WorldWideScience

Sample records for national radon measurement

  1. Reconstruction of national distribution of indoor radon concentration in Russia using results of regional indoor radon measurement programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmoshenko, I; Malinovsky, G; Vasilyev, A; Zhukovsky, M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the paper is a reconstruction of the national distribution and estimation of the arithmetic average indoor radon concentration in Russia using the data of official annual 4-DOZ reports. Annual 4-DOZ reports summarize results of radiation measurements in 83 regions of Russian Federation. Information on more than 400,000 indoor radon measurements includes the average indoor radon isotopes equilibrium equivalent concentration (EEC) and number of measurements by regions and by three main types of houses: wooden, one-storey non-wooden, and multi-storey non-wooden houses. To reconstruct the national distribution, all-Russian model sample was generated by integration of sub-samples created using the results of each annual regional program of indoor radon measurements in each type of buildings. According to indoor radon concentration distribution reconstruction, all-Russian average indoor radon concentration is 48 Bq/m(3). Average indoor radon concentration by region ranges from 12 to 207 Bq/m(3). The 95-th percentile of the distribution is reached at indoor radon concentration 160 Bq/m(3).

  2. The NIST Primary Radon-222 Measurement System

    OpenAIRE

    Collé, R.; Hutchinson, J. M. R.; Unterweger, M. P.

    1990-01-01

    Within the United States, the national standard for radon measurements is embodied in a primary radon measurement system that has been maintained for over 50 years to accurately measure radon (222Rn) against international and national radium (226Ra) standards. In turn, all of the radon measurements made at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the radon transfer calibration standards and calibration services provided by NIST are directly related to this national radon ...

  3. Radon legislation and national guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakerblom, G

    1999-07-01

    50-500 Bq/l for public waters and 200-1000 Bq/l for private water supplies. 4 EU member states and 11 non-EU European countries have reference levels for the concentration of radioactive elements in building materials. 8 European countries have guidelines regarding radon at city planning and 13 have mapped the radon risk in their countries. It is essential to the work against radon and to future reduction of radon concentrations in dwellings and workplaces that the national states issue recommendations, regulations, directives or laws on radon limits and building practices. In order to have a significant effect on the radon situation, the questionnaire responses show that radon reference levels and regulations must be enforced or very little progress is achieved. Extensive measurement and research programs have been carried out in many in countries. Heretofore, only those countries with enforced regulations have had successful programs, resulting in remedial actions in more than 10,000 buildings. The only exception is USA, which concentrated on extensive information media campaigns on radon and the training of large numbers of contractors to perform measurements and remedial measures.

  4. Indoor radon measurements in Turkey dwellings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, N; Ataksor, B; Taskın, H; Bingoldag, N Albayrak

    2015-12-01

    In this work, indoor radon radioactivity concentration levels have been measured in dwellings of Turkey within the frame of the National Radon Monitoring Programme. The (222)Rn concentrations were measured with time-integrating passive nuclear etched track detectors in 7293 dwellings in 153 residential units of 81 provinces, and the radon map of Turkey was prepared. Indoor radon concentrations were distributed in the range of 1-1400 Bq m(-3). The arithmetic mean of the radon gas concentration was found to be 81 Bq m(-3); the geometric mean was 57 Bq m(-3) with a geometric standard deviation of 2.3.

  5. Indoor Radon Measurement in Van

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, E.; Osmanlioglu, A. E.; Dogan, I.; Celebi, N.

    2007-04-01

    In this study, indoor radon concentrations obtained from the radon surveys conducted in the Van. Radon monitoring was performed by applying a passive, time-integrating measuring technique. For this purpose, CR-39 nuclear track detectors were installed in dwellings for 2 months. After the monitoring period, detectors were collected. In order to make the alpha tracks visible, chemical etching was applied to the exposed detectors. Nuclear track numbers and the corresponding indoor radon concentrations were determined. Annual effective dose equivalents and the risk probabilities caused by indoor radon inhalation were calculated, and the found results compared with the indoor radon concentrations' data measured in different provinces of Turkey.

  6. Radon Measurement in Schools. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other major national and international scientific organizations have concluded that radon is a human carcinogen and a serious environmental health problem. The EPA has conducted extensive research on the presence and measurement of radon in schools. This report provides school administrators and…

  7. Radon in Estonian dwellings - Results from a National Radon Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahapill, Lia; Rulkov, Anne; Rajamaee, Raivo [Estonian Radiation Protection Centre (Kiirguskeskus), Tallinn (Spain); Aakerblom, Gustav [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2003-10-01

    A countrywide survey of radon concentrations in Estonian dwellings was carried out during the period 1998-2001. The survey formed a part of the cooperation program on radiation protection between the Estonian Radiation Protection (Kiirguskeskus) Centre and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). The survey included measurements in a number of dwellings representative for Estonia in detached houses and multifamily buildings (only dwellings on the bottom floor were included in the survey). Altogether, radon concentrations were measured in 515 dwellings, a number large enough to be statistically significant. All measurements were made with alphatrack film detectors of the same type that SSI uses in Sweden. The measurements were made during a 2-3 month period during the winter half-year. Two detectors were used in each dwelling. In Estonia there are 0.17 million dwellings in detached houses and 0.45 million in multi apartment buildings. Of the 1.26 million inhabitants in Estonia. 0.36 million live in detached houses and 0.90 million in multi apartment buildings. Most of the latter were built during the Soviet occupation. Of the dwellings in multifamily buildings 30 % are assumed to be situated on the first floor. The mean radon concentration in dwellings in detached hoses, according to the survey results, is 103 Bq/m{sup 3}, in dwellings on the bottom floor in multi apartment buildings it is 78 Bq/m{sup 3}. In 1% of the dwellings the radon concentration exceeded 400 Bq/m{sup 3}. The highest radon concentration found in the study was 1040 Bq/m{sup 3}. Based on the assumption that the average radon concentration in the dwellings in multi-apartment buildings that are not situated on the bottom floor is 30 Bq/m{sup 3}, and that these dwellings constitute 70% of all dwellings in multi apartment buildings, the mean radon concentration in dwellings in multi apartment buildings is calculated to be 44 Bq/m{sup 3}. The mean value for all Estonia dwellings is calculated

  8. Efficacy of radon remedial measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naismith, S. (National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom))

    1994-04-01

    About 2000 householders in the UK have taken remedial action to reduce high radon levels in their homes. Some 800 of these householders have sought measurements to confirm the effectiveness of the action. Results for 528 such homes are discussed. (author).

  9. The Austrian radon activities on the way to the national radon action plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, V; Ringer, W; Wurm, G; Haider, W

    2014-07-01

    Based on the new Euratom Basic Safety Standards (BSS), all EU member states will be obliged to design a strategy to address long-term risks from radon exposure, which is laid down in the 'national radon action plan'. In Austria, the National Radon Centre is responsible for the development of the action plan. This paper presents the current and planned radon protection activities on the way to establish the radon action plan--like the national radon database, the definition of radon risk areas by improving the existing radon map, as well as strategies and activities to increase the radon awareness of the public and decision-makers and to involve the building sector. The impact of and the need for actions caused by the BSS requirements on the Austrian radon legislation, strategy and programme are discussed.

  10. Radon concentration measurements in bituminous coal mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisne, Abdullah; Okten, Gündüz; Celebi, Nilgün

    2005-01-01

    Radon measurements were carried out in Kozlu, Karadon and Uzülmez underground coal mines of Zonguldak bituminous coal basin in Turkey. Passive-time integrating method, which is the most widely used technique for the measurement of radon concentration in air, was applied by using nuclear etched track detectors (CR-39) in the study area. The radon concentration measurements were performed on a total of 42 points in those three mines. The annual exposure, the annual effective dose and lifetime fatality risk, which are the important parameters for the health of workers, were estimated based on chronic occupational exposure to the radon gas, which is calculated using UNCEAR-2000 and ICRP-65 models. The radon concentrations at several coal production faces are higher than the action level of 1000 Bq m(-3). It is suggested that the ventilation rates should be rearranged to reduce the radon concentration.

  11. High sensitivity radon emanation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuzel, G; Simgen, H

    2009-05-01

    The presented radon detection technique employs miniaturized ultra-low background proportional counters. (222)Rn samples are purified, mixed with a counting gas and filled into a counter using a special glass vacuum line. The absolute sensitivity of the system is estimated to be 40 microBq (20 (222)Rn atoms). For emanation investigations two metal sealed stainless steel vessels and several glass vials are available. Taking into account their blank contributions, measurements at a minimum detectable activity of about 100 microBq can be performed.

  12. Measurements of radon around closed uranium mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Sadaaki E-mail: furuta@ningyo.jnc.go.jp; Ito, Kimio; Ishimori, Yuu

    2002-07-01

    There are several waste rock yards at closed uranium mines around Ningyo-toge, in the Western Honshu Island of Japan, and measurements of radon were carried out by both the passive method and the sampling method around these yards. As comparatively high radon concentrations were observed in two districts through routine measurements, more detailed measurements were made by the passive method in these districts. The impact of radon emanation from the waste rock yards was small for both residential districts and around these yards when considering the natural background level of radon. In addition, by simultaneous continuous measurements of radon and its progeny at two locations, it was estimated that the effective dose caused by the representative uranium waste rock yards was less than the public effective dose limit of 1 mSv year{sup -1} at the fenced boundary of the waste rock site.

  13. Find a Radon Test Kit or Measurement and Mitigation Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find a qualified radon service professional to fix or mitigate your home. If you have questions about a radon, you should contact your state radon contact and/or contact one or both of the two privately-run National Radon Proficiency Programs

  14. Quality assurance for radon exposure chambers at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semler, M.O.; Sensintaffar, E.L. [National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, AL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), operates six radon exposure chambers in its two laboratories, the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL) in Montgomery, Alabama, and the Las Vegas Facility, Las Vegas, Nevada. These radon exposure chambers are used to calibrate and test portable radon measuring instruments, test commercial suppliers of radon measurement services through the Radon Measurement Proficiency Program, and expose passive measurement devices to known radon concentrations as part of a quality assurance plan for federal and state studies measuring indoor radon concentrations. Both laboratories participate in national and international intercomparisons for the measurement of radon and are presently working with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to receive a certificate of traceability for radon measurements. NAREL has developed an estimate of the total error in its calibration of each chamber`s continuous monitors as part of an internal quality assurance program. This paper discusses the continuous monitors and their calibration for the three chambers located in Montgomery, Alabama, as well as the results of the authors intercomparisons and total error analysis.

  15. Novel method of measurement of radon exhalation from building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awhida, A; Ujić, P; Vukanac, I; Đurašević, M; Kandić, A; Čeliković, I; Lončar, B; Kolarž, P

    2016-11-01

    In the era of the energy saving policy (i.e. more air tight doors and windows), the radon exhaled from building materials tends to increase its concentration in indoor air, which increases the importance of the measurement of radon exhalation from building materials. This manuscript presents a novel method of the radon exhalation measurement using only a HPGe detector or any other gamma spectrometer. Comparing it with the already used methods of radon exhalation measurements, this method provides the measurement of the emanation coefficient, the radon diffusion length and the radon exhalation rate, all within the same measurement, which additionally defines material's radon protective properties. Furthermore it does not necessitate additional equipment for radon or radon exhalation measurement, which simplifies measurement technique, and thus potentially facilitates introduction of legal obligation for radon exhalation determination in building materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Radon measurement using a liquid scintillation spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Taeko; Morishima, Hiroshige; Kawai, Hiroshi; Kondo, Sohei (Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.); Mifune, Masaki; Konishi, Masanobu; Shirai, Chiaki

    1992-12-01

    A convenient radon detecting device for the purpose of estimating natural radiation exposure is described. The [alpha] radioactivity of radon gas absorbed in fine active carbon particles exposed to air is measured with a liquid scintillation spectrometer (Packard-PICO-RAD system). Its detection limits are 2mBq/l in air and 0.5 Bq/l in water with an accuracy of about 10 %. Radon concentrations at Misasa hot springs in Tottori prefecture were measured using this method. They were 0.16 [approx] 7.7 Bq/l in a bath room and 0.057 [approx] 0.36 Bq/l outdoors. Radon concentrations of the hot springs were 82 [approx] 1,700 Bq/l. (author).

  17. Radon measurements in some areas in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid Khan, M.A. [Physics Division, Atomic Energy Centre, Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 164, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: hamidkhan1950@yahoo.com; Chowdhury, M.S. [Physics Department, Dhaka University, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh)

    2008-08-15

    A survey of radon level measurements using CR-39 has been carried out in some of urban and rural residential areas and one gas explosion area in Bangladesh. The lowest level of radon concentration was found to be 49Bqm{sup -3} inside a hospital in Cox's Bazar district and the highest level was found to be 835Bqm{sup -3} inside a mud-made old residential house in Sylhet city. It was observed that old residential houses were found to have higher levels of radon concentrations compared to newly built houses. The radon level at the gas explosion area at Magurchara in Moulvibazar district was found to be 408{+-}98Bqm{sup -3}.

  18. Update of Ireland's national average indoor radon concentration - Application of a new survey protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdall, A; Murphy, P; Pollard, D; Fenton, D

    2017-04-01

    In 2002, a National Radon Survey (NRS) in Ireland established that the geographically weighted national average indoor radon concentration was 89 Bq m(-3). Since then a number of developments have taken place which are likely to have impacted on the national average radon level. Key among these was the introduction of amending Building Regulations in 1998 requiring radon preventive measures in new buildings in High Radon Areas (HRAs). In 2014, the Irish Government adopted the National Radon Control Strategy (NRCS) for Ireland. A knowledge gap identified in the NRCS was to update the national average for Ireland given the developments since 2002. The updated national average would also be used as a baseline metric to assess the effectiveness of the NRCS over time. A new national survey protocol was required that would measure radon in a sample of homes representative of radon risk and geographical location. The design of the survey protocol took into account that it is not feasible to repeat the 11,319 measurements carried out for the 2002 NRS due to time and resource constraints. However, the existence of that comprehensive survey allowed for a new protocol to be developed, involving measurements carried out in unbiased randomly selected volunteer homes. This paper sets out the development and application of that survey protocol. The results of the 2015 survey showed that the current national average indoor radon concentration for homes in Ireland is 77 Bq m(-3), a decrease from the 89 Bq m(-3) reported in the 2002 NRS. Analysis of the results by build date demonstrate that the introduction of the amending Building Regulations in 1998 have led to a reduction in the average indoor radon level in Ireland. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Instruments to measure radon-222 activity concentration or exposure to radon-222. Intercomparison 2014; Messgeraete zur Bestimmung der Radon-222-Aktivitaetskonzentration oder der Radon-222-Exposition. Vergleichspruefung 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, Elisabeth; Beck, Thomas; Buchroeder, Helmut; Doering, Joachim; Schmidt, Volkmar

    2014-10-15

    According to the Directive 96/29/EURATOM the monitoring of occupational radiation exposures shall base on individual measurements carried out by an approved dosimetric service. Pursuant to the European Directive an approved dosimetric service is a body responsible for the calibration, reading or interpretation of individual monitoring devices.., whose capacity to act in this respect is recognized by the competent authorities. This concept will also be applied to radon services issuing passive radon measurement devices. Passive radon measurement devices{sup 1} using solid state nuclear track detectors or electrets are recommended for individual monitoring of exposures to radon. German regulations lay down that radon measuring devices are appropriate for purposes of occupational radiation monitoring if the devices are issued by recognized radon measurement services, and the measurement service submits devices of the same type issued for radon monitoring to regular intercomparisons conducted by the Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS). A radon measuring service is recognized by the competent authority if it proves its organisational and technical competence, e. g. by accreditation. These regulations have been introduced in the area of occupational radiation exposures. Nevertheless, it is recommended that radon measuring services which carry out radon measurements in other areas (e.g. dwellings) should subject themselves to these measures voluntarily. The interlaboratory comparisons comprise the organization, exposure, and evaluation of measurements of radon activity concentration or exposure to radon. The comparisons only concern radon-222; radon-220 is not in the scope. Radon services being interested can get further information from the European Information System on Proficiency Testing Schemes (EPTIS) and from the BfS websites.

  20. A comparison of contemporary and retrospective radon gas measurements in high radon dwellings in Ireland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelleher, K.; McLaughlin, J.P. [University College Dublin (Ireland); Fenton, D.; Colgan, P.A. [Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, Dublin (Ireland)

    2006-07-01

    Little correlations has been found between contemporary radon gas measurements made in the past and retrospective radon gas measurements in Irish dwellings. This would suggest that these two techniques would result in two significantly different cumulative radon exposure estimates. Contemporary radon gas measurements made a few years apart in the same room of a dwelling were found to be significantly different. None of these differences could be explained by known changes to the rooms themselves., such ventilation or structural alterations to the room. This highlights the limitations of the contemporary radon gas measurements as a surrogate measurement for use in residential radon epidemiology. The contemporary radon gas measurements made by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (R.P.I.I.) and University College of Dublin (U.C.D.) do not cover the same exposure period as the retrospective estimates and so the accuracy of the retrospective measurements cannot be demonstrated. A weak correlation can be seen between the retrospective radon gas estimates and a combination of the two contemporary radon gas estimates. It is not unreasonable to expect improvement in the correlation if further contemporary radon gas measurements were made in these rooms. (N.C.)

  1. Absolute activity measurement of radon gas at IRA-METAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Philippe; Nedjadi, Youcef; Bailat, Claude; Triscone, Gilles; Bochud, François

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the system of the Swiss national metrological institute (IRA-METAS) for the absolute standardisation of radon gas. This method relies on condensing radon under vacuum conditions within a specified cold area using a cryogenerator, and detecting its alpha particles with an ion-implanted silicon detector, through a very accurately defined solid angle. The accuracy of this defined solid angle standardisation technique was corroborated by another primary measurement method involving 4 πγ NaI(Tl) integral counting and Monte Carlo efficiency calculations. The 222Rn standard submitted by IRA-METAS to the Système International de Référence (SIR) at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) has also been found to be consistent with an analogous standard submitted by the German national metrological institute (PTB). IRA-METAS is able to deliver radon standards, with activities ranging from a few kBq to 350 kBq, in NIST-Type ampoules, and glass or steel containers usable for calibrating radon-measuring instruments.

  2. Calibration system for measuring the radon flux density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, A; Zhukovsky, M; Bastrikov, V

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of radon flux from soil surface is the useful tool for the assessment of radon-prone areas and monitoring of radon releases from uranium mining and milling residues. The accumulation chambers with hollow headspace and chambers with activated charcoal are the most used devices for these purposes. Systematic errors of the measurements strongly depend on the geometry of the chamber and diffusion coefficient of the radon in soil. The calibration system for the attestation of devices for radon flux measurements was constructed. The calibration measurements of accumulation chambers and chambers with activated charcoal were conducted. The good agreement between the results of 2D modelling of radon flux and measurements results was observed. It was demonstrated that reliable measurements of radon flux can be obtained by chambers with activated charcoal (equivalent volume ~75 l) or by accumulation chambers with hollow headspace of ~7-10 l and volume/surface ratio (height) of >15 cm.

  3. Measurements of radon and chemical elements: Popocatepetl volcano; Mediciones de radon y elementos quimicos: Volcan Popocatepetl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, P.; Segovia, N.; Lopez, B.; Reyes, A.V. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Armienta, M.A.; Valdes, C.; Mena, M. [IGFUNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Seidel, J.L.; Monnin, M. [UMR 5569 CNRS Hydrosciences, Montpellier (France)

    2002-07-01

    The Popocatepetl volcano is a higher risk volcano located at 60 Km from Mexico City. Radon measurements on soil in two fixed seasons located in the north slope of volcano were carried out. Moreover the radon content, major chemical elements and tracks in water samples of three springs was studied. The radon of soil was determined with solid detectors of nuclear tracks (DSTN). The radon in subterranean water was evaluated through the liquid scintillation method and it was corroborated with an Alpha Guard equipment. The major chemical elements were determined with conventional chemical methods and the track elements were measured using an Icp-Ms equipment. The radon on soil levels were lower, indicating a moderate diffusion of the gas across the slope of the volcano. The radon in subterranean water shown few changes in relation with the active scene of the volcano. The major chemical elements and tracks showed a stable behavior during the sampling period. (Author)

  4. Measurement of soil and indoor radon in Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torri, G.; Azimi-Garakani, D.; Oppon, O.C.; Piermattei, S.; Susanna, A.F.; Seidel, J.-L.; Tommasino, L.; Ardanese, L. (ENEA, Rome (Italy))

    1988-01-01

    In spite of the fact that in the majority of cases the most important radon source is the soil and the rock beneath the house, no large scale survey of soil radon has ever been made in Italy. In this paper the results of a large scale survey of soil radon are presented from measurements made in hundreds of different sites in Latium and Campania. For several locations, results of measurements gathered for different years are described and up-dated. As a pilot project for indoor radon survey monthly variations of radon concentrations in typical houses have been investigated. (author).

  5. A nation-wide survey on indoor radon from 2007 to 2010 in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Gen; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Ogata, Hiromitsu; Sugiyama, Hideo; Yonehara, Hidenori; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Fujiwara, Saeko; Tatsukawa, Yoshimi; Mori, Ippei; Kimura, Shinzo

    2010-01-01

    In two previous nation-wide surveys in the late 1980s and early 1990s, Japanese indoor radon concentrations increased in homes built after the mid 1970s. In order to ascertain whether this trend continued, a nation-wide survey was conducted from 2007 to 2010. In total 3,900 houses were allocated to 47 prefectures by the Neyman allocation method and 3,461 radon measurements were performed (88.7% success). The fraction of reinforced concrete / concrete block buildings was 32.4%, similar to the value from national statistics. Arithmetic mean (standard deviation, SD) and geometric mean (geometric SD) of radon concentration after adjusting for seasonal fluctuation were 14.3 (14.7) and 10.8 (2.1) Bq/m(3). The corresponding population-weighted values were 13.7 (12.3) and 10.4 (2.0) Bq/m(3), respectively. It was estimated that only 0.1% of dwellings exceed 100 Bq/m(3), a new WHO reference level for indoor radon. Radon concentrations were highest in houses constructed in the mid 1980s and decreased thereafter. In conclusion, arithmetic mean indoor radon in the present survey was slightly lower than in previous surveys and significant reductions in indoor radon concentrations in both wooden and concrete houses can be attributed to alterations in Japanese housing styles in recent decades.

  6. The rate of radon remediation in Ireland 2011-2015: Establishing a base line rate for Ireland's National Radon Control Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdall, A; Fenton, D; Rafferty, B

    2016-10-01

    Radon is the greatest source of radiation exposure to the public. In Ireland, it is estimated that approximately 7% of the national housing stock have radon concentrations above the Reference Level of 200 Bq m(-3). A radon test can be carried out to identify homes with radon levels above the Reference Level. However there is no health benefit associated with radon testing unless it leads to remediation. Surveys to establish the rate of remediation in Ireland, that is the proportion of householders who having found levels of radon above the Reference Level proceed to carry out remediation work have been carried out in 2011 and 2013. Reasons for not carrying out remediation work were also investigated. In 2015 the survey was repeated to establish the current rate of remediation and reasons for not remediating. This report presents the results of that survey. It also compiles the data from all three surveys to identify any trends over time. The rate of remediation is an important parameter in estimating the effectiveness of programmes aimed at reducing radon levels. Currently the rate of remediation is 22% and the main reasons householders gave for not remediating were not certain there is a serious risk and concern about the cost of the work. In Ireland, this figure of 22% will be now used as a baseline metric against which the effectiveness of its National Radon Control Strategy will be measured over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of retrospective and contemporary indoor radon measurements in a high-radon area of Serbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zunic, Z.S. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , Belgrade (Serbia); Yarmoshenko, I.V. [Institute of Industrial Ecology, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)], E-mail: ivy@ecko.uran.ru; Kelleher, K. [Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, Dublin (Ireland); Paridaens, J. [SCK.CEN Mol (Belgium); Mc Laughlin, J.P. [School of Physics, University College Dublin (Ireland); Celikovic, I.; Ujic, P. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , Belgrade (Serbia); Onischenko, A.D. [Institute of Industrial Ecology, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Jovanovic, S.; Demajo, A. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , Belgrade (Serbia); Birovljev, A. [Radonlab Ltd., Oslo (Norway); Bochicchio, F. [Italian National Institute of Health, Rome (Italy)

    2007-11-15

    In Niska Banja, Serbia, which is a high-radon area, a comparison was made between two retrospective radon measuring methods and contemporary radon measurements. The two retrospective methods derive the radon concentrations that occurred in dwellings over longer periods in the past, based on the amount of trapped {sup 210}Po on the surface of glass objects (surface traps, ST) or in the bulk of porous materials (volume traps, VT). Both surface implanted {sup 210}Po in glass objects and contemporary radon in air were measured in 46 rooms, distributed in 32 houses of this radon spa-town, using a dual alpha track detector configuration (CR-39 and LR115) and CR-39 track etched detectors, respectively. In addition to the use of surface trap measurements, in 18 rooms (distributed in 15 houses) VT samples of suitable material were also collected, allowing to compare ST and VT retrospective radon concentration estimates. For each room, contemporary annual radon concentrations (CONT) were measured or estimated using seasonal correction factors. The distribution of the radon concentration in all data sets was found to be close to lognormal (Chi-square test > 0.05). Geometric means (GM) are similar, ranging from 1040 to 1380 Bq m{sup -3}, whereas geometric standard deviations (GSD) for both the retrospective methods are greater than for the CONT method, showing reasonable agreement between VT, ST and CONT measurements. A regression analysis, with respect to the lognormal distribution of each data set, shows that for VT-ST the correlation coefficient r is 0.85, for VT-CONT r is 0.82 and for ST-CONT r is 0.73. Comparison of retrospective and contemporary radon concentrations with regard to supposed long-term indoor radon changes further supports the principal agreement between the retrospective and conventional methods.

  8. Comparison of retrospective and contemporary indoor radon measurements in a high-radon area of Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunić, Z S; Yarmoshenko, I V; Kelleher, K; Paridaens, J; Mc Laughlin, J P; Celiković, I; Ujić, P; Onischenko, A D; Jovanović, S; Demajo, A; Birovljev, A; Bochicchio, F

    2007-11-15

    In Niska Banja, Serbia, which is a high-radon area, a comparison was made between two retrospective radon measuring methods and contemporary radon measurements. The two retrospective methods derive the radon concentrations that occurred in dwellings over longer periods in the past, based on the amount of trapped (210)Po on the surface of glass objects (surface traps, ST) or in the bulk of porous materials (volume traps, VT). Both surface implanted (210)Po in glass objects and contemporary radon in air were measured in 46 rooms, distributed in 32 houses of this radon spa-town, using a dual alpha track detector configuration (CR-39 and LR115) and CR-39 track etched detectors, respectively. In addition to the use of surface trap measurements, in 18 rooms (distributed in 15 houses) VT samples of suitable material were also collected, allowing to compare ST and VT retrospective radon concentration estimates. For each room, contemporary annual radon concentrations (CONT) were measured or estimated using seasonal correction factors. The distribution of the radon concentration in all data sets was found to be close to lognormal (Chi-square test>0.05). Geometric means (GM) are similar, ranging from 1040 to 1380 Bq m(-3), whereas geometric standard deviations (GSD) for both the retrospective methods are greater than for the CONT method, showing reasonable agreement between VT, ST and CONT measurements. A regression analysis, with respect to the lognormal distribution of each data set, shows that for VT-ST the correlation coefficient r is 0.85, for VT-CONT r is 0.82 and for ST-CONT r is 0.73. Comparison of retrospective and contemporary radon concentrations with regard to supposed long-term indoor radon changes further supports the principal agreement between the retrospective and conventional methods.

  9. Determination of air-loop volume and radon partition coefficient for measuring radon in water sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kil Yong; Burnett, William C

    A simple method for the direct determination of the air-loop volume in a RAD7 system as well as the radon partition coefficient was developed allowing for an accurate measurement of the radon activity in any type of water. The air-loop volume may be measured directly using an external radon source and an empty bottle with a precisely measured volume. The partition coefficient and activity of radon in the water sample may then be determined via the RAD7 using the determined air-loop volume. Activity ratios instead of absolute activities were used to measure the air-loop volume and the radon partition coefficient. In order to verify this approach, we measured the radon partition coefficient in deionized water in the temperature range of 10-30 °C and compared the values to those calculated from the well-known Weigel equation. The results were within 5 % variance throughout the temperature range. We also applied the approach for measurement of the radon partition coefficient in synthetic saline water (0-75 ppt salinity) as well as tap water. The radon activity of the tap water sample was determined by this method as well as the standard RAD-H2O and BigBottle RAD-H2O. The results have shown good agreement between this method and the standard methods.

  10. Radon in homes of the Portland, Oregon Area: Radon data from local radon testing companies collected by CRM (Continuous Radon Measurement) machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, H.; Lindsey, K.; Linde, T.; Burns, S. F.

    2013-12-01

    Students from the Department of Geology at Portland State University paired up with the Oregon Health Authority to better understand radon gas values in homes of the Portland metropolitan area. This study focuses on radon values collected by continuous radon measurement (CRM) machines, taken by local radon testing companies. The local companies participating in this study include Alpha Environmental Services, Inc., Cascade Radon, Environmental Works, The House Detectives, LLC, and Soil Solutions Environmental Services, Inc. In total, 2491 radon readings spanning across 77 zip codes were collected from local companies in the Portland metropolitan area. The maximum value, average value, percentage of homes greater than 4 pCi/L and total rank sum was calculated and used to determine the overall radon potential for each zip code (Burns et al., 1998). A list and four maps were produced showing the results from each category. Out of the total records, 24 zip codes resulted in high radon potential and the average reading for the entire Portland Metropolitan area was 3.7 pCi/L. High potential zip codes are thought to be a result of sand and gravel (Missoula Flood deposits) and faults present in the subsurface. The CRM data was compared with both long-term and short-term data provided by the Oregon Health Authority to validate radon potentials in each zip code. If a home is located in a zip code with high or moderate radon potential across two types of data sets, it is recommended that those homes be tested for radon gas.

  11. Radon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Radon is a colorless, odorless, tasteless and invisible gas produced by the decay of naturally occurring uranium in soil and water.

  12. Radon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can move to air, groundwater, and surface water. Radon-222 has a radioactive half-life of about 4 ... concerns. The main isotope of health concern is radon-222 ( 222 Rn). Many scientists believe that the alpha ...

  13. Method for radon measurement in the subsoil in geothermal prospectus; Metodos de medicion de radon en el subsuelo en prospeccion geotermica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar G, M

    1991-02-15

    The present formless describe the technique for radon measurement in the underground, being able to be used as an additional study in the geothermal prospecting. This methodology has been developed in the National Institute of Nuclear Research of Mexico using a film of cellulose nitrate to detect those emanated alpha particles, by the Rn (222). By means of the trace account in this films its settle down the present radon levels in the underground. The present method thinks about as an alternating one to overcome in it leaves the limitations found in the development of the methodology using a radon emanometer ETR-1, of the trade mark SCINTREX. The radon detected by plastics is also an integral method of measuring in a geothermal field that avoids the problems of variations of radon to pluvial precipitations and barometric variations. These variations affect the results strongly when it is used the punctual sampler as it is the ETR-1. (Author)

  14. Etched track radiometers in radon measurements: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolaev, V A

    1999-01-01

    Passive radon radiometers, based on alpha particle etched track detectors, are very attractive for the assessment of radon exposure. The present review considers various devices used for measurement of the volume activity of radon isotopes and their daughters and determination of equilibrium coefficients. Such devices can be classified into 8 groups: (i) open or 'bare' detectors, (ii) open chambers, (iii) sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn chambers with an inlet filter, (iv) advanced sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn radiometers, (v) multipurpose radiometers, (vi) radiometers based on a combination of etched track detectors and an electrostatic field, (vii) radiometers based on etched track detectors and activated charcoal and (viii) devices for the measurement of radon isotopes and/or radon daughters by means of track parameter measurements. Some of them such as the open detector and the chamber with an inlet filter have a variety of modifications and are applied widely both in geophysical research and radon dosimetric surveys. At the...

  15. Use of health economics in the development of a national radon control strategy in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, D; Fenton, D

    2014-07-01

    A health economics evaluation of different radon intervention strategies was undertaken including the incorporation of prevention into new buildings, the incorporation of potential remedial measures into new buildings and remediation of existing buildings. The analysis shows that (1) the incorporation of prevention into new houses at the time of construction is generally more cost effective than remediation of existing houses and (2) that the cost effectiveness of programmes aimed at encouraging householders to test and remediate their houses may be poor if they are not undertaken within the context of coherent radon reduction strategy. The results of this evaluation were used to identify the most cost-effective radon interventions in an Irish context in support of the development of a National Radon Control Strategy.

  16. Current international intercomparison measurement on radon and its progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, Keizo [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    1996-12-01

    The international intercomparison measurement on radon and its progeny was held between the EML of USDOE and several Japanese organisations, using the radon test chamber installed in EML. Japanese results of radon concentration by the active method using the ionization chamber or scintillation cell and the passive method using the solid track detector were about 5% small compared to that of EML. On the results of radon progeny, there were not any large systematic differences between EML and Japanese participants in spite of wide range of deviation except for the results at the condition of low aerosol density. (author)

  17. Systematic grid-wise radon concentration measurements and first radon map in Cyprus

    CERN Document Server

    Theodoulou, G; Parpottas, Y; 10.1016/j.radmeas.2012.03.019

    2012-01-01

    A systematic study of the indoor airborne radon concentration in the central part of the Nicosia district was conducted, using high-sensitivity active radon portable detectors of the type "RADIM3A". From a total of 108 measurements in 54 grids of 1 km^2 area each, the overall mean value is 20.6 \\pm 13.2 Bq m^-3 (A.M.\\pm S.D.). That is almost twice less than the corresponding average worldwide value. The radon concentration levels in drinking water were also measured in 24 sites of the residential district, using the high-sensitivity radon detector of the type "RADIM3W". The mean value obtained from these measurements is 243.8 \\pm 224.8 mBq L^-1, which is relatively low compared to the corresponding internationally accepted level. The associated annual effective dose rates to each measurement were also calculated and compared to the corresponding worldwide values. From the geographical coordinates of the measuring sites and the corresponding radon concentration values, the digital radon map of the central part...

  18. Study of indoor radon distribution using measurements and CFD modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Neetika; Chauhan, R P; Joshi, M; Agarwal, T K; Aggarwal, Praveen; Sahoo, B K

    2014-10-01

    Measurement and/or prediction of indoor radon ((222)Rn) concentration are important due to the impact of radon on indoor air quality and consequent inhalation hazard. In recent times, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based modeling has become the cost effective replacement of experimental methods for the prediction and visualization of indoor pollutant distribution. The aim of this study is to implement CFD based modeling for studying indoor radon gas distribution. This study focuses on comparison of experimentally measured and CFD modeling predicted spatial distribution of radon concentration for a model test room. The key inputs for simulation viz. radon exhalation rate and ventilation rate were measured as a part of this study. Validation experiments were performed by measuring radon concentration at different locations of test room using active (continuous radon monitor) and passive (pin-hole dosimeters) techniques. Modeling predictions have been found to be reasonably matching with the measurement results. The validated model can be used to understand and study factors affecting indoor radon distribution for more realistic indoor environment.

  19. Intercomparison 2003 for Radon measurement services at PSI

    CERN Document Server

    Butterweck, G

    2003-01-01

    Twelve radon measurement services participated in the 2003 Radon Intercomparison Exercise performed at the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) during March 13th to 24th, 2003. Ten of these laboratories were approved by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health and their participation in the intercomparison exercise was a requirement to warrant quality of measurement. Radon gas detectors (etched-track and electret ionisation chambers) and instruments (ionisation chambers and electrostatic precipitation) were exposed in the PSI Radon Chamber in a reference atmosphere with an average radon gas concentration of 1950 Bqm sup - sup 3 leading to a radon gas exposure of 517 kBqhm sup - sup 3. Additional five electret-detectors of an approved measuring service were purchased by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health for a spot check. Two of these were exposed as described above, two had an exposure of 247 kBqhm sup - sup 3 at an average radon concen...

  20. Measurement of indoor radon levels in the Bologna metropolitan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beozzo, M. (ENEA, Bologna (Italy)); Bottazzi, E.; Calligola, P. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy)) (and others)

    1991-01-01

    Indoor radon concentrations in Bologna were monitored using two types of detectors with different characteristics. The detectors were the polymeric track detector, CR-39, and activated charcoal. The measurements gave consistent results. It has been verified that the radon concentration in Bologna is well below the 'attention' level given in the scientific literature. (author).

  1. Applications of a silicon photodiode detector for radon progeny measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Voytchev, M; Chambaudet, A; Georgiev, G; Iovtchev, M

    1999-01-01

    An application of our developed silicon photodiode detector for radon progeny measurements is presented in this paper. It was determined the deposition velocity for free (3.6+-0.7)x10 sup - sup 3 m s sup - sup 1 and attached (1.0+-0.5)x10 sup - sup 5 m s sup - sup 1 fraction of short living radon progeny.

  2. Methods for measuring diffusion coefficients of radon in building materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cozmuta, [No Value; van der Graaf, ER

    2001-01-01

    Two methods for determining the Rn-222 diffusion coefficient in concrete are presented. Experimentally, the flush and adsorption technique to measure radon release rates underlines both methods. Theoretically, the first method was developed fur samples of cubical geometry. The radon diffusion

  3. Measurement of indoor radon concentration levels in Islamabad, Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, S.U.; Anwar, J. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Matiullah [PD, PINSTECH Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: matiullah@pieas.edu.pk

    2008-08-15

    Indoor radon measurement survey has been carried out in properly selected houses of the city of Islamabad. In this regard, CR-39-based NRPB radon dosimeters were used. The dosimeters were installed at head heights in bedroom and living room of each house. For intercomparison purpose, houses having basements were also selected. In such houses, dosimeters were installed in basements, ground floor and first floor. All the dosimeters were exposed to radon for a period of three months. After exposure, CR-39 detectors were etched for 16 h in 6 M NaOH at 80{sup 0}C and were counted under an optical microscope. The observed track densities were then related to radon concentration levels using a calibration factor of 2.7trackscm{sup -2}h{sup -1}(kBqm{sup -3}){sup -1}. Measured indoor radon concentration levels were found to vary from 11 to 78Bqm{sup -3}. The average radon concentration levels in bedrooms and sitting/living rooms in basements were found to be 40 and 32Bqm{sup -3}, respectively. In bedrooms and living rooms, on ground floor, the average radon concentration levels were found to be 30 and 27Bqm{sup -3}, whereas on first floor the average values were 29 and 27Bqm{sup -3}, respectively. The radon concentration levels found in this study are below the action level recommended by the ICRP.

  4. The history, development and the present status of the radon measurement programme in the United States of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, A C

    2015-11-01

    The US radon measurement programme began in the late 1950s by the US Public Health Service in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah during the uranium frenzy. After the 1967 Congressional Hearings on the working conditions in uranium mines, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was asked to conduct studies in active uranium mines to assess the exposure of the miners on the Colorado Plateau and in New Mexico. From 1967 to 1972, the Health and Safety Laboratory of the US AEC in New York investigated more than 20 uranium mines for radon and radon decay product concentrations and particle size in 4 large uranium mines in New Mexico. In 1970, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was established and took over some of the AEC radon measurement activities. Between 1975 and 1978, the Environmental Measurements Laboratory of the US Department of Energy conducted the first detailed indoor radon survey in the USA. Later in 1984, the very high concentrations of radon found in Pennsylvania homes set the wheels in motion and gave birth to the US Radon Industry. The US EPA expanded its involvement in radon issues and assumed an active role by establishing the National Radon Proficiency Program to evaluate the effectiveness of radon measurement and mitigation methods. In 1998, due to limited resources EPA privatised the radon programme. This paper presents a personal perspective of past events and current status of the US radon programme. It will present an update on radon health effects, the incidence rate of lung cancer in the USA and the number of radon measurements made from 1988 to 2013 using short-term test methods. More than 23 million measurements were made in the last 25 y and as a result more than 1.24 million homes were mitigated successfully. It is estimated that radon measurements performed in the USA are made using long-term testing devices. The number of homes above the US action level of 148 Bq m(-3) (4 pCi l(-1)) may be ∼8.5 million because ∼50 million homes

  5. Measurement of Radon Concentration in Selected Houses in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usikalu, M. R.; Olatinwo, V.; Akpochafor, M.; Aweda, M. A.; Giannini, G.; Massimo, V.

    2017-05-01

    Radon is a natural radioactive gas without colour or odour and tasteless. The World Health Organization (WHO) grouped radon as a human lung carcinogen. For this reason, there has been a lot of interest on the effects of radon exposure to people all over the world and Nigeria is no exception. The aim of this study is to investigate the radon concentration in selected houses in three local government areas of Ibadan. The indoor radon was measured in both mud and brick houses. Fifty houses were considered from the three Local government areas. A calibrated portable continuous radon monitor type (RAD7) manufactured by Durridge company was used for the measurement. A distance of 100 to 200 m was maintained between houses in all the locations. The living room was kept closed during the measurements. The mean radon concentration measured in Egbeda is 10.54 ±1.30 Bqm -3; Lagelu is 16.90 ± 6.31 Bqm -3 and Ona-Ara is 17.95 ± 1.72 Bqm -3. The mean value of the annual absorbed dose and annual effective dose for the locations in the three local government areas was 0.19 mSvy-1 and 0.48 mSvy-1 respectively. The radon concentration for location 10 in Ono-Ara local government exceeded the recommended limit. However, the overall average indoor radon concentration of the three local governments was found to be lower than the world average value of 40 Bqm -3. Hence, there is need for proper awareness about the danger of radon accumulation in dwelling places.

  6. Measurements of radon in dwellings with CR-39 track detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majborn, Benny

    1986-01-01

    A passive integrating dosemeter has been designed for measuring natural radiation in dwellings. The dosemeter contains one or two CR-39 track detectors to measure radon and three thermoluminescence dosemeters to measure external radiation. The dosemeter was investigated in a pilot study in 1983....../84, and it is now used in a nationwide survey of natural radiation in Danish dwellings. The characteristics of the dosemeter with respect to radon measurements are presented, and the radon monitoring results obtained in the pilot study are summarized...

  7. Radon Measurements in Schools: An Interim Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation Programs.

    Radon-222 is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally in soil, rocks, underground water, and air. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other scientific organizations have identified an increased risk of lung cancer associated with exposure to elevated levels of radon in homes. Schools in many…

  8. Measurements of radon activity concentration in mouse tissues and organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimori, Yuu; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Akihiro; Kataoka, Takahiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Mitsunobu, Fumihiro

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the biokinetics of inhaled radon, radon activity concentrations in mouse tissues and organs were determined after mice had been exposed to about 1 MBq/m(3) of radon in air. Radon activity concentrations in mouse blood and in other tissues and organs were measured with a liquid scintillation counter and with a well-type HP Ge detector, respectively. Radon activity concentration in mouse blood was 0.410 ± 0.016 Bq/g when saturated with 1 MBq/m(3) of radon activity concentration in air. In addition, average partition coefficients obtained were 0.74 ± 0.19 for liver, 0.46 ± 0.13 for muscle, 9.09 ± 0.49 for adipose tissue, and 0.22 ± 0.04 for other organs. With these results, a value of 0.414 for the blood-to-air partition coefficient was calculated by means of our physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. The time variation of radon activity concentration in mouse blood during exposure to radon was also calculated. All results are compared in detail with those found in the literature.

  9. Indoor Radon Measurement In The City Of Edirne, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, A.; Kam, E.

    2007-04-01

    This study assesses the indoor radon concentrations for the city of Edirne situated in the European part of Turkey (Eastern Thrace). A total of 88 CR-39 nuclear track detectors were kept in basements of the selected apartment buildings and houses for passively determining the indoor radon levels of the dwellings for a period of three months. The detectors were then collected and a chemical process of etching was applied to the films. At this stage, the tracks left by alpha particles on the films exposed to radon gas were visible and were counted with a microscope (500×magnification) to estimate the corresponding indoor radon concentrations. The average indoor radon concentration was found to be 49.2 Bq/m3 equivalent to an annual effective dose of 1.24 mSv. The measurement results obtained in this study show no significant departure from the other parts of the country.

  10. Indoor radon measurements and radon prognosis for the province of Kymi, southeastern Finland; Huoneilman radonmittaukset Kymen laeaenissae: Tilannekatsaus ja radonennuste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennanen, M.; Maekelaeinen, I.; Voutilainen, A.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of the regional radon prognosis is to classify areas with different levels of radon risk. The radon prognosis gives the percentages of future homes expected to have indoor radon concentrations exceeding the levels of 200 and 400 Bq/m{sup 3}. It is assumed that no protection against the entry of radon is used in construction. In this study about 5900 indoor radon measurements made in single family houses, semi-detached houses and row houses were used. Data on the location, geology and construction of buildings were determined from maps and questionnaires. An empirical statistical model, the adjusted indoor radon measurements and geological data were used to assess the radon risk from soil and bedrock in different areas. The building sites of the province of Kymi were divided into thirteen sub-areas. The radon prognosis are calculated for the most radon-prone foundation types including (1) houses with a slab-on-grade and (2) houses with a basement or hillside houses with open stairwells between basement and first floor. The radon levels are generally greater in the western part of the area. The radon risk is highest in gravel-dominated esker areas in southwestern, western (in Pyhtaa, Kotka, Anjalankoski, litti, Valkeala) and central (Taipalsaari) parts of the area. The radon risk is also high in some bedrock and till areas, also in southwestern and western parts of the area. In these areas the level of 200 Bq/m{sup 3} will be exceeded in 80 % of new houses. About half of the future houses in these areas will have indoor radon concentrations exceeding 400 Bq/m{sup 3}. The radon risk is lowest in the eastern part of the province of Kymi in every soil type. In this area the level of 200 Bq/m{sup 3} will be exceeded in 30 % of new houses. Below 10 % will exceed 400 Bq/m{sup 3}. (orig.) (14 refs.).

  11. Ingredients for a Dutch radon action plan, based on a national survey in more than 2500 dwellings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetsers, R C G M Ronald; Blaauboer, R O Roelf; Dekkers, S A J Fieke

    2016-12-01

    A new Euratom directive demands that Member States establish a national action plan for indoor radon. Important requirements are a national reference level for the radon concentration in dwellings, actions to identify dwellings with radon concentrations that might exceed this reference level and the encouragement of appropriate measures to reduce the radon concentrations in dwellings where these are high. This paper provides ingredients and recommendations for a national action plan for radon in dwellings, applicable to the Netherlands. The approach presented here, which may serve as a model for other countries or regions with a comparatively favourable indoor radon situation, is based on the analysis of radon data from a national survey in more than 2500 Dutch dwellings, built since 1930. The annual average activity concentration of radon in dwellings in the Netherlands equals 15.6 ± 0.3 Bq m(-3). The 50th and 95th percentiles were found to be 12.2 and 38.0 Bq m(-3), respectively. In 0.4 per cent of the dwellings we found values above 100 Bq m(-3). Radon concentrations showed correlations with type of dwelling, year of construction, ventilation system, soil type and smoking behaviour of inhabitants. The survey data suggest that it is feasible for the Netherlands to adopt a national reference level for radon in dwellings of 100 Bq m(-3), in line with recommendations by WHO and ICRP. We were able to predict dwellings with a moderate probability for radon concentrations above 100 Bq m(-3) by applying a combination of three selection criteria: location, type of dwelling and manner of ventilation. Of the existing 6.2 million dwellings in the Netherlands (built since 1930), approximately 23-24 thousand are suspected to exceed this level. Some 80% of these are found in the group of naturally ventilated single-family dwellings in either the southern part of Limburg (approx. 13 thousand) or the Meuse-Rhine-Waal river delta (approx. six thousand). This selected

  12. From the similarities between neutrons and radon to advanced radon-detection and improved cold fusion neutron-measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasino, L.; Espinosa, G.

    2014-07-01

    Neutrons and radon are both ubiquitous in the earth's crust. The neutrons of terrestrial origin are strongly related to radon since they originate mainly from the interactions between the alpha particles from the decays of radioactive-gas (namely Radon and Thoron) and the light nuclei. Since the early studies in the field of neutrons, the radon gas was used to produce neutrons by (α, n) reactions in beryllium. Another important similarity between radon and neutrons is that they can be detected only through the radiations produced respectively by decays or by nuclear reactions. These charged particles from the two distinct nuclear processes are often the same (namely alpha-particles). A typical neutron detector is based on a radiator facing a alpha-particle detector, such as in the case of a neutron film badge. Based on the similarity between neutrons and radon, a film badge for radon has been recently proposed. The radon film badge, in addition to be similar, may be even identical to the neutron film badge. For these reasons, neutron measurements can be easily affected by the presence of unpredictable large radon concentration. In several cold fusion experiments, the CR-39 plastic films (typically used in radon and neutron film-badges), have been the detectors of choice for measuring neutrons. In this paper, attempts will be made to prove that most of these neutron-measurements might have been affected by the presence of large radon concentrations.

  13. A brief overview on radon measurements in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobbágy, Viktor; Altzitzoglou, Timotheos; Malo, Petya; Tanner, Vesa; Hult, Mikael

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present information about currently used standard and routine methods for radon analysis in drinking waters. An overview is given about the current situation and the performance of different measurement methods based on literature data. The following parameters are compared and discussed: initial sample volume and sample preparation, detection systems, minimum detectable activity, counting efficiency, interferences, measurement uncertainty, sample capacity and overall turnaround time. Moreover, the parametric levels for radon in drinking water from the different legislations and directives/guidelines on radon are presented. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Radon metrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naismith, S.; Howarth, C. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1996-09-01

    NRPB carries out calibrations of various types of radon and radon decay product measurement systems for its own purposes and for laboratories throughout Europe. There are currently two radon calibration facilities at NRPB: a 43 m{sup 3} radon chamber and the Fast Radon Exposure Device (FRED), a sealed steel drum. The radon chamber is used for active radon detection systems and the calibration of large numbers of passive detectors. Fred has a high radon concentration and is used to calibrate small numbers of passive radon gas detectors in a short period. (Author).

  15. The influence of thoron on instruments measuring radon activity concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michielsen, N; Bondiguel, S

    2015-11-01

    Thoron, the isotope 220 of radon, is a radionuclide whose concentration may influence the measurement of the activity concentration of (222)Rn in the air. If in the case of continuous and active sampling measuring instruments, using a pump for example, the influence of thoron on radon measurement is obvious and is taken into account in the apparatus, it is often assumed that in the case of a passive sampling, by diffusion through a filter for example, this thoron influence is negligible. This is due to the very short radioactive half-life of thoron, 55.6 s (3.82 d for (222)Rn), and the assumption that the diffusion time of thoron in the detection chamber is long enough beside that of the thoron half-life. The objective of this study is to check whether this assumption is true or not for different kinds of commercial electronic apparatus used to measure radon activity concentration from soil to dwellings. First of all, the devices were calibrated in activity concentration of radon, and then they were exposed to a controlled thoron atmosphere. The experiments concerning the thoron aimed to investigate the sensitivity to thoron in the radon measuring mode of the apparatus. Results of these experiments show that all devices have a very quick answer to thoron atmosphere, even though the sensitivities vary from one instrument to another. Results clearly show that this influence on radon measurement due to the thoron is observed also after the exposition because of the decay of (212)Pb and its progenies. In conclusion, the sensitivity to thoron in the radon measuring mode depends strongly on the type of instruments. The results of the present investigation show that for some apparatus, the influence of thoron cannot be disregarded especially when measuring radon in soil.

  16. Measurement of indoor radon concentration in kindergartens in Sofia, Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Kremena; Stojanovska, Zdenka; Tsenova, Martina; Badulin, Viktor; Kunovska, Bistra

    2014-11-01

    As a part of the systematic survey of indoor radon in Bulgaria, the indoor radon concentration was measured in 296 kindergarten buildings of Sofia city during 3 months (February to April 2013) using the CR-39 nuclear tract detectors. In 256 buildings at least two frequently occupied rooms (mainly playrooms) were observed. Altogether, 922 measurements were performed. The frequency distribution was well described by the lognormal function. The measured radon concentrations range between 9 and 1415 Bq m(-3) with a geometric mean of 101 Bq m(-3) (2.08) and an arithmetic mean 132 Bq m(-3) with a standard deviation of 118 Bq m(-3). The radon concentrations obtained in this survey were compared with that in Sofia city dwellings obtained from a previous study. A detailed statistical analysis of the building factors was presented.

  17. Radon detection and measurement. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the measurement of radon and radon daughter isotopes in various environments. Radon measurement in homes and buildings, mines, rainwater, groundwater, soils, the Arctic and other atmosphere, and exhaled air is discussed. Radon exhalation rates of building materials and mine tailings are noted. Analytical methods and equipment used to measure radon and radon isotopes are described. Radon detection as an earthquake prediction tool is briefly presented.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  18. Radon measurements with a PIN photodiode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Martin, A. [Laboratorio de Investigacion en Baja Radiactividad (LIBRA), Edificio I-D, Campus Miguel Delibes, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid 47011 (Spain) and Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid 47011 (Spain)]. E-mail: alonsomm@libra.uva.es; Gutierrez-Villanueva, J.L. [Laboratorio de Investigacion en Baja Radiactividad (LIBRA), Edificio I-D, Campus Miguel Delibes, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid 47011 (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid 47011 (Spain); Munoz, J.M. [Departamento de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid 47011 (Spain); Garcia-Talavera, M. [Laboratorio de Investigacion en Baja Radiactividad (LIBRA), Edificio I-D, Campus Miguel Delibes, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid 47011 (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid 47011 (Spain); Adamiec, G. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid 47011 (Spain); Iniguez, M.P. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid 47011 (Spain)

    2006-10-15

    Silicon photodiodes are well suited to detect alphas coming from different sources as neutron reactions or radon daughters. In this work a radon in air detecting device, using an 18x18 mm silicon PIN photodiode is studied. The ionized airborne decay products formed during radon diffusion were focused by an accelerating high voltage to the PIN surface. Several conducting rings were disposed inside a cylindrical PVC vessel in such a way that they reproduced the electric field created by a punctual charge located behind PIN position. Alpha spectra coming from the neutral and ionized species deposited on the PIN surface, dominated by {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po progeny peaks, were recorded for varying conditions. Those include radon concentration from a Pylon source, high voltage (thousands of volts) and PIN inverse bias voltage. Different parameters such as temperature and humidity were also registered during data acquisition. The increase in the particle collection efficiency with respect to zero electric field was compared with the corresponding to a parallel plates configuration. A discussion is made in terms of the most appropriate voltages for different radon concentrations.

  19. Radon measurements by track detectors in Calabrian workplaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nastro, V.; Niceforo, G.; Vuono, D.; Luca, P. de; Nastro, A. [Calabria Univ., Dipt. di Pianificazione Territoriale, Arcavacata di Rende, CS (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Indoor radon studies have been carried out in some workplaces of the South Calabria (Italy) by track detectors CR-39. This study has been undertaken for the purpose of safeguarding the public healthy: since the European population spends, in average, the most greater part of their time in confined environments(residences and offices) the risks of exposure can be elevated. This radon passive measurements are been effectuated according to the recommendations. The exposure time in the workplaces was two different cycle: three months, and six months. The obtained results indicate a radon concentration not only in an average of low level but also in the range of action level (>500 Bq/m{sup 3}). In this last case will be necessary to reduce the radon pollution by adequate land operation works, and a continuous monitoring is also necessary.

  20. Preliminary integrated indoor radon measurements in Transylvania (Romania).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosma, Constantin; Szacsvai, Kinga; Dinu, Alexandra; Ciorba, Daniela; Dicu, Tiberius; Suciu, Liviu

    2009-09-01

    Measurements of indoor radon concentrations were performed in 406 residential houses in five counties (Cluj, Bihor, Alba, Bistrita, and Sibiu) using Makrofol and CR-39 alpha-track detectors. From our measurements, an average indoor radon concentration of 82.5 Bq m(-3) for the Transylvanian population was calculated, i.e. an annual effective dose of 2.4 mSv for the whole body. The calculated dose is 62% higher than that previously reported but yet below the recommended action level of ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). A log-normal distribution of the radon concentration was obtained for the studied counties, excluding some higher values from the Stei region--a radon-prone area in Transylvania. For the Stei region, the data show a dual log-normal distribution of the radon concentration with the second maximum being related to the houses built using uranium waste as a construction material. Assuming a cancer risk coefficient of 10(-4)/100 Bq m(-3) year(-1), one can estimate that about 600 lung cancer per year, for about 7,000,000 inhabitants of the Transylvania region, are due to radon inhalation.

  1. Turbidimetry for measurement of radon concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Huanqiang [HuBei Provincial Academy of Medical Sciences, WuHan (China). Inst. of Radioactive Protection

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes a turbidimetric technique counting the tracks registered on CR-39 foils exposed to radon. Instead of eyeview through microscope, by using the differential spectrophotometer, strong correlation between the radon cumulative concentration and track turbidence was observed(r=0.999). Under the etching condition of 7.07 mol{center_dot}L{sup -1} KOH water solution at 80{sup o}C for 16 hr, linear regression showed that the ratio of track turbidence and cumulative concentration of radon exposure was 1.99 x 10{sup -1} turbidence (KBq m{sup -1}h){sup -1} and the determination limit was 36 KBq m{sup -3}h. The details of the experiments are represented in this paper. (Author).

  2. Radon exhalation from Libyan soil samples measured with the SSNTD technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, A F; Abdallah, R M; Hussein, N A

    2013-02-01

    Radon concentrations in soil samples collected from the cities of Benghazi and Al-Marj, located in northeastern Libya, were measured using the sealed-can technique based on the CR-39 SSNTDs. Mass and areal radon exhalation rates, radium content and radon concentration contribute to indoor radon, and annual effective doses were determined. The results indicate mostly normal rates, but there were some higher levels of radon concentration and emanation in samples collected from Al-Marj and one sample from Benghazi.

  3. Measurements of thoron and radon progeny concentrations in Beijing, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Lei; Liu Cuihong; Guo Qiuju [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)], E-mail: qjguo@pku.edu.cn

    2008-12-15

    It has been reported that thoron levels in China are above the world average and may therefore make a significant contribution to the natural background radiation dose. We therefore conducted a pilot study of concentrations of both thoron and radon progeny during the spring of 2006 in the Beijing area, China. A new type of portable 24 h integrating monitor with a CR-39 detector was used during the survey. Seventy dwellings and eight outdoor sites were measured during the survey. For country houses built of red bricks and slurry, the average equilibrium equivalent concentrations (EEC) of thoron and radon were 1.02 {+-} 0.48 and 16.41 {+-} 9.02 Bq m{sup -3}, respectively, whereas for city dwellings built of cement blocks and floor slabs, the results were 0.48 {+-} 0.47 and 11.50 {+-} 6.99 Bq m{sup -3} for thoron and radon, respectively. For outdoor air, concentrations of thoron and radon progeny were 0.29 {+-} 0.28 and 7.05 {+-} 2.68 Bq m{sup -3}, respectively. Radiation exposures from thoron and radon progeny were also evaluated; the ratio of dose contribution from thoron progeny to that of radon progeny was evaluated to be 28% and 17% in country houses and city dwellings, respectively. (note)

  4. Radon measurement of natural gas using alpha scintillation cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitto, Michael E; Torres, Miguel A; Haines, Douglas K; Semkow, Thomas M

    2014-12-01

    Due to their sensitivity and ease of use, alpha-scintillation cells are being increasingly utilized for measurements of radon ((222)Rn) in natural gas. Laboratory studies showed an average increase of 7.3% in the measurement efficiency of alpha-scintillation cells when filled with less-dense natural gas rather than regular air. A theoretical calculation comparing the atomic weight and density of air to that of natural gas suggests a 6-7% increase in the detection efficiency when measuring radon in the cells. A correction is also applicable when the sampling location and measurement laboratory are at different elevations. These corrections to the measurement efficiency need to be considered in order to derive accurate concentrations of radon in natural gas.

  5. Measurement of radon concentration in super-Kamiokande's buffer gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Y.; Sekiya, H.; Tasaka, S.; Takeuchi, Y.; Wendell, R. A.; Matsubara, M.; Nakahata, M.

    2017-09-01

    To precisely measure radon concentrations in purified air supplied to the Super-Kamiokande detector as a buffer gas, we have developed a highly sensitive radon detector with an intrinsic background as low as 0.33 ± 0.07 mBq /m3 . In this article, we discuss the construction and calibration of this detector as well as results of its application to the measurement and monitoring of the buffer gas layer above Super-Kamiokande. In March 2013, the chilled activated charcoal system used to remove radon in the input buffer gas was upgraded. After this improvement, a dramatic reduction in the radon concentration of the supply gas down to 0.08 ± 0.07 mBq /m3 . Additionally, the Rn concentration of the in-situ buffer gas has been measured 28.8 ± 1.7 mBq /m3 using the new radon detector. Based on these measurements we have determined that the dominant source of Rn in the buffer gas arises from contamination from the Super-Kamiokande tank itself.

  6. Improvements needed in the Environmental Protection Agency's testing program for radon measurement companies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hembra, R.L.

    1990-05-01

    Radon, a naturally occurring, colorless, odorless gas, has been shown to cause lung cancer. As a result, EPA and the Public Health Service advise homeowners to test their homes and to take action if elevated radon levels are discovered. However, GAO believes that to make health decisions, homeowners need more assurance that the radon test results they obtain are accurate. This report discusses how greater accuracy in radon measurements would result from mandating company participation in the Radon Measurement Proficiency program and requiring radon measurement firms to meet minimum quality assurance requirements as a condition to participation. In addition, to ensure that state programs provide a minimum degree of control and consistency over radon measurement companies, GAO recommends that EPA issue guidance on the type of state programs and level of control it believes are needed at the state level in order to provide homeowners with adequate assurances that radon measurements are accurate.

  7. A COMPARISON OF WINTER SHORT-TERM AND ANNUAL AVERAGE RADON MEASUREMENTS IN BASEMENTS OF A RADON-PRONE REGION AND EVALUATION OF FURTHER RADON TESTING INDICATORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Nirmalla G.; Steck, Daniel J.; Field, R. William

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the temporal variability between basement winter short-term (7 to 10 days) and basement annual radon measurements. Other objectives were to test the short-term measurement’s diagnostic performance at two reference levels and to evaluate its ability to predict annual average basement radon concentrations. Electret ion chamber (short-term) and alpha track (annual) radon measurements were obtained by trained personnel in Iowa residences. Overall, the geometric mean of the short-term radon concentrations (199 Bq m−3) was slightly greater than the geometric mean of the annual radon concentrations (181 Bq m−3). Short-term tests incorrectly predicted that the basement annual radon concentrations would be below 148 Bq m−3 12% of the time and 2% of the time at 74 Bq m−3. The short-term and annual radon concentrations were strongly correlated (r=0.87, pradon potential when the reference level is lowered to 74 Bq m−3. PMID:24670901

  8. Radon fluxes measured with the MANOP bottom lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berelson, W. M.; Buchholtz, M. R.; Hammond, D. E.; Santschi, P. H.

    1987-07-01

    At five Pacific Ocean sites, radon fluxes were determined from water samples collected by the MANOP Lander, from measurements of 222Rn and 226Ra concentrations in Lander-collected box core sediments, and from measurements of excess radon in the water column. At MANOP sites H and M, fluxes (all in atoms m -2 s -1) determined with Lander water samples (2200 and 1540 ± 480) agree within the measurement uncertainty with water column standing crop measurements (2220 ± 450, 2040 ± 470). At MANOP site C, the diffusive flux calculated from measurements of 226Ra in box core sediments (550 ± 20), the integrated deficiency of 222Rn in the sediments (720 ± 90), and the water column standing crop (500 ± 160) are in agreement, but all are about twice as large as the single Lander water measurement of the radon flux (330). At MANOP site S radon fluxes from measurements of Lander water (3000 ± 260) are in agreement with the predicted diffusive flux from site S sediments (2880), and both fluxes are close to the lower end of the range of water column standing crop measurements (3000-5170). In San Clemente Basin, California, the Lander water flux measurements at four different sites vary by a factor of 3 due to variability in the sediment radium distribution, but the average (1030 ± 190) is close to the water column standing crop value (780 ± 230). Because there is excellent agreement between the fluxes measured with Lander water samples and the predicted diffusive fluxes in most cases, diffusion must be the primary process controlling benthic exchange of radon at the sites studied. The agreement between the Lander water flux estimates and the water column standing crop estimates indicates that the MANOP Lander functions as an accurate benthic flux chamber in water depths ranging from 1900 to 4900 m. In San Clemente Basin, surficial sediments are enriched in manganese and radium, due to manganese cycling near the sediment-water interface. Molecular diffusion of radon from

  9. An absolute radon 222 activity measurement system at LNE-LNHB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabot, B; Pierre, S; Cassette, P

    2016-12-01

    A good metrological traceability of radon and progenies is necessary to accurately measure the radon concentration. In 1995, at the LNE-LNHB, J.L. Picolo developed a reference method using a defined-solid-angle (DSA) alpha spectrometer to measure a frozen radon source. With this method it was possible to measure radon standards with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.5%. This paper presents the design and the characterization of a new upgraded measurement system; all parameters and their uncertainties are discussed. This new system allows the measurement of radon sources from 100Bq to 4MBq with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.3%.

  10. A national survey on radon concentration in underground inspection rooms and in buildings of a telephone company: methods and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carelli, V., E-mail: vinicio.carelli@telecomitalia.i [Safety and Environment Dept., Telecom-Italia S.p.A., Via di Valcannuta 182, I-00168 Roma (Italy); Bianco, V.; Cordedda, C. [Safety and Environment Dept., Telecom-Italia S.p.A., Via di Valcannuta 182, I-00168 Roma (Italy); Ferrigno, G.; Carpentieri, C.; Bochicchio, F. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita (Italian National Institute of Health), Viale Regina Elena 299, I-00161 Roma (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    A national survey has been carried out to measure radon concentration in a large sample of Telecom-Italia small underground inspection rooms, which form a particularly dense net in urban areas. Measuring radon in such underground places is interesting both for a possible contribution to radon mapping activities and to evaluate workers exposures. Radon concentration was also measured in Telecom buildings (i.e. buildings housing plant equipment, including telephone switches, often also offices, etc.) close and partially connected to the selected inspection rooms. The methodology and the first results of the survey related to the first year of measurements, for a total of 1438 inspection rooms and 1414 Telecom buildings, are reported. Radon concentration was measured with passive devices containing CR-39 detectors for about 12 consecutive months, in order to average seasonal variations. In underground inspection rooms, measured radon concentration reached values up to about 44,000 Bq/m{sup 3}, with a regional median ranging from about 90 Bq/m{sup 3} up to about 1600 Bq/m{sup 3}. In Telecom buildings, the regional median concentration ranged from 13 Bq/m{sup 3} to 174 Bq/m{sup 3}. These results show that radon concentration in underground inspection rooms can reach very high values, whereas medians in monitored buildings are generally lower than those measured in dwellings in a representative national survey.

  11. Comparison of Northern Ireland radon maps based on indoor radon measurements and geology with maps derived by predictive modelling of airborne radiometric and ground permeability data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, J D; Miles, J C H; Young, M

    2011-03-15

    Publicly available information about radon potential in Northern Ireland is currently based on indoor radon results averaged over 1-km grid squares, an approach that does not take into account the geological origin of the radon. This study describes a spatially more accurate estimate of the radon potential of Northern Ireland using an integrated radon potential mapping method based on indoor radon measurements and geology that was originally developed for mapping radon potential in England and Wales. A refinement of this method was also investigated using linear regression analysis of a selection of relevant airborne and soil geochemical parameters from the Tellus Project. The most significant independent variables were found to be eU, a parameter derived from airborne gamma spectrometry measurements of radon decay products in the top layer of soil and exposed bedrock, and the permeability of the ground. The radon potential map generated from the Tellus data agrees in many respects with the map based on indoor radon data and geology but there are several areas where radon potential predicted from the airborne radiometric and permeability data is substantially lower. This under-prediction could be caused by the radon concentration being lower in the top 30 cm of the soil than at greater depth, because of the loss of radon from the surface rocks and soils to air. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. UTILITY OF SHORT-TERM BASEMENT SCREENING RADON MEASUREMENTS TO PREDICT YEAR-LONG RESIDENTIAL RADON CONCENTRATIONS ON UPPER FLOORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Nirmalla; Steck, Daniel J; William Field, R

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated temporal and spatial variability between basement radon concentrations (measured for ∼7 d using electret ion chambers) and basement and upper floor radon concentrations (measured for 1 y using alpha track detectors) in 158 residences in Iowa, USA. Utility of short-term measurements to approximate a person's residential radon exposure and effect of housing/occupant factors on predictive ability were evaluated. About 60 % of basement short-term, 60 % of basement year-long and 30 % of upper floor year-long radon measurements were equal to or above the United States Environmental Protection Agency's radon action level of 148 Bq m(-3) Predictive value of a positive short-term test was 44 % given the year-long living space concentration was equal to or above this action level. Findings from this study indicate that cumulative radon-related exposure was more closely approximated by upper floor year-long measurements than short-term or year-long measurements in the basement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Radon measurements in the Catalagzi Thermal Power Plant, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytekin, H; Bayata, S; Baldik, R; Celebi, N

    2008-01-01

    The Catalağzi Thermal Power Plant (CTPP) (41(0)30'48.4('')N and 0.31(0)53'41.5('')E) is located at nearly 13 km North-east of Zonguldak city, which is located at the West Black Sea coast in Turkey. The middling products with high ash content of bituminous coals are used in this plant. Seasonal radon concentration measurements have been carried out by using CR-39 plastic track detectors in and around the CTPP. The annual average radon concentration has been found to vary from a minimum of 39.8 +/- 28.9 Bq m(-3) in the ash area to a maximum of approximately 75.0 +/- 15.7 Bq m(-3) in the service building of the power plant. The annual average radon concentration in the dwellings of the thermal power plant colony of the plant is 71.0 +/- 33.4 Bq m(-3). The effective dose has been found to vary from 0.38 to 0.71 mSv y(-1) with a mean value of 0.56 mSv y(-1), which is lower than the effective dose values 3-10 mSv given as the range of action levels recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection: Protection against radon-222 at home and at work, ICRP Publication 65 (1993).

  14. Radon measurements in the Catalagzi Thermal Power Plant, Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aytekin, H.; Bayata, S.; Baldik, R.; Celebi, N. [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey). Dept. of Physics

    2008-01-15

    The Catalagzi Thermal Power Plant (CTPP) is located at nearly 13 km North-east of Zonguldak city, which is located at the West Black Sea coast in Turkey. The middling products with high ash content of bituminous coals are used in this plant. Seasonal radon concentration measurements have been carried out by using CR-39 plastic track detectors in and around the CTPP. The annual average radon concentration has been found to vary from a minimum of 39.8 {+-} 28.9 Bq m{sup -3}) in the ash area to a maximum of about to 75.0 {+-} 15.7 Bq m{sup -3} in the service building of the power plant. The annual average radon concentration in the dwellings of the thermal power plant colony of the plant is 71.0 {+-} 33.4 Bq m{sup -3}. The effective dose has been found to vary from 0.38 to 0.71 mSv y{sup -1} with a mean value of 0.56 mSv y{sup -1}, which is lower than the effective dose values 3-10 mSv given as the range of action levels recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection: Protection against radon-222 at home and at work, ICRP Publication 65 (1993).

  15. Radon measurements with CR-39 track detectors at specific locations in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulug Asiye

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Indoor radon concentration levels at three sites in Turkey were measured using CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors. The annual mean of radon concentration was estimated on the basis of four quarter measurements at specific locations in Turkey. The measuring sites are on the active faults. The results of radon measurements are based on 280 measurements in doors. The annual arithmetic means of radon concentrations at three sites (Isparta Egirdir, and Yalvac were found to be 164 Bqm–3, 124 Bqm–3, and 112 Bqm–3 respectively, ranging from 78 Bqm–3 to 279 Bqm–3. The in door radon concentrations were investigated with respect to the ventilation conditions and the age of buildings. The ventilation conditions were determined to be the main factor affecting the in door radon concentrations. The in door radon concentrations in the new buildings were higher than ones found in the old buildings.

  16. Indoor and soil radon measurements in the Hyblean Foreland (South-East Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Alessandro

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Indoor radon behavior in two sites of SE Sicily was studied as a function of the soil radon concentration. The chosen locations were Ragusa and Modica towns, placed in the Hyblean Plateau (northern margin of the African Plate. Soil samples were analysed by gamma spectrometry to determine the amount of radionuclides. Indoor air and soil gas radon measurements were simultaneously performed in both sites using active detectors. Radon in soil was measured one meter deep. A positive correlation was obtained between indoor radon concentration and the soil gas concentration.

  17. Nuclear traces on solids and concentration measurements of intramural radon; Trazas nucleares en solidos y mediciones de concentracion de radon intramuros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meza L, C. D.; Zendejaz L, B. E.; Vazquez L, C. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional No. 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07360 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J. I. [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)], e-mail: dmeza@fis.cinvestav.mx

    2009-10-15

    The Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency of United States and the European Community, have dedicated very important resources to study and analysis of intramural radon, its effects in public health and on remediation and control actions, trying to obtain lower levels. In Mexico have been organized intramural radon research programs by several institutions. With the proposal to contribute to intramural radon knowledge and its concentration levels in our country, the Dosimetry Applications Project of Physics Institute of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, in collaboration with the Physics Department of Research and Advanced Studies Center, have developed the methodology for intramural radon measurement by nuclear traces on solids. In this work a passive detector is presented for radiation measurement, using polycarbonate (C R-39) as sensitive material to particles alpha, as well as the protocols for the chemical engraving, the automatic reading system and calibration procedures. The results obtained are presented with this method in houses, buildings and work places. These results were compared with other, obtained with dynamic systems and other methodologies used by another research groups. These comparisons have achieve to take a high reliability in our measurements. (Author)

  18. Radon intercomparison measurements 2006 at PSI; Die Vergleichsmessung 2006 fuer Radongasmessgeraete am PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterweck, G.; Schuler, C

    2006-06-15

    Fifteen radon measurement services participated in the 2006 Radon Intercomparison Exercise performed at the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) during March 7th to 21st, 2006. Twelve of these laboratories were approved by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health and their participation in the intercomparison exercise was a requirement to warrant quality of measurements. Radon gas detectors (etched-track, electronic and electret ionisation chambers) and instruments (ionisation chambers and electrostatic precipitation) were exposed in the PSI Radon Chamber in a reference atmosphere with an average radon gas concentration of 1090 Bqm{sup -3} leading to a radon gas exposure of 366 kBqhm{sup -3}. (author)

  19. The efficacy and durability of radon remedial measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cliff, K.D.; Naismith, S.P. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom); Scivyer, C.; Stephen, R. [Building Research Establishment, Watford (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    In the UK, over 16,000 homes, from an estimated 100,000, with annual average radon concentrations exceeding the UK Action Level of 200 Bq.m{sup -3} have been discovered. Some 600 householders who have taken action have sought confirmatory measurements from NRPB. Results for 345 such homes are discussed. A number of remedied homes are being remeasured annually to determine the durability of the remedies: results for the first year follow-up measurements are given. In a separate exercise, homes having the highest radon levels known in the UK have been enrolled in a research programme of the Building Research Establishment. The results for 53 homes in which BRE surveyed, designed and supervised remedial work are presented. (author).

  20. An approach to define potential radon emission level maps using indoor radon concentration measurements and radiogeochemical data positive proportion relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Jean-Philippe; Martel, Richard; Poulin, Patrick; Dessau, Jean-Claude; Lavoie, Denis; Parent, Michel; Lévesque, Benoît

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the first step of a new approach to make a map of radonprone areas showing different potential radon emission levels in the Quebec province. This map is a tool intended to assist the Quebec government in identifying populations with a higher risk of indoor radon gas exposure. This map of radon-prone areas used available radiogeochemical information for the province of Quebec: (1) Equivalent uranium (eU) concentration from airborne surface gamma-ray surveys; (2) uranium concentration measurements in sediments; and (3) bedrock and surficial geology. Positive proportion relationships (PPR) between each individual criterion and the 1417 available basement radon concentrations were demonstrated. It was also shown that those criteria were reliable indicators of radon-prone areas. The three criteria were discretized into 3, 2 and 2 statistically significant different classes respectively. For each class, statistical heterogeneity was validated by Kruskal-Wallis one way analyses of variance on ranks. Maps of radon-prone areas were traced down for each criterion. Based on this statistical study and on the maps of radon-prone areas in Quebec, 18% of the dwellings located in areas with an equivalent uranium (eU) concentration from airborne surface gamma-ray surveys under 0.75 ppm showed indoor radon concentrations above 150 Bq/m3. This percentage increases to 33% when eU concentrations are between 0.75 ppm and 1.25 ppm and exceeds 40% when eU concentrations are above 1.25 ppm. A uranium concentration in sediments above 20 ppm showed an indoor radon concentration geometric mean of 215 Bq/m3 with more than 69% of the dwellings exceeding 150 Bq/m3 or more than 50% of dwellings exceeding the Canadian radon guideline of 200 Bq/m3. It is also shown that the radon emission potential is higher where a uranium-rich bedrock unit is not covered by a low permeability (silt/clay) surficial deposit.

  1. Temperature calibration of Pico-Rad detectors for radon measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bem, H; Bem, E M; Chruścielewski, W; Skalski, H

    2000-01-01

    A simple mathematical equation linking the activity of adsorbed radon in the vials to the time and temperature of its exposure is discussed. The calibration coefficient--Ks, defined as activity measured in cpm after saturation time, corresponding to radon air concentration of 1 Bq m-3, was determined for four temperatures: 284, 291, 294 and 298 K. A linear relationship of ln Ks values versus T-1 was found. The relatively high difference in Ks values: 2.12 and 1.24 cpm/Bq m-3 for the temperatures of 284 and 298 K, respectively, was observed. It indicates that temperature fluctuations during Pico-Rad vial exposure may lead to erroneous results if the constant average temperature of exposure is introduced into a commonly used computer programme for calculating Rn concentration.

  2. Temperature calibration of PICO-RAD detectors for radon measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bem, H.; Bem, E.M.; Chruscielewski, W.; Skalski, H. [Politechnika Lodzka, Lodz (Poland)

    1996-10-01

    A simple mathematical equation linking the activity of adsorbed radon in the vials to the time of its exposure has been discussed. The calibration coefficient K{sub s}, defined as a measured activity in cpm after a saturation time, corresponding to a radon air concentration of 1 Bq m{sup -3} has been determined for four temperatures: 284, 291, 294 and 298 K. A linear relationship of ln K{sub s} values versus T{sup -1} has been found. The relatively high difference in K{sub s} values: 2.12 and 1.24 cpm/Bq m{sup 3} for the temperatures of 284 and 298 K, respectively, was observed. It indicates that temperature fluctuations during Pico-Rad vial exposure may lead to erroneous results if the constant average temperature of exposure is introduced into a commonly used computer program for calculating Rn concentration. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs.

  3. A statistical evaluation of the influence of housing characteristics and geogenic radon potential on indoor radon concentrations in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoury, C; Ielsch, G; Hemon, D; Laurent, O; Laurier, D; Clavel, J; Guillevic, J

    2013-12-01

    Radon-222 is a radioactive natural gas produced by the decay of radium-226, known to be the main contributor to natural background radiation exposure. Effective risk management needs to determine the areas in which the density of buildings with high radon levels is likely to be highest. Predicting radon exposure from the location and characteristics of a dwelling could also contribute to epidemiological studies. Beginning in the nineteen-eighties, a national radon survey consisting in more than 10,000 measurements of indoor radon concentrations was conducted in French dwellings by the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN). Housing characteristics, which may influence radon accumulation in dwellings, were also collected. More recently, the IRSN generated a French geogenic radon potential map based on the interpretation of geological features. The present study analyzed the two datasets to investigate the factors influencing indoor radon concentrations using statistical modeling and to determine the optimum use of the information on geogenic radon potential that showed the best statistical association with indoor radon concentration. The results showed that the variables associated with indoor radon concentrations were geogenic radon potential, building material, year of construction, foundation type, building type and floor level. The model, which included the surrounding geogenic radon potential (i.e. the average geogenic radon potential within a disc of radius 20 km centered on the indoor radon measurement point) and variables describing house-specific factors and lifestyle explained about 20% of the overall variability of the logarithm of radon concentration. The surrounding geogenic radon potential was fairly closely associated with the local average indoor radon concentration. The prevalence of exposure to radon above specific thresholds and the average exposures to radon clearly increased with increasing classes of geogenic radon

  4. Development of the primary measurement standard for gaseous radon-222 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B C; Lee, K B; Park, T S; Lee, J M; Lee, S H; Oh, P J; Lee, M K; Ahn, J K

    2012-09-01

    The Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) has developed a primary system for the activity standardization of gaseous radon-222, based on the defined solid angle counting method. The size of adsorbed radon is determined by a Cyclone Storage Phosphor System, and a buffer chamber is introduced between the measurement chamber and the source for the purpose of gas purification. The measured activity of gaseous radon-222 and its associated measurement uncertainty obtained using the system are presented.

  5. Development of a radon chamber and measurement of the radon solubility in tissues; Entwicklung einer Radonkammer und Messung der Radonloeslichkeit in Gewebe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Andreas

    2015-04-22

    Every year thousands of patients with inflammatory diseases of the musculoskeletal system undergo radon therapy, but the molecular mechanism and the risk of this therapy are not understood. To study the effects of radon exposure in vitro and in vivo we constructed a radon exposure chamber in the framework of the GREWIS project. With this device we are able to expose samples under controlled and reproducible conditions including the radon galleries in Austria and Germany. Adjustable parameters are radon activity-concentration, temperature, humidity and exposure time. These parameters are permanently monitored and controlled. During experiments with cell cultures it is also possible to adjust the CO{sub 2}-concentration. In addition, experiments with mice can be performed with this setup. To measure the radon kinetics in different types of tissue we exposed tissue samples like fat or muscle and mice in the radonchamber. Afterwards we measured the -spectra of the short living radon decay products lead-214 and bismuth-214 in the exposed samples with a HPGe-Detector. We recorded the spectra at different time points after exposure and calculated the initial amount of radon at the end of the exposure period in the sample and investigated the diffusion of the radon out of it. We compared the results from different types of tissue but also activated coal. In an activated coal sample the radon is bound to it via Van-der-Waals-force and the decay spectra are governed by the life time of the bound radon (3,8 days). In contrast in the biological samples the primary radon diffuses out of the samples in less than 20 minutes and the spectra follow the kinetics of the decay of the daughter products. These measurements where performed for the first time under therapy conditions like in radon galleries and also with higher radon concentration. In our experiments we could see an enhanced accumulation of radon and its decay products in fatty tissue compared to muscle tissue. Also in

  6. The Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at PSI; Das Referenzlabor fuer Radongas-Konzentrationsmessungen am PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuler, Christoph

    1998-09-01

    Active or passive radon gas measuring instruments are exposed during intercomparison exercises in the radon chamber of the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Concentration Measurements at Paul Scherrer Institut: The traceability of radon gas measurements to nationally and internationally acknowledged standards is inspected in the reference atmosphere of the chamber with calibrated {sup 222}Rn activity concentration. The use of secondary standards guarantees the traceability of the radon chamber reference atmosphere. Besides the principal secondary standard, a radon gas standard (secondary standard I), a {sup 226}Ra standard solution (secondary standard II) and a {sup 222}Rn emanation standard (secondary standard III) are used. The {sup 222}Rn activity delivered by one of these standards is quantitatively transferred into a reference volume and hence converted to an activity concentration serving for the calibration of a measuring instrument transfer standard consisting of scintillation cell and counter. By this way, the transfer standard calibration is related and traceable to the internationally acknowledged primary standard laboratories National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland (U.S.A.) or National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex (UK). The calibrated transfer standard is then used to calibrate the radon gas activity concentration in the radon chamber. For a single grab sampling determination of the {sup 222}Rn activity concentration in the radon chamber with the transfer standard, the estimation of Type A and Type B uncertainties yields a relative expanded uncertainty (95% confidence level) of minimum 3% for high concentration levels (10 kBqm{sup -3}) and maximum 30% for low concentration levels (0.2 kBqm{sup -3}). Extended evaluations of the reproducibility of calibration factor measurements obtained by calibration of the transfer standard with the secondary standards I, II and III show a very good reproducibility quality

  7. Measurement of airborne radon concentrations at several sites in a radioactivity research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, M; Anzai, I

    1999-06-01

    Radon-222 is a natural, gaseous, radioactive nuclide released from the ground and building materials into the air. Radon and its daughter nuclides can be an important disturbance factor for the measurement of environmental radioactivity. Radon concentrations in air in a radiation laboratory were measured with PICO-RAD detectors, which directly adsorb radon gas on activated charcoal. Generally, radon concentration increased in the absence of ventilation; a high concentration was observed in a radioisotope storage room without ventilation. Concentrations were low in other rooms used for experiments and measurement, which suggests that the radiation control practice in this laboratory is satisfactory and that the influence of natural radon gas on the measurement of radioactivity is negligible.

  8. Radon intercomparison measurements 2004 at PSI; Die Vergleichsmessung 2004 fuer Radongasmessgeraete am PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterweck, G.; Schuler, C

    2004-08-01

    Twelve radon measurement services participated in the 2004 Radon Intercomparison Exercise performed at the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) during March 5{sub th} to 16{sub th}, 2004. Ten of these laboratories were approved by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health and their participation in the intercomparison exercise was a requirement to warrant quality of measurement. Radon gas detectors (etched-track and electret ionisation chambers) and instruments (ionisation chambers and electrostatic precipitation) were exposed in the PSI Radon Chamber in a reference atmosphere with an average radon gas concentration of 5516 Bqm{sup -3} leading to a radon gas exposure of 1458 kBqhm{sup -3}. This exposure was above the measuring range of participating LST electret ionisation chambers. Thus, these detector were exposed for a shorter period leading to a radon gas exposure of 401 kBqhm{sup -3} at an average radon gas concentration of 5538 Bqm{sup -3}. Additional five etched-track detectors of an approved measuring service were purchased by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health for a spot check. Two of these were exposed over the complete exposure interval, two were removed from the exposure chamber together with the LST electret ionisation chambers and another was used as transport detector. The results of these detectors showed an even larger difference to the target value and a larger standard deviation than the detectors submitted for the intercomparison exercise by the measuring service. (author)

  9. False positive and false negative radon measurement results due to uncertainties in seasonal correction factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cliff, K.D.; Miles, J.C.H.; Naismith, S.P. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Data from the UK national survey of radon in 2300 homes has been re-analysed to determine the uncertainty in seasonal correction factors applied to measurements of less than 1 year. The required correction factor for each six-month result was calculated from the known annual average for the appropriate home. The seasonal correction factors derived for each month were found to be approximately log-normally distributed, with an average geometric standard deviation of 1.36. Following this initial survey, radon measurements have been made in more than 80,000 homes in southwest England to determine whether they are above the UK radon Action Level of 2000 Bq.m{sup -3}. The measurements were carried out over three months in each case using etched track detectors in two locations in each home, and the results were corrected for the average seasonal variation found in the original UK study of radon in homes. Because of the uncertainty in the seasonal correction factors, households with between 130 and 300 Bq.m{sup -3} were advised to have a second three-month measurement in a different season before deciding whether or not to take remedial action. More than 7000 homes were remonitored for this purpose. The results are analysed to show the number of false positive and false negative results that would have been reported if advice had been based solely on the initial measurement. It is shown that the present scheme results in extremely small numbers of false positive and false negative results. (author).

  10. An outdoor radon survey and minimizing the uncertainties in low level measurements using CR-39 detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, G A; Pollard, D; Finch, E C

    2014-06-01

    Long term outdoor radon measurements were recorded in Ireland using CR-39 track etch detectors. A measurement protocol was designed for this study, which was optimized for the relatively low radon concentrations expected outdoors. This protocol included pre-etching the detectors before exposure to allow radon tracks to be more easily distinguished from background. The average outdoor radon concentration for the Republic of Ireland was found to be 5.6 ± 0.7 Bq m(-3). A statistically significant difference between inland and coastal radon concentrations was evident but no difference between mean radon concentrations on the east coast and those on the west coast was observed.

  11. Measurements of radon and radium activity in bottled mineral water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappke, Jaqueline; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine N.; Reque, Marilson; Tabuchi, Camila Garcia; Del Claro, Flavia; Perna, Allan Felipe, E-mail: jaquelinekappke@gmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Deniak, Valeriy [Instituto de Pesquisa Pele Pequeno Principe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Current work presents the results of further development of optimized experimental protocol for RAD7 instant radon detector (Durridge Company Inc.) usage in low level radon in water measurements and the results concerning Ra-226 activity evaluation in bottled mineral water samples purchased at Brazilian market. With the purpose to achieve the statistically consistent results for the activity levels of 0.1Bq/L for radon (radium) activity in water, present study used modified experimental protocol which consists of: 1) water samples were stored in hermetically sealed glass vials of 250mL during 30 days to guarantee that Rn-222 will reach the secular equilibrium; 2) the measurements were performed using WAT250 protocol of RAD7 detector; 3) with an aim to decrease the background, the cleaning (activated carbon filter) and drying (DRIERITE desiccant) vessels, which have a function to retain the radioactive decay product of Rn-222 and humidity, were connected to a closed air loop of RAD7 permanently by means of valves and taps, which gave a possibility to repeat all sequence of measurements (including background evaluation) three or four times without to open the air loop and disconnect the sample vial with water. Each water sample was submitted to such measurements two or three times. Obtained results presented the level of Ra-226 activity in studied samples of bottled mineral water that varied from 0.007 ± 0.061 Bq/L to 0.145 ± 0.049 Bq/L, which is below the limit of 0,5 Bq/L established by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2011 for drinking water. (author)

  12. Retrospective assessment of indoor radon exposure by measurements of embedded 210Po activity in glass objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramola, R. C.; Gusain, G. S.; Prasad, Ganesh

    In most of the epidemiological studies contemporary radon measurements have been used as surrogates for radon concentrations in past decades even though changes in radon levels and residence may have occurred. Short-lived radon progeny may deposit on available surfaces in dwellings thus giving rise over time to a build up of long-lived progeny. Airborne radon decay products can be deposited and implanted through alpha recoil into the glass surfaces. On glass surface, activities of 210Po may arise as a result of the decay of recoil implanted activity following the alpha decay of surface deposited 218Po or 214Po. Measurement of 210Po implanted on a household glass is a method that can be employed to retrospectively determine the historic level of radon in dwellings. This method is based on the assumption that levels of recoil implanted 210Po in the glass provide a measure of time integrated radon concentration in the environment in which the glass has been located. The surface deposited activity of the radon progenies, which then become implanted in the glass by alpha recoil, is believed to reflect past exposure to airborne activity. Such retrospective measurements on glass are valuable in estimating the human dose derived from radon during the time of exposure. In this paper an account is given of the principles and some field applications of a retrospective technique, using the alpha track detectors, CR-39 and LR-115, to measure 210Po implanted in glass surfaces (surface traps). By using this CR-LR difference technique, the cumulative radon exposure in a dwelling in past decades may be estimated. This method provides reliable radon exposure data as a support to epidemiological studies concerning the health effects of radon exposure in the living environment.

  13. Evaluating Progress in Radon Control Activities for Lung Cancer Prevention in National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Plans, 2011-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acree, Pascal; Puckett, Mary; Neri, Antonio

    2017-04-04

    Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer among smokers and the leading cause among nonsmokers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) funds every state, seven tribes, seven territories and the District of Columbia to develop formal cancer plans that focus efforts in cancer control. A 2010 review of cancer plans identified radon-related activities in 27 (42%) plans. Since then, 37 coalitions have updated their plans with new or revised cancer control objectives. There has also been recent efforts to increase awareness about radon among cancer coalitions. This study assesses NCCCP grantees current radon activities and changes since the 2010 review. We reviewed all 65 NCCCP grantee cancer plans created from 2005 to 2015 for radon related search terms and categorized plans by radon activities. The program's most recent annual progress report to CDC was also reviewed. We then compared the results from the updated plans with the findings from the 2010 review to assess changes in radon activities among cancer coalitions. Changes in state radon laws between 2010 and 2015 were also assessed. While a number of cancer plans have added or expanded radon-specific activities since 2010, approximately one-third of NCCCP grantees still do not include radon in their cancer plans. Cancer programs can consider addressing radon through partnership with existing radon control programs to further reduce the risk of lung cancer, especially among non-smokers.

  14. Comparative study of short- and long-term indoor radon measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Jarallah, M.I. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: mibrahim@kfupm.edu.sa; Fazal-ur-Rehman,; Abdalla, Khalid [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2008-08-15

    Short-term indoor radon measurements are used widely. Therefore, it is interesting to find out a correlation between these measurements and long-term measurements which reflect a better average radon concentration of individual measurement. To find the correlation between the two measurements of indoor radon concentrations at low radon levels, a study was carried out at 34 locations of King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), Dhahran, Saudi Arabia using active and passive methods. In the short-term active method, a radon gas analyzer (AlphaGUARD) was used for a duration of 24 h in each measurement. In the long-term passive method, CR-39 based radon dosimeters were utilized for a period of 6 months, from January 2006 to June 2006. The short-term active measurements showed that the average, minimum and maximum radon concentrations were 19, 8 and 58Bqm{sup -3}, respectively, with a standard deviation of 8.6Bqm{sup -3}. The long-term passive measurements showed that the average, minimum and maximum radon concentrations were 25, 10 and 67Bqm{sup -3}, respectively, with a standard deviation of 12Bqm{sup -3}. The two measurements showed a poor correlation (R{sup 2}=0.38). The long-term measurements showed on the average higher concentrations by a factor of 1.3.

  15. Mathematical model of radon activity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine N.; Kappke, Jaqueline; Zambianchi, Pedro, E-mail: sergei@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: janine_nicolosi@hotmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Denyak, Valeriy, E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisa Pele Pequeno Principe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Present work describes a mathematical model that quantifies the time dependent amount of {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn altogether and their activities within an ionization chamber as, for example, AlphaGUARD, which is used to measure activity concentration of Rn in soil gas. The differential equations take into account tree main processes, namely: the injection of Rn into the cavity of detector by the air pump including the effect of the traveling time Rn takes to reach the chamber; Rn release by the air exiting the chamber; and radioactive decay of Rn within the chamber. Developed code quantifies the activity of {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn isotopes separately. Following the standard methodology to measure Rn activity in soil gas, the air pump usually is turned off over a period of time in order to avoid the influx of Rn into the chamber. Since {sup 220}Rn has a short half-life time, approximately 56s, the model shows that after 7 minutes the activity concentration of this isotope is null. Consequently, the measured activity refers to {sup 222}Rn, only. Furthermore, the model also addresses the activity of {sup 220}Rn and {sup 222}Rn progeny, which being metals represent potential risk of ionization chamber contamination that could increase the background of further measurements. Some preliminary comparison of experimental data and theoretical calculations is presented. Obtained transient and steady-state solutions could be used for planning of Rn in soil gas measurements as well as for accuracy assessment of obtained results together with efficiency evaluation of chosen measurements procedure. (author)

  16. Effects of air exchange property of passive-type radon-thoron discriminative detectors on performance of radon and thoron measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Y; Janik, M; Sorimachi, A; Ishikawa, T; Tokonami, S

    2012-11-01

    Pairs of diffusion chambers with different air exchange rates are used in a large-scale survey to determine radon and thoron, separately. When they are enclosed in radon-proof bags for keeping after the exposure, since radon does not escape out immediately from the low-diffusion chamber, it leads to further exposure in the bags and disturbs the estimation of radon and thoron concentrations. In this study, the effects of the different air exchange properties of the radon-thoron discriminative detectors with CR-39 chips on the estimations of radon and thoron concentrations were investigated. The commercially available and frequently used detectors, Raduet, are examined in this study. The result shows that radon escapes out in 10 h. When degassing is not enough after the exposure in a calibration experiment or high-background radiation area, the residual radon causes the overestimation of the radon concentration and increase in the uncertainty in the thoron concentration, i.e. a low-performance quality of radon and thoron measurements.

  17. An experimental setup for measuring generation and transport of radon in building materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pal, M.; Hendriks, N.A.; de Meijer, R.J.; van der Graaf, E.R.; de Wit, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    This study describes an approach for measuring and modelling diffusive and advective transport of radon through building materials. The goal of these measurements and model calculations is to improve our understanding concerning the factors influencing the transport of radon through building

  18. Measurements of radon daughter particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knutson, E.O.; George, A.C.; Knuth, R.H.; Koh, B.R. (Department of Energy, New York (USA). Environmental Measurements Lab.)

    1984-01-01

    Measurements using three types and sizes of diffusion batteries and two cascade impactors showed that the particle size distribution of the potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) is usually bimodal. The major mode, comprising 85-100% of the PAEC, is well defined and centred at about 100 nm in diameter. The minor mode, comprising the balance of the PAEC, varies in location from below 5 nm to about 10 nm. The particle size of the minor mode appears to correlate to the 'age' of the /sup 218/Po. The impactor tests conducted showed that < 16% of the PAEC resides on particles > 0.6 ..mu..m in diameter.

  19. Radon measurements by nuclear track detectors in secondary schools in Oke-Ogun region, Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obed, R.I., E-mail: rachelobed@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University of Ibadan, Ibadan (Nigeria); Ademola, A.K. [Department of Physical Sciences, Bells University of Technology, Ota (Nigeria); Vascotto, M. [Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Trieste (Italy); Giannini, G. [The Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Trieste (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Radon measurements were performed in secondary schools in the Oke-Ogun area, South-west, Nigeria, by solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). About seventy CR-39 detectors were distributed in 35 high schools of the Oke-Ogun area. The CR-39 detectors were exposed in the schools for 3 months and then etched in NaOH 6 N solution at 90 deg. C for 3 h. The tracks were counted manually at the microscope and the radon concentration was determined at the Radioactivity Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy. The overall average radon concentration in the surveyed area was 45 {+-} 27 Bq m{sup -3}. The results indicate no radiological health hazard. The research also focused on parameters affecting radon concentrations such as the age of the building in relation to building materials and floor number of the classrooms. The results show that radon concentrations in ground floors are higher than in upper floors. - Highlights: > We measured radon concentration levels in a sample of schools in Oke-Ogun, Nigeria. > We analyzed the main factors that affect indoor radon levels. > Dependence of radon concentrations on floor levels confirmed the influence of soil as main source of indoor radon.

  20. Measurement of simulated lung deposition of radon daughters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonassen, N.; Jensen, B. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Lab. of Applied Physics 3)

    1992-01-01

    A measurement system for the lung deposition of radon daughters based on respiratory models was suggested by Hopke et al. By choosing suitable mesh size and flow velocities it is possible to design a multiple-wire screen sampler simulating deposition in the respiratory tract of aerosols over the size range 0.5-1000 nm. This paper describes a preliminary investigation where simulated deposition in the nasal tract and in the bronchii (for mouth breathing as well as nasal breathing) is determined. The measurements were performed in atmospheres where the normalised exposure rate (equilibrium factor) was varied by changing the aerosol loading of the air as well as by enhanced electrostatic plateout. The general results of the measurements are that the energy deposited in the nose with nasal breathing and in the bronchii with mouth breathing varies as the calculated dose while the energy deposited in the bronchii with nasal breathing follows the exposure. It is also demonstrated that the energy deposited for a fixed value of the radon concentration may vary by a factor of 2-7 depending on the treatment of the air. (author).

  1. Measurement of radon concentration in water by means of {alpha}, {gamma} spectrometry. Radon concentration in ground and spring water in Hiroshima Prefecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Radon ({sup 222}Rn, T{sub 1/2}=3.8235{+-}0.0003d) is {alpha}-ray releasing nuclide, so that it can not be detected by {gamma}-ray measurement. But, the daughter nuclides {sup 214}Pb (T{sub 1/2}=26.8 min) and {sup 214}Bi (T{sub 1/2}=19.9 min) release {gamma}-ray, accordingly they are measured by Ge detector. Their radioactive equilibrium is kept in the closed vessel, because their half-lives are shorter than that of radon. We developed a measurement method of radon concentration by means of {gamma}-spectrometry. We applied this method to catch radon in the atmosphere by active carbon. The same principle can be applied to radon in water. Radon concentrations in the ground water were measured in 22 points in the Higashi-Hiroshima city and 82 points in the Hiroshima prefecture. The efficiencies of {gamma}-ray were determined. The radon concentration showed between 11 and 459 Bq/l and the average was 123 Bq/l. The high concentration of radon was distributed in the spring of granitic layer and higher concentration of radon were observed in the ground water of fault. (S.Y.)

  2. Measurements on, and modelling of diffusive and advective radon transport in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, E.R. van der; Witteman, G.A.A.; Spoel, W.H. van der;

    1994-01-01

    Results are presented of measurements on radon transport in soil under controlled conditions with a laboratory facility consisting of a stainless steel vessel (height and diameter 2 m) filled with a uniform column of sand. At several depths under the sand surface, probes are radially inserted...... into the vessel to measure the radon concentration in the soil gas. To study advective radon transport a perforated circular box is placed in the sand close to the bottom of the vessel. By pressurising this box, an air flow through the sand column is induced. Radon concentration profiles were measured without...... an air flow as a function of time, and for several values of the air flow, equilibrium radon concentration profiles were measured....

  3. Evaluation of the open vial method in the radon measurement; Evaluacion del metodo del vial abierto en la medicion de radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez del Rio, H.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F., E-mail: hlopezdelrio@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The open vial method is a simple technique, under-utilized but that take advantage of the great radon solubility in organic solvents, therefore applies in the measurement of the radon concentration exhaled in soil. The method consists on the exposition to the gas radon of an open vial with scintillating solution. An integral mathematical model for indoors that describes the emanation processes and gas radon exhalation was developed, as well as the radon dissolution in the scintillation liquid, besides obtaining the characteristic parameters of the experimental system proposed for the radon concentration calculation exhaled by soils. Two experimental arrangements were designed with exposition cameras of 12 and 6 L and quantity of different soil. The open vial was prepared with a mixture of 8 ml of deionized water and 12 ml of scintillation liquid OptiPhase Hi Safe 3 in polyethylene vials; the measurements of the dissolved radon were carried out in scintillation liquid equipment. As a result, on average 2.0% of the exhaled radon is dissolved in the open vial and the dissolved fraction is independent of the experimental arrangement. Also was observed that the exposition time does not affect the radon dissolution significantly, in correspondence with the reported in the literature. (Author)

  4. Indoor radon measurements in Kosovo and Metohija over the period 1995-2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milic, Gordana [Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Pristina, Lole Ribara 29, 28000 Kosovska Mitrovica (Serbia); Yarmoshenko, Ilia V., E-mail: ivy@ecko.uran.r [Institute of Industrial Ecology, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Jakupi, Bajram [Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Pristina, Lole Ribara 29, 28000 Kosovska Mitrovica (Serbia); Kovacevic, Milojko; Zunic, Zora S. [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Science, Mike Alasa St., 12-14, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2011-01-15

    The paper deals with the results of the investigations of indoor radon measurements in more than 300 rural and urban dwellings in Kosovo and Metohija. All measurements were carried out using CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors by similar protocols and within two series in 1990-s and in 2000-s, in 34 settlements divided by 9 regions, thus covering significant part of Kosovo. For most of measured points the adjustment for seasonal variation was necessary and had been conducted. Highest average values of indoor radon concentrations were found in rural settlements of Lipljan and Vitina regions, 512 and 452 Bq/m{sup 3}, respectively. Combined analysis allows indoor radon concentration of 220 Bq/m{sup 3} to be suggested as representative estimate for Kosovo, while additional data appear. Observed pattern of indoor radon seasonal variation and difference of radon levels between ground and upper floors suggest soil radon as primary source of indoor radon and significance of convection type radon entry.

  5. Measurement of radon in ground waters of the Western Caucasus for seismological application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevinsky, I; Tsvetkova, T; Nevinskaya, E

    2015-11-01

    Results of radon ((222)Rn) concentration measurement in ground waters in the Western Caucasus are described. In 2010-2011 each day at 12:00 Moscow winter time (9:00 GMT) sampling in volume of 0.5 l of waters was carried out in two wells at depth of 30 m and 180 m. In 2012 three times per day (7:00, 12:00, 17:00) this sampling was already carried out. Radon from water was extracting by degassing method with use of bubbler. Measurements of alpha activity of gas in scintillation (ZnS) chambers were done. The water radon data with seismic, meteorological and the Sun-Lunar data were compared. The mathematical method of definition of "splashes" in radon data before regional earthquakes is considered. The greatest probability in 72% of the forecast of regional earthquakes for the data from a well of 30 m depth was received. Correlation between meteo and radon data is absent. Correlation of lunar phases and solar activity with radon data is discussed. In July-December, 2012 sampling of water from 15 wells and measurements of radon were carried out. The distance between wells was near 50 km. Changes of radon maps in territory of South Russia during earthquakes are shown.

  6. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detector CR-39 for radon measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Marcia Pires de; Martins, Elaine Wirney [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: mpcampos@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) are widely used for radon measurements and CR-39 is one of the most popular SSNTD. In this work it was determined the calibration factor for radon concentration measurements through the passive method with CR-39 detectors. The detectors were put in a proper device (an adapted Lucas cell) and exposed to the standard radon concentration through the Pylon Model RN-150 flow through radon gas source. After exposure, the detectors were etched for 5.5 hours in a KOH solution at 80 deg C in a bath at a constant temperature. The track density was read in an Axiolab-Zeiss optical microscope, with nominal magnification of X10 connected to a video camera and to a personal computer. The calibration factor was obtained through the relation between standard radon concentration, track density and exposure time. (author)

  7. Seasonal variation measurements of radon levels in caves using SSNTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: espinosa@fisica.unam.mx; Golzarri, J.I. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Gammage, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6480 (United States); Sajo-Bohus, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Simon Bolivar (Venezuela); Viccon-Pale, J.; Signoret-Poillon, M. [El Hombre y su Ambiente, UAM-Xochimilco, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-08-15

    The results of radon concentration measurements inside of the Gabriel caves of Mexico, during three consecutive two-month periods covering almost three seasons, are reported in the present work. The radio-ecological importance of this site is related to the radon and its concentration-dynamic behavior in the cave. Further interest in radiation safety motivated this initiative since routine biological field work is done, with people spending long periods of time there. CR-39 passive nuclear track detector was chosen for this survey. Radon concentration levels decrease during the rainy season and show different values depending on the ventilation and geometeorological structure. Measured values range between 956 and 4931Bqm{sup -3}, an indication that radon doses may exceed the allowed values for workers. This project is part of a larger study of indoor radon alpha emitters in Mexican caves.

  8. Application of pulse decay discrimination liquid scintillation counting for indoor radon measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bem, H.; Ostrowska, M.; Bem, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    The pulse decay discrimination (PDD) liquid scintillation technique has been applied to optimise radon counting by the Pico-Rad method. A dermination limit (with 10% relative error) of 4.8 Bqm-3 for indoor radon measurement has been achieved for optimal PDD setting with a radon elution cocktail containing 20% (v/v) of Ultima Gold AB in Instafluor. From a practical point of view this procedure allows a shortening of the counting time to 1 hour after 48 hours exposure to detectors. This method has been applied to indoor radon determinations in 626 places (municipal offices and private dwellings) in the Lódz region. These measureents resulted in an average concentration of 21.4 Bqm-3 and a median value of 15.1 Bqm-3. Analysis of the data indicates that most indoor radon comes from the underlying soil, which contains relatively little226Ra (10-20 Bqkg-1).

  9. Radon measurements in soil and water and its relation with geology, Garhwal Himalaya, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choubey, V.M. [Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology, Dehra Dun (India)

    1998-12-31

    Radon concentrations were measured in soil and spring water in the Garhwal Himalaya using radon emanometer. The measurements were made in the Berinag, Bhatwari and Munsiari Formations. The main rock types in the area are sheared granitic gneiss, porphyritic gneiss, chlorite schist, mica schist, mylonite, slate, phyllite, quartzite and metabasic. The radon concentrations were found to vary from 1.2 kBq/m{sup 3} to 56.5 kBq/m{sup 3} in soil and 0.4 Bq/l to 887 Bq/l in water. The results suggest that the radon emanation is controlled not only by uranium content of the rock and soil but also by structural zones (thrust, fault, etc.) which help in the easy migration of radon from the deeper parts of the earth crust. (author)

  10. The influence of thoron on measurement results of radon exhalation rate

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao De Tao; Ling Qiu; Leung, J K C

    2002-01-01

    Because of thoron exhalation, the measurement results of radon exhalation rate using a local still method is usually larger than the true value of radon flux rate of the monitored material surface. The influence of sup 2 sup 1 sup 6 Po(ThA) on radon exhalation rate can be eliminated for sensitive radon monitors. Theoretical evaluations of the influence of sup 2 sup 1 sup 2 Bi(ThC) and sup 2 sup 1 sup 2 Po(ThC')on radon exhalation rate are carried out in a sampler with diameter of 188 mm, and height of 125 mm, and supplied electrostatic field inside (generated by high voltage and electret) under following conditions: the sampling time are 1, 2, 3 h, respectively, thoron exhalation rate is 100 times of radon's. The calculation results indicate that the measurement results of radon flux rate are possibly 35.5% larger than true value due to the influence of thoron for fast and multifunctional radon monitors with electret, high voltage, respectively and using CR-39 SSNTD as detector, but this influence is negligib...

  11. Study of radon dispersion in typical dwelling using CFD modeling combined with passive-active measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabi, R.; Oufni, L.

    2017-10-01

    Inhalation of radon (222Rn) and its decay products are a major source of natural radiation exposure. It is known from recent surveys in many countries that radon and its progeny contribute significantly to total inhalation dose and it is fairly established that radon when inhaled in large quantity causes lung disorder. Indoor air conditions and ventilation systems strongly influence the indoor radon concentration. This study focuses on investigating both numerically and experimentally the influence of environmental conditions on the indoor radon concentration and spatial distribution. The numerical results showed that ventilation rate, temperature and humidity have significant impacts on both radon content and distribution. The variations of radon concentration with the ventilation, temperature and relative humidity are discussed. The measurement results show the diurnal variations of the indoor radon concentration are found to exhibit a positive correlation with relative humidity and negatively correlate with the air temperature. The analytic solution is used to validate the numeric results. The comparison amongst analytical, numerical and measurement results shows close agreement.

  12. Development of radon {center_dot} thoron exhalation measuring system and its application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saegusa, Jun; Yamasaki, Keizo; Yoshimoto, Takaaki; Okamoto, Kenichi; Tsujimoto, Tadashi [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Shimo, Michikuni

    1995-02-01

    As representative methods to determine radon/thoron exhalation rate from the surface of ground, we have used `accumulation method`, `adsorption method` or `vertical profile method`. These methods, however, are complicated in their procedures and not always measure radon/thoron activities directly. To make up for these weakness, we developed a radon/thoron exhalation in-situ measuring system with large-sized ZnS(Ag) scintillator. This system is basically composed of, skirt part which covers the ground, scintillation detector (30cmx40cm), light guide, photomultiplier tube, digital ratemeter, recorder (hand-held computer) and printer. The nuclides which accumulate in the skirt and contribute to counts are {sup 222}Rn, {sup 218}Po, and {sup 214}Po in the U-series, {sup 220}Rn, {sup 216}Po, in the Th-series. Each count due to radon and thoron can be distinguished from the difference of half time. We can assess exhalation rates readily and speedy using the counts of alpha particles from these nuclides. The calibration of the system was performed by the comparison with the accumulation method or the `flow method`. We applied this system on the spot located at Tsuruga district of Fukui prefecture in Japan. Radon/thoron concentrations at this spot is very high. To investigate the source of radon we used this system and the PICO-RAD system, and the relation between radon concentrations and radon exhalation rates will be reported. (author).

  13. Radon-thoron measurements in air and soil from some districts of northern part of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Nisha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radon, thoron and their progenies in the indoor environment are considered as one of the health hazards. The alpha emitting nature of these gases made it possible to detect in indoor environment with the help of nuclear track detector techniques. The soil is the main source of indoor radon as it contains varying amounts of uranium and thorium. Thus the exhalation of radon from soil and its environmental activity needs to be studied. In the present study, the measurement of the indoor radon-thoron from the indoor environment and exhalation from soil are carried out using solid state nuclear track detector technique from Sirsa and Bhiwani districts of northern part of India. The canister technique was used to measure the radon ex- halation rate from the soil samples collected from the study area and pinhole based radon-thoron dosimeters were used to measure indoor radon and thoron concentration. The results show that indoor radon concentration varied from 9 to 28 Bq/m3, with an average of 18.9 Bq/m3 and from 5 to 21 Bq/m3, with an average of 13.8 Bq/m3, for Bhiwani and Sirsa, respectively. Similarly, thoron concentration varied from 14 to 48 Bq/m3, with average of 28.9 Bq/m3 and 27 to 54 Bq/m3, with the average of 39.0 Bq/m3, for Bhiwani and Sirsa, respectively. The mass exhalation rates from soil samples were also measured, to estimate their contribution to indoor radon. A correlation study was carried out between soil exhalation rates and indoor radon concentration.

  14. Indoor radon measurements in dwellings and other buildings in the metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Talita de Oliveira [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: talitaolsantos@yahoo.com.br; Rocha, Zildete [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Quimica e Radioquimica]. E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    Radon is a radioactive noble gas derived from the natural decay series of {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 232}Th, which are present in rocks and soils. By diffusion and convection, radon migrates from the rocks and soils to the surface and through fissures, pipes and holes it may enter the dwellings and other buildings. Another important indoor radon source is the building material construction. Therefore, it may accumulate indoor environments with reduced ventilation rates. Radon progeny attach to the aerosol particle in the air. The attached and unattached radon progeny may deposit in the lungs and irradiate to the lung tissue as they decay. Radon has been recognized as a radiation hazard, that causes excess of lung cancer among underground miners and there is an evidence that radon is also a heath hazard in dwellings and other indoor environments. Radon accounts for about half of all human exposure to natural radiation. Radon concentration measurements were carried out in dwellings, schools and shopping centers in the Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte - RMBH. Most part of the inhabitants of the RMBH lives over the granitic gneissic complex, which has a variable depth out coming in some areas. For the radon concentration measurement continuous detectors, AlphaGUARD PQ2000PRO, RAD7 and Pylon Lucas Cells were used and, for Potential Alpha Energy Concentration-PAEC measurement a solid state alpha spectroscope, the DOSEman PRO was used. The experiments showed that most results are below 50 Bqm{sup -3} (mean+3{sigma}). This value is bellowing the action levels of the USEPA, ICRP and others, which varies in the range from 148 to 200 Bqm{sup -3}. The values are in the low range, as it was expected for a tropical climate. (author)

  15. RADON DIAGNOSTIC MEASUREMENT GUIDANCE FOR LARGE BUILDINGS - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses the development of radon diagnostic procedures and mitigation strategies applicable to a variety of large non-residential buildings commonly found in Florida. The investigations document and evaluate the nature of radon occurrence and entry mechanisms for rad...

  16. RADON DIAGNOSTIC MEASUREMENT GUIDANCE FOR LARGE BUILDINGS - VOLUME 2. APPENDICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses the development of radon diagnostic procedures and mitigation strategies applicable to a variety of large non-residential buildings commonly found in Florida. The investigations document and evaluate the nature of radon occurrence and entry mechanisms for rad...

  17. Improved mixing height monitoring through a combination of lidar and radon measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Griffiths

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface-based radon (222Rn measurements can be combined with lidar backscatter to obtain a higher quality time series of mixing height within the planetary boundary layer (PBL than is possible from lidar alone, and a more quantitative measure of mixing height than is possible from only radon. The reason why lidar measurements are improved is that there are times when lidar signals are ambiguous, and reliably attributing the mixing height to the correct aerosol layer presents a challenge. By combining lidar with a mixing length scale derived from a time series of radon concentration, automated and robust attribution is possible during the morning transition.

    Radon measurements provide mixing information during the night, but concentrations also depend on the strength of surface emissions. After processing radon in combination with lidar, we obtain nightly measurements of radon emissions and are able to normalise the mixing length scale for changing emissions. After calibration with lidar, the radon-derived equivalent mixing height agrees with other measures of mixing on daily and hourly timescales and is a potential method for studying intermittent mixing in nocturnal boundary layers.

  18. Measurements of indoor radon concentrations in Chaiya and Tha Chana districts, Surat Thani province, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titipornpun, K.; Titipornpun, A.; Sola, P.; Bhongsuwan, T.

    2015-05-01

    Chaiya and Tha Chana districts of Surat Thani province are located in the areas with high levels of equivalent uranium at the ground surface, which have been identified as sources of radon. A survey measurement of indoor radon concentrations was carried out in 248 houses, using CR-39 detectors in closed cups. The geometric mean of indoor radon concentrations in Chaiya and Tha Chana districts were 26 ± 2 Bq·m-3 and 30 ± 2 Bq·m-3, respectively. Although the minimum radon concentration was 4 Bq·m-3 in both locations, the maximum radon concentration was found to be 159 Bq·m-3 in Tha Chana district, while it was 88 Bq·m-3 in Chaiya district. The level of radon concentrations above the action level (148 Bq·m-3) recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency was only found in two houses, which accounted for 1% of the total buildings surveyed in this present study. The majority of houses, which accounted for 94% of the total buildings surveyed, showed the radon concentration below the action level. As these houses had access to air flow during the daytime through open doors and windows, it is likely that such ventilation was sufficient to keep radon at a low concentration.

  19. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-04-01

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009–2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of 50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes.

  20. Soil radon measurements as a potential tracer of tectonic and volcanic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Marco; Ferrera, Elisabetta; Giammanco, Salvatore; Currenti, Gilda; Cirrincione, Rosolino; Patanè, Giuseppe; Zanon, Vittorio

    2016-04-15

    In Earth Sciences there is a growing interest in studies concerning soil-radon activity, due to its potential as a tracer of numerous natural phenomena. Our work marks an advance in the comprehension of the interplay between tectonic activity, volcanic eruptions and gas release through faults. Soil-radon measurements, acquired on Mt. Etna volcano in 2009-2011, were analyzed. Our radon probe is sensitive to changes in both volcanic and seismic activity. Radon data were reviewed in light of the meteorological parameters. Soil samples were analyzed to characterize their uranium content. All data have been summarized in a physical model which identifies the radon sources, highlights the mechanism of radon transport and envisages how such a mechanism may change as a consequence of seismicity and volcanic events. In the NE of Etna, radon is released mainly from a depth of 50 m/day. Three periods of anomalous gas release were found (February 2010, January and February 2011). The trigger of the first anomaly was tectonic, while the second and third had a volcanic origin. These results mark a significant step towards a better understanding of the endogenous mechanisms that cause changes in soil-radon emission at active volcanoes.

  1. The status quo of radon concentrations and mitigation measures in underground working places of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaoyan; ZHENG Baoshan; WANG Yan; WANG Xue

    2005-01-01

    By using solid-state nuclear detectors, the air radon concentrations at 87 underground working places were measured during spring, summer and winter, respectively. The survey covered 23 cities whose annual radon concentrations range from 14.9 to 246.4 Bq·m -3 with an overall arithmetic mean value of 106.7 Bq·m -3. The average annual effective dose received by people working in these underground working places was 1.6 mSv, hence the lifetime fatality risk was 1.2×10 -4. Fujian Province had the highest radon level during the survey. It is better to reduce the radon concentration heavily in summer because of higher radon concentration than in winter.

  2. Comparison of seasonal variability in European domestic radon measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Groves-Kirkby

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of published data characterising seasonal variability of domestic radon concentrations in Europe and elsewhere shows significant variability between different countries and between regions where regional data is available. Comparison is facilitated by application of the Gini Coefficient methodology to reported seasonal variation data. Overall, radon-rich sedimentary strata, particularly high-porosity limestones, exhibit high seasonal variation, while radon-rich igneous lithologies demonstrate relatively constant, but somewhat higher, radon concentrations. High-variability regions include the Pennines and South Downs in England, Languedoc and Brittany in France, and especially Switzerland. Low-variability high-radon regions include the granite-rich Cornwall/Devon peninsula in England, and Auvergne and Ardennes in France, all components of the Devonian-Carboniferous Hercynian belt.

  3. A theoretical study of radon measurement with activated charcoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikezić, Dragoslav; Urošević, Vlade

    1998-02-01

    Diffusion of radon in a bed of activated charcoal is described by diffusion equations. An analytical solution of these equations is presented for the case of constant radon concentration in the atmosphere. The solutions are given separately for short term and long term exposure. An analytical form of the calibration constant f for long term exposure and constant radon concentration in air, was found to be f=kp {D}/{λ}S {sinh{λ}/{D}l }/{cosh{λ}/{D}l } A numerical method and computer code based on the method of finite elements is developed for the case of variable radon concentration in air. This program simulates radon adsorption by the activated charcoal bed, enabling determination of sensitivity. The dependence of sensitivity on different parameters, such as temperature, thickness of the charcoal, etc. was studied using this program.

  4. Radon measurements during the building of a low-level laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Antanasijevic, R; Bikit, I; Banjanac, R; Dragic, A; Joksimovic, D; Krmpotic, D; Udovicic, V; Vukovic, J

    1999-01-01

    Radon measurements were provided during the different stages of building of a low-level laboratory in Belgrade. The depth of the laboratory is 12 m, equivalent to 30 m of water with an area of 45 m sup 2. The whole of the laboratory is hermetically lined with 1 mm A1 foil and is ventilated with filtered air. Radon concentrations were measured with the CR-39 detector as well as via the gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements. The radon concentrations in the air were achieved to 20 Bqm sup - sup 3 and reduction of secondary and tertiary cosmic-ray fluxes is five times when ventilation, filtering and sealing was applied.

  5. Measurements of 222Rn and 220Rn with a Large Size Collector of Radon Progeny

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Qifan; Jia Wenyi; Fang Fang; Wang Jun; Cheng Jianping; Liu Guilin; Zhu Li

    2003-01-01

    Radon concentrations in high background radiation areas in the south are higher than those of others in China, especially 220Rn concentration is significantly high. Therefore, measurements of 222Rn and 220 Rn concentrations should be carried out there. This paper introduces a large size collector of radon progeny and its applications. The collector is a sheet of polyvinyl chloride fiber with electrostatics of (-500 V) - ( -700 V). Its size (60 mm in diameter) is larger than those of others (26 mm in diameter) that work with the same principle. The collector is more effective to adsorb radon progeny than most of others. The equipment of ZnS(Ag) Scintillation Counting System is available for large size collectors to detect radon progeny. Therefore, its sensitivity of measurement is higher than that of others.According to the different half lives of radon progeny, and based on both theory and experiments, a formula for discrimination and calculation of 222 Rn and 220Rn concentrations is deduced. The 222Rn and 220Rn concentrations were surveyed with electrostatic collectors of radon progeny on the campus of com-mercial school and some other areas in Hainan, southern China. Neither 222Rn nor 220Rn concentration was found significantly high. However, several faults underground were delineated. The collector is also used to study radon transportation. Results indicate that radon changes regularly with date when it has transported for a certain distance. Velocities of radon migration in the four media are quite different.Radon migrates more quickly in vertical tube than in the horizontal tube.

  6. Indoor radon measurements in the uranium regions of Poli and Lolodorf, Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saïdou; Abdourahimi; Tchuente Siaka, Y F; Bouba, O

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this work is to carry out indoor radon measurements in the uranium regions of Poli and Lolodorf in which lie the uranium deposits of Kitongo and Lolodorf, prior to their impending exploitation. The indoor radon concentration was measured in 103 and 50 dwellings located respectively in Poli and Lolodorf using E-PERM electret chamber detectors. Indoor radon distributions in Poli and Lolodorf follow the lognormal law. Radon concentrations range respectively in Poli and Lolodorf between 29 and 2240 Bq m(-3) and 24-4390 Bq m(-3) with corresponding median values of 165 Bq m(-3) and 331 Bq m(-3). Corresponding arithmetic and geometric means are respectively 294 Bq m(-3) and 200 Bq m(-3) for the uranium region of Poli, 687 Bq m(-3) and 318 Bq m(-3) for the uranium region of Lolodorf. For the uranium region of Poli, 80% of dwellings have radon concentration above the reference level of 100 Bq m(-3) and 20% of dwellings show a radon concentration above 300 Bq m(-3). For the uranium region of Lolodorf, 80% of dwellings have radon concentration above 100 Bq m(-3) and 50% of dwellings show a radon concentration above 300 Bq m(-3). Thus radon monitoring and mitigation plan are required to better protect people against harmful effects of radon.

  7. Radium concentration and radon exhalation measurements using LR-115 type II plastic track detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, A.; Naqvi, A. H.; Srivastava, D. S.

    1995-12-01

    The “Track-Etch” technique using LR-115 type II plastic track detectors has been employed for measuring the radium content and radon exhalation rates of different types of building materials. Among the eight materials studied it was found that fine aggregates (Badarpur) show the greatest radon exhalation, whereas portland cement produces minimum values of radon exhalation. Experimentally-measured values of the “effective radium content” (in Bq kg-1) their “mass exhalation” rates (in Bq kg-1d-1) and “surface exhalation” rates (in Bq m-2d-1 ) are reported.

  8. Inter-comparison of radon detectors for one to four week measurement periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, G A; Murray, M; Long, S C; Foley, M J; Finch, E C

    2016-03-01

    Seven different types of radon detectors (Atmos 12 dpx, RAD7, RStone, Sun Nuclear 1028, Ramon 2.2, Canary and CR-39) were compared for exposure periods of 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks. The comparison was conducted under two conditions: (a) in a purpose-built radon chamber with an average radon concentration of 2560 Bq m(-3) (b) in a home environment with a radon concentration of 57 Bq m(-3), in both cases measured by the reference detector (Atmos 12 dpx) with a  ±10% uncertainty range. In (a) 5 out of 8 detectors recorded radon concentrations within the Atmos uncertainty range and all detectors recorded within  ±15%; in (b) 3 out of 9 detectors recorded within the Atmos uncertainty range and 6 out of 9 measured within  ±20%, for a 4 week measurement. The results from this study show that radon surveys can be conducted for shorter periods than the recommended 3 months where a rapid indication is needed of whether the radon concentration is above the reference level, such as when assessing the concentration during and after remediation work.

  9. Radon monitoring and hazard prediction in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elio, Javier; Crowley, Quentin; Scanlon, Ray; Hodgson, Jim; Cooper, Mark; Long, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas which forms as a decay product from uranium. It is the largest source of natural ionizing radiation affecting the global population. When radon is inhaled, its short-lived decay products can interact with lung tissue leading to DNA damage and development of lung cancer. Ireland has among the highest levels of radon in Europe and eighth highest of an OECD survey of 29 countries. Every year some two hundred and fifty cases of lung cancer in Ireland are linked to radon exposure. This new research project will build upon previous efforts of radon monitoring in Ireland to construct a high-resolution radon hazard map. This will be achieved using recently available high-resolution airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (radiometric) and soil geochemistry data (http://www.tellus.ie/), indoor radon concentrations (http://www.epa.ie/radiation), and new direct measurement of soil radon. In this regard, legacy indoor radon concentrations will be correlated with soil U and Th concentrations and other geogenic data. This is a new approach since the vast majority of countries with a national radon monitoring programme rely on indoor radon measurements, or have a spatially limited dataset of soil radon measurements. Careful attention will be given to areas where an indicative high radon hazard based on geogenic factors does not match high indoor radon concentrations. Where such areas exist, it may imply that some parameter(s) in the predictive model does not match that of the environment. These areas will be subjected to measurement of radon soil gas using a combination of time averaged (passive) and time dependant (active) measurements in order to better understand factors affecting production, transport and accumulation of radon in the natural environment. Such mapping of radon-prone areas will ultimately help to inform when prevention and remediation measures are necessary, reducing the radon exposure of the population. Therefore, given

  10. Comparative study of various techniques for environmental radon, thoron and progeny measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramola, R C; Prasad, Mukesh; Rawat, Mukesh; Dangwal, Anoop; Gusain, G S; Mishra, Rosaline; Sahoo, S K; Tokonami, S

    2015-11-01

    Long-term average concentrations of radon, thoron and progeny were measured in normal and high background radiation areas in India using different techniques. Radon, thoron and progeny concentrations were measured using Raduet, Pin-Hole dosimeter, deposition-based CR-39 and deposition-based direct radon/thoron progeny sensor (DRPS/DTPS) detector system. All these techniques were used at a same time inside an individual dwelling. Radon concentration was recorded higher than thoron concentration in Garhwal Homes (NBRA) while thoron concentration was found relatively higher in the houses of Chhatarpur area (HBRA) in Odisha, India. The values measured with the CR-39 detector-based technique were found comparable with the values measured with the LR-115 detector-based technique. The comparisons of results using various techniques and their usefulness in radiation measurements are discussed in detail.

  11. Radon measurements with charcoal canisters temperature and humidity considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović Miloš Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radon testing by using open-faced charcoal canisters is a cheap and fast screening method. Many laboratories perform the sampling and measurements according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency method - EPA 520. According to this method, no corrections for temperature are applied and corrections for humidity are based on canister mass gain. The EPA method is practiced in the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences with recycled canisters. In the course of measurements, it was established that the mass gain of the recycled canisters differs from mass gain measured by Environmental Protection Agency in an active atmosphere. In order to quantify and correct these discrepancies, in the laboratory, canisters were exposed for periods of 3 and 4 days between February 2015 and December 2015. Temperature and humidity were monitored continuously and mass gain measured. No significant correlation between mass gain and temperature was found. Based on Environmental Protection Agency calibration data, functional dependence of mass gain on humidity was determined, yielding Environmental Protection Agency mass gain curves. The results of mass gain measurements of recycled canisters were plotted against these curves and a discrepancy confirmed. After correcting the independent variable in the curve equation and calculating the corrected mass gain for recycled canisters, the agreement between measured mass gain and Environmental Protection Agency mass gain curves was attained. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III43009: New Technologies for Monitoring and Protection of Environment from Harmful Chemical Substances and Radiation Impact

  12. Measurement of short-lived radon progenies by simultaneous alpha gamma-spectrometry at the German radon reference chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, A; Honig, A; Sulima, T; Buchholz, A; Keyser, U

    1999-01-01

    In the German radon reference chamber, the short-lived radon progenies are separated by a sample tube according to the attached or unattached fraction, while their activity concentration is afterwards measured by simultaneous alpha- and gamma-spectrometry. The results are expressed by the equilibrium factor F and the unattached fraction f sub p (International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP Publication 50, Ann. ICRP 17 (1987) 1). Both F and f sub p , can be therefore studied with respect to the full set of environmental parameters, e.g. temperature, humidity, air pressure and aerosol concentration (Honig et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 416 (1998) 525). Up to now, well-defined and stable equilibrium factors in the interval from 0.1 to 1.0 have been established. In correlation with this, the unattached fraction can be varied from 0.01 to 0.9. The sample and measuring technique for the short-lived radon progenies described in this work is the basis for fundamental studies with regard to the equilibr...

  13. Consideration of tidal influences in determining measurement periods when monitoring built-environment radon levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crockett, R.G.M.; Phillips, P.S. [Northampton Univ., School of Applied Sciences (United Kingdom); Gillmore, G.K. [Bradford Univ., School of Archaeological, Geographical and Environmental Sciences (United Kingdom); Denman, A.R.; Groves-Kirkby, C.J. [Northampton General Hospital, Medical Physics Dept. (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Using three hourly-sampling continuous radon monitors, deployed at separate locations in and around the town of Northampton, UK, during the period May 2002 to September 2005, evidence has been identified of tidal influences on built environment radon levels. The data-sets from these deployments, together with additional data-sets collected from a house in Devon, UK, over the period May 1994 to October 1996, and made available by the UK Building Research Establishment, have been analysed using a number of analytical techniques, including a novel cortion technique developed during the investigation. Radon concentration levels in all of the investigated sites exhibit cyclic variation with a period of approximately 14-15 days, equivalent to the spring-tide interval, and lag the corresponding new and full moons by varying periods. The tide/radon lag interval for the two public-sector buildings changes abruptly in September/October, indicating that a significant characteristic of these buildings changes at this time. For domestic properties, the lag is relatively unchanged during the year, but is greater in Devon, in the South-West of England, than in Northampton, in the English East Midlands. These differences are attributed to location relative to coastlines (the South-West experiences greater tidal-loading than the Midlands), underlying geology and rock/soil hydration. Depending on its position within the local 14 to 15-day tidally-induced radon cycle, an individual 7-day radon measurement may yield an erroneous estimate of longer term average levels, up to 46% higher or lower than the average level for one of the reported data-sets. Thus a building with a mean radon concentration below the local Action Level could appear to be unsafe if measured around a tidal-cyclic radon maximum: conversely, a building with a mean radon concentration above the Action Level could appear to be safe when measured around a tidal-cyclic radon minimum. A minimum radon-measurement period

  14. Real-time setup to measure radon emission during rock deformation: implications for geochemical surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuccimei, P.; Mollo, S.; Soligo, M.; Scarlato, P.; Castelluccio, M.

    2015-05-01

    Laboratory experiments can represent a valid approach to unravel the complex interplay between the geochemical behaviour of radon and rock deformation mechanisms. In light of this, we present a new real-time experimental setup for analysing in continuum the alpha-emitting 222Rn and 220Rn daughters over variable stress-strain regimes. The most innovative segment of this setup consists of the radon accumulation chamber obtained from a tough and durable material that can host large cylindrical rock samples. The accumulation chamber is connected, in a closed-loop configuration, to a gas-drying unit and to a RAD7 radon monitor. A recirculating pump moves the gas from the rock sample to a solid-state detector for alpha counting of radon and thoron progeny. The measured radon signal is enhanced by surrounding the accumulation chamber with a digitally controlled heating belt. As the temperature is increased, the number of effective collisions of radon atoms increases favouring the diffusion of radon through the material and reducing the analytical uncertainty. The accumulation chamber containing the sample is then placed into a uniaxial testing apparatus where the axial deformation is measured throughout a linear variable displacement transducer. A dedicated software allows obtaining a variety of stress-strain regimes from fast deformation rates to long-term creep tests. Experiments conducted with this new real-time setup have important ramifications for the interpretation of geochemical anomalies recorded prior to volcanic eruptions or earthquakes.

  15. World History Of Radon Research And Measurement From The Early 1900's To Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, A. C.

    2008-08-01

    In 1900, Dorn discovered the emanation in the uranium series that eventually became the well-known gas 222Rn. From 1900 through 1908, it was demonstrated that 222Rn is a radioactive gas found in tap water, highly condensable at low temperatures with a half-life of approximately 3.7 days and can be collected on charcoal by adsorption. Although, radon was discovered in 1900, the effects of prolonged exposure had been suspected and noted 300 years earlier among underground miners who developed lung cancer. During the period from 1924-1932, it was suggested that radon was the cause of high lung cancer incidence. In 1951, researchers at the university of Rochester N.Y. pointed out that the lung cancer health hazard was from the alpha radiation dose delivered by the radon decay products that deposited in the respiratory tract. The findings of the BEIR Committee Report VI, which was based on epidemiological studies in different groups of mines in the 1950's and 1960's and on laboratory studies, showed that from 60,000 miners over 2,600 developed lung cancer where only 750 were expected. Since 1998, the epidemiological study conducted in Iowa US, showed beyond any reasonable doubt that radon decay products cause lung cancer among women who lived at least twenty years in their homes. This paper will cover early radon measurements in soil, building material, ground water and in different air environments such as in the atmosphere, caves spas, underground mines and in residential indoor air environment. Radon measurements were conducted in many areas for diagnostic purposes. Radon was used as natural tracer to study air masses, vertical diffusion, and atmospheric studies, in earthquake prediction, and as a geological indicator for radium and uranium. In the early radon measurements, electroscopes, electrometers and primitive ionization chambers were used for many years. In the 1940's fast pulse ionization chambers replaced total ionization chambers. From the mid 1950's

  16. MEASUREMENT OF RADON, THORON AND THEIR PROGENY CONCENTRATIONS IN THE DWELLINGS OF PAURI GARHWAL, UTTARAKHAND, INDIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Veena; Dutt, Sanjay; Yadav, Manjulata; Mishra, Rosaline; Ramola, R C

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that inhalation of radon, thoron and their progeny contributes more than 50 % of natural background radiation dose to human being. The time-integrated passive measurements of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were carried out in the dwellings of Pauri Garhwal, Uttarakhand, India. The measurements of radon and thoron concentrations were performed by LR-115 detector-based single-entry pin-hole dosemeter, while for the measurement of progeny concentrations, LR-115 deposition-based direct radon and thoron progeny sensors technique was used. The experimental techniques and results obtained are discussed in detail. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Improved mixing height monitoring through a combination of lidar and radon measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Griffiths

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface-based radon (222Rn measurements can be combined with lidar backscatter to obtain a higher quality time series of mixing height within the Planetary Boundary-Layer (PBL than is possible from lidar alone, and a more quantitative measure of mixing height than is possible from only radon. The lidar measurements benefit because even when aerosol layers are detected, reliably attributing the mixing height to the correct layer presents a challenge. By combining lidar with a mixing length scale derived from a time series of radon concentration, automated and robust attribution is possible during the morning transition.

    Radon measurements also provide mixing information during the night and with the addition of lidar these measurements become insensitive to night-to-night changes in radon emissions. After calibration with lidar, the radon-derived equivalent mixing height agrees with other measures of mixing on daily and hourly time scales and is a potential method for studying intermittent mixing in nocturnal boundary layers.

  18. Identifying areas with potential for high indoor radon levels: analysis of the national airborne radiometric reconnaissance data for California and the Pacific Northwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moed, B.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Schwehr, M.B.; Van Heuvelen, A.

    1984-04-01

    Radon-222 is an important indoor air pollutant which, through the inhalation of its radioactive decay products, accounts for nearly half of the effective dose equivalent to the public from natural ionizing radiation. Indoor radon concentrations vary widely, largely because of local and regional differences in the rate of entry from sources. The major sources are soil and rock near building foundations, earth-based building materials, and domestic water; of these, soil and rock are thought to be predominant in many buildings with higher-than-average concentrations. Thus, one key factor in determining radon source potential is the concentration of radium, the progenitor of radon, in surficial rocks and soils. Aerial radiometric data were analyzed, collected for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program, for seven Western states to: (1) provide information on the spatial distribution of radium contents in surficial geologic materials for those states; and (2) investigate approaches for using the aerial data, which have been collected throughout the contiguous United States and Alaska, to identify areas where high indoor radon levels may be common. Radium concentrations were found to be relatively low in central and western portions of Washington, Oregon, and northern California; they were found to be relatively high in central and southern California. A field validation study, conducted along two flight-line segments near Spokane, Washington, showed close correspondence between the aerial data, in situ measurements of both radium content and radon flux from soil, and laboratory measurements of both radium content of and radon emanation rate from soil samples. 99 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

  19. Passive and active measurements of radon-related parameters inside ancient Egyptian tombs in Luxor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abo-Elmagd, M. [Radiation Measurements Department, National Institute for Standard, Giza (Egypt)]. E-mail: abo_elmgd@hotmail.com; Metwally, S.M. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); El-Fiki, S.A. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Eissa, H.M. [Radiation Measurements Department, National Institute for Standard, Giza (Egypt); Salama, E. [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2007-01-15

    Radon and its related parameters were measured using passive (CR-39) and active (Alpha-Guard analyzer) techniques inside seven ancient Egyptian tombs of the Valley of the Kings in Luxor. The measurements were performed throughout the winter and summer seasons. The average radon concentration inside the tombs ranges from 96.9+/-10.8 to 415+/-43Bqm{sup -3} in winter and from 86.4+/-13.8 to 6102.8+/-573.6 in summer. Because of the variations of tombs dimensions and their ventilation systems, the equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny ranges from 0.228+/-0.02 to 0.95+/-0.05. The effective doses for the tomb workers, the tour guide and visitors were calculated. Active measurements show that radon exhalation rates range from 0.68+/-0.30 to 1.47+/-0.27Bqm{sup -2}h{sup -1} and from 0.60+/-0.03 to 1.42+/-0.05Bqm{sup -2}h{sup -1} for passive measurements. The real radium content was determined for all examined tombs by HPGe detector, while the effective radium content was obtained by Alpha-Guard and sealed cup techniques. Radon exhalation rates were correlated with the real radium content. A good correlation was found between active and passive measurements of radon exhalation rate.

  20. Study of radon measurement instrumentation in extreme environmental conditions; Estudio de la instrumentacion de medida de radon en condiciones ambientales extremas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, V.; Baixeras, C.; Amgarou, K.; Font, L.; Vargas, A.; Grossi, C.

    2011-07-01

    Within the framework of the scientific project of the Nuclear Safety Council ''Study of environmental monitoring instrumentation and measurement of radon in extreme environmental conditions' at the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona has established a partnership with the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (UPC) to conduct a study to identify the most appropriate filters to minimize the influence of measurement conditions, particularly with respect to moisture on the response of continuous radon detectors and integrators. (Author)

  1. Measurement of the deposited activity of the short-lived radon progeny in the human respiratory tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vezzu, G.; Butterweck-Dempewolf, G.; Schuler, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland). Div. for Radiation Protection and Waste Management

    1998-12-31

    Volunteers were exposed in the radon chamber at Paul Scherrer Institut to an atmosphere enriched with highly unattached radon progeny. The deposited radon progeny activity in the respiratory tract of the volunteers was determined using a low level in-vivo counter. The detector arrangement and its calibration for the measurement of deposited radon progeny activity is described and the results for a mouth and a nose breathing volunteer are presented. For the nose breathing volunteer 55% of the deposited radon progeny activity was located in the head and the remaining 45% in the chest whereas for the mouth breathing volunteer 25% was located in the head and the remaining 75% in the chest. A mean clearance half-life for the deposited radon progeny from the respiratory tract of (2{+-}1) h was obtained from the analyses of the temporal behaviour of the deposited radon progeny activity in the head. (orig.)

  2. Soil radon measurements as potential tracer of seismic and volcanic activity at Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Marco; Giammanco, Salvatore; Galli, Gianfranco; Ferrera, Elisabetta

    2014-05-01

    Radon is a radioactive noble gas present in all rocks of the Earth. It's used by the scientific community as a tracer of natural phenomena related to outgassing from the soil along faults, fractures and crustal discontinuity. Recently, radon has also been used on active volcanoes such as Etna, both as a precursor of volcanic phenomena as well as in the study of the dynamics of faults. The Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) performs discrete and continuous measurements of radon from soil at Etna since 2002. First studies concerned measurements of radon and thoron emissions from soil carried out on the E and SW flanks of Etna, in zones characterized by the presence of numerous seismogenic and aseismic faults. The statistical treatment of the geochemical data allowed recognizing anomaly thresholds, producing distribution maps that highlighted a significant spatial correlation between soil gas anomalies and tectonic lineaments. These studies confirmed that mapping the distribution of radon and thoron in soil gas can reveal hidden faults buried by recent soil cover. INGV permanent radon monitoring network was installed in July 2005. First results were obtained during the July 2006 eruption. The radon signal recorded at Torre del Filosofo (TdF, ~2950 m asl) was compared with volcanic tremor and thermal radiance data. The onset of explosive activity and a lava fountaining episode were preceded by some hours with increases in radon activity and more gradual increases in volcanic tremor. After 2006, Etna produced dozens of paroxysmal episodes from a new vent opened on the eastern flank of the Southeast Crater (summit area), that have built up a new, huge pyroclastic cone. In many cases we observed increase in radon activity some hours before the eruptive events. These observations suggest that radon emissions from the TdF zone are sensitive to the local geodynamic pressure induced by magma dynamics in the conduit systems. Other promising results were

  3. Application of thoron interference as a tool for simultaneous measurement of radon and thoron with a pulse ionisation chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, R M; Sumesh, C G; Vinod Kumar, A; Puranik, V D

    2013-07-01

    Pulse ionisation chamber (PIC)-based monitors measuring radioactive gas radon ((222)Rn) without energy discrimination will have interference due to thoron ((220)Rn) present in the atmosphere. A technique has been developed to use this property of interference for simultaneous measurement of radon and thoron gas. These monitors work on the principle of counting of gross alphas emitted from radon and its progeny. A theoretical model has been developed for the variation of thoron sensitivity with respect to the flow rate of gas through the monitor. The thoron sensitivity of the monitor is found to vary with the flow rate of gas through the monitor. Using this sensitivity, the sampling procedure has been developed and verified for simultaneous measurement of radon and thoron. The PIC-measured radon and thoron concentration using this procedure agrees well with those measured by using standard radon and thoron discriminating monitor.

  4. Indoor radon concentration measurement in the dwellings of district Poonch (Azad Kashmir), Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Muhammad; Rahman, Said; Rahman, S U; Jabeen, Shahida; Shahzad, M Ikram; Rathore, Mumtaz H; Matiullah

    2010-02-01

    The present study deals with measurement of indoor radon concentrations in dwellings of the district Poonch of the state of Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Pakistan. In this context, CR-39-based box-type radon detectors were installed in drawing rooms and bedrooms of 80 selected houses and were exposed to indoor radon for 3 months. After exposure, the CR-39 detectors were etched for 9 h in 6 mol NaOH at 70 degrees C and the observed track densities were related to radon concentrations. Measured indoor radon concentrations in the studied area ranged from 27 +/- 6 to 169 +/- 4, 29 +/- 6 to 196 +/- 4 and 31 +/- 5 to 142 +/- 2 Bq m(-3) in the drawing rooms and 74 +/- 5 to 172 +/- 3, 32 +/- 6 to 191 +/- 4 and 27 +/- 5 to 155 +/- 2 Bq m(-3) in bedrooms of the Abbaspur, Hajira and Rawalakot regions of the district Poonch, respectively; whereas weighted average radon concentration ranged from 93 +/- 6 to 159 +/- 4, 33 +/- 5 to 118 +/- 3 and 31 +/- 6 to 155 +/- 5 Bq m(-3) in the dwellings of Abbaspur, Hajira and Rawalakot, respectively. Estimated doses due to the indoor radon ranged from 2.35 +/- 0.15 to 4.00 +/- 0.10, 0.83 +/- 0.08 to 2.98 +/- 0.08 and 0.78 +/- 0.15 to 3.91 +/- 0.13 mSv y(-1) for Abbaspur, Rawalakot and Hajira, respectively. Comparing the current indoor radon results with those of the Health Protection Agency UK and US EPA (i.e. 200 and 148 Bq m(-3)) limits, majority of the houses surveyed in the present study are within the safe limits.

  5. Radon measurement studies in workplace buildings of the Rawalpindi region and Islamabad Capital area, Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, S.U.; Anwar, J. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Rafique, M. [Department of Physics, University of Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Muzaffarabad, Azad Kashmir (Pakistan); Matiullah [Physics Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2010-02-15

    A survey concerning measurement of the indoor radon levels has been carried out in 105 workplaces of the Rawalpindi region and Islamabad Capital Territory using CR-39 based radon detectors. The main objective of this study was to assess the health hazard due to the indoor radon. CR-39 based NRPB type detectors were installed in offices/rooms located on first floors, ground floors and basements and were exposed to indoor radon for six months. The measured indoor radon concentration in the buildings surveyed ranged from 12 {+-} 5 to 293 {+-} 19 Bq m{sup -3} with an overall mean value of 64 {+-} 32 Bq m{sup -3}. The highest mean radon concentration (113 {+-} 48 Bq m{sup -3}) was observed in the offices located in basements of the Rawalpindi city. The overall average annual effective dose in the studied workplaces was estimated to be 0.61 {+-} 0.30 mSv. The mean annual effective doses in basements, ground floor and first floor were found to be 0.87 {+-} 0.34 mSv, 0.55 {+-} 0.28 mSv, and 0.47 {+-} 0.29 mSv, respectively. These values are less than the action level recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection. (author)

  6. Measurement of soil-gas radon in some areas of northern Rajasthan, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vikas Duggal; Asha Rani; Rohit Mehra

    2014-08-01

    The health hazards of the radioactive gas radon on general public are well known. In order to understand the level and distribution of 222Rn concentrations in soil-gas in Sri Ganganagar district of Rajasthan, a 222Rn survey was carried out for the first time using RAD7, an electronic radon detector manufactured by Durridge Company (USA), at different locations covering a total area of 10,978 km2, having a population of approximately 20 lakh. The measurement of 222Rn concentration in soil-gas was carried out at four different depths (10, 40, 70, and 100 cm). The radon concentration in soil-gas for 10, 40, 70, and 100 cm depths ranged from 0.09–4.25, 0.15–6.30, 0.50–9.18, and 0.72–10.40 kBq m−3, respectively. The minimum value of radon concentration is observed in 33 GB village at 10 cm depth and maximum for Mohanpura village at 100 cm depth. As expected, our data show an increase of soil-gas radon concentration levels with depth. The present results are compared with the available radon data from other studies.

  7. Final report of evaluation of dose and measurement of radon concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    A mean annual exposure to radon daughters in indoor air was estimated on the basis of measurement of radon concentration in indoor air in Japan from fiscal 1992 to 1996. Doses were estimated by UNSCEAR method. The representative values in this report show the mean values in whole Japan. Each dose in the local area was different reflecting the different concentration of radon daughters. However, the same parameters were used in each area. When mean annual dose of radon daughters was estimated, we used 15.5 Bq m{sup -3} mean annual exposure to radon daughters in indoor air, 5 Bq m{sup -3} that in outdoor air, 0.4 the equilibrium factor indoor, 0.6 the equilibrium factor outdoor and 0.9 of P. The model of UNSCEAR based on these above values gave 0.46 mSv y{sup -1} mean annual dose of radon daughters which were consisted of from 0.38 mSv y{sup -1} in Kanto district to 0.52 mSv y{sup -1} Kyushu, Okinawa district. (S.Y.)

  8. Measurement of the radon concentration in an underground public facility and dose assessment. Fukuoka Tenjin Shopping Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narazaki, Yukinori [Fukuoka Inst. of Health and Environmental Sciences, Dazaifu (Japan); Tokonami, Shinji; Sanada, Tetsuya; Kanno, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Yuji

    2000-12-01

    Radon concentrations were measured with a passive radon detector from April 1998 through June 1999 in the Fukuoka Tenjin Underground Shopping Center to assess the dose affecting workers because of radon progeny inhalation. The radon concentration during the period was distributed from a range of 1.9 to 13.6 Bq/m{sup 3}. The arithmetic average concentration was estimated to be 6.9{+-}2.4 Bq/{sup 3}. The radon level was lower than that in dwellings in Japan and other countries. No spatial distribution of radon concentration was found in that area. From continuous measurement, the radon concentration was found to be high from midnight to noon and low in the afternoon. Little difference was noted between the daily average radon concentration and that during working hours. There was no seasonal variation. The equilibrium factor of 0.21{+-}0.10 was obtained during working hours. The activity-weighted size distribution of radon progeny was evaluated by using the number distribution of ambient aerosols and the classical attachment theory. Consequently, the activity median diameter was 150 nm. The unattached fraction of radon progeny was estimated to be 0.025 with an empirical equation. The annual effective dose of workers at the Tenjin center was calculated with the dose conversion factor from the UNSCEAR 1993 report and estimated to be 0.024 mSv/y. (author)

  9. The influence of house characteristics on the effectiveness of radon remedial measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naismith, S.P.; Miles, J.C.H. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom); Scivyer, C.R. [Building Research Establishment, Garston (United Kingdom)

    1998-10-01

    The effectiveness of remedial measures in houses with high radon levels has been tested in 943 houses in the UK. Radon levels were measured for 3 mo before and after remediation, and the results were corrected for typical seasonal variations. Householders completed questionnaires about house characteristics and remedial measures. The results were analyzed to determine the influence of house characteristics on the effectiveness of different remedial measures. Significant differences in effectiveness were found, in particular depending on the age of the house and whether the measures were installed by a major contractor, a local builder, or the householder.

  10. Measuring radon reduction in xenon boil-off gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruenner, Stefan; Cichon, Dominick; Lindemann, Sebastian; Marrodan Undagoitia, Teresa; Simgen, Hardy [MPIK, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    {sup 222}Rn, which originates from the decay of primordial {sup 238}U, is one of the major background sources for ultra-low background noble gas detectors. One of them is XENON1T, which is a dark matter direct detection experiment looking for hypothetical weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). It uses liquid xenon (LXe) as a detection medium and aims to be sensitive to spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-sections of σ∝2.10{sup -47} cm{sup 2} at a WIMP mass of ∝50 GeV/c{sup 2}. To achieve this goal, radon activity inside the detector must be limited to a few mBq/kg. One possible way for reducing the concentration of {sup 222}Rn inside such an LXe detector is using the so-called ''boil-off method''. It takes advantage of the fact, that the radon concentration in boil-off xenon is smaller compared to the concentration in the liquid xenon from which the boil-off xenon evaporated. This can be understood by the different vapor pressures of radon and xenon. In this talk, tests conducted at the MPIK are outlined which probe the feasibility and effectiveness of the boil-off method. The results prove, that a reduction of the radon concentration can indeed be achieved. In addition, an outlook for possible future applications of this technique is given.

  11. Radon Measurement in Schools: Self-Paced Training Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute for Disability Research and Training, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    This workbook is designed to educate school personnel in randon detection. The workbook is intended for an audience of school officials, including administrators, business officers, facility managers, and maintenance and operations staff. It is meant to provide trainees with experience in planning a radon test, interpreting test results,…

  12. Measurement of 210Po atoms content in glass as an indicator of long-term exposure to radon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, J; Olszewski, J; Skubalski, J

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of exposure to radon are performed using numerous research methods which register either temporary or periodic radon concentrations. The method presented below allows for the estimation of average radon concentration in the past. This is possible due to indirect measurement of the contents of 210Pb embedded in glass structure. The half-life of 210Pb is about 22 years. A number of exposures of window glass to radon have been carried out in laboratory conditions (radon chamber) and the obtained results were used to calculate the coefficient that renders it possible to define global indoor exposure to radon. The registration was made using a track detector CR-39, which records alpha particles resulting from the disintegration of 210Po, one of 222Rn decay products.

  13. Environmental effects of radon and its progeny from uranium waste rock piles. Pt. 1. Measurements by passive and continuous monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishimori, Yuu; Ito, Kimio; Furuta, Sada-aki [Ningyo Toge Works, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, Kamisaibara, Okayama (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    The radon concentration in atmosphere on and around the uranium waste rock pile sites has been measured by integrating passive monitors since 1989. In fiscal 1996, except for the Katamo-shimo 1, the average concentration of radon on the sites, around the sites and in control areas, ranged from 11 to 194 Bq/m{sup 3} (average: 45 Bq/m{sup 3}), from 8 to 75 Bq/m{sup 3} (average: 26 Bq/m{sup 3}), and from 9 to 77 Bq/m{sup 3} (average: 30 Bq/m{sup 3}), respectively. Additionally, the typical daily and seasonal variations of radon concentration, radon progeny concentration and radon exhalation rate are observed with continuous or automatic monitors. According to the measurement results by passive monitors and continuous monitors, the environmental effects of radon and its progeny from the waste rock pile sites are estimated small in residential regions around the sites. (author)

  14. Evaluation of the atmospheric transport in a GCM using radon measurements: sensitivity to cumulus convection parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zhang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The radioactive species radon (222Rn has long been used as a test tracer for the numerical simulation of large scale transport processes. In this study, radon transport experiments are carried out using an atmospheric GCM with a finite-difference dynamical core, the van Leer type FFSL advection algorithm, and two state-of-the-art cumulus convection parameterization schemes. Measurements of surface concentration and vertical distribution of radon collected from the literature are used as references in model evaluation.

    The simulated radon concentrations using both convection schemes turn out to be consistent with earlier studies with many other models. Comparison with measurements indicates that at the locations where significant seasonal variations are observed in reality, the model can reproduce both the monthly mean surface radon concentration and the annual cycle quite well. At those sites where the seasonal variation is not large, the model is able to give a correct magnitude of the annual mean. In East Asia, where radon simulations are rarely reported in the literature, detailed analysis shows that our results compare reasonably well with the observations.

    The most evident changes caused by the use of a different convection scheme are found in the vertical distribution of the tracer. The scheme associated with weaker upward transport gives higher radon concentration up to about 6 km above the surface, and lower values in higher altitudes. In the lower part of the atmosphere results from this scheme does not agree as well with the measurements as the other scheme. Differences from 6 km to the model top are even larger, although we are not yet able to tell which simulation is better due to the lack of observations at such high altitudes.

  15. Evaluation of the atmospheric transport in a GCM using radon measurements: sensitivity to cumulus convection parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zhang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The radioactive species radon (222Rn has long been used as a test tracer for the numerical simulation of large scale transport processes. In this study, radon transport experiments are carried out using an atmospheric GCM with a finite-difference dynamical core, the van Leer type FFSL advection algorithm and two state-of-the-art cumulus convection parameterization schemes. Measurements of surface concentration and vertical distribution of radon collected from literature are used as references in model evaluation.

    The simulated radon concentrations using both convection schemes turn out to be consistent with earlier studies with many other models. Comparison with measurements indicates that at the locations where significant seasonal variations are observed in reality, the model can reproduce both the monthly mean surface radon concentration and the annual cycle quite well. At those sites where the seasonal variation is not large, the model is able to give a correct magnitude of the annual mean. In East Asia, where radon simulations are rarely reported in literature, detailed analysis shows that our results compare reasonably well with the observations.

    The most evident changes caused by the use of a different convection scheme are found in the vertical distribution of the tracer. The scheme associated with a weaker upward transport gives higher radon concentration up to about 6 km above the surface, and lower values in higher altitudes. In the lower part of the atmosphere results from this scheme does not agree as well with the measurements as the other scheme. Differences from 6 km to the model top are even larger, although we are not yet able to tell which simulation is better due to the lack of observations at such high altitudes.

  16. Determining the radon exhalation rate from a gold mine tailings dump by measuring the gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongori, Joash N; Lindsay, Robert; Newman, Richard T; Maleka, Peane P

    2015-02-01

    The mining activities taking place in Gauteng province, South Africa have caused millions of tons of rocks to be taken from underground to be milled and processed to extract gold. The uranium bearing tailings are placed in an estimated 250 dumps covering a total area of about 7000 ha. These tailings dumps contain considerable amounts of radium and have therefore been identified as large sources of radon. The size of these dumps make traditional radon exhalation measurements time consuming and it is difficult to get representative measurements for the whole dump. In this work radon exhalation measurements from the non-operational Kloof mine dump have been performed by measuring the gamma radiation from the dump fairly accurately over an area of more than 1 km(2). Radon exhalation from the mine dump have been inferred from this by laboratory-based and in-situ gamma measurements. Thirty four soil samples were collected at depths of 30 cm and 50 cm. The weighted average activity concentrations in the soil samples were 308 ± 7 Bq kg(-1), 255 ± 5 Bq kg(-1) and 18 ± 1 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U, (40)K and (232)Th, respectively. The MEDUSA (Multi-Element Detector for Underwater Sediment Activity) γ-ray detection system was used for field measurements. The radium concentrations were then used with soil parameters to obtain the radon flux using different approaches such as the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) formula. Another technique the MEDUSA Laboratory Technique (MELT) was developed to map radon exhalation based on (1) recognising that radon exhalation does not affect (40)K and (232)Th activity concentrations and (2) that the ratio of the activity concentration of the field (MEDUSA) to the laboratory (HPGe) for (238)U and (40)K or (238)U and (232)Th will give a measure of the radon exhalation at a particular location in the dump. The average, normalised radon flux was found to be 0.12 ± 0.02 Bq m(-2) s(-1) for the mine dump.

  17. Theoretical calculation on CR-39 response for radon measurements and optimum diffusion chambers dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, H. R.; Ghandi, Kh.; Rahimi, M.; Negarestani, A.

    2008-11-01

    One method to measure radon gas concentration in the air with a long time of radiation is trace chemical etching technique. There is a direct proportion between the number of traces on solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) and activity concentration of radon. In this paper, calibration constant for a cylindrical chamber with CR-39 detector has been measured analytically. Using this measurement, trace curves on the base of concentration for chambers with different heights and radii have been drawn. The results show that to measure radon gas concentration, the optimum chamber should have a height between 3.5 and 4 cm and a radius between 2.5 and 3.2 cm.

  18. Theoretical calculation on CR-39 response for radon measurements and optimum diffusion chambers dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askari, H.R.; Ghandi, Kh. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Vali-e-Asr University, Rafsanjan 7713936417 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Vali-e-Asr University, Rafsanjan 7713936417 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: rahimi_bam@yahoo.com; Negarestani, A. [International Center for Science and High Technology and Environmental Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-11-11

    One method to measure radon gas concentration in the air with a long time of radiation is trace chemical etching technique. There is a direct proportion between the number of traces on solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) and activity concentration of radon. In this paper, calibration constant for a cylindrical chamber with CR-39 detector has been measured analytically. Using this measurement, trace curves on the base of concentration for chambers with different heights and radii have been drawn. The results show that to measure radon gas concentration, the optimum chamber should have a height between 3.5 and 4 cm and a radius between 2.5 and 3.2 cm.

  19. Radon measurements in an area of tectonic zone: A case study in Central Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojzeš, Andrej; Marko, František; Porubčanová, Barbara; Bartošová, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    General overviews of the spatial distribution of radon and other natural radionuclides in the geological basement as commonly presented on regional or country maps tend to offer a low density of information, insufficient for gaining relevant knowledge of the environmental impact, especially in the areas of tectonic zones often assumed to be radon prone and therefore dangerous for the human population. An additional survey, employing radon measurements in soil and indoor air, was carried out seeking to provide a more detailed characterization of the expressive fault zone of the Malá Magura in the Horná Nitra region of Central Slovakia. Eventually, the results of soil (222)Rn volume activity measurements along two short profiles crossing the assumed fault line did not reveal any indication of active nature of local tectonics, but merely pointed to an existence of a zone of contact between different types of rocks. The results of indoor radon measurements in dwellings of two villages lying on the studied fault showed values that were lower than those commonly observed on the Slovak territory, ruling out any negative health impact on population. Nevertheless, in order to add new findings to an already well established study of geological structure of the region, the indoor radon data collected through a previous survey require a further analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A campaign of discrete radon concentration measurements in soil of Niska Banja town, Serbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zunic, Z.S. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , ECE LAB, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade, Serbia (Serbia); Kozak, K. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31-342 Cracow (Poland)], E-mail: Krzysztof.Kozak@ifj.edu.pl; Ciotoli, G. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , Piazzale A. Moro, 5-00185 Rome (Italy); Ramola, R.C. [Department of Physics, H.N.B. Garhwal University, Badshahi Thaul Campus, Tehri Garhwal 249 199 (India); Kochowska, E. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31-342 Cracow (Poland); Ujic, P.; Celikovic, I. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , ECE LAB, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Mazur, J.; Janik, M. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31-342 Cracow (Poland); Demajo, A. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , ECE LAB, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Birovljev, A. [RADONLAB, Forskningsveien 3 B, 0373 Oslo (Norway); Bochicchio, F. [Italian National Institute of Health, Department of Technology and Health, Unit of Radioactivity and Related Health Effects, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Yarmoshenko, I.V. [Radiation Laboratory Institute of Industrial Ecology, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, 20A S. Kovalevskoy Street, Ekaterinburg 620219 (Russian Federation); Kryeziu, D. [Low-level Counting Laboratory, Faradaygasse 3, Arsenal Objekt 214, A-1030 Vienna (Austria); Olko, P. [Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31-342 Cracow (Poland)

    2007-11-15

    The first radon soil gas survey in Serbia, using passive detectors (SSNTD, CR-39), was carried out in June 2005 at field sites in Niska Banja town. The aim of the survey was to identify risk zones characterised by high levels of this radioactive gas. Radon measurements were made at the depth of 50 cm, in the ground according to a systematic grid pattern. Furthermore, at all 48 measurement points, the surface gamma dose rates in the air was also measured at the same locations and soil samples were collected for gamma spectrometric analysis for the radionuclides {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Th and {sup 40}K. Radon concentrations were found to range from 1270 to 155000Bqm{sup -3} with an average of 33765Bqm{sup -3} and a median value of 12626Bqm{sup -3}. The geometrical mean value and geometrical standard deviation were calculated as 16160Bqm{sup -3} and 3.5Bqm{sup -3}, respectively. Gamma dose rate varies from 92 to 316nGyh{sup -1}, with an average of 132nGyh{sup -1}. The radium content in collected soil samples ranges from 24 to 1810Bqkg{sup -1} with an average of 187Bqkg{sup -1}. High correlations (r{sup 2}>0.8) between soil gas radon concentration, gamma dose rate and {sup 226}Ra content in soil were found for each pair. The distribution of radon concentrations in soil gas shows bimodal shape.

  1. [The measurement of radon in kindergarten and infant nursery buildings in East-North Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, M; Karpińska, M; Mnich, Z; Kapała, J

    1998-01-01

    The measurements of radon concentration in 58 buildings of day nursery schools and kindergartens were performed in the six province of the East North Poland. The measurements of indoor radon were performed by means of a charcoal canister (Pico-Rad). The concentration ranged from 4.5 to 320 Bq/m3 and have arthimetic average 24.5 Bq/m3, geometric average 15.7 Bq/m3, median 15 Bq/m3. The highest average values were observed in Suwałki Province and Olsztyn Province. The results of all these measurements do not exceeded the limit of the Polish law.

  2. Indoor radon activity concentration measurements in the great historical museums of University of Naples, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarto, Maria; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; Loffredo, Filomena; La Verde, Giuseppe; Roca, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Indoor radon activity concentrations were measured in seven Museums of University of Naples, very old buildings of great historical value. The measurements were performed using a time-integrated technique based on LR-115 solid-state nuclear track detectors. The annual average concentrations were found to range from 40 up to 1935 Bq m(-3) and in 26 % of measurement sites, the values were higher than 500 Bq m(-3) which is the limit value of Italian legislation for workplace. Moreover, we analysed the seasonal variations of radon concentrations observing the highest average in cold weather than in warm.

  3. Measurements of radon concentration levels in thermal waters in the region of Konya, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Mehmet; Ozdemir, Fatih; Eren, Nuretdin

    2013-01-01

    (222)Rn (radon) is one of the most important sources of natural radiation to which people are exposed. It is an alpha-emitting noble gas and it can be found in various concentrations in soil, air and in different kinds of water. In this study, we present the results of radon concentration measurements in thermal waters taken from the sources in the region of Konya located in the central part of Turkey. The radon activity concentrations in 10 thermal water samples were measured by using the AlphaGUARD PQ 2000PRO radon gas analyser in spring and summer of the year 2012. We found that radon activity concentrations range from 0.60±0.11 to 70.34±3.55 kBq m(-3) and from 0.67±0.03 to 36.53±4.68 kBq m(-3) in spring and summer, respectively. We also calculated effective doses per treatment in the spas for the spring and summer seasons. It was found that the minimum and maximum effective doses per treatment are in the range of 0.09-10.13 nSv in spring and in the range of 0.1-5.26 nSv in summer.

  4. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer: a re-assessment based on the recent cross-Canada radon survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Moir, D.; Whyte, J.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to indoor radon has been determined to be the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. Canadian population risk of radon induced lung cancer was assessed in 2005 with the radon distribution characteristics determined from a radon survey carried out in the late 1970s in 19 cities. In that survey, a grab sampling method was used to measure radon levels. The observed radon concentration in 14 000 Canadian homes surveyed followed a log–normal distribution with a geometric mean (GM) of 11.2 Bq m–3 and a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 3.9. Based on the information from that survey, it was estimated that ∼10 % of lung cancers in Canada resulted from indoor radon exposure. To gain a better understanding of radon concentrations in homes across the country, a national residential radon survey was launched in April 2009. In the recent survey, long-term (3 month or longer) indoor radon measurements were made in roughly 14 000 homes in 121 health regions across Canada. The observed radon concentrations follow, as expected, a log–normal distribution with a GM of 41.9 Bq m–3 and a GSD of 2.8. Based on the more accurate radon distribution characteristics obtained from the recent cross-Canada radon survey, a re-assessment of Canadian population risk for radon induced lung cancer was undertaken. The theoretical estimates show that 16 % of lung cancer deaths among Canadians are attributable to indoor radon exposure. These results strongly suggest the ongoing need for the Canadian National Radon Program. In particular, there is a need for a focus on education and awareness by all levels of government, and in partnership with key stakeholders, to encourage Canadians to take action to reduce the risk from indoor radon exposure. PMID:22874897

  5. Radon measurements by nuclear track detectors in secondary schools in Oke-Ogun region, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obed, R I; Ademola, A K; Vascotto, M; Giannini, G

    2011-11-01

    Radon measurements were performed in secondary schools in the Oke-Ogun area, South-west, Nigeria, by solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). About seventy CR-39 detectors were distributed in 35 high schools of the Oke-Ogun area. The CR-39 detectors were exposed in the schools for 3 months and then etched in NaOH 6 N solution at 90 °C for 3 h. The tracks were counted manually at the microscope and the radon concentration was determined at the Radioactivity Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy. The overall average radon concentration in the surveyed area was 45 ± 27 Bq m(-3). The results indicate no radiological health hazard. The research also focused on parameters affecting radon concentrations such as the age of the building in relation to building materials and floor number of the classrooms. The results show that radon concentrations in ground floors are higher than in upper floors.

  6. The 2008 intercomparison exercise for radon gas measurement instruments at PSI; Die Vergleichsmessung 2008 fuer Radongasmessgeraete am PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterweck, G.; Schuler, Ch.; Mayer, S.

    2010-09-15

    Sixteen radon measurement services participated in the 2008 Radon Intercomparison Exercise performed at the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) during August 28{sup th} to September 7{sup th}, 2008 on behalf of the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (FOPH). Twelve of these laboratories were approved by the FOPH and their participation in the intercomparison exercise was a requirement to warrant quality of measurement. Radon gas dosemeters (etched-track, electronic and electret ionisation chambers) and instruments (ionization chambers) were exposed in the PSI Radon Chamber in a reference atmosphere with an average radon gas concentration of 627 Bq m{sup -3} leading to a radon gas exposure of 155 kBq h m{sup -3}. One measuring instrument participating for testing purposes stored values for part of the exposure interval (30.8. - 7.9.2008). The exposure during this partial interval was 117 kBq h m{sup -3} at an average radon gas concentration of 624 Bq m{sup -3}. The exposure of 155 kBq h m{sup -3} was the lowest used at the PSI intercomparisons down to the present day. Especially the LLT electret ionisation chambers used by some of the laboratories reached the lower end of their measurement range with this exposure. Unexpected deviations of instruments of the same model seem to show a dependence on the serial number and thus production date. (authors)

  7. An Alpha spectrometer for measuring radon daughter individual activity concentration; Spettrometro Alfa per la misura delle concentrazioni individuali in attivita' della progenie del radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berico, M.; Formignani, M. [ENEA, Div. Protezione dell' Uomo e degli Ecosistemi, Centro Ricerche E. Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Mariotti, F. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2001-07-01

    In the frame of the program of the Institute for Radiation Protection of ENEA, related to the evaluation of dose from radon and thoron progeny, an alpha spectrometer for the continuous air monitoring (CAM type) of radon and thoron has been realized. The constructive characteristics of the device are here presented together with energy and efficiency calibration. The device allows, by means of a screen type diffusion battery and a filter, to determinate the single radioactivity of each radionuclide of the progeny selecting them in relation to their diffusive behaviour (dichotomous particle size selection). The three-count filter method has been employed to measure the concentrations of {sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi in air. Radon and thoron effective doses using a dosimetric, instead of an epidemiologic approach, will be then evaluated. [Italian] Presso l'Istituto per la Radioprotezione, nell'ambito del programma di valutazione di dose da radon e' stato progettato e realizzato uno spettrometro alfa per il monitoraggio continuo in aria (CAM) della progenie del radon e del toron. Le caratteristiche costruttive dello strumento permettono, tramite l'utilizzo di batterie a diffusione a reti, di determinare l'attivita' individuale della progenie per diverse dimensioni granulometriche in particolare per la frazione attaccata e non al particolato amosferico con un taglio granulometrico di qualche nanometro. E' stato inoltre applicato un metodo spettrometrico a tre conteggi per il calcolo delle concentrazioni individuali della progenie del radon, {sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi, effettuando un conteggio alfa di {sup 218}Po e due conteggi alfa di {sup 214}Po. Tale informazione consentira' una valutazione della dose di radon utilizzando il modello dosimetrico in alternativa a quello epidemiologico.

  8. Comparison of passive and active radon measurement methods for personal occupational dose assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanzadeh Elham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To compare the performance of the active short-term and passive long-term radon measurement methods, a study was carried out in several closed spaces, including a uranium mine in Iran. For the passive method, solid-state nuclear track detectors based on Lexan polycarbonate were utilized, for the active method, AlphaGUARD. The study focused on the correlation between the results obtained for estimating the average indoor radon concentrations and consequent personal occupational doses in various working places. The repeatability of each method was investigated, too. In addition, it was shown that the radon concentrations in different stations of the continually ventilated uranium mine were comparable to the ground floor laboratories or storage rooms (without continual ventilation and lower than underground laboratories.

  9. Radon measurements by etched track detectors applications in radiation protection, earth sciences and the environment

    CERN Document Server

    Durrani, Saeed A

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to radon gas, which is present in the environment naturally, constitutes over half the radiation dose received by the general public annually. At present, the most widely used method of measuring radon concentration levels throughout the world, both in dwellings and in the field, is by etched track detectors - also known as Solid State Nuclear Detectors (SSNTDs). Although this is not only the most widely used method but is also the simplest and the cheapest, yet there is at present no book available on the market globally, devoted exclusively or largely to the methodology of, and deal

  10. Measurements of Indoor Radon Levels in India using Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors: Need for Standardisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Subba Ramu

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state nuclear track detectors are being used to obtain the time integrated concentration levels of indoor radon/thoron and their daughters. This technique is preferred for taking such measurements in dwellings. Such measurements are important as the radiation dose to human beings due to indoor radon constitutes more than 50 per cent of the total dose including that received from the natural sources. Normalisation is necessary to obtain a representative value of the effective dose equivalent to the population. Indoor measurements carried out by several laboratories all over the country show that the indoor radon levels vary from 1.5 to about 2000 Bq m/sup -3/, while the normal level is in the range of 10 to 60 Bq m/sup -3/. It is rather difficult to compare the levels since the exposure conditions, the period of measurements and the calibration techniques used are not standardised. The present paper discusses the measurements of indoor radon in India by various groups and the important problems associated with the standardisation of these measurements. The standardisation procedure and the calibration set-up developed at this laboratory are also presented.

  11. Measurements of indoor radon concentration levels in dwellings in Bethlehem, Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leghrouz, Amin A; Abu-Samreh, Mohammad M; Shehadeh, Ayah K

    2013-02-01

    Indoor radon level measurements were carried out in 42 dwellings in Bethlehem, Palestine, using CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors. The measurements were performed during winter and spring seasons of the year 2010, for a period ranging from 97-118 d using a total of 100 detectors. The detectors were installed in living rooms, bedrooms, kitchens, and storage areas of 39 houses, as well as in three schools, selected randomly in the surveyed area. The results of indoor radon levels and the annual effective dose in houses were found to vary from 26 - 611 Bq m(-3) and 0.65 - 14.1 m Sv y(-1), with average values of 117.0 Bq m(-3) and 2.95 m Sv y(-1), respectively. The mean values of radon concentration levels in bedrooms, kitchens, living rooms, basements, and storage areas are, respectively, 106.5, 113.1, 101.5, and 164.2 Bq m(-3). The corresponding mean values of annual effective dose for the bedrooms, kitchens, living rooms, basements, and storage areas are 2.66, 2.83, 2.54, 14.1 m Sv y(-1), respectively. In schools, the radon levels are found to vary from 31 - 400 Bq m(-3) with an average value of 125.1 Bq m(-3). The average annual effective dose in schools is found to be 3.12 mSv y(-1). This value is higher than the assigned international value. In general, the results show that radon concentration levels in 83% of the investigated dwellings are lower than the indoor radon action level of 150 Bq m(-3) for the United States.

  12. Indoor radon monitoring in Northern Iran using passive and active measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, Kamal; Doulatdar, R; Mehdizadeh, S

    2007-01-01

    In this work we present the results of a 2-year survey of indoor radon variations in four cities of Lahijan, Ardabil, Sar-Ein and Namin in North and Northwest Iran. We used both passive and active measurements by solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) with CR-39 polycarbonate and PRASSI Portable radon Gas Surveyor. A total of 1124 samplers in Lahijan, Ardabil, Sar-Ein and Namin were installed. Sampling frequency was seasonal and sampling locations were randomly chosen based on dwelling structures, floors, geological formations, elevation and temperature variation parameters. For quality assurance, 281 active measurements and double sampling were carried out. Based on our results and the results of previous surveys, Ardabil and Lahijan have the second and third highest radon concentration in Iran, respectively (Ramsar is first). The average radon concentration during the year in Lahijan, Ardabil, Sar-Ein and Namin were 163, 240, 160 and 144 Bq/m(3) with medians of 160, 168, 124 and 133 Bq/m(3), respectively. These concentrations give rise to annual effective doses of 3.43 mSv/y for Lahijan and 5.00 mSv/y for Ardabil. The maximum recorded concentration was 2386 Bq/m(3) during winter in Ardabil and the minimum concentration was 55 Bq/m(3) during spring in Lahijan. Relationships between radon concentration and building materials and room ventilation were also studied. The dosimetry calculations showed that these four cities could be categorized as average natural radiation zones. The correlation coefficients relating warm and cold season radon variation data were obtained.

  13. Indoor radon monitoring in Northern Iran using passive and active measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadad, Kamal [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 7134851154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: hadadk@shirazu.ac.ir; Doulatdar, R. [Shiraz University Nuclear Safety Research Center, Shiraz 7134851154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehdizadeh, S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 7134851154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    In this work we present the results of a 2-year survey of indoor radon variations in four cities of Lahijan, Ardabil, Sar-Ein and Namin in North and Northwest Iran. We used both passive and active measurements by solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) with CR-39 polycarbonate and PRASSI Portable radon Gas Surveyor. A total of 1124 samplers in Lahijan, Ardabil, Sar-Ein and Namin were installed. Sampling frequency was seasonal and sampling locations were randomly chosen based on dwelling structures, floors, geological formations, elevation and temperature variation parameters. For quality assurance, 281 active measurements and double sampling were carried out. Based on our results and the results of previous surveys, Ardabil and Lahijan have the second and third highest radon concentration in Iran, respectively (Ramsar is first). The average radon concentration during the year in Lahijan, Ardabil, Sar-Ein and Namin were 163, 240, 160 and 144 Bq/m{sup 3} with medians of 160, 168, 124 and 133 Bq/m{sup 3}, respectively. These concentrations give rise to annual effective doses of 3.43 mSv/y for Lahijan and 5.00 mSv/y for Ardabil. The maximum recorded concentration was 2386 Bq/m{sup 3} during winter in Ardabil and the minimum concentration was 55 Bq/m{sup 3} during spring in Lahijan. Relationships between radon concentration and building materials and room ventilation were also studied. The dosimetry calculations showed that these four cities could be categorized as average natural radiation zones. The correlation coefficients relating warm and cold season radon variation data were obtained.

  14. Measurements of {sup 222}Rn and{sup 220}Rn with a large size collector of radon progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qifan; Cheng, Jianping; Liu, Guilin; Zhu, Li [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Ja, Wenyi; Fang, Fang [Chengdu Univ. of Technology, Chengdu (China)

    2002-07-01

    People have paid more attention to radon since 1980s. Radon concentrations in high background radiation areas in the south are higher than others in China, especially {sup 220} Rn concentration is significantly high. Therefore, measurement of {sup 222} Rn and {sup 220} Rn concentration should be carried out there. I will introduce a large size collector of radon progeny and its applications in this paper. The collector is a sheet of polyvinyl chloride fibre with electrostatics of -500V {approx} -700V. Its size (60mm in diameter) is larger than others (26mm in diameter) that work as the same principle. The collector is more effective to adsorb radon progeny than most of others. The equipment of ZnS(Ag) Scintillation Counting System is available for large size collectors to detect radon progeny. Therefore its sensitivity of measurement is high than others. According to the different half life of radon progeny and based on both theory and experiment, a formula for discrimination and calculation of {sup 222} Rn and {sup 220} Rn concentrations was deduced. The {sup 222} Rn and {sup 220} Rn concentrations were surveyed with electrostatic collectors of radon progeny on the campus of commercial school and some other areas in Hainan, southern China. Neither {sup 222} Rn nor {sup 220} Rn concentrations were found significant high. However several faults underground were delineated. The collector is also used to study radon transportation. Results indicate that radon changes regularly with date when it has transported for a certain distance. Velocities of radon migration in the four media are quite different. Radon migrates more quickly in vertical tube than in the horizontal tube.

  15. Development of a highly sensitive radon-222 amplifier (HiSRA) for low-level atmospheric measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topin, Sylvain; Richon, Patrick; Thomas, Vincent; Gréau, Claire; Pujos, Julie; Moulin, Julien; Hovesepian, Alexandre; Deliere, Ludovic

    2017-05-01

    Radon ((222)Rn), a radioactive gas with a half-life of 3.82 days, is continuously emanated from soil, rocks, and water by the radioactive decay of (226)Ra. Radon-222 is released from the ground into the atmosphere, where it is transported mainly by turbulent diffusion or convection. For precise measurement of radon-222 atoms in the atmosphere, the detectors typically used present a small volume or surface area and are therefore not very sensitive, especially for online measurements and short sample intervals (Radon Amplifier (HiSRA) consisting in an enrichment system placed prior to a classic radon-222 analyzer. This system uses permeation membranes that make it possible to treat large quantities of air online (30 m(3) h(-1)). The radon-222 concentration is increased instantaneously by at least a factor of 30 across the HiSRA system. Therefore, in this study, when coupling to an ionization chamber (AlphaGUARDTM) at the outlet of the HiSRA system, the detection limit of the overall system is multiplied by factor of 30 and induces a new LD for a radon 222 gas analyzer lower than 1 Bq m(-3) for an integrating time of 10 min and 0.1 Bq m(-3) for 1 h. We constructed one radon amplifier prototype that provided the preliminary results for amplification efficiency and the initial measurements presented herein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Concentration of Radon Progeny in Air by Alpha Spectrometry Measurement; Medida de los descendientes del radon en aire por Espectrometria Alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acena, M. L.; Crespo, M. T.

    1989-07-01

    The concentration of radon progeny in air has been determined by alpha spectrometry measurement of 214 Po and 318 Po. A known volume of air was passed through a filter, then the alpha activity was directly measured on this filter. (Author) 15 refs.

  17. Radon-thoron discriminative measurements in the high natural radiation areas of southwestern Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saïdou; Tokonami, Shinji; Janik, Miroslaw; Samuel, Bineng Guillaume; Abdourahimi; Joseph Emmanuel, Ndjana Nkoulou I I

    2015-12-01

    Although indoor radon was initially measured in the uranium regions of Poli and Lolodorf using Electret Ionization Chambers, discriminative RADUET detectors were deployed in 70 houses of the high natural radiation areas of Bikoue and Ngombas in the uranium region of Lolodorf in Southwestern Cameroon. Radon and thoron concentrations were determined using Image-J and Microscope Methods for track evaluation. Radon and thoron concentrations follow lognormal distributions and ranged respectively from 27 ± 26 to 937 ± 5 Bq m(-3) and from 48 ± 40 to 700 ± 128 Bq m(-3). The arithmetic means of radon and thoron concentrations were found to be 92 ± 3 Bq m(-3) and 260 ± 13 Bq m(-3.) Less than 2% of houses have indoor radon above the reference level of 300 Bq m(-3) and 30% of houses have thoron concentrations above 300 Bq m(-3.) Inhalation doses due to radon and thoron range respectively between 0.6-17.7 mSv yr(-1) and 0.2-3 mSv yr(-1) with the mean values of 1.4 mSv yr(-1) and 1 mSv yr(-1). The contribution of indoor thoron to the total inhalation dose ranges between 15%- 78.5% with the mean value of 47%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation dose.

  18. Measuring Radon in Air, Soil and Water: An Introduction to Nuclear Physics for Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, K. E.; Nilsson, Ch.; Wachtmeister, S.

    2007-01-01

    With the radon measurement activities at Stockholm House of Science, nuclear and experimental physics is introduced in a way that attracts the attention and interest of the students. These projects give the students the opportunity to use mobile detectors, either in their school, in the House of Science or in their homes. During 2006, 34 radon…

  19. Measuring Radon in Air, Soil and Water: An Introduction to Nuclear Physics for Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, K. E.; Nilsson, Ch.; Wachtmeister, S.

    2007-01-01

    With the radon measurement activities at Stockholm House of Science, nuclear and experimental physics is introduced in a way that attracts the attention and interest of the students. These projects give the students the opportunity to use mobile detectors, either in their school, in the House of Science or in their homes. During 2006, 34 radon…

  20. Kosova’da Bazı İlköğretim ve Ortaöğretim Okullarında İç Mekan Radon Konsantrasyonun İzlenmesi

    OpenAIRE

    NAFEZI, Gazmend; BAHTIJARI, Meleq; XHAFA, Besim; HODOLLI, Gezim; KADIRI, Sehad; MAKOLLI, Sami; SHALA, Behar; MULAJ, Zenun

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of radon concentration were carried out at indoor air of 30 elementary and secondary schools in Kosovo. The aim of this study was to know the level of indoor radon concentration in these locations and to enhance the national radon survey. The main method for indoor radon measurement was direct sampling in alpha scintillation cells and continuous monitoring during some days. However, in cases with an increased instantaneous and continuous radon concentration the additional method ...

  1. Measurements of the radon-222 concentration in residences of Lima - Peru; Mediciones de la concentracion de radon 222 en residencias de Lima - Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereyra, P.; Lopez, M. E.; Perez, B., E-mail: ppereyr@pucp.edu.pe [Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Seccion Fisica, Av. Universitaria 1801, Lima (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    The measurement of the Radon-222 levels was realized in the first semester of 2013 in residences corresponding to 16 districts of the metropolitan area of Lima, including to the zones North, Center and South of the city, during one period of 3 to 6 months in continuous form, with measurement periods of 1 to 2 months. The houses where the measurements were made were selected considering diverse variables as antiquity, construction materials, coatings, soil type, occupational use of the monitored rooms, etc. The measurements were realized in basements, first and second floor of the residences. For the Radon-222 measurements passive detectors of cellulose nitrate (Lr-115) were used. The procedure of data collection, dosimeters reading and the measurement results are shown in this work; this monitoring is the first one that is carried out in this city. The results are only indicators of the present radon rate, by the detectors type not is possible to discriminate the presence of the Radon-222 descendants. (Author)

  2. Indoor radon risk potential of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, G.M.; Szarzi, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of radon risk potential in the State of Hawaii indicates that the potential for Hawaii is low. Using a combination of factors including geology, soils, source-rock type, soil-gas radon concentrations, and indoor measurements throughout the state, a general model was developed that permits prediction for various regions in Hawaii. For the nearly 3,100 counties in the coterminous U.S., National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) aerorad data was the primary input factor. However, NURE aerorad data was not collected in Hawaii, therefore, this study used geology and soil type as the primary and secondary components of potential prediction. Although the radon potential of some Hawaiian soils suggests moderate risk, most houses are built above ground level and the radon soil potential is effectively decoupled from the house. Only underground facilities or those with closed or recirculating ventilation systems might have elevated radon potential. ?? 2005 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  3. Radon Levels Measured at a Touristic Thermal Spa Resort in Montagu (South Africa) and Associated Effective Doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botha, R; Newman, R T; Maleka, P P

    2016-09-01

    Radon activity concentrations (in water and in air) were measured at 13 selected locations at the Avalon Springs thermal spa resort in Montagu (Western Cape, South Africa) to estimate the associated effective dose received by employees and visitors. A RAD-7 detector (DURRIDGE), based on alpha spectrometry, and electret detectors (E-PERM®Radelec) were used for these radon measurements. The primary source of radon was natural thermal waters from the hot spring, which were pumped to various locations on the resort, and consequently a range of radon in-water analyses were performed. Radon in-water activity concentration as a function of time (short term and long term measurements) and spatial distributions (different bathing pools, etc.) were studied. The mean radon in-water activity concentrations were found to be 205 ± 6 Bq L (source), 112 ± 5 Bq L (outdoor pool) and 79 ± 4 Bq L (indoor pool). Radon in-air activity concentrations were found to range between 33 ± 4 Bq m (at the outside bar) to 523 ± 26 Bq m (building enclosing the hot spring's source). The most significant potential radiation exposure identified is that due to inhalation of air rich in radon and its progeny by the resort employees. The annual occupational effective dose due to the inhalation of radon progeny ranges from 0.16 ± 0.01 mSv to 0.40 ± 0.02 mSv. For the water samples collected, the Ra in-water activity concentrations from samples collected were below the lower detection limit (~0.7 Bq L) of the γ-ray detector system used. No significant radiological health risk can be associated with radon and progeny from the hot spring at the Avalon Springs resort.

  4. Radon Like atmospheric pollutant; El gas Radon como contaminante atmosferico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quindos Poncela, L. S.; Sainz Fernandez, C.; Quindos Lopez, L.; Fuente Merino, I.; Arteche, J. L.

    2008-07-01

    In this work different aspects about the problem of the radon in dwellings are approached. This gas of natural origin is virtually present in all the soils in the earths crust due to the presence of uranium and radium in the composition of them. Depending on architectural factors and of occupancy habits of the house, high concentrations of this gas can be reached indoors. In these situations, there is a quantifiable increment of the risk of developing lung cancer in the inhabitants of the housing. In the last years the methodological improvements in the realization of epidemiologic studies have led to the obtaining of scientific evidence about the relationship between the presence of indoor radon and the risk of lung cancer. This relationship fund years ago in workers of uranium mines, has been corroborated in the case of the residential radon by the light of several recent meta-analysis performed on groups of epidemiologic studies. More than 4000 radon measurements have been carried out in spain during the las 25 years. A summary of the results obtained from the main national radon surveys are also presented, as well as the criteria recently established by the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council concerning radon action levels in dwellings and workplaces. (Author) 18 refs.

  5. MEASUREMENT OF RADON CONCENTRATION IN DWELLINGS IN THE REGION OF HIGHEST LUNG CANCER INCIDENCE IN INDIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoliana, B; Rohmingliana, P C; Sahoo, B K; Mishra, R; Mayya, Y S

    2016-10-01

    Indoor radon/thoron concentration has been measured in Aizawl district, Mizoram, India, which has the highest lung cancer incidence rates among males and females in India. Simultaneously, radon flux emanated from the surrounding soil of the dwellings was observed in selected places. The annual average value of concentration of radon(thoron) of Aizawl district is 48.8(22.65) Bq m(-3) with a geometric standard deviation of 1.25(1.58). Measured radon flux from the soil has an average value of 22.6 mBq m(-2) s(-1) These results were found to be much below the harmful effect or action level as indicated by the World Health Organisation. On the other hand, food habit and high-level consumption of tobacco and its products in the district have been found to increase the risk of lung cancer incidence in the district. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Seasonal radon measurements in Darbandikhan Lake water resources at Kurdistan region-northeastern of Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafir, Adeeb Omer; Ahmad, Ali Hassan; Saridan, Wan Muhamad

    2016-03-01

    A total of 164 water samples were collected from Darbandikhan Lake with their different resources (spring, stream, and lake) during the four seasons, and the measurements were carried out using the electronic RAD 7 detector. For spring water the average radon concentration for spring, summer, autumn and summer were found to be 8.21 Bq/1, 8.94 Bq/1, 7.422 Bq/1, and 8.06 Bq/1, respectively, while for lake and streams the average values were found to be 0.43 Bq/1, 0.877 Bq/1, 0.727 Bq/1, 0.575 Bq/1 respectively. The radon concentration level was higher in summer and lower in spring, and only two samples from spring water have radon concentrations more than 11.1 Bq/1 recommended by the EPA. Total annual effective dose due to ingestion and inhalation has been estimated, the mean annual effective dose during the whole year for spring water was 0.022 mSv/y while for lake with streams was 0.00157 mSv/y. The determined mean annual effective dose in water was lower than the 0.1 mSv/y recommended by WHO. Some physicochemical parameters were measured and no correlation was found between them and radon concentration except for the conductivity of the spring drinking water which reveals a strong correlation for the four seasons.

  7. Uncertainties of retrospective radon concentration measurements by multilayer surface trap detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastrikov, V.; Kruzhalov, A. [Ural State Technical Univ., Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Zhukovsky, M. [Institute of Industrial Ecology UB RAS, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    The detector for retrospective radon exposure measurements is developed. The detector consists of the multilayer package of solid-state nuclear track detectors LR-115 type. Nitrocellulose films works both as {alpha}-particle detector and as absorber decreasing the energy of {alpha}-particles. The uncertainties of implanted {sup 210}Pb measurements by two- and three-layer detectors are assessed in dependence on surface {sup 210}Po activity and gross background activity of the glass. The generalized compartment behavior model of radon decay products in the room atmosphere was developed and verified. It is shown that the most influencing parameters on the value of conversion coefficient from {sup 210}Po surface activity to average radon concentration are aerosol particles concentration, deposition velocity of unattached {sup 218}Po and air exchange rate. It is demonstrated that with the use of additional information on surface to volume room ratio, air exchange rate and aerosol particles concentration the systematic bias of conversion coefficient between surface activity of {sup 210}Po and average radon concentration can be decreased up to 30 %. (N.C.)

  8. The uncertainty in the radon hazard classification of areas as a function of the number of measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, H; Baumgartner, A; Gruber, V; Kaineder, H; Maringer, F J; Ringer, W; Seidel, C

    2017-07-01

    The administration in many countries demands a classification of areas concerning their radon risk taking into account the requirements of the EU Basic Safety Standards. The wide variation of indoor radon concentrations in an area which is caused by different house construction, different living style and different geological situations introduces large uncertainties for any classification scheme. Therefore, it is of importance to estimate the size of the experimental coefficient of variation (relative standard deviation) of the parameter which is used to classify an area. Besides the time period of measurement it is the number of measurements which strongly influences this uncertainty and it is important to find a compromise between the economic possibilities and the needed confidence level. Some countries do not use pure measurement results for the classification of areas but use derived quantities, usually called radon potential, which should reduce the influence of house construction, living style etc. and should rather represent the geological situation of an area. Here, radon indoor measurements in nearly all homes in three municipalities and its conversion into a radon potential were used to determine the uncertainty of the mean radon potential of an area as a function of the number of investigated homes. It could be shown that the coefficient of variation scales like 1/√n with n the number of measured dwellings. The question how to deal with uncertainties when using a classification scheme for the radon risk is discussed and a general procedure is proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Recent developments in radon metrology: new aspects in the calibration of radon, thoron and progeny devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röttger, A; Honig, A

    2011-05-01

    Due to the importance of reliable measurements of radon activity concentration, one of the past developments in metrology was applied to the field of radon, thus meeting two basic needs: (1) the harmonisation of metrology within the scope of the mutual recognition arrangement, an arrangement drawn up by the International Committee of Weights and Measures for the mutual recognition of national standards and of calibrations issued by national metrology institutes and (2) the increased demands of the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) directive, transferred into national radiation protection regulations with regard to natural radioactivity and its quality-assured measurements. This paper gives an overview of typical technical procedures in the radon-measuring technique group of PTB, covering all aspects of reference atmospheres (primary standards) for radon, thoron and their respective progenies.

  10. Measurement of radon exhalation rate in various building materials and soil samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Pankaj; Kumar, Vinod; Mehra, Rohit

    2017-03-01

    Indoor radon is considered as one of the potential dangerous radioactive elements. Common building materials and soil are the major source of this radon gas in the indoor environment. In the present study, the measurement of radon exhalation rate in the soil and building material samples of Una and Hamirpur districts of Himachal Pradesh has been done with solid state alpha track detectors, LR-115 type-II plastic track detectors. The radon exhalation rate for the soil samples varies from 39.1 to 91.2 mBq kg-1 h-1 with a mean value 59.7 mBq kg-1 h-1. Also the radium concentration of the studied area is found and it varies from 30.6 to 51.9 Bq kg-1 with a mean value 41.6 Bq kg-1. The exhalation rate for the building material samples varies from 40.72 (sandstone) to 81.40 mBq kg-1 h-1 (granite) with a mean value of 59.94 mBq kg-1 h-1.

  11. Measurement of radon exhalation rate in various building materials and soil samples

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pankaj Bala; Vinod Kumar; Rohit Mehra

    2017-03-01

    Indoor radon is considered as one of the potential dangerous radioactive elements. Common building materials and soil are the major source of this radon gas in the indoor environment. In the present study, the measurement of radon exhalation rate in the soil and building material samples of Una and Hamirpurdistricts of Himachal Pradesh has been done with solid state alpha track detectors, LR-115 type-II plastic track detectors. The radon exhalation rate for the soil samples varies from 39.1 to 91.2 mBq kg⁻¹ h⁻¹with a mean value 59.7 mBq kg⁻¹ h⁻¹. Also the radium concentration of the studied area is found and it varies from 30.6 to 51.9 Bq kg⁻¹ with a mean value 41.6 Bq kg⁻¹ . The exhalation rate for the building material samples varies from 40.72 (sandstone) to 81.40 mBq kg⁻¹ h⁻¹ (granite) with a mean value of59.94 mBq kg⁻¹ h⁻¹.

  12. Radon Measurements in Soils along the Coast of Accra from Teshie to Nyanyano, Southeastern Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Ekua Amponsah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A study has been undertaken along the coast of Accra (Teshie to Nyanyano in the Greater Accra Metropolitan Area to investigate the emission of soil radon gas in the area using Lenin Resin (LR 115 cellulose nitrate detectors. Twenty seven sampling points were considered for the investigation. A set of detectors were buried at a time and were replaced fortnightly for a period of 2 weeks. Three exposures were made at each location. Due to logistics constraints, the detectors were buried in phases over a period of 15 weeks. After the exposure period, the detectors were etched, air dried in the laboratory and the registered alpha tracks were counted using the Spark counter. The track density was calculated and the radon gas concentration was computed. The radon concentrations ranged from 1.40 kBqm-3 to 282.87 kBqm-3 for the period of monitoring. The average soil radon concentration measured during the period of the survey was 24.41 kBqm-3. Local earthquakes of magnitude ranging from 1.1 to 2.8 on the Richter scale were recorded during the study. Continuous monitoring of the gas could confirm high emanation with the activity of the coastal boundary fault.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.71.2.7063

  13. Long-term measurements of radon, thoron and their airborne progeny in 25 schools in Republic of Srpska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćurguz, Z; Stojanovska, Z; Žunić, Z S; Kolarž, P; Ischikawa, T; Omori, Y; Mishra, R; Sapra, B K; Vaupotič, J; Ujić, P; Bossew, P

    2015-10-01

    This article reports results of the first investigations on indoor radon, thoron and their decay products concentration in 25 primary schools of Banja Luka, capital city of Republic Srpska. The measurements have been carried out in the period from May 2011 to April 2012 using 3 types of commercially available nuclear track detectors, named: long-term radon monitor (GAMMA 1)- for radon concentration measurements (C(Rn)); radon-thoron discriminative monitor (RADUET) for thoron concentration measurements (C(Tn)); while equilibrium equivalent radon concentration (EERC) and equilibrium equivalent thoron concentrations (EETC) measured by Direct Radon Progeny Sensors/Direct Thoron Progeny Sensors (DRPS/DTPS) were exposed in the period November 2011 to April 2012. In each school the detectors were deployed at 10 cm distance from the wall. The obtained geometric mean concentrations were C(Rn) = 99 Bq m(-3) and C(Tn) = 51 Bq m(-3) for radon and thoron gases respectively. Those for equilibrium equivalent radon concentration (EERC) and equilibrium equivalent thoron concentrations (EETC) were 11.2 Bq m(-3) and 0.4 Bq m(-3), respectively. The correlation analyses showed weak relation only between C(Rn) and C(Tn) as well as between C(Tn) and EETC. The influence of the school geographical locations and factors linked to buildings characteristic in relation to measured concentrations were tested. The geographical location and floor level significantly influence C(Rn) while C(Tn) depend only from building materials (ANOVA, p ≤ 0.05). The obtained geometric mean values of the equilibrium factors were 0.123 for radon and 0.008 for thoron.

  14. Retrospective measurements of thoron and radon by CDs/DVDs: a model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressyanov, Dobromir S

    2012-05-01

    An approach for retrospective measurements of thoron ((220)Rn) and radon ((222)Rn) by home-stored CDs/DVDs is proposed. It employs analysis of alpha tracks at two depths beneath the disk surface. The signal in the first one (69 µm) is due both to (220)Rn and (222)Rn, while the signal at the second (80 µm) is due only to (222)Rn. The second signal is used as to measure (222)Rn, as well as to determine and subtract 'the (222)Rn component' from the first signal. The remaining '(220)Rn component' is used to measure thoron. Numerical modelling is performed and the results show that simultaneous retrospective measurements of thoron and radon are possible over a wide range of environmental concentrations.

  15. Measurements of size distributions of radon progeny for improved quantification of the lung cancer risk emanating from exposure to radon decay products; Messungen der Groessenverteilungen von Radon-Folgeprodukten zur Verbesserung der Quantifizierung des durch Radonexposition verursachten Lungenkrebsrisikos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haninger, T.

    1997-12-31

    A major issue in radiation protection is to protect the population from the harmful effects of exposure to radon and radon progeny. Quantification of the lung cancer risk emanating from exposure to radon decay products in residential and working environments poses problems, as epidemiologic studies yield information deviating from the results obtained by the indirect method of assessment based on dosimetric respiratory tract models. One important task of the publication here was to characterize the various exposure conditions and to quantify uncertainties that may result from application of the ``dose conversion convention``. A special aerosol spectrometer was therefore designed and built in order to measure the size distributions of the short-lived radon decay products in the range between 0.5 nm and 10 000 nm. The aerosol spectrometer consists of a three-step diffusion battery with wire nets, an 11-step BERNER impactor, and a detector system with twelve large-surface proportional detectors. From the measured size distributions, dose conversion coefficients, E/P{sup eq}, were calculated using the PC software RADEP; the RADEP program was developed by BIRCHALL and JAMES and is based on the respiratory tract model of the ICRP. The E/P{sup eq} coefficients indicate the effective dose E per unit exposure P{sup eq} to radon decay products. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Eines der groessten Probleme des Strahlenschutzes ist der Schutz der Bevoelkerung vor einer Strahlenexposition durch Radon und seine Folgeprodukte. Die Quantifizierung des Lungenkrebsrisikos, das durch Radonexpositionen in Wohnungen und an Arbeitsplaetzen verursacht wird, ist ein grosses Problem, weil epidemiologische Studien ein anderes Ergebnis liefern, als die indirekte Methode der Abschaetzung mit dosimetrischen Atemtrakt-Modellen. Eine wichtige Aufgabe der vorliegenden Arbeit war es, unterschiedliche Expositionsbedingungen zu charakterisieren und die Unsicherheiten zu quantifizieren, die sich aus der

  16. Measurements of size distributions of radon progeny for improved quantification of the lung cancer risk emanating from exposure to radon decay products; Messungen der Groessenverteilungen von Radon-Folgeprodukten zur Verbesserung der Quantifizierung des durch Radonexposition verursachten Lungenkrebsrisikos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haninger, T.

    1997-12-31

    A major issue in radiation protection is to protect the population from the harmful effects of exposure to radon and radon progeny. Quantification of the lung cancer risk emanating from exposure to radon decay products in residential and working environments poses problems, as epidemiologic studies yield information deviating from the results obtained by the indirect method of assessment based on dosimetric respiratory tract models. One important task of the publication here was to characterize the various exposure conditions and to quantify uncertainties that may result from application of the ``dose conversion convention``. A special aerosol spectrometer was therefore designed and built in order to measure the size distributions of the short-lived radon decay products in the range between 0.5 nm and 10 000 nm. The aerosol spectrometer consists of a three-step diffusion battery with wire nets, an 11-step BERNER impactor, and a detector system with twelve large-surface proportional detectors. From the measured size distributions, dose conversion coefficients, E/P{sup eq}, were calculated using the PC software RADEP; the RADEP program was developed by BIRCHALL and JAMES and is based on the respiratory tract model of the ICRP. The E/P{sup eq} coefficients indicate the effective dose E per unit exposure P{sup eq} to radon decay products. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Eines der groessten Probleme des Strahlenschutzes ist der Schutz der Bevoelkerung vor einer Strahlenexposition durch Radon und seine Folgeprodukte. Die Quantifizierung des Lungenkrebsrisikos, das durch Radonexpositionen in Wohnungen und an Arbeitsplaetzen verursacht wird, ist ein grosses Problem, weil epidemiologische Studien ein anderes Ergebnis liefern, als die indirekte Methode der Abschaetzung mit dosimetrischen Atemtrakt-Modellen. Eine wichtige Aufgabe der vorliegenden Arbeit war es, unterschiedliche Expositionsbedingungen zu charakterisieren und die Unsicherheiten zu quantifizieren, die sich aus der

  17. Inverse estimation of radon flux distribution for East Asia using measured atmospheric radon concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirao, S; Hayashi, R; Moriizumi, J; Yamazawa, H; Tohjima, Y; Mukai, H

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the (222)Rn flux density distribution at surface was estimated in East Asia with the Bayesian synthesis inversion using measurement data and a long-range atmospheric (222)Rn transport model. Surface atmospheric (222)Rn concentrations measured at Hateruma Island in January 2008 were used. The estimated (222)Rn flux densities were generally higher than the prior ones. The area-weighted mean (222)Rn flux density for East Asia in January 2008 was estimated to be 44.0 mBq m(-2) s(-1). The use of the estimated (222)Rn flux density improved the discrepancy of the model-calculated concentrations with the measurements at Hateruma Island.

  18. Measurement of waterborne radon in the drinking water of the Dera Ismail Khan city using active and passive techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Tabassum

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater is considered to be the second largest contributor to the indoor radon concentration after soil. Therefore, measurement of waterborne radon has remained a point of interest for many researchers. The main objective of this study is to study waterborne radon activity in the city of Dera Ismail Khan. In this context, water samples were collected from different locations of the city and waterborne radon was measured using a pylon vacuum water degassing system and CR-39 based radon detectors. The pylon system measured waterborne radon activities in samples of hand pumps and motor driven pumps varying from 0.015 to 0.066 Bq/L and 0.021 to 0.145 Bq/L with average values of 0.041 ± 0.015 Bq/L and 0.076 ± 0.024 Bq/L, respectively. Whereas CR-39 based measured values ranged from 0.042 to 0.125 Bq/L and 0.075 to 0.158 Bq/L with average values of 0.081 ± 0.021 Bq/L and 0.120 ± 0.020 Bq/L, respectively. The estimated average annual effective dose due to ingestion of radon from drinking water using pylon and CR-39 based radon detectors for hand and motor pump samples was found to be 1.055×10-4 mSv and 1.947×10-4 mSv, and 2.067×10-4 mSv and 3.058×10-4 mSv, respectively. The waterborne radon concentrations and as a result the annual effective dose expected to be received from it are within the recommended safe limits.

  19. The radon indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, L.

    2005-11-01

    The radon indicator is an efficient instrument for measuring the radon daughter concentrations in a house or dwelling. Physics or environmental science students could build a radon indicator as a student project. Another possibility would be to use a radon indicator in a student investigation of radon levels in different houses. Finally the radon indicator is an excellent device for producing a radioactive source, free of charge, for the study of α-, β- and γ-radiation. The half-life of the activity collected is approximately 40 min. The radon indicator makes use of an electrostatic method by which charged particles are drawn to a small aluminium plate with a high negative voltage (-5 kV), thus creating a strong electric field between the plate and a surrounding copper wire. The radioactivity on the plate is subsequently measured by a GM-counter and the result calculated in Bq m-3. The collecting time is just 5.5 min and therefore the instrument is only suitable for use in a short-time method for indicating the radon concentration. An improved diagram, ground-radon and/or wall-radon in houses, is presented on the basis of the author's measurements recorded with the radon indicator over many years. This diagram is very useful when discussing how to reduce radiation levels in homes.

  20. Geographical information system for radon gas from soil measurement; Il sistema informativo territoriale per la valutazione del potenziale di esalazione di radon dal suolo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlando, P.; Amici, M.; Altieri, A.; Massari, P.; Miccadei, E.; Onofri, A.; Orlando, C.; Paolelli, C.; Paron, P.; Perticaroli, P.; Piacentini, T.; Silvestri, C. [Milan Univ. Sacro Cuore, Milan (Italy). Servizio Centralizzato Radioisotopi; Belli, M.; Marchetti, A.; Petrocchi, A.; Rosamilia, S.; Serva, L.; Singh, G.; Tommasino, L. [Agenzia Nazionale per la Protezione dell' Ambiente, Rome (Italy); Minach, L.; Verdi, L. [Agenzia Provinciale per la Protezione dell' Ambiente, Bolzano (Italy); Bertolo, A.; Trotti, F. [Agenzia Regionale per la Protezione dell' Ambiente, Regione Veneto (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    The working program foresees the realization of an geographical information system for the check in field of the geological parameters and determination of uranium and radium contents in various type of rocks. It is here also pointed out a measuring method for radon concentration in soil. [Italian] In questo documento viene presentato il lavoro svolto fino ad oggi: dalla definizione dei parametri geologici ritenuti piu' significativi per la presenza di radon nel suolo e dalle misure in campo e in laboratorio, fino alla realizzazione del Sistema Informativo Territoriale (SIT) per la gestione dei suddetti parametri. Nel primo capitolo sono descritte le caratteristiche del radon, dal punto di vista chimico-fisico e geologico, per introdurre i criteri adottati nella scelta dei paramentri geologici e del loro peso per la valutazione del PERS (Potenziale di Esalazione Radon dal Suolo). Il secondo capitolo descrive il progetto in generale, mentre i successivi capitoli descrivono piu' in dettaglio la parte informatica e quella delle indagini sperimentali.

  1. Development of calibration facility for radon and its progenies at NIM (China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, J C; Zheng, P H; Yang, Z J; Liu, H R; Zhang, M; Li, Z S; Zhang, L; Guo, Q J

    2015-11-01

    Accurate measurement of radon and its progenies is the basis to control the radon dose and reduce the risk of lung cancer caused. The precise calibration of measuring instrument is an important part of the quality control of measurements of the concentration of radon and radon progenies. To establish Chinese national standards and realise reliable calibrations of measuring instrument for radon and its progenies, a radon chamber with regulation capability of environmental parameters, aerosol and radon concentrations was designed and constructed at National Institute of Metrology (NIM). The chamber has a total volume of ∼20 m(3) including an exposure volume of 12.44 m(3). The radon concentration can be controlled from 12 Bq m(-3) to the maximum of 232 kBq m(-3). The regulation range of temperature, relative humidity and aerosol are 0.66 -44.39°C, 16.4 -95 %RH and 10(2) -10(6) cm(-3), respectively. The main advantages of the NIM radon chamber with respect to maintaining a stable concentration and equilibrium factor of radon progenies in a wide range through automatic regulation and control of radon and aerosol are described.

  2. Semi-empirical approach for calibration of CR-39 detectors in diffusion chambers for radon measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereyra A, P.; Lopez H, M. E. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Av. Universitaria 1801, San Miguel Lima 32 (Peru); Palacios F, D.; Sajo B, L. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Apartado 89000 Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Valdivia, P., E-mail: ppereyr@pucp.edu.pe [Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru s/n, Rimac, Lima 25 (Peru)

    2016-10-15

    Simulated and measured calibration of PADC detectors is given for cylindrical diffusion chambers employed in environmental radon measurements. The method is based on determining the minimum alpha energy (E{sub min}), average critical angle (<Θ{sub c}>), and fraction of {sup 218}Po atoms; the volume of the chamber (f{sub 1}), are compared to commercially available devices. Radon concentration for exposed detectors is obtained from induced track densities and the well-established calibration coefficient for NRPB monitor. Calibration coefficient of a PADC detector in a cylindrical diffusion chamber of any size is determined under the same chemical etching conditions and track analysis methodology. In this study the results of numerical examples and comparison between experimental calibration coefficients and simulation purpose made code. Results show that the developed method is applicable when uncertainties of 10% are acceptable. (Author)

  3. Implementation of a radon measurement protocol and its communication plan by child care centre managers in Québec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Fabien; Poulin, Patrick; Leclerc, Jean-Marc; Dessau, Jean-Claude; Abab, Aryan; Arsenault, Pamela; El-Turaby, Fady; Lachance-Paquette, Guillaume; Vézina, Félix-Antoine

    2016-10-20

    To invite and support managers of child care centres to measure radon concentrations in their buildings. Their ability to carry out a measurement protocol and communication plan was also evaluated as well as the intention of parents and educators to test for radon at home. Managers, parents and educators of child care centres. 36 child care centres located in two priority investigation areas in Québec. A kit containing radon detectors with installation and recovery instructions was shipped by mail in addition to factsheets intended for parents and educators. Site visits and phone calls were also conducted with a sample of child care centres and participants. The instructions related to detector installation were generally well respected. Afterward, more than half (18) of the 34 parents and educators interviewed said that they had been directly informed of this radon testing by managers or other educators, and not by the factsheet provided. This radon measurement intervention was considered very relevant by 91% of them and a quarter (26%) expressed their intention to test for radon at home, while 6% had already done so. Two child care centres (5.5%) had at least one measurement above the Canadian guideline level of 200 Bq/m3. This intervention has demonstrated the ability of child care centre managers to carry out this type of autonomous procedure, which can be centralized to minimize costs. This type of intervention may influence parents to become more familiar with this contaminant and measure their family's exposure at home.

  4. About ageing and fading of Cr-39 PADC track detectors used as air radon concentration measurement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caresana, M. [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Ferrarini, M., E-mail: michele.ferrarini@polimi.i [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Garlati, L. [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Parravicini, A. [Mi.Am srl, via De Amicis 5, 29029 Rivergaro (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    PADC detectors are widely used as air radon concentration measurement devices and the typical procedure that a Radon Service Laboratory uses to manage the detectors provides a calibration phase followed by the field measurement. The calibration is performed in a reference radon concentration atmosphere, using high radon concentration values in order to achieve typical exposure values of few MBq h m{sup -3} with an exposure time of few days. On the other hand the field measurement is characterized by long term exposures lasting up to six months and by radon concentrations that are quite lower than the ones used in the calibration. The aim of this study is to check whether the calibration procedure is actually representative of a field measurement, or, in other words, whether and how much ageing or fading can affect the calibration factor. We found that the ageing and fading effect can produce a decrease in the detector sensitivity leading to an underestimation of the radon concentration up to 40% for exposure lasting few months. An important issue is that both ageing and fading can be ascribed to a decrease in the track etching velocity V{sub t}. In the paper we also provide an algorithm to compensate for the sensitivity variation due to fading/ageing effect.

  5. Measurment of radon, thoron and their progeny in indoor environment of Mohali, Punjab, Northern India, using pinhole dosimeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Vimal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The health hazards of radon and its decay products above certain levels are well known. However, for any preventive measures to be taken, we have to be aware of radon levels of that particular area. Measurement of radon and its decay products in indoor environments is an important aspect of assessing indoor air quality and health conditions associated with it. Keeping this in mind, measurements of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were carried out in Mohali, Northern India, using pinhole-based twin cup dosimeters. Radon exhalation rates of soil samples in the dwellings/areas were measured via an active technique of a continuous radon monitor. The indoor radon concentration in Mohali varied from 15.03 ± 0.61 Bq/m3 to 39.21 ± 1.46 Bq/m3 with an average of 26.95 Bq/m3 ,while thoron concentration in the same dwellings varied from 9.62 ± 0.54 Bq/m3 to 52.84 ± 2.77 Bq/m3 with an average of 31.09 Bq/m3. Radon progeny levels in dwellings under study varied from 1.63 to 4.24 mWL, with an average of 2.94 mWL, while thoron progeny levels varied from 0.26 to 1.43 mWL , with an average of 0.84 mWL. The annual dose received by the inhabitants of dwellings under study varied from 0.78 to 2.36 mSv, with an average of 1.61 mSv. The in situ gamma dose rate varied from 0.12 to 0.32 mSv/h.

  6. Radon tightness of different sample sealing methods for gamma spectrometric measurements of ²²⁶Ra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauring, Alexander; Gäfvert, Torbjörn

    2013-11-01

    Different methods for sealing sample containers for (222)Rn when measuring (226)Ra through its progenies (214)Pb and (214)Bi using gamma-ray spectrometry have been investigated. Results show that a method consisting of vacuum packaging of the sample container in a sealed aluminium lined bag gives excellent results for ensuring radon tightness. However, care should be taken to fill the sample container completely in order to avoid systematic errors due to radon accumulating in the void volume.

  7. Effects of atmospheric parameters on radon measurements using alpha-track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, C.; Zhuo, W., E-mail: whzhuo@fudan.edu.cn; Fan, D.; Yi, Y.; Chen, B. [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, 2094 Xietu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-02-15

    The calibration factors of alpha-track radon detectors (ATDs) are essential for accurate determination of indoor radon concentrations. In this paper, the effects of atmospheric parameters on the calibration factors were theoretically studied and partially testified. Based on the atmospheric thermodynamics theory and detection characteristics of the allyl diglycol carbonate (CR-39), the calibration factors for 5 types of ATDs were calculated through Monte Carlo simulations under different atmospheric conditions. Simulation results showed that the calibration factor increased by up to 31% for the ATDs with a decrease of air pressure by 35.5 kPa (equivalent to an altitude increase of 3500 m), and it also increased by up to 12% with a temperature increase from 5 °C to 35 °C, but it was hardly affected by the relative humidity unless the water-vapor condensation occurs inside the detectors. Furthermore, it was also found that the effects on calibration factors also depended on the dimensions of ATDs. It indicated that variations of the calibration factor with air pressure and temperature should be considered for an accurate radon measurement with a large dimensional ATD, and water-vapor condensation inside the detector should be avoided in field measurements.

  8. Measuring radon flux across active faults: Relevance of excavating and possibility of satellite discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richon, Patrick, E-mail: patrick.richon@cea.f [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Equipe Geologie des Systemes Volcaniques, 4 place Jussieu, UMR-7154 CNRS, F-75005 Paris (France); Klinger, Yann; Tapponnier, Paul [Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Equipe de Seismotectonique, 4 place Jussieu, UMR-7154 CNRS, F-75005 Paris (France); Li Chenxia [Institute of Geology, Chinese Earthquake Administration, P.O. Box 9803, 100029 Beijing (China); Van Der Woerd, Jerome [Institut de Physique du Globe de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR-7516, INSU, Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg I, 5 Rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Perrier, Frederic [Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Equipe de Geomagnetisme, 4 place Jussieu, UMR-7154 CNRS et Universite Paris 7 Denis-Diderot, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2010-02-15

    Searching for gas exhalation around major tectonic contacts raises important methodological issues such as the role of the superficial soil and the possible long distance transport. These effects have been studied on the Xidatan segment of the Kunlun Fault, Qinghai Province, China, using measurement of the radon-222 and carbon dioxide exhalation flux. A significant radon flux, reaching up to 538 +- 33 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} was observed in a 2-3 m deep trench excavated across the fault. On the soil surface, the radon flux varied from 7 to 38 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, including on the fault trace, with an average value of 14.1 +- 1.0 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, similar to the world average. The carbon dioxide flux on the soil surface, with an average value of 12.9 +- 3.3 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, also remained similar to regular background values. It showed no systematic spatial variation up to a distance of 1 km from the fault, and no clear enhancement in the trench. However, a high carbon dioxide flux of 421 +- 130 g m{sup -2} day{sup -1} was observed near subvertical fractured phyllite outcrops on a hill located about 3 km north of the fault, at the boundary of the large-scale pull-apart basin associated with the fault. This high carbon dioxide flux was associated with a high radon flux of 607 +- 35 mBq m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. These preliminary results indicate that, at the fault trace, it can be important to measure gas flux at the bottom of a trench to remove superficial soil layers. In addition, gas discharges need to be investigated also at some distance from the main fault, in zones where morphotectonics features support associated secondary fractures.

  9. Indoor radon measurements in a Greek city located in the vicinity of lignite-fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manousakas, M.; Fouskas, A.; Papaefthymiou, H.; Koukouliou, V.; Siavalas, G.; Kritidis, P. [University of Patras, Patras (Greece). Dept. of Chemistry

    2010-10-15

    This work presents indoor radon measurements in 42 dwellings in the city of Megalopolis, Southern Greece, located in the vicinity of 2 lignite-fired power plants and examines the effect of season, floor level and age of the dwellings on indoor radon concentration. The radon measurements have been carried out using the LR-115, type II and CR-39 alpha track detectors in 'closed-can' geometry. The average annual indoor radon concentration (GM) was found to be 52 Bq m{sup -3}, which is well below the recommended action level of the European Union. This value corresponds to an annual effective dose to the population of 1.3 {+-} 0.4 mSv. Season and age of the examined dwellings represent factors that affected significantly the indoor radon in Megalopolis, while the effect of floor level appeared to be not significant. Radium activity concentration values, measured by gamma-ray spectrometry in 20 sub-samples of six soil cores (60-135 cm depth), collected from the surrounding area of the city, were found to be consistent with the Greek and world average values. Based on the results of this study, it is concluded that the effect of the lignite-fired power plants on indoor radon concentration in Megalopolis' dwellings was not significant.

  10. A new method for the determination of geophysical parameters by radon concentration measurements in bore-hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, B; Deák, F; Horváth, A; Kiss, A; Rajnai, G; Szabó, Cs

    2008-11-01

    We propose a new method to measure the (222)Rn concentration in a closed bore-hole and to use the results for estimation of the diffusion parameter and the average radium content of the surrounding geological formations. In a closed bore-hole, only several meters from the surface, the radon concentration is rather constant (in the +/-15% range) under different meteorological conditions. The inflow of radon gas, after removing the radon from the bore-hole by dry nitrogen, shows characteristic time-dependence, which is determined by the diffusion parameter for radon in the surrounding environment. The experimental data were well described by a straightforward model calculation. From the results estimate can be given for the diffusion parameter and for the average radium content of the surrounding geological formation.

  11. Development of a technique for the measurement of the radon exhalation rate using an activated charcoal collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iimoto, Takeshi [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)], E-mail: iimoto@n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Akasaka, Yoshinori [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Koike, Yuya [Radioisotope Center, University of Tokyo (Japan); Kosako, Toshiso [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2008-04-15

    A simple system to evaluate the {sup 222}Rn (radon) exhalation rate from soil has been improved. A sampling cuvette of 2.1 L is placed so that it covers the targeted ground soil, and radon emanating from the soil accumulates within the cuvette for 24 h. Its internal radon concentration is measured by the combination of an activated charcoal (PICO-RAD) and a liquid scintillation counting system. This study shows variations of the conversion factor (CF: unit Bq m{sup -3}/cpm) of PICO-RAD. The range of CF due to temperature (10-30 deg. C) was between -21% and +69%, and this due to humidity (30-90%) was between 0% and -15%. Humidity and radon concentration in the cuvette covering soil tended to saturate in a few hours. The above information was used to correct the CF for the evaluation. The improved system shows high reliability and can be easily applied to natural environments.

  12. Development of a technique for the measurement of the radon exhalation rate using an activated charcoal collector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimoto, Takeshi; Akasaka, Yoshinori; Koike, Yuya; Kosako, Toshiso

    2008-04-01

    A simple system to evaluate the 222Rn (radon) exhalation rate from soil has been improved. A sampling cuvette of 2.1 L is placed so that it covers the targeted ground soil, and radon emanating from the soil accumulates within the cuvette for 24 h. Its internal radon concentration is measured by the combination of an activated charcoal (PICO-RAD) and a liquid scintillation counting system. This study shows variations of the conversion factor (CF: unit Bq m(-3)/cpm) of PICO-RAD. The range of CF due to temperature (10-30 degrees C) was between -21% and +69%, and this due to humidity (30-90%) was between 0% and -15%. Humidity and radon concentration in the cuvette covering soil tended to saturate in a few hours. The above information was used to correct the CF for the evaluation. The improved system shows high reliability and can be easily applied to natural environments.

  13. Characterising terrestrial influences on Antarctic air masses using radon-222 measurements at King George Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Chambers

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on one year of high precision direct hourly radon observations at King Sejong Station (King George Island beginning in February 2013. Findings are compared with historic and ongoing radon measurements from other Antarctic sites. Monthly median concentrations reduced from 72 mBq m−3 in late summer to 44 mBq m−3 in late-winter and early-spring. Monthly 10th percentiles, ranging from 29 to 49 mBq m−3, were typical of oceanic baseline values. Diurnal cycles were rarely evident and local influences were minor, consistent with regional radon flux estimates one tenth of the global average for ice-free land. The predominant fetch region for terrestrially influenced air masses was South America (47–53° S, with minor influences also attributed to aged Australian air masses and local sources. Plume dilution factors of 2.8–4.0 were estimated for the most terrestrially influenced (South American air masses, and a seasonal cycle in terrestrial influence on tropospheric air descending at the pole was identified and characterised.

  14. Radon water to air transfer measured in a bathroom in an energy-efficient home with a private well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Naomi H; Chittaporn, Passaporn; Cook, Gordon B; Fisenne, Isabel M

    2014-07-01

    Monthly measurements of radon in kitchen and bath tap water along with indoor air concentrations were made from 1994 to 1996 in an energy-efficient home with a private well. The well supplies all water to the home. The radon in cold and hot kitchen water averaged 69±2 and 52±2 Bq l(-1), respectively. Radon in cold and hot water from the bath/shower room shower head averaged 60±1 and 38±2 Bq l(-1), respectively, whereas hot water collected in the shower at the tub base averaged 5±1 Bq l(-1) or a 92% radon loss to air. While the calculated transfer factor of 1/10,000, i.e. radon concentration in air to radon in water, conventionally applies to the whole house, measurements for the specific water release during showering in a bathroom exhibit a larger transfer factor of 1/2300, due to smaller room volume. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Radon Measurements of Atmospheric Mixing (RAMIX) 2006–2014 Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, ML [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Biraud, SC [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Hirsch, A [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    2015-05-01

    Uncertainty in vertical mixing between the surface layer, boundary layer, and free troposphere leads to large uncertainty in “top-down” estimates of regional land-atmosphere carbon exchange (i.e., estimates based on measurements of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios). The radioisotope radon-222 (222Rn) is a valuable tracer for measuring atmospheric mixing because it is emitted from the land surface and has a short enough half-life (3.8 days) to allow characterization of mixing processes based on vertical profile measurements.

  16. Indoor radon measurements in the dwellings of Kangra District of Himachal Pradesh, India, using LR-115 nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhiman, M. [Punjab Technical University (India); Mehra, R. [Department of Physics, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar National Institute of Technology (India); Tyagi, A.K. [Department of Applied Sciences, Shaheed Bhagat Singh College of Engineering and Technology (India)

    2014-07-01

    Study of indoor radon was carried out in the domestic environment of 15 villages of Kangra district of Himachal Pradesh, India. Time integrated track etch technique has been used for the measurement of indoor radon levels. Bare cellulose nitrate LR-115 type II films have been used as detectors in the survey of indoor radon for four seasons of three months each covering a period of one year from March 2012 to March 2013. The houses were chosen randomly in such a way that the dwellings constructed with different types of building materials such as soil, bricks, cement, marble, concrete, wood in different localities of the village are covered. It has been found that indoor radon concentration depends upon the type of house, ventilation condition etc. The calibration constant of 1 track cm{sup -2} day{sup -1} which is equal to 50 Bqm{sup -3} has been used to express radon concentration in Bqm{sup -3}. The conversion factors have been used to calculate the exposure (an exposure of an individual to radon progeny of 1 WLM is equivalent to 3.54 mJ h m{sup -3}), the annual effective dose (1 WLM=3.88 mSv) and the lifetime fatality risk (3 x 10{sup -4} WLM). Indoor radon concentrations were found to vary from 132.25 Bqm{sup -3} to 449.75 Bqm{sup -3} with an average value of 261.40 Bqm{sup -3}. Annual effective dose in these dwellings were found to vary form 2.78 mSv to 7.68 mSv with an average value of 4.5 mSv. The average radon concentration in dwellings in most of the villages falls in the action level (200-600 Bqm{sup -3}) recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  17. Increasing the accuracy and temporal resolution of two-filter radon-222 measurements by correcting for the instrument response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Alan D.; Chambers, Scott D.; Williams, Alastair G.; Werczynski, Sylvester

    2016-06-01

    Dual-flow-loop two-filter radon detectors have a slow time response, which can affect the interpretation of their output when making continuous observations of near-surface atmospheric radon concentrations. While concentrations are routinely reported hourly, a calibrated model of detector performance shows that ˜ 40 % of the signal arrives more than an hour after a radon pulse is delivered. After investigating several possible ways to correct for the detector's slow time response, we show that a Bayesian approach using a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler is an effective method. After deconvolution, the detector's output is redistributed into the appropriate counting interval and a 10 min temporal resolution can be achieved under test conditions when the radon concentration is controlled. In the case of existing archived observations, collected under less ideal conditions, the data can be retrospectively reprocessed at 30 min resolution. In one case study, we demonstrate that a deconvolved radon time series was consistent with the following: measurements from a fast-response carbon dioxide monitor; grab samples from an aircraft; and a simple mixing height model. In another case study, during a period of stable nights and days with well-developed convective boundary layers, a bias of 18 % in the mean daily minimum radon concentration was eliminated by correcting for the instrument response.

  18. A method for determining an indicator of effective dose calculation due to inhalation of Radon and its progeny from in vivo measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, J

    1994-01-01

    Direct measurement of the absolved dose to lung tissue from inhalation of radon and its progeny is not possible and must be calculated using dosimetric models, taking into consideration the several parameters upon which the dose calculation depends. To asses the dose due to inhalation of radon and its progeny, it is necessary to estimate the cumulative exposure. Historically, this has been done using WLM values estimated with measurements of radon concentration in air. The radon concentration in air varies significantly, however, in space with time, and the exposed individual is also constantly moving around. This makes it almost impossible to obtain a precise estimate of an individual's inhalation exposure. This work describes a pilot study to calculate lung dose from the deposition of radon progeny, via estimates of cumulative exposure derived from in vivo measurements of sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Pb, in subjects exposed to above-average radon and its progeny concentrations in their home environments. The measureme...

  19. MEASUREMENT OF RADON, THORON AND THEIR PROGENY IN DIFFERENT TYPES OF DWELLING IN ALMORA DISTRICT OF KUMAUN HIMALAYAN REGION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kuldeep; Semwal, Poonam; Pant, Preeti; Gusain, G S; Joshi, Manish; Sapra, B K; Ramola, R C

    2016-10-01

    The indoor concentrations of radon ((222)Rn), thoron ((220)Rn) and their daughter products were measured in the dwellings of Almora district in Kumaun Himalaya, India using pin-hole dosemeters and deposition progeny sensors. The measurements were made in the residential houses built of mud, stone with cement plaster and cemented house during winter season. Average [geometric mean (GM) values] radon and thoron concentrations for all dwellings were found to be 99.82 and 79.70 Bq m(-3), respectively, while average equilibrium equivalent radon concentration and equilibrium equivalent thoron concentration (measured for the first time for this region) were measured at 35.22 and 2.52 Bq m(-3), respectively. Radon concentration (GM values) was found to be 110.73, 97.00 and 93.85 Bq m(-3) for mud houses, stone with cemented plaster houses and cemented houses, respectively. On the other hand, thoron concentration values were 87.10, 75.79 and 75.68 Bq m(-3) for cemented houses, mud houses and stone with cemented plaster houses, respectively. Interpretations have been made on the basis of measured radon/thoron and progeny concentration values with respect to the difference of construction material of the dwellings. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Indoor radon measurements in dwellings and workplaces of Curitiba urban area, Parana state, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Claro, Flavia; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine N.; Kappke, Jaqueline; Perna, Allan F.N.; Schelin, Hugo R., E-mail: sergei@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Rocha, Zildete; Santos, Talita O., E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Considering that radon and its progeny exposure is proved to be the main cause of lung cancer among nonsmokers and occupation-time at some commercial establishments and workplaces is equal or even bigger then at domiciles and dwelling, present study has been spread to the constructed closed environment and workplaces of commerce and productive sector. The measurements were performed by the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics of UTFPR in 2009 - 2011 when 120 detectors were installed at domiciles and workplaces of Curitiba, Parana St., Brazil. Experimental setup was based at CR-39 detectors that were installed in diffusion chambers protected with filters. In collaboration with CDTN/CNEN it was performed the calibration of CR-39 detectors at the NIRS in Japan. The exposure time was set to be of 100 days. Alpha particle track development was performed using 6.25M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution and ethanol (2%) during 14 hours at 70 deg C. The counting was conducted using an optical microscope. Measured {sup 222}Rn activity levels in dwellings varied between 4.37 Bq/m{sup 3} and 320.82 Bq/m{sup 3} resulting at an average of 46.94 Bq/m{sup 3}. Indoor measurements at workplaces presented the variation of radon activity concentration between 3.08 Bq/m{sup 3} and 67.50 Bq/m{sup 3} resulting at the average of 34.51 Bq/m{sup 3}. Considering the recommendations of the World Health Organization, UNSCEAR and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) concerning the radon-in-air concentration inside the dwellings that can reach 200 Bq/m{sup 3} taking into account the occupation-time of 7000 hours/year, obtained results are within normal limits and no mitigation measures have to be performed. (author)

  1. Metrology of the radon in air volume activity at the italian radon reference chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciocchetti, G.; Cotellessa, G.; Soldano, E.; Pagliari, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, ENEA Centro Ricerche Casaccia Roma (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    The approach of the Italian National Institute of Ionising Radiations (I.N.M.R.I.-ENEA) on radon metrology has been based on a complete and integrated system which can be used to calibrate the main types of {sup 222}Rn in air measuring instruments with international traceability. The Italian radon reference chamber is a research and calibration facility developed at the Casaccia Research Center in Roma. This facility has an inner volume of one m{sup 3}. The wall is a cylindrical stainless steel vessel coupled with an automated climate apparatus operated both at steady and dynamic conditions. The control and data acquisition equipment is based on Radotron system, developed to automate the multitasking management of different sets of radon monitors and climatic sensors. A novel approach for testing passive radon monitors with an alpha track detector exposure standard has been developed. It is based on the direct measurement of radon exposure with a set of passive integrating monitors based on the new ENEA piston radon exposure meter. This paper describes the methodological approach on radon metrology, the status-of-art of experimental apparatus and the standardization procedures. (authors)

  2. Variance of indoor radon concentration: Major influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmoshenko, I; Vasilyev, A; Malinovsky, G; Bossew, P; Žunić, Z S; Onischenko, A; Zhukovsky, M

    2016-01-15

    Variance of radon concentration in dwelling atmosphere is analysed with regard to geogenic and anthropogenic influencing factors. Analysis includes review of 81 national and regional indoor radon surveys with varying sampling pattern, sample size and duration of measurements and detailed consideration of two regional surveys (Sverdlovsk oblast, Russia and Niška Banja, Serbia). The analysis of the geometric standard deviation revealed that main factors influencing the dispersion of indoor radon concentration over the territory are as follows: area of territory, sample size, characteristics of measurements technique, the radon geogenic potential, building construction characteristics and living habits. As shown for Sverdlovsk oblast and Niška Banja town the dispersion as quantified by GSD is reduced by restricting to certain levels of control factors. Application of the developed approach to characterization of the world population radon exposure is discussed.

  3. The use of mapped geology as a predictor of radon potential in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Robin J; Smethurst, Mark A; Ganerød, Guri V; Finne, Ingvild; Rudjord, Anne Liv

    2017-01-01

    Radon exposure is considered to cause several hundred fatalities from lung-cancer each year in Norway. A national map identifying areas which are likely to be exposed to elevated radon concentrations would be a useful tool for decision-making authorities, and would be particularly important in areas where only few indoor radon measurements exist. An earlier Norwegian study (Smethurst et al. 2008) produced radon hazard maps by examining the relationship between airborne gamma-ray spectrometry, bedrock and drift geology, and indoor radon. The study was limited to the Oslo region where substantial indoor radon and airborne equivalent uranium datasets were available, and did not attempt to test the statistical significance of relationships, or to quantify the confidence of its predictions. While it can be anticipated that airborne measurements may have useful predictive power for indoor radon, airborne measurement coverage in Norway is at present sparse; to provide national coverage of radon hazard estimates, a good understanding of the relationship between geology and indoor radon is therefore important. In this work we use a new enlarged (n = 34,563) form of the indoor radon dataset with national coverage, and we use it to examine the relationship between geology and indoor radon concentrations. We use this relationship to characterise geological classes by their radon potential, and we produce a national radon hazard map which includes confidence limits on the likelihood of areas having elevated radon concentrations, and which covers the whole of mainland Norway, even areas where little or no indoor radon data are available. We find that bedrock and drift geology classes can account for around 40% of the total observed variation in radon potential. We test geology-based predictions of RP (radon potential) against locally-derived estimates of RP, and produce classification matrices with kappa values in the range 0.37-0.56. Our classifier has high predictive value

  4. Focus measurement in 3D focal stack using direct and inverse discrete radon transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Cárdenes, Óscar; Marichal-Hernández, José G.; Trujillo-Sevilla, Juan M.; Carmona-Ballester, David; Rodríguez-Ramos, José M.

    2017-05-01

    The discrete Radon transform, DRT, calculates, with linearithmic complexity, the sum of pixels through a set of discrete lines covering all possible slopes and intercepts in an image. In 2006, a method was proposed to compute the inverse DRT that remains exact and fast, in spite of being iterative. In this work the DRT pair is used to propose a Ridgelet and a Curvelet transform that perform focus measurement of an image. Then the shape from focus approach based on DRT pair is applied to a focal stack to create a depth map of a scene.

  5. Indoor radon measurements by nuclear track detectors: Applications in secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banjanac R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Indoor radon measurements by nuclear track detectors and application of the method in secondary schools in Serbia were performed in the spring 2004. Thirty detectors (type CR-39 were distributed to high school teachers in several cities in Serbia. After three months of the detectors exposure, they were sent back to the Low- Level Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Belgrade. After exposure, the CR-39 detectors were etched in a 6N NaOH at 700C for 3 hours. The tracks were counted by the semiautomatic track-counting system. The preliminary results are presented in this paper.

  6. Investigation of radon entry and effectiveness of mitigation measures in seven houses in New Jersey: Midproject report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, T.G.; Dudney, C.S.; Monar, K.P.; Landguth, D.C.; Wilson, D.L.; Hawthorne, A.R.; Hubbard, L.M.; Gadsby, K.J.; Bohac, D.L.; Decker, C.A.

    1987-12-01

    A detailed radon mitigation study is in progress in 14 homes in the New Jersey Piedmont area. The principal goals are the refinement of diagnostic measurements for selection and implementation of mitigation systems, and the reduction of radon concentrations to acceptable levels inside the study houses. Monitoring stations were installed in each home in October, 1986. Instrumented measurements included: basement and upstairs radon; differential pressures across the basement/subslag, basement/upstairs and basement/outdoor interfaces; temperatures at basement, upstairs and outdoor locations; and central air handler usage. A weather station was located at one house, monitoring wind speed and direction; barometric pressure; precipitation; soil temperature; and outdoor temperature and relative humidity. A time-averaged value of all of the above parameters was recorded every 30 min. Several additional parameters were monitored on an intermittent basis in all or selected homes. These include multizone air infiltration rates which have been measured in all homes using passive perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT) and in two homes using a constant concentration tracer gas system (CCTG). Total radon progeny, soil gas radon concentration and permeability characteristics, and gamma radiation levels were also monitored periodically in all study homes. 10 refs., 53 figs.

  7. Radon measurements at IC-09 well of Chingshui geothermal field (Taiwan): A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Department of Mineral and Petroleum Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1, University Ave., Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Kuo, T., E-mail: mctkuobe@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Mineral and Petroleum Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1, University Ave., Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Fan, K. [Department of Mineral and Petroleum Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1, University Ave., Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liang, H. [Exploration and Development Research Institute, CPC Corporation, Taiwan (China); Tsai, C. [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chiang, C. [Central Geological Survey, Ministry of Economic Affairs, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Su, C. [Department of Mineral and Petroleum Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1, University Ave., Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2011-02-15

    Radon concentration was monitored during the flow tests of well IC-09 at the Chingshui geothermal field. The radon concentration was found to increase from 54 {+-} 29 to 983 {+-} 65 Bq/m{sup 3} as a step function of production time, or cumulative production. The observed radon behavior can be explained by a radial composite model with the carbonate scales deposited in the skin zone near the well. The radius of skin zone near well IC-09 can be estimated with radon data at about 20 m using a plug flow model. Monitoring natural radon during the well flow tests is a helpful tracer to diagnose the formation damage near the well.

  8. Measuring radon-222 in soil gas with high spatial and temporal resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxtable, Darren; Read, David; Shaw, George

    2017-02-01

    In order to exploit (222)Rn as a naturally-occurring tracer in soils we need to sample and measure radon isotopes in soil gas with high spatial and temporal resolution, without disturbing in situ activity concentrations and fluxes. Minimisation of sample volume is key to improving the resolution with which soil gas can be sampled; an analytical method is then needed which can measure radon with appropriate detection limits and precision for soil gas tracer studies. We have designed a soil gas probe with minimal internal dead volume to allow us to sample soil gas volumes of 45 cm(3). Radon-222 is extracted from these samples into a mineral oil-based scintillation cocktail before counting on a conventional liquid scintillation counter. A detection limit of 320 Bq m(-3) (in soil gas) is achievable with a 1 h count. This could be further reduced but, in practice, is sufficient for our purpose since (222)Rn in soil gas typically ranges from 2000-50,000 Bq m(-3). The method is simple and provides several advantages over commonly used field-portable instruments, including smaller sample volumes, speed of deployment and reliability under field conditions. The major limitation is the need to count samples in a liquid scintillation counter within 2-3 days of collection, due to the short (3.824 day) radioactive half-life of (222)Rn. The method is not applicable to the very short-lived (55 s half-life) (220)Rn.

  9. Measurement and Application of Radium and Radon in the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guebuem Kim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of low-level Ra and Rn isotopes in water samples has become increasingly convenient and accurate in recent years. I summarize these new and advanced techniques and then introduce their application fields in geophysical and environmental studies.

  10. Results of simultaneous radon and thoron measurements in 33 metropolitan areas of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Bergman, Lauren; Falcomer, Renato; Whyte, Jeff

    2015-02-01

    Radon has been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. (222)Rn (radon gas) and (220)Rn (thoron gas) are the most common isotopes of radon. In order to assess thoron contribution to indoor radon and thoron exposure, a survey of residential radon and thoron concentrations was initiated in 2012 with ∼4000 homes in the 33 census metropolitan areas of Canada. The survey confirmed that indoor radon and thoron concentrations are not correlated and that thoron concentrations cannot be predicted from widely available radon information. The results showed that thoron contribution to the radiation dose varied from 0.5 to 6% geographically. The study indicated that, on average, thoron contributes ∼3% of the radiation dose due to indoor radon and thoron exposure in Canada. Even though the estimated average thoron concentration of 9 Bq m(-3) (population weighted) in Canada is low, the average radon concentration of 96 Bq m(-3) (population weighted) is more than double the worldwide average indoor radon concentration. It is clear that continued efforts are needed to further reduce the exposure and effectively reduce the number of lung cancers caused by radon.

  11. Theoretical modeling of indoor radon concentration and its validation through measurements in South-East Haryana, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhjot; Sahoo, B K; Bajwa, B S

    2016-04-15

    A three dimensional semi-empirical model deduced from the existing 1-D model has been used to predict indoor radon concentration with theoretical calculations. Since the major contributor of radon concentration in indoors originates from building materials used in construction of walls and floor which are mostly derived from soil. In this study different building materials have been analyzed for radon exhalation, diffusion length along with physical dimensions of observation area to calculate indoor radon concentration. Also calculated values have been validated by comparing with experimental measurements. The study has been carried out in the mud, brick and cement houses constructed from materials available locally in South-East region of Haryana. This region is also known for its protruding land structure consisting volcanic, felsite and granitic rocks in plane. Further, exhalation (Jw) ratio from wall and floor comparison has been plotted for each selected village dwelling to identify the high radon emanating source (building material) from the study region. All those measured factors might be useful in building construction code development and selection of material to be used in construction.

  12. Measurement of radon concentration in old metalliferous mines in San Luis, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjos, Roberto M.; Lacerda, Tiago; Rosas, Juan P. de [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal Milton Tavares de Souza, s/no, Gragoata, 24210-346, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Da Silva, Almy A.R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal Milton Tavares de Souza, s/no, Gragoata, 24210-346, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, P. O. Box 66318, 05314-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rizzotto, Marcos; Valladares, Diego L.; Velasco, Hugo [GEA, Instituto de Matematica Aplicada San Luis (IMASL), Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Ej. de los Andes 950, D5700HHW San Luis (Argentina); Yoshimura, Elisabeth M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, P. O. Box 66318, 05314-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Radon levels in two old mines in San Luis, Argentina, were measured and analyzed. La Carolina gold mine and Los Condores tungsten mine are today used as tourism mines. CR-39 nuclear track detectors were used for this purpose. Measurements were performed during both winter and summer seasons. The findings show that in these environments, significant radon concentrations are subject to large seasonal fluctuations, due to the strong dependence on natural ventilation with the outside temperature variations. For both mines, high concentration values of {sup 222}Rn were observed in summer and low values in winter; with an extreme ratio of 2.5 times between summer and winter seasons for Los Condores mine. The radiation dose and environmental health risk of {sup 222}Rn concentrations to both guides and visitors were estimated for both seasons and compared with dose and action level values recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The radon contribution to the effective dose rate for visitors has been previously assessed for the warm season. The values are 0.38±0.07 mSv y{sup -1} and 0.05±0.02 mSv y{sup -1} for La Carolina and Los Condores, respectively. These values were obtained assuming an accumulated annual time underground of 20 h. For the guides these values are 11±2 mSv y{sup -1} and 1.45±0.5 mSv y{sup -1} for La Carolina and Los Condores, respectively, assuming an accumulated annual time underground of 600 h. The occupational dose rate limit suggested by the ICRP is 20 mSv y{sup -1}. As these values indicate the dose is an order of magnitude lower in Los Condores than La Carolina mine. This is because this mine, due to its characteristics, is more ventilated than La Carolina mine. This is important because actions can be taken to lower the radon accumulation in La Carolina gold mine, for example by opening new ducts to increase air circulation. Finally, in this work, seasonal variations of the dose rate are assessed and

  13. Measurements of natural radioactivity and radon exhalation rates from different brands of cement used in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujahid, S A; Rahim, A; Hussain, S; Farooq, M

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of activity due to the naturally occurring radionuclide has been carried out in different brands of cement available in Pakistan. The gamma spectra of the collected samples were obtained using high-purity germanium detector and analysed for the presence of 232Th, 238U and 40K. The assessment of radiological hazards due to these radionuclides has also been made. The studies concerning the determination of radon-exhalation rates from these samples of cement were also carried out using CR-39 based NRPB radon dosimeters. The range of activity concentrations were found for 226Ra (from 25.10 +/- 1.55 to 52.60 +/- 3.20 Bq kg(-1)), 232Th (from 10.30 +/- 0.65 to 30.40 +/- 1.70 Bq kg(-1)) and 40K (from 17.25 +/- 1.55 to 292.95 +/- 23.05 Bq kg(-1)). The estimated value of radium equivalent concentration was from 11.16 +/- 2.60 to 114.98 +/- 7.11 Bq kg(-1). The calculated absorbed dose rate in air and the annual effective dose were in the range from 18.54 +/- 1.17 to 52.90 +/- 3.31 nGy h(-1) and 0.09 +/- 0.01 to 0.26 +/- 0.02 mSv, respectively. The external and internal hazard indices were in the range from 0.11 +/- 0.01 to 0.31 +/- 0.02 and 0.18 +/- 0.01 to 0.45 +/- 0.03, respectively. The radon exhalation rates from different brands of cement were found in the range from 3.3 +/- 0.7 to 8.1 +/- 1.7 mBq kg(-1) h(-1).

  14. Radon surveys in Ajloun city using CR-39 detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabadi, Douha R. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Yarmouk University, Irbid 21163 (Jordan); Abumurad, Khalid M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Yarmouk University, Irbid 21163 (Jordan)], E-mail: abumurad@yu.edu.jo

    2008-08-15

    In the present study radon ({sup 222}Rn) concentrations in dwellings, soil and water at Ajloun city was performed by using CR-39. The detectors were chemically etched and the alpha track density was measured using an optical microscope. The average indoor radon concentration for the whole survey was 27.6{+-}1.8Bqm{sup -3}. Differences were found at the different floors: 31.1{+-}4.4, 23.8{+-}3.6 and 19.7{+-}3.2Bqm{sup -3} for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd floors, respectively. Furthermore, the average concentration of radon in soil air was 3.4{+-}1.4kBqm{sup -3}. In addition, the average radon level in water samples from different water springs was 2.0{+-}0.3Bql{sup -1}. However, the average concentration of radon in Ajloun city is lower than the national average ({approx}40.0Bqm{sup -3})

  15. Prospects for electric-dipole-moment measurements in radon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupp, Timothy

    2014-09-01

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or system would arise due to breaking of time-reversal, or equivalently CP symmetry. Experiments to date on the neutron, atoms and molecules have only set upper limits on EDMs. New techniques and systems in which the effects of CP violation would be greatly enhanced are driving the field forward. Systems that may be favorable for significant advances include 221,223Rn, where the combination of octupole collectivity and relatively closely spaced opposite parity levels would increase the nuclear Schiff moment by one or more orders of magnitude compared to other diamagnetic atoms, i.e. 199Hg. We have developed and tested at TRIUMF-ISAC an on-line EDM experiment that will collect and make measurements on the short-lived species (T1 / 2 ~ 25 m) featuring high-efficiency collection and spin-exchange polarization of noble-gas isotopes. Nuclear-structure issues include determining the octupole collectivity as well as the spacing of opposite parity levels. Experiments are underway at ISOLDE, NSCL and ISAC to study the nuclear structure of isotopes in this mass region. I will report on progress and comment on how we learn about the basic physical parameters of CP violation from EDM measurements. A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or system would arise due to breaking of time-reversal, or equivalently CP symmetry. Experiments to date on the neutron, atoms and molecules have only set upper limits on EDMs. New techniques and systems in which the effects of CP violation would be greatly enhanced are driving the field forward. Systems that may be favorable for significant advances include 221,223Rn, where the combination of octupole collectivity and relatively closely spaced opposite parity levels would increase the nuclear Schiff moment by one or more orders of magnitude compared to other diamagnetic atoms, i.e. 199Hg. We have developed and tested at TRIUMF-ISAC an on-line EDM experiment that will collect

  16. Radon as a hydrological indicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komae, Takami [National Research Inst. of Agricultural Engineering, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    The radon concentration in water is measured by a liquid scintillation method. After the radioactive equilibrium between radon and the daughter nuclides was attained, the radon concentration was determined by the liquid scintillation analyzer. {alpha}-ray from radon, then two {beta}- and two {alpha}-ray from the daughter nuclei group were released, so that 500% of the apparent counting efficiency was obtained. The detector limit is about 0.03 Bq/l, the low value, which corresponds to about 5.4x10{sup -15} ppm. By determining the radon concentration in groundwater, behavior of radon in hydrological process, the groundwater exchange caused by pumping and exchange between river water and groundwater were investigated. The water circulation analysis by means of radon indicator in the environment was shown. By using the large difference of radon concentration between in river water and in groundwater, arrival of injected water to the sampling point of groundwater was detected. (S.Y.)

  17. Radon-Instrumentation; Radon-Instrumentacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno y Moreno, A. [Departamento de Apoyo en Ciencias Aplicadas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, 4 Sur 104, Centro Historico 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The presentation of the active and passive methods for radon, their identification and measure, instrumentation and characteristics are the objectives of this work. Active detectors: Active Alpha Cam Continuous Air Monitor, Model 758 of Victoreen, Model CMR-510 Continuous Radon Monitor of the Signature Femto-Tech. Passive detectors: SSNTD track detectors in solids Measurement Using Charcoal Canisters, disk of activated coal deposited in a metallic box Electrets Methodology. (Author)

  18. The radon gas. An air pollutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Santiago Quindós Poncela

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work different aspects about the problem of the radon in dwellings are approached. This gas of natural origin is virtually present in all the soils in the earth’s crust due to the presence of uranium and radium in the composition of them. Depending on architectural factors and of occupancy habits of the house, high concentrations of this gas can be reached indoors. In these situations, there is a quantifiable increment of the risk of developing lung cancer in the inhabitants of the housing. In the last years the methodological improvements in the realization of epidemiologic studies have led to the obtaining of scientific evidences about the relationship between the presence of indoor radon and the risk of lung cancer. This relationship, found years ago in workers of uranium mines, has been corroborated in the case of the residential radon by the light of several recent meta-analysis performed on groups of epidemiologic studies. More than 6.000 radon measurements have been carried out in Spain during the last 25 years. A summary of the results obtained from the main national radon surveys are also presented, as well as the criteria recently established by the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council concerning radon action levels in dwellings and workplaces.

  19. Construction and Measurements of an Improved Vacuum-Swing-Adsorption Radon-Mitigation System

    CERN Document Server

    Street, J; Dunagan, C; Loose, X; Schnee, R W; Stark, M; Sundarnath, K; Tronstad, D

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto detector surfaces, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. An improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon mitigation system and cleanroom build upon a previous design implemented at Syracuse University that achieved radon levels of $\\sim$0.2$\\,$Bq$\\,$m$^{-3}$. This improved system will employ a better pump and larger carbon beds feeding a redesigned cleanroom with an internal HVAC unit and aged water for humidification. With the rebuilt (original) radon mitigation system, the new low-radon cleanroom has already achieved a $>$$\\,$300$\\times$ reduction from an input activity of $58.6\\pm0.7$$\\,$Bq$\\,$m$^{-3}$ to a cleanroom activity of $0.13\\pm0.06$$\\,$Bq$\\,$m$^{-3}$.

  20. Construction and measurements of an improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, J.; Bunker, R.; Dunagan, C.; Loose, X.; Schnee, R. W.; Stark, M.; Sundarnath, K.; Tronstad, D.

    2015-08-01

    In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto detector surfaces, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. An improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon mitigation system and cleanroom build upon a previous design implemented at Syracuse University that achieved radon levels of ˜0.2 Bq m-3. This improved system will employ a better pump and larger carbon beds feeding a redesigned cleanroom with an internal HVAC unit and aged water for humidification. With the rebuilt (original) radon mitigation system, the new low-radon cleanroom has already achieved a > 300× reduction from an input activity of 58.6 ± 0.7 Bq m-3 to a cleanroom activity of 0.13 ± 0.06 Bq m-3.

  1. Construction and measurements of an improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Street, J., E-mail: joseph.street@mines.sdsmt.edu; Bunker, R.; Dunagan, C.; Loose, X.; Schnee, R. W.; Stark, M.; Sundarnath, K.; Tronstad, D. [Department of Physics, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, Rapid City, SD 57701 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto detector surfaces, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. An improved vacuum-swing-adsorption radon mitigation system and cleanroom build upon a previous design implemented at Syracuse University that achieved radon levels of ∼0.2 Bq m{sup −3}. This improved system will employ a better pump and larger carbon beds feeding a redesigned cleanroom with an internal HVAC unit and aged water for humidification. With the rebuilt (original) radon mitigation system, the new low-radon cleanroom has already achieved a > 300× reduction from an input activity of 58.6 ± 0.7 Bq m{sup −3} to a cleanroom activity of 0.13 ± 0.06 Bq m{sup −3}.

  2. Indoor radon concentrations in Poland as determined in short-term (two-day) measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, M; Mnich, Z; Karpińska, M; Kapała, J; Zalewski, P

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to obtain a pattern of 222Rn concentration distributions in typical buildings in Poland. In the investigations, the environmental passive detectors of the PICO-RAD type were used. The study encompassed buildings that were typical for Poland. The distribution of airborne 222Rn concentrations indoors is of a log-normal type. A total 1171 detectors were measured. Measurements were made in 319 basements, the remaining 852 measurements were carried out in the inhabited part of the houses. The radon concentrations in the basements in Bq x m(-3) ranged from 6 to 1300 with the arithmetic mean AM = 60, geometric mean GM = 30 and median M = 28, whereas those in the inhabited parts of the house (above the ground level) were: AM = 25, GM = 17 and M = 16 with the highest record value of 420.

  3. Indoor radon concentrations in Poland as determined in short-term (two-day) measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalewski, M.; Mnich, Z.; Karpiska, M.; Kapala, J.; Zalewski, P

    2001-07-01

    The aim of the present work was to obtain a pattern of {sup 222}Rn concentration distributions in typical buildings in Poland. In the investigations, the environmental passive detectors of the PICO-RAD type were used. The study encompassed buildings that were typical for Poland. The distribution of airborne {sup 222}Rn concentrations indoors is of a log-normal type. A total 1171 detectors were measured. Measurements were made in 319 basements, the remaining 852 measurements were carried out in the inhabited part of the houses. The radon concentrations in the basements in Bq.m{sup -3} ranged from 6 to 1300 with the arithmetic mean AM=60, geometric mean GM=30 and median M=28, whereas those in the inhabited parts of the house (above the ground level) were: AM=25, GM=17 and M=16 with the highest record value of 420. (author)

  4. Radon Control Activities for Lung Cancer Prevention in National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Plans, 2005–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sherri L.; Angell, William

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer among smokers and the leading cause among nonsmokers. The US Environmental Protection Agency recommends that every home be tested for radon. Comprehensive Cancer Control (CCC) programs develop cancer coalitions that coordinate funding and resources to focus on cancer activities that are recorded in cancer plans. Radon tests, remediation, and radon mitigation techniques are relatively inexpensive, but it is unclear whether coalitions recognize radon as an important carcinogen. Methods We reviewed 65 cancer plans created from 2005 through 2011 for the terms “radon,” “radiation,” or “lung.” Plan activities were categorized as radon awareness, home testing, remediation, supporting radon policy activities, or policy evaluation. We also reviewed each CCC program’s most recent progress report. Cancer plan content was reviewed to assess alignment with existing radon-specific policies in each state. Results Twenty-seven of the plans reviewed (42%) had radon-specific terminology. Improving awareness of radon was included in all 27 plans; also included were home testing (n = 21), remediation (n = 11), support radon policy activities (n = 13), and policy evaluation (n = 1). Three plans noted current engagement in radon activities. Thirty states had radon-specific laws; most (n = 21) were related to radon professional licensure. Eleven states had cancer plan activities that aligned with existing state radon laws. Conclusion Although several states have radon-specific policies, approximately half of cancer coalitions may not be aware of radon as a public health issue. CCC-developed cancer coalitions and plans should prioritize tobacco control to address lung cancer but should consider addressing radon through partnership with existing radon control programs. PMID:23928457

  5. Optimized measurement of radium-226 concentration in liquid samples with radon-222 emanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Aupiais, Jean; Girault, Frédéric; Przylibski, Tadeusz A; Bouquerel, Hélène

    2016-06-01

    Measuring radium-226 concentration in liquid samples using radon-222 emanation remains competitive with techniques such as liquid scintillation, alpha or mass spectrometry. Indeed, we show that high-precision can be obtained without air circulation, using an optimal air to liquid volume ratio and moderate heating. Cost-effective and efficient measurement of radon concentration is achieved by scintillation flasks and sufficiently long counting times for signal and background. More than 400 such measurements were performed, including 39 dilution experiments, a successful blind measurement of six reference test solutions, and more than 110 repeated measurements. Under optimal conditions, uncertainties reach 5% for an activity concentration of 100 mBq L(-1) and 10% for 10 mBq L(-1). While the theoretical detection limit predicted by Monte Carlo simulation is around 3 mBq L(-1), a conservative experimental estimate is rather 5 mBq L(-1), corresponding to 0.14 fg g(-1). The method was applied to 47 natural waters, 51 commercial waters, and 17 wine samples, illustrating that it could be an option for liquids that cannot be easily measured by other methods. Counting of scintillation flasks can be done in remote locations in absence of electricity supply, using a solar panel. Thus, this portable method, which has demonstrated sufficient accuracy for numerous natural liquids, could be useful in geological and environmental problems, with the additional benefit that it can be applied in isolated locations and in circumstances when samples cannot be transported.

  6. Indoor radon in a Spanish region with different gamma exposure levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quindos, L.S. [RADON Group, Faculty of Medicine, University of Cantabria, c/Cardenal Herrera Oria s/n, 39011 Santander (Spain)], E-mail: quindosl@unican.es; Fernandez, P.L. [RADON Group, Faculty of Medicine, University of Cantabria, c/Cardenal Herrera Oria s/n, 39011 Santander (Spain)], E-mail: pedroluis.fernandez@unican.es; Sainz, C. [RADON Group, Faculty of Medicine, University of Cantabria, c/Cardenal Herrera Oria s/n, 39011 Santander (Spain)], E-mail: sainzc@unican.es; Fuente, I. [RADON Group, Faculty of Medicine, University of Cantabria, c/Cardenal Herrera Oria s/n, 39011 Santander (Spain)], E-mail: ismael.fuente@unican.es; Nicolas, J. [RADON Group, Faculty of Medicine, University of Cantabria, c/Cardenal Herrera Oria s/n, 39011 Santander (Spain)], E-mail: nicolas_jorge@yahoo.es; Quindos, L. [RADON Group, Faculty of Medicine, University of Cantabria, c/Cardenal Herrera Oria s/n, 39011 Santander (Spain)], E-mail: quindosll@unican.es; Arteche, J. [RADON Group, Faculty of Medicine, University of Cantabria, c/Cardenal Herrera Oria s/n, 39011 Santander (Spain)], E-mail: jlag@inm.es

    2008-10-15

    In the beginning of 1990s within the framework of a national radon survey of more than 1500 points, radon measurements were performed in more than 100 houses located in Galicia region, in the Northwest area of Spain. The houses were randomly selected only bearing in mind general geological aspects of the region. Subsequently, a nationwide project called MARNA dealt with external gamma radiation measurements in order to draw a Spanish natural radiation map. The comparison in Galicia between these estimations and the indoor radon levels previously obtained showed good agreement. With the purpose of getting a confirmation of this relationship and also of creating a radon map of the zone, a new set of measurements were carried out in 2005. A total of 300 external gamma radiation measurements were carried out as well as 300 measurements of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K content in soil. Concerning radon, 300 1-m-depth radon measurements in soil were performed, and indoor radon concentration was determined in a total of 600 dwellings. Radon content in soil gave more accurate indoor radon predictions than external gamma radiation or {sup 226}Ra concentration in soil.

  7. In vivo Measurement of Unattached Radon Progeny Deposited in the Human Respiratory Tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterweck, G.; Vezzu, G.; Schuler, Ch.; Mueller, R.; Marsh, J.W.; Thrift, S.; Birchall, A

    2001-07-01

    Seven nose breathing and seven mouth breathing volunteers were exposed to atmospheres enriched with unattached radon progeny ({sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi). The activity of these radionuclides deposited in the respiratory track was measured in vivo after the exposures. The results of these measurements are in agreement with predictions calculated with the ICRP Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract Model. Temporal analysis of the activity deposited in the heads of the volunteers leads to the conclusion that a significant amount of the deposited activity associated with particle diameters of about 1 nm is not subject to a fast transport to the gastrointestinal tract as generally reported for larger aerosol particles. (author)

  8. A primary standard source of radon-222 based on the HPGe detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, M Y A; Vasyanovich, M; Zhukovsky, M

    2017-02-01

    The present paper describes the prototype of a calibration standard system for radon concentrations to be used in establishing the traceability of radon concentration measurements in dwellings. Radon gas was generated with a radium-226 solid source in a certified volume as a closed system. The activity of the radon that was released in the closed system was determined from the difference between the absolute activity of the standard radium solid source and the residual radon decay products ((214)Bi or (214)Pb). A high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, which was calibrated using gamma reference standard sources, was used to measure the activity of a radium solid source and radon decay products ((214)Bi or (214)Pb). The emanation factor of the (226)Ra source was controlled online with the HPGe detector. Radon activity was achieved at ~1500±45Bq from the radium source at 3.95±0.2kBq under equilibrium conditions. After this activity, the radon gas was transferred into the closed system producing radon activity concentrations of 31.1±0.3kBq/m(3). Systematic errors were found of less than 4% with a random error around 0.5%. The random error is generally associated with the estimation of the count rate of the measured radon progenies ((214)Po and (214)Po for alpha measurements or (214)Pb and (214)Bi for gamma measurements), but systematic errors are associated with the errors introduced by the instrumentation and measurement technique. The system that was developed has a high degree of accuracy and can be recommended as a national or regional prototype standard of radon activity concentration to calibrate different working radon measurement devices.

  9. Radon in Dwellings in the Republic of Kalmykia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aakerblom, Gustav (Aakerblom och Aakerblom HP, Skaerholmen (Sweden)); German, Olga; Soederman, Ann-Louise (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Stockholm (Sweden)); Stamat, Ivan; Venkov, Vladimir (Research Inst. of Radiation Hygiene, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation))

    2009-02-15

    The National Radon Survey in the Republic of Kalmykia, Russian Federation during 2006-2007 was carried out in a cooperation project between the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI) and the Russian Institute of Radiation Hygiene (RIRH). In August 2006 SSI, RIRH, federal and local authorities carried out a field study in Kalmykia when radon daughter measurements (equilibrium equivalent radon concentrations in the air) and gamma radiation measurements were made in 103 buildings. Gamma spectrometry measurements were made at several sites. During the visit the cooperating parties devoted some time to the education of local authorities on radon related issues. During three months in the winter season 2006-2007, long term radon trace measurements were made in 525 randomly chosen dwellings in the Republic of Kalmykia. The radon gas activity varied between 3 and 973 Bq/m3, with a mean value of 122 Bq/m3. In 19 of a total of 835 measurement points, the radon activity exceeded the maximum permitted value in Russia of 200 Bq/m3 of EERC. The year-round radon trace measurement were made in 20 houses in Elista, the capital of the Republic of Kalmykia, for comparison with the three-month measurements. The year-round measurements showed some higher values for the radon activity, and a correction factor of 0.85 was applied. Using data on the number of people living in detached houses and apartments, and applying the radon activities measured, the number of new lung cancer cases caused by radon was calculated to be 20 to 40 of the 100 new cases reported annually. The methods of construction of the dwellings in Kalmykia is greatly influenced by the history and culture. Most of them were built after World War II and there are only a few that are newly built because of the poor economic situation and the low population growth rate in the Republic. Most people live in detached houses, one-storied with 3-5 rooms, built directly on the ground or on coquina blocks or on a cast

  10. Interpreting short and medium exposure etched-track radon measurements to determine whether an action level could be exceeded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman, A R; Crockett, R G M; Groves-Kirkby, C J; Phillips, P S

    2016-10-01

    Radon gas is naturally occurring, and can concentrate in the built environment. It is radioactive and high concentration levels within buildings, including homes, have been shown to increase the risk of lung cancer in the occupants. As a result, several methods have been developed to measure radon. The long-term average radon level determines the risk to occupants, but there is always pressure to complete measurements more quickly, particularly when buying and selling the home. For many years, the three-month exposure using etched-track detectors has been the de facto standard, but a decade ago, Phillips et al. (2003), in a DEFRA funded project, evaluated the use of 1-week and 1-month measurements. They found that the measurement methods were accurate, but the challenge lay in the wide variation in radon levels - with diurnal, seasonal, and other patterns due to climatic factors and room use. In the report on this work, and in subsequent papers, the group proposed methodologies for 1-week, 1-month and 3-month measurements and their interpretation. Other work, however, has suggested that 2-week exposures were preferable to 1-week ones. In practice, the radon remediation industry uses a range of exposure times, and further guidance is required to help interpret these results. This paper reviews the data from this study and a subsequent 4-year study of 4 houses, re-analysing the results and extending them to other exposures, particularly for 2-week and 2-month exposures, and provides comprehensive guidance for the use of etched-track detectors, the value and use of Seasonal Correction Factors (SCFs), the uncertainties in short and medium term exposures and the interpretation of results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. RADON DIAGNOSTIC MEASUREMENT GUIDANCE FOR LARGE BUILDINGS - VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses the development of radon diagnostic procedures and mitigation strategies applicable to a variety of large non-residential buildings commonly found in Florida. The investigations document and evaluate the nature of radon occurrence and entry mechanisms for rad...

  12. SOME RESULTS FROM THE DEMONSTRATION OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION MEASURES IN BLOCK BASEMENT HOUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Active soil ventilation techniques have been tested in 26 block-wall basement houses in eastern Pennsylvania with significantly elevated indoor radon concentrations, generally above 740 Bq/m3, and the results indicate that radon levels can be reduced substantially often below the...

  13. Some investigations and use of LR-115 track detectors for radon measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Amrani, D

    2001-01-01

    Closed passive integrating radon dosimeters based on the use of cellulose nitrate (LR-115 type II) have been developed for assessment of long term radon exposure. This paper presents and comments the results of investigations, of registration efficiency, calibration factors, linearity tests and lower limit of detection for LR-115 detectors from different batches.

  14. A comparison between active and passive techniques for measurements of radon emanation factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Coto, I. [Dept. Fisica Aplicada, University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain)], E-mail: Israel.lopez@dfa.uhu.es; Mas, J.L. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada I, E.U.P., University of Seville, Seville (Spain); San Miguel, E.G.; Bolivar, J.P. [Dept. Fisica Aplicada, University of Huelva, Huelva (Spain); Sengupta, D. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, I.I.T. Kharagpur, West Bengal (India)

    2009-05-15

    Some radon related parameters have been determined through two different techniques (passive and active) in soil and phosphogypsum samples. Emanation factors determined through these techniques show a good agreement for soil samples while for phosphogympsum samples appear large discrepancies. In this paper, these discrepancies are analyzed and explained if non-controlled radon leakages in the passive technique are taken into account.

  15. RADON DIAGNOSTIC MEASUREMENT GUIDANCE FOR LARGE BUILDINGS - VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report discusses the development of radon diagnostic procedures and mitigation strategies applicable to a variety of large non-residential buildings commonly found in Florida. The investigations document and evaluate the nature of radon occurrence and entry mechanisms for rad...

  16. Construction and measurements of a vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, R. W.; Bunker, R.; Ghulam, G.; Jardin, D.; Kos, M.; Tenney, A. S.

    2013-08-01

    Long-lived alpha and beta emitters in the 222Rn decay chain on (and near) detector surfaces may be the limiting background in many experiments attempting to detect dark matter or neutrinoless double beta decay, and in screening detectors. In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto the wires of the Beta Cage during its assembly, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at Syracuse University using a vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system. The radon filter shows ˜20× reduction at its output, from 7.47±0.56 to 0.37±0.12 Bq/m3, and the cleanroom radon activity meets project requirements, with a lowest achieved value consistent with that of the filter, and levels consistently < 2 Bq/m3.

  17. Construction and measurements of a vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system

    CERN Document Server

    Schnee, R W; Ghulam, G; Jardin, D; Kos, M; Tenney, A S

    2014-01-01

    Long-lived alpha and beta emitters in the $^{222}$Rn decay chain on (and near) detector surfaces may be the limiting background in many experiments attempting to detect dark matter or neutrinoless double-beta decay, and in screening detectors. In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto the wires of the BetaCage during its assembly, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at Syracuse University using a vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system. The radon filter shows ~20$\\times$ reduction at its output, from 7.47$\\pm$0.56 to 0.37$\\pm$0.12 Bq/m$^3$, and the cleanroom radon activity meets project requirements, with a lowest achieved value consistent with that of the filter, and levels consistently < 2 Bq/m$^3$.

  18. Construction and measurements of a vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnee, R. W.; Bunker, R.; Ghulam, G.; Jardin, D.; Kos, M.; Tenney, A. S. [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States)

    2013-08-08

    Long-lived alpha and beta emitters in the {sup 222}Rn decay chain on (and near) detector surfaces may be the limiting background in many experiments attempting to detect dark matter or neutrinoless double beta decay, and in screening detectors. In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto the wires of the Beta Cage during its assembly, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at Syracuse University using a vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system. The radon filter shows ∼20× reduction at its output, from 7.47±0.56 to 0.37±0.12 Bq/m{sup 3}, and the cleanroom radon activity meets project requirements, with a lowest achieved value consistent with that of the filter, and levels consistently < 2 Bq/m{sup 3}.

  19. Indoor radon and radon daughters survey at Campinas-Brazil using CR-39: First results

    CERN Document Server

    Guedes, S; Iunes, P J; Navia, L M S; Neman, R S; Paulo, S R; Rodrigues, V C; Souza, W F; Tello, C A S; Zúñiga, A G

    1999-01-01

    The first results of a radon and radon daughters (RD) survey performed at Campinas-SP, Brazil, are presented. We employed a technique that, potentially, makes possible to measure the radon and RD activity in the air and to separate from this result the activity of radon, alone. In this preliminary paper only the former activity is studied.

  20. Radon programmes and health marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojtikova, Ivana; Rovenska, Katerina

    2011-05-01

    Being aware of negative health effects of radon exposure, many countries aim for the reduction of the radon exposure of their population. The Czech radon programme was commenced >20 y ago. Since then experts have gathered a lot of knowledge, necessary legislation has been enacted, tens of thousands of inhabitants have been offered free measurement and subsidy for the mitigation. Despite the effort, the effectiveness of the radon programme seems to be poor. Newly built houses still exhibit elevated radon concentrations and the number of houses mitigated is very low. Is it possible to enhance the effectivity of radon programme while keeping it on a voluntary basis? One possible way is to employ health marketing that draws together traditional marketing theories and science-based strategies to prevention. The potential of using marketing principles in communication and delivery of radon information will be discussed.

  1. Indoor radon, geogenic radon surrogates and geology - Investigations on their correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, H; Baumgartner, A; Bernreiter, M; Gräser, J; Gruber, V; Kabrt, F; Kaineder, H; Maringer, F J; Ringer, W; Seidel, C; Wurm, G

    2017-01-01

    The indoor radon concentration was measured in most houses in a couple of municipalities in Austria. At the same time the activity concentration of radium in soil, the soil gas radon concentration, the permeability of the ground and the ambient dose equivalent rate were also measured and the geological situations (geological units) were recorded too. From the indoor radon concentration and different house and living parameters a radon potential (Austrian radon potential) was derived which should represent the radon concentration in a standard room. Another radon potential (Neznal radon potential) was calculated from the soil gas radon concentration and the permeability. The aim of the investigation was to correlate all the different variables and to test if the use of surrogate data (e.g. geological information, ambient dose equivalent rate, etc.) can be used to judge the radon risk for an area without performing numerous indoor measurements.

  2. Geohydrological control on radon availability in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Yogesh; Prasad, Ganesh [Department of Physics, H. N. B. Garhwal University, Badshahi Thaul Campus, Tehri Garhwal 249 199 (India); Choubey, V.M. [Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology, Dehradun 248001 (India); Ramola, R.C. [Department of Physics, H. N. B. Garhwal University, Badshahi Thaul Campus, Tehri Garhwal 249 199 (India)], E-mail: rcramola@gmail.com

    2009-01-15

    The radon content in groundwater sources depends on the radium concentration in the rock of the aquifer. Radon was measured in water in many parts of the world, mostly for the risk assessment due to consumption of drinking water. The exposure to radon through drinking water is largely by inhalation and ingestion. Airborne radon can be released during normal household activities and can pose a greater potential health risk than radon ingested with water. Transport of radon through soil and bedrock by water depends mainly on the percolation of water through the pores and along fractured planes of bedrock. In this study, radon concentration in springs and hand pumps of Kumaun and Garhwal Himalaya, India was measured using radon emanometry technique. The study shows that radon concentration in springs and hand pumps is controlled by geohydrological characteristics, which in turn is also governed by tectonic processes.

  3. Indoor radon in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaupotič Janja

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Slovenian Radon Programme started in 1990. Since then, radon and radon short-lived decay products have been surveyed in 730 kindergartens, 890 schools, 1000 randomly selected homes, 5 major spas, 26 major hospitals, 10 major municipal water supply plants, and 8 major wineries. Alpha scintillation cells, etched track detectors, electret-based detectors and various continuously measuring devices have been used. On the basis of estimated effective doses, decisions were made on appropriate mitigation. In total, 35 buildings have been appropriately modified. The programme is displayed and results reviewed chronologically and discussed.

  4. Soil gas and radon entry into a simple test structure: Comparison of experimental and modelling results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.E.; Søgaard-Hansen, J.; Majborn, B.

    1994-01-01

    A radon test structure has been established at a field site at Riso National Laboratory. Measurements have been made of soil gas entry rates, pressure couplings and radon depletion. The experimental results have been compared with results obtained from measured soil parameters and a two......-dimensional steady-state numerical model of Darcy flow and combined diffusive and advective transport of radon. For most probe locations, the calculated values of the pressure couplings and the radon depletion agree well with the measured values, thus verifying important elements of the Darcy flow approximation......, and the ability of the model to treat combined diffusive and advective transport of radon. However, the model gives an underestimation of the soil gas entry rate. Even if it is assumed that the soil has a permeability equal to the highest of the measured values, the model underestimates the soil gas entry rate...

  5. Recognition of microclimate zones through radon mapping, Lechuguilla Cave, Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, K.I.; LaRock, E.J.

    1991-01-01

    Radon concentrations range from temperature and barometric pressure, similar to other Type 2 caves. Most of the cave is developed in three geographic branches beneath the entrance passages; these areas maintain Rn levels independent of surface effects, an indication that Rn levels in deep, complex caves or mines cannot be simply estimated by outside atmospheric parameters. These deeper, more isolated areas are subject to convective ventilation driven by temperature differences along the 477-m vertical extent of the cave. Radon concentrations are used to delineate six microclimate zones (air circulation cells) throughout the cave in conjunction with observed airflow data. Suspected surface connections contribute fresh air to remote cave areas demonstrated by anomalous Rn lows surrounded by higher values, the presence of mammalian skeletal remains, CO2 concentrations and temperatures lower than the cave mean, and associated surficial karst features.

  6. Measurement and apportionment of radon source terms for modeling indoor environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harley, N.H.

    1992-01-01

    During the present 2 1/2 year contract period, we have made significant Progress in modeling the source apportionment of indoor [sup 222]Rn and in [sup 222]Rn decay product dosimetry. Two additional areas were worked on which we believe are useful for the DOE Radon research Program. One involved an analysis of the research house data, grouping the hourly house [sup 222]Rn measurements into 2 day, 7 day and 90 day intervals to simulate the response of passive monitors. Another area requiring some attention resulted in a publication of 3 years of our indoor/outdoor measurements in a high-rise apartment. Little interest has been evinced in apartment measurements yet 20% of the US population lives in multiple-family dwellings, not in contact with the ground. These data together with a summary of all other published data on apartments showed that apartments have only about 50% greater [sup 222]Rn concentration than the measured outdoor [sup 222]Rn. Apartment dwellers generally represent a low risk group regarding [sup 222]Rn exposure. The following sections describe the main projects in some detail.

  7. Calculation and measurement of migration coefficient of radon under laboratory conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Under laboratory conditions (i.e. a sealed system in which the temperature may vary according to air temperature), the migration of radon in upward, downward and horizontal directions has been investigated. After a period of accumulation, the spatial distribution profile of radon was drawn on the basis of the experimental data. The profile showed whorl-shape with bigger ends. The longer the accumulation time, the bigger the whorl end, and the higher the radon concentration is. By fitting the experimental data by least-square statistical method, we find that the distributions of radon follow negative exponential functions in the upward, downward and horizontal directions. However,exponents for the three directions are not exactly identical. The upward migration is more effective than the downward one and both upward and downward migrations are more effective than the horizontal one.

  8. Variation in the annual average radon concentration measured in homes in Mesa County, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, A.S.; George, J.L.; Langner, G.H. Jr.

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the variability in the annual average indoor radon concentration. The TMC has been collecting annual average radon data for the past 5 years in 33 residential structures in Mesa County, Colorado. This report is an interim report that presents the data collected up to the present. Currently, the plans are to continue this study in the future. 62 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Measurement of indoor radon and thoron levels in dwellings and estimation of uranium, thorium and potassium in soil samples from central part of India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kher, R.S. [Department of Physics, Government Science Postgraduate College, Bilaspur 495 006 (India)], E-mail: kherrs@hotmail.com; Khokhar, M.S.K. [Department of Rural Technology, Guru Ghasidas University, Bilaspur 495 009 (India); Rathore, V.B. [Department of Radiotherapy, Pt. J.N.M. Medical College, Raipur 492 001 (India); Ramachandran, T.V. [Environmental Assessment Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2008-08-15

    In the frame of nationwide survey project, measurement of indoor radon/thoron level has been carried out in 132 dwellings situated in 10 different towns/villages of centrally located states Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh. LR 115 solid-state nuclear track detectors in plastic twin chamber dosimeter cups were used for the measurement. The measurements were carried out for a full year, divided into four quarters. The mean radon/thoron concentration at all the locations falls well below the range of active level recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection. The results of uranium, thorium and potassium estimation in soil samples belonging to these areas are also reported. Positive correlation has not been observed between indoor radon/thoron concentration and uranium/thorium content of the soil. It is concluded that the diffusion of radon from soil to dwelling is greatly affected by flooring material.

  10. Indoor and outdoor Radon concentration measurements in Sivas, Turkey, in comparison with geological setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihci, Metin; Buyuksarac, Aydin; Aydemir, Attila; Celebi, Nilgun

    2010-11-01

    Indoor and soil gas Radon ((222)Rn) concentration measurements were accomplished in two stages in Sivas, a central eastern city in Turkey. In the first stage, CR-39 passive nuclear track detectors supplied by the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA) were placed in the selected houses throughout Sivas centrum in two seasons; summer and winter. Before the setup of detectors, a detailed questionnaire form was distributed to the inhabitants of selected houses to investigate construction parameters and properties of the houses, and living conditions of inhabitants. Detectors were collected back two months later and analysed at TAEA laboratories to obtain indoor (222)Rn gas concentration values. In the second stage, soil gas (222)Rn measurements were performed using an alphameter near the selected houses for the indoor measurements. Although (222)Rn concentrations in Sivas were quite low in relation with the allowable limits, they are higher than the average of Turkey. Indoor and soil gas (222)Rn concentration distribution maps were prepared seperately and these maps were applied onto the surface geological map. In this way, both surveys were correlated with the each other and they were interpreted in comparison with the answers of questionnaire and the geological setting of the Sivas centrum and the vicinity.

  11. Indoor and outdoor Radon concentration measurements in Sivas, Turkey, in comparison with geological setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihci, Metin [Iller Bankasi, Etud Plan ve Yol Dairesi, Opera, 06053 Ankara (Turkey); Buyuksarac, Aydin [Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Department of Geophysical Engineering, 17020, Canakkale (Turkey); Aydemir, Attila, E-mail: aydemir@tpao.gov.t [Turkiye Petrolleri A.O. Mustafa, Kemal Mah. 2. Cad. No: 86, 06100 Sogutozu, Ankara (Turkey); Celebi, Nilgun [Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Centre (CNAEM), Cekmece, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Indoor and soil gas Radon ({sup 222}Rn) concentration measurements were accomplished in two stages in Sivas, a central eastern city in Turkey. In the first stage, CR-39 passive nuclear track detectors supplied by the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA) were placed in the selected houses throughout Sivas centrum in two seasons; summer and winter. Before the setup of detectors, a detailed questionnaire form was distributed to the inhabitants of selected houses to investigate construction parameters and properties of the houses, and living conditions of inhabitants. Detectors were collected back two months later and analysed at TAEA laboratories to obtain indoor {sup 222}Rn gas concentration values. In the second stage, soil gas {sup 222}Rn measurements were performed using an alphameter near the selected houses for the indoor measurements. Although {sup 222}Rn concentrations in Sivas were quite low in relation with the allowable limits, they are higher than the average of Turkey. Indoor and soil gas {sup 222}Rn concentration distribution maps were prepared seperately and these maps were applied onto the surface geological map. In this way, both surveys were correlated with the each other and they were interpreted in comparison with the answers of questionnaire and the geological setting of the Sivas centrum and the vicinity.

  12. Measurements of radon gas concentrations in dwellings of Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah province in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, R I; Alfull, Z Z; Dawood, N D

    2014-01-01

    Indoor radon concentration levels in a large number of dwellings in Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah Province have been measured. Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah is in the western region of Saudi Arabia. It is the second holiest city in Islam after Mecca, because it is the burial place of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad. The city was divided into four regions: western (contains nine sites), eastern (contains six sites), northern (contains nine sites) and southern (contains five sites). Radon gas concentration was measured using the closed chamber technique employing 2×2 cm(2) sheets of CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors. The detectors were kept for a period of 5 to 6 months from September 2010 to February 2011 in order to expose to radon gas. The results of the survey in the western and eastern sites showed that the overall minimum, maximum and average radon concentration levels were 20±1.6, 27±3.2 and 21±2.5 Bq m(-3), respectively. The lowest average radon concentration (20±1.6 Bq m(-3)) was found in Al Anabes and Al Suqya in the western region and Bani Dhafar in the eastern region, while the highest average concentration (27±3.2 Bq m(-3)) was found in Teeyba in the western region and Al 'Aridh in the eastern region, with an average of 21±2.5 Bq m(-3) in the western and eastern sites of Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah. Also in the northern region, the minimum radon concentration was 20±1.6 Bq m(-3) in Oyun, while the maximum was 42±1.6 Bq m(-3) in Sayyed al Shuhadd and Hai Nasr. In the southern region, the minimum radon concentration was 25±2.6 Bq m(-3) at Hai Al Hejrah, while the maximum value was 37±2.6 Bq m(-3) at Al Awali and Dawadia. The average radon concentration was 26±2.5 Bq m(-3) for Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah (western, eastern, northern and southern regions). The corresponding annual effective dose E (mSv y(-1)) to public from (222)Rn and its progeny was estimated to be 0.66 mSv y(-1) as an average value for Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah. The authors concluded that all

  13. Measurement and Result of Soil Gas Radon and Soil Gas Mercury in the Exploration of Haihe Hidden Fault

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Yongxin; Yang Xulian; Li Yibing

    2008-01-01

    In the exploration of the hidden Haihe fault, radon and mercury in soil gas were measured by using FG-3017 radon detector and XG-4 mercury analyzer. In this paper, based on the measurement results of 12 fault gas profiles, and integrating with the exploration results of artificial seismic prospecting, the relationship between anomalous site of fault gas and fault location is analyzed. Using the relationship between anomalous strength of fault gas and fault activity, the activity of Haihe fault is studied, thus the location and activity segmentation of the Haihe fault in Tianjin region are presented. This study shows that the method of fault gas detection can not only identify the preliminary location of fault, but also make preliminary segmentation of fault activity. The fault detected by the method of fault gas measurement is shown as a hand. Through contrasting with exploration results of artificial seismic prospecting and analyzing, we find that the fault is located inside the band. According to the measurements of soil gas radon, the Haihe fault can be divided into east and west segments and the activity of the east segment of Haihe fault is stronger than that of the west segment. This is only a relative result, and it is difficult to judge whether the fault is active or not with this result.

  14. Cornerstones of the Austrian radon risk communication strategy; Eckpfeiler der oesterreichischen Radonrisikokommunikationsstrategie (OeRRKS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunte, A.; Ringer, W. [AGES, Linz (Austria). Oesterreichische Fachstelle fuer Radon

    2015-07-01

    On behalf of the Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management (BMLFUW), the National Radon Centre of Austria developed the National Radon Risk Communication Strategy. The superior goal is the reduction of the radon exposure of Austrian citizens as well as the reduction of radon-related lung cancer deaths. Austria, like many other countries, follows the approach to raise awareness and to inform the public to achieve this goal. The presented strategy deals with the question of how radon protection issues can be communicated to the public, existing fears can be reduced and affected people can be motivated to take action (perform a radon test, if necessary, mitigate or install preventive measures in new buildings). The cornerstones of the National Radon Risk Communication Strategy can be summarized as follows: - Definition of communication goals - Identification and categorization of target groups - Development of specific key messages for each of the target groups - Determination of communication channels and assessment of their efficiency - Integration of the radon issue in education and training - Cooperation with relevant organizations and platforms. The communication objectives, target groups and communication paths (and their evaluation) will be discussed during the presentation in detail.

  15. Association of School District Policies for Radon Testing and Radon-Resistant New Construction Practices with Indoor Radon Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Stephanie; Everett Jones, Sherry

    2016-12-13

    Radon is a naturally occurring, colorless, odorless, and tasteless radioactive gas. Without testing, its presence is unknown. Using nationally representative data from the 2012 School Health Policies and Practices Study, we examined whether the prevalence of school district policies for radon testing and for radon-resistant new construction practices varied by district location in relation to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Map of Radon Zones. Among school districts located in counties with high predicted average indoor radon, 42.4% had policies for radon testing and 37.5% had policies for radon-resistant new construction practices. These findings suggest a critical need for improved awareness among policy makers regarding potential radon exposure for both students and school staff.

  16. Invited Article: Radon and thoron intercomparison experiments for integrated monitors at NIRS, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Omori, Y.; Kavasi, N.

    2014-02-01

    Inhalation of radon (222Rn) and its short-lived decay products and of products of the thoron (220Rn) series accounts for more than half of the effective dose from natural radiation sources. At this time, many countries have begun large-scale radon and thoron surveys and many different measurement methods and instruments are used in these studies. Consequently, it is necessary to improve and standardize technical methods of measurements and to verify quality assurance by intercomparisons between laboratories. Four international intercomparisons for passive integrating radon and thoron monitors were conducted at the NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan). Radon exercises were carried out in the 24.4 m3 inner volume walk-in radon chamber that has systems to control radon concentration, temperature, and humidity. Moreover, the NIRS thoron chamber with a 150 dm3 inner volume was utilized to provide three thoron intercomparisons. At present, the NIRS is the only laboratory world-wide that has carried out periodic thoron intercomparison of passive monitors. Fifty laboratories from 26 countries participated in the radon intercomparison, using six types of detectors (charcoal, CR-39, LR 115, polycarbonate film, electret plate, and silicon photodiode). Eighteen laboratories from 12 countries participated in the thoron intercomparisons, using two etch-track types (CR-39 and polycarbonate) detectors. The tests were made under one to three different exposures to radon and thoron. The data presented in this paper indicated that the performance quality of laboratories for radon measurement has been gradually increasing. Results of thoron exercises showed that the quality for thoron measurements still needs further development and additional studies are needed to improve its measuring methods. The present paper provides a summary of all radon and thoron international intercomparisons done at NIRS from 2007 to date and it describes the present status on radon and

  17. Invited Article: Radon and thoron intercomparison experiments for integrated monitors at NIRS, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janik, M., E-mail: mirek@fml.nirs.go.jp; Ishikawa, T.; Omori, Y.; Kavasi, N. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, 263-8555 Chiba (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Inhalation of radon ({sup 222}Rn) and its short-lived decay products and of products of the thoron ({sup 220}Rn) series accounts for more than half of the effective dose from natural radiation sources. At this time, many countries have begun large-scale radon and thoron surveys and many different measurement methods and instruments are used in these studies. Consequently, it is necessary to improve and standardize technical methods of measurements and to verify quality assurance by intercomparisons between laboratories. Four international intercomparisons for passive integrating radon and thoron monitors were conducted at the NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan). Radon exercises were carried out in the 24.4 m{sup 3} inner volume walk-in radon chamber that has systems to control radon concentration, temperature, and humidity. Moreover, the NIRS thoron chamber with a 150 dm{sup 3} inner volume was utilized to provide three thoron intercomparisons. At present, the NIRS is the only laboratory world-wide that has carried out periodic thoron intercomparison of passive monitors. Fifty laboratories from 26 countries participated in the radon intercomparison, using six types of detectors (charcoal, CR-39, LR 115, polycarbonate film, electret plate, and silicon photodiode). Eighteen laboratories from 12 countries participated in the thoron intercomparisons, using two etch-track types (CR-39 and polycarbonate) detectors. The tests were made under one to three different exposures to radon and thoron. The data presented in this paper indicated that the performance quality of laboratories for radon measurement has been gradually increasing. Results of thoron exercises showed that the quality for thoron measurements still needs further development and additional studies are needed to improve its measuring methods. The present paper provides a summary of all radon and thoron international intercomparisons done at NIRS from 2007 to date and it describes the

  18. A map of radon flux at the Australian land surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Griffiths

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A time-dependent map of radon-222 flux density at the Australian land surface has been constructed with a spatial resolution of 0.05° and temporal resolution of one month. Radon flux density was calculated from a simple model utilising data from national gamma-ray aerial surveys, modelled soil moisture, and maps of soil properties. The model was calibrated against a large data set of accumulation-chamber measurements, thereby constraining it with experimental data. A notable application of the map is in atmospheric mixing and transport studies which use radon as a tracer, where it is a clear improvement on the common assumption of uniform radon flux density.

  19. A map of radon flux at the Australian land surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Griffiths

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A time-dependent map of radon-222 flux density at the Australian land surface has been constructed with a spatial resolution of 0.05° and temporal resolution of one month. Radon flux density was calculated from a simple model utilising data from national gamma-ray aerial surveys; modelled soil moisture, available from 1900 in near real-time; and maps of soil properties. The model was calibrated against a data set of accumulation chamber measurements, thereby constraining it with experimental data. A notable application of the map is in atmospheric mixing and transport studies which use radon as a tracer, where it is a clear improvement on the common assumption of uniform radon flux density.

  20. Submarine groundwater discharge to a small estuary estimated from radon and salinity measurements and a box model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Crusius

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Submarine groundwater discharge was quantified by a variety of methods for a 4-day period during the early summer of 2004, in Salt Pond, adjacent to Nauset Marsh, on Cape Cod, USA. Discharge estimates based on radon and salinity took advantage of the presence of the narrow channel connecting Salt Pond to Nauset Marsh, which allowed constructing whole-pond mass balances as water flowed in and out due to tidal fluctuations. The data suggest that less than one quarter of the discharge in the vicinity of Salt Pond happened within the pond itself, while three quarters or more of the discharge occurred immediately seaward of the pond, either in the channel or in adjacent regions of Nauset Marsh. Much of this discharge, which maintains high radon activities and low salinity, is carried into the pond during each incoming tide. A box model was used as an aid to understand both the rates and the locations of discharge in the vicinity of Salt Pond. The model achieves a reasonable fit to both the salinity and radon data assuming submarine groundwater discharge is fresh and that most of it occurs either in the channel or in adjacent regions of Nauset Marsh. Salinity and radon data, together with seepage meter results, do not rule out discharge of saline groundwater, but suggest either that the saline discharge is at most comparable in volume to the fresh discharge or that it is depleted in radon. The estimated rate of fresh groundwater discharge in the vicinity of Salt Pond is 3000-7000 m3 d-1. This groundwater flux estimated from the radon and salinity data is comparable to a value of 3200-4500 m3 d-1 predicted by a recent hydrologic model (Masterson, 2004; Colman and Masterson, 2004, although the model predicts this rate of discharge to the pond whereas our data suggest most of the groundwater bypasses the pond prior to discharge. Additional work is needed to determine if the measured rate of discharge is representative of the long-term average, and to

  1. Measurement of radioactivity and radon exhalation rate in different kinds of marbles and granites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Dine, N W; El-Shershaby, A; Ahmed, F; Abdel-Haleem, A S

    2001-12-01

    Geological materials usually contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) have become a focus of great attention. These NORM under certain conditions can reach hazardous contamination levels. Some contamination levels may be sufficiently severe that precautions must be taken. The present study deals with 60 geological samples (marble and granite) from both Egyptian and foreign locations. The studied samples were analyzed and the concentrations in Bq/kg dry weight of radioisotopes were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry using hyper-pure germanium (HPGe) detector in Bq/kg dry weight. The absorbed dose rate due to the natural radioactivity in the samples under investigation ranged from 2.45 +/- 0.07 to 64.44 +/- 1.93 nGy/h for marble and from 41.55 +/- 1.25 to 111.94 +/- 3.36 nGy/h for granite. The radium equivalent activity varied from 5.46 +/- 0.16 to 150.52 +/- 4.52 Bq/kg for marble samples and from 229.52 +/- 6.89 to 92.16 +/- 2.76 Bq/kg for granite. The representative external hazard index values for the corresponding samples are also estimated and given. The radon exhalation rates for marble and granite samples were also calculated by using solid state nuclear track detector (CR-39). The value of radium exhalation rate varied from 8.0 +/- 2.39 to 30.20 +/- 5.06 Bq/m2/d for marble and 6.89 +/- 1.72 to 25.79 +/- 4.38 Bq/m2/d for granite and the effective radium content was found to vary from 1.700 +/- 0.51 to 6.42 +/- 1.08 Bq/kg for marble and 1.29 +/- 0.32 to 5.63 +/- 0.96 Bq/kg for granite. The values of the radon exhalation rate and effective radium content are found to correspond with the values of uranium concentration measured by the HPGe detector in the corresponding sample.

  2. Radon mapping strategies in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, V; Ringer, W; Wurm, G; Friedmann, H

    2015-11-01

    According to current European and international recommendations (e.g. by IAEA, WHO and European Union), countries shall identify high radon areas. In Austria, this task was initiated already in the early 1990s, which yielded the first Austrian Radon Potential Map. This map is still in use, updated with recent indoor radon data in 2012. The map is based on radon gas measurements in randomly selected dwellings, normalised to a standard situation. To meet the current (legal) requirements, uncertainties in the existing Austrian radon map should be reduced. A new indoor radon survey with a different sampling strategy was started, and possible mapping methods are studied and tested. In this paper, the methodology for the existing map as well as the planned strategies to improve this map is discussed.

  3. Measurement of HO{sub x}{center_dot} production rate due to radon decay in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Huiling

    1993-08-01

    Radon in indoor air may cause the exposure of the public to excessive radioactivity. Radiolysis of water vapor in indoor air due to radon decay could produce ({center_dot}OH and HO{sub 2} {center_dot}) that may convert atmospheric constituents to compounds of lower vapor pressure. These lower vapor pressure compounds might then nucleate to form new particles in the indoor atmosphere. Chemical amplification was used to determine HO{sub x}{center_dot} production rate in indoor air caused by radon decay. Average HO{sub x}{center_dot} production rate was found to be (4.31{plus_minus}0.07) {times} 10{sup 5} HO{sub x}{center_dot} per Rn decay per second (Bq) 3.4 to 55.0% at 22C. This work provided G{sub (HO{sub x}{center_dot})}-value, 7.86{plus_minus}0.13 No./100 eV in air by directly measuring [HO{sub x}{center_dot}] formed from the radiolysis procedure. This G value implies that HO{sub x}{center_dot} produced by radon decay in air might be formed by multiple processes and may be result of positive ion-molecule reactions, primary radiolysis, and radical reactions. There is no obvious relation between HO{sub x}{center_dot} production rate and relative humidity. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been used for {center_dot}OH production rate measurement; it consists of an excimer laser, a dye laser, a frequency doubler, a gaseous fluorescence chamber, and other optical and electronic parts. This system needs to be improved to eliminate the interferences of light scattering and artificial {center_dot}OH produced from the photolysis of O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O.

  4. Indoor radon (Rn-222) concentration measurements in Cyprus using high-sensitivity portable detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Anastasiou, T; Christofides, S; Christodoulides, G

    2003-01-01

    Using high--sensitivity radon (Rn-222) portable detectors, the airborne Rn-222 concentration in the interior of various Cypriot buildings and dwellings was measured. For each preselected building and dwelling, a calibrated detector was put into a closed room, and the Rn-222 concentration was registered in sampling intervals of 2 to 4 hours for a total counting time of typically 48 hours. Rn-222 activity concentrations were found to be in the range of 6.2 to 102.8 Bq/m**3, with an overall arithmetic mean value of (19.3 +- 1.6) Bq/m**3. This value is by a factor of two below the world average (population-weighted) value of 39 Bq/m**3. The total annual effective dose equivalent to the Cypriot population was calculated to be between 0.16 and 2.6 mSv with an overall arithmetic mean value of (0.49 +- 0.04) mSv.

  5. Measurement of radon in air using the PICO-RAD detector and a liquid scintillation spectrometer. 2. Misasa district, Tottori pref. on sampling of 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Taeko; Inagaki, Masayo; Morishima, Hiroshige; Kawai, Hiroshi; Kondo, Sohei [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Morishita, Satoru; Kitamura, Naoya; Mifune, Masaaki

    1994-12-01

    A convenient radon detecting device for the purpose of estimating natural radiation exposure is described. The {alpha} radioactivity of its daughters originated from radon gas adsorbed in fine active carbon particles exposed to air is measured with a liquid scintillation spectrometer (Packard PICO-RAD system). Its detection limit is 1.7 Bq/m{sup 3} in air with an accuracy of about 10% on 200 minutes of counting time, and correction coefficient, the ratio of measured radon concentration to standard radon concentration (about 300 Bq/m{sup 3}) is 0.75 on the standard radon gas chamber of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Radon concentrations at Misasa hot springs in Tottori prefecture were measured using the PICO-RAD method on 1993. They were 128-3,600 Bq/m{sup 3} in a bath room, 25-45 Bq/m{sup 3} outdoors and 28-89 Bq/m{sup 3} indoors. (author).

  6. In vivo measurements of lead-210 for assessing cumulative radon exposure in uranium miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilmette, R.A.; Laurer, G.R. [New York Univ. Inst. of Environmental Medicine, Tuxedo, NY (United States); Lambert, W.E.; Gilliland, F.D. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    It has long been recognized that a major contributor to the uncertainty in risk analysis of lung cancer in uranium and other hard rock miners is the estimation of total radon progeny exposure of individual miners under study. These uncertainties arise from the fact that only a limited number of measurements of airborne {sup 222}Rn progeny concentrations were made in the mines during the times that the miners were being exposed, and that dosimeters capable of integrating the Rn progeny exposures of the miners did not exist. Historically, the cumulative exposures for individual uranium and other hard rock miners have been calculated by combining the employee`s work history, which may or may not have included time spent at different jobs within the mines and at different locations within the mines, with whatever periodic measurements of Rn and Rn progeny were available. The amount and quality of the measurement data varied enormously from mine to mine and from population to population. Because the quality of the exposure data collected during the period of active mining in the United STates cannot now be altered substantially, significant improvement in individual miner exposure estimates is only likely to be achieved if a new cumulative exposure metric is developed and implemented. The decay chain of Rn includes the production of {sup 210}Pb, which can accumulate in the skeleton in amounts proportional to the intake of Rn progeny. We hypothesize that the in vivo measurement of {sup 210}Pb in the skulls of miners will provide such a metric. In summary, the primary purpose of this pilot study to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring {sup 210}Pb in the heads of former uranium miners has been accomplished.

  7. Radon-222 activity flux measurement using activated charcoal canisters: revisiting the methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Sami H; Akber, Riaz A

    2014-03-01

    The measurement of radon ((222)Rn) activity flux using activated charcoal canisters was examined to investigate the distribution of the adsorbed (222)Rn in the charcoal bed and the relationship between (222)Rn activity flux and exposure time. The activity flux of (222)Rn from five sources of varying strengths was measured for exposure times of one, two, three, five, seven, 10, and 14 days. The distribution of the adsorbed (222)Rn in the charcoal bed was obtained by dividing the bed into six layers and counting each layer separately after the exposure. (222)Rn activity decreased in the layers that were away from the exposed surface. Nevertheless, the results demonstrated that only a small correction might be required in the actual application of charcoal canisters for activity flux measurement, where calibration standards were often prepared by the uniform mixing of radium ((226)Ra) in the matrix. This was because the diffusion of (222)Rn in the charcoal bed and the detection efficiency as a function of the charcoal depth tended to counterbalance each other. The influence of exposure time on the measured (222)Rn activity flux was observed in two situations of the canister exposure layout: (a) canister sealed to an open bed of the material and (b) canister sealed over a jar containing the material. The measured (222)Rn activity flux decreased as the exposure time increased. The change in the former situation was significant with an exponential decrease as the exposure time increased. In the latter case, lesser reduction was noticed in the observed activity flux with respect to exposure time. This reduction might have been related to certain factors, such as absorption site saturation or the back diffusion of (222)Rn gas occurring at the canister-soil interface.

  8. Mutagenicity of radon and radon daughters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, H.H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of our research is to investigate the dose-response relationship of the lethal and mutagenic effects of exposure of cells to radon and its decay products. Dose rate dependence and the nature of the DNA lesion will be studied, using the thymidine kinase and HPRT loci to measure mutation frequency. A deficiency in DNA repair is shown to lead to a greater proportion of mutants with intergenic lesions. The cytotoxic effects of radon and its daughters are similar in human TK6 lymphoblasts and mouse L5178Y lymphoblasts, the cell line used in previous experiments. The results of molecular analysis of four spontaneous and 25 X-radiation induced HPRT{sup {minus}} mutants. Eleven radon-induced HPRT{sup {minus}} mutants have been isolated, and will be analyzed in a similar fashion. 9 figs.

  9. Scopingsreport Radon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauboer RO; Vaas LH; Hesse JM; Slooff W

    1989-01-01

    Dit scopingsrapport vormt een onderdeel van de voorbereiding tot het opstellen van het basisdocument radon. Het doel van dit rapport is het algemene kennisniveau van de deelnemers aan de scopingsbijeenkomst aangaande radon op eenzelfde peil te brengen en discussie- en beslispunten inzake de inho

  10. Scopingsreport Radon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauboer RO; Vaas LH; Hesse JM; Slooff W

    1989-01-01

    Dit scopingsrapport vormt een onderdeel van de voorbereiding tot het opstellen van het basisdocument radon. Het doel van dit rapport is het algemene kennisniveau van de deelnemers aan de scopingsbijeenkomst aangaande radon op eenzelfde peil te brengen en discussie- en beslispunten inzake de inho

  11. Measure of exposure of short-lived radon products using an alpha spectrometer for measuring indoor aerosol activity concentration and dose evaluation; Misure di esposizione ai prodotti di decadimento del radon a breve vita tramite uno spettrometro alfa per la misura dell'attivita' del particolato atmosferico indoor e valutazioni dosimetriche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berico, M.; Castellani, C.M.; Formignani, M. [ENEA, Divisione Protezione dell' Uomo e degli Ecosistemi, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Mariotti, F. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2001-07-01

    A new italian law introduces the regulation of occupational exposure to radon. To evaluate the inhalation of radon daughters by the workers a sampling device has been assembled with the aim of evaluation of unattached and aerosol attached radon daughters' fractions. The instrument, based on selection of the aerosuspended particles by means of a wire screen type battery and subsequent collection on a total filter, allows to describe the behaviour of both fractions using defined temporal pattern of collecting particles and counting them by alpha spectroscopy. A measurement campaign to test the radon daughter dichotomous spectrometer in comparison with a commercial Radon Working Level meter, has been performed in a research laboratory of central Italy affected by high radon concentrations. The radon concentration during the measurement campaign has been also measured. The equilibrium factor F{sub e}q ad the attachment factor fp have been evaluated during 3 days campaign. Using the measured mean parameters (radon concentration, F{sub e}q, f{sub p}) the dose evaluation for workers using dosimetric approach has been performed. A comparison between the epidemiologic approach, based on the radon concentration, and dosimetric approach is also presented. [Italian] L'esposizione a radon in ambiente lavorativo e la conseguente inalazione dei suoi prodotti di decadimento in forma particolata e' oggetto di una recente normativa italiana in materia di protezione dalle radiazioni ionizzanti. Per rispondere a questa necessita', presso l'Istituto per la Radioprotezione dell'ENEA di Bologna e' stato progettato e realizzato uno spettrometro alfa per la misura della progenie del radon con la finalita' di valutare, su brevi periodi di tempo, la concentrazione individuale dei suoi prodotti di decadimento e, con l'impiego di batterie a diffusione a reti, consentire inoltre la discriminazione della concentrazione della frazione attaccata e non

  12. Modelling of radon transport in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, E.R.; de Meijer, R.J.; Katase, A; Shimo, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the state of the art of modelling radon transport in soil on basis of multiphase radon transport equations. Emphasis is given to methods to obtain a consistent set of input parameters needed For such models. Model-measurement comparisons with the KVI radon transport Facil

  13. Modelling of radon transport in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, E.R.; de Meijer, R.J.; Katase, A; Shimo, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the state of the art of modelling radon transport in soil on basis of multiphase radon transport equations. Emphasis is given to methods to obtain a consistent set of input parameters needed For such models. Model-measurement comparisons with the KVI radon transport Facil

  14. Reducing Radon in Schools: A Team Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligman, Bryan K.; Fisher, Eugene J.

    This document presents the process of radon diagnostics and mitigation in schools to help educators determine the best way to reduce elevated radon levels found in a school. The guidebook is designed to guide school leaders through the process of measuring radon levels, selecting the best mitigation strategy, and directing the efforts of a…

  15. A Physician's Guide to Radon

    Science.gov (United States)

    This booklet has been developed for physicians by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in consultation with the American Medical Association (AMA). Its purpose is to enlist physicians in the national effort to inform the American public about radon.

  16. Effect of indoor-generated airborne particles on radon progeny dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trassierra, C. Vargas [Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, University of Cassino and Southern Lazio, Cassino, FR (Italy); Stabile, L., E-mail: l.stabile@unicas.it [Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, University of Cassino and Southern Lazio, Cassino, FR (Italy); Cardellini, F.; Morawska, L. [National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (INMRI-ENEA), Rome (Italy); Buonanno, G. [Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, University of Cassino and Southern Lazio, Cassino, FR (Italy); International Laboratory for Air Quality and Health, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Investigation of the interaction between particles and radon progeny dynamics. • Measurements of particles emitted by different indoor sources. • Tests performed in a controlled radon chamber. • Particle size strongly influences the radon progeny dynamics. • Particle surface area concentration is the key parameter of the radon-particle interaction. - Abstract: In order to investigate the interaction between radon progeny and particles, an experimental campaign was carried out in a radon chamber at the Italian National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology, quantifying the amount of attached and unattached radon daughters present in air, as well as the equilibrium factor in the presence of particles generated through indoor sources. A fixed radon concentration was maintained, while particles were generated using incense sticks, mosquito coils and gas combustion. Aerosols were characterized in terms of particle concentrations and size distributions. Simultaneously, radon concentration and attached/unattached potential alpha energy concentration in the air were continuously monitored by two different devices, based on alpha spectroscopy techniques. The presence of particles was found to affect the attached fraction of radon decay products, in such a way that the particles acted as a sink for radionuclides. In terms of sources which emit large particles (e.g. incense, mosquito coils), which greatly increase particle surface area concentrations, the Equilibrium Factor was found to double with respect to the background level before particle generation sessions. On the contrary, the radon decay product dynamics were not influenced by gas combustion processes, mainly due to the small surface area of the particles emitted.

  17. Radon-Nikodym property of conjugate Banach spaces and w*-equivalence theorems of w*-u-measurable functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭铁信

    1996-01-01

    A deep representation theorem of random conjugate spaces and its several important applications are given. As an application of the representation theorem, the following basic theorem is also proved: let B* be the conjugate space of a Banach space B, be a given probability space. Then every B*-valued w*-u-measurable function defined on is w*-equivalent to a B*-valued u-measurable function defined on if and only if B* has the Radon-Nikodym property with respect to

  18. CONTRIBUTION OF RADON FLOWS AND RADON SOURCES TO THE RADON CONCENTRATION IN A DWELLING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEIJER, RJ; STOOP, P; PUT, LW

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a model is presented for analysis of the radon concentrations in a compartment in terms of contributions from transport by flows of air between compartments and from radon sources in the compartment. Measurements were made to study the effect of increased natural ventilation of the cra

  19. CONTRIBUTION OF RADON FLOWS AND RADON SOURCES TO THE RADON CONCENTRATION IN A DWELLING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEIJER, RJ; STOOP, P; PUT, LW

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a model is presented for analysis of the radon concentrations in a compartment in terms of contributions from transport by flows of air between compartments and from radon sources in the compartment. Measurements were made to study the effect of increased natural ventilation of the cra

  20. Preliminary investigation of radon concentration in surface water and drinking water in Shenzhen City, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Wang, Nanping; Li, Shijun

    2015-11-01

    A radon survey in surface water and drinking water was conducted using a portable degassing system associated with an ionisation chamber AlphaGUARD (PQ2000) for understanding levels of dissolved radon ((222)Rn) concentration in different types of water sources and risk assessment of radon in drinking water in Shenzhen City (SC) with a population of 10 628 900 in 2013, Guangdong Province of China. The measurements show that arithmetic means ± standard deviations of radon ((222)Rn) concentration are 52.05 ± 6.64, 0.29 ± 0.26, 0.15 ± 0.23 and 0.37 ± 0.42 kBq m(-3) in spring water, surface water, large and small public water supplies, respectively. Only radon concentrations of two water samples collected in mountainous areas are more than 11.10 kBq m(-3), exceeding the limit of radon concentration in drinking water stipulated by the national standard of China (GB5749-2006). The annual effective doses due to radon in drinking water were also calculated. The investigation suggests that there are no risks caused by radon in the drinking water in SC.

  1. Calibration of radon-222 detectors using closed circuit radium-226 sources; Calibracao de detectores de radonio-222 atraves do uso de fontes de radio-222 em circuito fechado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perna, Allan Felipe Nunes; Paschuk, Sergei Anatolyevich; Correa, Janine Nicolosi; Del Claro, Flavia, E-mail: allan_perna@hotmail.com, E-mail: sergei@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: janine@utfpr.edu.br, E-mail: flavia_delclaro@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the results of the calibration of the Radon-222 detectors used by the Laboratories specializing in measuring natural radiation from this gas. The research was conducted in collaboration between UTFPR, CDTN/CNEN, UFRN and IRD/CNEN. During the calibration the detectors were exposed in isolated chambers with radioactive calibrated sources. The calibration procedure was supported with four instant radon monitors AlphaGUARD (SAPHYMO Co.) responsible for radon activity measurements in the experimental chamber. The calibration procedure resulted an equation that relates the number of tracks found in solid-state detector CR-39 (Track-Etch detector) with the concentration of radon in the atmosphere. Obtained results are compatible with previously performed calibration at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS, Japan) using high activity levels of radon in air. Present results of calibration give the possibility to expand the calibration curve of CR-39 for medium and low activity levels of radon. (author)

  2. Study on the solubility of radon in tissues; Untersuchung der Loeslichkeit von Radon in Gewebe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Claudia; Kraft, Gerhard; Maier, Andreas; Beek, Patrick van [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    At the GSI Helmholtz Center in Darmstadt a radon chamber with conditions similar to the radon galleries was built for studies on the solubility of radon in tissues using cell cultures and animals. The samples are investigated using gamma spectroscopy following the radon exposure measuring Pb-214 and Bi-214. The original concentration of Rn-222 in the sample is determined by the time dependence of the decay rates of Rn-222. The experimental conditions and preliminary measurements are described.

  3. A study on heavy radioactive pollution: Radon and Radium in streams and drinking water of Ramsar region by measured Prassi system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mohammadi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  Inhalation of radon gas 222Rn, which is a decay product of 226Ra, and its decay products accounts for typically about half of the effective doses received by public from all natural sources of ionizing radiation. Radon alpha particles can initiate a series of molecular and cellular events that culminates in the development of lung and other cancers. Also, 226Ra in the environment is widely distributed, being present in various concentrations in waters, soils and rocks. When radium is ingested, the majority of material is rapidly excreted. However, since radium is chemically similar to calcium, a significant fraction is absorbed into the bloodstream and deposited mainly in the skeleton. So, presence of these radioactive contaminants in water is dangerous and many studies especially about radon have been done in this area. For these reasons and becauses some areas of Ramsar, a city in northern Iran in mazandaran province, have been among the highest known background radiation levels in the world we measured radon and radium concentrations in water sources of Ramsar region. In this study, Radon and radium concentrations of the 22 streams and 20 drinking water samples were measured by PRASSI system. According to the data, the arithmetic mean of radon concentration for all samples was 3.030 ± 1.122 Bq/l. Similarly, arithmetic mean of radium for all samples was 0.185 ± 0.055 Bq/l. Also 1 sample of streams and 1 sample of drinking water showed radon concentration higher than 10Bq/l as normal level. Radium-226 alone, in 11 samples of streams and 8 samples of drinking water had concentrations higher than 0.185Bq/l as normal level for the combined Radium-226 and Radium-228.

  4. Canadian Lung Cancer Relative Risk from Radon Exposure for Short Periods in Childhood Compared to a Lifetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Long-term exposure to elevated indoor radon concentrations has been determined to be the second leading cause of lung cancer in adults after tobacco smoking. With the establishment of a National Radon Program in Canada in 2007 thousands of homes across the country have been tested for radon. Although the vast majority of people are exposed to low or moderate radon concentrations; from time to time; there are homes found with very high concentrations of radon. Among those living in homes with very high radon concentrations, it is typically parents of young children that demonstrate a great deal of concern. They want to know the equivalent risk in terms of the lifetime relative risk of developing lung cancer when a child has lived in a home with high radon for a few years. An answer to this question of risk equivalency is proposed in this paper. The results demonstrate clearly that the higher the radon concentration; the sooner remedial measures should be undertaken; as recommended by Health Canada in the Canadian radon guideline.

  5. Long-term measurements of residential radon, thoron, and thoron progeny concentrations around the Chhatrapur placer deposit, a high background radiation area in Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Yasutaka; Prasad, Ganesh; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Sahoo, Sarata Kumar; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Vidya Sagar, Devulapalli; Ramola, Rakesh Chand; Tokonami, Shinji

    2016-10-01

    The Chhatrapur placer deposit is found in a high background radiation area which has been recently identified on the southeastern coast of India. Previously, some geochemical studies of this area were carried out to assess external dose from radionuclides-bearing heavy mineral sands. In this study, radon, thoron and thoron progeny concentrations were measured in about 100 dwellings during three seasons (autumn-winter, summer, and rainy) in a 10- to 12-month period and annual doses due to inhalation of them were evaluated. The measurements were made by passive-type radon-thoron discriminative detectors and thoron progeny detectors in which solid state nuclear track detectors were deployed. The results show that radon and thoron concentrations differ by one order of magnitude depending on exposure periods, while thoron progeny concentration is nearly constant throughout the year. Since thorium-rich sand is distributed in the studied area, exposure to thoron is equal to, or exceeds, exposure to radon and is not negligible for dose evaluation. Based on the measurements, doses due to inhalation of radon and thoron are evaluated as 0.1-1.6 mSv y(-1) and 0.2-3.8 mSv y(-1), respectively. The total dose is 0.8-4.6 mSv y(-1), which is the same order of magnitude as the worldwide value. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The radon EDM apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardiff, E. R.; Rand, E. T.; Ball, G. C.; Chupp, T. E.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Garrett, P.; Hayden, M. E.; Kierans, C. A.; Lorenzon, W.; Pearson, M. R.; Schaub, C.; Svensson, C. E.

    2014-01-01

    The observation of a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) at current experimentally accessible levels would provide clear evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model. EDMs violate CP symmetry, making them a possible route to explaining the size of the observed baryon asymmetry in the universe. The Radon EDM Experiment aims to search for an EDM in radon isotopes whose sensitivity to CP-odd interactions is enhanced by octupole-deformed nuclei. A prototype apparatus currently installed in the ISAC hall at TRIUMF includes a gas handling system to move radon from a collection foil to a measurement cell and auxiliary equipment for polarization diagnostics and validation. The features and capabilities of the apparatus are described and an overview of the experimental design for a gamma-ray-anisotropy based EDM measurement is provided.

  7. Radon: a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepman, S.R.; Boegel, M.L.; Hollowell, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, with the support of the Department of Energy, has developed a computerized database to manage research information in the area of building ventilation and indoor air quality. This literature survey contains references pertaining to the physical properties of radon and its daughters, instrumentation for their measurement, health effects, surveys and measurements, and regulatory information. The references in the bibliography are sequenced in alphabetical order and abstracts are included when supplied by the author. The objective of this report is to disseminate the bibliographic references compiled at the laboratory relating to radon research portion of the program. Interested database users are encouraged to contact the laboratory to receive instructions for direct database acess. A flyer describing the database is supplied at the end of the bibliography and a brief overview of the Radon Research porgram is given.

  8. The measurement of radon working levels at a mineral separation pilot plant in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid Khan, M A; Chowdhury, M S

    2003-10-01

    Beach Sand Exploitation Centre at Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, produces commercial grade concentrations of magnetite, ilmenite, zircon, etc., from the high-grade accumulations available along the beach and foredune of Cox's Bazar. Solid state nuclear track detectors (CR-39 foils) were used to determine indoor radon concentration of radioactive mineral sands and the technologically enhanced radiation level inside the pilot plant of the Centre. It is found that the concentrations at processed mineral stock areas are high, and the maximum concentration was found to be 2,103 +/- 331 Bq m(-3) (0.23 +/- 0.03 WL). The indoor concentration of radon and its decay products in the raw sand stock area and at other locations was in the range of 116 +/- 27 Bq m(-3) (0.03 +/- 0.003 WL) to 2,042 +/- 233 Bq m(-3) (0.22 +/- 0.03 WL).

  9. Measurement of radon on Misasa district, Tottori pref. using the PICO-RAD detector and a liquid scintillation spectrometer. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Taeko; Inagaki, Masayo; Morishima, Hiroshige; Tanaka, Yuki [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Nakanishi, Akihiro; Sasaki, Noriko; Mifune, Masaaki

    1996-12-01

    By means of a radon detecting device (Packard Pico-Rad System) using absorbed active charcoal and a liquid scintillation spectrometer, studies on environmental movements of radon and its decay nuclides on Misasa district in Tottori pref. were done continuously on last year. Its minimum detection limits of radon in the air are 1.7Bq/m{sup 3} and 0.43Bq/l in the water on counting time of 200 minutes. This method is able to measure conveniently and rapidly on sampling period for 24 hours. (1) Radon concentrations in the air at Misasa environs area on October and November, 1995 were ranged 7.7-59Bq/m{sup 3} in outdoor and 13-141Bq/m{sup 3} in indoor. On the results measured on Misasa area, {sup 222}Rn concentrations on Asahi district located southward from Misasa spa district and Takeda district along Tenjin stream are high, on Kojika district located east-southward from Misasa spa district and Mitoku district are low and outdoor {sup 222}Rn concentrations on Ningyo toge neighboring are low level with ranged 12-31Bq/m{sup 3}. Indoor {sup 222}Rn concentrations at Takeda district are about 4 times higher than Kojika district showed the lowest concentration and those of Kojika district are almost similar to those of Higashi Osaka. Indoor {sup 222}Rn concentration are higher than outdoor, the mean ratio of indoor to outdoor {sup 222}Rn concentration on a few sample of Takeda and Asahi districts (upper stream) are about 2 and those on the other district are shown in low tendency ranged 1-1.3. There are a few difference among some districts. (2) {sup 222}Rn concentration variations in a dwelling at Misasa spa district were observed from May to December 1995 in the time course. They are varied in range of 53-121Bq/m{sup 3} indoor, 9-50Bq/m{sup 3} outdoor and 48-188Bq/m{sup 3} in bathroom. (3) {sup 222}Rn concentration variations in water samples at Misasa spa district are 91-161Bq/l in hot spring, 2.3-10Bq/l in river water and 14-34Bq/l in well water from May to December 1995

  10. A European-wide 222Radon and 222Radon progeny comparison study

    OpenAIRE

    Schmithüsen, Dominik; Chambers, Scott; Fischer, Bernd; Gilge, Stefan; Hatakka, Juha; Kazan, Victor; Neubert, Rolf; Paatero, Jussi; Ramonet, Michel; Schlosser, Clemens; Schmid, Sabine; Vermeulen, Alex; Levin, Ingeborg

    2016-01-01

    A European-wide 222Radon/222Radon progeny comparison study has been conducted in order to determine correction factors that could be applied to existing atmospheric 222Radon data sets for quantitative use of this tracer in atmospheric transport model validation. Two compact and easy-to-transport Heidelberg Radon Monitors (HRM) were moved around to run for at least one month at each of the nine European measurement stations that were included in the comparison. Linear regressions between paral...

  11. National Weatherization Assistance Program Impact Evaluation: Impact of Exhaust-Only Ventilation on Radon and Indoor Humidity - A Field Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigg, Scott [Energy Center of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The study described here sought to assess the impact of exhaust-only ventilation on indoor radon and humidity in single-family homes that had been treated by the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP).

  12. A study on the correlation between soil radon potential and average indoor radon potential in Canadian cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Ford, Ken L

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to indoor radon is identified as the main source of natural radiation exposure to the population. Since radon in homes originates mainly from soil gas radon, it is of public interest to study the correlation between radon in soil and radon indoors in different geographic locations. From 2007 to 2010, a total of 1070 sites were surveyed for soil gas radon and soil permeability. Among the sites surveyed, 430 sites were in 14 cities where indoor radon information is available from residential radon and thoron surveys conducted in recent years. It is observed that indoor radon potential (percentage of homes above 200 Bq m(-3); range from 1.5% to 42%) correlates reasonably well with soil radon potential (SRP: an index proportional to soil gas radon concentration and soil permeability; average SRP ranged from 8 to 26). In five cities where in-situ soil permeability was measured at more than 20 sites, a strong correlation (R(2) = 0.68 for linear regression and R(2) = 0.81 for non-linear regression) was observed between indoor radon potential and soil radon potential. This summary report shows that soil gas radon measurement is a practical and useful predictor of indoor radon potential in a geographic area, and may be useful for making decisions around prioritizing activities to manage population exposure and future land-use planning. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Radon levels and doses in dwellings in two villages in Kosovo, affected by depleted uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafezi, G; Gregoric, A; Vaupotic, J; Bahtijari, M; Kuqali, M

    2014-01-01

    The radon ((222)Rn) activity concentration in 15 dwellings in the Planej village and 10 dwellings in the Gorozhup village has been measured with the aim to complement the national radon survey and to compare the results of two different measurement techniques. The radon concentration has been measured in winter and spring using alpha scintillation cells and in winter, spring and summer by exposing solid-state nuclear track detectors. Both methods gave similar results. Radon concentrations in both villages were similar, ranging from 82 to 432 Bq m(-3); the value of 400 Bq m(-3) was exceeded only in two dwellings. The resulting annual effective doses ranged from 1.78 to 6.40 mSv, with the average values of 3.28 mSv in the Planej village and 3.87 mSv in the Gorozhup village.

  14. First radon measurements and occupational exposure assessments in underground geodynamic laboratory the Polish Academy of Sciences Space Research Centre in Książ Castle (SW Poland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijałkowska-Lichwa, Lidia; Przylibski, Tadeusz A

    2016-12-01

    The article presents the results of the first radon activity concentration measurements conducted continuously between 17(th) May 2014 and 16(th) May 2015 in the underground geodynamic laboratory of the Polish Academy of Sciences Space Research Centre in Książ. The data were registered with the use of three Polish semiconductor SRDN-3 detectors located the closest (SRDN-3 No. 6) to and the furthest (SRDN-3 No. 3) from the facility entrance, and in the fault zone (SRDN-3 No. 4). The study was conducted to characterize the radon behaviour and check it possibility to use with reference to long- and short-term variations of radon activity concentration observed in sedimentary rocks strongly fractured and intersected by systems of multiple faults, for integrated comparative assessments of changes in local orogen kinetics. The values of radon activity concentration in the underground geodynamic laboratory of the Polish Academy of Sciences (PAN) Space Research Centre in Książ undergo changes of a distinctly seasonal character. The highest values of radon activity concentration are recorded from late spring (May/June) to early autumn (October), and the lowest - from November to April. Radon activity concentrations varied depending on the location of measurement points. Between late spring and autumn they ranged from 800 Bq·m(-3) to 1200 Bq·m(-3), and even 3200 Bq·m(-3) in the fault zone. Between November and April, values of radon activity concentration are lower, ranging from 500 Bq·m(-3) to 1000 Bq·m(-3) and 2700 Bq·m(-3) in the fault zone. The values of radon activity concentration recorded in the studied facility did not undergo short-term changes in either the whole annual measuring cycle or any of its months. Effective doses received by people staying in the underground laboratory range from 0.001 mSv/h to 0.012 mSv/h. The mean annual effective dose, depending on the measurement site, equals 1 or is slightly higher than 10 mSv/year, while the maximum

  15. Radon dose assessment in underground mines in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, T O; Rocha, Z; Cruz, P; Gouvea, V A; Siqueira, J B; Oliveira, A H

    2014-07-01

    Underground miners are internally exposed to radon, thoron and their short-lived decay products during the mineral processing. There is also an external exposure due to the gamma emitters present in the rock and dust of the mine. However, the short-lived radon decay products are recognised as the main radiation health risk. When inhaled, they are deposited in the respiratory system and may cause lung cancer. To address this concern, concentration measurements of radon and its progeny were performed, the equilibrium factor was determined and the effective dose received was estimated in six Brazilian underground mines. The radon concentration was measured by using E-PERM, AlphaGUARD and CR-39 detectors. The radon progeny was determined by using DOSEman. The annual effective dose for the miners was estimated according to United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation methodologies. The mean value of the equilibrium factor was 0.4. The workers' estimated effective dose ranged from 1 to 21 mSv a(-1) (mean 9 mSv a(-1)).

  16. Evolution of radon dose evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujimoto Kenzo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The historical change of radon dose evaluation is reviewed based on the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR reports. Since 1955, radon has been recognized as one of the important sources of exposure of the general public. However, it was not really understood that radon is the largest dose contributor until 1977 when a new concept of effective dose equivalent was introduced by International Commission on Radiological Protection. In 1982, the dose concept was also adapted by UNSCEAR and evaluated per caput dose from natural radiation. Many researches have been carried out since then. However, lots of questions have remained open in radon problems, such as the radiation weighting factor of 20 for alpha rays and the large discrepancy of risk estimation among dosimetric and epidemiological approaches.

  17. Methodology developed to make the Quebec indoor radon potential map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Jean-Philippe; Martel, Richard; Poulin, Patrick; Dessau, Jean-Claude

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a relevant approach to predict the indoor radon potential based on the combination of the radiogeochemical data and the indoor radon measurements in the Quebec province territory (Canada). The Quebec ministry of health asked for such a map to identify the radon-prone areas to manage the risk for the population related to indoor radon exposure. Three radiogeochemical criteria including (1) equivalent uranium (eU) concentration from airborne surface gamma-ray surveys, (2) uranium concentration measurements in sediments, (3) bedrock and surficial geology were combined with 3082 basement radon concentration measurements to identify the radon-prone areas. It was shown that it is possible to determine thresholds for the three criteria that implied statistically significant different levels of radon potential using Kruskal-Wallis one way analyses of variance by ranks. The three discretized radiogeochemical datasets were combined into a total predicted radon potential that sampled 98% of the studied area. The combination process was also based on Kruskal-Wallis one way ANOVA. Four statistically significant different predicted radon potential levels were created: low, medium, high and very high. Respectively 10 and 13% of the dwellings exceed the Canadian radon guideline of 200 Bq/m(3) in low and medium predicted radon potentials. These proportions rise up to 22 and 45% respectively for high and very high predicted radon potentials. This predictive map of indoor radon potential based on the radiogeochemical data was validated using a map of confirmed radon exposure in homes based on the basement radon measurements. It was shown that the map of predicted radon potential based on the radiogeochemical data was reliable to identify radon-prone areas even in zones where no indoor radon measurement exists.

  18. MEASUREMENT OF RADON EXHALATION RATE, RADIUM ACTIVITY AND ANNUAL EFFECTIVE DOSE FROM BRICKS AND CEMENT SAMPLES COLLECTED FROM DERA ISMAIL KHAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisar Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radon concentration, exhalation rate, radium activity and annual effective dose have been measured from baked and unbaked bricks and cement samples commonly used as construction material in the dwellings of Dera Ismail Khan City, Pakistan. CR-39 based NRPB radon dosimeters and RAD7 have been used as passive and active devises. The values of radon concentration for baked, unbaked bricks and cements obtained from passive and active techniques were found in good agreement. Average values of radon exhalation rates in baked, unbaked bricks and cement were found (1.202±0.212 Bq m-2 h-1, (1.419±0.230 Bq m-2 h-1 and (0.386±0.117 Bq m-2 h-1 and their corresponding average radium activity and annual effective dose were found (0.956±0.169 Bq/kg, (1.13±0.184 Bq/kg, (0.323±0.098 Bq/kg and (33.96±5.99 µSv y-1, (40.3±6.51 µSv y-1 and (10.94±3.28 µSv y-1, respectively. Radon concentration, exhalation rate and their corresponding radium activity and annual effective dose were found higher in unbaked bricks as compared to baked bricks and cement but overall values of radon exhalation rate, annual effective dose and radium activity were found well below the world average values of 57.600 Bq m-2 h-1, 1100 µSv y-1 and 370 Bq/kg, respectively.

  19. A radon and meteorological measurement network for the Alligator Rivers Region, Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P. E-mail: paul.martin@deh.gov.au; Tims, S. E-mail: steve.tims@anu.edu.au; Ryan, B. E-mail: bruce.ryan@ea.gov.au; Bollhoefer, A. E-mail: andreas.bollhoefer@ea.gov.au

    2004-07-01

    The network described in this paper has been set up to provide detailed time-series data on concentrations of {sup 222}Rn in air at various locations within the Alligator Rivers Region, over a time frame of several years. These data will be important in assessing the effects of uranium mining operations on radon levels in the region, both in providing baseline and monitoring data and in calibrating and verifying predictive models. At present, three stations are operating in the region with a fourth being commissioned. Each station logs half hourly average radon concentrations and relevant meteorological data (wind speed, direction and variability, air pressure and temperature, relative humidity, soil temperature, rain and sunshine rates). It is intended to operate the four stations at selected locations for one- or two-year intervals, at the end of which three will be moved to new locations (one station at Mudginberri will be kept as a constant control station). Sites for which extensive datasets are currently available include: Jabiru Town, Jabiru East, Djarr Djarr, East Alligator Ranger Station and Nabarlek minesite. Illustrative data from these sites are presented.

  20. Are seasonal correction factors useful in assessing the health risk from domestic radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, A.R.; Groves-Kirkby, C.J. [Northampton General Hospital, Medical Physics Dept. (United Kingdom); Crockett, R.G.M.; Phillips, P.S.; Woolridge, A.C. [Northampton Univ., School of Applied Sciences (United Kingdom); Gillmore, G.K. [Bradford Univ., School of Archaeological, Geographical and Environmental Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Following an intensive survey of domestic radon levels in the UK, the former National Radiological Protection Board (N.R.P.B.), now the Radiation Protection Division of the Health Protection Agency (H.P.A.-R.P.D.) established a measurement protocol and promulgated a set of Seasonal Correction Factors (S.C.F.) applicable to the United Kingdom as a whole. Radon levels are assumed to exhibit systematic repeatable annual variation, generally higher in winter than in summer, and the S.C.F. comprise numerical multipliers which convert a one-month oree-month radon measurement, commencing in any month of the year, to an effective annual mean radon concentration. In a recent project to assess the utility of short-term exposures in quantifying domestic radon levels, radon variability in a set of 34 houses on common radon-rich geology was found to depart significantly from that predicted by the H.P.A.-R.P.D. seasonal correction factors, with year-end discontinuities at both 1-month and 3- month measurement resolutions. Following this study, monitoring with electrets was continued in four properties, with weekly radon concentration data now available for a total duration of three years. Analysis of this data has permitted the derivation of reliable local seasonal correction factors. Overall, these are significantly lower than those recommended by H.P.A.-R.P.D., but are comparable with other results from the UK and from abroad, particularly those that recognise geological diversity and are consequently prepared on a regional rather than a national basis. The discussion calls into question the validity of using nationally aggregated factors, especially for shorter exposures. (authors)

  1. Study of Active Carbon Measuring Method for Accurate Measurements of Radon Exhalation Rates for Building Materials%活性炭盒法准确测量建材222 Rn析出率的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕丽丹; 邱小平; 邱寿康; 何正忠; 贺夔

    2014-01-01

    通过活性炭-γ能谱法测量表面经过预处理后的不同建材样品氡析出率,计算求得该建材氡固有析出率。实验结果表明,建材固有氡析出率能真实反映出建材氡析出率的情况且不受建材自身形状因素的影响,不失为一种准确可靠测量建材表面氡析出率值的方法。%Radon exhalation rate from different building materials after pretreatment were measured using the charcoal canister method for calculating radon inherent exhalation rate. The results showed that radon inherent exhalation rate can represent the true radon in building materials and not be affected by the shape factor of building materials. It is simple and reliable for the method to calculate radon inherent exhalation rate. It can be regarded as a method for accurate measurements of radon exhalation rates for building materials.

  2. Factors influencing upstairs and downstairs radon levels in two-storey dwellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, A.R.; Groves-Kirkby, C.J.; Groves-Kirkby, N.P. [Northampton General Hospital, Medical Physics Dept. (United Kingdom); Crockett, R.G.M.; Phillips, P.S.; Woolridge, A.C. [Northampton Univ., School of Applied Sciences (United Kingdom); Woolridge, A.C. [Northampton Univ., School of Health (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    Environmental radon exposure of residents of two-storey domestic premises is generally estimated on the basis of the measured radon concentrations in, and the relative occupancies of, the principal living-room and bed-room, assuming 45% and 55% occupancy of these two locations respectively. In practice, however, significant case-to-case variability exists, both in the relative periods that individuals spend in the upstairs and downstairs rooms of storey homes, and in the relative radon levels in these two areas. Moreover, while it is assumed that radon levels in upper storeys of multi-storey homes will be intrinsically lower than at ground level, this is not always the case, since radon exhalation from the materials from which the house is constructed may contribute significantly to indoor levels. While studies on radon level variability in the individual units in apartment blocks have been reported, the situation in two-storey low-rise dwellings appears not to have been considered. To investigate this, detailed extended measurements of radon concentrations were made in a set of thirty-four homes situated in areas of Northamptonshire known to exhibit high radon levels and declared a radon Affected Area by the United Kingdom (UK) National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) in 1992. All homes were of typical UK construction of brick/block/stone walls under a pitched tile/slate roof. Approximately 50% of the sample were detached houses, the remainder being semidetached (duplex) or terraced (row-house). Around 25% of the sample possessed cellars, while 12% were single-storey dwellings. In two-storey homes, all monitored bedrooms were on the upper floor. Distribution of the ratios of bedroom/living-room radon levels in individual properties was left-skewed (mean 0.67, median 0.73, range 0.05 to 1.05). The mean is consistent with the outcome of early NRPB studies in England, while the variability depends principally on the characteristics of the property, and not on

  3. Managing Radon in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA recommends testing all schools for radon. As part of an effective IAQ management program, schools can take simple steps to test for radon and reduce risks to occupants if high radon levels are found.

  4. The use of track registration detectors to reconstruct contemporary and historical airborne radon ( sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn) and radon progeny concentrations for a radon-lung cancer epidemiologic study

    CERN Document Server

    Steck, D J

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies that investigate the relationship between radon and lung cancer require accurate estimates for the long-term average concentrations of radon progeny in dwellings. Year-to-year and home-to-home variations of radon in domestic environments pose serious difficulties for reconstructing an individual's long-term radon-related exposure. The use of contemporary radon gas concentrations as a surrogate for radon-related dose introduces additional uncertainty in dose assessment. Studies of glass exposed in radon chambers and in a home show that radon progeny deposited on, and implanted in, glass hold promise for reconstructing past radon concentrations in a variety of atmospheres. We developed an inexpensive track registration detector for the Iowa Radon Lung Cancer Study (IRLCS) that simultaneously measures contemporary airborne radon concentrations, surface deposited alpha activity density, and implanted sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Po activity density. The implanted activity is used to reconstruct the cum...

  5. Activity of radon (222Rn) in the lower atmospheric surface layer of a typical rural site in south India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K. Charan; Prasad, T. Rajendra; Ratnam, M. Venkat; Nagaraja, Kamsali

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of one year measurements of in situ radon (222Rn) and its progenies along with surface air temperature, relative humidity and pressure near to the Earth's surface has been carried out for the first time at the National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL, 13.5∘N and 79.2∘E) located in a rural site in Gadanki, south India. The dataset was analysed to understand the behaviour of radon in relation to the surface air temperature and relative humidity at a rural site. It was observed that over a period of the 24 hours in a day, the activity of radon and its progenies reaches a peak in the morning hours followed by a remarkable decrease in the afternoon hours. Relatively, a higher concentration of radon was observed at NARL during fair weather days, and this can be attributed to the presence of rocky hills and dense vegetation surrounding the site. The high negative correlation between surface air temperature and activity of radon (R = - 0.70, on an annual scale) suggests that dynamical removal of radon due to increased vertical mixing is one of the most important controlling processes of the radon accumulation in the atmospheric surface layer. The annual averaged activity of radon was found to be 12.01±0.66 Bq m-3 and 4.25±0.18 Bq m-3 for its progenies, in the study period.

  6. Activity of radon (222Rn) in the lower atmospheric surface layer of a typical rural site in south India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K. Charan; Prasad, T. Rajendra; Ratnam, M. Venkat; Nagaraja, Kamsali

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of one year measurements of in situ radon (222Rn) and its progenies along with surface air temperature, relative humidity and pressure near to the Earth's surface has been carried out for the first time at the National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL, 13.5∘N and 79.2∘E) located in a rural site in Gadanki, south India. The dataset was analysed to understand the behaviour of radon in relation to the surface air temperature and relative humidity at a rural site. It was observed that over a period of the 24 hours in a day, the activity of radon and its progenies reaches a peak in the morning hours followed by a remarkable decrease in the afternoon hours. Relatively, a higher concentration of radon was observed at NARL during fair weather days, and this can be attributed to the presence of rocky hills and dense vegetation surrounding the site. The high negative correlation between surface air temperature and activity of radon ( R = - 0.70, on an annual scale) suggests that dynamical removal of radon due to increased vertical mixing is one of the most important controlling processes of the radon accumulation in the atmospheric surface layer. The annual averaged activity of radon was found to be 12.01±0.66 Bq m-3 and 4.25±0.18 Bq m-3 for its progenies, in the study period.

  7. Activity of radon ($^{222}$Rn) in the lower atmospheric surface layer of a typical rural site in south India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Charan Kumar; T Rajendra Prasad; M Venkat Ratnam; Nagaraja Kamsali

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of one year measurements of in situ radon ($^{222}$Rn) and its progenies along with surface air temperature, relative humidity and pressure near to the Earth’s surface has been carried out for the first time at the National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL, 13.5◦N and 79.2◦E) located in a rural site in Gadanki, south India. The dataset was analysed to understand the behaviour of radon inrelation to the surface air temperature and relative humidity at a rural site. It was observed that over a period of the 24 hours in a day, the activity of radon and its progenies reaches a peak in the morning hours followed by a remarkable decrease in the afternoon hours. Relatively, a higher concentration of radon was observed at NARL during fair weather days, and this can be attributed to the presence ofrocky hills and dense vegetation surrounding the site. The high negative correlation between surface air temperature and activity of radon (R = – 0.70, on an annual scale) suggests that dynamical removal of radon due to increased vertical mixing is one of the most important controlling processes of the radon accumulation in the atmospheric surface layer. The annual averaged activity of radon was found to be12.01±0.66 Bq m$^{−3}$ and 4.25±0.18 Bq m$^{−3}$ for its progenies, in the study period.

  8. Methodology developed to make the Quebec indoor radon potential map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drolet, Jean-Philippe, E-mail: jean-philippe.drolet@ete.inrs.ca [Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Eau Terre Environnement Research Centre (ETE-INRS), 490 de la Couronne, G1K 9A9 Quebec (Canada); Martel, Richard [Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Eau Terre Environnement Research Centre (ETE-INRS), 490 de la Couronne, G1K 9A9 Quebec (Canada); Poulin, Patrick [Institut national de santé publique du Québec (INSPQ), 945 avenue Wolfe, G1V 5B3 Quebec (Canada); Dessau, Jean-Claude [Agence de la santé et des services sociaux des Laurentides, 1000 rue Labelle, J7Z 5 N6 Saint-Jérome (Canada)

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a relevant approach to predict the indoor radon potential based on the combination of the radiogeochemical data and the indoor radon measurements in the Quebec province territory (Canada). The Quebec ministry of health asked for such a map to identify the radon-prone areas to manage the risk for the population related to indoor radon exposure. Three radiogeochemical criteria including (1) equivalent uranium (eU) concentration from airborne surface gamma-ray surveys, (2) uranium concentration measurements in sediments, (3) bedrock and surficial geology were combined with 3082 basement radon concentration measurements to identify the radon-prone areas. It was shown that it is possible to determine thresholds for the three criteria that implied statistically significant different levels of radon potential using Kruskal–Wallis one way analyses of variance by ranks. The three discretized radiogeochemical datasets were combined into a total predicted radon potential that sampled 98% of the studied area. The combination process was also based on Kruskal–Wallis one way ANOVA. Four statistically significant different predicted radon potential levels were created: low, medium, high and very high. Respectively 10 and 13% of the dwellings exceed the Canadian radon guideline of 200 Bq/m{sup 3} in low and medium predicted radon potentials. These proportions rise up to 22 and 45% respectively for high and very high predicted radon potentials. This predictive map of indoor radon potential based on the radiogeochemical data was validated using a map of confirmed radon exposure in homes based on the basement radon measurements. It was shown that the map of predicted radon potential based on the radiogeochemical data was reliable to identify radon-prone areas even in zones where no indoor radon measurement exists. - Highlights: • 5 radiogeochemical datasets were used to map the geogenic indoor radon potential. • An indoor radon potential was determined for

  9. Measures of Gross National Happiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruut Veenhoven

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Happiness is rising on the political agenda and this calls for measures of how well nations perform in creating great happiness for a great number, analogous to measures of success in creating wealth, such as GDP. Happiness is defined as subjective enjoyment of one’s life as-a-whole and this can be measured using self-reports. Question on happiness are currently used in large scale surveys of the general population in nations. As a result we have now comparable data on happiness in 144 contemporary nations and time-series of 25 years and longer on 11 developed nations. These data can be aggregated in different ways: If the aim is simply greater happiness for a greater number of citizens, Average happiness (AH is an appropriate measure. If the focus is on enduring happiness, it is better to combine average happiness with longevity in an index of Happy Life Years (HLY. If the aim is to reduce disparity among citizens a relevant indicator is the Inequality of Happiness (IH in the nations as measured with the standard deviation. Average and dispersion can also be combined in an index of Inequality-Adjusted Happiness (IAH. Comparison across nations shows sizable differences on all these measures of gross national happiness and these differences correspond with societal characteristics that can be influenced by policy makers, such as freedom and justice. Comparison over time shows major improvement during the last decade.

  10. Radon transfer and intracorporal deposition of radon decay products under balneotherapeutic conditions; Radon-Transfer und intrakorporale Deposition von Radon-Folgeprodukten unter balneotherapeutischen Bedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunewald, Wolfgang A. [Kurmittelhaus Sibyllenbad, Neualbenreuth (Germany); Just, Guenther [Forschungsbuero Radon, Grosspoesna (Germany); Petzold, Juergen [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum, Leipzig (Germany); Philipsborn, Henning von [Radiometrisches Seminar, Univ. Regensburg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The intracorporal deposition of radon decay products was determined on four persons after 40 and 30 min respectively in radon water with about 1500 Bq/L by whole-body gamma spectrometry. The measurements started about 2 1/2h after exposure. In addition, the radon activity concentration of inspiratory and expiratory air was measured on one person during and after exposure and the deposition of radon decay products on the skin was measured on another person. The radon activity leaving the body with the expiratory air during exposure in the water (called ''radon transfer'') amounts to about 800 Bq. An intracorporal radon activity immediately after therapeutic exposure of about 3000 Bq was obtained as a result of first measurements by extrapolation from measurements starting about 2 1/2 hours later. Additional studies are necessary. There are indications that both the radon transfer and the intracorporal deposition can be increased by exposure in mixed radon-CO{sub 2} water. (orig.)

  11. DETERMINATION OF RADIUM AND RADON CONCENTRATIONS IN SOME ROCK SAMPLES

    OpenAIRE

    BAYKARA, Oktay

    2006-01-01

    The concentrations of radium (226Ra), radon (222Rn) and radon exhalation rate in nine rock samples have been determined using solid-state nuclear track detectors (CR-39). The measured maximum values of radium, radon and radon exhalation rate in rock samples were found to be 24.62 Bq/kg, 4911.32 Bq/m3 and 4,86 Bqm-2h-1, respectively. Linear correlation was observed among radon concentration, radon exhalation and radium concentration. The linear correlation coefficient between radium content an...

  12. Radon atlas of Finland; Suomen radonkartasto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutilainen, A.; Maekelaeinen, I.; Pennanen, M.; Reisbacka, H.; Castren, O.

    1997-11-01

    The most efficient means of reducing indoor radon exposure is to locate and mitigate dwellings with radon concentration exceeding the action level of 400 Bq/m{sup 3} and to build new houses so that radon concentrations do not exceed 200 Bq/m{sup 3}. The maps and tables in this report are useful tools for those who plan and decide what kind of radon mitigation measures are needed in municipalities. STUK (The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority) has an indoor radon database of 52 000 dwellings, for which the indoor radon concentration and construction details are known. The building site soil type of about 38 000 dwellings is known. This atlas is a summary of all indoor radon measurements made by STUK in lowrise dwellings and in first-floor flats. The results are shown as arithmetic means of 5- or 10-km squares on maps of the provinces. Three radon maps have been made for each province. On one map the data consist of all measurements the position coordinates of which are known. On the two other maps the building sites of houses are classified into permeable and low-permeable soil types. The tables show statistics for all indoor radon measurements by municipality and building site soil type. (orig.). 11 refs. The publication contains all texts both in Finnish and in English.

  13. The radon influence of SAGE results

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrin, V N; Mirmov, I N

    2002-01-01

    The method for evaluating systematic errors, connected with radon, is described in the experiment on determining the SAGE solar neutrino flux. The systematic error by the measured neutrino capture rate in the gallium 75 SNU target does not exceed 0.3 SNU. The obtained value (0.3 SNU) is the upper limit of the radon systematic error. Its low value means, that radon does not contribute significantly to the SAGE result

  14. A prediction model for assessing residential radon concentration in Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauri, D.D.; Huss, A.; Zimmermann, F.; Kuehni, C.E.; Roosli, M.

    2012-01-01

    Indoor radon is regularly measured in Switzerland. However, a nationwide model to predict residential radon levels has not been developed. The aim of this study was to develop a prediction model to assess indoor radon concentrations in Switzerland. The model was based on 44,631 measurements from the

  15. Submarine groundwater discharge to a small estuary estimated from radon and salinity measurements and a box model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Colman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Submarine groundwater discharge was quantified by a variety of methods in Salt Pond, adjacent to Nauset Marsh on Cape Cod, USA. Discharge estimates based on radon and salinity took advantage of the presence of the narrow channel connecting Salt Pond to Nauset Marsh, which allowed constructing whole-pond mass balances as water flowed in and out due to tidal fluctuations. A box model was used to estimate discharge separately to Salt Pond and to the channel by simulating the timing and magnitude of variations in the radon and salinity data in the channel. Discharge to the pond is estimated to be 2200±1100 m3d-1, while discharge to the channel is estimated to be 300±150 m3d-1, for a total discharge of 2500±1250 m3d-1 to the Salt Pond system. This translates to an average groundwater flow velocity of 3±1.5 cm d-1 Seepage meter flow estimates are broadly consistent with this figure, provided discharge is confined to shallow sediments (water depth 3d-1 predicted by a recent hydrologic model (Masterson, 2004; Colman and Masterson, 2004. Additional work is needed to determine if the measured rate of discharge is representative of the long-term average, and to determine the rate of groundwater discharge seaward of Salt Pond. Data also suggest a TDN flux from groundwater to Salt Pond of ~2.6 mmol m-2d-1, a figure comparable to fluxes observed in other eutrophic settings.

  16. Evaluation of radon measuring technique using passive detector activated carbon; Avaliacao da tecnica de medicao do radonio utilizando detector passivo com carvao ativado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Paulo Roberto Rocha; Lessa, Edmilson de Lima; Oliveira, Evaldo Paulo de, E-mail: epoliveira@aluno.ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Radioprotecao Ambiental e Ocupacional

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the efficiency of measuring the radioactive gas Radon ({sup 222} Rn) with passive detector activated carbon. Alpha Guard, exposure chamber, air sampler, default font Radio, calibrator flow, flow adjuster, ducts drivers: For this, various equipment to make the measurement system as were used. An assembly of such equipment, with specific sequence was used allowing for more efficient exposure of passive detectors Radon gas. Twenty samples were heated to remove moisture and then stored in desiccator until the experiment were made. The exhibition was held passive dosimeters being removed from the chamber, and one hour after, subjected to analysis by gamma spectrometry in germanium (HPGe) for an hour. Subsequently, other measurements were made at scheduled times and sequential for one hour. The results were presented in report form and spectra, measures and graphs generated by Alpha Guard were also extracted. Finally we calculated the efficiency of the passive meter activated carbon. (author)

  17. Radon gas monitoring survey for the determination of Radon Prone Areas in Lombardia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolo, D. de; Alberici, A.; Gallini, R.; Maggioni, T.; Mondini, A.; Zini, E. [A.R.P.A. della Lombardia, Milano (Italy); Arrigoni, S.; Cazzaniga, P.; Cugini, A.; Gallinari, G.; Olivieri, F.; Romanelli, M. [A.R.P.A. della Lombardia, Dipt. di Bergamo, Bergamo (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Region Lombardia has carried out a radon gas monitoring survey on its territory to localize radon prone areas as by law 241/00 enacted. To plan the survey, the Lombardia territory has been divided into two different types according to the morphology as well as the presence of a substratum of rock. The area with hills and mountains has been investigated with more attention compared to the plain because we can assume higher variability in radon concentration distribution due to the geological and morphological characteristics. The territory subdivision was based on the standard grid.. of the techniregional cartography (8 x 5 km). To perform radon indoor concentration measurements about 3600 measuring points were selected. They are located at the ground floor of buildings with the characteristics to ensure the tests are representative and comparable. It has also been taken into account evaluations done with previous surveys in accordance with the defined specification of the sites. The measurements were carried out using C.R. 39 trace detector technique. The detectors were contained in closed plastic canisters and they were positioned in situ for one year and measured each semester. The detectors were chemically treated and the traces counted using the automated optical system installed at the Radiometric Laboratory of the A.R.P.A. Department in Bergamo. The instrument accuracy and precision were evaluated using data obtained with different methods: using detectors exposed to radon known concentrations, participating to an international intercomparison as well as exposing the detector in a national calibration centre. Due to the large amount of detectors involved, a particular attention was taken for the detector homogeneity response and for the optimization of the analysis parameters. For further investigating the reliability of the measurements, two detectors were used in parallel in 10% of the tests. The results show higher values in the areas of Bergamo, Brescia

  18. Low-Cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, William B. [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, Champaign, IL (United States); Francisco, Paul W. [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, Champaign, IL (United States); Merrin, Zachary [Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the research was to conduct a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation-living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity the foundation was improved. However, this improved isolation did not lead to significant reductions in radon concentration in the living space. Other factors such as outdoor temperature were shown to have an impact on radon concentration.

  19. Measures of Gross National Happiness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHappiness is rising on the political agenda and this calls for measures of how well nations perform in creating great happiness for a great number, analogous to measures of success in creating wealth, such as GDP. Happiness is defined as subjective enjoyment of one’s life as-a-whole and

  20. Assessment of long-term radon concentration measurement precision in field conditions (Serbian Schools) for a survey carried out by an international collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentieri, C; Zunic, Z S; Carelli, V; Cordedda, C; Ferrigno, G; Veselinovic, N; Bossew, P; Tollefsen, T; Cuknic, O; Vojinovic, Z; Bochicchio, F

    2011-05-01

    In an international collaboration, a long-term radon concentration survey was carried out in schools of Southern Serbia with radon detectors prepared, etched and read-out in Italy. In such surveys it is necessary to evaluate measurement precision in field conditions, and to check whether quality assurance protocols were effective in keeping uncertainties under control, despite the complex organisation of measurements. In the first stage of the survey, which involves only some of the total number of municipalities, paired detectors were exposed in each monitored room in order to experimentally assess measurement precision. Paired passive devices (containing CR-39 detectors) were exposed for two consecutive 6-month periods. Two different measurement systems were used to read out CR-39s of the first and second period, respectively. The median of the coefficient of variation (CV) of the measured exposures was 8 % for 232 paired devices of the first 6-month period and 4 % for 242 paired devices of the second 6-month period, respectively. This difference was mainly due to a different track count repeatability of the two read-out systems, which was 4 and 1 %, respectively, as the median value of CV of repeated countings. The in-field measured precision results are very similar to the precision assessed in calibration conditions and are much lower than the room-to-room variation of radon concentration in the monitored schools. Moreover, a quality assurance protocol was followed to reduce extra-exposures during detector transport from Rome to schools measured and back.

  1. Radon in Himalayan springs: a geohydrological control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choubey, V.M.; Bartarya, S.K. [Wadia Inst. of Himalayan Geology, Dehra Dun (India); Ramola, R.C. [Garhwal Univ., Srinagar, Uttar Pradesh (India). Dept. of Physics

    2000-04-01

    This paper presents the results of radon measurements in springs of the Himalayan region by using radon emanometry technique. The radon was measured in different springs, draining from different geohydrological setups, and from stream water in order to find the geohydrological control over radon concentration in groundwater emanating in the form of spring. The radon values were found to vary from 0.4 Bq/l to 887 Bq/l, being observed lowest for a turbulent stream and highest for the spring. The radon values were recorded highest in the springs draining through gneiss, granite, mylonite, etc. Radon concentrations have been related with four spring types viz. fracture-joint related spring, fault-lineament related spring, fluvial related spring and colluvial related spring, showing geohydrological characteristics of the rocks through which they are emanating. The high radon concentration in fracture-joint and fault-lineament springs is related to increased ratio of rock surface area to water volume and uranium mineralisation in the shear zones present in the close vicinity of fault and thrust. The low concentration of radon in fluvial and colluvial springs is possibly because of high transmissivity and turbulent flow within such deposits leading to natural de-emanation of gases. (orig.)

  2. Radon exhalation rates of some granites used in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Mladen D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to address concern about radon exhalation in building material, radon exhalation rate was determined for different granites available on Serbian market. Radon exhalation rate, along with mass exhalation rate and effective radium content were determined by closed chamber method and active continuous radon measurement technique. For this research, special chambers were made and tested for back diffusion and leakage, and the radon concentrations measured were included in the calculation of radon exhalation. The radon exhalation rate ranged from 0.161 Bq/m2h to 0.576 Bq/m2h, the mass exhalation rate from 0.167 Bq/kgh to 0.678 Bq/kgh, while the effective radium content was found to be from 12.37 Bq/kg to 50.23 Bq/kg. The results indicate that the granites used in Serbia have a low level of radon exhalation.

  3. Indoor radon survey in the Vojvodina region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forkapic, S.; Todorovic, N.; Bikit, I.; Mrda, D.; Slivka, J.; Veskovic, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 4, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2010-07-01

    The results of an indoor radon survey in the Vojvodina region (Serbia) are presented. Long-term average radon measurements in an existing building can be measured relatively simply and inexpensively using a passive device, such as an alpha track detector. Houses in the suburbs were chosen as the target locations of the present investigations. Indoor radon concentrations were measured with CR-39 alpha track detectors at {approx}1000 locations in Vojvodina during the winter period. Effect of floor level, space under the rooms, boarding and the heating system on radon accumulation are discussed in this paper. For the dwellings typical of such regions, we measure a mean annual radon activity concentration of 112 Bq/m{sup 3} (747 measurements using the alpha track detector CR-39). (authors)

  4. Radon in indoor air of primary schools: determinant factors, their variability and effective dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Rufo, João; Moreira, André; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo; Pereira, Alcides

    2016-04-01

    Radon is a radioactive gas, abundant in granitic areas, such as in the city of Porto at the north-east of Portugal. This gas is a recognized carcinogenic agent, being appointed by the World Health Organization as the leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The aim of this preliminary survey was to determine indoor radon concentrations in public primary schools, to analyse the main factors influencing their indoor concentration levels and to estimate the effective dose in students and teachers in primary schools. Radon concentrations were measured in 45 classrooms from 13 public primary schools located in Porto, using CR-39 passive radon detectors for about 2-month period. In all schools, radon concentrations ranged from 56 to 889 Bq/m(3) (mean = 197 Bq/m(3)). The results showed that the limit of 100 Bq/m(3) established by WHO IAQ guidelines was exceeded in 92 % of the measurements, as well as 8 % of the measurements exceeded the limit of 400 Bq/m(3) established by the national legislation. Moreover, the mean annual effective dose was calculated as 1.25 mSv/y (ranging between 0.58 and 3.07 mSv/y), which is below the action level (3-10 mSv). The considerable variability of radon concentration observed between and within floors indicates a need to monitor concentrations in several rooms for each floor. A single radon detector for each room can be used, provided that the measurement error is considerably lower than variability of radon concentration between rooms. The results of the present survey will provide useful baseline data for adopting safety measures and dealing effectively with radiation emergencies. In particular, radon remediation techniques should be used in buildings located in the highest radon risk areas of Portugal. The results obtained in the current study concerning radon levels and their variations will be useful to optimize the design of future research surveys.

  5. Measurement and apportionment of radon source terms for modeling indoor environments. Final progress report, March 1990--August 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harley, N.H.

    1992-12-31

    During the present 2 1/2 year contract period, we have made significant Progress in modeling the source apportionment of indoor {sup 222}Rn and in {sup 222}Rn decay product dosimetry. Two additional areas were worked on which we believe are useful for the DOE Radon research Program. One involved an analysis of the research house data, grouping the hourly house {sup 222}Rn measurements into 2 day, 7 day and 90 day intervals to simulate the response of passive monitors. Another area requiring some attention resulted in a publication of 3 years of our indoor/outdoor measurements in a high-rise apartment. Little interest has been evinced in apartment measurements yet 20% of the US population lives in multiple-family dwellings, not in contact with the ground. These data together with a summary of all other published data on apartments showed that apartments have only about 50% greater {sup 222}Rn concentration than the measured outdoor {sup 222}Rn. Apartment dwellers generally represent a low risk group regarding {sup 222}Rn exposure. The following sections describe the main projects in some detail.

  6. Radon measurements by nuclear track detectors in dwellings in Oke-Ogun area, South-Western, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obed, R I; Ademola, A K; Ogundare, F O

    2012-03-01

    An indoor radon survey of a total of 77 dwellings randomly selected in 10 districts in Oke-Ogun area of Oyo state, South-western Nigeria was carried out using CR-39 detectors. The CR-39 detectors were placed in the bedrooms and living rooms and exposed for 6 months and then etched in NaOH 6.25 N solution at 90 °C for 3 h. Mean concentrations amount to 255 ± 47 and 259 ± 67 Bq m(-3) in the living rooms and bedrooms, respectively. The lowest radon concentration (77 ± 29 Bq m(-3)) was found in Igbeti, whereas the highest was found in Okeho (627 ± 125 Bq m(-3)). The annual exposure of dwellers was estimated to fall radon level in this part of the country may be attributed to its geographic location. The data presented here will serve as a baseline survey for radon concentration in dwellings in the area.

  7. Seasonal variation in indoor radon concentrations in dwellings in six districts of the Punjab province, Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faheem, Munazza; Mati, N; Matiullah [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), PO Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2007-12-15

    An indoor radon measurement survey has been carried out in six districts of the Punjab province. These included Gujranwala, Gujrat, Hafizabad, Sialkot, Narowal and Mandibahauddin districts. In each district, 40 representative houses were chosen and indoor radon levels were measured in these dwellings in autumn, winter, spring and summer seasons using CR-39 based NRPB radon dosimeters. After exposure to radon, the CR-39 detectors were etched in 25% NaOH at 80 {sup 0}C and track densities were related to radon concentration levels. From the observed data, average radon concentration levels and a seasonal correction factor were calculated. The average {sup 222}Rn concentration level was found to vary from 40 {+-} 15 to 160 {+-} 32 Bq m{sup -3} and 38 {+-} 17 to 141 {+-} 26 Bq m{sup -3} in the bedrooms and living rooms of the houses surveyed, respectively. The annual mean effective dose received by the occupants has been calculated using ICRP (1993 Ann. ICRP 23) and UNSCEAR (2000 Sources and Effects of Ionizing Radiation (New York: United Nations)); it varied from 1.2 to 1.7 mSv and from 1.8 to 2.4 mSv, respectively. (note)

  8. Seasonal variation in indoor radon concentrations in dwellings in six districts of the Punjab province, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faheem, Munazza; Mati, N; Matiullah

    2007-12-01

    An indoor radon measurement survey has been carried out in six districts of the Punjab province. These included Gujranwala, Gujrat, Hafizabad, Sialkot, Narowal and Mandibahauddin districts. In each district, 40 representative houses were chosen and indoor radon levels were measured in these dwellings in autumn, winter, spring and summer seasons using CR-39 based NRPB radon dosimeters. After exposure to radon, the CR-39 detectors were etched in 25% NaOH at 80 degrees C and track densities were related to radon concentration levels. From the observed data, average radon concentration levels and a seasonal correction factor were calculated. The average 222Rn concentration level was found to vary from 40 +/- 15 to 160 +/- 32 Bq m(-3) and 38 +/- 17 to 141 +/- 26 Bq m(-3) in the bedrooms and living rooms of the houses surveyed, respectively. The annual mean effective dose received by the occupants has been calculated using ICRP (1993 Ann. ICRP 23) and UNSCEAR (2000 Sources and Effects of Ionizing Radiation (New York: United Nations)); it varied from 1.2 to 1.7 mSv and from 1.8 to 2.4 mSv, respectively.

  9. The ORNL Indoor Air Quality Study: Re-cap, Context, and Assessment on Radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rose, Erin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ternes, Mark P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    As part of the retrospective evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy s low-income Weatherization Assistance Program that was led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an assessment of the impacts of weatherization on indoor air quality (IAQ) was conducted. This assessment included nearly 500 treatment and control homes across the country. Homes were monitored for carbon monoxide, radon, formaldehyde, temperature and humidity pre- and post-weatherization. This report focuses on the topic of radon and addresses issues not thoroughly discussed in the original IAQ report. The size, scope and rigor of the radon component of the IAQ study are compared to previous studies that assessed the impacts of weatherization on indoor radon levels. It is found that the ORNL study is by far the most extensive study conducted to date, though the ORNL results are consistent with the findings of the other studies. However, the study does have limitations related to its reliance on short-term measurements of radon and inability to attribute changes in radon levels in homes post-weatherization to specific weatherization measures individually or in combination.

  10. How to Ensure Low Radon Concentrations in Indoor Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn; Wraber, Ida Kristina

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on methods for measuring radon levels in the indoor air in buildings as well as on concrete solutions that can be carried out in the building to prevent radon leakage and to lower the radon concentration in the indoor air of new buildings. The radon provision in the new Danish...... Building Regulations from 2010 has been tightened as a result of new recommendations from the World Health Organization. Radon can cause lung cancer and it is not known whether there is a lower limit for its harmfulness. It is therefore important to reduce the radon concentration as much as possible in new...... buildings. The airtightness is a major factor when dealing with radon in buildings. Above the ground it is important to build airtight in compliance with energy requirements and against the ground it is important to prevent radon from seeping into the building. There is a direct connection between...

  11. Radon removal from gaseous xenon with activated charcoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Hieda, K.; Hiraide, K.; Hirano, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Koshio, Y.; Liu, J.; Martens, K.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nishiie, H.; Ogawa, H.; Sekiya, H.; Shinozaki, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Takachio, O.; Takeda, A.; Ueshima, K.; Umemoto, D.; Yamashita, M.; Hosokawa, K.; Murata, A.; Otsuka, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Kusaba, F.; Motoki, D.; Nishijima, K.; Tasaka, S.; Fujii, K.; Murayama, I.; Nakamura, S.; Fukuda, Y.; Itow, Y.; Masuda, K.; Nishitani, Y.; Takiya, H.; Uchida, H.; Kim, Y. D.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, J. S.; Xmass Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Many low background experiments using xenon need to remove radioactive radon to improve their sensitivities. However, no method of continually removing radon from xenon has been described in the literature. We studied a method to remove radon from xenon gas through an activated charcoal trap. From our measurements we infer a linear relationship between the mean propagation velocity vRn of radon and vXe of xenon in the trap with vRn/vXe=(0.96±0.10)×10-3 at -85 °C. As the mechanism for radon removal in this charcoal trap is its decay, knowledge of this parameter allows us to design an efficient radon removal system for the XMASS experiment. The verification of this system found that it reduces radon by a factor of 0.07, which is in line with its expected average retention time of 14.8 days for radon.

  12. Identification of high radon areas with passive methods and geological assessments in some Italian regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Marta; Bartolomei, Paolo; Esposito, Massimo; Marrocchino, Elena; Vaccaro, Carmela

    2010-05-01

    Internationally the indoor radon exposition as health hazard is widely recognized; so in many countries specific laws and regulations and so-called radon - risk maps have been introduced. Few Italian Regions have started surveys for the identification of 'radon prone areas', with independent standards and protocols and this involves a bigger uncertainty on the definition of a national risk map failing guidelines. In the present work a standardized methodology for indoor radon measurements has been set up by U-Series Srl (Bologna), with attention to the development of a passive measurement technique (solid state nuclear track detectors) on large scale. The developed technique has been validated through an inter-laboratory comparison conducted by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) in 2008 and repeated in 2009. An indoor radon monitoring survey has been conducted in all Italian Regions with the developed methodology and 5425 measurements have been elaborated to obtain the annual average radon concentration in regional scale and the relapse of seasonal fluctuations on radon concentrations were verified. For the survey, the detectors were installed in underground rooms in workplaces and the measurements were performed over one solar year. As a consequence of our developed methodology (measurements only in underground rooms), indoor radon concentrations resulted generally higher than the concentrations obtained in the National Survey; we estimated an annual mean radon concentration of 110 Bqm3 compared to 70 Bq/m3 obtained by the National Survey. Only for the Italian Regions with the largest number of sampling (Lombardia, with the case studies of Milano Province and Milano city, Emilia Romagna, Toscana, Puglia) the data obtained were georeferentiated and we elaborated these data using geostatistical technique in order to produce distribution maps of the annual average indoor radon concentration. We have integrated the elaborated maps with the

  13. Variation in alpha radioactivity of plants with the use of different fertilizers and radon measurement in fertilized soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Pooja; Chauhan, Rishi Pal

    2014-01-01

    People are exposed to ionizing radin from the radionuclides that are present in different types of natural sources, of which phosphate fertilizer is one of the most important sources. Fertilizers are commonly used in agricultural field worldwide to enhance the crop yield. In the present investigation, a control study was carried out on the lady's finger plants grown in earthen pots. To observe the effect of fertilizers their equal amounts were added to the soil just before the plantation. The alpha track densities were measured using solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs), a sensitive detector for alpha particles. The measured alpha track densities (T cm(-2)d(-1)) in lady's finger plants on top and bottom face of leaves after 30, 50 and 70 days of plantation varied from 49 ± 11 to 206 ± 2.6, 49 ± 16 to 248 ± 16 and 57 ± 8.5 to 265 ± 32 respectively in various leaf samples. The alpha track densities were found to vary with nature of fertilizers added to the soil and an increase was also observed with time. The alpha track densities were also measured in soil samples mixed with different fertilizers. The radon exhalation rates in various soil samples and soil to plant transfer factor (TF) of alpha tracks were also calculated.

  14. Development of a compact electronic dosemeter from CMOS sensor for radon measurement; Developpement d'un dosimetre electronique compact a base de capteurs CMOS pour la mesure du radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higueret, St

    2007-12-15

    Radon detection is a long-standing challenge in the field of radioprotection, and the IPHC Institute of Strasbourg has pushed for the development of a fully electronic device, portable and really standalone. Our first prototype of CMOS system-on-chip is presented, together with efficiency tests and the corresponding physics simulations (TRIM, GEANT IV). We describe several electronic boards which have been developed for various kinds of tests, firstly passive detection of {alpha}-particles from gaseous {sup 222}Rn in a large spectrum of activity concentrations. In a second stage, active collection of the daughter isotopes {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po was performed: these elements, appearing as attached on the aerosols present in air, are an important contribution to internal {alpha}-irradiation. The final electronic system, of only 10 cm size, includes four independent chips to ensure simultaneous detection of radon gas and its aerosols. An excellent linearity has been measured up to 80 kBq.m{sup -3} on the BACCARA bench of the IRSN at Saclay. A new generation chip is also studied. (author)

  15. Comparison of radon doses based on different radon monitoring approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaupotič, Janja; Smrekar, Nataša; Žunić, Zora S

    2017-04-01

    In 43 places (23 schools, 3 kindergartens, 16 offices and one dwelling), indoor radon has been monitored as an intercomparison experiment, using α-scintillation cells (SC - Jožef Stefan Institute, Slovenia), various kinds of solid state nuclear track detectors (KfK - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany; UFO - National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan; RET - University College Dublin, Ireland) and active electronic devices (EQF, Sarad, Germany). At the same place, the radon levels and, consequently, the effective doses obtained with different radon devices differed substantially (by a factor of 2 or more), and no regularity was observed as regards which detector would show a higher or lower dose. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Systematic radon survey over active volcanoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, J.L.; Monnin, M.; Garcia Vindas, J.R. [Centre National de la Recherche Cientifique, Montpellier (France). Lab. GBE; Ricard, L.P.; Staudacher, T. [Observatoire Volcanologique Du Pitou de la Fournaise, La Plaine des Cafres (France)

    1999-08-01

    Data obtained since 1993 on Costa Rica volcanos are presented and radon anomalies recorded before the eruption of the Irazu volcano (December 8, 1994) are discussed. The Piton de la Fournaise volcano is inactive since mid 1992. The influence of the external parameters on the radon behaviour is studied and the type of perturbations induced on short-term measurements are individuate.

  17. Radon as a groundwater tracer in Forsmark and Laxemar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grolander, Sara

    2009-10-15

    Radon concentrations were measured in different water types in Forsmark and Laxemar during the site investigation and within this study. From these measurements it can be concluded that large differences between surface water, near surface groundwater and deep groundwater can be found in both Laxemar and Forsmark. The differences in radon concentrations between different water types are used in this study to detect interactions between surface water, near surface water and deep groundwater. From the radon measurements it can also be concluded that radon concentration in deep groundwater varies largely with depth. These variations with depth are probably caused by groundwater flow in conductive fracture zones in the bedrock. The focus of this study has been the radon concentration of near surface groundwater and the interaction between near surface groundwater and deep groundwater. Radon measurements have been done using the RAD-7 radon detector within this study. It could be concluded that RAD-7 is a good technique for radon measurements and also easy to use in field. The radon concentrations measured in near surface groundwater in Laxemar within this study were low and homogenous. The variation in radon concentration has been analyses and compared to other parameters. Since the hypothesis of this study has been that there are differences in radon concentrations between recharging and discharging groundwater, the most important parameter to consider is the recharge/discharge field classification of the wells. No correlation between the recharge/discharge classifications of wells and the radon concentrations were found. The lack of correlation between groundwater flow patterns and radon concentration means that it is not possible to detect flow patterns in near surface groundwater using radon as a tracer in the Laxemar area. The lack of correlation can be caused by the fact that there are just a few wells located in areas classified as recharge area. It can also be

  18. Indoor radon measurements in south west England explained by topsoil and stream sediment geochemistry, airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy and geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Antonio; Daraktchieva, Zornitza; Beamish, David; Kirkwood, Charles; Lister, T Robert; Cave, Mark; Wragg, Joanna; Lee, Kathryn

    2016-05-20

    Predictive mapping of indoor radon potential often requires the use of additional datasets. A range of geological, geochemical and geophysical data may be considered, either individually or in combination. The present work is an evaluation of how much of the indoor radon variation in south west England can be explained by four different datasets: a) the geology (G), b) the airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy (AGR), c) the geochemistry of topsoil (TSG) and d) the geochemistry of stream sediments (SSG). The study area was chosen since it provides a large (197,464) indoor radon dataset in association with the above information. Geology provides information on the distribution of the materials that may contribute to radon release while the latter three items provide more direct observations on the distributions of the radionuclide elements uranium (U), thorium (Th) and potassium (K). In addition, (c) and (d) provide multi-element assessments of geochemistry which are also included in this study. The effectiveness of datasets for predicting the existing indoor radon data is assessed through the level (the higher the better) of explained variation (% of variance or ANOVA) obtained from the tested models. A multiple linear regression using a compositional data (CODA) approach is carried out to obtain the required measure of determination for each analysis. Results show that, amongst the four tested datasets, the soil geochemistry (TSG, i.e. including all the available 41 elements, 10 major - Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, Ti - plus 31 trace) provides the highest explained variation of indoor radon (about 40%); more than double the value provided by U alone (ca. 15%), or the sub composition U, Th, K (ca. 16%) from the same TSG data. The remaining three datasets provide values ranging from about 27% to 32.5%. The enhanced prediction of the AGR model relative to the U, Th, K in soils suggests that the AGR signal captures more than just the U, Th and K content in the soil. The

  19. Radon in houses and soil of Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radolic, V.; Vukovic, B.; Stanic, D.; Miklavcic, I.; Planinic, J. [Osijek Univ., Dept. of Physics (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    Long-term indoor radon measurements in thousand Croatian homes, randomly selected, were performed by the LR-115 track etch detectors during a year 2003/2004. The obtained values of arithmetic means of radon concentrations in 20 Croatian counties were in range from 33 to 198 Bq/m{sup 3}, while the arithmetic and geometric means for Croatia were 68 and 50 Bq/m{sup 3}, respectively. Indoor radon concentrations follow log-normal distribution and the percentage of dwellings with concentrations above 400 Bq/m{sup 3} was 1.8 %. Radon concentrations in soil gas, at depth of 0.8 m, were measured by 'Alphaguard' measuring system. Association between levels of indoor and soil radon was investigated. (authors)

  20. Exploring a long-lasting volcanic eruption by means of in-soil radon measurements and seismic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsaperla, Susanna; Neri, Marco; Di Grazia, Giuseppe; Langer, Horst; Spampinato, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    We analyze in-soil radon (Rn) emission and ambient parameters (barometric pressure and air temperature measurements) along with seismic activity during the longest flank eruption of this century at Mt. Etna, Italy. This eruption occurred between 14 May 2008 and 6 July 2009, from a N120-140°E eruptive fissure extending between 3050 and 2620 m above sea level. It was heralded by a short-lived (~5 hours) episode of lava fountaining three days before a dike-forming intrusion fed a lava emission, which affected the summit area of the volcano over ~15 months. The peculiar position of the station for the Rn measurement, which was at an altitude of 2950 m above sea level and near (~1 km) the summit active craters, offered us the uncommon chance: i) to explore the temporal development of the gas emission close (relationship between in-soil Rn fluxes and seismic signals (in particular, local earthquakes and volcanic tremor) during the uninterrupted lava emission. This approach reveals important details about the recharging phases characterizing the 2008-2009 eruption, which are not visible with other methods of investigation. Our study benefitted from the application of methods of pattern classification developed in the framework of the European MEDiterrranean Supersite Volcanoes (MED­SUV) project.

  1. Assessment of indoor radon gas concentration change of college

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hoon Hee; Jeong, Eui Hwan; Kim, Hak Jae; Lyu, Kang Yeul [Dept. of of Radiological Technology, Shingu College, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju Young [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Songho College, Hoengseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact by comparing the concentration of indoor radon and look for ways to lower the concentration of indoor radon gas measurements of three variables, the year of completion, volume of the building and ventilation. Measurement target is six classrooms on the sixth floor of building that was constructed in 1973 and was extended in 2011. Selected classroom's volume is different. Four classrooms were selected to compare the radon concentration in accordance with the year of completion, Classrooms that is same year of completion were selected to compare the radon concentration in accordance with the volume, six classroom was performed closure and ventilation to compare radon concentration according to ventilation. Radon concentrations in accordance with the year of building completion showed a high concentration of radon in a building recently built. Also, Radon concentration in volume is high the smaller the volume. Radon concentration change according to ventilation showed a reduction of about 80% when the ventilation than during closing. Especially, The radon concentrations were high detected while the recently year of building completion and the smaller volume. Ventilation of the three variables is considered that can be expected to exposure reduction effect by radon affecting the greatest radon concentration reduction.

  2. The latest trend of the research on radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Hiroshi [Science Univ. of Tokyo, Noda, Chiba (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology

    1996-12-01

    In June, 1995, the international conference of sixth Natural Radiation Environment was held in Montreal. More than 80% of more than 200 published researches were concerned with radon and thoron. The participants came from 32 countries. The classification of the research on radon and the number of the publication are shown. The contents of the researches in respective items of measuring method, concentration level and dose evaluation, indoor model and indoor and outdoor radon balance, the countermeasures for reducing indoor radon, radon potential, dose evaluation model, the particle size distribution of aerosol including the particle size distribution of free daughter nuclides and radon in the atmosphere are described. The research on the radon in water is excluded. The most remarkable trend is the theme of radon potential. The trend of connecting the research on radon in soil and the research on dissipation rate to radon potential and the forecast of indoor and outdoor radon concentration seems to become stronger. As to the research on concentration level, the detection of hot spots and the supplementary measurement for clarifying cause are carried out in the advanced countries concerning radon based on the results of survey in whole country. The researches in schools are conspicuous. (K.I.)

  3. Domestic Radon Exposure and Risk of Childhood Cancer: A Prospective Census-Based Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauri, Dimitri; Spycher, Ben; Huss, Anke; Zimmermann, Frank; Grotzer, Michael; von der Weid, Nicolas; Weber, Damien; Spoerri, Adrian; Kuehni, Claudia E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In contrast with established evidence linking high doses of ionizing radiation with childhood cancer, research on low-dose ionizing radiation and childhood cancer has produced inconsistent results. Objective: We investigated the association between domestic radon exposure and childhood cancers, particularly leukemia and central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods: We conducted a nationwide census-based cohort study including all children radon levels were estimated for each individual home address using a model developed and validated based on approximately 45,000 measurements taken throughout Switzerland. Data were analyzed with Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for child age, child sex, birth order, parents’ socioeconomic status, environmental gamma radiation, and period effects. Results: In total, 997 childhood cancer cases were included in the study. Compared with children exposed to a radon concentration below the median (radon exposure is associated with childhood cancer, despite relatively high radon levels in Switzerland. Citation: Hauri D, Spycher B, Huss A, Zimmermann F, Grotzer M, von der Weid N, Weber D, Spoerri A, Kuehni C, Röösli M, for the Swiss National Cohort and the Swiss Paediatric Oncology Group (SPOG). 2013. Domestic radon exposure and risk of childhood cancer: a prospective census-based cohort study. Environ Health Perspect 121:1239–1244; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306500 PMID:23942326

  4. Residential radon in Finland: sources, variation, modelling and dose comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvela, H.

    1995-09-01

    The study deals with sources of indoor radon in Finland, seasonal variations in radon concentration, the effect of house construction and ventilation and also with the radiation dose from indoor radon and terrestrial gamma radiation. The results are based on radon measurements in approximately 4000 dwellings and on air exchange measurements in 250 dwellings as well as on model calculations. The results confirm that convective soil air flow is by far the most important source of indoor radon in Finnish low-rise residential housing. (97 refs., 61 figs., 30 tabs.).

  5. Impact of measurement error in radon exposure on the estimated excess relative risk of lung cancer death in a simulated study based on the French Uranium Miners' Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allodji, Rodrigue S; Leuraud, Klervi; Thiébaut, Anne C M; Henry, Stéphane; Laurier, Dominique; Bénichou, Jacques

    2012-05-01

    Measurement error (ME) can lead to bias in the analysis of epidemiologic studies. Here a simulation study is described that is based on data from the French Uranium Miners' Cohort and that was conducted to assess the effect of ME on the estimated excess relative risk (ERR) of lung cancer death associated with radon exposure. Starting from a scenario without any ME, data were generated containing successively Berkson or classical ME depending on time periods, to reflect changes in the measurement of exposure to radon ((222)Rn) and its decay products over time in this cohort. Results indicate that ME attenuated the level of association with radon exposure, with a negative bias percentage on the order of 60% on the ERR estimate. Sensitivity analyses showed the consequences of specific ME characteristics (type, size, structure, and distribution) on the ERR estimates. In the future, it appears important to correct for ME upon analyzing cohorts such as this one to decrease bias in estimates of the ERR of adverse events associated with exposure to ionizing radiation.

  6. A complete low cost radon detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrak, A; Barlas, E; Emirhan, E; Kutlu, Ç; Ozben, C S

    2013-08-01

    Monitoring the (222)Rn activity through the 1200 km long Northern Anatolian fault line, for the purpose of earthquake precursory, requires large number of cost effective radon detectors. We have designed, produced and successfully tested a low cost radon detection system (a radon monitor). In the detector circuit of this monitor, First Sensor PS100-7-CER-2 windowless PIN photodiode and a custom made transempedence/shaping amplifier were used. In order to collect the naturally ionized radon progeny to the surface of the PIN photodiode, a potential of 3500 V was applied between the conductive hemi-spherical shell and the PIN photodiode. In addition to the count rate of the radon progeny, absolute pressure, humidity and temperature were logged during the measurements. A GSM modem was integrated to the system for transferring the measurements from the remote locations to the data process center.

  7. STUDY OF RADON FLUX FROM SOIL IN BUDHAKEDAR REGION USING SRM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourai, A A; Aswal, Sunita; Kandari, Tushar; Kumar, Shiv; Joshi, Veena; Sahoo, B K; Ramola, R C

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, the radon flux rate of the soil is measured using portable radon monitor (scintillation radon monitor) in the Budhakedar region of District Tehri, India. The study area falls along a fault zone named Main Central Thrust, which is relatively rich in radium-bearing minerals. Radon flux rate from the soil is one of the most important factors for the evaluation of environmental radon levels. The earlier studies in the Budhakedar region shows a high level of radon (>4000 Bq m(-3)). Hence, it is important to measure the radon flux rate. The aim of the present study is to calculate the average estimate of the surface radon flux rate as well as the effective mass exhalation rate. A positive correlation of 0.54 was found between radon flux rate and radon mass exhalation rate. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Radon as an Anthropogenic Indoor Air Pollutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Crockett, Robin

    2016-04-01

    Radon is generally regarded as a naturally occurring radiological hazard but we report here measurements of significant, hazardous radon concentrations that arise from man-made sources, including granite ornaments/artefacts, uranium glass and glazed objects as well radium dial watches. This presentation concerns an examination and assessment of health risks from radium and uranium found in historical artefacts, many of which were once viewed as everyday items, and the radon that emanates from them. Such objects were very popular in industrialised countries such as the USA, UK and European countries) particularly between and including the two World Wars but are still readily available. A watch collection examined gave rise to a hazardous radon concentration of 13.24 kBq•m-3 approximately 67 times the Domestic Action Level of 200 Bq•m-3.The results for an aircraft altimeter are comparable to those of the watches, indicating radon activity equivalent to several watches, and also indicate an equilibrium concentration in the 16.3 m3 room ca. 33 times the UK domestic Action Level. Results from a granite block indicate a radon emanation of 19.7 Bq•kg-1, but the indicated equilibrium concentration in the 16.3 m3 room is only ca. 1.7% of the UK domestic Action Level. Uranium-glazed crockery and green uranium glass were scoped for radon activity. The former yielded a radon concentration of ca. 44 Bq•m-3 in a small (7 L) sealed container. The latter yielded a lower radon concentration in a larger (125 L) sealed container of ca. 6 Bq•m-3. This is barely above the background radon concentration in the laboratory, which was typically ca. 1-2 Bq•m-3. Individual items then are capable of giving rise to radon concentrations in excess of the UK Domestic Action Level in rooms in houses, particularly if poorly ventilated. We highlight the gap in the remediation protocols, which are focused on preventing radon entering buildings from outside, with regard to internally

  9. Identification and mapping of radon-prone areas in Croatia-preliminary results for Lika-Senj and the southern part of Karlovac counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radolić, Vanja; Miklavčić, Igor; Stanić, Denis; Poje, Marina; Krpan, Ivana; Mužević, Matko; Petrinec, Branko; Vuković, Branko

    2014-11-01

    Long-term indoor radon measurements performed by LR 115 track etched detectors in Croatian homes during 2003-04 showed that the arithmetic means of radon concentrations in Lika-Senj and the southern part of Karlovac counties were three times higher (198 Bq m(-3)) than in houses at national level (68 Bq m(-3)). Recently, indoor radon measurements in randomly selected houses were investigated. The obtained values in these new measurements have confirmed the values obtained 10 y ago (the average radon value in 225 investigated houses in this area is 223 Bq m(-3)). Radon concentrations in soil gas were measured in September and October 2012 and 2013 with the AlphaGUARD measuring system. Areas with both elevated indoor radon levels and radon in soil gas were identified (some micro locations in Korenica, Ličko Lešće, Generalski Stol, Slunj and Ogulin) and visually presented in the form of maps using the inverse distance weighting approach.

  10. Compilation of geogenic radon potential map of Pest County, Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, K. Zs.; Pásztor, L.; Horváth, Á.; Bakacsi, Zs.; Szabó, J.; Szabó, Cs.

    2010-05-01

    222Rn and its effect on the human health have recently received major importance in environmental studies. This natural radioactive gas accounts for about 9% of lung cancer death and about 2% of all deaths from cancer in Europe due to indoor radon concentrations. It moves into the buildings from the natural decay chain of uranium in soils, rocks and building materials. Radon mapping regionalizes the average hazard from radon in a selected area as a radon risk map. Two major methods (concerning the applied radon data) have been used for mapping. One uses indoor radon data whereas the other is based on soil gas radon data. The outputs of the second approach are the geogenic radon potential maps. The principal objective of our work is to take the first step in geogenic radon mapping in Hungary. Soil samples collected in Pest County (Central Region of Hungary) in the frame of a countrywide soil survey (Soil Information and Monitoring System) were studied to have empirical information of the potential radon risk. As the first two steps radium concentration of soil samples, collected at 43 locations sampling soil profiles by genetic horizons from the surface level down to 60-150 cm, were determined using HPGe gamma-spectroscopy technique, as well as measurement of radon exhalation on the soil samples were carried out applying closed radon accumulation chamber coupled with RAD7 radon monitor detector. From these data the exhalation coefficient was calculated, which shows how many percent of the produced radon can come out from the sample. This rate strongly depends on the depth: at circa 100 cm a drastic decrease have been noticed, which is explained by the change in soil texture. The major source of indoor radon is the soil gas radon concentration (Barnet et al., 2005). We estimated this value from the measured radon exhalation and calculated soil porosity and density. The soil gas radon concentration values were categorized after Kemski et al. (2001) and then the

  11. Radon concentration in houses over a closed Hungarian uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somlai, Janos; Kovacs, Tibor [University of Veszprem Department of Radiochemistry, H-8200, Veszprem P.O.B.: 158 (Hungary); Gorjanacz, Zoran [Mecsek Ore Environmental Protection Co. H-7614, Pecs, P.O.B.: 121 (Hungary); Varhegyi, Andras [Mecsek-OEko Environmental Protection Co. H-7614, Pecs, P.O.B.: 121 (Hungary)

    2006-08-31

    High radon concentration (average 410 kBq m{sup -3}) has been measured in a tunnel of a uranium mine, located 15-55 m below the village of Kovagoszolos, Hungary. The mine was closed in 1997; the artificial ventilation of the tunnel was then terminated and recultivation works begun. In this paper, a study has been made as to whether the tunnel has an influence on the radon concentration of surface dwellings over the mining tunnel. At different distances from the surface projection of the mining tunnel, radon concentration, the gamma dose, radon exhalation and radon concentration of soil gas were measured. The average radon concentration in the dwellings was 483 Bq m{sup -3}. Significantly higher radon concentrations (average 667 Bq m{sup -3}) were measured in houses within +/-150 m from the surface projection of the mining tunnel +50 m, compared with the houses further than the 300-m belt (average 291 Bq m{sup -3}). The average radon concentration of the soil gas was 88.8 kBq m{sup -3}, the average radon exhalation was 71.4 Bq m{sup -2} s{sup -1} and higher values were measured over the passage as well. Frequent fissures crossing the passage and running up to the surface and the high radon concentration generated in the passage (average 410 kBq m{sup -3}) may influence the radon concentration of the houses over the mining tunnel. (author)

  12. Conversion of an Alpha CAM Monitor of Victoreen calibrated of factory for plutonium in a measurement monitor of radon in the atmosphere; Conversion de un monitor Alpha CAM de la Victoreen calibrado de fabrica para plutonio en un monitor para medicion de radon en la atmosfera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno y Moreno, A. [Departamento de Apoyo en Ciencias Aplicadas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    It is presented in this work the conversion of a monitor ALPHA CAM of the monitor Victoreen gauged of it manufactures for plutonium in a monitor for radon mensuration in the atmosphere. Those units in that the radon measures are expressed are: peak curies/unit of volume of air to sampling. This way one has to gauge and to supplement the software and the parts that the old one monitor for plutonium. It requires. This task implies: a) To calibrate and to determine the efficiency of the detector of accustomed to state of 1700 mm{sup 2} for alpha particles coming from the radioactive series of the radon. b) to connect in series and to calibrate a flow measurer of air in it lines with the detector. Measures are presented of the ambient air and other places of the the historical area of the city of Puebla obtained with the team Converted ALPHA-CAM. (Author)

  13. Criteria of radon risk of territories and methods for their determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhakova, Nadezhda K

    2014-09-01

    The paper analyzes the values used in the assessment of radon potential of territories. It was shown that the most reliable criterion in the assessment of radon risk of territories can be the value of radon activity concentration fixed at large depths. The authors proposed a simple method to assess this value and radon flux density from the soil surface, based on the measurement of radon activity concentration in soil gas at two twice differing depths and the diffusion model of transport.

  14. Mutagenicity of radon and radon daughters. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, H.H.

    1991-12-01

    The objective of our research is to investigate the dose-response relationship of the lethal and mutagenic effects of exposure of cells to radon and its decay products. Dose rate dependence and the nature of the DNA lesion will be studied, using the thymidine kinase and HPRT loci to measure mutation frequency. A deficiency in DNA repair is shown to lead to a greater proportion of mutants with intergenic lesions. The cytotoxic effects of radon and its daughters are similar in human TK6 lymphoblasts and mouse L5178Y lymphoblasts, the cell line used in previous experiments. The results of molecular analysis of four spontaneous and 25 X-radiation induced HPRT{sup {minus}} mutants. Eleven radon-induced HPRT{sup {minus}} mutants have been isolated, and will be analyzed in a similar fashion. 9 figs.

  15. The Radon Monitoring System in Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, M C; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Leung, J K C; Leung, K Y; Lin, Y C; Luk, K B; Pun, C S J

    2016-01-01

    We developed a highly sensitive, reliable and portable automatic system (H$^{3}$) to monitor the radon concentration of the underground experimental halls of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. H$^{3}$ is able to measure radon concentration with a statistical error less than 10\\% in a 1-hour measurement of dehumidified air (R.H. 5\\% at 25$^{\\circ}$C) with radon concentration as low as 50 Bq/m$^{3}$. This is achieved by using a large radon progeny collection chamber, semiconductor $\\alpha$-particle detector with high energy resolution, improved electronics and software. The integrated radon monitoring system is highly customizable to operate in different run modes at scheduled times and can be controlled remotely to sample radon in ambient air or in water from the water pools where the antineutrino detectors are being housed. The radon monitoring system has been running in the three experimental halls of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment since November 2013.

  16. Radon exhalation rates corrected for leakage and back diffusion – Evaluation of radon chambers and radon sources with application to ceramic tile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abo-Elmagd

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The natural radon decay, leakage and back diffusion are the main removal processes of radon from its container. Ignoring these processes leads to underestimate the measured value of radon related parameters like exhalation rate and radium content. This work is aimed to evaluate two different radon chambers through determining their leakage rate λv and evaluation of radon source by determine its back diffusion rate λb inside the evaluated radon chambers as well as a small sealed cup. Two different methods are adapted for measuring both the leakage rate and the back diffusion rate. The leakage rate can be determined from the initial slope of the radon decay curve or from the exponential fitting of the whole decay curve. This can be achieved if a continuous monitoring of radon concentration inside the chamber is available. Also, the back diffusion rate is measured by sealing the radon source in the chamber and used the initial slope of the buildup curve to determine λb and therefore the exhalation rate of the source. This method was compared with simple equation for λb based on the ratio of the source to the chamber volume. The obtained results are applied to ceramic tile as an important radon source in homes. The measurement is targeted the ceramic glaze before and after firing as well as the obtained tile after adhere the glaze on the tile main body. Also, six different tile brands from Egyptian market are subjected to the study for comparison.

  17. Radon in the soil air of Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersell, Valter; Täht-Kok, Krista; Karimov, Mark; Milvek, Heli; Nirgi, Siim; Raha, Margus; Saarik, Krista

    2017-01-01

    Several investigations in Estonia during 1996¬-1999 have shown that permissible level (200 Bq/m(3)) of radon (222Rn) in indoor air is exceeded in 33% of the inspected dwellings. This makes Estonia one of the five countries with highest radon risk in Europe (Fig 1). Due to correlation between the soil radon risk level and radon concentration in houses, small scale radon risk mapping of soil air was carried out (one study point per 70-100 km(2)). It turned out that one-third of Estonian mainland has high radon risk potential, where radon concentration in soil air exceeds safe limit of 50 kBq/m(3). In order to estimate radon content in soil air, two different methods developed in Sweden were used simultaneously. Besides measuring radon content from soil air at the depth of 80 cm with an emanometer (RnM), maximum potential content of radon in soil (RnG) was estimated based on the rate of eU (226Ra) concentration in soil, which was acquired by using gamma-ray spectrometer. Mapping and following studies revealed that simultaneously measured RnG and RnM in study points may often differ. To inspect the cause, several monitoring points were set up in places with different geological conditions. It appeared that unlike the RnG content, which remains close to average level in repeated measurements, the RnM content may differ more than three times periodically. After continuous observations it turned out that concentration of directly measured radon depended on various factors being mostly controlled by mineral composition of soil, properties of topsoil as well as different factors influencing aeration of soil. The results of Rn monitoring show that reliable level of radon risk in Estonian soils can only be acquired by using calculated Rn-concentration in soil air based on eU content and directly measured radon content of soil air in combination with interpreting specific geological and geochemical situations in the study points. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  18. Durability of radon remedial actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naismith, S. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    In the UK, approximately 3600 householders are believed to have taken action to reduce high radon concentrations in their homes. In 1993 a number of those householders who had taken successful remedial actions were invited to participate in a study of durability of radon remedial actions. This involved the radon concentration being remeasured annually. Results for 26 such homes where a complete set of data are available and a further 32 with incomplete data are discussed here. All remedial actions were shown to remain durable during a period of 5 years. The largest variation in effectiveness was found in houses with natural ventilation of the underfloor void. The failure rate for all remedial measures was found to be 4.0% per annum, but in most cases the problems were noticed by the householder and corrected. The frequency of failures which were not noticed until a remeasurement was carried out was 0.4% per annum. (Author).

  19. Radon Guide for Tenants

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guide is for people who rent their apartments or houses. The guide explains what radon is, and how to find out if there is a radon problem in your home. The guide also talks about what you can do if there are high radon levels in your home.

  20. Health Risk of Radon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radon in Homes EPA 402-R-03-003. Summary Fact Sheet on the updated risk assessment . Top of Page Former U.S. Surgeon General ... WHO) launched an international radon project to help countries increase ... reduce radon-related risks. The U.S. EPA is one of several government ...

  1. XENON1T radon assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruenner, Stefan [MPIK, Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: XENON-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The radioactive isotope {sup 222}Rn is one of the most dominant intrinsic background sources for experiments dealing with a low event rate like the XENON1T Dark Matter detector. Being part of the primordial decay chain of {sup 238}U the noble gas {sup 222}Rn permanently emanates from almost all materials. Therefore, it is crucial to determine the radon emanation rate of those detector components that will be in contact with the xenon target. The technique of the radon emanation measurements, making use of ultra low background proportional counters is presented as well as selected results for XENON1T.

  2. Monitoring of Radon in Tourist Part of Skocjan Caves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debevec Gerjevic, Vanja; Jovanovic, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Due to their exceptional significance for cultural and natural heritage, the Škocjan Caves were entered on UNESCO's list of natural and cultural world heritage sites in 1986. Park Škocjan Caves is located in South Eastern part of Slovenia. It was established with aim of conserving and protecting exceptional geomorphological, geological and hydrological outstanding features, rare and endangered plant and animal species, paleontological and archaeological sites, ethnological and architectural characteristics and cultural landscape and for the purpose of ensuring opportunities for suitable development, by the National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia in 1996. Park Škocjan Caves established monitoring that includes caves microclimate parameters: humidity, CO2, wind flow and radon concentration and daughter products. The approach in managing the working place with natural background radiation is complex. Monitoring of Radon has been functioning for more than ten years now. Presentation will show the yearly dynamic observed in the different parts of the caves, related to radon daughter products and other microclimatic data, beside the most convenient measuring technique. Implementing the Slovene legislation in the field of radiation protection, we are obligated to perform special measurements in the caves and also having our guides and workers in the caves regularly examined according to established procedure. The medical exams are performed at Institution of Occupational Safety, Ljubljana in order to monitor the influence of Radon to the workers in the cave. The equivalent dose for each employed person is also established on regular basis and it is part of medical survey of workers in the caves. The survey will be described along with education of the staff working in the caves in the field of radiation protection. An overview of Slovene legislation with practical example on implementation will be demonstrated in the case of Škocjan Caves where the managing

  3. Theoretical aspects of the design of a passive radon dosemeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, P; Saunders, B J

    1985-10-01

    Some mathematical aspects of the development and design of a passive radon dosemeter are considered. In particular, a mathematical model is presented that is concerned with the gaseous diffusion of radon into a confined region bounded by a plastic material of known diffusion coefficient. The relationship between the time-integrated radon concentrations, inside and outside a sealed plastic container are derived. Estimates of the exposure of people to radon can be made using the time integrated radon concentration inside a calibrated container containing a CR-39 etched-track device. As a consequence of the analysis, it is possible to design a passive radon dosemeter that will be accurate, resistant to moisture and whose response will be independent of rapid variations in radon concentration. The possibility of using a container of this type for the measurement of diffusion coefficients is discussed.

  4. Radon release from granites in south-west England

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, J

    2001-01-01

    accessory minerals. The enhancement of surface area was attributed to the alteration of feldspar to sericite. This has implications for the release of radon. It is thought that the large surface area provides a sink for the adsorption of radon, retaining it in the rock structure. This radon retention explains the paradoxical decline in radon release at small particle size/large specific surface area. Various mechanisms for radon emanation are discussed with reference to the Cornubian granites. It is shown that, based on the measured specific surface areas, inter-crystalline diffusion is a slow process and not a significant contributor to overall radon release (0.01%). Approximately 1% of the total radon produced can be attributed to direct recoil processes, based on the calculated recoil ranges (36 nm). The remainder was attributed to diffusion processes through crystal imperfections and dislocations. The microscopic scale model developed here is extended to the macroscopic scale through examination of the la...

  5. Soil radon levels across the Amer fault

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Font, Ll. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Edifici Cc, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain)], E-mail: lluis.font@uab.cat; Baixeras, C.; Moreno, V. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Edifici Cc, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Bach, J. [Unitat de Geodinamica externa, Departament de Geologia, Edifici Cs, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2008-08-15

    Soil radon levels have been measured across the Amer fault, which is located near the volcanic region of La Garrotxa, Spain. Both passive (LR-115, time-integrating) and active (Clipperton II, time-resolved) detectors have been used in a survey in which 27 measurement points were selected in five lines perpendicular to the Amer fault in the village area of Amer. The averaged results show an influence of the distance to the fault on the mean soil radon values. The dynamic results show a very clear seasonal effect on the soil radon levels. The results obtained support the hypothesis that the fault is still active.

  6. Thorough investigations on indoor radon in Băiţa radon-prone area (Romania).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucoş Dinu, Alexandra; Cosma, Constantin; Dicu, Tiberius; Begy, Robert; Moldovan, Mircea; Papp, Botond; Niţă, Dan; Burghele, Bety; Sainz, Carlos

    2012-08-01

    A comprehensive radon survey has been carried out in Băiţa radon-prone area, Transylvania, Romania, in 4 localities (Băiţa, Nucet, Fînaţe, and Cîmpani) situated in the vicinity of former Romanian uranium mines. Indoor radon concentrations have been measured in 1128 ground floor rooms and cellars of 303 family houses by using CR-39 diffusion type radon detectors. The annual average of indoor radon concentration for Băiţa area was found to be 241±178 Bq m(-3), which is about two times higher than the average value of 126 Bq m(-3), computed for Romania. About 28% of investigated houses exceed the reference level of radon gas in dwellings of 300 Bq m(-3). The indoor radon measurements on each house have been carried out in several rooms simultaneously with the aim of obtaining a more detailed picture on the exposure to radon in the studied area. An analysis on the variability of radon levels among floors (floor-to-floor variation) and rooms (room-to-room variation) and also the influence of factors like the presence of cellar or the age of the building is presented. The coefficient of variation (CV) within ground floor rooms of the same house (room-to-room variation) ranged between 0.9 and 120.8%, with an arithmetic mean of 46.2%, a large variability among rooms within surveyed dwellings being clearly identified. The mean radon concentration in bedrooms without cellar was higher than in bedrooms above the cellar, the difference being statistically significant (t test, one tail, pradon levels was observed, but overall there was no significant difference in indoor radon concentrations by age of dwelling (one-way ANOVA test, p>0.05).

  7. Carbon dioxide and radon measurements in the soils of Pantelleria island (southern Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    D'Alessandro, W.; Brusca, L; D. Cinti; A. L. Gagliano; Longo, M.; Pecoraino, G; Pizzino, L.; Voltattorni, N.

    2013-01-01

    Pantelleria is an active volcanic complex, at present in quiescent status, hosting a high enthalpy geothermal system. Explorative geothermal wells tapped exploitable water-dominated reservoirs at 600-800 m depth with maximum measured temperatures of 250°C. Five field campaigns for soil gas measurements were made in the period from July 2005 to October 2006. CO2 flux was measured with the accumulation chamber method at 807 sites, CO2 concentration and Rn activity in soil atmosphere were me...

  8. Radon and radon-daughter concentrations in air in the vicinity of the Anaconda Uranium Mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momeni, M H; Lindstrom, J B; Dungey, C E; Kisieleski, W E

    1979-11-01

    Radon concentration, working level, and meteorological variables were measured continuously from June 1977 through June 1978 at three stations in the vicinity of the Anaconda Uranium Mill with measurements integrated to hourly intervals. Both radon and daughters show strong variations associated with low wind velocities and stable atmospheric conditions, and diurnal variations associated with thermal inversions. Average radon concentration shows seasonal dependence with highest concentrations observed during fall and winter. Comparison of radon concentrations and working levels between three stations shows strong dependence on wind direction and velocity. Radon concentrations and working-level distributions for each month and each station were analyzed. The average maximum, minimum, and modal concentration and working levels were estimated with observed frequencies. The highest concentration is 11,000 pCi/m/sup 3/ on the tailings. Working-level variations parallel radon variations but lag by less than one hour. The highest working levels were observed at night when conditions of higher secular radioactive equilibrium for radon daughters exist. Background radon concentration was measured at two stations, each located about 25 km from the mill, and the average is 408 pCi/m/sup 3/. Average working-level background is 3.6 x 10/sup -3/.

  9. Assessment of Concentration and the Annual Effective Dose of Radon Gas in Imam Hospital Indoor Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobra Verijkazemi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and purpose: Exposure to natural sources of radiation, especially radon and its short-term products, is an important issue around the world. Radon exposure causes lung cancer in humans. Therefore, the aim of this study was to measure the concentration of radon gas and its annual effective dose in Imam Hospital of Tehran, Iran and to compare its concentrations with the recommended standards. Methods: Radon levels and meteorological parameters (temperature, pressure, and moisture were measured in different levels and in four seasons, using Radstar and Lutron Electronic devices, respectively, during June 2014-June 2015. The collected data were analyzed through SPSS 18. Annual effective dose was calculated, using the equation for annual effective dose introduced by Scientific Committee of the United Nations. Results: The highest concentration of radon and annual effective dose were observed in the winter, which were 82/15 Bq/m3 and0/48 ms/y, respectively. Furthermore, concerning the various levels, the highest concentration was observed in the lowest level (56/1 Bq/m3.Conclusion: The results of the current study demonstrated that radon concentration was lower than the standards set by Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization. Regarding this, there are not concerns about the possible dangers of radon gas activities for the personnel and patients of the hospital. 

  10. Influence of a component of solar irradiance on radon signals at 1 km depth, Gran Sasso, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Steinitz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Exploratory monitoring of radon is conducted at one location at the deep underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS. Measurements (15-min resolution are performed over a time span of ca. 600 days in the air of the surrounding calcareous country rock. Utilizing both alpha and gamma-ray detectors systematic and recurring radon signals are recorded. Two primary signal types are determined: (a non-periodic Multi-Day (MD signals lasting 2–10 days, and (b Daily Radon (DR signals – which are of a periodic nature exhibiting a primary 24-h cycle. The local ancillary environmental conditions (P, T seem not to affect radon in air monitored at the site. Long term patterns of day-time measurements are different from the pattern of night-time measurements indicating a day-night modulation of gamma radiation from radon in air. The phenomenology of the MD and DR signals is similar to situations encountered at other locations where radon is monitored with a high time resolution in geogas at upper crustal levels. In accordance with recent field and experimental results it is suggested that a components of solar irradiance is affecting the radiation from radon in air, and this influence is further modulated by the diurnal rotation of Earth. The occurrence of these radon signals in the 1 km deep low radiation underground geological environment of LNGS provides new information on the time variation of the local radiation environment. The observations and results place the LNGS facility as a high priority location for performing advanced investigations of these geophysical phenomena, due to its location and its infrastructure.

  11. Thorough investigations on indoor radon in Baita radon-prone area (Romania)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucos, Alexandra; Cosma, Constantin [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, ' Babes-Bolyai' University, Fantanele No. 30, 400294, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Dicu, Tiberius, E-mail: tiberius.dicu@ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, ' Babes-Bolyai' University, Fantanele No. 30, 400294, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Begy, Robert; Moldovan, Mircea; Papp, Botond; Nita, Dan; Burghele, Bety [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, ' Babes-Bolyai' University, Fantanele No. 30, 400294, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Sainz, Carlos [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, ' Babes-Bolyai' University, Fantanele No. 30, 400294, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Cantabria, c/Herrera Oria s/n., 39011, Santander (Spain)

    2012-08-01

    A comprehensive radon survey has been carried out in Baita radon-prone area, Transylvania, Romania, in 4 localities (Baita, Nucet, Finate, and Cimpani) situated in the vicinity of former Romanian uranium mines. Indoor radon concentrations have been measured in 1128 ground floor rooms and cellars of 303 family houses by using CR-39 diffusion type radon detectors. The annual average of indoor radon concentration for Baita area was found to be 241 {+-} 178 Bq m{sup -3}, which is about two times higher than the average value of 126 Bq m{sup -3}, computed for Romania. About 28% of investigated houses exceed the reference level of radon gas in dwellings of 300 Bq m{sup -3}. The indoor radon measurements on each house have been carried out in several rooms simultaneously with the aim of obtaining a more detailed picture on the exposure to radon in the studied area. An analysis on the variability of radon levels among floors (floor-to-floor variation) and rooms (room-to-room variation) and also the influence of factors like the presence of cellar or the age of the building is presented. The coefficient of variation (CV) within ground floor rooms of the same house (room-to-room variation) ranged between 0.9 and 120.8%, with an arithmetic mean of 46.2%, a large variability among rooms within surveyed dwellings being clearly identified. The mean radon concentration in bedrooms without cellar was higher than in bedrooms above the cellar, the difference being statistically significant (t test, one tail, p < 0.001, n = 82). For houses built during 1960-1970 an increasing trend for radon levels was observed, but overall there was no significant difference in indoor radon concentrations by age of dwelling (one-way ANOVA test, p > 0.05). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The annual average of indoor radon concentration for Baita area was 241 {+-} 178 Bq m{sup -3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A large variability among rooms within surveyed dwellings was clearly evidenced

  12. Intercomparison of radon gas detectors 2001 at PSI; Die Vergleichsmessung 2001 fuer Radongasmessgeraete am PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterweck, Gernot; Schuler, Christoph

    2001-06-01

    Fifteen radon measurement services participated in the 2001 Radon Intercomparison Exercise performed at the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) during March 2nd to 11th, 2001. Eleven of these laboratories were approved by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health and their participation in the intercomparison exercise was a requirement to warrant traceability to national or international standards. Radon gas detectors (etched-track and electret ionization chambers) and instruments (ionization chambers and electrostatic precipitation) were exposed in the PSI Radon Chamber in a reference atmosphere with an average radon gas concentration of 6100 Bqm{sup -3} leading to a radon gas exposure of 1300 kBqhm{sup -3}. Due to the low aerosol concentration during this intercomparison exercise, etched-track detectors without diffusion chamber showed a significant deviation to the reference exposure and an increase of the standard deviation of an ensemble of five detectors compared to intercomparisons with aerosol concentration in the specified range of these detectors. Radon monitors with electrostatic precipitation, which were recently introduced on the Swiss market, showed insufficient factory calibration and correction of the influence of air humidity on the measured radon gas activity concentrations. (author) [German] Kandidaten fuer diese vom 2. bis 11. Maerz 2001 durchgefuehrte Vergleichsmessung waren Firmen, Institutionen oder Privatpersonen, welche die Anerkennung des Bundesamtes fuer Gesundheit (BAG) als Radonmessstelle besitzen und deshalb nachweisen muessen, dass die geforderte Rueckverfolgbarkeit der Messresultate auf national oder international anerkannte Normale gewaehrleistet ist. Dem Aufruf des BAG zur Teilnahme folgten neben 11 anerkannten vier weitere Messstellen. Sechs verschiedene Detektor- oder Messgeraetearten waren vertreten. Neben Kernspurdetektoren wurden bei den passiven Systemen

  13. A Rapid Method for Radon Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enkhbat, N.; Shin, S. G.; Key, Y. U.; Cho, M. H. [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Norov, N. [National University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Kim, G. [Kungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Namkung, W.; Lee, H. S. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Research carried out in last decades has shown that more than 70% of a total annual radioactive dose received by people originates from natural sources of ionizing radiation, whereby 40% is due to inhalation and ingestion of natural radioactive gas radon {sup 222}Rn and its progeny. Radon has 3.5 days of half-life. However, its progeny is dangerous than Radon in the view of radiation protection. Radon measurement is commonly used in controlling radon concentration in underground mine, closed room and in forecasting earthquake. Radon gas emission rate in the immediate opening of the west ventilation shaft depends on the operation of the ventilation system, duration of ventilation system operation, and the air flow rate through the underground development. Specific activity of radon progeny in air (RaA (Po-218), RaB (Pb-214) and RaC (Bi-214)) and Ra-222 in radioactive equilibrium was calculated by formula 1 and 2, respectively. We include result of measurement carried out in the air around a mining. In Fig.2 shown that the distribution of Po-218, Pb-214, Bi-214 and Ra-222 isotopes releasing from west ventilation shaft in Gurvanbulag underground uranium mine in the eastern part of Mongolia.

  14. Radon Exhalation Considered in Building Material Standard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>In order to investigate the relationship between radon exhalation and specific activity of natural nuclides in building material, here different kinds of samples of building materials were measured by the

  15. Measurement error in the explanatory variable of a binary regression: regression calibration and integrated conditional likelihood in studies of residential radon and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearn, T; Hill, D C; Darby, S C

    2008-05-30

    In epidemiology, one approach to investigating the dependence of disease risk on an explanatory variable in the presence of several confounding variables is by fitting a binary regression using a conditional likelihood, thus eliminating the nuisance parameters. When the explanatory variable is measured with error, the estimated regression coefficient is biased usually towards zero. Motivated by the need to correct for this bias in analyses that combine data from a number of case-control studies of lung cancer risk associated with exposure to residential radon, two approaches are investigated. Both employ the conditional distribution of the true explanatory variable given the measured one. The method of regression calibration uses the expected value of the true given measured variable as the covariate. The second approach integrates the conditional likelihood numerically by sampling from the distribution of the true given measured explanatory variable. The two approaches give very similar point estimates and confidence intervals not only for the motivating example but also for an artificial data set with known properties. These results and some further simulations that demonstrate correct coverage for the confidence intervals suggest that for studies of residential radon and lung cancer the regression calibration approach will perform very well, so that nothing more sophisticated is needed to correct for measurement error.

  16. Application of a radon model to explain indoor radon levels in a Swedish house

    CERN Document Server

    Font, L; Jönsson, G; Enge, W; Ghose, R

    1999-01-01

    Radon entry from soil into indoor air and its accumulation indoors depends on several parameters, the values of which normally depend on the specific characteristics of the site. The effect of a specific parameter is often difficult to explain from the result of indoor radon measurements only. The adaptation of the RAGENA (RAdon Generation, ENtry and Accumulation indoors) model to a Swedish house to characterise indoor radon levels and the relative importance of the different radon sources and entry mechanisms is presented. The building is a single-zone house with a naturally-ventilated crawl space in one part and a concrete floor in another part, leading to different radon levels in the two parts of the building. The soil under the house is moraine, which is relatively permeable to radon gas. The house is naturally-ventilated. The mean indoor radon concentration values measured with nuclear track detectors in the crawl-space and concrete parts of the house are respectively 75+-30 and 200+-80 Bq m sup - sup 3...

  17. Estimation of radon concentration in soil and groundwater samples of Northern Rajasthan, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Mittal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, analysis of radon concentration in 20 water and soil samples collected from different locations of Bikaner and Jhunjhunu districts of Rajasthan, India has been carried out by using RAD7 an electronic Radon detector. The measured radon concentration in water samples lies in the range from 0.50 to 22 Bq l−1 with the mean value of 4.42 Bq l−1, which lies within the safe limit from 4 to 40 Bq l−1 recommended by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR, 2008. The total annual effective dose estimated due to radon concentration in water ranges from 1.37 to 60.06 μSV y−1 with the mean value of 12.08 μSV y−1, which is lower than the safe limit 0.1 mSv y−1 as set by World Health Organization (WHO, 2004 and European Council (EU, 1998. Radon measurement in soil samples varies from 941 to 10,050 Bq m−3 with the mean value of 4561 Bq m−3, which lies within the range reported by other investigators. It was observed that the soil and water of Bikaner and Jhunjhunu districts are suitable for drinking and construction purpose without posing any health hazard.

  18. Impact of haze-fog days to radon progeny equilibrium factor and discussion of related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Changsong; Shang, Bing; Zhang, Qingzhao; Cui, Hongxing; Wu, Yunyun; Deng, Jun

    2015-11-01

    The equilibrium factor F between radon and its short-lived progenies is an important parameter to estimate radon exposure of humans. Therefore, indoor and outdoor concentrations of radon and its short-lived radon progeny were measured in Beijing area using a continuously measuring device, in an effort to obtain information on the F value. The results showed that the mean values of F were 0.58 ± 0.13 (0.25-0.95, n = 305) and 0.52 ± 0.12 (0.31-0.91, n = 64) for indoor and outdoor, respectively. The indoor F value during haze-fog days was higher than the typical value of 0.4 recommended by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and it was also higher than the values of 0.47 and 0.49 reported in the literature. A positive correlation was observed between indoor F values and PM2.5 concentrations (R (2) = 0.71). Since 2013, owing to frequent heavy haze-fog events in Beijing and surrounding areas, the number of the days with severe pollution remains at a high level. Future studies on the impact of the ambient fine particulate matter on indoor radon progeny equilibrium factor F could be important.

  19. Radon in Soil Gas Above Bedrock Fracture Sets at the Shepley’s Hill Superfund Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.R. Giles; T.L. McLing; M.V. Carpenter; C.J. Smith; W. Brandon

    2012-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently provided technical support for ongoing environmental remediation activities at the Shepley’s Hill remediation site near Devens, MA (Figure 1). The technical support was requested as follow-on work to an initial screening level radiation survey conducted in 2008. The purpose of the original study was to assess the efficacy of the INL-developed Backpack Sodium Iodide System (BaSIS) for detecting elevated areas of natural radioactivity due to the decay of radon-222 gases emanating from the underlying fracture sets. Although the results from the initial study were mixed, the BaSIS radiation surveys did confirm that exposed bedrock outcrops have higher natural radioactivity than the surficial soils, thus a high potential for detecting elevated levels of radon and/or radon daughter products. (INL 2009) The short count times associated with the BaSIS measurements limited the ability of the system to respond to elevated levels of radioactivity from a subsurface source, in this instance radon gas emanating from fracture sets. Thus, it was postulated that a different methodology be employed to directly detect the radon in the soil gases. The CR-39 particle track detectors were investigated through an extensive literature and technology search. The relatively long deployment or “detection” time of several days, as well as the sensitivity of the measurement and robustness of the detectors made the CR-39 technology promising for deployment at the Shepley’s Hill site.

  20. Environmental gamma and radon dosimetry in Venezuela

    CERN Document Server

    Sajo-Bohus, L; Urbani, F; Castro, D D; Greaves, E D; Liendo, J A

    1999-01-01

    Environmental gamma exposure and radon concentration levels measured in Venezuelan regions are presented. A new generation image analyser was used for alpha particle track counting in CR-39 detectors. Mineral water wells from where water is supplied for massive consumption have an alpha activity around 0.450 Bq L sup - sup 1 and few of them have concentrations above 50 Bq L sup - sup 1. Coastal potable water activity is on the average around 5.3 +- 12% Bq L sup - sup 1. Indoor radon national average is 36 +- 5% Bq m sup - sup 3; in two of the 36 monitored sites, the measured average is above 400 +- 5% Bq m sup - sup 3. In air gamma dose values are between 100 and 144 nGy h sup - sup 1. In soil, sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs concentration is around 0.5 and 10 Bq kg sup - sup 1 at the depth of down to 20 cm. Building materials were included in this study. sup 7 Be and sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs were measured in low concentration in tropical plants on Tepuy-s (sacred mountains in the Amazonas State). Geological active faults w...

  1. Pilot study of the application of Tellus airborne radiometric and soil geochemical data for radon mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, J D; Miles, J C H; Green, B M R; Larmour, R

    2008-10-01

    The scope for using Tellus Project airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and soil geochemical data to predict the probability of houses in Northern Ireland having high indoor radon concentrations is evaluated, in a pilot study in the southeast of the province, by comparing these data statistically with in-house radon measurements. There is generally good agreement between radon maps modelled from the airborne radiometric and soil geochemical data using multivariate linear regression analysis and conventional radon maps which depend solely on geological and indoor radon data. The radon maps based on the Tellus Project data identify some additional areas where the radon risk appears to be relatively high compared with the conventional radon maps. One of the ways of validating radon maps modelled on the Tellus Project data will be to carry out additional indoor measurements in these areas.

  2. A search profile for dwellings with elevated radon levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjær, A.; Andersen, C.E.; Majborn, B.;

    1996-01-01

    basement/slab-on-grade foundation built on either fractured granitic basement rocks, or fractured limestone. Clayey till areas were also included in the profile in order to confirm earlier findings. Three areas representing these surface geologies were selected for indoor radon measurements with CR-39...... track detectors, and a total of 200 houses matching the profile underwent radon measurements during the winter 1994-95. The distribution of the measured radon concentrations were found in most cases to comply with log-normal distributions. Measurements in the living rooms of houses in each of the three......A search profile for dwellings with elevated radon levels has been employed to investigate possibly radon-prone areas in Denmark and to find houses suitable for radon mitigation studies. The profile is defined as dwellings which are single-family houses with slab-on-grade foundation or partly...

  3. Radon screening for XENON1T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindemann, Sebastian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Radon with its isotope {sup 222}Rn is one of the dominant sources of internal background in liquid xenon detectors searching for low energetic rare events like WIMP-nucleon scattering. In my talk I briefly review the problem posed by {sup 222}Rn and motivate the screening strategy followed by XENON1T. I introduce the radon emanation technique making use of ultra low background proportional counters and present selected results obtained during the design and construction phases of XENON1T. Finally, I sketch advances in radon emanation assay techniques and give a short outlook on upcoming measurements.

  4. Measurements of indoor gamma radiation and radon concentrations in dwellings of Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saleh, Ferdoas S. [Physics Department, Girls College of Education in Riyadh, P.O. Box 27329, Riyadh 11417 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: ferdoasalsaleh@hotmail.com

    2007-07-15

    Indoor gamma radiation measurement at dwellings of Riyadh city in Saudi Arabia using TLD has been performed. Measurements were carried out from October 2004 to June 2005. The city was divided into five sectors, for four categories of bed rooms, living rooms, bathrooms and kitchens. The indoor gamma annual absorbed dose of Riyadh city is in the range from 303{+-}57 to 700{+-}38 {mu}Gy y{sup -1} with an average value of 455.1{+-}45 {mu}Gy y{sup -1}. The calculated corresponding annual effective dose to the adult population of the locations will vary from 212{+-}40 to 490{+-}27 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} with an average value of 318.57{+-}31 {mu}Sv y{sup -1}.{sup 222}Rn concentration was measured at dwellings of Riyadh city in Saudi Arabia to estimate effective annual dose to the public from {sup 222}Rn and its progeny. The {sup 222}Rn concentrations were measured using CR-39 detector. The range of annual mean {sup 222}Rn concentrations for all sites was 2-69 Bq m{sup -3} with an average of 18.4 Bq m{sup -3}. The effective annual dose was estimated to be 0.46 mSv y{sup -1}.

  5. Measurements of indoor gamma radiation and radon concentrations in dwellings of Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Ferdoas S

    2007-07-01

    Indoor gamma radiation measurement at dwellings of Riyadh city in Saudi Arabia using TLD has been performed. Measurements were carried out from October 2004 to June 2005. The city was divided into five sectors, for four categories of bed rooms, living rooms, bathrooms and kitchens. The indoor gamma annual absorbed dose of Riyadh city is in the range from 303+/-57 to 700+/-38microGyy(-1) with an average value of 455.1+/-45microGyy(-1). The calculated corresponding annual effective dose to the adult population of the locations will vary from 212+/-40 to 490+/-27microSvy(-1) with an average value of 318.57+/-31microSvy(-1).(222)Rn concentration was measured at dwellings of Riyadh city in Saudi Arabia to estimate effective annual dose to the public from (222)Rn and its progeny. The (222)Rn concentrations were measured using CR-39 detector. The range of annual mean (222)Rn concentrations for all sites was 2-69Bqm(-3) with an average of 18.4Bqm(-3). The effective annual dose was estimated to be 0.46mSvy(-1).

  6. Intercomparison of radon gas detectors 1999 and 2000 at PSI; Die Vergleichsmessungen 1999 und 2000 fuer Radongasmessgeraete am PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuler, Christoph; Butterweck, Gernot

    2000-10-01

    This report describes the results of two radon intercomparison exercises performed by the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at Paul Scherrer Institut from Sep 9th to Oct 6th, 1999, and from March 21st to 28th, 2000. Radon gas detectors and instruments were exposed in the PSI Radon Chamber in reference atmospheres to 1060 kBqhm{sup -3} radon gas exposure at an average radon gas concentration of 6400 Bqm{sup -3} and to 2050 kBqhm{sup -3} radon gas exposure at an average radon gas concentration of 12500 Bqm{sup -3}, respectively. These intercomparison exercises determined the performance of electret ionisation chambers, track etch detectors and measuring instruments at high humidity (1999 Intercomparison Exercise) and at a high radon gas exposure (2000 Intercomparison Exercise). In the 1999 Intercomparison Exercise, electret ionisation chambers revealed an influence on high humidity. This effect may be due to impurities on a microscopic scale on the electrets of these detectors. With few exceptions, in both the 1999 and the 2000 Radon Intercomparison Exercise the deviations of the measurement results to the reference radon gas concentration values were less than 15% (traceability criterion) and the standard deviation of the results of five detectors less than 15% (reproducibility criterion). (author) [German] Im Referenzlabor fuer Radongas-Konzentrationsmessungen des PSI, welches der Eichstelle fuer Strahlenschutzmessgeraete des PSI angegliedert und seit 1997 vom Eidgenoessischen Amt fuer Messwesen akkreditiert ist, werden zur Ueberpruefung von Rueckverfolgbarkeit und Reproduzierbarkeit von Messresultaten Vergleichsmessungen durchgefuehrt. Kandidaten fuer die Teilnahme an diesen Vergleichsmessungen sind Firmen, Institutionen oder Privatpersonen, welche die Anerkennung des Bundesamtes fuer Gesundheit als Radongasmessstelle besitzen und deshalb nachweisen muessen, dass die geforderte Rueckverfolgbarkeit der Messresultate auf national

  7. The European radon mapping project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossew, P., E-mail: pbossew@bfs.de [German Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Berlin (Germany); Tollefsen, T.; Gruber, V.; De Cort, M., E-mail: tore.tollefsen@jrc.ec.europa.eu, E-mail: valeria.gruber@gmail.com, E-mail: marc.de-cort@jrc.ec.europa.eu [Institute for Transuranium Elements, Ispra, VA (Italy). DG Joint Research Centre. European Commission

    2013-07-01

    There is almost unanimous agreement that indoor radon (Rn) represents a hazard to human health. Large-scale epidemiological studies gave evidence that Rn is the second-most important cause o flung cancer after smoking and that also relatively low Rn concentrations can be detrimental. This has increasingly led to attempts to limit Rn exposure through regulation, mainly building codes. The proposed Euratom Basic Safety Standards (BSS) require Member States to establish Rn action plans aimed at reducing Rn risk, and to set reference values for Imitating indoor Rn concentration. In 2006 the JRC started a project on mapping Rn at the European level, in addition and complementary lo (but not as a substitute for) national efforts. These maps are part of the European Atlas of Natural Radiation project. which is planned eventually 10 comprise geographical assessments of ali sources of exposure to natural radiation. Started first, a map of indoor Rn is now in an advanced phase, but still incomplete as national Rn surveys are ongoing in a number of European countries. A European map of geogenic Rn, conceptually and technically more complicated, was started in 2008. The main difficulty encountered is heterogeneity of survey designs, measurement and evaluation methods and database semantics and structures. An important part or the work on the Atlas is therefore to harmonize data and methods. We present the current state of the Rn maps and discuss some of the methodological challenges. (author)

  8. Distribution of indoor radon levels in Mexico

    CERN Document Server

    Espinosa, G; Rickards, J; Gammage, R B

    1999-01-01

    Our laboratory has carried out a systematic monitoring and evaluation of indoor radon concentration levels in Mexico for ten years. The results of the distribution of indoor radon levels for practically the entire country are presented, together with information on geological characteristics, population density, socioeconomic levels of the population, and architectural styles of housing. The measurements of the radon levels were made using the passive method of nuclear tracks in solids with the end-cup system. CR-39 was used as the detector material in combination with a one-step chemical etching procedure and an automatic digital- image counting system. Wherever a high level was measured, a confirming measurement was made using a dynamic method. The results are important for future health studies, including the eventual establishment of patterns for indoor radon concentration, as it has been done in the USA and Europe.

  9. Observations of surface radon in Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Piero Di; Pitari, Giovanni; de Luca, Natalia; Battisti, Domenico

    2009-07-01

    Two years of in situ radon concentration measurements in the atmospheric surface layer have been collected in a central Italy town (L’Aquila), located in the Aterno river valley. These data have been analyzed in order to study the controlling mechanisms of surface radon abundance; observations of coincident meteorological parameters confirmed the role of dynamics on the local removal rate of this tracer. The relatively high negative correlation of hourly data of surface wind speed and radon activity concentration ( R = -0.54, on annual scale) suggests that dynamical removal of radon is one of the most important controlling processes of the tracer accumulation in the atmospheric surface layer. An attempt is made to quantify the precipitation impact on radon soil fluxes. No anticorrelation of radon and precipitation comes out from the data ( R = -0.15), as in previous studies. However, since the main physical parameter affecting the ground radon release is expected to be the soil accumulation of water, snow or ice, the emission flux has also been correlated with soil moisture; in this way a much clearer anticorrelation is found ( R = -0.54).

  10. The calibration of the solid state nuclear track detector LR 115 for radon measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Gericke, C; Jönsson, G; Freyer, K; Treutler, H C; Enge, W

    1999-01-01

    An experimental calibration of indoor room and outdoor soil detector devices which are based on LR 115 as sensitive element has taken place at the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute in Stockholm (Sweden) in 1994 and 1996, at the Physikalisch-Technischen Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig (Germany) in 1997 and at the Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle (Germany) in 1997. Special properties of the used solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) material LR 115 have been measured to define the application of the experimental calibration.

  11. Collectivity in the light radon nuclei measured directly via Coulomb excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Gaffney, L P; Jenkins, D G; Andreyev, A N; Bender, M; Blazhev, A; Bree, N; Bruyneel, B; Butler, P A; Cocolios, T E; Davinson, T; Deacon, A N; De Witte, H; DiJulio, D; Diriken, J; Ekström, A; Fransen, Ch; Freeman, S J; Geibel, K; Grahn, T; Hadinia, B; Hass, M; Heenen, P -H; Hess, H; Huyse, M; Jakobsson, U; Kesteloot, N; Konki, J; Kröll, Th; Kumar, V; Ivanov, O; Martin-Haugh, S; Mücher, D; Orlandi, R; Pakarinen, J; Petts, A; Peura, P; Rahkila, P; Reiter, P; Scheck, M; Seidlitz, M; Singh, K; Smith, J F; Van de Walle, J; Van Duppen, P; Voulot, D; Wadsworth, R; Warr, N; Wenander, F; Wimmer, K; Wrzosek-Lipska, K; Zielińska, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shape coexistence in heavy nuclei poses a strong challenge to state-of-the-art nuclear models, where several competing shape minima are found close to the ground state. A classic region for investigating this phenomenon is in the region around $Z=82$ and the neutron mid-shell at $N=104$. Purpose: Evidence for shape coexistence has been inferred from $\\alpha$-decay measurements, laser spectroscopy and in-beam measurements. While the latter allow the pattern of excited states and rotational band structures to be mapped out, a detailed understanding of shape coexistence can only come from measurements of electromagnetic matrix elements. Method: Secondary, radioactive ion beams of $^{202}$Rn and $^{204}$Rn were studied by means of low-energy Coulomb excitation at the REX-ISOLDE facility in CERN. Results: The electric-quadrupole ($E2$) matrix element connecting the ground state and first-excited $2^{+}_{1}$ state was extracted for both $^{202}$Rn and $^{204}$Rn, corresponding to ${B(E2;2^{+}_{1} \\to 2^...

  12. Indoor radon; Le radon dans les batiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The radon, a natural radioactive gas, is present almost everywhere on the earth's surface. It can be accumulated at high concentration in confined spaces (buildings, mines, etc). In the last decades many studies conducted in several countries showed that inhaling important amounts of radon rises the risk of lung cancer. Although, the radon is a naturally appearing radioactive source, it may be the subject of a human 'enhancement' of concentration. The increasing radon concentration in professional housing constitutes an example of enhanced natural radioactivity which can induce health risks on workers and public. Besides, the radon is present in the dwelling houses (the domestic radon). On 13 May 1996, the European Union Council issued the new EURATOM Instruction that establishes the basic standards of health protection of population and workers against the ionizing radiation hazards (Instruction 96/29/EURATOM, JOCE L-159 of 29 June 1996). This instruction does not apply to domestic radon but it is taken into consideration by another EURATOM document: the recommendation of the Commission 90/143/EURATOM of 21 February 1990 (JOCE L-80 of 27 March 1990). The present paper aims at establishing in accordance to European Union provisions the guidelines for radon risk management in working places, as well as in dwelling houses, where the implied risk is taken into account. This document does not deal with cases of high radon concentration on sites where fabrication, handling or storage of radium sources take place. These situations must be treated by special studies.

  13. Soil gas radon mapping of Muzaffarabad city, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tareen Aleem Dad Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil-based radon investigations are of value in correlating radon production and its transportation into buildings through the processes of convection and diffusion. Such studies can help in identifying land areas that pose special concerns. We present preliminary results of soil radon gas measurements at 60 different locations in an attempt to map out the geohazard zone of the city of Muzaffarabad. The seismic geohazard microzonation for the area includes five microzones based on different hazard parameters: a very high hazard zone, a high hazard zone, a moderate hazard zone, a low hazard zone, and a safe zone. Measurements were taken with an active radon monitoring system at the depths of 30, 40, 50, and 60 cm below the ground surface. The results obtained were explained by the lithology of the area. Average soil radon gas concentrations were correlated with the depth from the ground surface and indoor radon values for the study area. No significant correlation was found between soil radon gas and meteorological parameters, however soil radon gas increases as the depth from the surface of the ground grows. The results showed a linear relation between soil radon concentrations with depth from ground surface (R2 = 0.9577. The minimum soil radon concentration (68.5 Bq/m3 was found at a depth of 30 cm in the very high hazard zone, the maximum value (53.300 Bq/m3 at a depth of 60 cm in the seismically safe zone. Measured soil gas radon concentrations at depths of 30, 40, 50, and 60 cm were mapped for high, moderate, and low radon concentrations. Elevated soil radon gas concentrations were found in the safe zone, otherwise considered to be suitable for any type of construction.

  14. A novel application for 222Rn emanation standards: radon-cryptophane host chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureano-Perez, L; Collé, R; Jacobson, D R; Fitzgerald, R; Khan, N S; Dmochowski, I J

    2012-09-01

    In collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania, a (222)Rn emanation source was used for the determination of the binding affinity of radon to a cryptophane molecular host. This source was similar to a (222)Rn emanation standard that was developed and disseminated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The novel experimental design involved performing the reactions at femtomole levels, developing exacting gravimetric sampling methods and making precise (222)Rn assays by liquid scintillation counting. A cryptophane-radon association constant was determined, K(A)=(49,000±12,000) L mol(-1) at 293 K, which was the first measurement of radon binding to a molecular host.

  15. Radon emanation based material measurement and selection for the SuperNEMO double beta experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerna, Cédric, E-mail: cerna@cenbg.in2p3.fr; Soulé, Benjamin; Perrot, Frédéric [Centre d’Études Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France)

    2015-08-17

    The SuperNEMO Demonstrator experiment aims to study the neutrinoless double beta decay of 7 kg of {sup 82}Se in order to reach a limit on the light Majorana neutrino mass mechanism T{sub 1/2} (ββ0ν) > 6.5 10{sup 24} years (90%CL) equivalent to a mass sensitivity mβ{sub β} < 0.20 - 0.40 eV (90%CL) in two years of data taking. The detector construction started in 2014 and its installation in the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (LSM) is expected during the course of 2015. The remaining level of {sup 226}Ra ({sup 238}U chain) in the detector components can lead to the emanation of {sup 222}Rn gas. This isotope should be controlled and reduced down to the level of a 150 µBq/m{sup 3} in the tracker chamber of the detector to achieve the physics goals. Besides the HPGe selection of the detector materials for their radiopurity, the most critical materials have been tested and selected in a dedicated setup facility able to measure their {sup 222}Rn emanation level. The operating principle relies on a large emanation tank (0.7m{sup 3}) that allows measuring large material surfaces or large number of construction pieces. The emanation tank is coupled to an electrostatic detector equipped with a silicon diode to perform the alpha spectroscopy of the gas it contains and extract the {sup 222}Rn daughters. The transfer efficiency and the detector efficiency have been carefully calibrated through different methods. The intrinsic background of the system allows one to measure 222Rn activities down to 3 mBq, leading to a typical emanation sensitivity of 20 µBq/m{sup 2}/day for a 30 m{sup 2} surface sample. Several construction materials have been measured and selected, such as nylon and aluminized Mylar films, photomultipliers and tracking of the SuperNEMO Demonstrator.

  16. Consumer's Guide to Radon Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radon Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Consumer's Guide to Radon Reduction: How to Fix Your ... See EPA’s About PDF page to learn more. Consumer's Guide to Radon Reduction: How to Fix Your ...

  17. Anomalous indoor radon concentration in a dwelling in Qatif City, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jarallah, M I; Fazal-ur-Rehman

    2005-01-01

    An indoor radon survey was carried out recently in nine cities of Saudi Arabia using nuclear track detectors (NTD)-based passive radon detectors. The survey included Qatif City in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, where 225 detectors were collected back successfully. It was found that the average indoor radon concentration in the dwellings was 22 +/- 15 Bq m(-3). However, one of the dwellings showed an anomalous radon concentration of 535 +/- 23 Bq m(-3). This finding led to a detailed investigation of this dwelling using active and passive techniques. In the active technique, an AlphaGUARD 2000 PRQ radon gas analyser was used. In the passive technique, CR-39 based passive radon detectors were used in all the rooms of the dwelling. Radon exhalation from the wall and the floor was also measured using the can technique. The active measurement confirms the passive one. Before placing the passive radon detectors in all the rooms of the two-storey building, the inhabitant was advised to ventilate his house regularly. The radon concentration in the different rooms was found to vary from 124 to 302 Bq m(-3). Radon exhalation from the floor and the wall of the room with the anomalous radon concentration was found to vary from 0.5 to 0.8 Bq m(-2) h(-1). These low radon exhalation rates suggest that the anomalous radon concentration is most probably due to underground radon diffusion into the dwelling through cracks and joints in the concrete floor.

  18. Radon risk mapping in southern Belgium: an application of geostatistical and GIS techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zh, H C; Charlet, J M; Poffijn, A

    2001-05-14

    A data set of long-term radon measurements in approximately 2200 houses in southern Belgium has been collected in an on-going national radon survey. The spatial variation of indoor Rn concentrations is modelled by variograms. A radon distribution map is produced using the log-normal kriging technique. A GIS is used to digitise, process and integrate a variety of data, including geological maps, Rn concentrations associated with house locations and an administrative map, etc. It also allows evaluation of the relationships between various spatial data sets with the goal of producing radon risk maps. Based on geostatistical mapping and spatial analysis, we define three categories of risk areas: high risk, medium risk and low risk area. The correlation between radon concentrations and geological features is proved in this study. High and medium Rn risk zones are dominantly situated in bedrock from the Cambrian to Lower Devonian, although a few medium risk zones are within the Jurassic. It is evident that high-risk zones are related to a strongly folded and fractured context.

  19. Mathematical model for radon diffusion in earthen materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.

    1982-10-01

    Radon migration in porous, earthen materials is characterized by diffusion in both the air and water components of the system as well as by the interaction of the radon between the air and water. The size distribution and configuration of the pore spaces and their moisture distributions are key parameters in determining the radon diffusion coefficient for the bulk material. A mathematical model is developed and presented for calculating radon diffusion coefficients solely from the moisture content and pore size distribution of a soil, reducing the need for resorting to radon diffusion measurements. The resulting diffusion coefficients increase with the median pore diameter of the soil and decrease with increasing widths of the pore size distribution. The calculated diffusion coefficients are suitable for use in simple homogeneous-medium diffusion expressions for predicting radon transport and compare well with measured diffusion coefficients and with empirical diffusion coefficient correlations.

  20. Ambient Radon-222 Monitoring in Amargosa Valley, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.H. Karr; J.J. Tappen; D. Shafer; K.J. Gray

    2008-06-05

    As part of a program to characterize and baseline selected environmental parameters in the region around the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, ambient radon-222 monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, the community closest to the proposed repository site. Passive integrating radon monitors and a continuous radon monitoring instrument were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) (http://www.cemp.dri.edu/index.html) station located in the Amargosa Valley Community Center near the library. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated radon measurements as well as verify meteorological data collected by the continuous radon monitoring instrument. Additionally, different types of environmental enclosures that housed the monitors and instrument were used to determine if particular designs influenced the ambient radon measurements.

  1. Radon therapy; Radon in der Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruck, Kaija [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2017-04-01

    Radon therapies are used since more than 100 years in human medicine. Today this method is controversially discussed due to the possible increase of ionizing radiation induced tumor risk. Although the exact mode of biological radiation effect on the cell level is still not known new studies show the efficiency of the radon therapy without side effect for instance for rheumatic/inflammatory or respiratory disorders.

  2. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of radon gas (222Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the 226Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 ± 76.8 Bq m-3 to 571.1 ± 251.4 Bq m-3, 101.0 ± 41.0 Bq m-3 to 245.3 ± 100.2 Bq m-3, 53.1 ± 7.5 Bq m-3 to 181.8 ± 9.7 Bq m-3, 256.1 ± 59.3 Bq m-3 to 652.2 ± 222.2 Bq m-3 and 164.5 ± 75.9 Bq m-3 to 653.3 ± 240.0 Bq m-3, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 ± 194.3 Bq m-3, 192.1 ± 75.4 Bq m-3, 176.1 ± 85.9 Bq m-3 and 28.4 ± 5.7 Bq m-3, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the action level for radon gas of 148 Bq m-3 proposed by EPA except monazite 0.15 kg, struverite 0.15 kg and 0.25 kg. Whereas

  3. Correction factors for determination of annual average radon concentration in dwellings of Poland resulting from seasonal variability of indoor radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, K., E-mail: Krzysztof.Kozak@ifj.edu.pl [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Mazur, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); KozLowska, B. [University of Silesia, Bankowa 12, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Karpinska, M. [Medical University of Bialystok, Jana Kilinskiego 1, 15-089 BiaLystok (Poland); Przylibski, T.A. [WrocLaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze S. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 WrocLaw (Poland); Mamont-Ciesla, K. [Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection, Konwaliowa 7, 03-194 Warszawa (Poland); Grzadziel, D. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Stawarz, O. [Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection, Konwaliowa 7, 03-194 Warszawa (Poland); Wysocka, M. [Central Mining Institute, Plac Gwarkow1, 40-166 Katowice (Poland); Dorda, J. [University of Silesia, Bankowa 12, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Zebrowski, A. [WrocLaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze S. Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 WrocLaw (Poland); Olszewski, J. [Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Sw.Teresy od Dzieciatka Jezus 8, 91-348 lodz (Poland); Hovhannisyan, H. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Dohojda, M. [Institute of Building Technology (ITB), Filtrowa 1, 00-611 Warszawa (Poland); KapaLa, J. [Medical University of Bialystok, Jana Kilinskiego 1, 15-089 BiaLystok (Poland); Chmielewska, I. [Central Mining Institute, Plac Gwarkow1, 40-166 Katowice (Poland); KLos, B. [University of Silesia, Bankowa 12, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Jankowski, J. [Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Sw.Teresy od Dzieciatka Jezus 8, 91-348 lodz (Poland); Mnich, S. [Medical University of Bialystok, Jana Kilinskiego 1, 15-089 BiaLystok (Poland); KoLodziej, R. [Central Mining Institute, Plac Gwarkow1, 40-166 Katowice (Poland)

    2011-10-15

    The method for the calculation of correction factors is presented, which can be used for the assessment of the mean annual radon concentration on the basis of 1-month or 3-month indoor measurements. Annual radon concentration is an essential value for the determination of the annual dose due to radon inhalation. The measurements have been carried out in 132 houses in Poland over a period of one year. The passive method of track detectors with CR-39 foil was applied. Four thermal-precipitation regions in Poland were established and correction factors were calculated for each region, separately for houses with and without basements. - Highlights: > Using radon concentration results in houses we calculated the correction factors. > Factors were calculated for each month, 2 house types in different regions in Poland. > They enable the evaluation of average annual radon concentration in the house. > Annual average radon concentration basing on 1 or 3 months detector exposure.

  4. On the interaction between radon progeny and particles generated by electronic and traditional cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Trassierra, C.; Cardellini, F.; Buonanno, G.; De Felice, P.

    2015-04-01

    During their entire lives, people are exposed to the pollutants present in indoor air. Recently, Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems, mainly known as electronic cigarettes, have been widely commercialized: they deliver particles into the lungs of the users but a "second-hand smoke" has yet to be associated to this indoor source. On the other hand, the naturally-occurring radioactive gas, i.e. radon, represents a significant risk for lung cancer, and the cumulative action of these two agents could be worse than the agents separately would. In order to deepen the interaction between radon progeny and second-hand aerosol from different types of cigarettes, a designed experimental study was carried out by generating aerosol from e-cigarette vaping as well as from second-hand traditional smoke inside a walk-in radon chamber at the National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (INMRI) of Italy. In this chamber, the radon present in air comes naturally from the floor and ambient conditions are controlled. To characterize the sidestream smoke emitted by cigarettes, condensation particle counters and scanning mobility particle sizer were used. Radon concentration in the air was measured through an Alphaguard ionization chamber, whereas the measurement of radon decay product in the air was performed with the Tracelab BWLM Plus-2S Radon daughter Monitor. It was found an increase of the Potential Alpha-Energy Concentration (PAEC) due to the radon decay products attached to aerosol for higher particle number concentrations. This varied from 7.47 ± 0.34 MeV L-1 to 12.6 ± 0.26 MeV L-1 (69%) for the e-cigarette. In the case of traditional cigarette and at the same radon concentration, the increase was from 14.1 ± 0.43 MeV L-1 to 18.6 ± 0.19 MeV L-1 (31%). The equilibrium factor increases, varying from 23.4% ± 1.11% to 29.5% ± 0.26% and from 30.9% ± 1.0% to 38.1 ± 0.88 for the e-cigarette and traditional cigarette, respectively. These growths still continue for long

  5. Radon in private drinking water wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otahal, P; Merta, J; Burian, I

    2014-07-01

    At least 10% of inhabitants in the Czech Republic are supplied with water from private sources (private wells, boreholes). With the increasing cost of water, the number of people using their own sources of drinking water will be likely to increase. According to the Decree of the State Office for Nuclear Safety about the Radiation Protection 307/2002 as amended by Decree 499/2005, the guideline limit for the supplied drinking water ('drinking water for public supply') for radon concentration is 50 Bq·l(-1). This guideline does not apply to private sources of drinking water. Radon in water influences human health by ingestion and also by inhalation when radon is released from water during showering and cooking. This paper presents results of measurements of radon concentrations in water from private wells in more than 300 cases. The gross concentration of alpha-emitting radionuclides and the concentrations of radium and uranium were also determined.

  6. Evaluation of repeated measurements of radon-222 concentrations in well water sampled from bedrock aquifers of the Piedmont near Richmond, Virginia, USA: effects of lithology and well characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Shelley A; Billmeyer, Ernest R; Robinson, Michael A

    2006-07-01

    Radon (222Rn) concentrations in 26 ground water wells of two distinct lithologies in the Piedmont of Virginia were measured to assess variation in ground water radon concentrations (GWRC), to evaluate differences in concentrations related to well characteristics, lithology, and spatial distributions, and to assess the feasibility of predicting GWRC. Wells were sampled in accordance with American Public Health Association Method 7500 Rn-B, with modifications to include a well shaft profile analysis that determined the minimum purge time sufficient to remove the equivalent of one column of water from each well. Statistically significant differences in GWRC were found in the Trssu (1482 +/- 1711 pCi/L) and Mpg (7750 +/- 5188 pCi/L) lithologies, however, no significant differences were found among GWRC at each well over time. Using multiple regression, 86% of the variability (R2) in the GWRC was explained by the lithology, latitudinal class, and water table elevation of the wells. The GWRC in a majority of the wells studied exceed US Environmental Protection Agency designated maximum contaminant level and AMCL. Results support modifications to sampling procedures and indicate that, in previous studies, variations in GWRC concentrations over time may have been due in part to differences in sampling procedures and not in source water.

  7. Radon Concentration in the Cataniapo-Autana River Basin, Amazonas State, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajo-Bohus, L.; Greaves, E. D.; Alvarez, H.; Liendo, J.; Vásquez, G.

    2007-10-01

    Radon activity concentration is measured in rivers of the Autana-Cataniapo hydrologic basin. The region experiments mining and it is forecasted that the basin will be perturbed. Radon activity monitoring is one of the methods to measure environmental changes. Values of radon concentration in water range between 0.4 and 30 Bq L-1.

  8. Design Criteria for Achieving Low Radon Concentration Indoors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Design criteria for achieving low radon concentration indoors are presented in this paper. The paper suggests three design criteria. These criteria have to be considered at the early stage of the building design phase to meet the latest recommendations from the World Health Organization in most...... the radon concentration in the indoor air. In addition, a cheap and reliable method for measuring the radon concentration in the air indoors is described. The provision on radon in the Danish Building Regulations complies with the latest recommendations from the World Health Organization. Radon can cause...... lung cancer and it is not known whether there is a lower limit for when it is not harmful to human beings. Therefore, it is important to reduce the radon concentration as much as possible indoors in buildings. Airtightness is an important factor when dealing with buildings. For the building envelope...

  9. Radon Concentration in the Drinking Water of Aliabad Katoul, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinehvand, Karim; Sahebnasagh, Amin; Hashemi-Tilehnoee, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background According to the world health organization, radon is a leading cause of cancer in various internal organs and should be regarded with concern. Objectives The aim of this study is to evaluate the concentration of soluble radon in the drinking water of the city of Aliabad Katoul, Iran. Materials and Methods The radon concentration was measured by using a radon meter, SARADTM model RTM 1688-2, according to accepted standards of evaluation. Results The mean radon concentration in the drinking water of Aliabad Katoul is 2.90 ± 0.57 Bq/L. Conclusions The radon concentration in Aliabad Katoul is below the limit for hazardous levels, but some precautions will make conditions even safer for the local populace. PMID:27651948

  10. RADON AND CARCINOGENIC RISK IN MOSCOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Golovanev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: comparative evaluation of carcinogenic risk inMoscowfrom radon in indoor and atmospheric pollutants.Materials and methods: the lung cancer incidence in Moscow; radiation-hygienic passport of the territory; .U.S. EPA estimated average age at all and radon induced deaths, years of life lost; Report of UNSCEAR 2006 and WHO handbook on indoor radon, 2009. Trend analysis of incidence; evaluation of the excess relative risk; assessment of ratio radon-induced population risk and published values оf total population carcinogenic risk from chemical carcinogens.Results: it is shown that the 304 cases of lung cancer per year (1. 85 10-3 on average from 2006 to 2011 (21280diseases for 70 years in addition to background level induced by radon; the differences in average trends of all lungcancer incidence in the districts can exceed 25%.Conclusion. The potential of risk reduction by measures of mitigation radon concentration exceeds 5 times the cost efficiency to reduce emissions from vehicles and can reduce cancer incidence, on average 236 cases per year; population risk 16520 cases over 70 years or save not less than 2832 person-years of life per year. The annual effect of reducing losses from not-survival of 12 years as a result of radon-induced lung cancer deaths exceeds 14160000 dollars. The evaluating of the carcinogenic risk from radon in accordance with the definition of population risk increases the predictive evaluation of the effectiveness of preventive measures more than twice.

  11. Radon emanation from radium specific adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdula'aly, Abdulrahman I; Maghrawy, Hamed B

    2010-01-01

    Pilot studies were undertaken to quantify the total activity of radon that is eluted following no-flow periods from several Ra-226 adsorbents loaded to near exhaustion. The adsorbents studied included two types of barium sulphate impregnated alumina (ABA-8000 and F-1) and Dowex MSC-1 resin treated by either barium hydroxide or barium chloride. In parallel, radium loaded plain activated aluminas and Dowex MSC-1 resin were similarly investigated. The results revealed that radon was quantitatively eluted during the first few bed volumes of column operation after no-flow periods. Although similar radon elution profiles were obtained, the position of the radon peak was found to vary and depended on the adsorbent type. Radon levels up to 24 and 14 kBq dm(-3) were measured after a rest period of 72h from radium exhausted Dowex MSC-1 treated with barium chloride and F-1 impregnated alumina with barium sulphate, respectively. The eluted radon values measured experimentally were compared to those calculated theoretically from accumulated radium quantities for the different media. For plain adsorbents, an agreement better than 10% was obtained. For treated resin-types a consistency within 30% but for impregnated alumina-types high discrepancy between respective values were obtained.

  12. Preliminary Study for 3D Radon Distribution Modelling in the Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, ChoongWie; Kim, HeeReyoung [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Radon exists in the form of noble gas, which comes from decay of {sup 238}U, becoming stable {sup 206}Pb going through 4 alpha and 4 beta decays. If this process occurred in human body after inhalation, lung could be damaged by interaction with these radiations causing lung cancer. Most radon in indoor air comes from soil (85 - 97%) through crack of the wall but it also came from wall (2 - 5%) itself in home. Due to its hazardous and unpredictable characteristic, radon became one of the concerning nuclides in indoor air. Hence, the number of survey and research about radon has been increased. Although accurate radon measurement is important to evaluate health risk, it is hard to actually achieve because radon is affected by many conditions, where its concentration can vary easily. Moreover, radon concentration can vary according to the height because of density of radon in the spatial aspect. 3D distribution modelling in the room of radon with aerodynamic features and sources variations was carried out to find average and maximum radon concentration. 3D radon distribution in the room would be find through this computational analysis and it is thought to be possible to correct measured radon concentration with spatial variation to fit the height of nose where inhalation occur. The methodological concept for 3D modelling was set up to solve transport equation for radon behavior by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software such as FLUENT.

  13. Radon exhalation from building materials used in Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, A. F.; Al-Awami, Hend H.; Hussein, N. A.

    2014-08-01

    Radon exhalation rates have been determined for various different samples of domestic and imported building materials available in the Libyan market for home construction and interior decoration. Radon exhalation rates were measured by the sealed-can technique based on CR-39 nuclear track detectors (NTDs). The results show that radon exhalation rates from some imported building materials used as foundations and for decoration are extremely high, and these samples are the main sources of indoor radon emanation. Radium contents and annual effective doses have also been estimated.

  14. Monitoring trends in civil engineering and their effect on indoor radon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringer, W

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the importance of monitoring new building concepts is discussed. The effect of energy-efficient construction technologies on indoor radon is presented in more detail. Comparing the radon levels of about 100 low-energy and passive houses in Austria with radon levels in conventional new houses show that, in energy-efficient new houses, the radon level is about one-third lower than in conventional new houses. Nevertheless, certain features or bad practice may cause high radon levels in energy-efficient new houses. Recommendations to avoid adverse effects were set up. Furthermore, the paper deals with the effect of thermal retrofitting on indoor radon. Results from a Swiss study where 163 dwellings were measured before and after thermal retrofit yield an increase of the radon level of 26% in average. Among the various retrofit measures, replacing windows has the greatest impact on the indoor radon level.

  15. LARGE BUILDING RADON MANUAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes information on how bilding systems -- especially the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system -- inclurence radon entry into large buildings and can be used to mitigate radon problems. It addresses the fundamentals of large building HVAC syst...

  16. Radon and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exposure and lung cancer: the Iowa Radon Lung Cancer Study. American Journal of Epidemiology 2000; 151(11):1091–1102. [PubMed Abstract] Frumkin H, Samet JM. Radon. CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians 2001; 51(6):337–344. [ ...

  17. LARGE BUILDING RADON MANUAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes information on how bilding systems -- especially the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system -- inclurence radon entry into large buildings and can be used to mitigate radon problems. It addresses the fundamentals of large building HVAC syst...

  18. Determination of Radon concentration in air using scinti-cell radon monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Taeko [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst; Morishima, Hiroshige; Arai, Naoki; Shiraishi, Masatoshi; Shigehara, Makiko [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, School of Science and Technology, Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka(Japan); Mifune, Masaaki

    2000-01-01

    This study is carried out the methodology characteristics of {sup 222}Rn (Radon) concentration in air using the scinti-cell radon monitor (Trace environmental level detector (PMT-TEL) and Lucas cell (300 A), Pylon Co. and the determination of Radon concentrations in air on Misasa spa area in Tottori pref. and Ikeda spa in Shimane pref. on November 1995 and 1996. We have reached to the following results; (1) Minimum detectable Radon concentrations in air using the scinti-cell monitor are 7.6 Bq/m{sup 3} with 23% of accuracy (relative standard deviation) on the grab sampling of Lucas cell and 0.58 Bq/m{sup 3} with that of 17% on the continuous measuring of PMT-TEL, when it measured after 3.5 hours on the air sampling to determine the mean radon concentrations. The radon concentrations by the PMT-TEL method is about ten times more detectable than those by Lucas cell, that the former is the most sensitive among the detectors used on this research and is able to detect low level environmental concentrations, particularly outdoor and the later is valuable to use conveniently and portably on grab spot sampling of high level radon concentrations indoor air. (2) On the comparison of characteristics on spot monitoring of radon in air, a pico-rad method is suitable for the determination of the mean concentration for continuous sampling period by PMT-TEL and Lucas cell 300 A, and the variation of radon concentration can be observed on elapse of time course. (author)

  19. Radon as geological tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, T.; Anjos, R.M. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Valladares, D.L.; Rizzotto, M.; Velasco, H.; Ayub, J. Juri [Universidad Nacional de San Luis (Argentina). Inst. de Matematica Aplicada San Luis (IMASL); Silva, A.A.R. da; Yoshimura, E.M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: This work presents measurements of {sup 222}Rn levels performed in La Carolina gold mine and Los Condores tungsten mine at the province of San Luis, Argentina, today used for tourist visitation, and can evaluate the potential use of such radioactive noble gas as tracer or marker for geological processes in underground environments. By concentrations of {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th and {sup 23}'8U were also measured in the walls of tunnels were determined the rocks mineral composition, what indicated that the mines have the same composition. In this sense, we used nuclear trace plastic detectors CR-39, gamma spectrometry of rock samples and Geiger-Muller (GM) monitors The patterns of radon gas transportation processes revealed that La Carolina could be interpreted through a model based on a radioactive gas confined into a single entrance tube, with constant cross section and air velocity. Los Condores, which has a second main entrance, could be interpreted through a model based on a radioactive gas confined into a two entrance tube, allowing a chimney effect for air circulation. The results showed the high potential of using {sup 222}Rn as a geological tracer. In what concerns the occupational hazard, in summer (time of more intense tourist activity in the mine) La Carolina presented a mean concentration of the radioactive noble gas that exceeds in four times the action level of 1,5 kBq m{sup -3} recommended by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP). The chimney effect shows the low mean concentration of radon in Los Condores. (author)

  20. Preliminary results regarding the first map of residential radon in some regions in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosma, C; Cucoş Dinu, A; Dicu, T

    2013-07-01

    Radon represents the most important contribution of population exposure to natural ionising radiation. This article presents the first indoor radon map in some regions of Romania based on 883 surveyed buildings in the Ştei-BăiŢa radon-prone region and 864 in other regions of Romania. Indoor radon measurements were performed in the last 10 y by using CR-39 nuclear track detectors exposed for 3-12 months on ground floor levels of dwellings. Excluding the Ştei-BăiŢa radon-prone region, an average indoor radon concentration of 126 Bq m(-3) was calculated for Romanian houses. In the Ştei-BăiŢa radon-prone area, the average indoor concentration was 292 Bq m(-3). About 21 % of the investigated dwellings in the Ştei-BăiŢa radon-prone region exceed the threshold of 400 Bq m(-3), while 5 % of the dwellings in other areas of Romania exceed the same threshold. As expected, indoor radon concentration is not uniformly distributed throughout Romania. The map shows a high variability among surveyed regions, mainly due to the differences in geology. The radon emanation rate is substantially influenced by the soil characteristics, such as the soil permeability and soil gas radon concentration. Since higher permeability enables the increased migration of soil gas and radon from the soil into the building, elevated levels of indoor radon can be expected in more permeable soil environments.

  1. Radon gamma-ray spectrometry with YAP:Ce scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Plastino, W; De Notaristefani, F

    2002-01-01

    The detection properties of a YAP:Ce scintillator (YAlO sub 3 :Ce crystal) optically coupled to a Hamamatsu H5784 photomultiplier with standard bialkali photocathode have been analyzed. In particular, the application to radon and radon-daughters gamma-ray spectrometry was investigated. The crystal response has been studied under severe extreme conditions to simulate environments of geophysical interest, particularly those found in geothermal and volcanic areas. Tests in water up to a temperature of 100 deg.C and in acids solutions such as HCl (37%), H sub 2 SO sub 4 (48%) and HNO sub 3 (65%) have been performed. The measurements with standard radon sources provided by the National Institute for Metrology of Ionizing Radiations (ENEA) have emphasized the non-hygroscopic properties of the scintillator and a small dependence of the light yield on temperature and HNO sub 3. The data collected in this first step of our research have pointed out that the YAP:Ce scintillator can allow high response stability for rad...

  2. The problem of general Radon representation for an arbitrary Hausdorff space. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakharov, V K; Mikhalev, A V [Centre for Telecommunication and Internet Technologies, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2002-12-31

    The problem of general Radon representation is as follows. Given a Hausdorff topological space, find the space of linear functionals that are representable as integrals over all Radon measures. One of the possible solutions of this problem was obtained in Part I of this paper. In Part II we establish that the classical theorems of Riesz-Radon and Prokhorov are corollaries of the theorem on general integral Radon representation.

  3. Radon monitoring in groundwater of some areas of Himachal Pradesh and Punjab states, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Vivek; Bajwa, B S; Virk, H S

    2003-02-01

    Radon measurements have been carried out in groundwater of Himachal Pradesh and Punjab states, India. Radon concentration values in potable water show a wide range of variation from source to source and from place to place. Generally, radon concentration values in thermal springs groundwater have been found to be higher than the values from other sources.

  4. Assessment of Radon level in dwellings of Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamhassan Haddadi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Indoor radon gas (222Rn has been recognized as one of the causes of lung cancer. The presence of radioactive radium in the construction & materials in the buildings its changes in contact with radon gas may lead to increase level of radon gas in the residential houses. In this regards, indoor radon measurement is important. This study was conducted to determine radon concentration in Tabriz houses. Materials & Methods: In this study, 196 radon diffusion dosimeters were left in different floors of houses constructed with different materials such as cement (betony, heated brick & clay with raw brick at every floor for 6 months. The “electrochemical etching” method was applied to detect “alpha tracks” on the polymers of dosimeters and based on number of these tracks, radon concentration was determined. Results: This study showed that average radon concentration were 39Bqm-3 in the houses. At different floors & different construction material the average effective dose equivalent of lung tissue was 0.97msvy-1. Conclusion: Based on these results, it can be concluded that, the indoor radon levels in the Tabriz houses are within acceptable range.

  5. Radon release and dispersion from an open pit uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisieleski, W.E.

    1980-06-01

    Radon-222 flux from representative sections of the United Nuclear St. Anthony open-pit mine complex was measured. The collected radon was adsorbed on activated charcoal and the radon activity was measured by gamma spectroscopy. System design, calibration, and the procedure to determine radon flux density (pCi/m/sup 2/.s) are described. A continuous series of radon flux densities were measured over a 5-month period at a control point in the mine. The average flux density at the control point was 1.9 pCi/m/sup 2/.s. A close correlation between radon flux density variations and changes in barometric pressure was observed by a comparison of meteorological data and average daily radon flux density measured at the control point. The release rate from each section of the mine was calculated from the average radon flux density and the area of the section, as determined from enlarged aerial photographs. The average radon flux density for eight locations over the ore-bearing section was 7.3 pCi/m/sup 2/.s. The average flux density for four locations over undisturbed topsoil was 0.17 pCi/m/sup 2/.s. The average Ra-226 content of ten samples taken from the ore-bearing region was 102 pCi/g ore. The ratio of radon flux density to radium content (specific flux) was 0.072. The release rate from the entire St. Anthony open pit was determined to be 3.5 x 10/sup 5/ pCi/s. This rate is comparable to the natural release of radon from one square mile of undisturbed topsoil. 16 refs., 31 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Strategy for the reduction of radon exposure in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-05-15

    caused by radon if you have lived in a house for 30 years, compared to if you lived in the same house (with the same radon levels) for 3 years. The above relationships are especially important when considering which mitigation measures should be implemented. All reduction of radon concentration and exposure time will have a favourable impact on health. Taking the population as a whole, the health benefit will be appreciable, even if the exposure reduction that is achieved from the measures is modest - so long as the reduction applies to a large number of buildings. The risk of radon induced lung cancer increases with exposure and is proportional to the indoor radon concentration and the exposure time. Moreover, there is no lowest threshold radon concentration where no risk occurs. The risk is greatest for smokers and ex-smokers, though never-smokers can also develop lung cancer as a result of radon exposure. In recent years, three important large-scale international pooled analyses of available reliable data have confirmed earlier risk estimates. (Author)

  7. Strategy for the reduction of radon exposure in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-05-15

    caused by radon if you have lived in a house for 30 years, compared to if you lived in the same house (with the same radon levels) for 3 years. The above relationships are especially important when considering which mitigation measures should be implemented. All reduction of radon concentration and exposure time will have a favourable impact on health. Taking the population as a whole, the health benefit will be appreciable, even if the exposure reduction that is achieved from the measures is modest - so long as the reduction applies to a large number of buildings. The risk of radon induced lung cancer increases with exposure and is proportional to the indoor radon concentration and the exposure time. Moreover, there is no lowest threshold radon concentration where no risk occurs. The risk is greatest for smokers and ex-smokers, though never-smokers can also develop lung cancer as a result of radon exposure. In recent years, three important large-scale international pooled analyses of available reliable data have confirmed earlier risk estimates. (Author)

  8. Occupational exposure to radon in Australian Tourist Caves an Australian-wide study of radon levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, S.B.; Langroo, R.; Peggie, J.R. [Australian Radiation Laboratory. Yallambie, VIC (Australia); Lyons, R.G. [University of Auckland, Auckland, (New Zealand). Department of Physics; James, J.M. [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Department of Chemisty

    1996-02-01

    The study described in this report sets out to determine which Australian show caves have long- term radon levels in excess of the proposed action level of 1000 Bq m{sup -3}. The collaborative study between the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL), the University of Sydney and the University of Auckland, was carried out with the support of a Research Grant from Worksafe Australia. The aims of this study were to measure radon levels for each season over a period of one year, at representative sites in all developed show caves around Australia, to determine yearly average radon levels for each cave tour, based on these site measurements, to estimate the radiation doses to the tour guides employed in these caves, and to identify caves with radon concentrations in excess of the action level. (authors) 7 refs., 10 tabs., 2 figs.

  9. Radon exhalation rate from soil samples of South Kumaun Lesser Himalayas, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Yogesh; Prasad, Ganesh; Gusain, G.S. [Department of Physics, H.N.B. Garhwal University, Badshahi Thaul Campus, Tehri Garhwal 249 199 (India); Choubey, V.M. [Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology, Dehradun 248 001 (India); Ramola, R.C. [Department of Physics, H.N.B. Garhwal University, Badshahi Thaul Campus, Tehri Garhwal 249 199 (India)], E-mail: rcramola@gmail.com

    2008-08-15

    Ionizing radiation exposure experienced by the general population is mainly due to the indoor radon. Major part of radon comes from the top layer of the earth. The radon emanation is associated with radon in soil and sleepy back radium in the soil. Both field and laboratory measurements were carried out for the instantaneous and integrated radon concentration in soil-gas. The radon exhalation rate from collected soil samples was measured using LR-115 Type II plastic track detector. The soil-gas radon concentration was measured with the help of radon Emanometry method. The effective radium content of the soil samples was also calculated. The correlation coefficient between radium contents in collected soil samples and soil-gas radon from the same locations was calculated as 0.1, while it is 0.2 between radon exhalation rate and soil-gas radon concentration. The results show weak positive correlation due to the geological disturbance in the equilibrium conditions and high mobility of radon in the same geological medium.

  10. Durability of radon remedial actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naismith, S. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1997-07-01

    It is estimated that at least 3600 householders in the UK have taken remedial action to reduce radon concentrations found to be above the government Action Level. A study has been carried out on the durability of these remedial actions. It involved annual reassessment of the radon levels in a number of homes. The results for 26 of these homes where data over five years are available show that in general the remedial actions remained effective. The remedy with the largest variation in efficacy was natural ventilation of the underfloor void. The failure rate was found to be 4.0% per annum for all measures, but in the majority of cases the failure was discovered by the householder and rectified. The rate of failures not noticed by the householders was 0.4% per annum. (UK).

  11. Measuring the wealth of nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kirk; Dixon, John A

    2003-01-01

    The sustainability of development is closely linked to changes in total per capita wealth. This paper presents estimates of the wealth of nations for nearly 100 countries, broken down into produced assets, natural resources and human resources. While the latter is the dominant form of wealth in virtually all countries, in low income natural resource exporters the share of natural resources in total wealth is equal to the share of produced assets. For low income countries in general, cropland forms the vast majority of natural wealth. The analysis suggests the process of development can be viewed as one of portfolio management: sustainable development entails saving the rents from exhaustible resources, managing renewable resources sustainably, and investing savings in both produced assets and human resources.

  12. Methods of radon remediation in Finnish dwellings; Asuntojen radonkorjauksen menetelmaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvela, H.

    1995-12-01

    A study was made of remedial measures taken in dwellings with high indoor radon concentrations and the results obtained. The data regarding the remedial measures taken in 400 dwellings was obtained from a questionnaire study. The mean annual average indoor radon concentration before the remedies was 1.500 Bq/m{sup 3}, the concentration exceeding in nearly every house the action level of 400 Bq/m{sup 3}. After the measures were taken the mean indoor radon concentration was 500 Bq/m{sup 3}. The resulting indoor radon concentration was less than 400 Bq/m{sup 3} in 60 percent of the dwellings. The best results were achieved using sub-slab-suction and radon well. These methods effectively decrease both the flow of radon bearing air from soil into dwellings and the radon concentration of leakage air. Typical reduction rates in radon concentration were 70-95 percent. The action level was achieved in more than 70 percent of the houses. Sealing the entry routes and improvement of the ventilation resulted typically in reduction rates of 10-50 percent. The goal of the report is to give useful information for the house owners, the do-it-yourself-mitigators, the mitigation firms and the local authorities. The report includes practical guidance, price information and examples of remedial measures. (13 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.).

  13. RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES FOR DETACHED HOUSES, TECHNICAL GUIDANCE (SECOND EDITION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document is intended for use by State officials, radon mitigation contractors, building contractors, concerned homeowners, and other persons as an aid in the selection, design, and operation of radon reduction measurements for houses. It is the second edition of EPA's techn...

  14. Influence of indoor air conditions on radon concentration in a detached house.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Keramatollah; Mahmoudi, Jafar; Ghanbari, Mahdi

    2013-02-01

    Radon is released from soil and building materials and can accumulate in residential buildings. Breathing radon and radon progeny for extended periods hazardous to health and can lead to lung cancer. Indoor air conditions and ventilation systems strongly influence indoor radon concentrations. This paper focuses on effects of air change rate, indoor temperature and relative humidity on indoor radon concentrations in a one family detached house in Stockholm, Sweden. In this study a heat recovery ventilation system unit was used to control the ventilation rate and a continuous radon monitor (CRM) was used to measure radon levels. FLUENT, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package was used to simulate radon entry into the building and air change rate, indoor temperature and relative humidity effects using a numerical approach. The results from analytical solution, measurements and numerical simulations showed that air change rate, indoor temperature and moisture had significant effects on indoor radon concentration. Increasing air change rate reduces radon level and for a specific air change rate (in this work Ach = 0.5) there was a range of temperature and relative humidity that minimized radon levels. In this case study minimum radon levels were obtained at temperatures between 20 and 22 °C and a relative humidity of 50-60%.

  15. Radon and Thoron Measured in Petrol and Gas-oil Exhaust Fumes by Using CR-39 and LR-115 II Nuclear Track Detectors: Radiation Doses to the Respiratory Tract of Mechanic Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misdaq, M A; Chaouqi, A; Ouguidi, J; Touti, R; Mortassim, A

    2015-06-01

    Mechanic workers are exposed to exhaust fumes when controlling vehicle engines in motion inside repair shops. To assess radiation doses due to radon short-lived progeny from the inhalation of exhaust fumes by mechanic workers, concentrations of these radionuclides were measured in petrol (gasoline) and gas-oil exhaust fumes by evaluating mean critical angles of etching of the CR-39 and LR-115 type II SSNTDs for alpha particles emitted by the radon and thoron decay series. Committed effective doses due to ²¹⁸Po and ²¹⁴Po short-lived radon decay products from the inhalation of petrol and gas-oil exhaust fumes by workers were evaluated. A maximum value of 1.35 mSv y⁻¹ due to radon short-lived decay products from the inhalation of gas-oil exhaust fumes by mechanic workers was found, which is lower than the (3-10 mSv y⁻¹) dose limit interval for workers.

  16. Radon entry into a simple test structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.E.; Søgaard-Hansen, J.; Majborn, B.

    1992-01-01

    A simple test structure for studies of radon entry into houses has been constructed at a field site at Riso National Laboratory. It consists of a 40 1, stainless-steel cylinder placed in a 0.52 m deep quadratic excavation with a side length of 2.4 m. The excavation is lined with an airtight...

  17. Ultra-low level radon assays in gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xin Ran [University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-17

    The SuperNEMO experiment aims to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νβ β) to T{sub 1{sub /{sub 2}}}(0ν) > 10{sup 26} years, this corresponds to an effective neutrino mass of 50-100 meV. The extremely rare event rate means the minimisation of background is of critical concern. The stringent strategy instigated to ensure detector radiopurity is outlined here for all construction materials. In particular the large R&D programme undertaken to reach the challengingly low level of radon, < 0.15 mBq/m{sup 3}, required inside the SuperNEMO gaseous tracker will be detailed. This includes an experiment designed to measure radon diffusion through various materials. A “Radon Concentration Line” (RnCL) was developed to be used in conjunction with a state-of-the-art radon detector in order to achieve world leading sensitivity to {sup 222}Rn content in large gas volumes at the level of a few µBq/m{sup 3}. A radon purification system was developed and installed which has demonstrated radon suppression by several orders of magnitude depending on the carrier gas. This apparatus has now been commissioned and measurements of cylindered gas have been made to confirm radon suppression by a factor 20 when using nitrogen as the carrier gas. The results from measurements of radon content in various gases, used inside SuperNEMO, using the RnCL will be presented.

  18. Radon Optical Processing in Radon Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-15

    yields one line through the three-dimensional Fourier transform 1. Radon, J., " Uber die Bestimmung von Funktiontn of the three-dimensional function (3...Alamos, New Mexico , April 11-15. 1983.a 6. W. G. Wee, "Application of projection techniques to image image. Figure 1(a) has approximately 8.0 bits/pixel

  19. Radon in soil gas in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikaj, Dafina; Jeran, Zvonka; Bahtijari, Meleq; Stegnar, Peter

    2016-11-01

    An assessment of the radiological situation due to exposure to radon and gamma emitting radionuclides was conducted in southern Kosovo. This study deals with sources of radon in soil gas. A long-term study of radon concentrations in the soil gas was carried out using the SSNTDs (CR-39) at 21 different locations in the Sharr-Korabi zone. The detectors were exposed for an extended period of time, including at least three seasonal periods in a year and the sampling locations were chosen with respect to lithology. In order to determine the concentration of the natural radioactive elements (238)U and (226)Ra, as a precursor of (222)Rn, soil samples were collected from each measuring point from a depth of 0.8 m, and measured by gamma spectrometry. The levels (Bq kg(-1)) of naturally occurring radionuclides and levels (kBq m(-3)) of radon in soil gas obtained at a depth 0.8 m of soil were: 21-53 for (226)Ra, 22-160 for (238)U and 0.295-32 for (222)Rn. With respect to lithology, the highest value for (238)U and (226)Ra were found in limestone and the highest value for (222)Rn was found in metamorphic rocks. In addition, the results showed seasonal variations of the measured soil gas radon concentrations with maximum concentration in the spring months. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Indoor radon concentrations in Adana, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degerlier, M; Celebi, N

    2008-01-01

    The indoor radon concentration in Adana, Turkey was measured in living rooms of 52 houses during winter 2005 and 57 houses during summer 2005. Forty-four houses were selected for both winter and summer researches for estimating seasonal variations. Indoor radon concentrations were measured seasonally over hotter and colder 2 months over the whole year, using CR-39 passive nuclear track radon detectors. The radon concentrations were ranged from 15 to 97 Bq m(-3) on January-February 2005 for 60 d and from 5 to 70 Bq m(-3) on June-July 2005 for 60 d. The average summer concentration measured was 25.8 Bq m(-3) and the average winter concentration was 48.9 Bq m(-3) in 44 houses that observed seasonal variations. The differences between winter and summer periods were ranged from 1 to 77 Bq m(-3). The average value in both winter and summer periods is 37 Bq m(-3) in 44 houses that observed seasonal variations. This value is below the worldwide indoor radon concentration distribution of 46 Bq m(-3). The annual effective dose equivalent from (222)Rn was 0.9 mSv y(-1).

  1. Radon barrier: Method of testing airtightness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn; Buch-Hansen, Thomas Cornelius

    2017-01-01

    The test method NBI 167/02 Radon membrane: Test of airtightness can be used for determining the airtightness of a radon barrier as a system solution. The test determines the air infiltration through the radon barrier for a number of levels of air pressure differences. The airflow through versus...... the difference in air pressure over the barrier is measured. The air pressure difference is kept constant, at a number of manually controlled levels. At each pressure level, the difference is measured in a single point close to the point where the suction for lowering the air pressure is located. Improvements...... to the test method were suggested. A digital stirring and control system, and a method for determining the mean air pressure difference, as well as a method for testing barriers with a very low air infiltration, were provided. The digital stirring and control system ensured automatic control and measuring...

  2. Analysis of soil radon data in earthquake precursory studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Prasad Jaishi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil radon data were recorded at two selected sites along Mat fault in Mizoram (India, which lies in the highest seismic zone in India. The study was carried out during July 2011 to May 2013 using LR-115 Type II films. Precursory changes in radon concentration were observed prior to some earthquakes that occurred around the measuring sites. Positive correlation was found between the measured radon data and the seismic activity in the region. Statistical analysis of the radon data together with the meteorological parameters was done using Multiple Regression Method. Results obtained show that the method employed was useful for removing the effect of meteorological parameters and to identify radon maxima possibly caused by seismic activity.

  3. Radon concentrations in schools of the Neapolitan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venoso, G.; De Cicco, F. [Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche (Italy); Flores, B. [Escuela Superior Politecnica de Chimborazo, Riobamba (Ecuador); Gialanella, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Pugliese, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche (Italy); Roca, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche (Italy)], E-mail: roca@na.infn.it; Sabbarese, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Seconda Universita degli studi di Napoli, Dipartimento di Scienze Ambientali, Caserta (Italy)

    2009-01-15

    A radon survey was carried out in 30 schools located in the metropolitan area around Naples, Italy. Radon concentration was measured using the SSNTD (Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors) method with LR115 detectors. Time integrated measurements covered two consecutive 6-month periods at different locations inside the school buildings: classrooms, laboratories and offices. Data distribution is well fitted by a log-normal curve. The arithmetic mean annual radon concentration is 144 Bq m{sup -3}, the geometric mean is 86 Bq m{sup -3}; the standard deviations are respectively 7 Bq m{sup -3} and 3. The fractions of rooms where radon concentrations exceed the reference levels of 200, 400 and 500 Bq m{sup -3} are 21.3%, 7.6% and 4.5% respectively. The results show that radon concentration in scientific laboratories and in offices is higher than in classrooms.

  4. Evaluation of radon gas concentration in the air of soil and dwellings of Hawar and Foara villages, using (CR-39) detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad, Abdallah I. [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, Irbid 21163 (Jordan); Abumurad, Khalid M. [Department of Physics, Yarmouk University, Irbid 21163 (Jordan)], E-mail: abumurad@yu.edu.jo

    2008-08-15

    The present study has measured radon concentration in dwellings and soil of two villages of Hawar and Foara by using a passive dosimeter containing a solid-state nuclear track plastic detector commercially known as (CR-39). About 224 dosimeters were distributed inside houses of both villages. Additionally, 56 dosimeters were placed in the soil of each village at 50cm depth. Soil dosimeters were retrieved after 14 days while house dosimeters were retrieved after three months. The collected dosimeters were chemically etched and then counted using an optical microscope. The study found that indoor radon concentration in Hawar village ranged from 31.6{+-}4.4Bqm{sup -3} in the south area to 41.7{+-}5Bqm{sup -3} in the west area, and in Foara village, varied between 39.9{+-}9Bqm{sup -3} in the east area to 47.9{+-}10.8Bqm{sup -3} in the south area. Moreover, the indoor radon concentration in the living rooms at Hawar village was 33.2{+-}2.2Bqm{sup -3} which is almost the same as that in the guest rooms, 40.1{+-}3.3Bqm{sup -3}, whereas the indoor radon concentration in living rooms at Foara was 36.6{+-}7.5Bqm{sup -3} and in the guest rooms was 50.8{+-}5.4Bqm{sup -3}. The study indicated also that radon concentration in soil air at Hawar village was 3.7{+-}0.2kBqm{sup -3} and in Foara village was 4.3{+-}0.9kBqm{sup -3}. The average indoor radon concentrations were comparable in both villages Hawar and Foara. Radon concentration in the study area is comparable to the national radon concentration.

  5. The reliability of radon as seismic precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilian Toader, Victorin; Moldovan, Iren Adelina; Ionescu, Constantin; Marmureanu, Alexandru

    2016-04-01

    Our multidisciplinary network (AeroSolSys) located in Vrancea (Curvature Carpathian Mountains) includes radon concentration monitoring in five stations. We focus on lithosphere and near surface low atmosphere phenomena using real-time information about seismicity, + / - ions, clouds, solar radiation, temperature (air, ground), humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind speed and direction, telluric currents, variations of the local magnetic field, infrasound, variations of the atmospheric electrostatic field, variations in the earth crust with inclinometers, electromagnetic activity, CO2 concentration, ULF radio wave propagation, seismo-acoustic emission, animal behavior. The main purpose is to inform the authorities about risk situation and update hazard scenarios. The radon concentration monitoring is continuously with 1 hour or 3 hours sample rate in locations near to faults in an active seismic zone characterized by intermediate depth earthquakes. Trigger algorithms include standard deviation, mean and derivative methods. We correlate radon concentration measurements with humidity, temperature and atmospheric pressure from the same equipment. In few stations we have meteorological information, too. Sometime the radon concentration has very high variations (maxim 4535 Bq/m3 from 106 Bq/m3) in short time (1 - 2 days) without being accompanied by an important earthquake. Generally the cause is the high humidity that could be generated by tectonic stress. Correlation with seismicity needs information from minimum 6 month in our case. For 10605 hours, 618 earthquakes with maxim magnitude 4.9 R, we have got radon average 38 Bq/m3 and exposure 408111 Bqh/m3 in one station. In two cases we have correlation between seismicity and radon concentration. In other one we recorded high variation because the location was in an area with multiple faults and a river. Radon can be a seismic precursor but only in a multidisciplinary network. The anomalies for short or long period of

  6. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions in The Netherlands: ambient measurements support the national inventories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. M. Neubert

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We present net emission estimates of CH4 and N2O of The Netherlands based on measurements conducted during the period of May 2006 to April 2009 at station Lutjewad, The Netherlands (6°21' E, 53°24' N, 1 m a.s.l.. 222Radon mixing ratios were applied as an indicator for vertical mixing and long-range air mass transport and used to calculate the net surface fluxes from atmospheric mixing ratios of CH4 and N2O. Our study shows that our measurement site Lutjewad is well-suited to measure emissions from The Netherlands and validation of the national inventories using the 222Radon flux method. Since this study is purely observation-based it is independent from inventories or atmospheric models. Our results are compared to the national inventories as reported to the UNFCCC. We found net emissions of: (15.2±5.3 t km−2 a−1 for CH4 and (0.9±0.3 t km−2 a−1 for N2O. These values are lower than the inventory-based emissions (2006-2008 averages of (18.3±3.3 t km−2 a−1 for CH4, and (1.3±0.6 t km−2 a−1 for N2O, but the differences are insignificant.

  7. Methane and nitrous oxide emissions in The Netherlands: ambient measurements support the national inventories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. van der Laan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We present net emission estimates of CH4 and N2O of The Netherlands based on measurements conducted during the period of May 2006 to April 2009 at station Lutjewad, The Netherlands (6° 21' E, 53° 24' N, 1 m a.s.l.. 222Radon mixing ratios were applied as an indicator for vertical mixing and long-range air mass transport and used to calculate the net surface fluxes from atmospheric mixing ratios of CH4 and N2O. Our study shows that our measurement site Lutjewad is well-suited to measure emissions from The Netherlands and validation of the national inventories using the 222Radon flux method. Since this study is purely observation-based it is independent from inventories or atmospheric models. Our results are compared to the national inventories as reported to the UNFCCC. We found net emissions of: (15.2±5.3 t km-2 a-1 for CH4 and (0.9±0.3 t km-2 a-1 for N2O. These values are lower than the inventory-based emissions (2006–2008 averages of (18.3±3.3 t km-2 a-1 for CH4, and (1.3±0.6 t km-2 a-1 for N2O, but the differences are insignificant.

  8. Procedure for the characterization of radon potential in existing dwellings and to assess the annual average indoor radon concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignan, Bernard; Powaga, Emilie

    2014-11-01

    Risk assessment due to radon exposure indoors is based on annual average indoor radon activity concentration. To assess the radon exposure in a building, measurement is generally performed during at least two months during heating period in order to be representative of the annual average value. This is because radon presence indoors could be very variable during time. This measurement protocol is fairly reliable but may be a limiting in the radon risk management, particularly during a real estate transaction due to the duration of the measurement and the limitation of the measurement period. A previous field study defined a rapid methodology to characterize radon entry in dwellings. The objective of this study was at first, to test this methodology in various dwellings to assess its relevance with a daily test. At second, a ventilation model was used to assess numerically the air renewal of a building, the indoor air quality all along the year and the annual average indoor radon activity concentration, based on local meteorological conditions, some building characteristics and in-situ characterization of indoor pollutant emission laws. Experimental results obtained on thirteen individual dwellings showed that it is generally possible to obtain a representative characterization of radon entry into homes. It was also possible to refine the methodology defined in the previous study. In addition, numerical assessments of annual average indoor radon activity concentration showed generally a good agreement with measured values. These results are encouraging to allow a procedure with a short measurement time to be used to characterize long-term radon potential in dwellings.

  9. Characteristics of soil radon transport in different geological formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershaidat, N. M.; Al-Bataina, B. A.; Al-Shereideh, S. A.

    2008-07-01

    Soil radon concentration levels in Deir Abu-Said District, Irbid, Jordan were measured for several depths using CR-39 detectors, in the summer 2004 for six geological formations, namely, Wadi umm ghudran (WG), Wadi esSir “massive” limestone, Amman silicified limestone (ASL), Al-Hisa phosphatic limestone (AHP), Muwaqqar chalky-marl (MCM), and Basalt. Using a model (Yakovleva in Ann Geophys 48(1):195 198, 2005) based on the solution of the diffusion equation in the quasi-homogenous approximation, the characteristics of radon transport were calculated. Radon flux density from the Earth’s surface, the depth Z eq, at which the equilibrium value of soil radon concentration is reached and the convective radon flux velocity ( v) for the different soils are calculated and found to be consistent with similar values presented elsewhere. Calculations indicate that the soil covering WG has a low radon risk while, on the contrary, AHP has a higher radon risk as expected, since AHP has higher content of uranium. The other formations have intermediate values. The results of the present study confirm the statement by Yakovleva (Ann Geophys 48(1):195 198, 2005) that two measurements suffice in order to estimate the characteristics of soil radon transport.

  10. Survey of radon and thoron in homes of Indian Himalaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramola, Rakesh Chand

    2011-07-01

    Measurements of radon, thoron and their progeny were carried out in some houses from Garhwal and Kumaun Himalayas of India using a LR-115 plastic track detector. The measurements were made in various residential houses of the area at a height of 2.5 m above the ground level using a twin chamber radon dosemeter, which can record the values of radon, thoron and their progeny separately. The concentrations of radon and thoron in these homes were found to vary from 11 to 191 and 1 to 156 Bq m(-3), respectively. The equilibrium factor between radon and progeny varies from 0.02 to 0.90, with an average of 0.26 for the region. The resulting dose rate due to radon, thoron and their decay products was found to vary from 0.02 to 0.84 μSv h(-1) with an arithmetic mean of 0.27 μSv h(-1). A detailed analysis of the distribution of radon, thoron and their decay products inside a house is also reported. The observed dose rates due to radon, thoron and progeny were found somewhat higher but well below the international recommendations.

  11. ROE Radon Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The polygon dataset represents predicted indoor radon screening levels in counties across the United States. These data were provided by EPA’s Office of Radiation...

  12. Radon in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... strategy below. Top of Page Testing and Mitigation Standards for Schools Copies of the following Radon Standards ... control is a critical component of any comprehensive indoor air quality (IAQ) management program, l earn how to manage ...

  13. Radon i danske lejeboliger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn; Skytte Clausen, Louise

    I denne undersøgelse kortlægges radonindholdet i indeluften og det undersøges, hvordan indholdet af radon i indeluften er fordelt og spredes i en ejendom, og om det er muligt at pege på en bygningsdel eller en bygningskomponent som en spredningsvej for radon i boliger. Boligerne er lejeboliger og...... ligger i etageejendomme, kæde- og rækkehuse tilhørende bygningstyper opført fra 1850 og frem. De udvalgte ejendomme ligger i områder af landet, hvor der ved tidligere undersøgelser har vist sig at være en stor andel af huse med et højt indhold af radon i indeluften. Koncentrationen af radon er målt over...

  14. 222Radon Concentration Measurements biased to Cerro Prieto Fault for Verify its Continuity to the Northwest of the Mexicali Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaro-Mancilla, O.; Lopez, D. L.; Reyes-Lopez, J. A.; Carreón-Diazconti, C.; Ramirez-Hernandez, J.

    2009-05-01

    The need to know the exact location in the field of the fault traces in Mexicali has been an important affair due that the topography in this valley is almost flat and fault traces are hidden by plow zone, for this reason, the southern and northern ends of the San Jacinto and Cerro Prieto fault zones, respectively, are not well defined beneath the thick sequence of late Holocene Lake Cahuilla deposits. The purpose of this study was to verify if Cerro Prieto fault is the continuation to the southeast of the San Jacinto Fault proposed by Hogan in 2002 who based his analysis on pre-agriculture geomorphy, relocation and analysis of regional microseismicity, and trench exposures from a paleoseismic site in Laguna Xochimilco, Mexicali. In this study, four radon (222Rn) profiles were carried out in the Mexicali Valley, first, to the SW-NE of Cerro Prieto Volcano, second, to the W-E along the highway Libramiento San Luis Río Colorado-Tecate, third, to the W-E of Laguna Xochimilco and fourth, to the W-E of the Colonia Progreso. The Radon results allow us to identify in the Cerro Prieto profile four regions where the values exceed 100 picocuries per liter (pCi/L), these regions can be associated to fault traces, one of them associated to the Cerro Prieto Fault (200 pCi/L) and other related with Michoacán de Ocampo Fault (450 pCi/L). The profile Libramiento San Luis Río Colorado-Tecate, show three regions above 100 pCi/L, two of them related to the same faults. In spite of the results of the Laguna Xochimilco, site used by Hogan (2002), the profile permit us observe three regions above the 100 pCi/L, but we can associate only one of the regions above this level to the Michoacán de Ocampo Fault, but none region to the Cerro Prieto Fault. Finally in spite of the Colonia Progreso is the shortest profile with only five stations, it shows one region with a value of 270 pCi/L that we can correlate with the Cerro Prieto Fault. The results of this study allow us to think in the

  15. Risk of Lung Cancer and Indoor Radon Exposure in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baysson, H.; Tirmarche, M.; Tymen, G.; Ducloy, F.; Laurier, D.

    2004-07-01

    It is well established that radon exposure increases risks of lung cancer among underground miners. to estimate the lung cancer risk linked to indoor radon exposure, a hospital based case-control study was carried out in France, With a focus on precise reconstruction of past indoor radon exposure over the 30 years preceding the lung cancer diagnosis. The investigation rook place from 1992 to 1998 in four regions of France: Auvergne, Brittany, Languedoc and Limousin. During face-to-face interviews a standardized questionnaire was used to ascertain demographic characteristics, information on active and passive smoking, occupational exposure, medical history as well as extensive details on residential history. Radon concentrations were measured in the dwellings where subjects had lived at least one year during the 5-30 year period before interview. Measurements of radon concentrations were performed during a 6-month period, using two Kodalpha LR 115 detectors, one in the living room and one in the bedroom. The time-weighted average (TWA) radon concentration for a subject during the 5-30 year period before interview was based on radon concentrations over all addresses occupied by the subject weighted by the number of years spent at each address. For the time intervals without available measurements, we imputed the region-specific arithmetic average of radon concentrations for measured addresses of control subjects. Lung cancer risk was examined in relation to indoor radon exposure after adjustment for age, sex, region, cigarette smoking and occupational exposure. The estimated relative a risk per 100 Bq/m''3 was 1.04, at the borderline of statistical significance (95 percent Confidence Interval: 0.99, 1..1). These results are in agreement with results from other indoor radon case-control studies and with extrapolations from underground miners studies. (Author) 31 refs.

  16. Radon og boligen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    Radon er en radioaktiv og sundhedsskadelig luftart, som ved indånding øger risikoen for lungekræft. Der er ingen dokumenteret nedre grænse for, hvornår radon er ufarligt. Derfor anbefales det, at man tilstræber et så lavt radonindhold i indeluften som muligt. Man kan hverken lugte, se, høre eller...... smage radon, så vil du vide, om du har radon i din bolig, må du måle radonindholdet i indeluften. Radon forekommer naturligt i jorden og kan suges ind sammen med jordluft, hvis der inde er et undertryk, og hvis konstruktionerne mod jord er utætte. Jordluft trænger ind gennem revner og utætte samlinger......, fx omkring rør til kloak, vand og varmeforsyning. Koncentrationen af radon i jorden varierer meget fra sted til sted, også lokalt og gennem året. Tidligere undersøgelser har vist, at der kan forekomme høje koncentrationer i Sydgrønland, specielt i området syd for Narsalik ved Paamiut, 61°30’N....

  17. Evaluation of Radon Pollution in Underground Parking Lots by Discomfort Index

    OpenAIRE

    AH Bu-Olayan; BV Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recent studies of public underground parking lots showed the influence of radon concentration and the probable discomfort caused by parking cars. Materials and Methods Radon concentration was measured in semi-closed public parking lots in the six governorates of Kuwait, using Durridge RAD7radon detector (USA). Results The peak radon concentration in the parking lots of Kuwait governorates was relatively higher during winter (63.15Bq/m3) compared to summer (41.73 Bq/m3). Radon in ...

  18. Geology of radon occurrence around Jari in Parvati Valley, Himachal Pradesh, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choubey, V.M. [Wadia Inst. of Himalayan Geology, Dehra Dun (India); Sharma, K.K.; Ramola, R.C. [H.N.B. Garhwal Univ., Tehri Garhwal (India). Dept. of Physics

    1997-02-01

    Soil gas and indoor radon concentrations have been measured around Jari in Parvati Valley, Himachal Pradesh, India, to study their relationship with the local geology. Both soil gas and indoor radon concentrations were found to be higher near structurally controlled uranium mineralization. Indoor radon levels in the houses of the study area are considerably higher than the ICRP recommended value of 200 Bq m{sup -3}. The high indoor radon concentration found may be attributed to the geology of the area. This area needs more detailed investigation as it may be one of the areas of high radon risk in India. (Author).

  19. Radon exhalation rate of some building materials used in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maged, A F; Ashraf, F A

    2005-09-01

    Indoor radon has been recognized as one of the health hazards for mankind. Common building materials used for construction of houses, which are considered as one of the major sources of this gas in indoor environment, have been studied for exhalation rate of radon. Non-nuclear industries, such as coal fired power plants or fertilizer production facilities, generate large amounts of waste gypsum as by-products. Compared to other building materials waste gypsum from fertilizer production facilities (phosphogypsum) shows increased rates of radon exhalation. In the present, investigation solid state alpha track detectors, CR-39 plastic detectors, were used to measure the indoor radon concentration and the radon exhalation rates from some building materials used in Egypt. The indoor radon concentration and the radon exhalation rate ranges were found to be 24-55 Bq m(-3 )and 11-223 mBq m(-2) h(-1), respectively. The effective dose equivalent range for the indoor was found 0.6-1.4 mSv y(-1). The equilibrium factor between radon and its daughters increased with the increase of relative humidity.

  20. Residential radon exposure and risk of lung cancer in Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavanja, M C; Lubin, J H; Mahaffey, J A; Brownson, R C

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study investigated residential radon exposure and lung cancer risk, using both standard radon dosimetry and a new radon monitoring technology that, evidence suggests, is a better measure of cumulative radon exposure. METHODS: Missouri women (aged 30 to 84 years) newly diagnosed with primary lung cancer during the period January 1, 1993, to January 31, 1994, were invited to participate in this population-based case-control study. Both indoor air radon detectors and CR-39 alpha-particle detectors (surface monitors) were used. RESULTS: When surface monitors were used, a significant trend in lung cancer odds ratios was observed for 20-year time-weighted-average radon concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: When surface monitors were used, but not when standard radon dosimetry was used, a significant lung cancer risk was found for radon concentrations at and above the action level for mitigation of houses currently used in the United States (148 Bqm-3). The risk was below the action level used in Canada (750 Bqm-3) and many European countries (200-400 Bqm-3). PMID:10394313

  1. Radon removal from gaseous xenon with activated charcoal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K.; Hieda, K.; Hiraide, K.; Hirano, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Koshio, Y. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Liu, J.; Martens, K. [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Moriyama, S. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Nakahata, M. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Nishiie, H.; Ogawa, H.; Sekiya, H.; Shinozaki, A. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Suzuki, Y. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Takachio, O.; Takeda, A.; Ueshima, K.; Umemoto, D. [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); and others

    2012-01-01

    Many low background experiments using xenon need to remove radioactive radon to improve their sensitivities. However, no method of continually removing radon from xenon has been described in the literature. We studied a method to remove radon from xenon gas through an activated charcoal trap. From our measurements we infer a linear relationship between the mean propagation velocity v{sub Rn} of radon and v{sub Xe} of xenon in the trap with v{sub Rn}/v{sub Xe}=(0.96{+-}0.10) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} at -85 Degree-Sign C. As the mechanism for radon removal in this charcoal trap is its decay, knowledge of this parameter allows us to design an efficient radon removal system for the XMASS experiment. The verification of this system found that it reduces radon by a factor of 0.07, which is in line with its expected average retention time of 14.8 days for radon.

  2. Detection of earthquake induced radon precursors