability of the Waste Acceptance Criteria and the generator sites` compliance with them; and related subjects. These analyses include assessments of reports issued by the DOE and its contractors, other federal agencies and organizations, as they relate to the potential health, safety and environmental impacts from WIPP. Another important function of EEG is the independent environmental monitoring of background radioactivity in air, water, and soil, both on-site and off-site.

  13. National Space Weather Program Advances on Several Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzelman, Mark; Babcock, Michael

    2008-10-01

    The National Space Weather Program (NSWP; http://www.nswp.gov) is a U.S. federal government interagency initiative through the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology that was created to speed the improvement of space weather services for the nation. The Committee for Space Weather (CSW) under the NSWP has continued to advance the program on a number of fronts over the past 12 months.

  14. Transuranic waste transportation issues in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Channell, J.K.; Rodgers, J.C.; Neill, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) expects to begin disposal of defence transuranic wastes at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Southeastern New Mexico before the end of 1988. Approximately 25,000 truck shipments involving 35 million vehicle kilometers will be required to transport about 175,000 m 3 of contact-handled transuranic waste. Up to 5,000 shipments of remote-handled transuranic waste (RH-TRU) will also be shipped to WIPP in shielded casks. This paper addresses the shipment of CH-TRU wastes

  15. Perceptions of a National Achievement Assessment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marielle Simon

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The School Achievement Indicators Program (SAIP has been collecting data across Canada on 13- and 16-year-old student achievement in mathematics, in science, and in reading and writing since 1993. In 1999, it completed its second assessment cycle and was reviewed in Spring 2000. The review design included a survey of officials from all the school boards/districts that participated in the science assessment program held in 1999. The results of this study show that this stakeholder views as the most pressing issue for SAIP to succeed in its mandate, the need for development in four areas: a Increased teacher and student motivation to participate wholeheartedly in the program; b Effective dissemination options; c Leadership through innovation in teaching and in assessment practices despite high accountability orientation; and d Cost-effective, yet rigorous means of providing both snapshot information and longitudinal means of comparisons. Although universally appealing, such approaches have yet to be supported by sound educational theory and methodology.

  16. Biological effects of transuranic elements in the environment: human effects and risk estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.C.; Wachholz, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    The potential for human effects from environmentally dispersed transuranic elements is briefly reviewed. Inhalation of transuranics suspended in air and ingestion of transuranics deposited on or incorporated in foodstuffs are the significant routes of entry. Inhalation is probably the more important of these routes because gastrointestinal absorption of ingested transuranics is so inefficient. Major uncertainties are those concerned with substantially enhanced absorption by the very young and the possibility of increased availability as transuranics become incorporated in biological food chains

  17. National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research Program Directory, 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (ED/OSERS), Washington, DC.

    This directory lists all projects funded by the National Institute of Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) during the 1999 fiscal year. It includes summaries, funding data, and contact information for a broad range of programs. Programs are grouped into the following research priorities: (1) employment outcomes; (2) health and function;…

  18. 76 FR 288 - National Organic Program (NOP); Sunset Review (2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ....C. 6507(b)(2)), a State organic certification program may contain additional requirements for the... the certification of organic farm and handling operations located within the State under certain... Service 7 CFR Part 205 [Document Number AMS-TM-07-0136; TM-07-14PR] RIN 0581-AC77 National Organic Program...

  19. Progress report of the National Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, L.G.; Brown, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinney, L.F. [Synertech Systems Corp. (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The National Weatherization Evaluation of the 1989 Program Year and the Metaevaluation of 1996 are described in two ways in this summary document. The text pages summarize the results of the two evaluations conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The photographs and explanations illustrate weatherization operations and tactics. An overview and history of the program is provided, followed by the scope of weatherization, metaevaluation methods and results for 1996, national evaluation methods and results for 1989, response to evaluation findings, remaining opportunities, and next steps. Conclusions and significant findings are then given.

  20. National NIF Diagnostic Program Fiscal Year 2002 Second Quarter Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGowan, B

    2002-01-01

    Since October 2001 the development of the facility diagnostics for NIF has been funded by the NIF Director through the National NIF Diagnostic Program (NNDP). The current emphasis of the NNDP is on diagnostics for the early NIF quad scheduled to be available for experiment commissioning in FY03. During the past six months the NNDP has set in place processes for funding diagnostics, developing requirements for diagnostics, design reviews and monthly status reporting. Those processes are described in an interim management plan for diagnostics (National NIF Diagnostic Program Interim Plan, NIF-008 13 15, April 2002) and a draft Program Execution Plan (Program Execution Plan for the National NlF Diagnostic Program, NIF-0072083, October 2001) and documents cited therein. Work has been funded at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bechtel Nevada at Los Alamos and Santa Barbara. There are no major technical risks with the early diagnostics. The main concerns relate to integration of the diagnostics into the facility, all such issues are being worked. This report is organized to show the schedule and budget status and a summary of Change Control Board actions for the past six months. The following sections then provide short descriptions of the status of each diagnostic. Where design reviews or requirements documents are cited, the documents are available on the Diagnostics file server or on request

  1. Recoverable immobilization of transuranic elements in sulfate ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Wilbur O.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of reversibly immobilizing sulfate ash at least about 20% of which is sulfates of transuranic elements. The ash is mixed with a metal which can be aluminum, cerium, samarium, europium, or a mixture thereof, in amounts sufficient to form an alloy with the transuranic elements, plus an additional amount to reduce the transuranic element sulfates to elemental form. Also added to the ash is a fluxing agent in an amount sufficient to lower the percentage of the transuranic element sulfates to about 1% to about 10%. The mixture of the ash, metal, and fluxing agent is heated to a temperature sufficient to melt the fluxing agent and the metal. The mixture is then cooled and the alloy is separated from the remainder of the mixture.

  2. Transuranic contaminated waste form characterization and data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniazewycz, B.G.; McArthur, W.C.

    1980-07-01

    This volume contains 5 appendices. Title listing are: technologies for recovery of transuranics; nondestructive assay of TRU contaminated wastes; miscellaneous waste characteristics; acceptance criteria for TRU waste; and TRU waste treatment technologies

  3. Modeling of a dissolution system for transuranic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Z.; Dease, C.

    1991-02-01

    A system is currently being developed at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to treat transuranic wastes by means of a mediated electrochemical oxidation process. The process involves generating Ag( ++ ) from a solution of silver nitrate and nitric acid in an electrochemical cell. Ag( ++ ) is highly reactive and is capable of attacking many organic and inorganic substances. In particular, if a mixture of particles containing transuranic and other scrap metal oxides is allowed to react with Ag( ++ ) in a nitric acid solution, the transuranic oxides will dissolve and can be removed with the solution leaving the other insoluble oxides behind. The dissolution of the transuranic oxides by reactions with Ag( ++ ) occurs due to further oxidation to higher valence states and the formation of soluble ions such as MO 2 + and MO 2 ++ . 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  4. Chemical behaviour of transuranic elements in the natural environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.I.

    1991-01-01

    The chemical behaviour of transuranic elements in natural aquifer systems is governed by a variety of geochemical reactions, such as dissolution reaction (solubility), hydrolysis, complexation with inorganics or organics, redox reaction, colloid formation, geochemical interaction with surfaces of various minerals, coprecipitation, mineralisation etc. This paper reviews the present state of knowledge on some of these particular reactions. The emphasis is placed on how the individual reactions can be appraised for the long-term prediction of the geochemical behaviour of transuranic elements in the natural environment. Of the various reactions, the primary thermodynamic processes of dissolution of transuranic compounds in aquatic solution, complexation with important anions present in groundwater and colloid generation are discussed with notable examples. Various laser spectroscopy in use for the chemical speciation are mentioned briefly as for their spectroscopic capability as well as applicability. The present review discussion is primarily directed to a better understanding of the migration behaviour of transuranic elements in natural aquifer systems. (author) 100 refs

  5. Youth exposure to violence prevention programs in a national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelhor, David; Vanderminden, Jennifer; Turner, Heather; Shattuck, Anne; Hamby, Sherry

    2014-04-01

    This paper assesses how many children and youth have had exposure to programs aimed at preventing various kinds of violence perpetration and victimization. Based on a national sample of children 5-17, 65% had ever been exposed to a violence prevention program, 55% in the past year. Most respondents (71%) rated the programs as very or somewhat helpful. Younger children (5-9) who had been exposed to higher quality prevention programs had lower levels of peer victimization and perpetration. But the association did not apply to older youth or youth exposed to lower quality programs. Disclosure to authorities was also more common for children with higher quality program exposure who had experienced peer victimizations or conventional crime victimizations. The findings are consistent with possible benefits from violence prevention education programs. However, they also suggest that too few programs currently include efficacious components. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S.M.

    1983-10-31

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  7. National Conversion Pilot Project Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, G.G.; Simmons, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy facilities are in the process of downsizing. Most plans for downsizing focus on the decontamination and decommissioning of excess production facilities. A different approach for downsizing is taken at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), which has four production buildings. These buildings were used for the production of weapons components from uranium and beryllium and contain unique and valuable equipment, such as rolling mills, furnaces, and high-capacity presses, which could be utilized for stage-III metal recycling. The mission of this National Conversion Pilot Project (NCPP) open-quotes is to explore and demonstrate, at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), the feasibility of economic conversion at Department of Energy facilities.close quotes The NCPP has been divided into three stages: 1. Stage I-planning and feasibility determination 2. Stage II-facility cleanup for reuse and operational assessment 3. Stage III-metals recycling. The NCPP has recently been approved to begin stage II. The objective of the NCPP stage II is to prepare the four NCPP buildings for stage III, to remove unwanted equipment, and to decontaminate buildings and essential equipment to levels consistent with those that commercial industrial operations must meet pursuant to applicable Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and state workplace regulations

  8. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards.

  9. Secondary calibration laboratory for ionizing radiation laboratory accreitation program National Institute of Standards and Technology National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the procedures and requirements for accreditation under the Secondary Calibration Laboratory for Ionizing Radiation Program (SCLIR LAP). The requirements for a quality system, proficiency testing and the onsite assessment are discussed. The purpose of the accreditation program is to establish a network of secondary calibration laboratories that can provide calibrations traceable to the primary national standards

  10. 76 FR 5186 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities; Office of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2010-0084] National Protection and Programs... Protection Stakeholder Input Project--Generic Clearance AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate.... SUMMARY: The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate (NPPD...

  11. Transuranic radionuclides dispersed into the aquatic environment, a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Stoker, A.C.; Wong, Kai M. [and others

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. Our intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions (i.e., site specific) in terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric environments An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of our literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments. On the basis of our reviews, we have arbitrarily outlined five general source terms. These are fallout, fuel cycle waste, accidents, disposal sites and resuspension. Resuspension of the transuranic radionuclides is a unique source term, in that the radionuclides can originate from any of the other source terms. If these transuranic radionuclides become resuspended into the air, they then become important as a source of inhaled radionuclides.

  12. 78 FR 9431 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: The meeting will be held on...

  13. 78 FR 38077 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office [NARA-13-0030] National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and... following committee meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: The...

  14. 78 FR 64024 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office [NARA-2014-001] National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and... following committee meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: The...

  15. 77 FR 63893 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: The meeting will be held on...

  16. Position for determining gas-phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R. [Benchmark Environmental Corp. (United States)

    1998-06-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  17. Position for determining gas phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R.

    1995-08-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations

  18. Position for determining gas-phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J.

    1998-06-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations

  19. Leaching of transuranics observed in lysimeter experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, A.; Fredriksson, L.

    1994-01-01

    Transuranic elements in fallout are generally bound in oxide particles, size from submicron to several microns. During the fallout they can be intercepted on plant covers or reach the soil surface. The particles can be re-suspended to the air and reach other residence sites, be linked into the food chain or be redistributed in other ways (Cf Essington et al. 1976) before eventually being incorporated into the soil. The fate of such particles in the soil depends on the size and on the nature of the particulate matter and on environmental factors, the climate and the properties of the soil. In a dry climate the particles tend to be kept intact long time, (Schulz et al. 1976) and they are more easily redistributed than in a humid climate with plant covered moist and living soils. In the former the particles move more easily in the soil profile than in the latter, the particle matter is very slowly dissolved and the average availability of the deposited nuclides for plant uptake can be assumed to be comparatively low. The downward movements of the particles or nuclide compounds bound to small soil particles are enhanced by the swelling and shrinking of soil caused by absorption and depletion of water during the season. Cracks and fissures are created and closed several times a year in soils rich in colloidal material. Sandy soils with coarse material have less cracks, but in dry conditions the empty pore space may allow transport of fine particles. The coarser material also has less specific area and sorption capacity. The nuclide compounds leached with the drainage water in coarse soils should be less retarded than in clays (Cf. Rai and Serne, 1977; Nishita and Haug, 1979 and Rai et al., 1980). The lysimeter installation used for the study reported below was primarily designed to study the plant uptake of transuranics from a number of Swedish soils. However, as such an installation in many ways well simulate field conditions and at the same time is a closed system

  20. Method of estimating maximum VOC concentration in void volume of vented waste drums using limited sampling data: Application in transuranic waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Connolly, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    A test program has been conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to demonstrate that the concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) within the innermost layer of confinement in a vented waste drum can be estimated using a model incorporating diffusion and permeation transport principles as well as limited waste drum sampling data. The model consists of a series of material balance equations describing steady-state VOC transport from each distinct void volume in the drum. The primary model input is the measured drum headspace VOC concentration. Model parameters are determined or estimated based on available process knowledge. The model effectiveness in estimating VOC concentration in the headspace of the innermost layer of confinement was examined for vented waste drums containing different waste types and configurations. This paper summarizes the experimental measurements and model predictions in vented transuranic waste drums containing solidified sludges and solid waste

  1. Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Content Codes (RH-Trucon)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC). The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: (1) A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. (2) A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is ''3''. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR

  2. Energy Programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, J.

    1999-05-11

    ;'a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable'' as the first component of its mission. The strategic goal established for energy resources, identified as one of DOE's four businesses, is for ''the Department of Energy and its partners [to] promote secure, competitive, and environmentally responsible energy systems that serve the needs of the public.'' DOE has also identified four strategic goals for its programs in energy resources: (1) strengthening the economy and raising living standards through improvements in the energy field; (2) protecting the environment by reducing the adverse environmental impacts associated with energy production, distribution, and use; (3) keeping America secure by reducing vulnerabilities to global energy market shocks; and (4) enhancing American competitiveness in a growing world energy market.

  3. Jamaica National Net-Billing Pilot Program Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doris, Elizabeth [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Stout, Sherry [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peterson, Kimberly [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-12-18

    This technical report discusses the effectiveness of the Jamaica Public Service Company Limited Net-Billing Pilot Program. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected and analyzed data from a wide range of stakeholders, conducted in-country research, and compared program elements to common interconnection practices to form programmatic recommendations for the Jamaica context. NREL finds that the net-billing pilot program has successfully contributed to the support of the emerging solar market in Jamaica with the interconnection of 80 systems under the program for a total of 1.38 megawatts (MW) at the time of original analysis.

  4. Framework for a National Testing and Evaluation Program ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract:The National STEPP Program seeks to improve water quality by accelerating the effective implementation and adoption of innovative stormwater management technologies. Itwill attempt to accomplish this by establishing practices through highly reliable, and cost-effective Stormwater control measures (SCM) testing, evaluation, and verification services. The program will aim to remove barriers to innovation, minimize duplicative performance evaluation needs, increase confidence that regulatory requirements are met by creating consistency among testing and evaluation protocols, and establishing equity between public domain and proprietary SCM evaluation approaches.The Environmental Technology Verification Program, established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 18 years ago, was the only national program of its kindin the stormwater sector, but is now defunct, leaving a national leadership void. The STEPP initiative was triggered in part by regulatory demands in the government and private sectors to fill this vacuum. A concerted focus and study of this matter led to the release of a Water Environment Federation (WEF) white paper entitled “Investigation into the Feasibility of a National Testing and Evaluation Program for Stormwater Products and Practices” in February 2014. During this second phase of the STEPP initiative, and with EPA support, five analogous technology evaluation programs related to both stormwater and non-stormwater were an

  5. 76 FR 2700 - National Protection and Programs Directorate; National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Goal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... Programs Directorate (NPPD)/Office of Cybersecurity and Communications (CS&C)/Office of Emergency Communications (OEC) will submit the following Information Collection Request to the Office of Management and... Directorate; National Emergency Communications Plan (NECP) Goal 2 Performance Report AGENCY: National...

  6. 75 FR 41796 - National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National Average Payments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... National Average Payments for free, reduced price and paid afterschool snacks as part of the National...; Hawaii--free lunch-- 288 cents, reduced price lunch--248 cents. Afterschool Snacks in Afterschool Care Programs--The payments are: Contiguous States--free snack--74 cents, reduced price snack--37 cents, paid...

  7. 76 FR 43256 - National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National Average Payments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... National Average Payments for free, reduced price and paid afterschool snacks as part of the National...; Hawaii--free lunch-- 294 cents, reduced price lunch--254 cents. Afterschool Snacks in Afterschool Care Programs--The payments are: Contiguous States--free snack--76 cents, reduced price snack--38 cents, paid...

  8. Rapid monitoring for transuranic contaminants during buried waste retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Shaw, P.G.; Randolph, P.D.; Amaro, C.R.; Pawelko, R.J.; Thompson, D.N.; Loomis, G.G.

    1991-03-01

    This document reports results of research performed in support of possible future transuranic waste retrieval operations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radioactive Waste Management Complex. The focus of this research was to evaluate various methods of performing rapid and, as much as possible, ''on-line'' quantitative measurements of 239 Pu or 241 Am, either as airborne or loose contamination. Four different alpha continuous air monitors were evaluated for lower levels of detection of airborne 239 Pu. All of the continuous air monitors were evaluated by sampling ambient air. In addition, three of the continuous air monitors were evaluated by sampling air synthetically laden with clean dust and dust spiked with 239 Pu. Six methods for making quantitative measurements of loose contamination were investigated. They were: (1) microwave digestion followed by counting in a photon electron rejecting alpha liquid scintillation spectrometer, (2) rapid radiochemical separation followed by alpha spectrometry, (3) measurement of the 241 Am 59 keV gamma ray using a thin window germanium detector, (4) measurement of uranium L-shell x-rays, (5) gross alpha counting using a large-area Ag activated ZnS scintillator, and (6) direct counting of alpha particles using a large-area ionization chamber. 40 refs., 42 figs., 24 tabs

  9. Uncertainty analysis of a nondestructive radioassay system for transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harker, Y.D.; Blackwood, L.G.; Meachum, T.R.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1996-01-01

    Radioassay of transuranic waste in 207 liter drums currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is achieved using a Passive Active Neutron (PAN) nondestructive assay system. In order to meet data quality assurance requirements for shipping and eventual permanent storage of these drums at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, New Mexico, the total uncertainty of the PAN system measurements must be assessed. In particular, the uncertainty calculations are required to include the effects of variations in waste matrix parameters and related variables on the final measurement results. Because of the complexities involved in introducing waste matrix parameter effects into the uncertainty calculations, standard methods of analysis (e.g., experimentation followed by propagation of errors) could not be implemented. Instead, a modified statistical sampling and verification approach was developed. In this modified approach the total performance of the PAN system is simulated using computer models of the assay system and the resultant output is compared with the known input to assess the total uncertainty. This paper describes the simulation process and illustrates its application to waste comprised of weapons grade plutonium-contaminated graphite molds

  10. Incineration method for volume reduction and disposal of transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borham, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    The Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is designed to process 7 TPD of transuranic (TRU) waste producing 8.5 TPD of cemented waste and 4100 ACFM of combustion gases with a volume reduction of up to 17:1. The waste and its container are shredded then fed to a rotary kiln heated to 1700 0 F, then cooled and classified by a trommel screen. The fine portion is mixed with a cement grout which is placed with the coarse portion in steel drums for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The kiln off-gas is reheated to 2000 0 F to destroy any remaining hydrocarbons and toxic volatiles. The gases are cooled and passed in a venturi scrubber to remove particulates and corrosive gases. The venturi off-gas is passed through a mist eliminator and is reheated to 50 0 F above the dew point prior to passing through a High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter. The scrub solution is concentrated to 25% solids by an inertial filter. The sludge containing the combustion chemical contaminants is encapsulated with the residue of the incinerated waste

  11. Approach for systematic evaluation of transuranic waste management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, K.; Koebnick, B.; Kotek, T.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an approach for systematic evaluation of management alternatives that are being considered for the treatment, storage, and disposal of transuranic waste (TRUW) at U.S. Department of Energy sites. The approach, which is currently under development, would apply WASTE-MGMT, a database application model developed at Argonne National Laboratory, to estimate projected environmental releases and would evaluate impact measures such as health risk and costs associated with each of the waste management alternatives. The customized application would combine site-specific TRUW inventory and characterization data with treatment and transportation parameters to estimate the quantities and characteristics of the wastes to be treated, emissions of hazardous substances from the treatment facilities, and the quantities and characteristics of the wastes to be shipped between sites. These data would then be used to estimate for several TRUW management scenarios the costs and health risks of constructing and operating the required treatment facilities and of transporting TRUW for treatment and final disposal. Treatment, storage, and disposal of TRUW at DOE sites is composed of many variables and options at each stage. The approach described in this paper would provide for efficient consideration of all of these facets when evaluating potentially feasible TRUW management alternatives. By expanding existing databases, this model could eventually be adapted to accommodate the introduction of new treatment technologies, updated TRUW characterization data, and/or revised waste acceptance criteria

  12. Assessment of LANL transuranic mixed waste management documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, K.D.; Hoevemeyer, S.S.; McCance, C.H.; Jennrich, E.A.; Lund, D.M.

    1991-04-01

    The objective of this report is to present findings from the evaluation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) TRU Mixed Waste Acceptance Criteria to determine its compliance with applicable DOE requirements. The driving requirements for s TRU Mixed Waste Acceptance Criteria are essentially those contained in the ''TRU Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant'' or WIPP WAC (DOE Report WIPP-DOE-069), 40 CFR 261-270, and DOE Order 5820.2A (Radioactive Waste Management), specifically Chapter II which is entitled ''Management of Transuranic Waste''. The primary purpose of the LANL WAC is the establishment of those criteria that must be met by generators of TRU mixed waste before such waste can be accepted by the Waste Management Group. An annotated outline of a genetic TRU mixed waste acceptance criteria document was prepared from those requirements contained in the WIPP WAC, 40 CFR 261-270, and 5820.2A, and is based solely upon those requirements

  13. [Extraction of management information from the national quality assurance program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Bartels, Claus; Bobrowski, Christoph

    2007-07-15

    Starting with clinically motivated projects, the national quality assurance program has established a legislative obligatory framework. Annual feedback of results is an important means of quality control. The annual reports cover quality-related information with high granularity. A synopsis for corporate management is missing, however. Therefore, the results of the University Clinics in Greifswald, Germany, have been analyzed and aggregated to support hospital management. Strengths were identified by the ranking of results within the state for each quality indicator, weaknesses by the comparison with national reference values. The assessment was aggregated per clinical discipline and per category (indication, process, and outcome). A composition of quality indicators was claimed multiple times. A coherent concept is still missing. The method presented establishes a plausible summary of strengths and weaknesses of a hospital from the point of view of the national quality assurance program. Nevertheless, further adaptation of the program is needed to better assist corporate management.

  14. The best solution to our Nation's waste management problem: Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikel, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    In addition to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) being the best solution today to the Nation's problem of permanent storage of transuranic radioactive waste produced by the defense industry, WIPP is also involved in finding the solution for another national problem: the education of our youth. The youth of America have grown up thinking that science and math are too hard, or not interesting. We, the parents of our Nation's leaders of tomorrow, must find a solution to this dilemma. It is the mission of the Waste Isolation Division Educational Programs to create programs to promote quality education in the classroom and to enhance each student's interest in mathematics and the sciences

  15. Physical Properties of Hanford Transuranic Waste Sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poloski, A. P.

    2004-01-01

    This project has two primary objectives. The first is to understand the physical properties and behavior of the Hanford transuranic (TRU) tank sludges under conditions that might exist during retrieval, treatment, packaging, and transportation for disposal at WIPP. The second primary objective is to develop a fundamental understanding of these sludge suspensions by correlating the macroscopic properties with particle interactions occurring at the colloidal scale in the various liquid media. The results of this research effort will enhance the existing understanding of agglomeration phenomena and the properties of complex colloidal suspensions. In addition, the knowledge gained and capabilities developed during this effort will aid in the development and optimization of techniques to process the wastes at various DOE sites. These objectives will be accomplished by: (1) characterizing the TRU sludges contained in the Hanford tanks that are intended for shipment to WIPP; (2) determining the physical behavior of the Hanford TRU tank sludges under conditions that might exist during treatment and packaging; (3) and modeling the retrieval, treatment, and packaging operations that will be performed at Hanford to dispose of TRU tank sludges

  16. Materials evaluation for a transuranic processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, S.A.; Schwenk, E.B.; Divine, J.R.

    1990-11-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company, with the assistance of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is developing a transuranium extraction process for preheating double-shell tank wastes at the Hanford Site to reduce the volume of transuranic waste being sent to a repository. The bench- scale transuranium extraction process development is reaching a stage where a pilot plant design has begun for the construction of a facility in the existing B Plant. Because of the potential corrosivity of neutralized cladding removal waste process streams, existing embedded piping alloys in B Plant are being evaluated and ''new'' alloys are being selected for the full-scale plant screening corrosion tests. Once the waste is acidified with HNO 3 , some of the process streams that are high in F - and low in Al and zr can produce corrosion rates exceeding 30,000 mil/yr in austenitic alloys. Initial results results are reported concerning the applicability of existing plant materials to withstand expected process solutions and conditions to help determine the feasibility of locating the plant at the selected facility. In addition, process changes are presented that should make the process solutions less corrosive to the existing materials. Experimental work confirms that Hastelloy B is unsatisfactory for the expected process solutions; type 304L, 347 and 309S stainless steels are satisfactory for service at room temperature and 60 degrees C, if process stream complexing is performed. Inconel 625 was satisfactory for all solutions. 17 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs

  17. Description of processes for the immobilization of selected transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmerman, C.L.

    1980-12-01

    Processed sludge and incinerator-ash wastes contaminated with transuranic (TRU) elements may require immobilization to prevent the release of these elements to the environment. As part of the TRU Waste Immobilization Program sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing applicable waste-form and processing technology that may meet this need. This report defines and describes processes that are capable of immobilizing a selected TRU waste-stream consisting of a blend of three parts process sludge and one part incinerator ash. These selected waste streams are based on the compositions and generation rates of the waste processing and incineration facility at the Rocky Flats Plant. The specific waste forms that could be produced by the described processes include: in-can melted borosilicate-glass monolith; joule-heated melter borosilicate-glass monolith or marble; joule-heated melter aluminosilicate-glass monolith or marble; joule-heated melter basaltic-glass monolith or marble; joule-heated melter glass-ceramic monolith; cast-cement monolith; pressed-cement pellet; and cold-pressed sintered-ceramic pellet

  18. Relating Operational Art to the National Guard State Partnership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Program Coordinator GEF Global Employment of the Force DSCA Defense Support of Civil Authorities BCA Budget Control Act NATO North Atlantic Treaty...between Florida and the U.S. Virgin Islands are referred to as the Regional Security System (RSS). Florida and the U.S. Virgin Islands partner with... Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in 2004 due, in part, to the mentorship from the Maryland National Guard.54 Not only did the Maryland National Guard

  19. Concentration of remote-handled, transuranic, sodium nitrate-based sludge using agitated thin-film evaporators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.F. Jr.; Youngblood, E.L.; Berry, J.B.; Pen, Ben-Li

    1991-01-01

    The Waste Handling and Packaging Plant (WHPP) is being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to prepared transuranic waste for final disposal. Once operational, this facility will process, package, and certify remote-handled transuranic waste for ultimate shipment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. One of the wastes that will be handled at WHIPP is the transuranic sludge currently stored at ORNL in eight 50,000-gal underground tanks. The use of an Agitated Thin-Film Evaporator (ATFE) for concentration of this waste is being investigated. Tests have shown that the ATFE can be used to produce a thick slurry, a powder, or a fused salt. A computer model developed at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) to simulate the operation of ATFE's on their waste is being modified for use on the ORNL transuranic sludge. This paper summarizes the results of the test with the ATFEs to date, discusses the changes in the SRP model necessary to use this model with the ORNL waste, and compares the results of the model with the actual data taken from the operation of ATFEs at vendors' test facilities. 8 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  20. Roadmap for a National Wildland Fire Research and Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagoner, R; Bradley, M M; Lin, R R

    2003-02-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research have formed a partnership to facilitate an innovative National Wildfire Research and Development Program. The ultimate purpose of the program will be to establish a deeper scientific understanding of the physics of fire than currently exists, to establish a solid scientific basis for strategic planning and policy making, and to develop and implement a set of advanced, scientifically based decision-making tools for the wildfire management community. The three main components of the program will be wildfire science, societal impacts, and operational applications. Smoke management, prescribed burns, wildfire mitigation and fuels assessment will be cross-cutting themes. We anticipate that this multidisciplinary, interagency program will bridge organizational and institutional barriers, and will be highly collaborative with numerous organizations and agencies, including other national laboratories; universities: federal, state, and county fire agencies; the Environmental Protection Agency; the Federal Emergency Management Agency; and the Western Governor's Association.

  1. National toxicology program chemical nomination and selection process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selkirk, J.K. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The National Toxicology Program (NTP) was organized to support national public health programs by initiating research designed to understand the physiological, metabolic, and genetic basis for chemical toxicity. The primary mandated responsibilities of NTP were in vivo and vitro toxicity testing of potentially hazardous chemicals; broadening the spectrum of toxicological information on known hazardous chemicals; validating current toxicological assay systems as well as developing new and innovative toxicity testing technology; and rapidly communicating test results to government agencies with regulatory responsibilities and to the medical and scientific communities. 2 figs.

  2. Establishing a national biological laboratory safety and security monitoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine, James W

    2012-12-01

    The growing concern over the potential use of biological agents as weapons and the continuing work of the Biological Weapons Convention has promoted an interest in establishing national biological laboratory biosafety and biosecurity monitoring programs. The challenges and issues that should be considered by governments, or organizations, embarking on the creation of a biological laboratory biosafety and biosecurity monitoring program are discussed in this article. The discussion focuses on the following questions: Is there critical infrastructure support available? What should be the program focus? Who should be monitored? Who should do the monitoring? How extensive should the monitoring be? What standards and requirements should be used? What are the consequences if a laboratory does not meet the requirements or is not willing to comply? Would the program achieve the results intended? What are the program costs? The success of a monitoring program can depend on how the government, or organization, responds to these questions.

  3. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Robotics and Intelligent Systems Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meacham, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of the newly formed Robotics and Intelligent Systems Program are discussed. The application of the remote systems technology developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program for the Department of Energy is presented. The activities (satellite refueling and space station truss assembly) with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration are presented in a videotape format with narration by the presenter. The goals of technology transfer to the private sector and the potential positive impact on the community conclude the oral presentation

  4. Separation of transuranic elements and some fission products in irradiated spent fuels. Program 2005; Separacion de elementos transuranicos y algunos productos de fision presentes en los combustibles nucleares irradiados Programa 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravaca, C.; Espartero, A. G.; Cordoba, G. de; Gascon, J. L.; Pina, G.; Martinez-Esparza, A.; Uriarte, A.

    2006-07-01

    This technical publication of ENRESA refers to Partitioning of some chemical elements containing longlived radionuclides (actinides and fission products), from spent nuclear fuels. The Partitioning includes the different processes developed or on R and D way, from the middle of the past century to the present. These processes are of two types, wet (hydro-metallurgical) and dry (pyro-metallurgical). Among the hydro-metallurgical processes the most important is the PUREX process, developed in the U.S.A. at the middle of the past century, used for the separation of uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuels, previous dissolution with nitric acid of the irradiated fuels. Later other hydrometallurgical processes have been developed for the separation of some TRUs and long-lived fission products from the high activity liquid (HLW) coming from PUREX reprocessing. Among the most important countries and institutions that are developing new hydrometallurgical processes are USA, Japan, China, Russia and the European Union, fundamentally France, the Czech Republic, United Kingdom, Italy, Belgium, Holland, Germany, Spain and the JRC-ITU. In the case of Spain it is possible to remark the works of synthesis of new extractants, developed by the group of the Prof. Javier de Mendoza of the Dept. of Organic Chemistry of the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid and by the group of Prof. Teixidor of the Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Barcelona (ICMAB) of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) and the activities carried out by the CIEMAT from 1999, based fundamentally on a collaboration agreement with ENRESA, that are related to the characterization and tests of the new extractants synthesized in Spain and also abroad, mainly by the CEA (France). All these activities are included in the Projects PARTNEW and EUROPART of the European Union. About Pyro-metallurgical Processes, they started in the ANL (Argonne National Laboratory, USA) by the 60' is of the

  5. Needs of National Infrastructure for Nuclear Energy Program in Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaushevski, A.; Poceva, S.N.; Spasevska, H.; Popov, N.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of a nuclear energy program is a major undertaking with significant implications for many aspects of national infrastructure, ranging from capacity of the power grid, access roads and production facilities, to the involvement of stakeholders and the development of human resources. For new comers countries without nuclear power, even for those who wish to realize substantial expansion of existing nuclear capacity, it can take up to 10-15 years to develop the necessary infrastructure. One of the crucial problems in nuclear energy implementation are human resources needs and educational infrastructure development in this field. No matter what will be the future energy scenario in the Republic of Macedonia, the nuclear educational program is the first step to have HR in the field of nuclear energy. This paper presents the proposed direction for having HR for establishing national infrastructure in nuclear energy program in Macedonia. This includes establishing and developing of MONEP (Macedonian NEPIO), and the enhancing the capabilities of the national regulatory body in the Republic of Macedonia. Keywords: NEP (Nuclear Energy Program), HR (Human Resources), NEPIO (Nuclear Energy Program Implementation Organization), MONEP Macedonian Organization for Nuclear Energy Program (Macedonian NEPIO), NRB (Nuclear Regulatory Body)

  6. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System Program Manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1. Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) has maintained functional environmental programs to assist with regulatory compliance for more than 30 years. During 2005, these existing programs were rolled into a formal environmental management system (EMS) that expands beyond the traditional compliance focus to managing and improving environmental performance and stewardship practices for all site activities. An EMS is a set of inter-related elements that represent a continuing cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes and actions undertaken to achieve environmental policy and goals. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard for Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 (ISO 2004). The site received ISO 14001 certification in September 2006. SNL/CA's EMS Program is applicable to the Sandia, Livermore site only. Although SNL/CA operates as one organizational division of the overall Sandia National Laboratories, the EMS Program is site-specific, with site-specific objectives and targets. SNL/CA (Division 8000) benefits from the organizational structure as it provides corporate level policies, procedures, and standards, and established processes that connect to and support elements of the SNL/CA EMS Program. Additionally, SNL/CA's EMS Program benefits from two corporate functional programs (Facilities Energy Management and Fleet Services Environmental programs) that maintain responsibility for energy management and fleet services for all Sandia locations. Each EMS element is further enhanced with site-specific processes and standards. Division 8000 has several groups operating at Sandia

  7. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System program manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2012-03-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 436.1. Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) has maintained functional environmental programs to assist with regulatory compliance for more than 30 years. During 2005, these existing programs were rolled into a formal environmental management system (EMS) that expands beyond the traditional compliance focus to managing and improving environmental performance and stewardship practices for all site activities. An EMS is a set of inter-related elements that represent a continuing cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes and actions undertaken to achieve environmental policy and goals. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard for Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 (ISO 2004). The site first received ISO 14001 certification in September 2006 and recertification in 2009. SNL/CA's EMS Program is applicable to the Sandia, Livermore site only. Although SNL/CA operates as one organizational division of the overall Sandia National Laboratories, the EMS Program is site-specific, with site-specific objectives and targets. SNL/CA (Division 8000) benefits from the organizational structure as it provides corporate level policies, procedures, and standards, and established processes that connect to and support elements of the SNL/CA EMS Program. Additionally, SNL/CA's EMS Program benefits from two corporate functional programs (Facilities Energy and Water Resource Management and Fleet Services programs) that maintain responsibility for energy management and fleet services for all Sandia locations. Each EMS element is further enhanced with site-specific processes and standards. Division 8000 has

  8. Sandia National Laboratories, California Environmental Management System Program Manual.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Barbara L.

    2011-04-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Environmental Management System (EMS) Program Manual documents the elements of the site EMS Program. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard on Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004and Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1. Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) has maintained functional environmental programs to assist with regulatory compliance for more than 30 years. During 2005, these existing programs were rolled into a formal environmental management system (EMS) that expands beyond the traditional compliance focus to managing and improving environmental performance and stewardship practices for all site activities. An EMS is a set of inter-related elements that represent a continuing cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes and actions undertaken to achieve environmental policy and goals. The SNL/CA EMS Program conforms to the International Standard for Environmental Management Systems, ISO 14001:2004 (ISO 2004). The site received ISO 14001 certification in September 2006. SNL/CA's EMS Program is applicable to the Sandia, Livermore site only. Although SNL/CA operates as one organizational division of the overall Sandia National Laboratories, the EMS Program is site-specific, with site-specific objectives and targets. SNL/CA (Division 8000) benefits from the organizational structure as it provides corporate level policies, procedures, and standards, and established processes that connect to and support elements of the SNL/CA EMS Program. Additionally, SNL/CA's EMS Program benefits from two corporate functional programs (Facilities Energy Management and Fleet Services programs) that maintain responsibility for energy management and fleet services for all Sandia locations. Each EMS element is further enhanced with site-specific processes and standards. Division 8000 has several groups operating at Sandia National Laboratories

  9. The Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant program at the INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, K.B.; Anderson, B.C.; Clements, T.L.; Hinckley, J.P.; Mayberry, J.L.; Smith, T.H.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1970, defense transuranic waste has been placed into 20-year retrievable storage at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A major objective of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Waste Management Program is to remove all retrievably stored transuranic waste from the INEL. The January 1981 DOE Record of Decision on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) stated, ''The WIPP facility will dispose of defense transuranic waste stored retrievably at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory.'' After retrieval and before shipment, processing may be necessary to prepare the waste for acceptance, handling, and enhanced long-term isolation in the WIPP. However, some of the waste is certifiable to the WIPP waste acceptance criteria without container opening or waste processing. To minimize costs, the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) is being developed to certify INEL stored transuranic waste without container opening or waste processing. The SWEPP certification concept is based on records assessment, nondestructive examination techniques, assay techniques, health physics examinations, and limited opening of containers at another facility for quality control

  10. Mobile loading transuranic waste at small quantity sites in the Department of Energy complex-10523

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, Mitch; Howard, Bryan; Weyerman, Wade; Mctaggart, Jerri

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Carlsbad Office (LANL-CO), operates mobile loading operations for all of the large and small quantity transuranic (TRU) waste sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The mobile loading team performs loading and unloading evolutions for both contact handled (CH) and remote handled (RH) waste. For small quantity sites, many of which have yet to remove their TRU waste, the mobile loading team will load shipments that will ship to Idaho National Laboratory, a centralization site, or ship directly to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). For example, Argonne National Laboratory and General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center have certified programs for RH waste so they will ship their RH waste directly to WIPP. Many of the other sites will ship their waste to Idaho for characterization and certification. The Mobile Loading Units (MLU) contain all of the necessary equipment needed to load CH and RH waste into the appropriate shipping vessels. Sites are required to provide additional equipment, such as cranes, fork trucks, and office space. The sites are also required to provide personnel to assist in the shipping operations. Each site requires a site visit from the mobile loading team to ensure that all of the necessary site equipment, site requirements and space for shipping can be provided. The mobile loading team works diligently with site representatives to ensure that all safety and regulatory requirements are met. Once the waste is ready and shipping needs are met, the mobile loading team can be scheduled to ship the waste. The CH MLU is designed to support TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT loading activities wherever needed within the DOE complex. The team that performs the mobile loading operation has obtained national certification under DOE for TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT loading and shipment certification. The RH MLU is designed to support removable lid canister (RLC) and RH-72B cask loading activities wherever needed within the DOE

  11. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudin, M.J.; Stanton, C.; Patterson, R.G.; Garcia, R.S.

    1992-02-01

    This report, Volume 2 of the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses radiological and chemical characteristics of technetium-99. This report also includes discussions about waste streams in which technetium-99 can be found, waste forms that contain technetium-99, and technetium-99's behavior in the environment and in the human body

  12. 75 FR 54076 - National Flood Insurance Program, Policy Wording Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... line with the format of the insurance industry's homeowners policy. FEMA also proposed changes in the...: FEMA-2010-0021] RIN 1660-AA70 National Flood Insurance Program, Policy Wording Correction AGENCY... correction to the FEMA, Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Standard Flood Insurance Policy...

  13. 76 FR 7508 - National Flood Insurance Program, Policy Wording Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... the insurance industry's homeowners policy. FEMA also proposed changes in the coverage. On October 12...: FEMA-2010-0021] RIN 1660-AA70 National Flood Insurance Program, Policy Wording Correction AGENCY... Insurance and Mitigation Administration, Standard Flood Insurance Policy regulations. In order to increase...

  14. National screening program vs. standardized neurodevelopmental follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maschke, Cornelia; Ellenrieder, Birte; Hecher, Kurt; Bartmann, Peter

    Background: Long-term follow-up is urgently needed to decide on the consequences of new therapies. Objective: This study assesses the use of a national child development screening program for a follow-up examination of a defined patient group. Patients and methods: Neurodevelopmental outcome of 139

  15. Social assessment for the Colville National Forest CROP program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angela J. Findley; Matthew S. Carroll; Keith A. Blatner

    2000-01-01

    A qualitative social assessment targeted salient issues connected to the Colville National Forest creating opportunities (CROP) research program that examines forest management alternatives for small-diameter stands in northeastern Washington. Research spanned various communities in three counties and investigated the diversity of fundamental values people attach to...

  16. Thailand's National Nutritional Program : Lessons in Management and Capacity Development

    OpenAIRE

    Heaver, Richard; Kachondam, Yongyout

    2002-01-01

    Thailand's community nutrition program has been the most successful in Asia. This paper looks at what made it work from a management and capacity development point of view. Key lessons are identified in the following areas: Building a strong consensus at national and local levels about the importance of nutrition as an investment in the country's future, rather than as a welfare expenditur...

  17. 75 FR 14500 - National Organic Program, Sunset Review (2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... as Generally Recognized As Safe; Approved by the FDA as a food additive; or Included in the FDA... the National Organic Program (NOP) is required by the Organic Foods Production Act of 1990 (OFPA). The... oil (CAS 8006-75-5); Fish oil (Fatty acid CAS 's: 10417- 94-4, and 25167-62-8); Fructooligosaccharides...

  18. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudin, M.J.; Garcia, R.S.

    1992-02-01

    This report, Volume 3 of the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses the radiological and chemical characteristics of carbon-14. The report also discusses waste streams that contain carbon-14, waste forms that contain carbon-14, and carbon-14 behavior in the environment and in the human body

  19. College of Lake County National Workplace Literacy Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Mary Kay

    The College of Lake County's 3-year National Workplace Literacy Program (1994-1997) contributed to economic development by meeting companies' changing educational and production needs as they fluctuated and met new challenges for global marketing and improvement. It assessed 883 employees at 8 business sites with customized assessment tools and…

  20. Evaluation of farmer's participation in National Special Program for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of farmer's participation in National Special Program for Food Security in Niger State, Nigeria. ... Loans provided for the project participants assisted the recipients in boosting their farm production. The t-test result revealed that significant increases were found in the farm size, output, p. 0.01 (1%) and income of ...

  1. Waste certification program plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornegay, F.C.

    1996-09-01

    This document defines the waste certification program being developed for implementation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The document describes the program structure, logic, and methodology for certification of ORNL wastes. The purpose of the waste certification program is to provide assurance that wastes are properly characterized and that the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for receiving facilities are met. The program meets the waste certification requirements outlined in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management, and ensures that 40 CFR documentation requirements for waste characterization are met for mixed (both radioactive and hazardous) and hazardous (including polychlorinated biphenyls) waste. Program activities will be conducted according to ORNL Level 1 document requirements

  2. Long-term management USDOE transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, W.S.; Gilbert, K.V.; Lowrey, R.Y.

    1982-01-01

    Activities for permanent disposal of US DOE TRU waste are presently focused on newly generated and stored waste. The buried waste and contaminated soils pose no near term problem. Decisions on any possible actions for these wastes will be deferred until the newly generated and stored wastes are being placed into disposal on a routine basis. Several elements must be in place before such disposal can become routine. These elements consist of: a disposal facility; waste acceptance criteria; waste certification mechanisms; waste processing facilities; and a waste transportation system. Each of these elements has been the subject of considerable activity in the recent past. Progress and plans for each element are summarized. As of January 1981, DOE has 60,500 m 3 of waste classified as Transuranic waste (TRU) in retrievable storage, and projects that additional TRU waste will be generated at an average rate of 4500 m 3 per year for the next 10 years. Over 99% of this waste is contact handled, with the remainder being remote handled, i.e., surface radiation dose levels exceeding 200 mrem/h. An estimated 273,000 m 3 of TRU waste were placed in shallow land burial prior to establishment of the 1970 policy. In addition, large quantities of soil at DOE sites are contaminated with TRU elements due to disposal of liquid wastes and by contact of soil with solid, buried waste whose original containers are now badly degraded. Possibly as much as 10,000,000 m 3 of soil are contaminated above 10 nCi/gm. Less than 1,000,000 m 3 are estimated to be contaminated above 100 nCi/gm

  3. Major national human biomonitoring programs in chemical exposure assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Choi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Human biomonitoring (HBM programs have been established in several countries around the world in order to monitor the levels of chemical exposures in the general population and qualify health risk assessment of national and international interest. Study design, population, sample collection, and chemical analysis must be considered when comparing and interpreting the results. In this review, the objectives and brief descriptions of the major national HBM programs in North America, Europe, and Asia are provided. Similarities and differences observed from a comparative analysis among these programs, including the stratification of data according to age, sex, socioeconomic background, etc. as well as the identification of chemical exposure associated with food intake, are discussed. Overall, although there are some discrepancies in the study designs among the reviewed national HBM programs, results from the programs can provide useful information such as chemical levels found within the general population of a country that can be compared. Furthermore, the results can be used by regulatory authorities or the government to enforce legislations in order to reduce the exposure of chemicals into the human body.

  4. Achieving public acceptance. Lessons from national repository programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Essentially all countries pursuing nuclear waste repository programs have had long and dynamic histories. There have had changes in policies, programs, and national laws, many successes and more failures. Most continue to pursue the siting and development of geologic repositories for the ultimate disposal of the spent nuclear fuel (or reprocessed wastes) arising from the operation of nuclear power plants. And while many have had very strong repository science and technology programs, they have continued to find significant challenges associated with the societal acceptance issues required for such programs to be successful. Over recent years repository programs have developed and implemented rather different approaches to managing the non-technical (e.g. societal, political, and institutional) aspects of repository program development. This is not unexpected as programs have had different histories, operate under different laws, reside in countries with different cultures and values, and are managed under different formulations. For example, the U.S. program is implemented by a branch of the Department of Energy while in several other countries the program is managed by a separate corporation on behalf of the nuclear waste owners or dedicated quasi-governmental organizations. These similar, but different programs, and their rich histories and current work, provide an excellent opportunity to investigate features that have and have not proven successful in helping to achieve public acceptance. This paper will review some of the compelling aspects and provide some guidelines for applications in other national circumstances. Recent experiences will be evaluated to discern emerging trends for achieving public acceptance in nuclear repository development and in the broader dimensions associated with the potential renaissance of nuclear power. (author)

  5. Transuranic Storage Area (TSA)-3 container storage unit RCRA closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, G.A.; Lodman, D.L.; Spry, M.J.; Poor, K.J.

    1992-11-01

    This document describes the proposed plan for closure of the Transuranic Storage Area (TSA)-3 container storage unit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure requirements. The location, size, capacity, history, and current status of the unit are described. The unit will be closed by decontaminating structures and equipment that may have contacted waste. Sufficient sampling and documentation of all activities will be performed to demonstrate clean closure. A tentative schedule is provided in the form of a milestone chart

  6. Sandia National Laboratories, California Chemical Management Program annual report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2012-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Chemical Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Chemical Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA. SNL/CA is responsible for tracking chemicals (chemical and biological materials), providing Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and for regulatory compliance reporting according to a variety of chemical regulations. The principal regulations for chemical tracking are the Emergency Planning Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the California Right-to-Know regulations. The regulations, the Hazard Communication/Lab Standard of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) are also key to the CM Program. The CM Program is also responsible for supporting chemical safety and information requirements for a variety of Integrated Enabling Services (IMS) programs primarily the Industrial Hygiene, Waste Management, Fire Protection, Air Quality, Emergency Management, Environmental Monitoring and Pollution Prevention programs. The principal program tool is the Chemical Information System (CIS). The system contains two key elements: the MSDS library and the chemical container-tracking database that is readily accessible to all Members of the Sandia Workforce. The primary goal of the CM Program is to ensure safe and effective chemical management at Sandia/CA. This is done by efficiently collecting and managing chemical information for our customers who include Line, regulators, DOE and ES and H programs to ensure compliance with regulations and to streamline customer business processes that require chemical information.

  7. 32 CFR 2004.20 - National Industrial Security Program Operating Manual (NISPOM) [201(a)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Industrial Security Program Operating... Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE, NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM DIRECTIVE NO. 1 Operations § 2004.20 National Industrial Security Program...

  8. 76 FR 67484 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office... made for the following committee meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters...

  9. 76 FR 28099 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office... made for the following committee meeting to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters...

  10. 76 FR 6636 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-07

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office... made for the following committee meeting. To discuss National Industrial Security Program policy...

  11. 75 FR 65526 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office..., announcement is made for the following committee meeting, to discuss National Industrial Security Program...

  12. 78 FR 24762 - National Toxicology Program Board of Scientific Counselors; Announcement of Meeting; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Toxicology Program... announces the next meeting of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC... authorities knowledgeable in fields such as toxicology, pharmacology, pathology, biochemistry, epidemiology...

  13. 77 FR 60707 - National Toxicology Program Board of Scientific Counselors; Announcement of Meeting; Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Toxicology Program... announces the next meeting of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC... such as toxicology, pharmacology, pathology, biochemistry, epidemiology, risk assessment...

  14. Research training among pediatric residency programs: a national assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Erika L; Naifeh, Monique M; Stevenson, Michelle D; Todd, Christopher; Henry, Emilie D; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Gerber, Linda M; Li, Su-Ting T

    2014-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) states that "residents should participate in scholarly activity." However, there is little guidance for effectively integrating scholarly activity into residency. This study was conducted to understand how pediatric residency programs meet ACGME requirements and to identify characteristics of successful programs. The authors conducted an online cross-sectional survey of all pediatric residency program directors in October 2012, assessing program characteristics, resident participation in scholarly activity, program infrastructure, barriers, and outcomes. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify characteristics of programs in the top quartile for resident scholarly activity participation. The response rate was 52.8% (105/199 programs). Seventy-seven (78.6%) programs required scholarly activity, although definitions were variable. When including only original research, systematic reviews or meta-analyses, and case reports or series with references, resident participation averaged 56% (range 0%-100%). Characteristics associated with high-participation programs included a scholarly activity requirement (odds ratio [OR] = 5.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03-30.0); program director belief that all residents should present work regionally or nationally (OR = 4.7, 95% CI = 1.5-15.1); and mentorship by >25% of faculty (OR = 3.6, CI = 1.2-11.4). Only 47.1% (41) of program directors were satisfied with resident participation, and only 30.7% (27) were satisfied with the quality of research training provided. The findings suggest that resident scholarly activity experience is highly variable and suboptimal. Identifying characteristics of successful programs can improve the resident research training experience.

  15. Program plan for the National Uranium Mine Tailings Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    The National Uranium Mine Tailings Program was formed to conduct research into the long-term environmental behaviour of uranium mine tailings. This research is necessary to provide a data base upon which close-cut criteria for uranium mines can be based. The research program to be carried out under the auspices of the National Tailings Program Office has, as its goal, the development of this data base, and the formulation of a series of reports based on that data base. These documents are to be designed to allow the uranium mining industry to produce site-specific close-out plans which will be acceptable to the regulatory authorities. This report addresses the program to be undertaken to meet the above broad objective. It focusses on defining in more specific and explicit terms what the program objectives need to be to meet the close-out requirements currently perceived by the regulatory agencies involved. These program objectives have been refined and summarized as follows: On close-out, the tailings site shall: 1. Meet currently accepted individual exposure criteria, and meet air and water quality regulations. 2. Ensure a predictable decline in release rates of contaminants to the environment. Ideally, this decline would be monotonic in nature. 3. Meet the ALARA principle both at present and into the long-term future. 4. Ensure that the management strategy or technologies employed in close-out shall be of a passive nature and not require ongoing institutional intervention. On the basis of these program objectives, this report identifies specific program product in terms of manuals of practice, guidelines, etc. that are to be produced as a result of program activity. These documents will effectively provide guidance on acceptable close-out technology to the uranium industry and regulatory agencies

  16. A National Survey of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) Participants on Environmental Effects, Wildlife Issues, and Vegetation Management on Program Lands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allen, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    A national survey of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contractees was completed to obtain information about environmental and social effects of the program on participants, farms, and communities...

  17. Scientific, institutional, regulatory, political, and public acceptance of the waste isolation pilot plant transuranic waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, L.G.

    2000-01-01

    The recent successful certification and opening of a first-of-a-kind, deep geological repository for safe disposal of long-lived, transuranic radioactive waste (TRUW) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, New Mexico, United States of America (USA), embody both long-standing local and wide-spread, gradually achieved, scientific, institutional, regulatory, political, and public acceptance. The related historical background and development are outlined and the main contributors to the successful siting, certification, and acceptance of the WIPP TRUW repository, which may also serve as a model to success for other radioactive waste disposal programs, are described. (author)

  18. Incorporation of transuranic elements in titanate nuclear waste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, H.J.; Ray, I.L.F.; Theile, H.; Trisoglio, C.; Walker, C.T.; White, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    The incorporation of actinide elements and their rare-earth element analogues in titanate nuclear waste forms in reviewed. New partitioning data are presented for three waste forms containing Purex waste simulant in combination with either NpO 2 , PuO 2 , or Am 2 O 3 . The greater proportion of transuranics partition between perovskite and zirconolite, while some americium may enter loveringite. Autoradiography revealed clusters of plutonium atoms which have been interpreted as unreacted dioxide or sesquioxide. It is concluded that the solid-state behavior of transuranic elements in titanate waste forms is poorly understood, certainly not well enough to tailor a ceramic for the incorporation of waste from reprocessing of fast breeder reactor fuel in which transuranic species are more abundant than in Purex waste

  19. Assessment of allowable transuranic activity levels for WIPP wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This study provides a technical evaluation for the establishment of an upper limit on the transuranic content of waste packages to be received. To accomplish this, the predicted radiological performance of WIPP is compared to the radiological performance requirements applicable to WIPP. These performance requirements include radiation protection standards for both routine facility operations and credible operational accidents. These requirements are discussed in Chapter 2.0. From the margin between predicted performance and the performance requirements, the maximum allowable transuranic content of waste packages can then be inferred. Within the resulting compliance envelope, a waste acceptance criterion can be established that delineates the allowable level of transuranic radioactivity content for contact handled (CH) and remote handled (RH) waste packages. 13 refs., 8 tabs

  20. 78 FR 53466 - Modification of Two National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) Tests Concerning Automated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Customs Automation Program (NCAP) Tests Concerning Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) Document Image... National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) tests concerning document imaging, known as the Document Image... the National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) tests concerning document imaging, known as the...

  1. Use of analog elements to predict the equilibrium and behavior of transuranic elements in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weimer, W.C.; Laul, J.C.; Kutt, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Several naturally-occurring elements with chemical properties similar to those of selected transuranic elements have been chosen and are being examined as potential predictors of transuranic geochemical behaviors. This approach may allow the estimation of the long-term behaviors of transuranic elements in the environment by analyses of the steady-state behaviors of their analog elements. The elements receiving principal attention are the transuranics Am and Cm and their proposed lanthanide element analog Nd

  2. The DEVELOP National Program's Strategy for Communicating Applied Science Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Gleason, L. M.; Ross, K. W.; Crepps, G.; Favors, J.; Kelley, C.; Miller, T. N.; Allsbrook, K. N.; Rogers, L.; Ruiz, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's DEVELOP National Program conducts rapid feasibility projects that enable the future workforce and current decision makers to collaborate and build capacity to use Earth science data to enhance environmental management and policy. The program communicates its results and applications to a broad spectrum of audiences through a variety of methods: "virtual poster sessions" that engage the general public through short project videos and interactive dialogue periods, a "Campus Ambassador Corps" that communicates about the program and its projects to academia, scientific and policy conference presentations, community engagement activities and end-of-project presentations, project "hand-offs" providing results and tools to project partners, traditional publications (both gray literature and peer-reviewed), an interactive website project gallery, targeted brochures, and through multiple social media venues and campaigns. This presentation will describe the various methods employed by DEVELOP to communicate the program's scientific outputs, target audiences, general statistics, community response and best practices.

  3. The 3D Elevation Program national indexing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Cindy A.; Heidemann, Hans Karl; Stoker, Jason M.; Eldridge, Diane F.

    2017-11-02

    The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) acquires high-resolution elevation data for the Nation. This program has been operating under an opportunity-oriented approach, acquiring light detection and ranging (lidar) projects of varying sizes scattered across the United States. As a result, the national 3DEP elevation layer is subject to data gaps or unnecessary overlap between adjacent collections. To mitigate this problem, 3DEP is adopting a strategic, systematic approach to national data acquisition that will create efficiencies in efforts to achieve nationwide elevation data coverage and help capture additional Federal and non-Federal investments resulting from advance awareness of proposed acquisitions and partnership opportunities. The 3DEP Working Group, an interagency group managed by the USGS, has agreed that all future 3DEP collections within the lower 48 States should be coordinated by using a 1-kilometer by 1-kilometer tiling scheme for the conterminous United States. Fiscal Year 2018 is being considered a transition year, and in Fiscal Year 2019 the national indexing scheme will be fully implemented, so that all 3DEP-supported projects will be acquired and delivered in the national indexing scheme and projected into the Albers Equal Area projection. 

  4. Patterns of transuranic uptake by aquatic organisms: consequences and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyman, L.D.; Trabalka, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Literature on the behavior of plutonium and transuranic elements in aquatic organisms is reviewed. The commonality of observed distribution coefficients over a wide array of aquatic environments (both freshwater and marine) and the lack of biomagnification in aquatic food chains from these environments are demonstrated. These findings lead to the conclusion that physical processes dominate in the transfer of transuranic elements from aquatic environments to man. The question of the nature of the association of plutonium with aquatic biota (surface sorption vs biological incorporation) is discussed as well as the importance of short food chains in the transfer of plutonium to man

  5. EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE STRONIUM AND TRANSURANIC SEPARATION PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SMALLEY CS

    2011-04-25

    In order to meet contract requirements on the concentrations of strontium-90 and transuranic isotopes in the immobilized low-activity waste, strontium-90 and transuranics must be removed from the supernate of tanks 241-AN-102 and 241-AN-107. The process currently proposed for this application is an in-tank precipitation process using strontium nitrate and sodium permanganate. Development work on the process has not proceeded since 2005. The purpose of the evaluation is to identify whether any promising alternative processes have been developed since this issue was last examined, evaluate the alternatives and the baseline process, and recommend which process should be carried forward.

  6. Remote-Handled Transuranic Content Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document represents the development of a uniform content code system for RH-TRU waste to be transported in the 72-Bcask. It will be used to convert existing waste form numbers, content codes, and site-specific identification codes into a system that is uniform across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites.The existing waste codes at the sites can be grouped under uniform content codes without any lossof waste characterization information. The RH-TRUCON document provides an all-encompassing description for each content code and compiles this information for all DOE sites. Compliance with waste generation, processing, and certification procedures at the sites (outlined in this document foreach content code) ensures that prohibited waste forms are not present in the waste. The content code gives an overall description of the RH-TRU waste material in terms of processes and packaging, as well as the generation location. This helps to provide cradle-to-grave traceability of the waste material so that the various actions required to assess its qualification as payload for the 72-B cask can be performed. The content codes also impose restrictions and requirements on the manner in which a payload can be assembled. The RH-TRU Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC), Appendix 1.3.7 of the 72-B Cask Safety Analysis Report (SAR), describes the current governing procedures applicable for the qualification of waste as payload for the 72-B cask. The logic for this classification is presented in the 72-B Cask SAR. Together, these documents (RH-TRUCON, RH-TRAMPAC, and relevant sections of the 72-B Cask SAR) present the foundation and justification for classifying RH-TRU waste into content codes. Only content codes described in thisdocument can be considered for transport in the 72-B cask. Revisions to this document will be madeas additional waste qualifies for transport. Each content code uniquely

  7. Understanding parenting in Manitoba First nations: implications for program development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eni, Rachel; Rowe, Gladys

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study introduced the "Manitoba First Nation Strengthening Families Maternal Child Health Pilot Project" program and evaluation methodologies. The study provided a knowledge base for programmers, evaluators, and communities to develop relevant health promotion, prevention, and intervention programming to assist in meeting health needs of pregnant women and young families. Sixty-five open-ended, semistructured interviews were completed in 13 communities. Data analysis was through grounded theory. Three major themes emerged from the data: interpersonal support and relationships; socioeconomic factors; and community initiatives. Complex structural, historical events compromise parenting; capacity and resilience are supported through informal and formal health and social supports.

  8. 2015 Key Wind Program and National Laboratory Accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program is committed to helping the nation secure cost-competitive sources of renewable energy through the development and deployment of innovative wind power technologies. By investing in improvements to wind plant design, technology development, and operation as well as developing tools to identify the highest quality wind resources, the Wind Program serves as a leader in making wind energy technologies more competitive with traditional sources of energy and a larger part of our nation’s renewable energy portfolio.

  9. National energy peak leveling program (NEPLP). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    This three-volume report is responsive to the requirements of Contract E (04-3)-1152 to provide a detailed methodology, to include management, technology, and socio-economic aspects, of a voluntary community program of computer-assisted peak load leveling and energy conservation in commercial community facilities. The demonstration project established proof-of-concept in reducing the kW-demand peak by the unofficial goal of 10%, with concurrent kWh savings. This section of the three volume report is a final report appendix with information on the National Energy Peak Leveling Program (NEPLP).

  10. Proposal of a fast gas-cooled reactor using transuranics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Anderson Altair Pinheiro de

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, nations that have invested in research and energy generation through nuclear source have devoted part of their efforts in developing new technologies for nuclear reactors. Part of this investment focuses on new material testing, particularly regarding new fuels. In a world view that breaths sustainability, the reprocess and reuse of spent fuel from conventional reactors comes alive in nuclear technology, presenting itself as a real alternative of energy source for the latest generation of reactors. Different concepts of fourth generation reactors have been proposed and must meet some basic requirements, such as: extended burnup, improvement of passive safety, better radioactive waste management, possibility to use reprocessed fuel and proliferation resistance. In this context, the GFR (Gas-cooled Fast Reactor) is one of the future promises, presenting satisfactory neutronic results on the use of type of fuel (U, Pu) C. In the present work, the fuel of a traditional GFR reactor that uses (U, Pu)C was sub was replaced by a transuranic reprocessed fuel (TRU), obtained by non-proliferation reprocessing technology. The UO 2 fuel initially enriched by 3.1% was burned in a standard PWR, with full burn of 33,000 MWd/T. Afterward it was left in a pool for 5 years and finally reprocessed by UREX + method. Two fuels were studied and evaluated, one diluted with depleted uranium (U, TRU)C, and the other diluted in thorium (Th, TRU)C. Assessments were done in steady state and as well as during burning and were compared with results obtained using the standard fuel, (U, Pu) C. The outcome shows that the use of TRU as a fuel, in GFR type reactors, is a real possibility. The research was done using the SCALE 6.0 code modules. (author)

  11. Intermediate depth burial of classified transuranic wastes in arid alluvium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, J.R.; Crowe, B.M.; Di Sanza, F.

    1999-01-01

    Intermediate depth disposal operations were conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1984 through 1989. These operations emplaced high-specific activity low-level wastes (LLW) and limited quantities of classified transuranic (TRU) wastes in 37 m (120-ft) deep, Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes. The GCD boreholes are 3 m (10 ft) in diameter and founded in a thick sequence of arid alluvium. The bottom 15 m (50 ft) of each borehole was used for waste emplacement and the upper 21 m (70 ft) was backfilled with native alluvium. The bottom of each GCD borehole is almost 200 m (650 ft) above the water table. The GCD boreholes are located in one of the most arid portions of the US, with an average precipitation of 13 cm (5 inches) per year. The limited precipitation, coupled with generally warm temperatures and low humidities results in a hydrologic system dominated by evapotranspiration. The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) 40 CFR 191 defines the requirements for protection of human health from disposed TRU wastes. This EPA standard sets a number of requirements, including probabilistic limits on the cumulative releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment for 10,000 years. The DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has contracted with Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) to conduct a performance assessment (PA) to determine if the TRU wastes emplaced in the GCD boreholes complies with the EPA's 40 CFR 191 requirements. This paper describes DOE's actions undertaken to evaluate whether the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes will, or will not, endanger human health. Based on preliminary modeling, the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes meet the EPA's requirements, and are, therefore, protective of human health

  12. The Canadian kidney paired donation program: a national program to increase living donor transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Edward H; Nickerson, Peter; Campbell, Patricia; Yetzer, Kathy; Lahaie, Nick; Zaltzman, Jeffery; Gill, John S

    2015-05-01

    Establishment of a national kidney paired donation (KPD) program represents a unique achievement in Canada's provincially organized health care system. Key factors enabling program implementation included consultation with international experts, formation of a unique organization with a mandate to facilitate interprovincial collaboration, and the volunteer efforts of members of the Canadian transplant community to overcome a variety of logistical barriers. As of December 2013, the program had facilitated 240 transplantations including 10% with Calculated panel reactive antibody (cPRA) ≥97%. Unique features of the Canadian KPD program include participation of n = 55 nondirected donors, performance of only donor specific antibody negative transplants, the requirement for donor travel, and nonuse of bridge donors. The national KPD program has helped maintain the volume of living kidney donor transplants in Canada over the past 5 years and serves as a model of inter-provincial collaboration to improve the delivery of health care to Canadians.

  13. Cultural Diversity and the National Parks: Working Together for Change. The National Parks Community Partners Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Alan

    This guidebook was developed to assist in the creation of partnerships. It discusses some of the best practices and lessons learned in the program's first year, and gives novice community-based organizers a sense of how effective partnerships can be formed. The guidebook will help the more experienced organizers of National Park Service employees…

  14. 77 FR 43232 - National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National Average Payments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ...) establishes National Average Payments for free, reduced price and paid afterschool snacks as part of the...--free lunch-- 303 cents, reduced price lunch--263 cents. Afterschool Snacks in Afterschool Care Programs--The payments are: Contiguous States--free snack--78 cents, reduced price snack--39 cents, paid snack...

  15. Research and development plans for disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, J.W.; Platt, A.M.

    1978-09-01

    This plan recommends a 20-year, 206 million (1975 $'s) R and D program on geologic structures in the contiguous U.S. and on the midplate Pacific seabed with the objective of developing an acceptable method for disposal of commercial high-level and transuranic wastes by 1997. No differentiation between high-level and transuranic waste disposal is made in the first 5 years of the program. A unique application of probability theory to R and D planning establishes, at a 95% confidence level, that the program objective will be met if at least fifteen generic options and five specific disposal sites are explored in detail and at least two pilot plants are constructed and operated. A parallel effort on analysis and evaluation maximizes information available for decisions on the acceptability of the disposal techniques. Based on considerations of technical feasibility, timing and technical risk, the other disposal concepts, e.g., ice sheets, partitioning, transmutation and space disposal cited in BNWL-1900 are not recommended for near future R and D

  16. R programming for the Quarterly National Accounts: Moroccan case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houssam HACHIMI

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The compilation of quarterly national accounts (QNA has different methods based on the specificity of the statistical system of the country, in effect, the method of calibration adopted by the Moroccan national account department has several steps that estimates indirectly the quarterly components of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP by using statistics indicators as regressors in a linear model. The use of R, as statistical software for the compilation of that official statistics presents some challenges for the statisticians from the first step of the data import, until the export of the results, the responsible of the compilation of the QNA must have good algorithmic coding skills so as he can build his R program by choosing the adequate packages and version of the R software. The objective of this work is to present the R program and challenges that face the Moroccan case.

  17. Innovative Applications of In Situ Gamma Spectroscopy for Non-destructive Assay of Transuranic Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watters, D.J.; Weismann, J.J.; Duke, S.J.; Nicosia, W.C.

    2009-01-01

    Cabrera Services (CABRERA), under contract to National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), supported the transuranic (TRU) waste reduction initiative at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). CABRERA developed advanced NDA techniques for oversized boxes (OSB) and drums using in situ gamma spectroscopy during several phases of the project. A more thorough characterization method was employed during the planning phase of the project to better understand the TRU content and distribution within each container, while a comprehensive NDA program was designed and implemented during the intrusive phase that guided waste segregation and re-packaging of both TRU and low-level wastes (LLW). NSTec took receipt of 58 oversized boxes of suspect TRU waste from Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL). TRU waste is defined as greater than 3.7 kilobecquerels per gram [kBq/g] (100 nanocuries (nCi)/g) activity from alpha-emitting radionuclides with atomic number greater than 92 having a half-life greater than 20 years. Each box was custom-made to house a variety of suspect TRU wastes resulting from years of weapons program research, development, and testing. Since their arrival at NTS, the boxes have undergone several iterations of non-destructive assay (NDA) in preparation for the comprehensive repackaging effort. NDA has included two rounds of in situ gamma spectroscopy and real-time radiography (RTR) scans that were videotaped. Contents have been confirmed to include glove boxes, HEPA filters and their housings, and assorted process equipment and piping. TRU content was determined via directly measuring plutonium-239 (Pu-239), americium-241 (Am-241), and other radionuclides, while adding calculated results for non-measurable nuclides using reliable scaling factors developed from acceptable knowledge (AK). Advantages of CABRERA's NDA methods included: - More NDA information is available in the same amount of counting time, allowing NSTec to make more

  18. Australia’s National Health Programs: An Ontological Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkalgud Ramaprasad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Australia has a large number of health program initiatives whose comprehensive assessment will help refine and redefine priorities by highlighting areas of emphasis, under-emphasis, and non-emphasis. The objectives of our research are to: (a systematically map all the programs onto an ontological framework, and (b systemically analyse their relative emphases at different levels of granularity. We mapped all the health program initiatives onto an ontology with five dimensions, namely: (a Policy-scope, (b Policy-focus, (c Outcomes, (d Type of care, and (e Population served. Each dimension is expanded into a taxonomy of its constituent elements. Each combination of elements from the five dimensions is a possible policy initiative component. There are 30,030 possible components encapsulated in the ontology. It includes, for example: (a National financial policies on accessibility of preventive care for family, and (b Local-urban regulatory policies on cost of palliative care for individual-aged. Four of the authors mapped all of Australia’s health programs and initiatives on to the ontology. Visualizations of the data are used to highlight the relative emphases in the program initiatives. The dominant emphasis of the program initiatives is: [National] [educational, personnel-physician, information] policies on [accessibility, quality] of [preventive, wellness] care for the [community]. However, although (a information is emphasized technology is not; and (b accessibility and quality are emphasized cost, satisfaction, and quality are not. The ontology and the results of the mapping can help systematically reassess and redirect the relative emphases of the programs and initiatives from a systemic perspective.

  19. R&D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUON ACCELERATOR PROGRAM

    OpenAIRE

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to ...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories performance assessment methodology for long-term environmental programs : the history of nuclear waste management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marietta, Melvin Gary; Anderson, D. Richard; Bonano, Evaristo J.; Meacham, Paul Gregory (Raytheon Ktech, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is the world leader in the development of the detailed science underpinning the application of a probabilistic risk assessment methodology, referred to in this report as performance assessment (PA), for (1) understanding and forecasting the long-term behavior of a radioactive waste disposal system, (2) estimating the ability of the disposal system and its various components to isolate the waste, (3) developing regulations, (4) implementing programs to estimate the safety that the system can afford to individuals and to the environment, and (5) demonstrating compliance with the attendant regulatory requirements. This report documents the evolution of the SNL PA methodology from inception in the mid-1970s, summarizing major SNL PA applications including: the Subseabed Disposal Project PAs for high-level radioactive waste; the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant PAs for disposal of defense transuranic waste; the Yucca Mountain Project total system PAs for deep geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; PAs for the Greater Confinement Borehole Disposal boreholes at the Nevada National Security Site; and PA evaluations for disposal of high-level wastes and Department of Energy spent nuclear fuels stored at Idaho National Laboratory. In addition, the report summarizes smaller PA programs for long-term cover systems implemented for the Monticello, Utah, mill-tailings repository; a PA for the SNL Mixed Waste Landfill in support of environmental restoration; PA support for radioactive waste management efforts in Egypt, Iraq, and Taiwan; and, most recently, PAs for analysis of alternative high-level radioactive waste disposal strategies including repositories deep borehole disposal and geologic repositories in shale and granite. Finally, this report summarizes the extension of the PA methodology for radioactive waste disposal toward development of an enhanced PA system for carbon sequestration and storage systems

  1. Fiscal year 1987 program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    The Defense TRU Waste Program (DTWP) is the focal point for the Department of Energy in national planning, integration, operation, and technical development for TRU waste management. The scope of this program extends from the point of TRU waste generation through delivery to a permanent repository. The TRU program maintains a close interface with repository development to ensure program compatibility and coordination. The defense TRU program does not directly address commercial activities that generate TRU waste. Instead, it is concerned with providing alternatives to manage existing and future defense TRU wastes. The FY 87 Program Plan is consistent with the Defense TRU Waste Program goals and objectives stated in the Defense Transuranic Waste Program Strategy Document, January 1984. The roles of participants, the responsibilities and authorities for Operations, and Research ampersand Development (R ampersand D), the organizational interfaces and communication channels for R ampersand D and the establishment of procedures for planning, reporting, and budgeting of Operations and R ampersand D activities meet requirements stated in the Technical Management Plan for the Transuranic Waste Management Program. Detailed budget planning (i.e., programmatic funding and capital equipment) is presented for FY 87; outyear budget projections are presented for future years

  2. The USA National Phenology Network: A national science and monitoring program for understanding climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltzin, J.

    2009-04-01

    Patterns of phenology for plants and animals control ecosystem processes, determine land surface properties, control biosphere-atmosphere interactions, and affect food production, health, conservation, and recreation. Although phenological data and models have applications related to scientific research, education and outreach, agriculture, tourism and recreation, human health, and natural resource conservation and management, until recently there was no coordinated effort to understand phenology at the national scale in the United States. The USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN; www.usanpn.org), established in 2007, is an emerging and exciting partnership between federal agencies, the academic community, and the general public to establish a national science and monitoring initiative focused on phenology. The first year of operation of USA-NPN produced many new phenology products and venues for phenology research and citizen involvement. Products include a new web-site (www.usanpn.org) that went live in June 2008; the web-site includes a tool for on-line data entry, and serves as a clearinghouse for products and information to facilitate research and communication related to phenology. The new core Plant Phenology Program includes profiles for 200 vetted local, regional, and national plant species with descriptions and (BBCH-consistent) monitoring protocols, as well as templates for addition of new species. A partnership program describes how other monitoring networks can engage with USA-NPN to collect, manage or disseminate phenological information for science, health, education, management or predictive service applications. Project BudBurst, a USA-NPN field campaign for citizen scientists, went live in February 2008, and now includes over 3000 registered observers monitoring 4000 plants across the nation. For 2009 and beyond, we will initiate a new Wildlife Phenology Program, create an on-line clearing-house for phenology education and outreach, strengthen

  3. Cost Effectiveness of Iran National Plasma Contract Fractionation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdol Majid Cheraghali

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasma derived medicines (PDM including immunoglobulins, clotting factors and albumin are life saving medicines which due to their high costs are inaccessible for many patients living in developing countries. By contrary substantial volume of plasma as raw materials for production of these medicines are discarded worldwide. Good quality recovered plasma, as a result of separation of donated blood into its components, could be used for production of PDM. In 2011 Iranian donors donated about 2 million units of blood. A shift fromadministration of whole blood to components therapy has resulted in the generation of over 250,000 liters of surplus of recovered plasma. This created a good opportunity for Iran’s health care system to use this plasma for production of PDM. Therefore Iran national transfusion service has started a contract fractionation program for converting recovered plasma into PDM. This program not only provided essential PDM for Iran pharmaceutical market but also has created a direct saving of about 8.5 million Euros in 2011 for national health sector. In addition this program has drastically contributed to improvement of overall quality of working procedures and services provided by Iran national blood transfusion organization.

  4. Social Media Programs at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance Elaine; Pompea, Stephen M.

    2015-08-01

    Observatories and other science research organizations want to share their research and activities with the public. The last several years, social media has become and increasingly important venue for communicating information about observatory activities, research and education and public outreach.The National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) uses a wide variety of social media to communicate with different audiences. NOAO is active on social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and Pinterest. Our social media accounts include those for the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Kitt Peak National Observatory and our dark skies conservation program Globe at Night.Our social media programs have a variety of audiences. NOAO uses social media to announce and promote NOAO sponsored meetings, observatory news and proposal deadlines to the professional astronomical community. Social media accounts are used to disseminate NOAO press releases, images from the observatory and other science using data from NOAO telescopes.Social media is important in our Education and Public Outreach programs (EPO). Globe at Night has very active facebook and twitter accounts encouraging people to become involved in preserving dark skies. Social media plays a role in recruiting teachers for professional development workshops such as Project Astro.NOAO produces monthly podcasts for the 365 Days of Astronomy podcast featuring interviews with NOAO astronomers. Each podcast highlights the science of an NOAO astronomer, an NOAO operated telescope or instrument, or an NOAO program. A separate series of podcasts is produced for NOAO’s Dark Skies Education programs. All the podcasts are archived at 365daysofastronomy.org.

  5. 76 FR 71037 - Proposed National Toxicology Program (NTP) Review Process for the Report on Carcinogens: Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Proposed National Toxicology Program (NTP) Review Process...: Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP), National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.... Bucher, Associate Director, National Toxicology Program. [FR Doc. 2011-29615 Filed 11-15-11; 8:45 am...

  6. 78 FR 45253 - National Toxicology Program Scientific Advisory Committee on Alternative Toxicological Methods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Toxicology Program... Alternative Methods (ICCVAM), the National Toxicology Program (NTP) Interagency Center for the Evaluation of... Director, National Toxicology Program. [FR Doc. 2013-17919 Filed 7-25-13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4140-01-P ...

  7. The advanced controls program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knee, H.E.; White, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), is conducting research that will lead to advanced, automated control of new liquid-metal-reactor (LMR) nuclear power plants. Although this program of research (entitled the ''Advanced Controls Program'') is focused on LMR technology, it will be capable of providing control design, test, and qualification capability for other advanced reactor designs (e.g., the advanced light water reactor [ALWR] and high temperature gas-cooled reactor [HTGR] designs), while also benefiting existing nuclear plants. The Program will also have applicability to complex, non-nuclear process control environments (e.g., petrochemical, aerospace, etc.). The Advanced Controls Program will support capabilities throughout the entire plant design life cycle, i.e., from the initial interactive first-principle dynamic model development for the process, systems, components, and instruments through advanced control room qualification. The current program involves five principal areas of research activities: (1) demonstrations of advanced control system designs, (2) development of an advanced controls design environment, (3) development of advanced control strategies, (4) research and development (R ampersand D) in human-system integration for advanced control system designs, and (5) testing and validation of advanced control system designs. Discussion of the research in these five areas forms the basis of this paper. Also included is a description of the research directions of the program. 8 refs

  8. Transport, handling, and interim storage of intermediate-level transuranic waste at the INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzger, J.C.; Snyder, A.M.

    1977-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory stores transuranic (TRU)-contaminated waste emitting significant amounts of beta-gamma radiation. This material is referred to as intermediate-level TRU waste. The Energy Research and Development Administration requires that this waste be stored retrievably during the interim before a Federal repository becomes operational. Waste form and packaging criteria for the eventual storage of this waste at a Federal repository, i.e., the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), have been tentatively established. The packaging and storage techniques now in use at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are compatible with these criteria and also meet the requirement that the waste containers remain in a readily-retrievable, contamination-free condition during the interim storage period. The Intermediate Level Transuranic Storage Facility (ILTSF) provides below-grade storage in steel pipe vaults for intermediate-level TRU waste prior to shipment to the WIPP. Designated waste generating facilities, operated for the Energy Research and Development Administration, use a variety of packaging and transportation methods to deliver this waste to the ILTSF. Transfer of the waste containers to the ILTSF storage vaults is accomplished using handling methods compatible with these waste packaging and transport methods

  9. National waste terminal storage program. Supplementary quality-assurance requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garland, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    The basic Quality Assurance Program Requirements standard for the National Waste Terminal Storage Program has been developed primarily for nuclear reactors and other fairly well established nuclear facilities. In the case of waste isolation, however, there are many ongoing investigations for which quality assurance practices and requirements have not been well defined. This paper points out these problems which require supplementary requirements. Briefly these are: (1) the language barrier, that is geologists and scientists are not familiar with quality assurance (QA) terminology; (2) earth sciences deal with materials that cannot be characterized as easily as metals or other materials that are reasonably homogeneous; (3) development and control of mathematical models and associated computer programs; (4) research and development

  10. Design of benign matrix drums for the non-destructive assay performance demonstration program for the National TRU Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.K.

    1996-09-01

    Regulatory compliance programs associated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program (the Program) require the collection of waste characterization data of known quality to support repository performance assessment, permitting, and associated activities. Blind audit samples, referred to as PDP (performance demonstration program) samples, are devices used in the NDA PDP program to acquire waste NDA system performance data per defined measurement routines. As defined under the current NDA PDP Program Plan, a PDP sample consists of a DOT 17C 55-gallon PDP matrix drum configured with insertable radioactive standards, working reference materials (WRMs). The particular manner in which the matrix drum and PDP standard(s) are combined is a function of the waste NDA system performance test objectives of a given cycle. The scope of this document is confined to the design of the PDP drum radioactive standard internal support structure, the matrix type and the as installed configuration. The term benign is used to designate a matrix possessing properties which are nominally non-interfering to waste NDA measurement techniques. Measurement interference sources are technique specific but include attributes such as: high matrix density, heterogeneous matrix distributions, matrix compositions containing high moderator/high Z element concentrations, etc. To the extent practicable the matrix drum design should not unduly bias one NDA modality over another due to the manner in which the matrix drum configuration manifests itself to the measurement system. To this end the PDP matrix drum configuration and composition detailed below is driven primarily by the intent to minimize the incorporation of matrix attributes known to interfere with fundamental waste NDA modalities, i.e. neutron and gamma based techniques

  11. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Academic Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomer, S. A.

    2004-12-01

    "Know the Earth.Show the Way." In fulfillment of its vision, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) provides geospatial intelligence in all its forms and from whatever source-imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial data and information-to ensure the knowledge foundation for planning, decision, and action. To achieve this, NGA conducts a multi-disciplinary program of basic research in geospatial intelligence topics through grants and fellowships to the leading investigators, research universities, and colleges of the nation. This research provides the fundamental science support to NGA's applied and advanced research programs. The major components of the NGA Academic Research Program (NARP) are: - NGA University Research Initiatives (NURI): Three-year basic research grants awarded competitively to the best investigators across the US academic community. Topics are selected to provide the scientific basis for advanced and applied research in NGA core disciplines. - Historically Black College and University - Minority Institution Research Initiatives (HBCU-MI): Two-year basic research grants awarded competitively to the best investigators at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Minority Institutions across the US academic community. - Director of Central Intelligence Post-Doctoral Research Fellowships: Fellowships providing access to advanced research in science and technology applicable to the intelligence community's mission. The program provides a pool of researchers to support future intelligence community needs and develops long-term relationships with researchers as they move into career positions. This paper provides information about the NGA Academic Research Program, the projects it supports and how other researchers and institutions can apply for grants under the program.

  12. Projected transuranic waste loads requiring treatment, storage, and disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, K.; Kotek, T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides information on the volume of TRU waste loads requiring treatment, storage, and disposal at DOE facilities for three siting configurations. Input consisted of updated inventory and generation data from. Waste Isolation Pilot plant Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory report. Results indicate that WIPP's design capacity is sufficient for the CH TRU waste found throughout the DOE Complex

  13. Utilization of borosilicate glass for transuranic waste immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledford, J.A.; Williams, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    Incinerated transuranic waste and other low-level residues have been successfully vitrified by mixing with boric acid and sodium carbonate and heating to 1050 0 C in a bench-scale continuous melter. The resulting borosilicate glass demonstrates excellent mechanical durability and chemical stability

  14. Management feature of transuranic for HTGR and LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Jinfeng; Li Fu; Sun Yuliang

    2013-01-01

    Long-lived actinides from spent fuels can cause potential long-term environ- mental hazards. The generation and incineration of transuranic in different closed fuel cycles were studied. U and Pu were recycled from spent fuel in the 250 MW high-temperature gas-cooled reactor-pebble-bed-module (HTR-PM) U-Pu fuelled core, and then PuO 2 and MOX fuel elements were designed based on this recycled U and Pu. These fuel elements were used to build up a new PuO 2 or MOX fuelled core with the same geometry of the original reactor. Characteristics of transuranic incineration with HTGR open and closed fuel cycles were studied with VSOP code, and the corresponding results from the light water reactor were compared and analyzed. The transuranic generation with HTGR open fuel cycle is almost half of the corresponding result of the light water reactor. Thus, HTGR closed fuel cycles can effectively burn transuranic. (authors)

  15. Sampling of soils for transuranic nuclides: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, E.B.; Essington, E.H.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the literature pertinent to the sampling of soils for radionuclides is presented; emphasis is placed on transuranic nuclides. Sampling of soils is discussed relative to systems of heterogeneous distributions and varied particle sizes encountered in certain environments. Sampling methods that have been used for two different sources of contamination, global fallout, and accidental or operational releases, are included

  16. 76 FR 67200 - Proposed National Toxicology Program (NTP) Review Process for the Report on Carcinogens: Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed National Toxicology... Session AGENCY: Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP), National Institute of Environmental.... Bucher, Associate Director, National Toxicology Program. [FR Doc. 2011-28132 Filed 10-28-11; 8:45 am...

  17. R and D Proposal for the National Muon Acccelerator Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R and D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R and D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons - the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R and D and, as the P5 panel has

  18. R&D Proposal for the National Muon Acccelerator Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-02-01

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons - the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently

  19. R&D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUON ACCELERATOR PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muon Accelerator Program; Zisman, Michael S.; Geer, Stephen

    2010-02-24

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons--the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently

  20. US Department of Energy acceptance of commercial transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboas, A.L.; Bennett, W.S.; Brown, C.M.

    1980-02-01

    Contaminated transuranic wastes generated as a result of non-defense activities have been disposed of by shallow land burial at a commercially operated (NECO) facility located on the Hanford federal reservation, which is licensed by the State of Washington and by the NRC. About 15,000 ft 3 of commercial TRU waste have been generated each year, but generation for the next three years could triple due to decontamination and decommissioning scheduled to start in 1980. Disposal at other commercial burial sites has been precluded due to sites closing or prohibitions on acceptance of transuranic wastes. The State of Washington recently modified the NECO-Hanford operating license, effective February 29, 1980, to provide that radioactive wastes contaminated with transuranics in excess of 10 nCi/g will not be accepted for disposal. Consistent with the state policy, the NRC amended the NECO special nuclear material license so that Pu in excess of 10n Ci/g cannot be accepted after February 29, 1980. As a result, NRC requested DOE to examine the feasibility of accepting these wastes at a DOE operated site. TRU wastes accepted by the DOE would be placed in retrievable storage in accordance with DOE policy which requires retrievable storage of transuranic wastes pending final disposition in a geologic repository. DOE transuranic wastes are stored at six major DOE sites: INEL, Hanford, LASL, NTS, ORNL, and SRP. A specific site for receiving commercial TRU waste has not yet been selected. Shipments to DOE-Hanford would cause the least disruption to past practices. Commercial TRU wastes would be subject to waste form and packaging criteria established by the DOE. The waste generators would be expected to incur all applicable costs for DOE to take ownership of the waste, and provide storage, processing, and repository disposal. The 1980 charge to generators for DOE acceptance of commercial TRU waste is $147 per cubic foot

  1. National Radon Contractor Proficiency Program. Proficiency report, October 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    The report lists those individual contractors in the United States who have met the requirements of the Radon Contractor Proficiency (RCP) Program as of August 18, 1990. These requirements are designed to provide minimum proficiency criteria for individuals who design and supervise the installation of radon mitigation systems in buildings. (Some States have more stringent requirements as part of their radon certification programs. The States should be consulted directly for details on their programs; see Section 5 for a list of State radon contacts). The RCP Program measures the proficiency of an individual contractor, not their company. Therefore, users of the report who select a mitigation firm should ensure that the services are provided by the listed contractor. The National RCP Program does not accredit mitigation contractors, nor does it certify, recommend, or endorse participating companies. Only the listed contractor, not their company of affilation, are deemed proficient. The inclusion of a contractor in the report should not be interpreted as a certification or accreditation of the individual or affiliated company

  2. Flow Induced Vibration Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has had a Flow Induced Vibration Program since 1967; the Program currently resides in the Laboratory's Components Technology Division. Throughout its existence, the overall objective of the program has been to develop and apply new and/or improved methods of analysis and testing for the design evaluation of nuclear reactor plant components and heat exchange equipment from the standpoint of flow induced vibration. Historically, the majority of the program activities have been funded by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), and Department of Energy (DOE). Current DOE funding is from the Breeder Mechanical Component Development Division, Office of Breeder Technology Projects; Energy Conversion and Utilization Technology (ECUT) Program, Office of Energy Systems Research; and Division of Engineering, Mathematical and Geosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Testing of Clinch River Breeder Reactor upper plenum components has been funded by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) Project Office. Work has also been performed under contract with Foster Wheeler, General Electric, Duke Power Company, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Westinghouse

  3. Role of the National Cancer Institute in the National Cancer Program on environmental carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flamm, W.G.

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: the need for the National Cancer Institute to coordinate all cancer-related activities at the federal level and the desirability of programming so as to exploit the best opportunities for alleviating the mortality, morbidity, and incidence of cancer in the United States; need for assessing opportunities for prevention of environmental carcinogenesis; creation of the Smoking and Health Program in the NCI; development of cancer atlases from a nationwide survey; and role of the NCI with respect to waterborne carcinogens. (HLW)

  4. National control and eradication program of bovine tuberculosis in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Vanessa; Paredes, Luis; Rivera, Alejandro; Ternicier, Claudio

    2011-07-05

    There have been reports of the presence of bovine tuberculosis (TB) in Chile for more than 100 years. Several prevalence studies have revealed that there is a wide spectrum of disease across the country with certain geographic areas where the disease is endemic through to other geographic areas where infection is sporadic and at very low prevalence. In 2009, this information was used to divide Chile into different geographic zones based on prevalence rates. This will enable the correct actions to be undertaken to reduce the prevalence of TB. Thus the northern part of Chile which has a medium to high prevalence of TB will be categorized as a control zone. In contrast, the southern part of Chile which has a high proportion of the bovine population, has a low prevalence of TB and will be classified as an eradication zone (Paredes, 2008). Although there have been several past attempts to create a national control and eradication program in Chile, none has been successful. A national program is proposed, and outlined in this paper. Progress toward program initiation in 2009 has been difficult, mostly because of the global economic crisis, difficulties in the milk and meat industry, and social and political issues. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. National Space Weather Program Releases Strategy for the New Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Samuel P.; Babcock, Michael R.; Bonadonna, Michael F.

    2010-12-01

    The National Space Weather Program (NSWP; http://www.nswp.gov) is a U.S. federal government interagency program established by the Office of the Federal Coordinator for Meteorology (OFCM) in 1995 to coordinate, collaborate, and leverage capabilities across stakeholder agencies, including space weather researchers, service providers, users, policy makers, and funding agencies, to improve the performance of the space weather enterprise for the United States and its international partners. Two important documents released in recent months have established a framework and the vision, goals, and strategy to move the enterprise forward in the next decade. The U.S. federal agency members of the NSWP include the departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, Interior, State, and Transportation, plus NASA, the National Science Foundation, and observers from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). The OFCM is also working with the Department of Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency to formally join the program.

  6. [The new national program for tuberculosis elimination in Israel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemtob, Daniel; Leventhal, Alex; Berlowitz, Yitzhak; Weiler-Ravell, Daniel

    2002-03-01

    The rise in the incidence of TB in Israel, mostly due to immigration from endemic areas, led to the establishment of a new TB control program which follows the guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO). Reorganization of the TB infrastructure was enabled by specific legislative, administrative and budgetary measures initiated by the Ministry of Health (MOH) in conjunction with the Sick Funds. To present the theoretical and practical aspects of this new program to the physicians of Israel. The essence of this program is the use of directly observed therapy (DOT) for all patients together with centralization of TB care in nine national centers, closely supervised by the MOH. This centralization allows a critical mass of patients to be seen in each clinic, thus enabling the labor-intensive task of modern TB treatment, including the supervision and/or the administration of DOT, to be performed in a cost-effective manner. Day to day treatment is conducted by general community clinics and supervised by District Health Offices. Hospitalization, a relatively rare necessity in the new program, is available in two dedicated centers with modern isolation facilities. Centralized laboratory services provide timely susceptibility testing. Billing is simplified according to disease categories, using a global assessment of costs negotiated with the Sick Funds. Management and quality control of the program are carried out on an ongoing basis by the Department of TB and AIDS at the MOH. In the first two years that have elapsed since the inception of the program, almost 93% of cases have documented evidence of completion of treatment (under DOT), compared to 54% (without any treatment supervision) before the program came into effect.

  7. National Report on the NASA Sounding Rocket and Balloon Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberspeaker, Philip; Fairbrother, Debora

    2013-01-01

    The U. S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs conduct a total of 30 to 40 missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community and other users. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program supports the science community by integrating their experiments into the sounding rocket payloads, and providing both the rocket vehicle and launch operations services. Activities since 2011 have included two flights from Andoya Rocket Range, more than eight flights from White Sands Missile Range, approximately sixteen flights from Wallops Flight Facility, two flights from Poker Flat Research Range, and four flights from Kwajalein Atoll. Other activities included the final developmental flight of the Terrier-Improved Malemute launch vehicle, a test flight of the Talos-Terrier-Oriole launch vehicle, and a host of smaller activities to improve program support capabilities. Several operational missions have utilized the new Terrier-Malemute vehicle. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program is currently engaged in the development of a new sustainer motor known as the Peregrine. The Peregrine development effort will involve one static firing and three flight tests with a target completion data of August 2014. The NASA Balloon Program supported numerous scientific and developmental missions since its last report. The program conducted flights from the U.S., Sweden, Australia, and Antarctica utilizing standard and experimental vehicles. Of particular note are the successful test flights of the Wallops Arc Second Pointer (WASP), the successful demonstration of a medium-size Super Pressure Balloon (SPB), and most recently, three simultaneous missions aloft over Antarctica. NASA continues its successful incremental design qualification program and will support a science mission aboard WASP in late 2013 and a science mission aboard the SPB in early 2015. NASA has also embarked on an intra-agency collaboration to launch a rocket from a balloon to

  8. Regional Innovation System Strengthening Program (SIDa as an Exit Strategy National Community Development Program (PNPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Narutomo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the PNPM program and follow the program with SIDA Strengthening Program. The research method used is a qualitative method approach of this research through the evaluation research design that builds on the CIPP evaluation model (Context-Input-Process-Product. Since the failure of theories and models of development are too glorifies growth, makes many people turn to focus on people development, which includes requiring optimization of local resources, participation, and empowerment. Since then, "empowerment" which was introduced in Indonesia has been anesthetized and made many hopes among many parties. In 2007 started the National Program for Community Empowerment (PNPM which continue Kecamatan Development Program (KDP. PNPM 2014 which is part of the United Indonesia Cabinet Volume 2 is going to end. For that we need to look for an exit strategy program that can maintain sustainability of PNPM. Regional Innovation Systems Strengthening Program (SIDA is a program of the whole process in one system to foster innovation made between government institutions, local governments, research institutions, educational institutions, innovation support institutions, businesses, and communities in areas that have been implemented since the 2012 SIDA program is an empowerment program as well, both to the public and even empowering to all elements such as academia, private industry, government and society.

  9. Hazardous gas production by alpha particles in solid organic transuranic waste matrices. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaVerne, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    'This project uses fundamental radiation chemical techniques to elucidate the basic processes occurring in the heavy-ion radiolysis of solid hydrocarbon matrices such as polymers and organic resins that are associated with many of the transuranic waste deposits or the transportation of these radionuclides. The environmental management of mixed waste containing transuranic radionuclides is difficult because these nuclides are alpha particle emitters and the energy deposited by the alpha particles causes chemical transformations in the matrices accompanying the waste. Most radiolysis programs focus on conventional radiation such as gamma rays, but the chemical changes induced by alpha particles and other heavy ions are typically very different and product yields can vary by more than an order of magnitude. The objective of this research is to measure the production of gases, especially molecular hydrogen, produced in the proton, helium ion, and carbon ion radiolysis of selected solid organic matrices in order to obtain fundamental mechanistic information on the radiolytic decomposition of these materials. This knowledge can also be used to directly give reasonable estimates of explosive or flammability hazards in the storage or transport of transuranic wastes in order to enhance the safety of DOE sites. This report summarizes the work after eight months of a three-year project on determining the production of hazardous gases in transuranic waste. The first stage of the project was to design and build an assembly to irradiate solid organic matrices using accelerated ion beams. It is necessary to measure absolute radiolytic yields, and simulate some of the conditions found in the field. A window assembly was constructed allowing the beam to pass consecutively through a collimator, a vacuum exit window and into the solid sample. The beam is stopped in the sample and the entire end of the assembly is a Faraday cup. Integration of the collected current, in conjunction

  10. Talks and status of the national conference of the national program of fight against climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In order to fulfill its commitments in the Kyoto protocol for the abatement of greenhouse gases emissions, France has started important environmental actions: the creation of the national program of fight against climate change (validated in January 2000), the integration of the problem of climate change in government actions (collective services and state-region contracts), creation of a national laboratory of global warming effects, creation of a research council on climate change and durable development, presentation of an annual status of the actions carried out in the framework of the national program. This last point was the aim of the conference held in Paris in June 2001. Debates were organized around four main sectors: industry, energy, buildings and transportation systems. The topics approached during the round-tables raised several essential questions for the fight against climate change: which practice changes are needed in the industry and energy production activities? Which actions need to be carried out in new and existing buildings to save energy? Which consistent transportation policies need to be implemented in urban areas? Is a rail-road traffic re-balancing possible? Which importance can have the territory organizations? What are the public expectations in front of the climate change risk? This document brings together the talks of Mrs D. Voynet, Minister of national development and environment, the talk of Mr R.G. Schwartzenberg, Minister of research, the talk of Mr C. Pierret, State Secretary of Industry, and a sectoral status (transports, industry, energy, buildings and mastery of electricity demand) of the first year of the program presented by Mr M. Mousel, head of the inter-ministry mission on greenhouse effect. The document ends with a presentation of the British and European climate change programs. (J.S.)

  11. 78 FR 9529 - National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... collection burden inventory for the National School Lunch Program is 12,181,012. These changes are contingent... American children and adolescents: What changes in prevalence rates could not reveal. International Journal... purchase and consume at school. Researchers concluded that these kinds of changes in food exposure and...

  12. Overview of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, P.P.; Thompson, T.H.

    1994-01-01

    The Nation's water resources are the basis for life and our economic vitality. These resources support a complex web of human activities and fishery and wildlife needs that depend upon clean water. Demands for good-quality water for drinking, recreation, farming, and industry are rising, and as a result, the American public is concerned about the condition and sustainability of our water resources. The American public is asking: Is it safe to swim in and drink water from our rivers or lakes? Can we eat the fish that come from them? Is our ground water polluted? Is water quality degrading with time, and if so, why? Has all the money we've spent to clean up our waters, done any good? The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program was designed to provide information that will help answer these questions. NAWQA is designed to assess historical, current, and future water-quality conditions in representative river basins and aquifers nationwide. One of the primary objectives of the program is to describe relations between natural factors, human activities, and water-quality conditions and to define those factors that most affect water quality in different parts of the Nation. The linkage of water quality to environmental processes is of fundamental importance to water-resource managers, planners, and policy makers. It provides a strong and unbiased basis for better decisionmaking by those responsible for making decisions that affect our water resources, including the United States Congress, Federal, State, and local agencies, environmental groups, and industry. Information from the NAWQA Program also will be useful for guiding research, monitoring, and regulatory activities in cost effective ways.

  13. Curriculum development for a national cardiotocography education program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thellesen, Line; Hedegaard, Morten; Bergholt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To define learning objectives for a national cardiotocography (CTG) education program based on expert consensus. DESIGN: A three-round Delphi survey. POPULATION AND SETTING: One midwife and one obstetrician from each maternity unit in Denmark were appointed based on CTG teaching......-point relevance scale. Consensus was predefined as objectives with a mean rating value of ≥3. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: A prioritized list of CTG learning objectives. RESULTS: A total of 42 midwives and obstetricians from 21 maternity units were invited to participate of whom 26 completed all three Delphi rounds...

  14. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Waste Minimization Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.A.; Tang, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    This Program Plan document describes the background of the Waste Minimization field at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and refers to the significant studies that have impacted on legislative efforts, both at the federal and state levels. A short history of formal LLNL waste minimization efforts is provided. Also included are general findings from analysis of work to date, with emphasis on source reduction findings. A short summary is provided on current regulations and probable future legislation which may impact on waste minimization methodology. The LLN Waste Minimization Program Plan is designed to be dynamic and flexible so as to meet current regulations, and yet is able to respond to an everchanging regulatory environment. 19 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs

  15. 77 FR 48527 - National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) Test Concerning Automated Commercial Environment (ACE...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) test concerning the simplified entry functionality in the... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection National Customs Automation Program (NCAP) Test Concerning Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) Simplified Entry: Modification of...

  16. Flow Induced Vibration Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory's Flow Induced Vibration Program, currently residing in the Laboratory's Components Technology Division is discussed. Throughout its existence, the overall objective of the program was to develop and apply new and/or improved methods of analysis and testing for the design evaluation of nuclear reactor plant components and heat exchange equipment from the standpoint of flow induced vibration. Historically, the majority of the program activities were funded by the US Atomic Energy Commission, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Department of Energy. Current DOE funding is from the Breeder Mechanical Component Development Division, Office of Breeder Technology Projects; Energy Conversion and Utilization Technology Program, Office of Energy Systems Research; and Division of Engineering, Mathematical and Geosciences, office of Basic Energy Sciences. Testing of Clinch River Breeder Reactor upper plenum components was funded by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant Project Office. Work was also performed under contract with Foster Wheeler, General Electric, Duke Power Company, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Westinghouse.

  17. Transportation packagings for high-level wastes and unprocessed transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmot, E.L.; Romesberg, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    Packagings used for nuclear waste transport are varied in size, shape, and weight because they must accommodate a wide variety of waste forms and types. However, this paper will discuss the common characteristics among the packagings in order to provide a broad understanding of packaging designs. The paper then discusses, in some detail, a design that has been under development recently at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for handling unprocessed, contact-handled transuranic (CHTRU) wastes as well as a cask design for defense high-level wastes (HLW). As presently conceived, the design of the transuranic package transporter (TRUPACT) calls for inner and outer boxes that are separated by a rigid polyurethane foam. The inner box has a steel frame with stainless steel surfaces; the outer box is similarly constructed except that carbon steel is used for the outside surfaces. The access to each box is through hinged doors that are sealed after loading. To meet another waste management need, a cask is being developed to transport defense HLW. The cask, which is at the preliminary design stage, is being developed by General Atomic under the direction of the TTC. The cask design relies heavily on state-of-the-art spent-fuel cask designs though it can be much simpler due to the characteristics of the HLW. A primary purpose of this paper is to show that CHTRU waste and defense HLW currently are and will be transported in packagings designed to meet the hazards of transportation that are present in general commerce

  18. 78 FR 46332 - Proposed Information Collection Request; Comment Request; National Estuary Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... Request; Comment Request; National Estuary Program AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... request (ICR), ``National Estuary Program'' (EPA ICR No. 1500.08, OMB Control No. 2040-0138 to the Office... comments to OMB. Abstract: The National Estuary Program (NEP) involves collecting information from the...

  19. 77 FR 22321 - National Toxicology Program (NTP) Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Toxicology Program (NTP) Interagency Center for... (HTS) Assays for the Tox21 Initiative AGENCY: Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP...: April 5, 2012. John R. Bucher, Associate Director, National Toxicology Program. [FR Doc. 2012-8942 Filed...

  20. 77 FR 58141 - Public Buildings Service; Information Collection; Art-in-Architecture Program National Artist...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... Buildings Service; Information Collection; Art-in- Architecture Program National Artist Registry (GSA Form... Information Collection 3090- 0274, Art-in-Architecture Program National Artist Registry (GSA Form 7437), by... corresponds with ``Information Collection 3090-0274, Art-in- Architecture Program National Artist Registry...

  1. 78 FR 31955 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection and Programs Directorate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ... 1974; Department of Homeland Security National Protection and Programs Directorate--001 Arrival and... of records titled Department of Homeland Security/National Protection and Programs Directorate--001... of 1974, 5 U.S.C. 552a, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) National Protection and Programs...

  2. 76 FR 52548 - National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Currently Accredited Veterinarians Performing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    .... APHIS-2006-0093] RIN 0579-AC04 National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Currently Accredited... accredited in the National Veterinary Accreditation Program (NVAP) may continue to perform accredited duties..., 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Todd Behre, National Veterinary Accreditation Program, VS...

  3. Project plans for transuranic waste at small quantity sites in the Department of Energy comples-10522

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mctaggart, Jerri Lynne; Lott, Sheila; Gadbury, Casey

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, Carlsbad Office (LANL-CO), has been tasked to write Project Plans for all of the Small Quantity Sites (SQS) with defense related Transuranic (TRU) waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Transuranic Work-Off Plans were precursors to the Project Plans. LANL-CO prepared a Work-Off Plan for each small quantity site. The Work-Off Plan that identified issues, drivers, schedules, and inventory. Eight sites have been chosen to deinventory their legacy TRU waste; Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, General Electric-Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory-Area 300, Nevada Test Site, Nuclear Radiation Development, Sandia National Laboratory, and the Separations Process Research Unit. Each plan was written for contact and/or remote handled waste if present at the site. These project plans will assist the small quantity sites to ship legacy TRU waste offsite and de-inventory the site of legacy TRU waste. The DOE is working very diligently to reduce the nuclear foot print in the United States. Each of the eight SQSs will be de-inventoried of legacy TRU waste during a campaign that ends September 2011. The small quantity sites have a fraction of the waste that large quantity sites possess. During this campaign, the small quantity sites will package all of the legacy TRU waste and ship to Idaho or directly to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The sites will then be removed from the Transuranic Waste Inventory if they are de-inventoried of all waste. Each Project Plan includes the respective site inventory report, schedules, resources, drivers and any issues. These project plans have been written by the difficult waste team and will be approved by each site. Team members have been assigned to each site to write site specific project plans. Once the project plans have been written, the difficult team members will visit the sites to ensure nothing has

  4. 75 FR 10507 - Information Security Oversight Office; National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office; National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... individuals planning to attend must be submitted to the Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) no later...

  5. R and D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUON ACCELERATOR PROGRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, Michael S.; Geer, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R and amp;D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R and D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons--the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R and D and, as the P5 panel has

  6. In situ grouting of buried transuranic waste with polyacrylamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, B.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Farmer, C.D.; Hyder, L.K.; Supaokit, P.

    1987-01-01

    This project is a demonstration and evaluation of the in situ hydrologic stabilization of buried transuranic waste at a humid site via grout injection. Two small trenches, containing buried transuranic waste, were filled with 34.000 L of polyacrylamide grout. Initial field results have indicated that voids within the trenches were totally filled by the grout and that the intratrench hydraulic conductivity was reduced to below field-measurable values. No evidence of grout constituents were observed in twelve perimeter groundwater monitoring wells indicating that grout was contained completely within the two trenches. Polyacrylamide grout was selected for field demonstration over the polyacrylate grout due to its superior performance in laboratory degradation studies. Also supporting the selection of polyacrylamide was the difficulty in controlling the set time of the acrylate polymerization. Based on preliminary degradation monitoring, the polyacrylamide was estimated to have a microbiological half-life of 362 years in the test soil. 15 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs

  7. Effects of transuranics on pulmonary lymph nodes of rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, C.L.

    1976-01-01

    Pulmonary lymph nodes have been suggested as the ''critical'' tissue for insoluble, inhaled transuranic compounds owing to the high concentration of transuranics in these lymph nodes. About 800 rats were given from 0.2 to 3600 nCi of 238 PuO 2 or 239 PuO 2 by inhalation, intratracheal instillation, intrapleural injection, or intraperitoneal injection. From about 1 to 10 percent of deposited plutonium was translocated to pulmonary lymph nodes, the amount depending on the time after deposition and the route of administration; 238 PuO 2 was cleared from pulmonary lymph nodes faster than 239 PuO 2 owing to the greater in vivo solubility of 238 PuO 2 . No primary tumors of pulmonary lymph nodes were observed, indicating that this tissue was not the critical tissue for carcinogenic induction

  8. Environmental aspects of the transuranics: a selected, annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fore, C.S.; Martin, F.M.; Faust, R.A.

    1976-07-01

    This bibliography of 500 references is compiled from the Data Base on the Environmental Aspects of the Transuranics built to provide information support to the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) of ERDA's Nevada Operations Office. The general scope is environmental aspects of uranium and the transuranic elements, with emphasis on plutonium. Laboratory and field studies dealing with the effects of plutonium-239 on animals are highlighted in this bibliography. Supporting information on ecology of the Nevada Test Site and reviews on the effects of other radionuclides upon man and his environment has been included at the request of the NAEG. The references are arranged by subject category with first authors appearing alphabetically in each category. Indexes are given for author, geographic location, keywords, taxons, permuted title and publication description

  9. Environmental aspects of the transuranics. A selected, annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, F.M.; Faust, R.A.; Sanders, C.T.

    1975-07-01

    This bibliography of 470 references is from the computer file built to provide information support to the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) of ERDA's Nevada Operations Office. The general scope is environmental aspects of uranium and the transuranic elements, with emphasis on plutonium. Biological aspects of the transuranics is highlighted in this bibliography. In addition, supporting materials involving basic ecology studies, ecology of the Nevada Test Site, and reviews on other radionuclides are entered at the request of the NAEG. Significant numeric data is shown in tabular display or is noted for reference to the original document. The references are arranged by subject category with first authors arranged alphabetically within the category. Indexes are given for author, keywords, geographic location, permuted title, taxons, and publication description. (U.S.)

  10. Environmental aspects of the transuranics: a selected, annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fore, C.S.; Martin, F.M.; Faust, R.A. (comp.)

    1976-07-01

    This bibliography of 500 references is compiled from the Data Base on the Environmental Aspects of the Transuranics built to provide information support to the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) of ERDA`s Nevada Operations Office. The general scope is environmental aspects of uranium and the transuranic elements, with emphasis on plutonium. Laboratory and field studies dealing with the effects of plutonium-239 on animals are highlighted in this bibliography. Supporting information on ecology of the Nevada Test Site and reviews on the effects of other radionuclides upon man and his environment has been included at the request of the NAEG. The references are arranged by subject category with first authors appearing alphabetically in each category. Indexes are given for author, geographic location, keywords, taxons, permuted title and publication description.

  11. In situ grouting of buried transuranic waste with polyacrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, B.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Farmer, C.D.; Hyder, L.K.; Supaokit, P.

    1987-01-01

    This project is a demonstration and evaluation of the in situ hydrologic stabilization of buried transuranic waste at a humid site via grout injection. Two small trenches, containing buried transuranic waste, were filled with 34.000 L of polyacrylamide grout. Initial field results have indicated that voids within the trenches were totally filled by the grout and that the intratrench hydraulic conductivity was reduced to below field-measurable values. No evidence of grout constituents were observed in twelve perimeter groundwater monitoring wells indicating that grout was contained completely within the two trenches. Polyacrylamide grout was selected for field demonstration over the polyacrylate grout due to its superior performance in laboratory degradation studies. Also supporting the selection of polyacrylamide was the difficulty in controlling the set time of the acrylate polymerization. Based on preliminary degradation monitoring, the polyacrylamide was estimated to have a microbiological half-life of 362 years in the test soil. 15 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. Environmental aspects of the transuranics: a selected, annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensminger, J.T.; Martin, F.M.; Fore, C.S.

    1977-03-01

    This eighth published bibliography of 427 references is compiled from the Nevada Applied Ecology Information Center's Data Base on the Environmental Aspects of the Transuranics. The data base was built to provide information support to the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) of ERDA's Nevada Operations Office. The general scope covers environmental aspects of uranium and the transuranic elements, with emphasis on plutonium. This bibliography highlights literature on plutonium 238 and 239 and americium in the critical organs of man and animals. Supporting information on ecology of the Nevada Test Site and reviews and summarizing literature on other radionuclides have been included at the request of the NAEG. The references are arranged by subject category with leading authors appearing alphabetically in each category. Indexes are provided for author(s), geographic location, keyword(s), taxon, title, and publication description

  13. Infotainment in the central informative TV programs of national broadcasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nešić Dejana B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this research is to determine the presence of infotainment elements as well as differences in the amount of their participation in the top news programs of the Public Service in Serbia: Radio Television of Serbia (RTS and two commercial televisions, Pink, being the most watched private television, and Television B92. 'Infotainment ' is an English compound word which denotes a phenomenon related to the television. This media phenomenon is not a new one, but it has experienced its massive breakthrough into the media content in the market competition. It was created with the intention of making the news program more popular in order to entice advertisers who pay for advertising time and on whom commercial televisions depend. The methods which were used in the research are qualitative (a discourse analysis and quantitative (a content analysis. The analysis of the data showed that there is a difference in news program of RTS, mostly in relation to TV Pink in terms of infotainment, and to some extent in relation to TV B92. In addition to the importance of the research that should show the state of the newscast on the Serbian national television, this paper also provides a theoretical contribution to the understanding of the infotainment problem.

  14. Quinquennial National Program (1990-1994) for the Energetic Modernization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The Mexican Energetics Sector currently has the eighth possition regarding reserves of hydrocarbons and the sixth regarding oil production, the installed capacity in electricity matters is among the first 20 of the world. The Program established first, a general balance of the situation in which the energetics sector lays today. It also points out the strategic role that this sector holds, as well an on the solutions to the problems faced. This Program establishes the objectives pursued by the energetics sector and that are as follows: to guarantee enough supply of energetics, to strenghten the link between the energetics sector and economy, society and environmental protection, to consolidate an energetics sector that is more current and better integrated. This Program presents the proposal to tend to five priorities: productivity, saving and effective use of energy, financing of the development and expansion of the offer, to diversify sources, as well as an efficient participation in international markets. In the chapter the effort regarding supply and demand of energy, it is evident that the effort made to expand the offer must be great, facing the total demand of energy demonstrated by the figures. For 1994 this demmand is of 31 - 36 % greater to that observed in 1988. Lastly, two statistic documents are enclosed, one historic, with general pointers of the sector, and another with the basic variables for national energy balance

  15. Math and science education programs from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This booklet reviews math and science education programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The programs can be categorized into six groups: teacher programs; science laboratories for students; student programs; education outreach programs; INEL Public Affairs Office; and programs for college faculty and students

  16. Transuranic waste management at Savannah River - past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ambrosia, J.

    1985-01-01

    The major objective of the TRU program at Savannah River is to support the TRU National Program, which is dedicated to preparing waste for, and emplacing waste in, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, (WIPP). Thus, the Savannah River Program also supports WIPP operations. The Savannah River site specific goals to phase out the indefinite storage of TRU waste, which has been the mode of waste management since 1974, and to dispose of Savannah River's Defense TRU waste

  17. Strategic management of health risks posed by buried transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jump, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    A strategy is presented for reducing health risks at sites contaminated with buried transuranic (TRU) wastes by first taking measures to immobilize the contaminants until the second step, final action, becomes cost-effective and poses less risk to the remediation workers. The first step of this strategy does not preclude further action if it is warranted and is in harmony with environmental laws and regulations

  18. Waste management facilities cost information for transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shropshire, D.; Sherick, M.; Biagi, C.

    1995-06-01

    This report contains preconceptual designs and planning level life-cycle cost estimates for managing transuranic waste. The report's information on treatment and storage modules can be integrated to develop total life-cycle costs for various waste management options. A procedure to guide the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractor personnel in the use of cost estimation data is also summarized in this report

  19. Online high sensitivity measurement system for transuranic aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordas, J.F.; Phelps, P.L.

    1976-01-01

    A measurement system for transuranic aerosols has been designed that will be able to withstand the corrosive nature of stack effluents and yet have extremely high sensitivity. It will be capable of measuring 1 maximum permissible concentration (MPC) of plutonium or americium in 30 minutes with a fractional standard deviation of less than 0.33. Background resulting from 218 Po is eliminated by alpha energy discrimination and a decay scheme analysis. A microprocessor controls all data acquisition, data reduction, and instrument calibration

  20. Ecological effects of transuranics in the terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, F.W.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter explores the ecological effects of transuranium radionuclides in terrestrial environments. No direct studies that relate the level of transuranic contamination to specific changes in structure or function of ecological systems have been carried out. The only alternative approach presently available is to infer such relationships from observations of biota in contaminated environments and models. Advantages and shortcomings of these observations as well as those of the direct experimental approach are discussed

  1. US experience with acid digestion of combustible transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.R.; Lerch, R.E.

    1982-09-01

    Contaminated transuranic waste from a plutonium finishing plant has been processed in a waste treatment demonstration plant, the Radioactive Acid Digestion Test Unit (RADTU) located at Hanford, Washington, USA. Waste treatment experience, including process and equipment performance, the behavior of plutonium in the system, and chemical and nuclear safety are all discussed. The complementary relationship of this research and development to that at the ALONA pilot plant in Mol, Belgium is noted. 7 figures, 4 tables

  2. Search for far transuranic elements in galactic comic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perelygin, V.P.; Lkhagvasuren, D.; Otgonsuren, O.; Stetsenko, S.G.; Yakupi, B.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental results on the search for the tracks of far transuranic elements of the galactic origin in olivine crystals from Marjalahti meteorite are presented. A total af 174 mm 3 of olivines taken from the surface layers of the meteorite and 60 mm 3 taken from its inner parts have been examined. The upper limit of the abundance of the Z >= 110 nuclei has been established to be -9 of the abundance of the Fe group nuclei. (orig.) [de

  3. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program: the Hydrogeochemical Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Program at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, G.H.

    1980-08-01

    From early 1975 to mid 1979, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) participated in the Hydrogeochemical Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR), part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Laboratory was initially responsible for collecting, analyzing, and evaluating sediment and water samples from approximately 200,000 sites in seven western states. Eventually, however, the NURE program redefined its sampling priorities, objectives, schedules, and budgets, with the increasingly obvious result that LLNL objectives and methodologies were not compatible with those of the NURE program office, and the LLNL geochemical studies were not relevant to the program goal. The LLNL portion of the HSSR program was consequently terminated, and all work was suspended by June 1979. Of the 38,000 sites sampled, 30,000 were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analyses (INAA), delayed neutron counting (DNC), optical emission spectroscopy (OES), and automated chloride-sulfate analyses (SC). Data from about 13,000 sites have been formally reported. From each site, analyses were published of about 30 of the 60 elements observed. Uranium mineralization has been identified at several places which were previously not recognized as potential uranium source areas, and a number of other geochemical anomalies were discovered

  4. Enterprise SRS: Leveraging Ongoing Operations to Advance National Programs - 13108

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.E.; Murray, A.M.; McGuire, P.W.; Wheeler, V.B.

    2013-01-01

    The SRS is re-purposing its vast array of assets to solve future national issues regarding environmental stewardship, national security, and clean energy. The vehicle for this transformation is Enterprise SRS which presents a new, strategic view of SRS as a united endeavor for 'all things nuclear' as opposed to a group of distinct and separate entities with individual missions and organizations. Key among the Enterprise SRS strategic initiatives is the integration of research into facilities in conjunction with ongoing missions to provide researchers from other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities the opportunity to demonstrate their technologies in a relevant environment and scale prior to deployment. To manage that integration of research demonstrations into site facilities, The DOE Savannah River Operations Office, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have established the Center for Applied Nuclear Materials Processing and Engineering Research (CANMPER). The key objective of this initiative is to bridge the gap between promising transformational nuclear materials management advancements and large-scale deployment of the technology by leveraging SRS assets (e.g. facilities, staff, and property) for those critical engineering-scale demonstrations necessary to assure the successful deployment of new technologies. CANMPER will coordinate the demonstration of R and D technologies and serve as the interface between the engineering-scale demonstration and the R and D programs, essentially providing cradle-to-grave support to the R and D team during the demonstration. While the initial focus of CANMPER will be on the effective use of SRS assets for these demonstrations, CANMPER also will work with research teams to identify opportunities to perform R and D demonstrations at other facilities. Unique to this approach is the fact that these SRS assets will continue to accomplish DOE's critical

  5. Fixation of transuranics with different degrees of oxidation on clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billon, A.

    1982-01-01

    Distribution coefficient (Ksub(d)) measurements available in the literature relate to plutonium, without reference to any particular valence state. It would be of interest to be able to ascertain the behaviour of this element (and the transuranics in general) from the nature of the chemical species taking part in the interaction with a natural or artificial medium (radioactive waste containment barriers). The author cites the results of measurements made for Np(IV), Np(V), Pu(IV), Pu(VI) and Am(III). Two types of clay have been tried out - bentonite and attapulgite. When the transuranic has been oxidized to a suitable degree, preferably by an electrochemical technique, it is brought into contact with a clay suspension. After stirring, decantation and filtration, the transuranic is analysed in the aqueous phase, by photospectrometry when the concentration makes it possible to do so (for NpO 2 + and PuO 2 2+ , which have high molar absorption coefficients epsilon), or else by counting techniques (liquid scintillation and gamma spectrometry). The results are given in the form of graphs (log Ksub(d) = f(pH)) or tables. Emphasis is given to the accuracy and reproducibility of the measurements. The effect of several mineral or organic anions (EDTA) on the retention of Np(V) is considered. An analysis is made of the behaviour of plutonium in accordance with its degree of oxidation. (author)

  6. Mapping of transuranic elements in soil by nuclear track methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.

    2001-01-01

    An alternative method is presented to map the distribution of transuranic elements, which is characterized by its simplicity in both implementation and instrumentation. The method is based on the interaction of alpha particles in polymeric materials and the formation of tracks, which become visible after chemical etching. Nuclear track detectors are placed on the soil in order to evaluate the distribution of the radioactive material and its relative intensity for transuranic contaminants. CR-39 polycarbonate was used as a nuclear track detector in this study. Chemical etching was done with a 6.25M KOH solution in a closed system for 16 hours. The readings were performed in an automatic system using digital image analysis. The results show the distribution of the contaminants and their location, identifying the zones with large intensities. This method is attractive for use in areas contaminated with alpha particles, and specially transuranic elements, because it involves in situ measurements, generates very low amounts of radioactive waste, and the detectors are easily handled. (author)

  7. Adsorption of transuranic elements from large volume sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, E.; Ballestra, S.

    1976-01-01

    Some years ago a sampler for concentrating radionuclides from large volumes of sea water was developed by Silker et al. of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories. They used pure A1 2 O 3 as the adsorbent. The device has been applied successfully to the determination of 238 Pu and 239 Pu in several sea water samples. Our experience on the application of an identical system for the determination of transuranics in Mediterranean sea water was not quite as satisfactory as we had hoped. The chemistry involved in leaching up to 1 kg Al 2 O 3 . with acid, followed by removal of dissolved aluminium from the transuranic fraction, is rather tedious and time-consuming for routine use. The adsorption efficiency of transuranics, checked by dual-bed adsorption did not give consistent results. However, since the principle of the device is attractive enough for handling large volume water samples, it was felt that it was worthwhile to test other types of adsorbents which are easier to handle than Al 2 O 3 . For this purpose, chitosan and manganese dioxide were chosen and series of experiments were conducted in order to examine the suitability of these materials as an adsorbent in the system

  8. Management of transuranics using Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, D.C.

    1994-01-01

    The 50 years of activities following the discovery of self-sustained fission chains have given rise to a buildup of roughly 900 tonnes of manmade transuranics. The formation of the transuranics is initiated by the parasitic neutron capture on the abundant isotope (U 238 ) of uranium ore to produce Pu 239 and the minor actinides are formed via the unavoidable parasitic neutron capture on the transuranic isotopes themselves. of the total, 260 tonnes of Pu 239 were generated for use in weapons while the remainder were generated as a byproduct of electrical power produced worldwide by the commercial thermal nuclear power industry. What to be done with these actinides? The options for disposition include interminable storage, burial, or recycle for use. The pros and cons of each option are being vigorously debated regarding the impact upon the issues of human and ecological risk both current and future; weapon proliferation potential both current and future; and total life cycle benefits and costs. (authors). 1 fig

  9. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory decontamination and decommissioning robotics development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, M.D.

    1993-04-01

    As part of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) Decontamination ampersand Decommissioning (D ampersand D) robotics program, a task was designed to integrate the plasma arc cutting technology being developed under the Waste Facility Operations (WFO) robotics program into D ampersand D cutting applications. The plasma arc cutting technology is based upon the use of a high energy plasma torch to cut metallic objects. Traditionally, D ampersand D workers removing equipment and processes from a facility have used plasma arc cutting to accomplish this task. The worker is required to don a protective suit to shield from the high electromagnetic energy released from the cutting operation. Additionally, the worker is required to don protective clothing to shield against the radioactive materials and contamination. This protective clothing can become restrictive and cumbersome to work in. Because some of the work areas contain high levels of radiation, the worker is not allowed to dwell in the environment for sustained periods of time. To help alleviate some of the burdens required to accomplish this task, reduce or eliminate the safety hazardous to the worker, and reduce the overall cost of remediation, a program was established though the Office of Technology Development (OTD) to design and develop a robotic system capable of performing cutting operations using a plasma arc torch. Several D ampersand D tasks were identified having potential for use of the plasma arc cutting technology. The tasks listed below were chosen to represent common D ampersand D type activities where the plasma arc cutting technology can be applied

  10. National Evaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program: Preliminary Evaluation Plan for Program Year 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternes, Mark P [ORNL; Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL; Tonn, Bruce Edward [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

    2007-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Weatherization Assistance Program was created by Congress in 1976 under Title IV of the Energy Conservation and Production Act. The purpose and scope of the Program as currently stated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 10CFR 440.1 is 'to increase the energy efficiency of dwellings owned or occupied by low-income persons, reduce their total residential expenditures, and improve their health and safety, especially low-income persons who are particularly vulnerable such as the elderly, persons with disabilities, families with children, high residential energy users, and households with high energy burden' (Code of Federal Regulations, 2005). DOE sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of the Program in the early 1990's to provide policy makers and program implementers with up-to-date and reliable information they needed for effective decision making and cost-effective operations. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed the five part study which was based primarily on data from Program Year (PY) 1989 and supplemented by data from 1991-92 (Brown, Berry, and Kinney, 1994). In more recent years, ORNL has conducted four metaevaluations of the Program's energy savings using studies conducted by individual states between the years 1990-1996 (Berry, 1997), 1996-1998 (Schweitzer and Berry, 1999), 1993-2002 (Berry and Schweitzer, 2003), and 1993-2005 (Schweitzer, 2005). DOE announced through its Weatherization Program Notice 05-1 (DOE, 2004) that it would undertake a new national evaluation of the Program because the Program that was evaluated comprehensively in the early 1990's is vastly different from the Program of today. The Program has incorporated new funding sources, management principles, audit procedures, and energy-efficiency measures in response to findings and recommendations resulting from the 1989 National Evaluation, the Weatherization Plus strategic planning process, and other

  11. After the Conference of United Nations Conference on Environment and Development. The national environmental action program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Following to the Strategy, priorities and principles of the state environmental policy the government of the Slovak republic has accepted by resolution No 350/1996 the first National environmental action program (NEAP), This NEAP contains the measures for attaining of aims of the Strategy in all nine sectors of protection and creation of the environment. The NEAP contains 1356 measures with conceptual, legislative, economic, educational-educational, scientific-research (including monitoring) and organizational character. The measures of the NEAP in detail are discussed

  12. Swiss national MD-PhD-program: an outcome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnle, Katrin; Winkler, David T; Meier-Abt, Peter J

    2009-09-19

    This study aims at a first evaluation of the outcome of the Swiss national MD-PhD program during the last 16 years. One hundred and twenty six former and current students in the Swiss national MD-PhD program were surveyed via a Web-based questionnaire in September 2007. Twenty-four questions assessed information regarding participant demographics, information on the PhD thesis and publication activity, current positions and research activity, as well as participant's opinions, attitudes and career goals. Eighty questionnaires were received from 126 MD-PhD students and graduates (63.5% response rate). The responders consisted of present students (36%), former graduates (56%), and dropouts (8%). The percentage of women in the program was 23%, and the average duration of the program was 4.2 +/- 1.4 years. Research interests were predominantly in the fields of neuroscience, immunology, molecular biology and cancer research. A considerable portion of the MD-PhD graduates had an excellent publication record stemming from their PhD research work, and 89% were planning to continue a research-orientated career. Over 50% of those MD-PhD graduates completing their thesis before 2002 had already reached an assistant or full professor position at the time of the survey. Nearly all participants considered the MD-PhD training helpful to their career and high quality standards were assigned to the acquired practical and intellectual skills. However, criticism was expressed concerning the general mentoring and the career related mentoring. Moreover, general mentoring and career related mentoring were significantly less well perceived in research groups employing more than seven PhD students at the same time. The MD-PhD students and graduates surveyed were satisfied with their education and most of them continued a research-orientated career. Regarding the overall positive evaluation, this study supports the view that MD-PhD graduates are well qualified for a successful career in

  13. Mentoring Faculty: Results from National Science Foundation's ADVANCE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Faculty mentoring programs are common components of National Science Foundation ADVANCE awards. The ADVANCE program aims to increase the number of women on the faculty in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) departments through grants to individuals and to entire institutions. These grants target a change in institutional culture so that faculty from non-majority groups will succeed and thrive. Mentoring programs are generally designed to fit the particular institution(s) or target population (e.g., meteorologists at the beginning of their careers). A successful mentoring program makes the implicit knowledge necessary for faculty success explicit: policies and practices are made transparent; routes for finding answers are clarified or generated with faculty input; faculty overcome a sense of isolation and develop a community. Mentoring programs may be formal, with assigned mentors and mentees, or informal, with opportunities for beginning, middle and advanced career STEM faculty to mingle, generally over food and sometimes with a formal speaker. The programs are formally evaluated; in general, attention to mentoring generates better outcomes for all faculty. Research indicates that most successful scientists have a network of mentors rather than relying on one person to help navigate department, institution, and profession. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln's (UNL) award, ADVANCE-Nebraska, offered opportunities for faculty to informally network over luncheons with women speakers, advanced in their careers. We also offered after-hours networking receptions. In response to faculty feedback, we shifted to a series of panel discussions entitled "Conversations". Most panels were conducted by successful UNL faculty; about one-third had an outside expert on a given topic. Topics were chosen based on faculty feedback and targeted specifically to beginning faculty (How to Start Up a Lab; How to Balance Teaching and Writing), mid-career faculty (Putting

  14. Integrity of the National Resident Matching Program for Radiation Oncology: National Survey of Applicant Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliday, Emma B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thomas, Charles R., E-mail: thomasch@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of radiation oncology applicants and to evaluate the prevalence of behaviors that may be in conflict with established ethical standards. Methods and Materials: An anonymous survey was sent to all 2013 applicants to a single domestic radiation oncology residency program through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). Questions included demographics, survey of observed behaviors, and opinions regarding the interview and matching process. Descriptive statistics were presented. Characteristics and experiences of respondents who matched were compared with those who did not match. Results: Questionnaires were returned by 87 of 171 applicants for a 51% response rate. Eighty-two questionnaires were complete and included for analysis. Seventy-eight respondents (95.1%) reported being asked at least 1 question in conflict with the NRMP code of conduct. When asked where else they were interviewing, 64% stated that this query made them uncomfortable. Forty-five respondents (54.9%) reported unsolicited post-interview contact by programs, and 31 (37.8%) felt pressured to give assurances. Fifteen respondents (18.3%) reported being told their rank position or that they were “ranked to match” prior to Match day, with 27% of those individuals indicating this information influenced how they ranked programs. Half of respondents felt applicants often made dishonest or misleading assurances, one-third reported that they believed their desired match outcome could be improved by deliberately misleading programs, and more than two-thirds felt their rank position could be improved by having faculty from their home institutions directly contact programs on their behalf. Conclusions: Radiation oncology applicants report a high prevalence of behaviors in conflict with written NRMP policies. Post-interview communication should be discouraged in order to enhance fairness and support the professional development of future

  15. Integrity of the National Resident Matching Program for Radiation Oncology: National Survey of Applicant Experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holliday, Emma B.; Thomas, Charles R.; Kusano, Aaron S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of radiation oncology applicants and to evaluate the prevalence of behaviors that may be in conflict with established ethical standards. Methods and Materials: An anonymous survey was sent to all 2013 applicants to a single domestic radiation oncology residency program through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). Questions included demographics, survey of observed behaviors, and opinions regarding the interview and matching process. Descriptive statistics were presented. Characteristics and experiences of respondents who matched were compared with those who did not match. Results: Questionnaires were returned by 87 of 171 applicants for a 51% response rate. Eighty-two questionnaires were complete and included for analysis. Seventy-eight respondents (95.1%) reported being asked at least 1 question in conflict with the NRMP code of conduct. When asked where else they were interviewing, 64% stated that this query made them uncomfortable. Forty-five respondents (54.9%) reported unsolicited post-interview contact by programs, and 31 (37.8%) felt pressured to give assurances. Fifteen respondents (18.3%) reported being told their rank position or that they were “ranked to match” prior to Match day, with 27% of those individuals indicating this information influenced how they ranked programs. Half of respondents felt applicants often made dishonest or misleading assurances, one-third reported that they believed their desired match outcome could be improved by deliberately misleading programs, and more than two-thirds felt their rank position could be improved by having faculty from their home institutions directly contact programs on their behalf. Conclusions: Radiation oncology applicants report a high prevalence of behaviors in conflict with written NRMP policies. Post-interview communication should be discouraged in order to enhance fairness and support the professional development of future

  16. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory laser-fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    The goals of the Laser-Fusion Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are to produce well-diagnosed, high-gain, laser-driven fusion explosions in the laboratory and to exploit this capability for both military applications and for civilian energy production. In the past year we have made significant progress both theoretically and experimentally in our understanding of the laser interaction with both directly coupled and radiation-driven implosion targets and their implosion dynamics. We have made significant developments in fabricating the target structures. Data from the target experiments are producing important near-term physics results. We have also continued to develop attractive reactor concepts which illustrate ICF's potential as an energy producer

  17. Food Service Perspectives on National School Lunch Program Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Rachel G; Moreland-Russell, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Explore barriers and facilitators to implementation of the new National School Lunch Program (NSLP) policy guidelines. Interviews with eight food service directors using an interview guide informed by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. Food service personnel; parents, teachers, school staff; and students were important stakeholders. Characteristics of the new NSLP policy guidelines were reported to create increased demands; resources alleviated some barriers. Directors reported increased food and labor costs, food sourcing challenges, decreased student participation, and organizational constraints as barriers to implementation. Creativity in menu planning facilitated success. Factors within the food service department, characteristics of implementing individuals and the new NSLP policy guidelines, and stakeholder involvement in the implementation process relate to successful implementation.

  18. The brazilian alcohol program in the national energy context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A. de; Araujo, J.L.R.H. de

    1987-01-01

    The new national as well as international energy context demands revision of the Brazilian Alcohol Program. This revision should aim at the preservation of alcohol as an energy source while reducing subsidies. To this end a moratorium on new distilleries should be enforced till the middle of the next decade, accompanied by a policy focusing on cost reductions and improvements in productivity aimed at making alcohol competitive in the middle term, as well as a motor fuel policy which acts on demand and makes this moratorium viable while preserving the existing production structure. Concrete mechanisms to implement such a policy are proposed which segment the market for new vehicles and preserve the stability of alcohol and gasoline markets for existing vehicles. The effects of this policy were analyzed through simulation of 7 scenarios through the year 2005, which showed its feasibility; the continuation of the present policy, on the other hand, implies heavy additional subsidies. (author)

  19. [The undergraduate program in forensic science: a national challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Castillo, Zoraida; Graue Wiechers, Enrique; Durante Montiel, Irene; Herrera Saint Leu, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The challenge in achieving an ideal state of justice is that each "proof" has the highest degree of reliability. This is the main responsibility of the forensic scientist. Up to now, criminal investigations in Mexico have been supported by forensic work from a wide variety of disciplinary backgrounds that give testimony in a particular area, even though they may have become forensic witnesses in a complementary and experiential manner. In January 2013, the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) approved the "Forensic Science" undergraduate program that, in collaboration with various academic entities and government institutions, will develop forensic scientists trained in science, law, and criminology. This is focused on contributing to the national demand that the justice system has more elements to procure and administer justice in dealing with crime.

  20. Arguments for new Yugoslav National Nuclear Scientific Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.; Pesic, M.; Pavlovic, R.; Neskovic, N.; Matausek, M.V.

    2001-01-01

    Information on actual status and arguments for urgent actions for solution of serious ecological problems concerning undefined status of the RA Reactor, spent fuel storage pool, and intermediate-level radioactive waste storage in the Vinca Institute, including proposal for modernisation of zero power Reactor RB and design of small low flux ADS are given in this paper. To solve problems mentioned above in next few years a national nuclear scientific program of the Vinca Institute, concerning Nuclear Reactors and Radioactive Waste, the following four projects were proposed to government for support: 1. Final shut down of the RA research reactor; 2. Provision of long term storage for spent fuel from the RA research reactor; 3. Refurbishment of the RB research reactor and design of the new research reactor H5B; 4. Building of the final repository for low and medium level radioactive waste. (authors)

  1. Perspectives on the Science Advisor Program at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, P.C.; Heath, R.B.; Podlesny, A.; Channon, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses a Science Advisor Program which has been established at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the long term augmentation of math and science instruction in New Mexico schools. Volunteer SNL engineers and scientists team with the faculty of participating schools to enhance the teachers' abilities to capture and hold the student's scientific imagination and develop their scientific skills. This is done primarily through providing laboratory resources, training the teachers how to use those resources, and advising how to obtain them in the future. In its first year, over 140 advisors teamed with 132 schools, for average weekly contact with 500 teachers and 10,000 students. Surveys indicate a general rise in frequency and quality of hands-on science instruction, as well as teacher and student attitudes. An expanded evaluation is planned for subsequent years

  2. The National Security Education Program and Its Service Requirement: An Exploratory Study of What Areas of Government and for What Duration National Security Education Program Recipients Have Worked

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comp, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The National Security Education Program, established under the National Security Education Act of 1991, has had a post-funding service requirement in the Federal Government for undergraduate scholarship and graduate fellowship recipients since its inception. The service requirement, along with the concern that the National Security Education…

  3. The seismic project of the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, D.H.; Bittenbinder, A.N.; Bogaert, B.M.; Buland, R.P.; Dietz, L.D.; Hansen, R.A.; Malone, S.D.; McCreery, C.S.; Sokolowski, T.J.; Whitmore, P.M.; Weaver, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    In 1997, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the five western States of Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington joined in a partnership called the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) to enhance the quality and quantity of seismic data provided to the NOAA tsunami warning centers in Alaska and Hawaii. The NTHMP funded a seismic project that now provides the warning centers with real-time seismic data over dedicated communication links and the Internet from regional seismic networks monitoring earthquakes in the five western states, the U.S. National Seismic Network in Colorado, and from domestic and global seismic stations operated by other agencies. The goal of the project is to reduce the time needed to issue a tsunami warning by providing the warning centers with high-dynamic range, broadband waveforms in near real time. An additional goal is to reduce the likelihood of issuing false tsunami warnings by rapidly providing to the warning centers parametric information on earthquakes that could indicate their tsunamigenic potential, such as hypocenters, magnitudes, moment tensors, and shake distribution maps. New or upgraded field instrumentation was installed over a 5-year period at 53 seismic stations in the five western states. Data from these instruments has been integrated into the seismic network utilizing Earthworm software. This network has significantly reduced the time needed to respond to teleseismic and regional earthquakes. Notably, the West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center responded to the 28 February 2001 Mw 6.8 Nisqually earthquake beneath Olympia, Washington within 2 minutes compared to an average response time of over 10 minutes for the previous 18 years. ?? Springer 2005.

  4. Research training needs in Peruvian national TB/HIV programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Elsa

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few published reports of research training needs assessments and research training programs. In an effort to expand this nascent field of study and to bridge the gap between research and practice, we sought to systematically assess the research training needs of health care professionals working at Peruvian governmental institutions leading HIV and tuberculosis (TB control and among senior stakeholders in the field. Methods Six institutional workshops were conducted with the participation of 161 mid-level health professionals from agencies involved in national HIV and TB control. At each workshop informants completed a structured questionnaire and participated in small and large group discussions. Additional data and institutional commitment was obtained through in-depth interviews from 32 senior managers and researchers from the Ministry of Health, academia and NGOs. Results Participants exhibited an overwhelming receptivity for additional research training, observing a gap between current levels of research training and their perceived importance. Specialized skills in obtaining funding, developing research protocols, particularly in operational, behavioral and prevention research were considered in greatest need. Beyond research training, participants identified broader social, economic and political factors as influential in infectious disease control. Conclusions The needs assessment suggests that future training should focus on operational research techniques, rather than on clinical skill building or program implementation only. Strengthening health systems not only requires additional research training, but also adequate financial resources to implement research findings.

  5. Research training needs in Peruvian national TB/HIV programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patricia J; Cotrina, Armando; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gonzalez, Elsa; Buffardi, Anne L

    2010-09-28

    There are few published reports of research training needs assessments and research training programs. In an effort to expand this nascent field of study and to bridge the gap between research and practice, we sought to systematically assess the research training needs of health care professionals working at Peruvian governmental institutions leading HIV and tuberculosis (TB) control and among senior stakeholders in the field. Six institutional workshops were conducted with the participation of 161 mid-level health professionals from agencies involved in national HIV and TB control. At each workshop informants completed a structured questionnaire and participated in small and large group discussions. Additional data and institutional commitment was obtained through in-depth interviews from 32 senior managers and researchers from the Ministry of Health, academia and NGOs. Participants exhibited an overwhelming receptivity for additional research training, observing a gap between current levels of research training and their perceived importance. Specialized skills in obtaining funding, developing research protocols, particularly in operational, behavioral and prevention research were considered in greatest need. Beyond research training, participants identified broader social, economic and political factors as influential in infectious disease control. The needs assessment suggests that future training should focus on operational research techniques, rather than on clinical skill building or program implementation only. Strengthening health systems not only requires additional research training, but also adequate financial resources to implement research findings.

  6. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Small Business Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt W. Marek, PhD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Small companies working to develop products in the cardiovascular space face numerous challenges, from regulatory, intellectual property, and reimbursement barriers to securing funds to keep the lights on and reach the next development milestone. Most small companies that spin out from universities have the scientific knowledge, but product development expertise and business acumen are also needed to be successful. Other challenges include reduced interest in early-stage technologies and limited deal flow for cardiovascular products. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI small business program is a comprehensive ecosystem designed to address these critical challenges and to provide resources and expertise to assist early-stage companies developing cardiovascular and other products within the institute’s mission. This article describes steps that NHLBI has taken to enhance our small business program to more effectively translate basic discoveries into commercial products to benefit patients and public health, including enhancing internal expertise and developing nonfinancial resources to assist small businesses as they develop their products and seek private sector investment and partnership.

  7. Research training needs in Peruvian national TB/HIV programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background There are few published reports of research training needs assessments and research training programs. In an effort to expand this nascent field of study and to bridge the gap between research and practice, we sought to systematically assess the research training needs of health care professionals working at Peruvian governmental institutions leading HIV and tuberculosis (TB) control and among senior stakeholders in the field. Methods Six institutional workshops were conducted with the participation of 161 mid-level health professionals from agencies involved in national HIV and TB control. At each workshop informants completed a structured questionnaire and participated in small and large group discussions. Additional data and institutional commitment was obtained through in-depth interviews from 32 senior managers and researchers from the Ministry of Health, academia and NGOs. Results Participants exhibited an overwhelming receptivity for additional research training, observing a gap between current levels of research training and their perceived importance. Specialized skills in obtaining funding, developing research protocols, particularly in operational, behavioral and prevention research were considered in greatest need. Beyond research training, participants identified broader social, economic and political factors as influential in infectious disease control. Conclusions The needs assessment suggests that future training should focus on operational research techniques, rather than on clinical skill building or program implementation only. Strengthening health systems not only requires additional research training, but also adequate financial resources to implement research findings. PMID:20875140

  8. Case studies of corrosion of mixed waste and transuranic waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosiewicz, S.T.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents three case studies of corrosion of waste drums at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Corrosion was not anticipated by the waste generators, but occurred because of subtle chemical or physical mechanisms. In one case, drums of a cemented transuranic (TRU) sludge experienced general and pitting corrosion. In the second instance, a chemical from a commercial paint stripper migrated from its primary containment drums to chemically attack overpack drums made of mild carbon steel. In the third case, drums of mixed low level waste (MLLW) soil corroded drum packaging even though the waste appeared to be dry when it was placed in the drums. These case studies are jointly discussed as ''lessons learned'' to enhance awareness of subtle mechanisms that can contribute to the corrosion of radioactive waste drums during interim storage

  9. Transuranic Storage Area (TSA)-2 container storage unit RCRA closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodman, D.W.; Spry, M.J.; Nolte, E.P.; Barry, G.A.

    1992-11-01

    This document describes the proposed plans for closure of the Transuranic Storage Area (TSA)-2 container storage unit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure requirements. The location, size, capacity, history, and current status of the unit are described. Future plans for the unit include incorporating the earthen-covered portion of the TSA-2 pad into a TSA retrieval enclosure along with the TSA-1 and TSAR pads, and closure of the portion of the TSA-2 pad under the Air Support Weather Shield (ASWS-2). This plan addresses closure of the ASWS-2 by decontaminating structures and equipment that may have contacted the waste. Sufficient sampling and documentation of all closure activities will be performed to demonstrate clean closure. A tentative schedule is provided in the form of a milestone chart

  10. Process Knowledge Summary Report for Materials and Fuels Complex Contact-Handled Transuranic Debris Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. P. Grant; P. J. Crane; S. Butler; M. A. Henry

    2010-02-01

    This Process Knowledge Summary Report summarizes the information collected to satisfy the transportation and waste acceptance requirements for the transfer of transuranic (TRU) waste between the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP). The information collected includes documentation that addresses the requirements for AMWTP and the applicable portion of their Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permits for receipt and treatment of TRU debris waste in AMWTP. This report has been prepared for contact-handled TRU debris waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory at MFC. The TRU debris waste will be shipped to AMWTP for purposes of supercompaction. This Process Knowledge Summary Report includes information regarding, but not limited to, the generation process, the physical form, radiological characteristics, and chemical contaminants of the TRU debris waste, prohibited items, and packaging configuration. This report, along with the referenced supporting documents, will create a defensible and auditable record for waste originating from MFC.

  11. Use of AERIN code for determining internal doses of transuranic isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    The AERIN computer code is a mathematical expression of the ICRP Lung Model. The code was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to compute the body organ burdens and absorbed radiation doses resulting from the inhalation of transuranic isotopes and to predict the amount of activity excreted in the urine and feces as a function of time. Over forty cases of internal exposure have been studied using the AERIN code. The code, as modified, has proven to be extremely versatile. The case studies presented demonstrate the excellent correlation that can be obtained between code predictions and observed bioassay data. In one case study a discrepancy was observed between an in vivo count of the whole body and the application of the code using urine and fecal data as input. The discrepancy was resolved by in vivo skull counts that showed the code had predicted the correct skeletal burden

  12. 77 FR 34411 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory... CFR 101-6, announcement is made for the following committee meeting. To discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: This meeting will be held on Wednesday, July 11, 2012 from 10:00 a...

  13. 75 FR 25867 - National Toxicology Program (NTP) Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Toxicology Program (NTP) Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM.... Bucher, Associate Director, National Toxicology Program. [FR Doc. 2010-10958 Filed 5-7-10; 8:45 am...

  14. 76 FR 54999 - Notice of 2011 National Organic Certification Cost-Share Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ...] Notice of 2011 National Organic Certification Cost-Share Program AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service... for the National Organic Certification Cost- Share Program. SUMMARY: This Notice invites all States of...) for the allocation of National Organic Certification Cost-Share Funds. Beginning in Fiscal Year 2008...

  15. Transuranic (TRU) Waste Repackaging at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Sanza, E.F.; Pyles, G.; Ciucci, J.; Arnold, P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the activities required to modify a facility and the process of characterizing, repackaging, and preparing for shipment the Nevada Test Site's (NTS) legacy transuranic (TRU) waste in 58 oversize boxes (OSB). The waste, generated at other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites and shipped to the NTS between 1974 and 1990, requires size-reduction for off-site shipment and disposal. The waste processing approach was tailored to reduce the volume of TRU waste by employing decontamination and non-destructive assay. As a result, the low-level waste (LLW) generated by this process was packaged, with minimal size reduction, in large sea-land containers for disposal at the NTS Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The remaining TRU waste was repackaged and sent to the Idaho National Laboratory Consolidation Site for additional characterization in preparation for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the NTS Management and Operating (M and O) contractor, NSTec, successfully partnered to modify and upgrade an existing facility, the Visual Examination and Repackaging Building (VERB). The VERB modifications, including a new ventilation system and modified containment structure, required an approved Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis prior to project procurement and construction. Upgrade of the VERB from a radiological facility to a Hazard Category 3 Nuclear Facility required new rigor in the design and construction areas and was executed on an aggressive schedule. The facility Documented Safety Analysis required that OSBs be vented prior to introduction into the VERB. Box venting was safely completed after developing and implementing two types of custom venting systems for the heavy gauge box construction. A remotely operated punching process was used on boxes with wall thickness of up to 3.05 mm (0.120 in) to insert aluminum

  16. Outcomes of a National Environmental Edutainment Program in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappe, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    We present results of the first longitudinal evaluation of a nation-wide environmental edutainment program. There has recently been rapid growth in curricula on the environment and climate change, yet few reach large and diverse audiences, and fewer still are evaluated. These results are from high schools participating in the Alliance for Climate Education (ACE) program. ACE is a 3 year-old program that has reached 1.2 million students with an edutainment presentation incorporating music, multi-media, animation, and documentary footage (www.acespace.org). A projected 850 schools across 23 states will see the presentation this year; 6% of schools (3 classes each) are randomly selected to be evaluated. The data described here were collected in Fall 2011 from 1,270 students in 21 schools; the full evaluation will be complete in May 2012. The sample is ethnically and socio-economically diverse — 29% are white, and 46% receive free/reduced lunches (a proxy for socio-economic status). Outcome measures included a test of climate knowledge and intentions to take (and to ask others to take) climate-related actions. The analyses examined direct effects of the ACE program on climate knowledge and intentions, as well as the moderating effects of student gender and age on learning. Before the ACE presentation, boys had significantly higher knowledge scores than girls (54% vs. 48% correct, respectively, p < .001). Afterward, boys and girls both had significantly higher knowledge scores (64% and 63% correct, respectively) and no longer differed from each other in this respect. Before the presentation, girls expressed significantly greater intentions to take climate-related actions than did boys. Afterward, intentions increased significantly in both groups, but the gap between girls and boys remained. The gap-closing pattern was somewhat different for the moderating variable of age. Before the presentation, knowledge and intentions were significantly higher among older students

  17. Inventory and sources of transuranic solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-08-01

    In the past, solid radioactive waste has often been buried in the most accessible and convenient vacant place, without a great deal of thought for the long-term consequences. The transuranium (TRU) elements were very strictly conserved and, at first, solid waste containing separated fission products was not a serious land burial problem. Wartime pressures for production and lack of knowledge or understanding led to siting and operational practices that, in many situations, are unsatisfactory by present day standards. Purpose of this report is to support the development of standards and criteria which will specifically address the problem of TRU contaminated waste generated by Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear programs and commercial application of nuclear technology. This report covers: DOE facilities, commercial disposal sites, commercial nuclear industry, TRU-contaminated waste inventory, and waste projections

  18. Methodologies for certification of transuranic waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, R.N.; Kok, K.D.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this study was to postulate methodologies for certification that a waste package is acceptable for disposal in a licensed geologic repository. Within the context of this report, certification means the overall process which verifies that a waste package meets the criteria or specifications established for acceptance for disposal in a repository. The overall methodology for certification will include (1) certifying authorities, (2) tests and procedures, and (3) documentation and quality assurance programs. Each criterion will require a methodology that is specific to that criterion. In some cases, different waste forms will require a different methodology. The purpose of predicting certification methodologies is to provide additional information as to what changes, if any, are needed for the TRU waste in storage

  19. New aspects on the transuranics transfer in the Palomares marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, L.; Lobo, A.M.; Holm, E.

    1992-01-01

    The environmental contamination of transuranics following the Palomares accident in 1966 (Southern Spain) has been continuous monitored on land and scientific programs are still running. The study of the land to sea transfer of the contamination started in 1986, focussed on the depositional history recorded in marine sediments. At the continental shelf, south of the mouth of the Almanzora river, enhanced levels of plutonium and americium were found which could be related to the accident. Additional analysis of marine sediments, collected far from the impact point, showed the presence of a hot particle. The study of the chronology of this sediment core and the isotopic ratios are given in this paper to assess the origin and pathway of the particle. The route of this particle was found to be the aerial transfer at the time of the accident. (author) 8 refs.; 3 figs

  20. 75 FR 39582 - National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-09

    ... Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: Information Security Oversight Office..., announcement is made for a meeting of the National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee. The meeting will be held to discuss National Industrial Security Program policy matters. DATES: The meeting...