WorldWideScience

Sample records for national high-power advanced

  1. Advanced Output Coupling for High Power Gyrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, Michael [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Ives, Robert Lawrence [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Marsden, David [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Collins, George [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States); Temkin, Richard [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Guss, William [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lohr, John [General Atomics, La Jolla, CA (United States); Neilson, Jeffrey [Lexam Research, Redwood City, CA (United States); Bui, Thuc [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, CA (United States)

    2016-11-28

    The Phase II program developed an internal RF coupler that transforms the whispering gallery RF mode produced in gyrotron cavities to an HE11 waveguide mode propagating in corrugated waveguide. This power is extracted from the vacuum using a broadband, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, Brewster angle window capable of transmitting more than 1.5 MW CW of RF power over a broad range of frequencies. This coupling system eliminates the Mirror Optical Units now required to externally couple Gaussian output power into corrugated waveguide, significantly reducing system cost and increasing efficiency. The program simulated the performance using a broad range of advanced computer codes to optimize the design. Both a direct coupler and Brewster angle window were built and tested at low and high power. Test results confirmed the performance of both devices and demonstrated they are capable of achieving the required performance for scientific, defense, industrial, and medical applications.

  2. Advanced Capacitors for High-Power Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As the consumer and industrial requirements for compact, high-power-density, electrical power systems grow substantially over the next decade; there will be a...

  3. Stabilized High Power Laser for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willke, B; Danzmann, K; Fallnich, C; Frede, M; Heurs, M; King, P; Kracht, D; Kwee, P; Savage, R; Seifert, F; Wilhelm, R

    2006-01-01

    Second generation gravitational wave detectors require high power lasers with several 100W of output power and with very low temporal and spatial fluctuations. In this paper we discuss possible setups to achieve high laser power and describe a 200W prestabilized laser system (PSL). The PSL noise requirements for advanced gravitational wave detectors will be discussed in general and the stabilization scheme proposed for the Advanced LIGO PSL will be described. Special emphasis will be given to the most demanding power stabilization requirements and new results (RIN ≤ 4x10 -9 /√Hz) will be presented

  4. Comparison of advanced high power underground cable designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erb, J.; Heinz, W.; Hofmann, A.; Koefler, H.J.; Komarek, P.; Maurer, W.; Nahar, A.

    1975-09-01

    In this paper, advanced high power underground cable designs are compared in the light of available literature, of reports and information supplied by participating industries (AEG, BICC, CGE, Pirelli, Siemens), spontaneous contributions by EdF, France, BBC and Felten and Guilleaume Kabelwerke A.G., Germany, and Hitachi, Furukawa, Fujikura and Sumitomo, Japan, and earlier studies carried out at German public research centres. The study covers cables with forced cooling by oil or water, SF 6 -cables, polyethylene cables, cryoresistive and superconducting cables. (orig.) [de

  5. Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekhiche, Mike [Principal Investigator; Dufera, Hiz [Project Manager; Montagna, Deb [Business Point of Contact

    2012-10-29

    The project conducted under DOE contract DE‐EE0002649 is defined as the Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Converter. The overall project is split into a seven‐stage, gated development program. The work conducted under the DOE contract is OPT Stage Gate III work and a portion of Stage Gate IV work of the seven stage product development process. The project effort includes Full Concept Design & Prototype Assembly Testing building on our existing PowerBuoy technology to deliver a device with much increased power delivery. Scaling‐up from 150kW to 500kW power generating capacity required changes in the PowerBuoy design that addressed cost reduction and mass manufacturing by implementing a Design for Manufacturing (DFM) approach. The design changes also focused on reducing PowerBuoy Installation, Operation and Maintenance (IO&M) costs which are essential to reducing the overall cost of energy. In this design, changes to the core PowerBuoy technology were implemented to increase capability and reduce both CAPEX and OPEX costs. OPT conceptually envisaged moving from a floating structure to a seabed structure. The design change from a floating structure to seabed structure would provide the implementation of stroke‐ unlimited Power Take‐Off (PTO) which has a potential to provide significant power delivery improvement and transform the wave energy industry if proven feasible.

  6. High-power ultrasonic processing: Recent developments and prospective advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Juarez, Juan A.

    2010-01-01

    also to be mentioned. The objective of this paper is to review some recent developments in ultrasonic processing to show the present situation and the prospective progresses of high-power ultrasonics as an innovative technology in many industrial sectors.

  7. Advanced Packaging Materials and Techniques for High Power TR Module: Standard Flight vs. Advanced Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, James Patrick; Del Castillo, Linda; Miller, Jennifer; Jenabi, Masud; Hunter, Donald; Birur, Gajanana

    2011-01-01

    The higher output power densities required of modern radar architectures, such as the proposed DESDynI [Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice] SAR [Synthetic Aperture Radar] Instrument (or DSI) require increasingly dense high power electronics. To enable these higher power densities, while maintaining or even improving hardware reliability, requires advances in integrating advanced thermal packaging technologies into radar transmit/receive (TR) modules. New materials and techniques have been studied and compared to standard technologies.

  8. Advanced Electrodes for High Power Li-ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M. Julien

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available While little success has been obtained over the past few years in attempts to increase the capacity of Li-ion batteries, significant improvement in the power density has been achieved, opening the route to new applications, from hybrid electric vehicles to high-power electronics and regulation of the intermittency problem of electric energy supply on smart grids. This success has been achieved not only by decreasing the size of the active particles of the electrodes to few tens of nanometers, but also by surface modification and the synthesis of new multi-composite particles. It is the aim of this work to review the different approaches that have been successful to obtain Li-ion batteries with improved high-rate performance and to discuss how these results prefigure further improvement in the near future.

  9. Advanced laser architectures for high power eyesafe illuminators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, N.; Pati, B.; Stebbins, K.; Bystryak, I.; Rayno, M.; Ezzo, K.; DePriest, C.

    2018-02-01

    Q-Peak has demonstrated a novel pulsed eyesafe laser architecture operating with >50 mJ pulse energies at Pulse Repetition Frequencies (PRFs) as high as 320 Hz. The design leverages an Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO) and Optical Parametric Amplifier (OPA) geometry, which provides the unique capability for high power in a comparatively compact package, while also offering the potential for additional eyesafe power scaling. The laser consists of a Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Q-switched front-end seed laser to produce pulse-widths around 10 ns at 1.06-μm, which is then followed by a pair of Multi-Pass Amplifier (MPA) architectures (comprised of side-pumped, multi-pass Nd:YAG slabs with a compact diode-pump-array imaging system), and finally involving two sequential nonlinear optical conversion architectures for transfer into the eyesafe regime. The initial seed beam is first amplified through the MPA, and then split into parallel optical paths. An OPO provides effective nonlinear conversion on one optical path, while a second MPA further amplifies the 1.06-μm beam for use in pumping an OPA on the second optical path. These paths are then recombined prior to seeding the OPA. Each nonlinear conversion subsystem utilizes Potassium Titanyl Arsenate (KTA) for effective nonlinear conversion with lower risk to optical damage. This laser architecture efficiently produces pulse energies of >50 mJ in the eyesafe band at PRFs as high as 320 Hz, and has been designed to fit within a volume of 4,500 in3 (0.074 m3 ). We will discuss theoretical and experimental details of the nonlinear optical system for achieving higher eyesafe powers.

  10. Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.H.

    1996-05-14

    Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4cm{sup 3} have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development.

  11. Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4cm 3 have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development

  12. Thermal modeling for advanced high power packaging development and on-line performance monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, C.; Xiao, A.; Salta, J.; Langen, M. de; Driel, W. van

    2010-01-01

    As the market demands for high power and high efficiency power electronics, the industries has developed advanced IC technology and conceptual configuration. However, in order to guarantee the performance and reliability of the power electronics, the challenge of the packaging arises. This paper

  13. Stabilized high-power laser system for the gravitational wave detector advanced LIGO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwee, P; Bogan, C; Danzmann, K; Frede, M; Kim, H; King, P; Pöld, J; Puncken, O; Savage, R L; Seifert, F; Wessels, P; Winkelmann, L; Willke, B

    2012-05-07

    An ultra-stable, high-power cw Nd:YAG laser system, developed for the ground-based gravitational wave detector Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory), was comprehensively characterized. Laser power, frequency, beam pointing and beam quality were simultaneously stabilized using different active and passive schemes. The output beam, the performance of the stabilization, and the cross-coupling between different stabilization feedback control loops were characterized and found to fulfill most design requirements. The employed stabilization schemes and the achieved performance are of relevance to many high-precision optical experiments.

  14. ADX: a high field, high power density, Advanced Divertor test eXperiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, R.; Labombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, J.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; ADX Team

    2014-10-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment (ADX) - a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research program on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. This high field (6.5 tesla, 1.5 MA), high power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) facility would utilize Alcator magnet technology to test innovative divertor concepts for next-step DT fusion devices (FNSF, DEMO) at reactor-level boundary plasma pressures and parallel heat flux densities while producing high performance core plasma conditions. The experimental platform would also test advanced lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ion-cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) actuators and wave physics at the plasma densities and magnetic field strengths of a DEMO, with the unique ability to deploy launcher structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-field side - a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and wave physics is most favorable for efficient current drive, heating and flow drive. This innovative experiment would perform plasma science and technology R&D necessary to inform the conceptual development and accelerate the readiness-for-deployment of FNSF/DEMO - in a timely manner, on a cost-effective research platform. Supported by DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  15. Improved Confinement in Highly Powered Advanced Tokamak Scenarios on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, T. W.; Leonard, A.; Luce, T.; Osborne, T.; Solomon, W.; Turco, F.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Holcomb, C.; Lasnier, C.; Makowski, M.

    2016-10-01

    DIII-D has recently demonstrated improved energy confinement by injecting neutral gas into high performance Advanced Tokamak (AT) plasmas during high power operation. Representative parameters are: q95 = 6, PIN up to 15 MW, H98 = 1.4-1.8, and βN = 2.8-4.2. Unlike in lower and moderate powered AT plasmas, τE and βN increased (and νELM decreased) as density was increased by deuterium gas puffing. We discuss how the interplay between pedestal density and temperature with fueling can lead to higher ballooning stability and a peeling/kink current limit that increasers as the pressure gradient increases. Comparison of neon, nitrogen, and argon as ``seed'' impurities in high PIN ATs in terms of their effects on core dilution, τE, and heat flux (q⊥) reduction favors argon. In general, the puff-and-pump radiating divertor was not as effective in reducing q⊥ while maintaining density control at highest PIN than it was at lower PIN. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-AC04-94AL85000, DE-AC52-07NA27344, and DE-FG02-07ER54917.

  16. Advances in High Power Calorimetric Matched Loads for Short Pulses and CW Gyrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bin, W.M.; Bruschi, A.; Cirant, S.; Gandini, F.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Muzzini, V.; Nardone, A.; Sozzi, C.; Spinicchia, N.

    2006-01-01

    The development of high power gyrotrons for plasma physics research needs proper matched and calorimetric loads able to absorb and measure the power, which nowadays is foreseen to be as high as 2 MW during CW operations. To this end IFP/CNR has developed a family of matched loads useful in the mm-wave frequency band for applications ranging from a few ms to CW in pulse length. The different loads in the family, made of an integrating sphere with a partially reflecting coating on the inner wall, are characterized by having the same absorbing geometry for the incoming beam and a different heat removal system for the specific application. Some important advances have been recently achieved from the point of view of the uniformity of power distribution on the absorbing wall and of the load construction. With high precision achieved in the coating thickness a better control of the heating power distribution is possible by proper shaping of the local reflectivity, in addition to the shaping of the mirror dispersing the input beam. A more sophisticated model describing the power distribution has been developed, taking into account a variable thickness of the absorbing coating, the proper shape of the spreading mirror, the frequency of the incoming radiation and the shape of the input beam. Lower coating thickness is shown to be preferable, at equal local reflectivity, from the point of view of a lower peak temperature and thermal stress. The paper describes a load with variable coating thickness along the meridian of the sphere, showing a uniform power deposition on the inner walls. The cooling pipe is completely electroformed on the spherical copper shell, ensuring the maintenance of the correct curvature of the inner surface and a fast heat conduction from the absorbing coating to the water through the thin copper body. For CW use all heated parts of the load must be cooled and this is achieved by 16 electroformed spiral channels. Both short pulse loads (0.1-1 s) and

  17. ADX: a high field, high power density, advanced divertor and RF tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Terry, J. L.; Vieira, R.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Baek, S.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Doody, J.; Ellis, R.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Kessel, C.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Leccacorvi, R.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Mahajan, S.; Minervini, J.; Mumgaard, R.; Nygren, R.; Parker, R.; Poli, F.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rognlien, T.; Rowan, W.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D.; Theiler, C.; Titus, P.; Umansky, M.; Valanju, P.; Walk, J.; White, A.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    The MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and collaborators are proposing a high-performance Advanced Divertor and RF tokamak eXperiment (ADX)—a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research programme on the pathway to next-step devices: fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF), fusion pilot plant (FPP) and/or demonstration power plant (DEMO). This high-field (⩾6.5 T, 1.5 MA), high power density facility (P/S ˜ 1.5 MW m-2) will test innovative divertor ideas, including an ‘X-point target divertor’ concept, at the required performance parameters—reactor-level boundary plasma pressures, magnetic field strengths and parallel heat flux densities entering into the divertor region—while simultaneously producing high-performance core plasma conditions that are prototypical of a reactor: equilibrated and strongly coupled electrons and ions, regimes with low or no torque, and no fuelling from external heating and current drive systems. Equally important, the experimental platform will test innovative concepts for lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequency actuators with the unprecedented ability to deploy launch structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-magnetic-field side—the latter being a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and favourable RF wave physics leads to efficient current drive, current profile control, heating and flow drive. This triple combination—advanced divertors, advanced RF actuators, reactor-prototypical core plasma conditions—will enable ADX to explore enhanced core confinement physics, such as made possible by reversed central shear, using only the types of external drive systems that are considered viable for a fusion power plant. Such an integrated demonstration of high-performance core-divertor operation with steady-state sustainment would pave the way towards an attractive pilot plant, as envisioned in the ARC concept

  18. The advances and characteristics of high-power diode laser materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin

    2000-10-01

    This paper presents a review of the direct applications of high-power diode lasers for materials processing including soldering, surface modification (hardening, cladding, glazing and wetting modifications), welding, scribing, sheet metal bending, marking, engraving, paint stripping, powder sintering, synthesis, brazing and machining. The specific advantages and disadvantages of diode laser materials processing are compared with CO 2, Nd:YAG and excimer lasers. An effort is made to identify the fundamental differences in their beam/material interaction characteristics and materials behaviour. Also an appraisal of the future prospects of the high-power diode lasers for materials processing is given.

  19. Noise reduction techniques used on the high power klystron modulators at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    The modulators used in the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory have been redesigned with an emphasis on electrical noise reduction. Since the modulators are 100 MW modulators with <700 ns rise time, electrical noise can be coupled very easily to other electronic equipment in the area. This paper will detail the efforts made to reduce noise coupled to surrounding equipment. Shielding and sound grounding techniques accomplished the goal of drastically reducing the noise induced in surrounding equipment. The approach used in grounding and shielding will be discussed, and data will be presented comparing earlier designs to the improved design

  20. Advances in High-Power, Ultrashort Pulse DPSSL Technologies at HiLASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Smrž

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of kW-class diode-pumped picosecond laser sources emitting at various wavelengths started at the HiLASE Center four years ago. A 500-W Perla C thin-disk laser with a diffraction limited beam and repetition rate of 50–100 kHz, a frequency conversion to mid-infrared (mid-IR, and second to fifth harmonic frequencies was demonstrated. We present an updated review on the progress in the development of compact picosecond and femtosecond high average power radiation sources covering the ultraviolet (UV to mid-IR spectral range at the HiLASE Center. We also report on thin-disk manufacturing by atomic diffusion bonding, which is a crucial technology for future high-power laser development.

  1. Radiation effects at a high power accelerator and applications to advanced energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, W.F.; Garner, F.A.; Brown, R.D.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Many materials are exposed to atom-displacing radiation at high-power accelerators such as the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). Beam current densities in the 800-MeV proton beam vary from 12.5 mA cm -2 (8 x 10 16 p/cm 2 s) on graphite targets to 20-μA cm -2 (1.3 x 10 14 p/cm 2 s) on metal-alloy windows. High-level radiation damage results from these particle fluxes. As a consequence of secondary-particle generation in targets and windows and low-level beam losses that lead to particle interactions with structural material, various components are exposed to low-level proton fluxes, gamma radiation, and neutron fluxes of 10 6 --10 10 n/cm 2 s. These include vacuum seals and vacuum chambers of stainless steel and aluminum alloys, solid-state devices for control, diagnostic, and data acquisition electronics, closed-loop cooling-water systems, and insulators. Properties of these materials are degraded by the radiation exposure. Studies of LAMPF and other accelerators, however, have produced solutions to materials problems, allowing the machines to operate for acceptable times without failure. Nevertheless, additional improvements are being investigated in order to further improve operational reliability and safety. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Advanced chip designs and novel cooling techniques for brightness scaling of industrial, high power diode laser bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, S.; McDougall, S. D.; Ryu, G.; Zhao, L.; Liu, X.; Holy, C.; Jiang, C.-L.; Modak, P.; Xiong, Y.; Vethake, T.; Strohmaier, S. G.; Schmidt, B.; Zimer, H.

    2018-02-01

    The advance of high power semiconductor diode laser technology is driven by the rapidly growing industrial laser market, with such high power solid state laser systems requiring ever more reliable diode sources with higher brightness and efficiency at lower cost. In this paper we report simulation and experimental data demonstrating most recent progress in high brightness semiconductor laser bars for industrial applications. The advancements are in three principle areas: vertical laser chip epitaxy design, lateral laser chip current injection control, and chip cooling technology. With such improvements, we demonstrate disk laser pump laser bars with output power over 250W with 60% efficiency at the operating current. Ion implantation was investigated for improved current confinement. Initial lifetime tests show excellent reliability. For direct diode applications 96% polarization are additional requirements. Double sided cooling deploying hard solder and optimized laser design enable single emitter performance also for high fill factor bars and allow further power scaling to more than 350W with 65% peak efficiency with less than 8 degrees slow axis divergence and high polarization.

  3. ADX: A high Power Density, Advanced RF-Driven Divertor Test Tokamak for PMI studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Dennis; ADX Team

    2015-11-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment, ADX; a divertor test tokamak dedicated to address critical gaps in plasma-material interactions (PMI) science, and the world fusion research program, on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. Basic ADX design features are motivated and discussed. In order to assess the widest range of advanced divertor concepts, a large fraction (>50%) of the toroidal field volume is purpose-built with innovative magnetic topology control and flexibility for assessing different surfaces, including liquids. ADX features high B-field (>6 Tesla) and high global power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) in order to access the full range of parallel heat flux and divertor plasma pressures foreseen for reactors, while simultaneously assessing the effect of highly dissipative divertors on core plasma/pedestal. Various options for efficiently achieving high field are being assessed including the use of Alcator technology (cryogenic cooled copper) and high-temperature superconductors. The experimental platform would also explore advanced lower hybrid current drive and ion-cyclotron range of frequency actuators located at the high-field side; a location which is predicted to greatly reduce the PMI effects on the launcher while minimally perturbing the core plasma. The synergistic effects of high-field launchers with high total B on current and flow drive can thus be studied in reactor-relevant boundary plasmas.

  4. Role of advanced RF/microwave technology and high power switch technology for developing/upgrading compact/existing accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Purushottam

    2001-01-01

    With the advances in high power microwave devices as well as in microwave technologies it has become possible to go on higher frequencies at higher powers as well as to go for newer devices which are more efficient and compact and hence reducing the power needs as well as space and weight requirement for accelerators. New devices are now available in higher frequency spectrum for example at C-Band, X-band and even higher. Also new devices like klystrodes/Higher Order Mode Inductive Output Tubes (HOM IOTs) are now becoming competitors for existing tubes which are in use at present accelerator complexes. The design/planning of the accelerators used for particle physics research, medical accelerators, industrial irradiation, or even upcoming Driver Accelerators for Sub Critical Reactors for nuclear power generation are being done taking into account the newer technologies. The accelerators which use magnetrons, klystrons and similar devices at S-Band can be modified/redesigned with devices at higher frequencies like X-Band. Pulsed accelerators need high power high voltage pulsed modulators whereas CW accelerators need high voltage power supplies for functioning of RF / Microwave tubes. There had been a remarkable growth in the development and availability of solid state switches both for switching the pulsed modulators for microwave tubes as well as for making high frequency switch mode power supplies. Present paper discusses some of the advanced devices/technologies in this field as well as their capability to make advanced/compact/reliable accelerators. Microwave systems developed/under development at Centre for Advanced Technology are also discussed briefly along with some of the efforts done to make them compact. An overview of state of art vacuum tube devices and solid state switch technologies is given. (author)

  5. Recent advances in phosphate laser glasses for high power applications. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.H.

    1996-05-01

    Recent advances in Nd-doped phosphate laser glasses for high-peak-power and high-average-power applications are reviewed. Compositional studies have progressed to the point that glasses can be tailored to have specific properties for specific applications. Non-radiative relaxation effects can be accurately modeled and empirical expressions have been developed to evaluate both intrinsic (structural) and extrinsic (contamination induced) relaxation effects. Losses due to surface scattering and bulk glass absorption have been carefully measured and can be accurately predicted. Improvements in processing have lead to high damage threshold (e.g. Pt inclusion free) and high thermal shock resistant glasses with improved edge claddings. High optical quality pieces up to 79 x 45 x 4 cm{sup 3} have been made and methods for continuous melting laser glass are under development.

  6. Towards swift ion bunch acceleration by high-power laser pulses at the Centre for Advanced Laser Applications (CALA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, F. H.; Haffa, D.; Bin, J. H.; Englbrecht, F.; Gao, Y.; Gebhard, J.; Hartmann, J.; Hilz, P.; Kreuzer, C.; Lehrack, S.; Ostermayr, T. M.; Rösch, T. F.; Speicher, M.; Würl, M.; Parodi, K.; Schreiber, J.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2017-07-01

    Laser-driven acceleration of ions has inspired novel applications, that can benefit from ion bunch properties different from conventionally (non-laser based) accelerated particle beams. Those differences range from extremely short bunch durations, broad energy spectra, large divergence angles and small source sizes to ultra-high ion bunch densities. So far, the main focus of research has been concentrating on the physics of the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasmas and the related mechanisms of ion acceleration. Now, the new Centre for Advanced Laser Applications (CALA) near Munich aims at pushing these ion bunches towards applications, including radiation therapy of tumors and the development of heavy ion bunches with solid-state-like density. These are needed for novel reaction mechanisms ('fission-fusion') to study the origin of heavy elements in the universe and to prepare for related studies at the upcoming EU-funded high-power laser facility ELI - Nuclear Physics in Bucharest.

  7. Preliminary Physics Motivation and Engineering Design Assessment of the National High Power Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert D. Woolley

    2009-06-11

    In April 2006, Dr. Ray Orbach, Director of the DOE Office of Science, challenged the fusion community to "propose a new facility... which will put the U.S. at the lead in world fusion science." Analysis of the gaps between expected ITER performance and the requirements of a demonstration power plant (Demo) pointed to the critical and urgent need to develop fusion-relvant plasma-material interface (PMI) solutions consistent with sustained high plasma performance. A survey of world fusion program indicated that present and planned experimental devices do not advance the PMI issue beyond ITER, and a major dedicated experimental facility is warranted. Such a facility should provide the flexibility and access needed to solve plasma boundary challenges related to divertor heat flux and particle exhaust while also developing methods to minimize hydrogenic isotope retention and remaining compatible with high plasma performance.

  8. Preliminary Physics Motivation and Engineering Design Assessment of the National High Power Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    In April 2006, Dr. Ray Orbach, Director of the DOE Office of Science, challenged the fusion community to 'propose a new facility... which will put the U.S. at the lead in world fusion science'. Analysis of the gaps between expected ITER performance and the requirements of a demonstration power plant (Demo) pointed to the critical and urgent need to develop fusion-relevant plasma-material interface (PMI) solutions consistent with sustained high plasma performance. A survey of world fusion program indicated that present and planned experimental devices do not advance the PMI issue beyond ITER, and a major dedicated experimental facility is warranted. Such a facility should provide the flexibility and access needed to solve plasma boundary challenges related to divertor heat flux and particle exhaust while also developing methods to minimize hydrogenic isotope retention and remaining compatible with high plasma performance.

  9. High Power High Thrust Ion Thruster (HPHTion): 50 CM Ion Thruster for Near-Earth Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advances in high power, photovoltaic technology has enabled the possibility of reasonably sized, high specific power, high power, solar arrays. New thin film solar...

  10. High Power High Thrust Ion Thruster (HPHTion): 50 CM Ion Thruster for Near-Earth Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advances in high power, photovoltaic technology has enabled the possibility of reasonably sized, high specific power, high power, solar arrays. New thin film solar...

  11. High Power High Thrust Ion Thruster (HPHTion): 50 CM Ion Thruster for Near-Earth Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advances in high power, photovoltaic technology has enabled the possibility of reasonably sized, high specific power, high power, solar arrays. At high specific...

  12. Fabrication, Inspection, and Test Plan for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) High-Power Mixed-Oxide (MOX) Fuel Irradiation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachs, G. W.

    1998-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Disposition Program (FMDP) has announced that reactor irradiation of Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuel is one of the preferred alternatives for disposal of surplus weapons-usable plutonium (Pu). MOX fuel has been utilized domestically in test reactors and on an experimental basis in a number of Commercial Light Water Reactors (CLWRs). Most of this experience has been with Pu derived from spent low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, known as reactor grade (RG) Pu. The High-Power MOX fuel test will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to provide preliminary data to demonstrate that the unique properties of surplus weapons-derived or weapons-grade (WG) plutonium (Pu) do not compromise the applicability of this MOX experience base. The purpose of the high-power experiment, in conjunction with the currently ongoing average-power experiment at the ATR, is to contribute new information concerning the response of WG plutonium under more severe irradiation conditions typical of the peak power locations in commercial reactors. In addition, the high-power test will contribute experience with irradiation of gallium-containing fuel to the database required for resolution of generic CLWR fuel design issues. The distinction between "high-power" and "average-power" relates to the position within the nominal CLWR core. The high-power test project is subject to a number of requirements, as discussed in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation High-Power Test Project Plan (ORNL/MD/LTR-125).

  13. ICC Experiment Performance Improvement through Advanced Feedback Controllers for High-Power Low-Cost Switching Power Amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Brian A.

    2006-01-01

    Limited resources force most smaller fusion energy research experiments to have little or no feedback control of their operational parameters, preventing achievement of their full operational potential. Recent breakthroughs in high-power switching technologies have greatly reduced feedback-controlled power supply costs, primarily those classified as switching power amplifiers. However, inexpensive and flexible controllers for these power supplies have not been developed. A uClinux-based micro-controller (Analog Devices Blackfin BF537) was identified as having the capabilities to form the base of a digital control system for switching power amplifiers. A control algorithm was created, and a Linux character device driver was written to realize the algorithm. The software and algorithm were successfully tested on a switching power amplifier and magnetic field coil using University of Washington (subcontractor) resources

  14. The comparative analysis of safety and economic competitiveness of the advanced high-power reactor projects of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrbekov, G.A.; Makhanov, U.M.; Philimonova, R.A.; Kichutkina, E.G.

    2002-01-01

    The comparative analysis results of the safety and economic competitiveness of the seven advanced large sized reactors projects (900 MW and more) are submitted in that report: EPR, Frameatome France, Siemens Germany; EP-1000 Westinghouse, USA and Genesi Italy; Candu 9, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd; System 80 +, ABB, USA; KNGR, group NSSS Engineering and Development, Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc; APWR, Electric Power company, Japan Atomic Power Company, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Westinghouse Electric; and WWER-1000 (V-392), Atomenergoproject/Gidropress Russian Federation. According to the economic competitiveness of listed compared power reactors the 14 criteria of safety have been accepted. These criteria: 1. Features of the barrier system of 'defence-in-depth'. 2. The self-security of a reactor under increase of power and reactivity of a reactor, decrease of the expense and phase transformations of the reactor core coolant (presence of negative feedbacks). 3. Presence of the reactor shutdown systems responding principles of a variety, independence and reservation. Presence of the passive means of initiation and operation of the emergency protection. 4. The emergency cooling of the core of reactor. A presence of the passive means of cooling. Presence of the water reservation for the water supply of the different safety systems. 5. The emergency electrical supply, its reliability and degree of reservation. 6. The prevention measures of the heavy accident with the melt core. The decrease of the heavy accident probability. 7. The account of the heavy accident under development of the levels of protection. 8. The protection levels of NPP, the technological criteria of efficiency of the each safety barriers and the limiting radiation criteria for the each level of protection , in particular for the design-basis and beyond-design-basis accidents. 9. The measures for reduction of the heavy accident consequences. The management by the beyond

  15. National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCAM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Integrated Composite Structures: Recent composite integrated structures technologies, using 3D preform co-bonded joints presents a step change in weight,...

  16. Advance directives and the National Health Act

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Advance directives and the National Health Act. David McQuoid-Mason. Advance directives are instructions given by patients regarding their future treatment should they become incompetent to con- sent to, or refuse, such treatment. Where a directive authorises a third person or proxy to give consent such person impliedly.

  17. Weldability of Advanced High Strength Steels using Ytterbium:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet high power laser for Tailor-Welded Blank applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajashekhar Shivaram

    Use of a high power Yb:YAG laser is investigated for joining advanced high strength steel materials for use in tailor-welded blank (TWB) applications. TWB's are materials of different chemistry, coating or thicknesses that are joined before metal forming and other operations such as trimming, assembly and painting are carried out. TWB is becoming an important design tool in the automotive industry for reducing weight, improving fuel economy and passenger safety, while reducing the overall costs for the customer. Three advanced high strength steels, TRIP780, DP980 and USIBOR, which have many unique properties that are conducive to achieving these objectives, along with mild steel, are used in this work. The objective of this work is to ensure that high quality welds can be obtained using Yb:YAG lasers which are also becoming popular for metal joining operations, since they produce high quality laser beams that suffer minimal distortion when transported via fiber optic cables. Various power levels and speeds for the laser beam were used during the investigation. Argon gas was consistently used for shielding purposes during the welding process. After the samples were welded, metallographic examination of the fusion and heat-affected zones using optical and scanning electron microscopes were carried out to determine the microstructures as well as weld defects. Optical and scanning electron microscopes were also used to examine the top of welds as well as fracture surfaces. Additionally, cross-weld microhardness evaluations, tensile tests using Instron tester, limited fatigue tests as well as formability evaluations using OSU plane strain evaluation were carried out. The examinations included a 2-factor full factorial design of experiments to determine the impact of coatings on the surface roughness on the top of the welds. Tensile strengths of DP980, TRIP780 and mild steel materials as well as DP980 welded to TRIP780 and mild steel in the rolling direction as well as

  18. High Power Helicon Plasma Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed work seeks to develop and optimize an electrode-less plasma propulsion system that is based on a high power helicon (HPH) that is being developed...

  19. High Power Helicon Plasma Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new thruster has been conceived and tested that is based on a high power helicon (HPH) plasma wave. In this new method of propulsion, an antenna generates and...

  20. High power VME system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, T.

    1990-01-01

    While the power consumption of CAMAC and VME modules is less than 40 watts per module and that of TKO and FASTBUS is much more, the former group consumes twice as much power per unit surface area as the latter group. The area occupied by components amounts to 60 percent of the total board area in TKO Super Controller Head Module and to 83 percent in VME Memory Partner module. Such a high packing density results in a high power density, and cooling of such modules becomes difficult. Despite these, such electronics systems with very high packing density are expected to become popular. The present report summarizes studies on various aspects of high power systems. The studies cover the cooling, routing power, and resistance to fire. A forced air cooling unit for TKO is developed. It serves to achieve a very high air flow rate for cooling, but high power systems would require better temperature compensation than other systems since one cannot expect a uniform ambient temperature distribution to be achieved over the board surface. It might even prohibit high resolution circuits to function to full capacity. Another study is made on a backplane that can supply much more current than conventional ones. A special power connector is developed which can supply currents up to 50 ampere. (N.K.)

  1. High-power electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Kapitsa, Petr Leonidovich

    1966-01-01

    High-Power Electronics, Volume 2 presents the electronic processes in devices of the magnetron type and electromagnetic oscillations in different systems. This book explores the problems of electronic energetics.Organized into 11 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the motion of electrons in a flat model of the magnetron, taking into account the in-phase wave and the reverse wave. This text then examines the processes of transmission of electromagnetic waves of various polarization and the wave reflection from grids made of periodically distributed infinite metal conductors. Other

  2. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  3. NASA's National Center for Advanced Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, John

    2003-01-01

    NASA has designated the Principal Center Assignment to the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for implementation of the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCAM). NCAM is NASA s leading resource for the aerospace manufacturing research, development, and innovation needs that are critical to the goals of the Agency. Through this initiative NCAM s people work together with government, industry, and academia to ensure the technology base and national infrastructure are available to develop innovative manufacturing technologies with broad application to NASA Enterprise programs, and U.S. industry. Educational enhancements are ever-present within the NCAM focus to promote research, to inspire participation and to support education and training in manufacturing. Many important accomplishments took place during 2002. Through NCAM, NASA was among five federal agencies involved in manufacturing research and development (R&D) to launch a major effort to exchange information and cooperate directly to enhance the payoffs from federal investments. The Government Agencies Technology Exchange in Manufacturing (GATE-M) is the only active effort to specifically and comprehensively address manufacturing R&D across the federal government. Participating agencies include the departments of Commerce (represented by the National Institute of Standards and Technology), Defense, and Energy, as well as the National Science Foundation and NASA. MSFC s ongoing partnership with the State of Louisiana, the University of New Orleans, and Lockheed Martin Corporation at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) progressed significantly. Major capital investments were initiated for world-class equipment additions including a universal friction stir welding system, composite fiber placement machine, five-axis machining center, and ten-axis laser ultrasonic nondestructive test system. The NCAM consortium of five universities led by University of New Orleans with Mississippi State University

  4. Critical advancements in achieving high power and stable nonprecious metal catalyst–based MEAs for real-world proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yingjie; Bai, Kyoung

    2018-01-01

    Despite great progress in the development of nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) over the past several decades, the performance and stability of these promising catalysts have not yet achieved commercial readiness for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Through rational design of the cathode catalyst layer (CCL), we demonstrate the highest reported performance for an NPMC-based membrane electrode assembly (MEA), achieving a peak power of 570 mW/cm2 under air. This record performance is achieved using a precommercial catalyst for which nearly all pores are catalyst pores to achieve high current densities. This advance is achieved at industrially relevant scales (50 cm2 MEA) using a precommercial NPMC. In situ electrochemical analysis of the CCLs is also used to help gain insight into the degradation mechanism observed during galvanostatic testing. Overall, the performance of this NPMC-based MEA has achieved commercial readiness and will be introduced into an NPMC-based product for portable power applications. PMID:29582018

  5. Critical advancements in achieving high power and stable nonprecious metal catalyst-based MEAs for real-world proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banham, Dustin; Kishimoto, Takeaki; Zhou, Yingjie; Sato, Tetsutaro; Bai, Kyoung; Ozaki, Jun-Ichi; Imashiro, Yasuo; Ye, Siyu

    2018-03-01

    Despite great progress in the development of nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) over the past several decades, the performance and stability of these promising catalysts have not yet achieved commercial readiness for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Through rational design of the cathode catalyst layer (CCL), we demonstrate the highest reported performance for an NPMC-based membrane electrode assembly (MEA), achieving a peak power of 570 mW/cm 2 under air. This record performance is achieved using a precommercial catalyst for which nearly all pores are <3 nm in diameter, challenging previous beliefs regarding the need for larger catalyst pores to achieve high current densities. This advance is achieved at industrially relevant scales (50 cm 2 MEA) using a precommercial NPMC. In situ electrochemical analysis of the CCLs is also used to help gain insight into the degradation mechanism observed during galvanostatic testing. Overall, the performance of this NPMC-based MEA has achieved commercial readiness and will be introduced into an NPMC-based product for portable power applications.

  6. Application of high power microwave vacuum electron devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yaogen; Liu Pukun; Zhang Zhaochuan; Wang Yong; Shen Bin

    2011-01-01

    High power microwave vacuum electron devices can work at high frequency, high peak and average power. They have been widely used in military and civil microwave electron systems, such as radar, communication,countermeasure, TV broadcast, particle accelerators, plasma heating devices of fusion, microwave sensing and microwave heating. In scientific research, high power microwave vacuum electron devices are used mainly on high energy particle accelerator and fusion research. The devices include high peak power klystron, CW and long pulse high power klystron, multi-beam klystron,and high power gyrotron. In national economy, high power microwave vacuum electron devices are used mainly on weather and navigation radar, medical and radiation accelerator, TV broadcast and communication system. The devices include high power pulse and CW klystron, extended interaction klystron, traveling wave tube (TWT), magnetron and induced output tube (IOT). The state of art, common technology problems and trends of high power microwave vacuum electron devices are introduced in this paper. (authors)

  7. High Power Laser Weapons and Operational Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Roso, Nelson Alex; Moreira, Romero da Costa; Oliveira, José Edimar Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The operational implications of high power laser weapons are constantly growing in countries with advanced military technological level. As well as on progress in integration with air, land and naval platforms, this paper discusses the necessary development and implementation of the operational concepts into Armed Forces, which should target orientation in the improvement process of the appropriate warfare material, i.e. the laser, as well as remodeling the existing combat's doctrin...

  8. Advances in high-power rf amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallerico, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    Several powerful accelerators and storage rings are being considered that will require tens or even hundreds of megawatts of continuous rf power. The economics of such large machines can be dictated by the cost and efficiency of the rf amplifiers. The overall design and performance of such narrow-band amplifiers, operating in the 50- to 1500-MHz region, are being theoretically studied as a function of frequency to determine the optimum rf amplifier output power, gain, efficiency, and dc power requirements. The state of the art for three types of amplifiers (gridded tubes, klystrons, and gyrocons) is considered and the development work necessary to improve each is discussed. The gyrocon is a new device, hence its various embodiments are discussed in detail. The Soviet designs are reviewed and the gyrocon's strengths and weaknesses are compared to other types of microwave amplifiers. The primary advantages of the gyrocon are the very large amount of power available from a single device and the excellent efficiency and stable operation. The klystron however, has much greater gain and is simpler mechanically. At very low frequencies, the small size of the gridded tube makes it the optimum choice for all but the most powerful systems

  9. High Power Orbit Transfer Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gulczinski, Frank

    2003-01-01

    ... from Virginia Tech University and Aerophysics, Inc. to examine propulsion requirements for a high-power orbit transfer vehicle using thin-film voltaic solar array technologies under development by the Space Vehicles Directorate (dubbed PowerSail...

  10. High-power converters and AC drives

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    This new edition reflects the recent technological advancements in the MV drive industry, such as advanced multilevel converters and drive configurations. It includes three new chapters, Control of Synchronous Motor Drives, Transformerless MV Drives, and Matrix Converter Fed Drives. In addition, there are extensively revised chapters on Multilevel Voltage Source Inverters and Voltage Source Inverter-Fed Drives. This book includes a systematic analysis on a variety of high-power multilevel converters, illustrates important concepts with simulations and experiments, introduces various megawatt drives produced by world leading drive manufacturers, and addresses practical problems and their mitigations methods.

  11. Summary of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides a summary of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act which pomote economic, environmental, and social well-being by bringing technology and industrial innovation to the marketplace

  12. Advanced Pumps and Cold Plates for Two-Phase Cooling Loops, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced instruments used for earth science missions require improved cooling systems to remove heat from high power electronic components and maintain tight...

  13. A National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlea, Edward; Elfring, Chris

    2012-12-04

    Climate models are the foundation for understanding and projecting climate and climate-related changes and are thus critical tools for supporting climate-related decision making. This study developed a holistic strategy for improving the nation's capability to accurately simulate climate and related Earth system changes on decadal to centennial timescales. The committee's report is a high level analysis, providing a strategic framework to guide progress in the nation's climate modeling enterprise over the next 10-20 years. This study was supported by DOE, NSF, NASA, NOAA, and the intelligence community.

  14. The advanced controls program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knee, H.E.; White, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), is conducting research that will lead to advanced, automated control of new liquid-metal-reactor (LMR) nuclear power plants. Although this program of research (entitled the ''Advanced Controls Program'') is focused on LMR technology, it will be capable of providing control design, test, and qualification capability for other advanced reactor designs (e.g., the advanced light water reactor [ALWR] and high temperature gas-cooled reactor [HTGR] designs), while also benefiting existing nuclear plants. The Program will also have applicability to complex, non-nuclear process control environments (e.g., petrochemical, aerospace, etc.). The Advanced Controls Program will support capabilities throughout the entire plant design life cycle, i.e., from the initial interactive first-principle dynamic model development for the process, systems, components, and instruments through advanced control room qualification. The current program involves five principal areas of research activities: (1) demonstrations of advanced control system designs, (2) development of an advanced controls design environment, (3) development of advanced control strategies, (4) research and development (R ampersand D) in human-system integration for advanced control system designs, and (5) testing and validation of advanced control system designs. Discussion of the research in these five areas forms the basis of this paper. Also included is a description of the research directions of the program. 8 refs

  15. High Power Uplink Amplifier for Deep Space Communications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Critical to the success of delivering on the promise of deep space optical communications is the creation of a stable and reliable high power multichannel optical...

  16. High Power Uplink Amplifier for Deep Space Communications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Critical to the success of delivering on the promise of deep space optical communications is the creation of a stable and reliable high power multichannel optical...

  17. Rapid Manufacturing of High Power Electric Propulsion Components, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A flexible, lower cost approach to the rapid manufacture of high power electric propulsion components is desirable. Today's near-net fabrication technologies are...

  18. High Power Room Temperature Terahertz Local Oscillator, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to build a high-power, room temperature compact continuous wave terahertz local oscillator for driving heterodyne receivers in the 1-5 THz frequency...

  19. Applications of high power microwaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benford, J.; Swegle, J.

    1993-01-01

    The authors address a number of applications for HPM technology. There is a strong symbiotic relationship between a developing technology and its emerging applications. New technologies can generate new applications. Conversely, applications can demand development of new technological capability. High-power microwave generating systems come with size and weight penalties and problems associated with the x-radiation and collection of the electron beam. Acceptance of these difficulties requires the identification of a set of applications for which high-power operation is either demanded or results in significant improvements in peRFormance. The authors identify the following applications, and discuss their requirements and operational issues: (1) High-energy RF acceleration; (2) Atmospheric modification (both to produce artificial ionospheric mirrors for radio waves and to save the ozone layer); (3) Radar; (4) Electronic warfare; and (5) Laser pumping. In addition, they discuss several applications requiring high average power than border on HPM, power beaming and plasma heating

  20. Autonomously managed high power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, D.J.; Bechtel, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The need for autonomous power management capabilities will increase as the power levels of spacecraft increase into the multi-100 kW range. The quantity of labor intensive ground and crew support consumed by the 9 kW Skylab cannot be afforded in support of a 75-300 kW Space Station or high power earth orbital and interplanetary spacecraft. Marshall Space Flight Center is managing a program to develop necessary technologies for high power system autonomous management. To date a reference electrical power system and automation approaches have been defined. A test facility for evaluation and verification of management algorithms and hardware has been designed with the first of the three power channel capability nearing completion

  1. High power light gas helicon plasma source for VASIMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squire, Jared P.; Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.; Glover, Timothy W.; Jacobson, Verlin T.; McCaskill, Greg E.; Winter, D. Scott; Baity, F. Wally; Carter, Mark D.; Goulding, Richard H.

    2006-01-01

    In the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL) helicon experiment (VX-10) we have measured a plasma flux to input gas rate ratio near 100% for both helium and deuterium at power levels up to 10 kW. Recent results at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) show enhanced efficiency operation with a high power density, over 5 kW in a 5 cm diameter tube. Our helicon is presently 9 cm in diameter and operates up to 10 kW of input power. The data here uses a Boswell double-saddle antenna design with a magnetic cusp just upstream of the antenna. Similar to ORNL, for deuterium at near 10 kW, we find an enhanced performance of operation at magnetic fields above the lower hybrid matching condition

  2. Prospects for high-power radioactive beam facilities worldwide

    CERN Document Server

    Nolen, Jerry A

    2003-01-01

    Advances in accelerators, targets, ion sources, and experimental instrumentation are making possible ever more powerful facilities for basic and applied research with short-lived radioactive isotopes. There are several current generation facilities, based on a variety of technologies, operating worldwide. These include, for example, those based on the in-flight method such as the recently upgraded National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University, the facility at RIKEN in Japan, GANIL in Caen, France, and GSI in Darmstadt, Germany. Present facilities based on the Isotope-Separator On-Line method include, for example, the ISOLDE laboratory at CERN, HRIBF at Oak Ridge, and the new high-power facility ISAC at TRIUMF in Vancouver. Next-generation facilities include the Radioactive-Ion Factory upgrade of RIKEN to higher energy and intensity and the upgrade of ISAC to a higher energy secondary beam; both of these projects are in progress. A new project, LINAG, to upgrade the capabilities at...

  3. High power switching and other high power devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Martin

    1992-09-01

    High power thyratrons and devices such as high power microwave sources have cathode-related performance limits. Research is described of a simple, robust 'super-emissive' cathode that produces greater than 10,000 A/sq cm from a macroscopic area (approx. 1 sq cm), and operates with a low pressure (approx. 0.1 torr), spatially uniform glow plasma (density greater than 1015 cu cm). The cathode also can operate as a hollow cathode, and is at the heart of the operation of the pseudospark and back-lighted thyratron. The physics of this hollow and super-emissive cathode is very rich. The hollow cathode geometry traps electrons in the hollow cathode backspace. The lifetime of these electrons enables them to ionize a spatially homogeneous high density glow, and this hollow cathode mode of operation is responsible for certain types of electron and ion beam behavior. A plasma cathode sheath that is formed during this phase leads to super-emissive behavior, which is responsible for high current emission. Super-emissive cathode thyratron-type switches (with higher peak current, voltage, di/dt) being developed for pulsed power switching of lasers, accelerators, high current and high coulomb transfer, Marx bank operation, transfer of technology to commercial applications, high current electron beams, and millimeter wave generation (1 to 100 GHz) are described.

  4. Risks of High-Powered Motorcycles Among Younger Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Paul J.; Hellier, Elizabeth; Hurst, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed whether policies designed to safeguard young motorcyclists would be effective given shifts in ownership toward high-powered motorcycles. Methods. We investigated population-wide motor vehicle driver and motorcyclist casualties (excluding passengers) recorded in Britain between 2002 and 2009. To adjust for exposure and measure individual risk, we used the estimated number of trips of motorcyclists and drivers, which had been collected as part of a national travel survey. Results. Motorcyclists were 76 times more likely to be killed than were drivers for every trip. Older motorcyclist age—strongly linked to experience, skill set, and riding behavior—did not abate the risks of high-powered motorcycles. Older motorcyclists made more trips on high-powered motorcycles. Conclusions: Tighter engine size restrictions would help reduce the use of high-powered motorcycles. Policymakers should introduce health warnings on the risks of high-powered motorcycles and the benefits of safety equipment. PMID:23327238

  5. GaN-based High Power High Frequency Wide Range LLC Resonant Converter, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SET Group will design, build and demonstrate a Gallium Nitride (GaN) based High Power High Frequency Wide Range LLC Resonant Converter capable of handling high power...

  6. Hall Effect Thruster for High Power Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek proposes to develop a flight version of a high power Hall Effect thruster. While numerous high power Hall Effect thrusters have been demonstrated in the...

  7. High power klystrons and lasertrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konrad, G.T.

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments on high power sources at SLAC are described. High power klystrons have been under development for many years. The two most recent tubes are a 150 MW klystron operating at an RF pulse length of 1 microsec and a 50 MW klystron operating at 5 microsec. The latter is the tube used for the SLAC linear collider. All work discussed in this paper was done at a frequency of 2856 MHz, the linear accelerator frequency. Design criteria and operating experience for both of these tubes are described. Several computer codes exist for calculating the performance of proposed designs. Problem areas encountered were with high voltage breakdown in the 300 to 500 KV range, window failures and RF instabilities. Window R and D has concentrated on dual output windows, BeO and multipactor suppressing coatings. The tubes must operate with fewer than four high voltage breakdowns in an eight-hour shift and with as few missing RF pulses as possible (less than 10/Hour is desirable). Current status on these criteria is described. Efficiencies achieved with these tubes are in the 45 to 50 percent range. Approaches to improve this performance are described

  8. Identifying advanced practice: A national survey of a nursing workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Glenn; Duffield, Christine; Doubrovsky, Anna; Adams, Margaret

    2016-03-01

    The size and flexibility of the nursing workforce has positioned nursing as central to the goals of health service improvement. Nursing's response to meeting these goals has resulted in proliferation of advanced practice nursing with a confusing array of practice profiles, titles and roles. Whilst numerous models and definitions of advanced practice nursing have been developed there is scant published research of significant scope that supports these models. Consequently there is an ongoing call in the literature for clarity and stability in nomenclature, and confusion in the health industry on how to optimise the utility of advanced practice nursing. To identify and delineate advanced practice from other levels of nursing practice through examination of a national nursing workforce. A cross-sectional electronic survey of nurses using the validated Advanced Practice Role Delineation tool based on the Strong Model of Advanced Practice. Study participants were registered nurses employed in a clinical service environment across all states and territories of Australia. A sample of 5662 registered nurses participated in the study. Domain means for each participant were calculated then means for nursing position titles were calculated. Position titles were grouped by delineation and were compared with one-way analysis of variance on domain means. The alpha for all tests was set at 0.05. Significant effects were examined with Scheffe post hoc comparisons to control for Type 1 error. The survey tool was able to identify position titles where nurses were practicing at an advanced level and to delineate this cohort from other levels of nursing practice, including nurse practitioner. The results show that nurses who practice at an advanced level are characterised by high mean scores across all Domains of the Strong Model of Advanced Practice. The mean scores of advanced practice nurses were significantly different from nurse practitioners in the Direct Care Domain and

  9. High power gyrotrons: a close perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartikeyan, M.V.

    2012-01-01

    Gyrotrons and their variants, popularly known as gyrodevices are millimetric wave sources provide very high powers ranging from long pulse to continuous wave (CW) for various technological, scientific and industrial applications. From their conception (monotron-version) in the late fifties until their successful development for various applications, these devices have come a long way technologically and made an irreversible impact on both users and developers. The possible applications of high power millimeter and sub-millimeter waves from gyrotrons and their variants (gyro-devices) span a wide range of technologies. The plasma physics community has already taken advantage of the recent advances of gyrotrons in the areas of RF plasma production, heating, non-inductive current drive, plasma stabilization and active plasma diagnostics for magnetic confinement thermonuclear fusion research, such as lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) (8 GHz), electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) (28-170-220 GHz), electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), collective Thomson scattering (CTS), heat-wave propagation experiments, and space-power grid (SPG) applications. Other important applications of gyrotrons are electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharges for the generation of multi- charged ions and soft X-rays, as well as industrial materials processing and plasma chemistry. Submillimeter wave gyrotrons are employed in high frequency, broadband electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Additional future applications await the development of novel high power gyro-amplifiers and devices for high resolution radar ranging and imaging in atmospheric and planetary science as well as deep space and specialized satellite communications, RF drivers for next generation high gradient linear accelerators (supercolliders), high resolution Doppler radar, radar ranging and imaging in atmospheric and planetary science, drivers for next-generation high-gradient linear accelerators

  10. 77 FR 37422 - National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Division of Comparative Medicine Peer Review Meeting; Office of Research Infrastructure Programs...

  11. Proceedings of national symposium on advanced instrumentation for nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The National Symposium on Advanced Instrumentation for Nuclear Research was held in Bombay during January 27-29, 1993 at BARC. Progress of modern nuclear research is closely related to the availability of state of the art instruments and systems. With the advancements in experimental techniques and sophisticated detector developments, the performance specifications have become more stringent. State of the art techniques and diverse applications of sophisticated nuclear instrumentation systems are discussed along with indigenous efforts to meet the specific instrumentation needs of research programs in nuclear sciences. Papers of relevance to nuclear science and technology are indexed separately. (original)

  12. Optics assembly for high power laser tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraze, Jason D.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2016-06-07

    There is provided a high power laser rotational optical assembly for use with, or in high power laser tools for performing high power laser operations. In particular, the optical assembly finds applications in performing high power laser operations on, and in, remote and difficult to access locations. The optical assembly has rotational seals and bearing configurations to avoid contamination of the laser beam path and optics.

  13. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, Frances M.; Allen, Todd R.; Benson, Jeff B.; Cole, James I.; Thelen, Mary Catherine

    2012-01-01

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of Wisconsin

  14. High power, 140 GHz gyrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreischer, K.E.; Temkin, R.J.; Mulligan, W.J.; MacCabe, S.; Chaplya, R.

    1982-01-01

    The design and construction of a pulsed 100 kW, 140 GHz gyrotron is described. Initial gyrotron operation is expected in early 1982. Advances in gyrotron theory have also been carried out in support of this experimental research. The application of gyrotrons to plasma diagnostics is also under investigation. (author)

  15. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility: advancing nuclear technology education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.; Allen, T.; Cole, J.; Marshall, F., E-mail: jeff.benson@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

    2013-07-01

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy designated the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a Users Week, internships, faculty student team projects and faculty/staff exchanges. In addition, the ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  16. National project : advanced robot for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunemi, T.; Takehara, K.; Hayashi, T.; Okano, H.; Sugiyama, S.

    1993-01-01

    The national project 'Advanced Robot' has been promoted by the Agency of Industrial science and Technology, MITI for eight years since 1983. The robot for a nuclear plant is one of the projects, and is a prototype intelligent one that also has a three dimensional vision system to generate an environmental model, a quadrupedal walking mechanism to work on stairs and four fingered manipulators to disassemble a valve with a hand tool. Many basic technologies such as an actuator, a tactile sensor, autonomous control and so on progress to high level. The prototype robot succeeded functionally in official demonstration in 1990. More refining such as downsizing and higher intelligence is necessary to realize a commercial robot, while basic technologies are useful to improve conventional robots and systems. This paper presents application studies on the advanced robot technologies. (author)

  17. 2014 National Workshop on Advances in Communication and Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Prasanna, S; Sarma, Kandarpa; Saikia, Navajit

    2015-01-01

    The present volume is a compilation of research work in computation, communication, vision sciences, device design, fabrication, upcoming materials and related process design, etc. It is derived out of selected manuscripts submitted to the 2014 National Workshop on Advances in Communication and Computing (WACC 2014), Assam Engineering College, Guwahati, Assam, India which is emerging out to be a premier platform for discussion and dissemination of knowhow in this part of the world. The papers included in the volume are indicative of the recent thrust in computation, communications and emerging technologies. Certain recent advances in ZnO nanostructures for alternate energy generation provide emerging insights into an area that has promises for the energy sector including conservation and green technology. Similarly, scholarly contributions have focused on malware detection and related issues. Several contributions have focused on biomedical aspects including contributions related to cancer detection using act...

  18. High to ultra-high power electrical energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Stefanie A; Banerjee, Parag; Rubloff, Gary W; Lee, Sang Bok

    2011-12-14

    High power electrical energy storage systems are becoming critical devices for advanced energy storage technology. This is true in part due to their high rate capabilities and moderate energy densities which allow them to capture power efficiently from evanescent, renewable energy sources. High power systems include both electrochemical capacitors and electrostatic capacitors. These devices have fast charging and discharging rates, supplying energy within seconds or less. Recent research has focused on increasing power and energy density of the devices using advanced materials and novel architectural design. An increase in understanding of structure-property relationships in nanomaterials and interfaces and the ability to control nanostructures precisely has led to an immense improvement in the performance characteristics of these devices. In this review, we discuss the recent advances for both electrochemical and electrostatic capacitors as high power electrical energy storage systems, and propose directions and challenges for the future. We asses the opportunities in nanostructure-based high power electrical energy storage devices and include electrochemical and electrostatic capacitors for their potential to open the door to a new regime of power energy.

  19. Electronic DC transformer with high power density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlovský, M.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the possibilities of increasing the power density of high-power dc-dc converters with galvanic isolation. Three cornerstones for reaching high power densities are identified as: size reduction of passive components, reduction of losses particularly in active components

  20. Packaging of high power semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xingsheng; Xiong, Lingling; Liu, Hui

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces high power semiconductor laser packaging design. The characteristics and challenges of the design and various packaging, processing, and testing techniques are detailed by the authors. New technologies, in particular thermal technologies, current applications, and trends in high power semiconductor laser packaging are described at length and assessed.

  1. National Laboratory for Advanced Scientific Visualization at UNAM - Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Marina; Constantin Manea, Vlad; Varela, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    In 2015, the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) joined the family of Universities and Research Centers where advanced visualization and computing plays a key role to promote and advance missions in research, education, community outreach, as well as business-oriented consulting. This initiative provides access to a great variety of advanced hardware and software resources and offers a range of consulting services that spans a variety of areas related to scientific visualization, among which are: neuroanatomy, embryonic development, genome related studies, geosciences, geography, physics and mathematics related disciplines. The National Laboratory for Advanced Scientific Visualization delivers services through three main infrastructure environments: the 3D fully immersive display system Cave, the high resolution parallel visualization system Powerwall, the high resolution spherical displays Earth Simulator. The entire visualization infrastructure is interconnected to a high-performance-computing-cluster (HPCC) called ADA in honor to Ada Lovelace, considered to be the first computer programmer. The Cave is an extra large 3.6m wide room with projected images on the front, left and right, as well as floor walls. Specialized crystal eyes LCD-shutter glasses provide a strong stereo depth perception, and a variety of tracking devices allow software to track the position of a user's hand, head and wand. The Powerwall is designed to bring large amounts of complex data together through parallel computing for team interaction and collaboration. This system is composed by 24 (6x4) high-resolution ultra-thin (2 mm) bezel monitors connected to a high-performance GPU cluster. The Earth Simulator is a large (60") high-resolution spherical display used for global-scale data visualization like geophysical, meteorological, climate and ecology data. The HPCC-ADA, is a 1000+ computing core system, which offers parallel computing resources to applications that requires

  2. Mentoring Faculty: Results from National Science Foundation's ADVANCE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Faculty mentoring programs are common components of National Science Foundation ADVANCE awards. The ADVANCE program aims to increase the number of women on the faculty in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) departments through grants to individuals and to entire institutions. These grants target a change in institutional culture so that faculty from non-majority groups will succeed and thrive. Mentoring programs are generally designed to fit the particular institution(s) or target population (e.g., meteorologists at the beginning of their careers). A successful mentoring program makes the implicit knowledge necessary for faculty success explicit: policies and practices are made transparent; routes for finding answers are clarified or generated with faculty input; faculty overcome a sense of isolation and develop a community. Mentoring programs may be formal, with assigned mentors and mentees, or informal, with opportunities for beginning, middle and advanced career STEM faculty to mingle, generally over food and sometimes with a formal speaker. The programs are formally evaluated; in general, attention to mentoring generates better outcomes for all faculty. Research indicates that most successful scientists have a network of mentors rather than relying on one person to help navigate department, institution, and profession. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln's (UNL) award, ADVANCE-Nebraska, offered opportunities for faculty to informally network over luncheons with women speakers, advanced in their careers. We also offered after-hours networking receptions. In response to faculty feedback, we shifted to a series of panel discussions entitled "Conversations". Most panels were conducted by successful UNL faculty; about one-third had an outside expert on a given topic. Topics were chosen based on faculty feedback and targeted specifically to beginning faculty (How to Start Up a Lab; How to Balance Teaching and Writing), mid-career faculty (Putting

  3. Advanced Technologies for Intelligent Systems of National Border Security

    CERN Document Server

    Simek, Krzysztof; Świerniak, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    One of the world’s leading problems in the field of national security is protection of borders and borderlands. This book addresses multiple issues on advanced innovative methods of multi-level control of both ground (UGVs) and aerial drones (UAVs). Those objects combined with innovative algorithms become autonomous objects capable of patrolling chosen borderland areas by themselves and automatically inform the operator of the system about potential place of detection of a specific incident. This is achieved by using sophisticated methods of generation of non-collision trajectory for those types of objects and enabling automatic integration of both ground and aerial unmanned vehicles. The topics included in this book also cover presentation of complete information and communication technology (ICT) systems capable of control, observation and detection of various types of incidents and threats. This book is a valuable source of information for constructors and developers of such solutions for uniformed servi...

  4. Advanced energy systems and technologies - National R and D programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, P. D.

    1992-08-01

    The energy R and D in Finland is accomplished through the energy research programs of the Ministry of Trade and Industry. Today there are some 12 R and D programs in operation covering the various aspects of the energy sector. The NEMO-program deals with advanced new energy technologies and systems. The NEMO-program was launched in 1988 and it ends at the end of 1992. Helsinki University of Technology has been responsible for the coordination and most of the universities, research centers, and companies on new advanced energy technologies have been involved in the realization of NEMO. The objectives of the program have been to assess the potential of new technologies in the Finnish energy supply system, encourage and support businesses, and to create necessary research tradition in Finland. At the beginning in year 1988, several new technologies were included, but as the knowledge has increased, focusing on the most promising fields has taken place. Wind and solar energy show the best promises in respect to business activities and possibilities for utilization in Finland. Energy storage some other advanced technologies such as fuel cells and hydrogen technologies represented in the NEMO-program have an important role, but the commercial applications lie more distant in the future. The NEMO-program has reached its objectives. The international evaluation in fall 1990 gave very positive feedback and the scientific quality of the work was found good. At the same time, the contents was still focused more on commercial applications to support national industries in the field. The descriptions of the ongoing NEMO research projects are included in this report.

  5. High-Power ZBLAN Glass Fiber Lasers: Review and Prospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiushan Zhu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ZBLAN (ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF, considered as the most stable heavy metal fluoride glass and the excellent host for rare-earth ions, has been extensively used for efficient and compact ultraviolet, visible, and infrared fiber lasers due to its low intrinsic loss, wide transparency window, and small phonon energy. In this paper, the historical progress and the properties of fluoride glasses and the fabrication of ZBLAN fibers are briefly described. Advances of infrared, upconversion, and supercontinuum ZBLAN fiber lasers are addressed in detail. Finally, constraints on the power scaling of ZBLAN fiber lasers are analyzed and discussed. ZBLAN fiber lasers are showing promise of generating high-power emissions covering from ultraviolet to mid-infrared considering the recent advances in newly designed optical fibers, beam-shaped high-power pump diodes, beam combining techniques, and heat-dissipating technology.

  6. Fingerprint identification: advances since the 2009 National Research Council report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champod, Christophe

    2015-08-05

    This paper will discuss the major developments in the area of fingerprint identification that followed the publication of the National Research Council (NRC, of the US National Academies of Sciences) report in 2009 entitled: Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward. The report portrayed an image of a field of expertise used for decades without the necessary scientific research-based underpinning. The advances since the report and the needs in selected areas of fingerprinting will be detailed. It includes the measurement of the accuracy, reliability, repeatability and reproducibility of the conclusions offered by fingerprint experts. The paper will also pay attention to the development of statistical models allowing assessment of fingerprint comparisons. As a corollary of these developments, the next challenge is to reconcile a traditional practice dominated by deterministic conclusions with the probabilistic logic of any statistical model. There is a call for greater candour and fingerprint experts will need to communicate differently on the strengths and limitations of their findings. Their testimony will have to go beyond the blunt assertion of the uniqueness of fingerprints or the opinion delivered ispe dixit. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Piezoelectric Transformers for a High Power Module

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ezaki, T

    2003-01-01

    .... Here, in order to obtain compact and high-power AC-DC adaptors, we explored suitable designs for a multi-layered piezoelectric transformer, by taking into account the effect of the mechanical quality...

  8. High Power Fiber Laser Test Bed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility, unique within DoD, power-combines numerous cutting-edge fiber-coupled laser diode modules (FCLDM) to integrate pumping of high power rare earth-doped...

  9. High power PWM rectifier research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Tao; Wang Weiqiang; Chen Duo

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the high power PWM rectifier control principle, hardware and software design technique. By analysis of waveforms and data proves the rectifier meet the application requirements. (authors)

  10. Switching power converters medium and high power

    CERN Document Server

    Neacsu, Dorin O

    2013-01-01

    An examination of all of the multidisciplinary aspects of medium- and high-power converter systems, including basic power electronics, digital control and hardware, sensors, analog preprocessing of signals, protection devices and fault management, and pulse-width-modulation (PWM) algorithms, Switching Power Converters: Medium and High Power, Second Edition discusses the actual use of industrial technology and its related subassemblies and components, covering facets of implementation otherwise overlooked by theoretical textbooks. The updated Second Edition contains many new figures, as well as

  11. Apodised aperture assembly for high power lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliss, E.S.; Speck, D.R.

    1975-01-01

    An apodized aperture assembly using absorbing liquid or solid to vary transmission over the cross section thereof is used to minimize deleterious diffraction effects in high power lasers. By employing, for example, an absorbing liquid of varying optical density to obtain the transmission profile, a circular aperture of this type can be used to minimize diffraction effects, thereby substantially improving the performance of a high power laser system. (U.S.)

  12. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials

  13. Resonance tracking and vibration stablilization for high power ultrasonic transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Y; Jin, Y; Cochran, S; Huang, Z

    2014-01-01

    Resonant frequency shift and electrical impedance variation are common phenomena in the application of high power ultrasonic transducers, e.g. in focused ultrasound surgery and in cutting. They result in low power efficiency and unstable vibration amplitude. To solve this problem, a driving and measurement system has been developed to track the resonance of high power transducers and to stabilise their vibration velocity. This has the ability to monitor the operating and performance parameters of the ultrasonic transducers in real time. The configuration of the system, with its control algorithm implemented in LabVIEW (National Instruments, Newbury, UK), ensures flexibility to suit different transducers and load conditions. In addition, with different programs, it can be utilised as a high power impedance analyser or an instantaneous electrical power measurement system for frequencies in the MHz range. The effectiveness of this system has been demonstrated in detailed studies. With it, high transducer performance at high power can be achieved and monitored in real time. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. ICAN: High power neutral beam generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moustaizis, S.D.; Lalousis, P.; Perrakis, K.; Auvray, P.; Larour, J.; Ducret, J.E.; Balcou, P.

    2015-01-01

    During the last few years there is an increasing interest on the development of alternative high power new negative ion source for Tokamak applications. The proposed new neutral beam device presents a number of advantages with respect to: the density current, the acceleration voltage, the relative compact dimension of the negative ion source, and the coupling of a high power laser beam for photo-neutralization of the negative ion beam. Here we numerically investigate, using a multi- fluid 1-D code, the acceleration and the extraction of high power ion beam from a Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID). The diode configuration will be coupled to a high power device capable of extracting a current up to a few kA with an accelerating voltage up to MeV. An efficiency of up to 92% of the coupling of the laser beam, is required in order to obtain a high power, up to GW, neutral beam. The new high energy, high average power, high efficiency (up to 30%) ICAN fiber laser is proposed for both the plasma generation and the photo-neutralizer configuration. (authors)

  15. High-power optics lasers and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Apollonov, Victor V

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the basics, realization and materials for high power laser systems and high power radiation interaction with  matter. The physical and technical fundamentals of high intensity laser optics and adaptive optics and the related physical processes in high intensity laser systems are explained. A main question discussed is: What is power optics? In what way is it different from ordinary optics widely used in cameras, motion-picture projectors, i.e., for everyday use? An undesirable consequence of the thermal deformation of optical elements and surfaces was discovered during studies of the interaction with powerful incident laser radiation. The requirements to the fabrication, performance and quality of optical elements employed within systems for most practical applications are also covered. The high-power laser performance is generally governed by the following: (i) the absorption of incident optical radiation (governed primarily by various absorption mechanisms), (ii) followed by a temperature ...

  16. High power communication satellites power systems study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josloff, A.T.; Peterson, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses a DOE-funded study to evaluate the commercial attractiveness of high power communication satellites and assesses the attributes of both conventional photovoltaic and reactor power systems. This study brings together a preeminent US Industry/Russian team to cooperate on the role of high power communication satellites in the rapidly expanding communications revolution. These high power satellites play a vital role in assuring availability of universally accessible, wide bandwidth communications, for high definition TV, super computer networks and other services. Satellites are ideally suited to provide the wide bandwidths and data rates required and are unique in the ability to provide services directly to the users. As new or relocated markets arise, satellites offer a flexibility that conventional distribution services cannot match, and it is no longer necessary to be near population centers to take advantage of the telecommunication revolution. The geopolitical implications of these substantially enhanced communications capabilities will be significant

  17. Targets for high power neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.

    1980-01-01

    Stopping high-power, long-pulse beams is fast becoming an engineering challenge, particularly in neutral beam injectors for heating magnetically confined plasmas. A brief review of neutral beam target technology is presented along with heat transfer calculations for some selected target designs

  18. CAS Accelerator Physics (High-Power Hadron Machines) in Spain

    CERN Multimedia

    CAS

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and ESS-Bilbao jointly organised a specialised course on High-Power Hadron Machines, held at the Hotel Barceló Nervión in Bilbao, Spain, from 24 May to 2 June, 2011.   CERN Accelerator School students. After recapitulation lectures on the essentials of accelerator physics and review lectures on the different types of accelerators, the programme focussed on the challenges of designing and operating high-power facilities. The particular problems for RF systems, beam instrumentation, vacuum, cryogenics, collimators and beam dumps were examined. Activation of equipment, radioprotection and remote handling issues were also addressed. The school was very successful, with 69 participants of 22 nationalities. Feedback from the participants was extremely positive, praising the expertise and enthusiasm of the lecturers, as well as the high standard and excellent quality of their lectures. In addition to the academic programme, the participants w...

  19. Advancing prion science: guidance for the National Prion Research Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erdtmann, Rick; Sivitz, Laura

    2004-01-01

    In Advancing Prion Science , the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Assessment of Relevant Science recommends priorities for research and investment to the Department of Defenseâ...

  20. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Advancing Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T.R.; Benson, J.B.; Foster, J.A.; Marshall, F.M.; Meyer, M.K.; Thelen, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  1. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility advancing nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T.R.; Thelen, M.C.; Meyer, M.K.; Marshall, F.M.; Foster, J.; Benson, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  2. High Performance Plasma Channel Insulators for High Power Hall Thrusters, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA missions for planetary exploration require high power, long-life Hall thrusters. However, thruster power and lifetime are limited by the erosion of plasma...

  3. A Waveguide Based, High Power Pockels Cell Modulator for Sub-Nanosecond Pulse Slicing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Goal of this STTR is to develop a high speed, high power, waveguide based modulator (phase and amplitude) and investigate its use as a pulse slicer. The key...

  4. High-Power, High-Efficiency 1.907nm Diode Lasers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — nLight proposes to develop high-power, high-efficiency laser diodes emitting at 1907nm. Performance is expected to improve from the current state-of-the-art...

  5. High-Power, High-Efficiency 1.907nm Diode Lasers, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — nLight developed high-power, high-efficiency laser diodes emitting at 1907nm for the pumping of solid-state lasers during the Phase I. The innovation brought to bear...

  6. High Power Narrow Linewidth 1.26 Micron Ho-Doped Fiber Amplifier, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is for the development of an innovative, high power, and extremely reliable 1.26-micron Ho-doped fluoride fiber amplifier. The proposed fiber amplifier...

  7. High Power Narrow Linewidth 1.26 Micron Ho-Doped Fiber Amplifier, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is for the development of an innovative, high power, and extremely reliable 1.26-micron Ho-doped fluoride fiber amplifier. The proposed fiber amplifier...

  8. High Power Electro-Optic Modulator for Space-Based Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ADVR, Inc. proposes the development of a fiber coupled, high power, electro-optically controlled, space qualified, phase modulator for the NASA Laser Interferometer...

  9. High Power Electro-Optic Modulator for Space-Based Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I effort will establish the feasibility of developing a fiber coupled, high power, electro-optically controlled, space...

  10. High Performance Plasma Channel Insulators for High Power Hall Thrusters, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA missions for planetary exploration require high power, long-life Hall thrusters. However, thruster power and lifetime are limited by the erosion of plasma...

  11. Efficient High Power 2 micron Tm3+-Doped Fiber Laser, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is for the development of new Tm3+ doped germanate glass fibers for efficient high power 2-micron fiber lasers capable of generating an output power of...

  12. High Power (50W) WDM Space Lasercom 1.5um Fiber Laser Transmitter, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fibertek proposes to develop and demonstrate a spaceflight prototype of a wideband, high power (up to 50W), polarization maintaining (PM), 1.5-um fiber laser...

  13. High-power X- and Ka-band Gallium Nitride Amplifiers with Exceptional Efficiency Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Achieving very high-power amplification with maximum efficiency at X- and Ka-band is challenging using solid-state technology. Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) has been the...

  14. Energetic Ion Mitigation Methodology for High Power Plasma Thruster Cathodes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The presence of energetic ions, that appear under high cathode current operation, stand as a showstopper to the realization of high power electric propulsion....

  15. Efficient high power 2 micron Tm3+-Doped Fiber Laser, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is for the development of new Tm3+ doped germanate glass fibers for efficient high power 2 micron fiber lasers capable of generating an output power of...

  16. High Power Ga2O3-based Schottky Diode, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Program will develop a new generation of radiation hard high-power high-voltage Ga2O3-based Schottky diode, which is suitable for applications in the space...

  17. Efficient, High Power Density Hydrocarbon-Fueled Solid Oxide Stack System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) proposes to develop and demonstrate an innovative high power density design for direct internal reforming of regolith off-gases...

  18. Efficient, high power density hydrocarbon-fueled solid oxide stack system, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) proposes to develop and demonstrate an innovative high power density design for direct internal reforming of regolith off-gases...

  19. Research and development on the application of advanced control technologies to advanced nuclear reactor systems: A US national perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.D.; Monson, L.R.; Carrol, D.G.; Dayal, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Control system designs for nuclear power plants are becoming more advanced through the use of digital technology and automation. This evolution is taking place because of: (1) the limitations in analog based control system performance and maintenance and availability and (2) the promise of significant improvement in plant operation and availability due to advances in digital and other control technologies. Digital retrofits of control systems in US nuclear plants are occurring now. Designs of control and protection systems for advanced LWRs are based on digital technology. The use of small inexpensive, fast, large-capacity computers in these designs is the first step of an evolutionary process described in this paper. Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, GE Nuclear Energy and several universities are performing research and development in the application of advances in control theory, software engineering, advanced computer architectures, artificial intelligence, and man-machine interface analysis to control system design. The target plant concept for the work described in this paper is the Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module reactor (PRISM), an advanced modular liquid metal reactor concept. This and other reactor designs which provide strong passive responses to operational upsets or accidents afford good opportunities to apply these advances in control technology. 18 refs., 5 figs

  20. Protection Related to High-power Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Plum, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Target protection is an important part of machine protection. The beam power in high-intensity accelerators is high enough that a single wayward pulse can cause serious damage. Today's high-power targets operate at the limit of available technology, and are designed for a very narrow range of beam parameters. If the beam pulse is too far off centre, or if the beam size is not correct, or if the beam density is too high, the target can be seriously damaged. We will start with a brief introduction to high-power targets and then move to a discussion of what can go wrong, and what are the risks. Next we will discuss how to control the beam-related risk, followed by examples from a few different accelerator facilities. We will finish with a detailed example of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source target tune up and target protection.

  1. Industrial Applications of High Power Ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patist, Alex; Bates, Darren

    Since the change of the millennium, high-power ultrasound has become an alternative food processing technology applicable to large-scale commercial applications such as emulsification, homogenization, extraction, crystallization, dewatering, low-temperature pasteurization, degassing, defoaming, activation and inactivation of enzymes, particle size reduction, extrusion, and viscosity alteration. This new focus can be attributed to significant improvements in equipment design and efficiency during the late 1990 s. Like most innovative food processing technologies, high-power ultrasonics is not an off-the-shelf technology, and thus requires careful development and scale-up for each and every application. The objective of this chapter is to present examples of ultrasonic applications that have been successful at the commercialization stage, advantages, and limitations, as well as key learnings from scaling up an innovative food technology in general.

  2. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong Jae Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined.

  3. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  4. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  5. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-08-08

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined.

  6. Advanced Optical Fibers for High power Fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-24

    silica single-mode opti‐ cal fiber with photonic crystal cladding,” Opt. Lett. 21, 1547 -1549 (1996). [4] T.A. Birks, J.C. Knight and P.St.J. Russell...Kozlov, J. Hernández-Cordero, R. L. Shubochkin, A. L. G. Carter, and T. F. Morse, “Silica–Air Double-Clad Optical Fiber,” IEEE Photonics Technology...Percival, G. Bouwmans, J.C. Knight, T.A. Birks, T.D. Hedley, and P.St.J. Russell, “Very high numerical aperture fibers,” IEEE Photonic Technology Letters

  7. Establishment of Research Infrastructure for National Advanced Radiation Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuk, Il Hiun; Byun, Myung Woo; Jeong, Il Yun; and others

    2007-07-15

    Construction of fundamental analysis system for RT/RFT advancement and pilot scale laboratory/facility for industry support and Assembly/installation of 30 MeV cyclotron for RI production and research utilizing positron beam, and construction of /distribution system for industrial and medical purpose were carried out for fast settlement for research environment of ARTI (a Jeongeup branch of KAERI)

  8. High-Power Lasers for Science and Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siders, C. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haefner, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-05

    Since the first demonstration of the laser in 1960 by Theodore Maiman at Hughes Research Laboratories, the principal defining characteristic of lasers has been their ability to focus unprecedented powers of light in space, time, and frequency. High-power lasers have, over the ensuing five and a half decades, illuminated entirely new fields of scientific endeavor as well as made a profound impact on society. While the United States pioneered lasers and their early applications, we have been eclipsed in the past decade by highly effective national and international networks in both Europe and Asia, which have effectively focused their energies, efforts, and resources to achieve greater scientific and societal impact. This white paper calls for strategic investment which, by striking an appropriate balance between distributing our precious national funds and establishing centers of excellence, will ensure a broad pipeline of people and transformative ideas connecting our world-leading universities, defining flagship facilities stewarded by our national laboratories, and driving innovation across industry, to fully exploit the potential of high-power lasers.

  9. Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation at the National Science Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurczynski, Peter; Neff, James E.

    2018-01-01

    Over its more than thirty-year history, the Advanced Technologies and Instrumentation (ATI) program within the Division of Astronomical Sciences has provided grants to support the development and deployment of detectors and instrumentation for ground-based astronomy. This program has enabled scientific advances in diverse fields from solar physics to exoplanets to cosmology. ATI has provided instrumentation for both small and large observatories from radio through visible wavebands. It has played a role in the early development of major initiatives such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Technology development for astronomy unfolds over a longer period than the lifetime of a single grant. This review will consider ATI from an historical perspective to assess its impact on astronomy.

  10. Review of the cultivation program within the national alliance for advanced biofuels and bioproducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cultivation efforts within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) were developed to provide four major goals for the consortium, which included biomass production for downstream experimentation, development of new assessment tools for cultivation, development of new ...

  11. Advances and emerging issues in national forest inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald E. McRoberts; Erkki O. Tomppo; Erik. Naesset

    2010-01-01

    National forest inventories (NFIs) have a long history, although their current major features date only to the early years of the twentieth century. Recent issues such as concern over the effects of acid deposition, biodiversity, forest sustainability, increased demand for forest data, international reporting requirements and climate change have led to the expansion of...

  12. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

    2011-05-01

    This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

  13. 77 FR 29673 - National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ... Translational Sciences Special Emphasis Panel; Comparative Medicine Special Emphasis Panel Date: June 7-8, 2012... Advancing Translational Sciences; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... for Advancing Translational, Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Room 1082...

  14. High power microwave hazard facing smart ammunitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, J.

    1995-03-01

    The battle field of the present and even more the one in future will be characterized by the use of weapon systems with a high degree of electronics, computers, and sensors, designed and built to keep not only the man out of the loop. But the higher the technology used for smart weapon systems, the more these systems are endangered by numerous sources of hazard. One of those sources is the threat caused by induced or natural electromagnetic fields. These threat factors can be generated by natural, civil and military environment. In principle there are two main applications which must be considered in military applications: Firstly, weapon systems, that is, high power microwave sources as well as intelligent electromagnetic radiation systems to defeat ammunition on the battle field and secondly, the hardening of the own smart ammunition systems and missiles against the interference sources created by the different types of electromagnetic fields. This report will discuss the possible electromagnetic coupling effects on smart ammunition and missiles and their typical interference caused on the electronics and sensor level. Real time 6-DOF simulations show the flight mission which may be compromised depending on the coupled electromagnetic fields. The German MOD has established a research program where smart ammunitions with different seeker systems are investigated in respect of the coupling effects on smart ammunition caused by high power microwaves. This program considers all available resources and know how in Germany. The systems are investigated by analytical, numerical, and experimental methods with passive and activated missiles.

  15. Recent advances in applying decision science to managing national forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcot, Bruce G.; Thompson, Matthew P.; Runge, Michael C.; Thompson, Frank R.; McNulty, Steven; Cleaves, David; Tomosy, Monica; Fisher, Larry A.; Andrew, Bliss

    2012-01-01

    Management of federal public forests to meet sustainability goals and multiple use regulations is an immense challenge. To succeed, we suggest use of formal decision science procedures and tools in the context of structured decision making (SDM). SDM entails four stages: problem structuring (framing the problem and defining objectives and evaluation criteria), problem analysis (defining alternatives, evaluating likely consequences, identifying key uncertainties, and analyzing tradeoffs), decision point (identifying the preferred alternative), and implementation and monitoring the preferred alternative with adaptive management feedbacks. We list a wide array of models, techniques, and tools available for each stage, and provide three case studies of their selected use in National Forest land management and project plans. Successful use of SDM involves participation by decision-makers, analysts, scientists, and stakeholders. We suggest specific areas for training and instituting SDM to foster transparency, rigor, clarity, and inclusiveness in formal decision processes regarding management of national forests.

  16. Modular Ultra-High Power Solar Array Architecture, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Deployable Space Systems (DSS) will focus the proposed Phase 2 SBIR program on the hardware-based development and TRL advance of a highly-modularized and...

  17. Very-High Efficiency, High Power Laser Diodes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AdTech Photonics, in collaboration with the Center for Advanced Studies in Photonics Research (CASPR) at UMBC, is pleased to submit this proposal entitled ?Very-High...

  18. Proceedings of national workshop on advanced methods for materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    During the past two decades there had been tremendous growth in the field of material science and a variety of new materials with user specific properties have been developed such as smart shape memory alloys, hybrid materials like glass-ceramics, cermets, met-glasses, inorganic- organic composite layered structures, mixed oxides with negative thermal expansion, functional polymer materials etc. Study of nano-particles and the materials assembled from such particles is another area of active research being pursued all over the world. Preparation and characterization of nano-sized materials is a challenge because of their dimensions and size dependent properties. This has led to the emergence of a variety of advanced techniques, which need to be brought to the attention of the researchers working in the field of material science which requires the expertise of physics, chemistry and process engineering. This volume deals with above aspects and papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  19. Advanced Placement Human Geography and the Annual Meetings of the National Council for Geographic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublett, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Members of the National Council for Geographic Education have been instrumental in the creation, launch, and early success of Advanced Placement Human Geography. Annual meetings of the Council have served as a forum for spreading the word about the course and its follow-up national examination and in helping teachers develop content confidence and…

  20. Advanced Neonatal Medicine in China: A National Baseline Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipenda-Dansokho, Selma; Lewin, Antoine; Abdelouahab, Nadia; Wei, Shu-Qin

    2017-01-01

    Previous surveys of neonatal medicine in China have not collected comprehensive information on workforce, investment, health care practice, and disease expenditure. The goal of the present study was to develop a national database of neonatal care units and compare present outcomes data in conjunction with health care practices and costs. We summarized the above components by extracting data from the databases of the national key clinical subspecialty proposals issued by national health authority in China, as well as publicly accessible databases. Sixty-one newborn clinical units from provincial or ministerial hospitals at the highest level within local areas in mainland China, were included for the study. Data were gathered for three consecutive years (2008–2010) in 28 of 31 provincial districts in mainland China. Of the 61 newborn units in 2010, there were 4,948 beds (median = 62 [IQR 43–110]), 1,369 physicians (median = 22 [IQR 15–29]), 3,443 nurses (median = 52 [IQR 33–81]), and 170,159 inpatient discharges (median = 2,612 [IQR 1,436–3,804]). During 2008–2010, the median yearly investment for a single newborn unit was US$344,700 (IQR 166,100–585,800), median length of hospital stay for overall inpatient newborns 9.5 (IQR 8.2–10.8) days, median inpatient antimicrobial drug use rate 68.7% (IQR 49.8–87.0), and median nosocomial infection rate 3.2% (IQR1.7–5.4). For the common newborn diseases of pneumonia, sepsis, respiratory distress syndrome, and very low birth weight (neonatal medicine in China, gathering valuable information for quality improvement, decision making, longitudinal studies and horizontal comparisons. PMID:28099450

  1. Reactor G1: high power experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laage, F. de; Teste du Baillet, A.; Veyssiere, A.; Wanner, G.

    1957-01-01

    The experiments carried out in the starting-up programme of the reactor G1 comprised a series of tests at high power, which allowed the following points to be studied: 1- Effect of poisoning by Xenon (absolute value, evolution). 2- Temperature coefficients of the uranium and graphite for a temperature distribution corresponding to heating by fission. 3- Effect of the pressure (due to the coiling system) on the reactivity. 4- Calibration of the security rods as a function of their position in the pile (1). 5- Temperature distribution of the graphite, the sheathing, the uranium and the air leaving the canals, in a pile running normally at high power. 6- Neutron flux distribution in a pile running normally at high power. 7- Determination of the power by nuclear and thermodynamic methods. These experiments have been carried out under two very different pile conditions. From the 1. to the 15. of August 1956, a series of power increases, followed by periods of stabilisation, were induced in a pile containing uranium only, in 457 canals, amounting to about 34 tons of fuel. A knowledge of the efficiency of the control rods in such a pile has made it possible to measure with good accuracy the principal effects at high temperatures, that is, to deal with points 1, 2, 3, 5. Flux charts giving information on the variations of the material Laplacian and extrapolation lengths in the reflector have been drawn up. Finally the thermodynamic power has been measured under good conditions, in spite of some installation difficulties. On September 16, the pile had its final charge of 100 tons. All the canals were loaded, 1,234 with uranium and 53 (i.e. exactly 4 per cent of the total number) with thorium uniformly distributed in a square lattice of 100 cm side. Since technical difficulties prevented the calibration of the control rods, the measurements were limited to the determination of the thermodynamic power and the temperature distributions (points 5 and 7). This report will

  2. Feasibility of High-Power Diode Laser Array Surrogate to Support Development of Predictive Laser Lethality Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowdermilk, W H; Rubenchik, A M; Springer, H K

    2011-01-13

    Predictive modeling and simulation of high power laser-target interactions is sufficiently undeveloped that full-scale, field testing is required to assess lethality of military directed-energy (DE) systems. The cost and complexity of such testing programs severely limit the ability to vary and optimize parameters of the interaction. Thus development of advanced simulation tools, validated by experiments under well-controlled and diagnosed laboratory conditions that are able to provide detailed physics insight into the laser-target interaction and reduce requirements for full-scale testing will accelerate development of DE weapon systems. The ultimate goal is a comprehensive end-to-end simulation capability, from targeting and firing the laser system through laser-target interaction and dispersal of target debris; a 'Stockpile Science' - like capability for DE weapon systems. To support development of advanced modeling and simulation tools requires laboratory experiments to generate laser-target interaction data. Until now, to make relevant measurements required construction and operation of very high power and complex lasers, which are themselves costly and often unique devices, operating in dedicated facilities that don't permit experiments on targets containing energetic materials. High power diode laser arrays, pioneered by LLNL, provide a way to circumvent this limitation, as such arrays capable of delivering irradiances characteristic of De weapon requires are self-contained, compact, light weight and thus easily transportable to facilities, such as the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where testing with energetic materials can be performed. The purpose of this study was to establish the feasibility of using such arrays to support future development of advanced laser lethality and vulnerability simulation codes through providing data for materials characterization and laser

  3. Innovation on high-power long-pulse gyrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvak, Alexander; Sakamoto, Keishi; Thumm, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    Progress in the worldwide development of high-power gyrotrons for magnetic confinement fusion plasma applications is described. After technology breakthroughs in research on gyrotron components in the 1990s, significant progress has been achieved in the last decade, in particular, in the field of long-pulse and continuous wave (CW) gyrotrons for a wide range of frequencies. At present, the development of 1 MW-class CW gyrotrons has been very successful; these are applicable for self-ignition experiments on fusion plasmas and their confinement in the tokamak ITER, for long-pulse confinement experiments in the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) and for EC H and CD in the future tokamak JT-60SA. For this progress in the field of high-power long-pulse gyrotrons, innovations such as the realization of high-efficiency stable oscillation in very high order cavity modes, the use of single-stage depressed collectors for energy recovery, highly efficient internal quasi-optical mode converters and synthetic diamond windows have essentially contributed. The total tube efficiencies are around 50% and the purity of the fundamental Gaussian output mode is 97% and higher. In addition, activities for advanced gyrotrons, e.g. a 2 MW gyrotron using a coaxial cavity, multi-frequency 1 MW gyrotrons and power modulation technology, have made progress.

  4. Innovation on high-power long-pulse gyrotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, Alexander; Sakamoto, Keishi; Thumm, Manfred

    2011-12-01

    Progress in the worldwide development of high-power gyrotrons for magnetic confinement fusion plasma applications is described. After technology breakthroughs in research on gyrotron components in the 1990s, significant progress has been achieved in the last decade, in particular, in the field of long-pulse and continuous wave (CW) gyrotrons for a wide range of frequencies. At present, the development of 1 MW-class CW gyrotrons has been very successful; these are applicable for self-ignition experiments on fusion plasmas and their confinement in the tokamak ITER, for long-pulse confinement experiments in the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) and for EC H&CD in the future tokamak JT-60SA. For this progress in the field of high-power long-pulse gyrotrons, innovations such as the realization of high-efficiency stable oscillation in very high order cavity modes, the use of single-stage depressed collectors for energy recovery, highly efficient internal quasi-optical mode converters and synthetic diamond windows have essentially contributed. The total tube efficiencies are around 50% and the purity of the fundamental Gaussian output mode is 97% and higher. In addition, activities for advanced gyrotrons, e.g. a 2 MW gyrotron using a coaxial cavity, multi-frequency 1 MW gyrotrons and power modulation technology, have made progress.

  5. Splitting of high power, cw proton beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Facco

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A simple method for splitting a high power, continuous wave (cw proton beam in two or more branches with low losses has been developed in the framework of the EURISOL (European Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam Facility design study. The aim of the system is to deliver up to 4 MW of H^{-} beam to the main radioactive ion beam production target, and up to 100 kW of proton beams to three more targets, simultaneously. A three-step method is used, which includes magnetic neutralization of a fraction of the main H^{-} beam, magnetic splitting of H^{-} and H^{0}, and stripping of H^{0} to H^{+}. The method allows slow raising and individual fine adjustment of the beam intensity in each branch.

  6. High power electron beam dumps at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiseman, M.; Sinclair, C.K.; Whitney, R.; Zarecky, M.

    1997-01-01

    The CEBAF accelerator produces a very small emittance CW electron beam of up to 200 μA average current. The resulting beam power, up to 1 MW at 5 GeV, and the very high beam power density, pose challenging problems for beam dump design. Two styles of high power dumps have been developed. The first, rated for 100+ kW, is used for beam tune-up and accelerator commissioning. The beam power is entirely contained in metal in this dump, minimizing the problems associated with radioactive water handling. Full power 1 MW dumps are used with the experimental halls. In these dumps, one-third of the beam power is directly absorbed in water. Both dump designs require the beam to be rastered when the smallest beam sizes are used. Design details for each of these dumps will be presented

  7. High power density solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-10-12

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O (LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  8. Silver based batteries for high power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpinski, A. P.; Russell, S. J.; Serenyi, J. R.; Murphy, J. P.

    The present status of silver oxide-zinc technology and applications has been described by Karpinski et al. [A.P. Karpinski, B. Makovetski, S.J. Russell, J.R. Serenyi, D.C. Williams, Silver-Zinc: status of technology and applications, Journal of Power Sources, 80 (1999) 53-60], where the silver-zinc couple is still the preferred choice where high specific energy/energy density, coupled with high specific power/power density are important for high-rate, weight or size/configuration sensitive applications. Perhaps the silver oxide cathode can be considered one of the most versatile electrode materials. When coupled with other anodes and corresponding electrolyte management system, the silver electrode provides for a wide array of electrochemical systems that can be tailored to meet the most demanding, high power requirements. Besides zinc, the most notable include cadmium, iron, metal hydride, and hydrogen electrode for secondary systems, while primary systems include lithium and aluminum. Alloys including silver are also available, such as silver chloride, which when coupled with magnesium or aluminum are primarily used in many seawater applications. The selection and use of these couples is normally the result of a trade-off of many factors. These include performance, safety, risk, reliability, and cost. When high power is required, silver oxide-zinc, silver oxide-aluminum, and silver oxide-lithium are the most energetic. For moderate performance (i.e., lower power), silver oxide-zinc or silver-cadmium would be the system of choice. This paper summarizes the suitability of the silver-based couples, with an emphasis on the silver-zinc system, as primary or rechargeable power sources for high energy/power applications.

  9. Recent progress on the National Ignition Facility advanced radiographic capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegner, P.; Bowers, M.; Chen, H.; Heebner, J.; Hermann, M.; Kalantar, D.; Martinez, D.

    2016-01-08

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a megajoule (million-joule)-class laser and experimental facility built for Stockpile Stewardship and High Energy Density (HED) science research [1]. Up to several times a day, 192 laser pulses from NIF's 192 laser beamlines converge on a millimeter-scale target located at the center of the facility's 10-meter diameter target chamber. The carefully synchronized pulses, typically a few nanoseconds (billionths of a second) in duration and co-times to better than 20 picoseconds (trillionths of a second), a deliver a combined energy of up to 1.8 megajoules and a peak power of 500 terawatts (trillion watts). Furthermore, this drives temperatures inside the target to tens of millions of degrees and pressures to many billion times greater than Earth's atmosphere.

  10. Professional Nurse Coaching: Advances in National and Global Healthcare transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    Nurse coaches are responding to the mandate of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910)—the foundational philosopher of modern nursing—to advocate, identify, and focus on factors that promote health, healthy people, and healthy communities that are recognized today as environmental and social determinants of health.1,2 The Institute of Medicine report3 and other health initiatives suggest the need for increased education and leadership from nurses to address the healthcare needs of our nation and world. Nurse coaches are strategically pos-i tioned and equipped to implement health-promoting and evidence-based strategies with clients and support behavioral and lifestyle changes to enhance growth, overall health, and well-being. With possibilities not yet imagined, employment opportunities for nurses who incorporate coaching into professional practice are developing across the entire spectrum of health, well-ness, and healing. PMID:24416681

  11. Advanced robotic technologies for transfer at Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, P.C.

    1994-10-01

    Hazardous operations which have in the past been completed by technicians are under increased scrutiny due to high costs and low productivity associated with providing protective clothing and environments. As a result, remote systems are needed to accomplish many hazardous materials handling tasks such as the clean-up of waste sites in which the exposure of personnel to radiation, chemical, explosive and other hazardous constituents is unacceptable. Computer models augmented by sensing, and structured, modular computing environments are proving effective in automating many unstructured hazardous tasks. Work at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has focused on applying flexible automation (robotics) to meet the needs of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE). Dismantling facilities, environmental remediation, and materials handling in changing, hazardous environments lead to many technical challenges. Computer planning, monitoring and operator assistance shorten training cycles, reduce errors, and speed execution of operations. Robotic systems that re-use well-understood generic technologies can be much better characterized than robotic systems developed for a particular application, leading to a more reliable and safer systems. Further safety in robotic operations results from use of environmental sensors and knowledge of the task and environment. Collision detection and avoidance is achieved from such sensor integration and model-based control. This paper discusses selected technologies developed at SNL for use within the USDOE complex that have been or are ready for transfer to government and industrial suppliers. These technologies include sensors, sub-systems, and the design philosophy applied to quickly integrate them into a working robotic system. This paper represents the work of many people at the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at SNL, to whom the credit belongs.

  12. Advanced robotic technologies for transfer at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, P.C.

    1994-01-01

    Hazardous operations which have in the past been completed by technicians are under increased scrutiny due to high costs and low productivity associated with providing protective clothing and environments. As a result, remote systems are needed to accomplish many hazardous materials handling tasks such as the clean-up of waste sites in which the exposure of personnel to radiation, chemical, explosive and other hazardous constituents is unacceptable. Computer models augmented by sensing, and structured, modular computing environments are proving effective in automating many unstructured hazardous tasks. Work at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has focused on applying flexible automation (robotics) to meet the needs of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE). Dismantling facilities, environmental remediation, and materials handling in changing, hazardous environments lead to many technical challenges. Computer planning, monitoring and operator assistance shorten training cycles, reduce errors, and speed execution of operations. Robotic systems that re-use well-understood generic technologies can be much better characterized than robotic systems developed for a particular application, leading to a more reliable and safer systems. Further safety in robotic operations results from use of environmental sensors and knowledge of the task and environment. Collision detection and avoidance is achieved from such sensor integration and model-based control. This paper discusses selected technologies developed at SNL for use within the USDOE complex that have been or are ready for transfer to government and industrial suppliers. These technologies include sensors, sub-systems, and the design philosophy applied to quickly integrate them into a working robotic system. This paper represents the work of many people at the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at SNL, to whom the credit belongs

  13. High power RF systems for the BNL ERL project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaltsman, A.; Lambiase, R.

    2011-03-28

    The Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) project, now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory, requires two high power RF systems. The first RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting electron gun. The RF power from this system is used to drive nearly half an Ampere of beam current to 2 MeV. There is no provision to recover any of this energy so the minimum amplifier power is 1 MW. It consists of 1 MW CW klystron, transmitter and power supplies, 1 MW circulator, 1 MW dummy load and a two-way power splitter. The second RF system is for the 703.75 MHz superconducting cavity. The system accelerates the beam to 54.7 MeV and recovers this energy. It will provide up to 50 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. It consists of 50 kW transmitter, circulator, and dummy load. This paper describes the two high power RF systems and presents the test data for both.

  14. High power diode lasers converted to the visible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Andersen, Peter E.

    2017-01-01

    High power diode lasers have in recent years become available in many wavelength regions. However, some spectral regions are not well covered. In particular, the visible spectral range is lacking high power diode lasers with good spatial quality. In this paper, we highlight some of our recent...... results in nonlinear frequency conversion of high power near infrared diode lasers to the visible spectral region....

  15. Status report on the Advanced Photon Source Project at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebner, R.H. Sr.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory is designed as a national synchrotron radiation user facility which will provide extremely bright, highly energetic x-rays for multidisciplinary research. When operational, the Advanced Photon Source will accelerate positrons to a nominal energy of 7 GeV. The positrons will be manipulated by insertion devices to produce x-rays 10,000 times brighter than any currently available for research. Accelerator components, insertion devices, optical elements, and optical-element cooling schemes have been and continue to be the subjects of intensive research and development. A call for Letters of Intent from prospective users of the Advanced Photon Source has resulted in a substantial response from industrial, university, and national laboratory researchers

  16. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  17. Test of a High Power Target Design

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %IS343 :\\\\ \\\\ A high power tantalum disc-foil target (RIST) has been developed for the proposed radioactive beam facility, SIRIUS, at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The yield and release characteristics of the RIST target design have been measured at ISOLDE. The results indicate that the yields are at least as good as the best ISOLDE roll-foil targets and that the release curves are significantly faster in most cases. Both targets use 20 -25 $\\mu$m thick foils, but in a different internal geometry.\\\\ \\\\Investigations have continued at ISOLDE with targets having different foil thickness and internal geometries in an attempt to understand the release mechanisms and in particular to maximise the yield of short lived isotopes. A theoretical model has been developed which fits the release curves and gives physical values of the diffusion constants.\\\\ \\\\The latest target is constructed from 2 $\\mu$m thick tantalum foils (mass only 10 mg) and shows very short release times. The yield of $^{11}$Li (half-life of ...

  18. High power diode laser remelting of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmelickova, H; Tomastik, J; Ctvrtlik, R; Supik, J; Nemecek, S; Misek, M

    2014-01-01

    This article is focused on the laser surface remelting of the steel samples with predefined overlapping of the laser spots. The goal of our experimental work was to evaluate microstructure and hardness both in overlapped zone and single pass ones for three kinds of ferrous metals with different content of carbon, cast iron, non-alloy structural steel and tool steel. High power fibre coupled diode laser Laserline LDF 3600-100 was used with robotic guided processing head equipped by the laser beam homogenizer that creates rectangular beam shape with uniform intensity distribution. Each sample was treated with identical process parameters - laser power, beam diameter, focus position, speed of motion and 40% spot overlap. Dimensions and structures of the remelted zone, zone of the partial melting, heat affected zone and base material were detected and measured by means of laser scanning and optical microscopes. Hardness progress in the vertical axis of the overlapped zone from remelted surface layer to base material was measured and compared with the hardness of the single spots. The most hardness growth was found for cast iron, the least for structural steel. Experiment results will be used to processing parameters optimization for each tested material separately.

  19. High power accelerator for environmental application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, B.; Kim, J.K.; Kim, Y.R.; Kim, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The problems of environmental damage and degradation of natural resources are receiving increasing attention throughout the world. The increased population, higher living standards, increased urbanization and enhanced industrial activities of humankind are all leading to degradation of the environment. Increasing urbanization has been accompanied by significant environmental pollution, given the seriousness of the situation and future risk of crises, there is an urgent need to develop the efficient technologies including economical treatment methods. Therefore, cost-effective treatment of the stack gases, wastewater and sludge containing refractory pollutant with electron beam is actively studied in EB TECH Co. Electron beam treatment of such hazardous wastes is caused by the decomposition of pollutants as a result of their reactions with highly reactive species formed from radiolysis. However, to have advantages over existing processes, the electron beam process should have cost-effective and reliable in operation. Therefore high power accelerators (400kW~1MW) are developed for environmental application and they show the decrease in the cost of construction and operation of electron beam plant. In other way to reduce the cost for treatment, radical reactions accompanied by the other processes are introduced, and the synergistic effect upon the use of combined methods such as electron beam treatment with catalytic system, biological treatment and physico-chemical adsorption and others also show the improvement of the effect of electron beam treatment. (author)

  20. Fibrous zinc anodes for high power batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. Gregory

    This paper introduces newly developed solid zinc anodes using fibrous material for high power applications in alkaline and large size zinc-air battery systems. The improved performance of the anodes in these two battery systems is demonstrated. The possibilities for control of electrode porosity and for anode/battery design using fibrous materials are discussed in light of experimental data. Because of its mechanical integrity and connectivity, the fibrous solid anode has good electrical conductivity, mechanical stability, and design flexibility for controlling mass distribution, porosity and effective surface area. Experimental data indicated that alkaline cells made of such anodes can have a larger capacity at high discharging currents than commercially available cells. It showed even greater improvement over commercial cells with a non-conventional cell design. Large capacity anodes for a zinc-air battery have also been made and have shown excellent material utilization at various discharge rates. The zinc-air battery was used to power an electric bicycle and demonstrated good results.

  1. New high power coherent radiation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprangle, P.; Coffey, T.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable renewed interest in the development of novel devices for the production of high power coherent electromagnetic radiation. This interest has been motivated largely by the realization that, with existing technology, certain processes utilizing relativistic electron beams can produce coherent electromagnetic radiation at power levels far in excess of those achieved by conventional electron devices. This paper will review the current status of this rapidly developing field, with emphasis on two generic devices. The major thrust in the recent development of electron beam driven radiation sources has been directed towards achieving shorter wavelengths, greater power and higher efficiencies. Shortly after the development of such successful sources as the magnetron, kylstron and various traveling wave devices, it became clear that, in their original form, they were limited in their ability to produce high levels of radiation efficiently at short wavelengths. To circumvent the inherent limitations of these conventional coherent radiation sources, many new concepts and mechanisms, as well as variations on conventional concepts, were proposed. This paper is concerned primarily with two devices which are, relatively speaking, newcomers to the list of coherent classical radiation sources. They are the free electron laser and the cyclotron resonance maser (CRM); one well known type of CRM is the gyrotron.

  2. National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies Institute. Status report, March 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, C.

    1997-12-31

    The National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies (NADET) program is intended to pool support, talent, and technologies of the industries dependent upon drilling and excavation technologies to initiate, coordinate, and sustain programs capable of developing substantial technological advances. The NADET Institute has been funded by the DOE Office of Geothermal Technologies and is now supporting seven projects aimed at advanced geothermal drilling technologies. The Institute seeks to broaden its base of funding and technological support from both government and industry sources. Encouraging progress has been made with the support of dues-paying industrial members and industrial sponsorship of a substantial drilling research study.

  3. Research and Development Progress of National Key Laboratory of Advanced Composites on Advanced Aeronautical Resin Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Bintai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Applications and research progress in advanced aeronautical resin matrix composites by National Key Laboratory of Advanced Composites (LAC were summarized. A novel interlaminar toughening technology employing ultra-thin TP non-woven fabric was developed in LAC, which significantly improved the compression after impact (CAI performances of composite laminates.Newly designed multilayer sandwich stealth composite structures exhibited a good broadband radar absorbing properties at 1-18 GHz.There were remarkable developments in high toughness and high temperature resin matrix composites, covering major composite processing technologies such as prepreg-autoclave procedure, liquid composite molding and automation manufacture, etc. Finally, numerical simulation and optimization methods were deliberately utilized in the study of composites curing behavior, resin flow and curing deformation. A composite material database was also established.In conclusion, LAC has been a great support for the development of aeronautical equipment, playing such roles as innovation leading, system dominating, foundation supporting and application ensuring of aerocomposites.

  4. An adaptive crystal bender for high power synchrotron radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, L.E.; Hastings, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    Perfect crystal monochromators cannot diffract x-rays efficiently, nor transmit the high source brightness available at synchrotron radiation facilities, unless surface strains within the beam footprint are maintained within a few arcseconds. Insertion devices at existing synchrotron sources already produce x-ray power density levels that can induce surface slope errors of several arcseconds on silicon monochromator crystals at room temperature, no matter how well the crystal is cooled. The power density levels that will be produced by insertion devices at the third-generation sources will be as much as a factor of 100 higher still. One method of restoring ideal x-ray diffraction behavior, while coping with high power levels, involves adaptive compensation of the induced thermal strain field. The design and performance, using the X25 hybrid wiggler beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), of a silicon crystal bender constructed for this purpose are described

  5. Baseline data on forest loss and associated uncertainty: advances in national forest monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Johanne; Goetz, Scott J.

    2015-02-01

    Countries participating in climate change mitigation via the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation mechanism are required to establish national forest monitoring systems. The design of national forest monitoring system includes provision of transparent, consistent and accurate estimates of emissions and removals from forests, while also taking into account national circumstances and capabilities. One key component of these systems lies in satellite remote sensing approaches and techniques to determine baseline data on forest loss against which future rates of change can be evaluated. Advances in approaches meeting these criteria for measuring, reporting and verification purposes are therefore of tremendous interest. A robust example advancing such approaches, focused on Peru, is provided in the recent paper of Potapov et al (2014 Environ. Res. Lett. 9 124012).

  6. High power ring methods and accelerator driven subcritical reactor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahar, Malek Haj [Univ. of Grenoble (France)

    2016-08-07

    transverse beam dynamics. The results obtained allow to develop a correction scheme to minimize the tune variations of the FFAG. This is the cornerstone of a new fixed tune non-scaling FFAG that represents a potential candidate for high power applications. As part of the developments towards high power at the KURRI FFAG, beam dynamics studies have to account for space charge effects. In that framework, models have been installed in the tracking code ZGOUBI to account for the self-interaction of the particles in the accelerator. Application to the FFAG studies is shown. Finally, one focused on the ADSR concept as a candidate to solve the problem of nuclear waste. In order to establish the accelerator requirements, one compared the performance of ADSR with other conventional critical reactors by means of the levelized cost of energy. A general comparison between the different accelerator technologies that can satisfy these requirements is finally presented. In summary, the main drawback of the ADSR technology is the high Levelized Cost Of Energy compared to other advanced reactor concepts that do not employ an accelerator. Nowadays, this is a show-stopper for any industrial application aiming at producing energy (without dealing with the waste problem). Besides, the reactor is not intrinsically safer than critical reactor concepts, given the complexity of managing the target interface between the accelerator and the reactor core.

  7. The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments

  8. The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James R. Boyce

    2006-01-01

    Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

  9. GaN High Power Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PEARTON,S.J.; REN,F.; ZHANG,A.P.; DANG,G.; CAO,X.A.; LEE,K.P.; CHO,H.; GILA,B.P.; JOHNSON,J.W.; MONIER,C.; ABERNATHY,C.R.; HAN,JUNG; BACA,ALBERT G.; CHYI,J.-I.; LEE,C.-M.; NEE,T.-E.; CHUO,C.-C.; CHI,G.C.; CHU,S.N.G.

    2000-07-17

    A brief review is given of recent progress in fabrication of high voltage GaN and AlGaN rectifiers, GaN/AlGaN heterojunction bipolar transistors, GaN heterostructure and metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. Improvements in epitaxial layer quality and in fabrication techniques have led to significant advances in device performance.

  10. Compact High Power Fiber Laser, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of the proposed work is the development of a portable and efficient pulsed laser system for LIDAR and ranging applications, which make use of the latest...

  11. High Power Betavoltaic Technology, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation will dramatically improve the performance of tritium-powered betavoltaic batteries through the development of a high-aspect ratio, expanded...

  12. Perspectives on the value of advanced medical imaging: a national survey of primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christine M; Kramer, Erich; Colamonico, Jennifer; Duszak, Richard

    2015-05-01

    To understand perceptions of primary care physicians (PCPs) about the value of advanced medical imaging. A national quantitative survey of 500 PCPs was conducted using an online self-administered questionnaire. Questions focused on advanced medical imaging (CT, MRI, and PET) and its perceived impact on the delivery of patient care. Responses were stratified by physician demographics. Large majorities of the PCPs indicated that advanced imaging increases their diagnostic confidence (441; 88%); provides data not otherwise available (451; 90%); permits better clinical decision making (440; 88%); increases confidence in treatment choices (438; 88%), and shortens time to definitive diagnosis (430; 86%]). Most (424; 85%) believe that patient care would be negatively affected without access to advanced imaging. PCPs whose clinical careers predated the proliferation of advanced imaging modalities (>20 years of practice) assigned higher value to advanced imaging on several dimensions compared with younger physicians whose training overlapped widespread technology availability. By a variety of metrics, large majorities of PCPs believe that advanced medical imaging provides considerable value to patient care. Those whose careers predated the widespread availability of advanced imaging tended to associate it with even higher value. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. National advanced drilling and excavation technologies program: Summary of third meeting of interested Federal agencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-12-07

    The purpose of the meeting was: (1) to discuss a proposal by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) outlining a National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technologies Program, (2) to brief participants on events since the last meeting, and (3) to hear about drilling research activities funded by the Department of Energy. The meeting agenda is included as Attachment B.

  14. Assessing Advanced Airway Management Performance in a National Cohort of Emergency Medical Services Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry E; Donnelly, John P; Barton, Dustin; Jarvis, Jeffrey L

    2018-05-01

    Although often the focus of quality improvement efforts, emergency medical services (EMS) advanced airway management performance has few national comparisons, nor are there many assessments with benchmarks accounting for differences in agency volume or patient mix. We seek to assess variations in advanced airway management and conventional intubation performance in a national cohort of EMS agencies. We used EMS data from ESO Solutions, a national EMS electronic health record system. We identified EMS emergency responses with attempted advanced airway management (conventional intubation, rapid sequence intubation, sedation-assisted intubation, supraglottic airway insertion, and cricothyroidotomy). We also separately examined cases with initial conventional intubation. We determined EMS agency risk-standardized advanced airway management and initial conventional intubation success rates by using mixed-effects regression models, fitting agency as a random intercept, adjusting for patient age, sex, race, cardiac arrest, or trauma status, and use of rapid sequence or sedation-assisted intubation, and accounting for reliability variations from EMS agency airway volume. We assessed changes in agency advanced airway management and initial conventional intubation performance rank after risk and reliability adjustment. We also identified high and low performers (reliability-adjusted and risk-standardized success confidence intervals falling outside the mean). During 2011 to 2015, 550 EMS agencies performed 57,209 advanced airway management procedures. Among 401 EMS agencies with greater than or equal to 10 advanced airway management procedures, there were a total of 56,636 procedures. Median reliability-adjusted and risk-standardized EMS agency advanced airway management success was 92.9% (interquartile range 90.1% to 94.8%; minimum 58.2%; maximum 99.0%). There were 56 advanced airway management low-performing and 38 high-performing EMS agencies. Among 342 agencies with

  15. The JLab high power ERL light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.R. Neil; C. Behre; S.V. Benson; M. Bevins; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; J. Coleman; L.A. Dillon-Townes; D. Douglas; H.F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; D. Gruber; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; M.J. Kelley; L. Merminga; J. Mammosser; W. Moore; N. Nishimori; E. Pozdeyev; J. Preble; R. Rimmer; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; C. Tennant; R. Walker; G.P. Williams and S. Zhang

    2005-03-19

    concerning the physics performance, design optimization, and operational limitations of such a first generation high power ERL light source.

  16. Novel, High-power, Mid-infrared Optical Source for the 5-12 Micron Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    for the visible and ultraviolet ”, Advanced Solid- State Photonics, Denver, Colorado, USA, February 2009 3. M. Ebrahim-Zadeh, “Tunable, high...power, solid-state sources for the blue and ultraviolet ”, Lasers and applications in science and engineering (LASE 2009), Photonics West, San Jose, USA...XXIVth International Conference on Photochemistry , ICP 2009, Toledo, Spain, July 2009 9. M. Ebrahim-Zadeh, “Advances in laser wavelength conversion

  17. National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Saphir, William; Shalf, John; Bailey, David; Oliker, Leonid; Banda, Michael; McCurdy, C. William; Hules, John; Canning, Andrew; Day, Marc; Colella, Philip; Serafini, David; Wehner, Michael; Nugent, Peter

    2004-04-02

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) proposes to create a National Facility for Advanced Computational Science (NFACS) and to establish a new partnership between the American computer industry and a national consortium of laboratories, universities, and computing facilities. NFACS will provide leadership-class scientific computing capability to scientists and engineers nationwide, independent of their institutional affiliation or source of funding. This partnership will bring into existence a new class of computational capability in the United States that is optimal for science and will create a sustainable path towards petaflops performance.

  18. High power-efficiency terahertz quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Jun-Qi; Liu, Feng-Qi; Zhang, Jin-Chuan; Zhai, Shen-Qiang; Zhuo, Ning; Wang, Li-Jun; Liu, Shu-Man; Wang, Zhan-Guo

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate continuous-wave (CW) high power-efficiency terahertz quantum cascade laser based on semi-insulating surface-plasmon waveguide with epitaxial-side down (Epi-down) mounting process. The performance of the device is analyzed in detail. The laser emits at a frequency of ˜ 3.27 THz and has a maximum CW operating temperature of ˜ 70 K. The peak output powers are 177 mW in pulsed mode and 149 mW in CW mode at 10 K for 130-μm-wide Epi-down mounted lasers. The record wall-plug efficiencies in direct measurement are 2.26% and 2.05% in pulsed and CW mode, respectively. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014CB339803 and 2013CB632801), the Special-funded Program on National Key Scientific Instruments and Equipment Development, China (Grant No. 2011YQ13001802-04), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61376051).

  19. High-Efficiency, High-Power Ka-Band Elliptic-Beam Traveling-Wave-Tube Amplifier for Long-Range Space RF Telecommunications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space telecommunications require amplifiers that are efficient, high-power, wideband, small, lightweight, and highly reliable. Currently, helix traveling wave tube...

  20. Aluminium alloys welding with high-power Nd:YAG lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Orza, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Aluminium alloys have good mechanical properties (high strength-to-weight ratio, corrosion resistance) and good workability. their applications are growing up, specially in the transportation industry. Weldability is however poorer than in other materials; recent advances in high power YAG laser are the key to obtain good appearance welds and higher penetration, at industrial production rates. Results of the combination of high power YAG beams with small fiber diameters and specific filler wires are presented. It is also characterized the air bone particulate material, by-product of the laser process: emission rates, size distribution and chemical composition are given for several aluminium alloys. (Author) 6 refs

  1. Compact, Low-Cost, Frequency-Locked Semiconductor Laser for Injection Seeding High Power Laser, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Small Business Innovative Research Phase II project will develop a compact, low-cost, wavelength locked seed laser for injection locking high powered...

  2. Integrated Production of Ultra-Low Defect GaN Films and Devices for High-Power Amplifiers, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High quality GaN epitaxial films are key to current efforts for development of both high-power/high-speed electronic devices and optoelectronic devices. In fact,...

  3. High Efficiency Hybrid Energy Storage Utilizing High Power Density Ultracapacitors For Long Duration Balloon Flights, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FastCAP proposes to develop an ultra-high power density and high frequency ultracapacitor capable of surviving over the wide temperature range of -60C to 130C and...

  4. Integrated Production of Ultra-Low Defect GaN Films and Devices for High-Power Amplifiers, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High quality GaN epitaxial films are one of the keys to current efforts for development of both high-power/high-speed electronic devices and optoelectronic devices....

  5. Welding with high power fiber lasers - A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintino, L.; Costa, A.; Miranda, R.; Yapp, D.; Kumar, V.; Kong, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    The new generation of high power fiber lasers presents several benefits for industrial purposes, namely high power with low beam divergence, flexible beam delivery, low maintenance costs, high efficiency and compact size. This paper presents a brief review of the development of high power lasers, and presents initial data on welding of API 5L: X100 pipeline steel with an 8 kW fiber laser. Weld bead geometry was evaluated and transition between conduction and deep penetration welding modes was investigated

  6. Chaos in high-power high-frequency gyrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airila, M.

    2004-01-01

    Gyrotron interaction is a complex nonlinear dynamical process, which may turn chaotic in certain circumstances. The emergence of chaos renders dynamical systems unpredictable and causes bandwidth broadening of signals. Such effects would jeopardize the prospect of advanced gyrotrons in fusion. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the possibility of chaos in gyrotrons. There are three different chaos scenarios closely related to the development of high-power gyrotrons: First, the onset of chaos in electron trajectories would lead to difficulties in the design and efficient operation of depressed potential collectors, which are used for efficiency enhancement. Second, the radio-frequency signal could turn chaotic, decreasing the output power and the spectral purity of the output signal. As a result, mode conversion, transmission, and absorption efficiencies would be reduced. Third, spatio-temporal chaos in the resonator field structure can set a limit for the use of large-diameter interaction cavities and high-order TE modes (large azimuthal index) allowing higher generated power. In this thesis, the issues above are addressed with numerical modeling. It is found that chaos in electron residual energies is practically absent in the parameter region corresponding to high efficiency. Accordingly, depressed collectors are a feasible solution also in advanced high-power gyrotrons. A new method is presented for straightforward numerical solution of the one-dimensional self-consistent time-dependent gyrotron equations, and the method is generalized to two dimensions. In 1D, a chart of gyrotron oscillations is calculated. It is shown that the regions of stationary oscillations, automodulation, and chaos have a complicated topology in the plane of generalized gyrotron variables. The threshold current for chaotic oscillations exceeds typical operating currents by a factor of ten. However, reflection of the output signal may significantly lower the threshold. 2D

  7. Planning report for establishment of research infrastructure for national advanced radiation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuk, Il Hyun; Byun, Myung Woo; Lee, Ju Woon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-04-15

    Establishment of research infrastructure and assistant of industry renovation is needed to achieve technology level-up in the all industry areas including plant engineering, material engineering, polymers, nondestructive tests, radioisotope tracer application, environment engineering, medical science, agriculture, sterilization, sprouting, biotechnology and aerospace, which would be the core motivation of our future industry. Especially for early settlement of research environment for the new RT-specialized national institute, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute (ARTI) in Jeongup, Chonbuk, Korea is essential. For this purpose, an intensive system construction is demanded including: 1) Area of establishment of the system assisting radiation technology advancement: It is expected that radioisotope production for industrial or medical uses and activation of the related researches and training of experts by manufacture, installation, and operation of 30 MeV cyclotron. It also can be contributed in the promotion of national radiation related science and technology by establishment of a basic and advanced analysis system. 2) Area of establishment of training and education system of RT experts. 3) Area of establishment of a system for technological assistance for industry and industry-university-institute network. Contribution to balanced regional development and promotion of national RT-based science through establishment of RT industry cluster with Advanced Radiation Technology Institute (ARTi) at Jeongup as the center figure

  8. Irradiation Tests Supporting LEU Conversion of Very High Power Research Reactors in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolstenhulme, N. E.; Cole, J. I.; Glagolenko, I.; Holdaway, K. K.; Housley, G. K.; Rabin, B. H.

    2016-10-01

    The US fuel development team is developing a high density uranium-molybdenum alloy monolithic fuel to enable conversion of five high-power research reactors. Previous irradiation tests have demonstrated promising behavior for this fuel design. A series of future irradiation tests will enable selection of final fuel fabrication process and provide data to qualify the fuel at moderately-high power conditions for use in three of these five reactors. The remaining two reactors, namely the Advanced Test Reactor and High Flux Isotope Reactor, require additional irradiation tests to develop and demonstrate the fuel’s performance with even higher power conditions, complex design features, and other unique conditions. This paper reviews the program’s current irradiation testing plans for these moderately-high irradiation conditions and presents conceptual testing strategies to illustrate how subsequent irradiation tests will build upon this initial data package to enable conversion of these two very-high power research reactors.

  9. Operational Philosophy for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Benson; J. Cole; J. Jackson; F. Marshall; D. Ogden; J. Rempe; M. C. Thelen

    2013-02-01

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). At its core, the ATR NSUF Program combines access to a portion of the available ATR radiation capability, the associated required examination and analysis facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and INL staff expertise with novel ideas provided by external contributors (universities, laboratories, and industry). These collaborations define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high-temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light-water reactors (LWRs), and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. To make possible the broadest access to key national capability, the ATR NSUF formed a partnership program that also makes available access to critical facilities outside of the INL. Finally, the ATR NSUF has established a sample library that allows access to pre-irradiated samples as needed by national research teams.

  10. An assessment of seismic monitoring in the United States; requirement for an Advanced National Seismic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1999-01-01

    This report assesses the status, needs, and associated costs of seismic monitoring in the United States. It sets down the requirement for an effective, national seismic monitoring strategy and an advanced system linking national, regional, and urban monitoring networks. Modernized seismic monitoring can provide alerts of imminent strong earthquake shaking; rapid assessment of distribution and severity of earthquake shaking (for use in emergency response); warnings of a possible tsunami from an offshore earthquake; warnings of volcanic eruptions; information for correctly characterizing earthquake hazards and for improving building codes; and data on response of buildings and structures during earthquakes, for safe, cost-effective design, engineering, and construction practices in earthquake-prone regions.

  11. Advanced National Seismic System—Current status, development opportunities, and priorities for 2017–2027

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2017-05-25

    SummaryEarthquakes pose a threat to the safety of over 143 million people living in the United States. Earthquake impacts can be significantly reduced if communities understand their risk and take proactive steps to mitigate that risk. The Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) is a cooperative effort to collect and analyze seismic and geodetic data on earthquakes, issue timely and reliable notifications of their occurrence and impacts, and provide data for earthquake research and the hazard and risk assessments that are the foundation for creating an earthquakeresilient nation.

  12. Finite mass beam splitter in high power interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, Jan; Schnabel, Roman; Danzmann, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    The beam splitter in high-power interferometers is subject to significant radiation-pressure fluctuations. As a consequence, the phase relations which appear in the beam splitter coupling equations oscillate and phase modulation fields are generated which add to the reflected fields. In this paper, the transfer function of the various input fields impinging on the beam splitter from all four ports onto the output field is presented including radiation-pressure effects. We apply the general solution of the coupling equations to evaluate the input-output relations of the dual-recycled laser-interferometer topology of the gravitational-wave detector GEO 600 and the power-recycling, signal-extraction topology of advanced LIGO. We show that the input-output relation exhibits a bright-port dark-port coupling. This mechanism is responsible for bright port contributions to the noise density of the output field and technical laser noise is expected to decrease the interferometer's sensitivity at low frequencies. It is shown quantitatively that the issue of technical laser noise is unimportant in this context if the interferometer contains arm cavities

  13. In-volume heating using high-power laser diodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denisenkov, V.S.; Kiyko, V.V.; Vdovin, G.V.

    2015-01-01

    High-power lasers are useful instruments suitable for applications in various fields; the most common industrial applications include cutting and welding. We propose a new application of high-power laser diodes as in-bulk heating source for food industry. Current heating processes use surface

  14. Improved cutting performance in high power laser cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    Recent results in high power laser cutting especially with focus on cutting of mild grade steel types for shipbuilding are described.......Recent results in high power laser cutting especially with focus on cutting of mild grade steel types for shipbuilding are described....

  15. Terahertz radiation source using a high-power industrial electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We propose that high-power electron beam from such an industrial linac can first pass through an undulator to generate useful terahertz (THz) radiation, and the spent electron beam coming out of the undulator can still be used for the intended industrial applications. This will enhance the utilization of a high-power industrial ...

  16. Terahertz radiation source using a high-power industrial electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High-power ( ∼ 100 k W ) industrial electron linear accelerators (linacs) are used for irradiations, e.g., for pasteurization of food products, disinfection of medical waste, etc.We propose that high-power electron beam from such an industrial linac can first pass through an undulator to generate useful terahertz (THz) radiation, ...

  17. Final Report - Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program - Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Sandia National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitten, W.B.

    2002-12-18

    This report covers the three main projects that collectively comprised the Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program. Chapter 1 describes the direct interrogation of individual particles by laser desorption within the ion trap mass spectrometer analyzer. The goals were (1) to develop an ''intelligent trigger'' capable of distinguishing particles of biological origin from those of nonbiological origin in the background and interferent particles and (2) to explore the capability for individual particle identification. Direct interrogation of particles by laser ablation and ion trap mass spectrometry was shown to have good promise for discriminating between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin, although detailed protocols and operating conditions were not worked out. A library of more than 20,000 spectra of various types of biological particles has been assembled. Methods based on multivariate analysis and on neural networks were used to discriminate between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin. It was possible to discriminate between at least some species of bacteria if mass spectra of several hundred similar particles were obtained. Chapter 2 addresses the development of a new ion trap mass analyzer geometry that offers the potential for a significant increase in ion storage capacity for a given set of analyzer operating conditions. This geometry may lead to the development of smaller, lower-power field-portable ion trap mass spectrometers while retaining laboratory-scale analytical performance. A novel ion trap mass spectrometer based on toroidal ion storage geometry has been developed. The analyzer geometry is based on the edge rotation of a quadrupolar ion trap cross section into the shape of a torus. Initial performance of this device was poor, however, due to the significant contribution of nonlinear fields introduced by the rotation of the symmetric ion-trapping geometry. These

  18. Advanced Resources for Catalysis Science; Recommendations for a National Catalysis Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peden, Charles HF.; Ray, Douglas

    2005-10-05

    Catalysis is one of the most valuable contributors to our economy and historically an area where the United States has enjoyed, but is now losing, international leadership. While other countries are stepping up their work in this area, support for advanced catalysis research and development in the U.S. has diminished. Yet, more than ever, innovative and improved catalyst technologies are imperative for new energy production processes to ease our dependence on imported resources, for new energy-efficient and environmentally benign chemical production processes, and for new emission reduction technologies to minimize the environmental impact of an active and growing economy. Addressing growing concerns about the future direction of U.S. catalysis science, experts from the catalysis community met at a workshop to determine and recommend advanced resources needed to address the grand challenges for catalysis research and development. The workshop's primary conclusion: To recapture our position as the leader in catalysis innovation and practice, and promote crucial breakthroughs, the U.S. must establish one or more well-funded and well-equipped National Catalysis Research Institutes competitively selected, centered in the national laboratories and, by charter, networked to other national laboratories, universities, and industry. The Institute(s) will be the center of a national collaboratory that gives catalysis researchers access to the most advanced techniques available in the scientific enterprise. The importance of catalysis to our energy, economic, and environmental security cannot be overemphasized. Catalysis is a vital part of our core industrial infrastructure, as it is integral to chemical processing and petroleum refining, and is critical to proposed advances needed to secure a sustainable energy future. Advances in catalysis could reduce our need for foreign oil by making better use of domestic carbon resources, for example, allowing cost-effective and

  19. Brookhaven National Laboratory's capabilities for advanced analyses of cyber threats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePhillips, M. P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-01-01

    BNL has several ongoing, mature, and successful programs and areas of core scientific expertise that readily could be modified to address problems facing national security and efforts by the IC related to securing our nation’s computer networks. In supporting these programs, BNL houses an expansive, scalable infrastructure built exclusively for transporting, storing, and analyzing large disparate data-sets. Our ongoing research projects on various infrastructural issues in computer science undoubtedly would be relevant to national security. Furthermore, BNL frequently partners with researchers in academia and industry worldwide to foster unique and innovative ideas for expanding research opportunities and extending our insights. Because the basic science conducted at BNL is unique, such projects have led to advanced techniques, unlike any others, to support our mission of discovery. Many of them are modular techniques, thus making them ideal for abstraction and retrofitting to other uses including those facing national security, specifically the safety of the nation’s cyber space.

  20. Cutting and drilling studies using high power visible lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kautz, D.D.; Dragon, E.P.; Werve, M.E.; Hargrove, R.S.; Warner, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    High power and radiance laser technologies developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory such as copper-vapor and dye lasers show great promise for material processing tasks. Evaluation of models suggests significant increases in welding, cutting, and drilling capabilities, as well as applications in emerging technologies such as micromachining, surface treatment, and stereolithography. Copper lasers currently operate at 1.8 kW output at approximately three times the diffraction limit and achieve mean time between failures of more than 1,000 hours. Dye lasers have near diffraction limited beam quality at greater than 1.0 kW. Results from cutting and drilling studies in titanium and stainless steel alloys show that cuts and holes with extremely fine features can be made with dye and copper-vapor lasers. High radiance beams produce low distortion and small heat-affected zones. The authors have accomplished very high aspect ratios (> 60:1) and features with micron scale (5-50 μm) sizes. The paper gives a description of the equipment; discusses cutting theory; and gives experimental results of cutting and drilling studies on Ti-6Al-4V and 304 stainless steel

  1. Engineering safety features for high power experimental reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doval, A.; Villarino, E.; Vertullo, A.

    2000-01-01

    In the present analysis we will focus our attention in the way engineering safety features are designed in order to prevent fuel damage in case of abnormal or accidental situations. To prevent fuel damage two main facts must be considered, the shutdown of the reactor and the adequate core cooling capacity, it means that both, neutronic and thermohydraulic aspects must be analysed. Some neutronic safety features are common to all power ranges like negative feedback reactivity coefficients and the required number of control rods containing the proper absorber material to shutdown the reactor. From the thermohydraulic point of view common features are siphon-breaker devices and flap valves for those powers requiring cooling in the forced convection regime. For the high power reactor group, the engineering safety features specially designed for a generic reactor of 20 MW, will be presented here. From the neutronic point of view besides the common features, and to comply with our National Regulatory Authority, a Second Shutdown System was designed as a redundant shutdown system in case the control plates fail. Concerning thermohydraulic aspects besides the pump flywheels and the flap valves providing the natural convection loop, a metallic Chimney and a Chimney Water Injection System were supplied. (author)

  2. Experiments on high power EB evaporation of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandaswamy, E.; Bhardwaj, R.L.; Ram Gopal; Ray, A.K.; Kulgod, S.V.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The versatility of electron beam evaporation makes the deposition of many new and unusual materials possible. This technique offers freedom from contamination and precise control. High power electron guns are especially used for obtaining high evaporation rates for large area coatings. This paper deals with the coating experiments carried out on an indigenously developed high power strip electron gun with niobium as evaporant at 40 kW on S.S. substrate. The practical problems of conditioning the gun and venting the vacuum system after the high power operation are also discussed. The coating rate was calculated by weight difference method

  3. National Trends and Predictors of Locally Advanced Penile Cancer in the United States (1998-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipollini, Juan; Chaing, Sharon; Peyton, Charles C; Sharma, Pranav; Kidd, Laura C; Giuliano, Anna R; Johnstone, Peter A; Spiess, Philippe E

    2017-08-12

    We analyzed the trends in presentation of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis and determined the socioeconomic predictors for locally advanced (cT3-cT4) disease in the United States. The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with clinically nonmetastatic penile SCC and staging available from 1998 to 2012. Temporal trends per tumor stage were evaluated, and a multivariable logistic regression model was used to identify predictors for advanced presentation during the study period. A total of 5767 patients with stage ≤ T1-T2 (n = 5423) and T3-T4 (n = 344) disease were identified. Increasing trends were noted in all stages of penile SCC with a greater proportion of advanced cases over time (P = .001). Significant predictors of advanced presentation were age > 55 years, the presence of comorbidities, and Medicaid or no insurance (P < .05 for all). More penile SCC is being detected in the United States. Our results have demonstrated older age, presence of comorbidities, and Medicaid or no insurance as potential barriers to early access of care in the male population. Understanding the current socioeconomic gaps could help guide targeted interventions in vulnerable populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Advanced Daily Prediction Model for National Suicide Numbers with Social Media Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Sang; Lee, Hyewon; Myung, Woojae; Song, Gil-Young; Lee, Kihwang; Kim, Ho; Carroll, Bernard J; Kim, Doh Kwan

    2018-04-01

    Suicide is a significant public health concern worldwide. Social media data have a potential role in identifying high suicide risk individuals and also in predicting suicide rate at the population level. In this study, we report an advanced daily suicide prediction model using social media data combined with economic/meteorological variables along with observed suicide data lagged by 1 week. The social media data were drawn from weblog posts. We examined a total of 10,035 social media keywords for suicide prediction. We made predictions of national suicide numbers 7 days in advance daily for 2 years, based on a daily moving 5-year prediction modeling period. Our model predicted the likely range of daily national suicide numbers with 82.9% accuracy. Among the social media variables, words denoting economic issues and mood status showed high predictive strength. Observed number of suicides one week previously, recent celebrity suicide, and day of week followed by stock index, consumer price index, and sunlight duration 7 days before the target date were notable predictors along with the social media variables. These results strengthen the case for social media data to supplement classical social/economic/climatic data in forecasting national suicide events.

  5. The Google High Power Density Inverter Prize: Innovation in PV Inverter Power Density: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-14-568

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundstrom, Blake [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-05-08

    Google is encouraging development of advanced photovoltaic inverters with high power density by holding a public competition and offering a prize for the best performing high power developed. NREL will perform the performance and validation for all inverters entered into the competition and provide results to Google.

  6. Overview on the high power excimer laser technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingru

    2013-05-01

    High power excimer laser has essential applications in the fields of high energy density physics, inertial fusion energy and industry owing to its advantages such as short wavelength, high gain, wide bandwidth, energy scalable and repetition operating ability. This overview is aimed at an introduction and evaluation of enormous endeavor of the international high power excimer laser community in the last 30 years. The main technologies of high power excimer laser are reviewed, which include the pumping source technology, angular multiplexing and pulse compressing, beam-smoothing and homogenous irradiation, high efficiency and repetitive operation et al. A high power XeCl laser system developed in NINT of China is described in detail.

  7. High power laser downhole cutting tools and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2015-01-20

    Downhole cutting systems, devices and methods for utilizing 10 kW or more laser energy transmitted deep into the earth with the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems and devices for the laser cutting operations within a borehole in the earth. These systems and devices can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perform cutting operations in such boreholes deep within the earth.

  8. American National Identity in a Globalized World as a Topic in the Advanced EFL-Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Freese

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to make an issue as complex and controversial as that of ‘national identity’ teachable in the advanced EFL-classroom, it has to be reduced to exemplary aspects and illustrated with concrete examples. Therefore, I will suggest an appropriate ‘Course Opener,’ briefly survey the historical unfolding of the American identity concept in order to provide teachers with the necessary background knowledge, and then suggest two teaching units, the first of which traces some major developments by means of ‘classic’ texts, whereas the second deals with the crucial issue of whether a shared language is a prerequisite for a shared identity.

  9. Recommendations to reduce inequalities for LGBT people facing advanced illness: ACCESSCare national qualitative interview study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristowe, Katherine; Hodson, Matthew; Wee, Bee; Almack, Kathryn; Johnson, Katherine; Daveson, Barbara A; Koffman, Jonathan; McEnhill, Linda; Harding, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or trans (LGBT) people have higher risk of certain life-limiting illnesses and unmet needs in advanced illness and bereavement. ACCESSCare is the first national study to examine in depth the experiences of LGBT people facing advanced illness. Aim: To explore health-care experiences of LGBT people facing advanced illness to elicit views regarding sharing identity (sexual orientation/gender history), accessing services, discrimination/exclusion and best-practice examples. Design: Semi-structured in-depth qualitative interviews analysed using thematic analysis. Setting/participants: In total, 40 LGBT people from across the United Kingdom facing advanced illness: cancer (n = 21), non-cancer (n = 16) and both a cancer and a non-cancer conditions (n = 3). Results: In total, five main themes emerged: (1) person-centred care needs that may require additional/different consideration for LGBT people (including different social support structures and additional legal concerns), (2) service level or interactional (created in the consultation) barriers/stressors (including heteronormative assumptions and homophobic/transphobic behaviours), (3) invisible barriers/stressors (including the historical context of pathology/criminalisation, fears and experiences of discrimination) and (4) service level or interactional facilitators (including acknowledging and including partners in critical discussions). These all shape (5) individuals’ preferences for disclosing identity. Prior experiences of discrimination or violence, in response to disclosure, were carried into future care interactions and heightened with the frailty of advanced illness. Conclusion: Despite recent legislative change, experiences of discrimination and exclusion in health care persist for LGBT people. Ten recommendations, for health-care professionals and services/institutions, are made from the data. These are simple, low cost and offer potential gains in access

  10. Recommendations to reduce inequalities for LGBT people facing advanced illness: ACCESSCare national qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristowe, Katherine; Hodson, Matthew; Wee, Bee; Almack, Kathryn; Johnson, Katherine; Daveson, Barbara A; Koffman, Jonathan; McEnhill, Linda; Harding, Richard

    2018-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or trans (LGBT) people have higher risk of certain life-limiting illnesses and unmet needs in advanced illness and bereavement. ACCESSCare is the first national study to examine in depth the experiences of LGBT people facing advanced illness. To explore health-care experiences of LGBT people facing advanced illness to elicit views regarding sharing identity (sexual orientation/gender history), accessing services, discrimination/exclusion and best-practice examples. Semi-structured in-depth qualitative interviews analysed using thematic analysis. In total, 40 LGBT people from across the United Kingdom facing advanced illness: cancer ( n = 21), non-cancer ( n = 16) and both a cancer and a non-cancer conditions ( n = 3). In total, five main themes emerged: (1) person-centred care needs that may require additional/different consideration for LGBT people (including different social support structures and additional legal concerns), (2) service level or interactional (created in the consultation) barriers/stressors (including heteronormative assumptions and homophobic/transphobic behaviours), (3) invisible barriers/stressors (including the historical context of pathology/criminalisation, fears and experiences of discrimination) and (4) service level or interactional facilitators (including acknowledging and including partners in critical discussions). These all shape (5) individuals' preferences for disclosing identity. Prior experiences of discrimination or violence, in response to disclosure, were carried into future care interactions and heightened with the frailty of advanced illness. Despite recent legislative change, experiences of discrimination and exclusion in health care persist for LGBT people. Ten recommendations, for health-care professionals and services/institutions, are made from the data. These are simple, low cost and offer potential gains in access to, and outcomes of, care for LGBT people.

  11. 78 FR 67401 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Advanced Media...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... Production Act of 1993--Advanced Media Workflow Association, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on September 24, 2013, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Advanced Media Workflow Association, Inc. has filed written...

  12. 76 FR 66324 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Advanced Media...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... Production Act of 1993--Advanced Media Workflow Association, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on September 26, 2011, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Advanced Media Workflow Association, Inc. has filed written...

  13. 78 FR 22297 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Advanced Media...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... Production Act of 1993--Advanced Media Workflow Association, Inc. Notice is hereby given that, on March 20, 2013, pursuant to Section 6(a) of the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Advanced Media Workflow Association, Inc. has filed written...

  14. AN ASSESSMENT OF FLYWHEEL HIGH POWER ENERGY STORAGE TECHNOLOGY FOR HYBRID VEHICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, James Gerald [ORNL

    2012-02-01

    An assessment has been conducted for the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program to determine the state of the art of advanced flywheel high power energy storage systems to meet hybrid vehicle needs for high power energy storage and energy/power management. Flywheel systems can be implemented with either an electrical or a mechanical powertrain. The assessment elaborates upon flywheel rotor design issues of stress, materials and aspect ratio. Twelve organizations that produce flywheel systems submitted specifications for flywheel energy storage systems to meet minimum energy and power requirements for both light-duty and heavy-duty hybrid applications of interest to DOE. The most extensive experience operating flywheel high power energy storage systems in heavy-duty and light-duty hybrid vehicles is in Europe. Recent advances in Europe in a number of vehicle racing venues and also in road car advanced evaluations are discussed. As a frame of reference, nominal weight and specific power for non-energy storage components of Toyota hybrid electric vehicles are summarized. The most effective utilization of flywheels is in providing high power while providing just enough energy storage to accomplish the power assist mission effectively. Flywheels are shown to meet or exceed the USABC power related goals (discharge power, regenerative power, specific power, power density, weight and volume) for HEV and EV batteries and ultracapacitors. The greatest technical challenge facing the developer of vehicular flywheel systems remains the issue of safety and containment. Flywheel safety issues must be addressed during the design and testing phases to ensure that production flywheel systems can be operated with adequately low risk.

  15. Performance and reliability of high power 7xx nm laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ling; Wang, Jun; Devito, Mark; Xu, Dapeng; Grimshaw, Mike; Dong, Weimin; Guan, Xingguo; Huang, Hua; Leisher, Paul; Zhang, Shiguo; Wise, Damian; Martinsen, Robert; Haden, Jim

    2011-02-01

    High power diode lasers in 7xx-nm region, have been needed for various applications. Compared to 9xx nm lasers that have been developed extensively in the last 20 years, high power lasers at 7xx-nm region presents much more challenges for operation power, efficiency, temperature performance and reliability. This paper will present recent progresses on 7xx nm laser diodes for the above attributes. Two laser designs will be reviewed and high power diode laser performance and reliability will be presented. Single emitter devices, with 200μm wide emitting width, show up to 10W reliable operation power, with peak efficiency more than 65%. Accelerated life testing at 12A, 50°C heatsink temperature has been running for thousands of hours. High temperature performance and high COMD threshold (> 20W) will also be shown. Life-test failure modes will also be discussed. In summary, with advanced epitaxial structure design and MOCVD process, critical facet passivation and advanced heatsink and bonding technology, 7xx-8xx nm devices have been demonstrated with high performance and reliability similar to those of 9xx nm devices.

  16. Evaluation of beam quality for high-power lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongru; Wu, Lei; Wang, Xuexin; Shi, Jifang; Li, Gaoping; Ji, Xiao

    2008-03-01

    High-power lasers are widely used in various scientific, industrial and military applications. There is currently a desire for precision measurement the beam quality of high-power lasers in order to evaluate the performance of the laser systems and the operational effectiveness of chemical and solid-state high-power laser weapons. There are many methods of beam quality determination, such as beam parameter product, encircled energy ratio BQ, Strehi ratio, diffraction limit factor β and beam propagation factor M2. In this paper, a beam quality measurement device is developed for high-power lasers. This device consists of a beam attenuator with large reflective ratio and minimal wavefront distortion, an off-axis parabolic mirror, an imaging lens and an infrared focal plane array detector. The laser beam intensity distribution, beam width, beam divergence and beam pointing stability can be obtained in real-time and the beam quality can be evaluated by the various determinations through imaging process. Advantages and disadvantages of these beam quality determination for evaluation the performance of the high-power lasers are analyzed and discussed. The measurement uncertainties of relative parameters are also analyzed and discussed.

  17. Experimental approach to high power long duration neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiike, Hiroshi

    1981-12-01

    Experimental studies of ion sources and beam dumps for the development of a high power long duration neutral beam injector for JT-60 are presented. Long pulse operation of high power beams requires a high degree of reliability. To develop a reliable ion source with large extraction area, a new duoPIGatron ion source with a coaxially shaped intermediate electrode is proposed and tested. Magnetic configuration is examined numerically to obtain high current arc discharge and source plasma with small density variation. Experimental results show that primary electrons were fed widely from the cathode plasma region to the source plasma region and that dense uniform source plasma could be obtained easily. Source plasma characteristics are studied and comparison of these with other sources are also described. To develop extraction electrode of high power ion source, experimental studies were made on the cooling of the electrode. Long Pulse beams were extracted safely under the condition of high heat loading on the electrode. Finally, burnout study for the development of high power beam dumps is presented. Burnout data were obtained from subcooled forced-convective boiling of water in a copper finned tube irradiated by high power ion beams. The results yield simple burnout correlations which can be used for the prediction of burnout heat flux of the beam dump. (author)

  18. Trends in intensity modulated radiation therapy use for locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network centers

    OpenAIRE

    Marsha Reyngold, MD, PhD; Joyce Niland, PhD; Anna ter Veer, MS; Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD; Lily Lai, MD; Joshua E. Meyer, MD; Steven J. Nurkin, MD, MS; Deborah Schrag, MD, MPH; John M. Skibber, MD, FACS; Al B. Benson, MD; Martin R. Weiser, MD; Christopher H. Crane, MD; Karyn A. Goodman, MD, MS

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been rapidly incorporated into clinical practice because of its technological advantages over 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT). We characterized trends in IMRT utilization in trimodality treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network cancer centers between 2005 and 2011. Methods and materials: Using the prospective National Comprehensive Cancer Network Colorectal Cancer Database, ...

  19. Diagnosis of power fade mechanisms in high-power lithium-ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, D. P.; Liu, J.; Chen, C. H.; Hyung, Y. E.; Stoll, M.; Elsen, N.; MacLaren, S.; Twesten, R.; Haasch, R.; Sammann, E.; Petrov, I.; Amine, K.; Henriksen, G.

    Hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) need long-lived high-power batteries as energy storage devices. Batteries based on lithium-ion technology can meet the high-power goals but have been unable to meet HEV calendar-life requirements. As part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program, diagnostic studies are being conducted on 18650-type lithium-ion cells that were subjected to accelerated aging tests at temperatures ranging from 40 to 70 °C. This article summarizes data obtained by gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, electron microscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques, and identifies cell components that are responsible for the observed impedance rise and power fade.

  20. Dense granular Flows: a conceptual design of high-power neutron source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-power neutron source system is very useful for multifunctional applications, such as material facilities for advanced nuclear power, space radiation studies, radiography and tomography. Here the idea of inclined dense granular flow is utilized and developed in a new conceptual design of a compact high-power target to produce a high-energy and high-flux neutron irradiation (the flux is up to 1015 n/cm2/s or even 1016. Comparing to the traditional solid and liquid heavy metal targets, this design has advantages in material choice, fluid stability, heat removal, etc. In this paper the natures of the granular flows in an inclined chute are investigated and preliminary experimental and numerical results are reported. Then the feasibility of this design is discussed.

  1. Dense granular Flows: a conceptual design of high-power neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Zhang, Sheng; Lin, Ping; Yang, Guanghui; Tian, Yuan; Wan, Jiang-feng

    2017-06-01

    A high-power neutron source system is very useful for multifunctional applications, such as material facilities for advanced nuclear power, space radiation studies, radiography and tomography. Here the idea of inclined dense granular flow is utilized and developed in a new conceptual design of a compact high-power target to produce a high-energy and high-flux neutron irradiation (the flux is up to 1015 n/cm2/s or even 1016). Comparing to the traditional solid and liquid heavy metal targets, this design has advantages in material choice, fluid stability, heat removal, etc. In this paper the natures of the granular flows in an inclined chute are investigated and preliminary experimental and numerical results are reported. Then the feasibility of this design is discussed.

  2. High-powered CO2 -lasers and noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkasalo, Antero; Kuronen, Juhani

    High-power CO2 -lasers are being more and more widely used for welding, drilling and cutting in machine shops. In the near future, different kinds of surface treatments will also become routine practice with laser units. The industries benefitting most from high power lasers will be: the automotive industry, shipbuilding, the offshore industry, the aerospace industry, the nuclear and the chemical processing industries. Metal processing lasers are interesting from the point of view of noise control because the working tool is a laser beam. It is reasonable to suppose that the use of such laser beams will lead to lower noise levels than those connected with traditional metal processing methods and equipment. In the following presentation, the noise levels and possible noise-control problems attached to the use of high-powered CO2 -lasers are studied.

  3. High power pulsed sources based on fiber amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canat, Guillaume; Jaouën, Yves; Mollier, Jean-Claude; Bouzinac, Jean-Pierre; Cariou, Jean-Pierre

    2017-11-01

    Cladding-pumped rare-earth-doped fiber laser technologies are currently among the best sources for high power applications. Theses extremely compact and robust sources appoint them as good candidate for aeronautical and space applications. The double-clad (DC) fiber converts the poor beamquality of high-power large-area pump diodes from the 1st cladding to laser light at another wavelength guided in an active single-mode core. High-power coherent MOPA (Master Oscillator Power Amplifier) sources (several 10W CW or several 100W in pulsed regime) will soon be achieved. Unfortunately it also brings nonlinear effects which quickly impairs output signal distortions. Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and optical parametric amplification (OPA) have been shown to be strong limitations. Based on amplifier modeling and experiments we discuss the performances of these sources.

  4. High-Power Linac for the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rej, D. J.

    2002-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be the world’s most intense source of neutrons for fundamental science and industrial applications. Design and construction of this facility, located at Oak Ridge, is a joint venture between six DOE laboratories. Construction began in 1999 and is currently ahead of the scheduled 2006 completion date. Injecting a high-power, pulsed proton beam into a mercury target produces neutrons. In this talk, we review the physics requirements, design, and status of the construction of the 1-GeV, 1.4-MW average power RF linac for SNS. The accelerator consists of a drift tube linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and a superconducting rf (SRF) linac. The phase and quadrupole settings are set to avoid structure and parametric resonances, with coherent resonances posing minimal risk for emittance growth. The DTL is 37 m long and accelerates the ions to 87 MeV. The CCL is 55 m long and accelerates the ions to 186 MeV. The rf structure design and stability for both the DTL and CCL have been validated with scale models. The SRF linac has a modular design to accelerate ions to 1000 MeV, with a straightforward upgrade to 1.3 GeV at a later date. 3D particle-in-cell simulations of beam dynamics are performed to validate performance. The accelerator utilizes 93 MW of pulsed power operating continuously at 60-Hz with an 8factor. Approximately one hundred 402.5 or 805-MHz klystrons, with outputs between 0.55 and 5 MW, are used. The klystrons are powered by a novel converter-modulator that takes advantage of recent advances in IGBT switch plate assemblies and low-loss material cores for boost transformer. Beam diagnostics include position, phase, profile, and current monitors. They are designed to enable accurate beam steering and matching, and to minimize beam loss that would lead to activation and prevent hands-on maintenance.

  5. Optical design of high power excimer laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongsheng; Zhao Jun; Ma Lianying; Yi Aiping; Liu Jingru

    2011-01-01

    Image relay and angular multiplexing,which should be considered together in the design of high power excimer laser system, is reviewed. It's important to select proper illumination setup and laser beam shaping techniques. Given the complex and special angular multiplexing scheme in high power excimer laser systems, some detailed conceptual layout schemes are given in the paper. After a brief description of lens array and reflective telescope objective, which combine the incoming beams to a common focus, a new schematic layout which uses the final targeting optics and one optical delay line array, to realize multiplexing and de-multiplexing simultaneously is first proposed in the paper. (authors)

  6. Science opportunities at high power accelerators like APT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browne, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents applications of high power RF proton linear accelerators to several fields. Radioisotope production is an area in which linacs have already provided new isotopes for use in medical and industrial applications. A new type of spallation neutron source, called a long-pulse spallation source (LPSS), is discussed for application to neutron scattering and to the production and use of ultra-cold neutrons (UCN). The concept of an accelerator-driven, transmutation of nuclear waste system, based on high power RF linac technology, is presented along with its impact on spent nuclear fuels

  7. Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Tuong, Viet; Dylla, III, Henry Frederick

    1997-01-01

    An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost.

  8. Design of High Power Density Amplifiers: Application to Ka Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passi, Davide; Leggieri, Alberto; Di Paolo, Franco; Bartocci, Marco; Tafuto, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    Recent developments in the design of high-power-high-frequency amplifiers are assessed in this paper by the analysis and measurements of a high power density amplifier operating in the Ka Band. Design procedure is presented and a technical investigation is reported. The proposed device has shown over 23% of useful frequency bandwidth. It is an ensemble of 16 monolithic solid state power amplifiers that employees mixed technologies as spatial and planar combiners. Test performed have given maximum delivered power of 47.2 dBm.

  9. Advancing environmental health surveillance in the US through a national human biomonitoring network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latshaw, Megan Weil; Degeberg, Ruhiyyih; Patel, Surili Sutaria; Rhodes, Blaine; King, Ewa; Chaudhuri, Sanwat; Nassif, Julianne

    2017-03-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive, nationally-coordinated, state-based environmental health surveillance system. This lack of infrastructure leads to: • varying levels of understanding of chemical exposures at the state & local levels • often inefficient public health responses to chemical exposure emergencies (such as those that occurred in the Flint drinking water crisis, the Gold King mine spill, the Elk river spill and the Gulf Coast oil spill) • reduced ability to measure the impact of public health interventions or environmental policies • less efficient use of resources for cleaning up environmental contamination Establishing the National Biomonitoring Network serves as a step toward building a national, state-based environmental health surveillance system. The Network builds upon CDC investments in emergency preparedness and environmental public health tracking, which have created advanced chemical analysis and information sharing capabilities in the state public health systems. The short-term goal of the network is to harmonize approaches to human biomonitoring in the US, thus increasing the comparability of human biomonitoring data across states and communities. The long-term goal is to compile baseline data on exposures at the state level, similar to data found in CDC's National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals. Barriers to success for this network include: available resources, effective risk communication strategies, data comparability & sharing, and political will. Anticipated benefits include high quality data on which to base public health and environmental decisions, data with which to assess the success of public health interventions, improved risk assessments for chemicals, and new ways to prioritize environmental health research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Containment performance analyses for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.

    1992-10-01

    This paper discusses salient aspects of methodology, assumptions, and modeling of various features related to estimation of source terms from two conservatively scoped severe accident scenarios in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various containment configurations are considered for steaming-pool-type accidents and an accident involving molten core-concrete interaction. Several design features (such as rupture disks) are examined to study containment response during postulated severe accidents. Also, thermal-hydraulic response of the containment and radionuclide transport and retention in the containment are studied. The results are described as transient variations of source terms for each scenario, which are to be used for studying off-site radiological consequences and health effects for these postulated severe accidents. Also highlighted will be a comparison of source terms estimated by two different versions of the MELCOR code

  11. Locally advance breast cancer survival after radiotherapy following mastectomy at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ospino, Rosalba; Cendales, Ricardo; Cifuentes, Javier; Sanchez, Zayda; Galvis, Juan; Bobadilla, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate survival after treatment with mastectomy and teletherapy for locally advance breast cancer at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia. Methods: A case serie analysis was conducted. Frequencies and measures of central tendency were applied. Locoregional relapse free survival, disease free survival and overall survival were determined with Kaplan-Meyer and Cox regression analyses. Results: 174 patiens were included. Most of the patients corresponded to ductal tumors with positive axillary nodes and hormone receptors. The treatment was neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, axillary nodes resection, radiotherapy, and adjuvant hormone therapy. The 5-years locoregional relapse free survival was 88.8%, disease free survival was 63.3%, and overall survival 84.4%. Conclusions: The results are similar to previous reports. Breast reconstruction was associated with a greater chance of locoregional relapse. The node rate is a relevant predictor for overall survival, disease free survival, and locoregional relapse free survival, and tumor grade for the former two.

  12. Locally advance breast cancer survival after radiotherapy following mastectomy at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ospino, Rosalba; Cendales, Ricardo; Cifuentes, Javier; Sanchez, Zayda; Galvis, Juan; Bobadilla, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate survival after treatment with mastectomy and teletherapy for locally advance breast cancer at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia. Methods: A case serie analysis was conducted. Frequencies and measures of central tendency were applied. Locoregional relapse free survival, disease free survival and overall survival were determined with Kaplan-Meyer and Cox regression analyses. Results: 174 patients were included. Most of the patients corresponded to ductal tumors with positive axillary nodes and hormone receptors. The treatment was neoadjuvant chemotherapy, mastectomy, axillary nodes resection, radiotherapy, and adjuvant hormone therapy. The 5-years locoregional relapse free survival was 88.8%, disease free survival was 63.3%, and overall survival 84.4%. Conclusions: The results are similar to previous reports. Breast reconstruction was associated with a greater chance of locoregional relapse. The node rate is a relevant predictor for overall survival, disease free survival, and locoregional relapse free survival, and tumor grade for the former two.

  13. Ignition studies in support of the European High Power Laser ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The European High Power Laser Energy Research Facility (HiPER) project is one of a number of large-scale scientific infrastructure projects supported by the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7). Part of this project involves the development of a target area for the exploration of inertial fusion ...

  14. Rapid heating of matter using high power lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Woosuk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-08

    This slide presentation describes motivation (uniform and rapid heating of a target, opportunity to study warm dense matter, study of nuclear fusion reactions), rapid heating of matter with intense laser-driven ion beams, visualization of the expanding warm dense gold and diamond, and nuclear fusion experiments using high power lasers (direct heating of deuterium spheres (radius ~ 10nm) with an intense laser pulse.

  15. Energy Efficient and Compact RF High-Power Amplifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calvillo Cortés, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    The main objectives of this thesis are to improve the energy efficiency and physical form-factor of high-power amplifiers in base station applications. As such, the focus of this dissertation is placed on the outphasing amplifier concept, which can offer high-efficiency, good linearity and excellent

  16. High-power lasers for directed-energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprangle, Phillip; Hafizi, Bahman; Ting, Antonio; Fischer, Richard

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we review and discuss the research programs at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) on high-power lasers for directed-energy (DE) applications in the atmosphere. Physical processes affecting propagation include absorption/scattering, turbulence, and thermal blooming. The power levels needed for DE applications require combining a number of lasers. In atmospheric turbulence, there is a maximum intensity that can be placed on a target that is independent of the initial beam spot size and laser beam quality. By combining a number of kW-class fiber lasers, scientists at the NRL have successfully demonstrated high-power laser propagation in a turbulent atmosphere and wireless recharging. In the NRL experiments, four incoherently combined fiber lasers having a total power of 5 kW were propagated to a target 3.2 km away. These successful high-power experiments in a realistic atmosphere formed the basis of the Navy's Laser Weapon System. We compare the propagation characteristics of coherently and incoherently combined beams without adaptive optics. There is little difference in the energy on target between coherently and incoherently combined laser beams for multi-km propagation ranges and moderate to high levels of turbulence. Unlike incoherent combining, coherent combining places severe constraints on the individual lasers. These include the requirement of narrow power spectral linewidths in order to have long coherence times as well as polarization alignment of all the lasers. These requirements are extremely difficult for high-power lasers.

  17. Active Snubber Circuit for High Power Inverter Leg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Tonny Wederberg; Johansen, Morten Holst

    2009-01-01

    Abstract— High power converters in the conventional 6 pulse configuration with 6 switching elements IGBTs (Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor) are pushed to the limit of power. Especially the switching loss is high. This reduces the switching frequency due to cooling problems. Passive snubber...... indicating that the switching loss is reduced. Comparison between hard switched, passive and active snubber is done....

  18. Trends in packaging of high power semiconductor laser bars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solarz, R.W.; Emanuel, M.A.; Skidmore, J.A.; Freitas, B.L.; Krupke, W.F.

    1997-07-01

    Several different approaches to packaging high power diode laser bars for pumping solid state lasers or for direct diode laser applications are examined. The benefit and utility of each package is strongly dependent upon the fundamental optoelectronic properties of the individual diode laser bars. Factors which influence these properties are outlined and comparisons of packaging approaches for these materials are made.

  19. Using high-power light emitting diodes for photoacoustic imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, R. S.

    2011-01-01

    The preliminary result of using a high-power light emitting diode, LED, for photoacoustic imaging is presented. The pulsed light source is created by a 1Watt red Luxeon LED. The LED delivers light pulses with 25W peak power when supplied by 40A peak, 60ns wide current pulses. The phantom used for...

  20. Recent results in mirror based high power laser cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Nielsen, Jakob Skov; Elvang, Mads

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, recent results in high power laser cutting, obtained in reseach and development projects are presented. Two types of mirror based focussing systems for laser cutting have been developed and applied in laser cutting studies on CO2-lasers up to 12 kW. In shipyard environment cutting...

  1. Los Alamos high-power proton linac designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, G.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Medium-energy high-power proton linear accelerators have been studied at Los Alamos as drivers for spallation neutron applications requiring large amounts of beam power. Reference designs for such accelerators are discussed, important design factors are reviewed, and issues and concern specific to this unprecedented power regime are discussed.

  2. High Powered Rocketry: Design, Construction, and Launching Experience and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Pryce; Curtis, Jarret; Bartel, Evan; Cyr, Waycen Owens; Lamsal, Chiranjivi

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the nuts and bolts of designing and building a high powered rocket have been presented. A computer simulation program called RockSim was used to design the rocket. Simulation results are consistent with time variations of altitude, velocity, and acceleration obtained in the actual flight. The actual drag coefficient was determined…

  3. Thermal design for the high-power LED lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Xiaogai; Chen Wei; Zhang Jiyong

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes different kinds of heat sinks on the market for high power LED lamps. Analysis is made on the thermal model of LED, PCB and heat sink separately with a simplified mode provided. Two examples of simulation are illustrated as a demonstration for the thermal simulation as guidance for LED lamp design. (semiconductor devices)

  4. Functionally graded materials produced with high power lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Hosson, J. T. M.; Ocelik, V.; Chandra, T; Torralba, JM; Sakai, T

    2003-01-01

    In this keynote paper two examples will be present of functionally graded materials produced with high power Nd:YAG lasers. In particular the conditions for a successful Laser Melt Injection (LMI) of SiC and WC particles into the melt pool of A18Si and Ti6Al4V alloys are presented. The formation of

  5. Possibilities of production of nanopowders with high power ELV ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Possibilities of production of nanopowders with high power ELV electron accelerator. Vladimir Ivanovich Lysenko Sergey Bardakhanov Alexey Korchagin Nikolay Kuksanov Alexander Lavrukhin Rustam Salimov Sergey Fadeev Vladislav Cherepkov Mikhail Veis Andrey Nomoev. Volume 34 Issue 4 July 2011 pp 677-681 ...

  6. High Power Factor Hybrid Rectifier | Odeh | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the analysis of a new single-phase hybrid rectifier with high power factor (PF) and low harmonic distortion current. The proposed rectifier structure is composed of an ordinary single-phase diode rectifier with parallel connection of a switched converter. It is outlined that the switched converter is capable of ...

  7. In-situ strain observation in high power laser cladding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelik, V.; Bosgra, J.; de Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2009-01-01

    The modern experimental technique - so called Digital Image Correlation - is applied during high power laser surface treatments for in-situ observation of displacements and strains near the processing area during and a short time after laser processing. An experimental setup has been designed and

  8. Measurement of high-power microwave pulse under intense ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KALI-1000 pulse power system has been used to generate single pulse nanosecond duration high-power microwaves (HPM) from a virtual cathode oscillator (VIRCATOR) device. HPM power measurements were carried out using a transmitting–receiving system in the presence of intense high frequency (a few MHz) ...

  9. Measurement of high-power microwave pulse under intense ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. KALI-1000 pulse power system has been used to generate single pulse nanosecond duration high-power microwaves (HPM) from a virtual cathode oscillator. (VIRCATOR) device. HPM power measurements were carried out using a transmitting– receiving system in the presence of intense high frequency (a few ...

  10. High Power High Efficiency Diode Laser Stack for Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuanyuan; Lu, Hui; Fu, Yueming; Cui, Yan

    2018-03-01

    High-power diode lasers based on GaAs semiconductor bars are well established as reliable and highly efficient laser sources. As diode laser is simple in structure, small size, longer life expectancy with the advantages of low prices, it is widely used in the industry processing, such as heat treating, welding, hardening, cladding and so on. Respectively, diode laser could make it possible to establish the practical application because of rectangular beam patterns which are suitable to make fine bead with less power. At this power level, it can have many important applications, such as surgery, welding of polymers, soldering, coatings and surface treatment of metals. But there are some applications, which require much higher power and brightness, e.g. hardening, key hole welding, cutting and metal welding. In addition, High power diode lasers in the military field also have important applications. So all developed countries have attached great importance to high-power diode laser system and its applications. This is mainly due their low performance. In this paper we will introduce the structure and the principle of the high power diode stack.

  11. Amplified spontaneous emission pulses for high-power supercontinuum generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Huan Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors demonstrate an incoherent light source based on a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier as pump for high-power supercontinuum generation for the first time. The obtained power level is about 160 mW and 20 dB spectral bandwidth is around 170 nm.

  12. Neutronic analysis of a high power density hybrid reactor using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in hexagonal geometry with ten rows of pitch length 1·25 cm in the radial direction. In the investigated blanket, selection of the potential structural materials for a high power density reactor is conducted on the basis of the following considerations. Among the candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, tungsten (W) has ...

  13. Improved Structure and Fabrication of Large, High-Power KHPS Rotors - Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corren, Dean [Verdant Power, Inc.; Colby, Jonathan [Verdant Power, Inc.; Adonizio, Mary Ann [Verdant Power, Inc.

    2013-01-29

    Verdant Power, Inc, working in partnership with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Minnesota St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL), among other partners, used evolving Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) models and techniques to improve the structure and fabrication of large, high-power composite Kinetic Hydropower System (KHPS) rotor blades. The objectives of the project were to: design; analyze; develop for manufacture and fabricate; and thoroughly test, in the lab and at full scale in the water, the improved KHPS rotor blade.

  14. Progress on high-power 808nm VCSELs and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Delai; Seurin, Jean-Francois; Xu, Guoyang; Van Leeuwen, Robert; Miglo, Alexander; Wang, Qing; Kovsh, Alexey; Ghosh, Chuni

    2017-02-01

    High power 808nm semiconductor lasers are widely used for pumping neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) crystal to produce high-brightness lasing at 1064nm. In addition, there are growing interest to use such high power 808nm lasers in the field of automotive infra-red (IR) illumination and medical aesthetic treatment. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) have emerged as a promising candidate and attracted increased interests for those applications, due to their combined advantages of high efficiency, low diverging circular beam, narrow emission spectrum with reduced temperature sensitivity, low-cost manufacturability, simpler coupling optics, and increased reliability, especially at high temperatures. They can emit very high power with very high power density as they can be conveniently configured into large two-dimensional arrays and modules of arrays. We report recent development on such high-power, high-efficiency 808nm VCSELs with industrial leading 55% power conversion efficiency (PCE). Top emitting VCSELs were grown by MOCVD and processed into single devices and 2D arrays using selective wet oxidation process and substrate removal technique for efficient current confinement and heat removal. Peak PCE of 51% and peak power of 800W were achieved from 5x5mm array, corresponding to peak power density of 4kW/cm2. Pumped with new generation of 2.3kW VCSEL module, Q-switched laser pulse energy at 1064nm reached 46.9mJ, more than doubled from previously reported results.

  15. [Scientific advice by the national and European approval authorities concerning advanced therapy medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Nils; Schüssler-Lenz, Martina; Ziegele, Bettina; Reinhardt, Jens

    2015-11-01

    The aim of scientific advice is to support pharmaceutical developers in regulatory and scientific questions, thus facilitating the development of safe and efficacious new medicinal products. Recent years have shown that the development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) in particular needs a high degree of regulatory support. On one hand, this is related to the complexity and heterogeneity of this group of medicinal products and on the other hand due to the fact that mainly academic research institutions and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are developing ATMPs. These often have limited regulatory experience and resources. In 2009 the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI) initiated the Innovation Office as a contact point for applicants developing ATMPs. The mandate of the Innovation Office is to provide support on regulatory questions and to coordinate national scientific advice meetings concerning ATMPs for every phase in drug development and especially with view to the preparation of clinical trial applications. On the European level, the Scientific Advice Working Party (SAWP) of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicinal Agency (EMA) offers scientific advice. This article describes the concepts of national and EMA scientific advice concerning ATMPs and summarizes the experience of the last six years.

  16. Operational experience on the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.

    1994-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility is a laser-electron linear accelerator complex designed to provide high brightness beams for testing of advanced acceleration concepts and high power pulsed photon sources. Results of electron beam parameters attained during the commissioning of the nominally 45 MeV energy machine are presented

  17. Advanced Manufacturing - National Information Infrastructure (AM-NII) Final Report CRADA No. TO-4013-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickers, Don [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2001-03-23

    Advanced Manufacturing - National Information Infrastructure (AM-NII) was a multiyear DOE/DP program, involving multiple DOE laboratories and production facilities, focused on improving the manufacturing capabilities of the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) through the application of modem information technologies. AM-NII's published mission states: "In partnership with the manufacturing business sector, AMNII will leverage DOE capabilities to develop, demonstrate, and pilot industrial information infrastructure and applications that enhance national security." LLNL's AM-NII project targeted two opportunities for improving NWC manufacturing capabilities. First was the link between the NWC and its outside suppliers of manufactured parts - web-based supply-chain integration. Second was the cross-site enterprise integration (EI) within the Complex itself. The general approach to supply-chain integration was to leverage the National Information Infrastructure (including Internet) to demonstrate the procurement of fabricated electrical and mechanical parts using a completely paperless procurement process. The general approach to NWC enterprise integration was to utilize SecureNet, a network that provides a secure, high-speed data link among the various NWC sites. If one looks at SecureNet as "the track," our goal was to get the trains running. Cross-site enterprise integration presupposes there is some level of local integration, so we worked both local and cross-site is sues simultaneously. Our EI work was in support of the LLNL Stockpile Life Extension Programs (SLEPs), the Submarine Launch Ballistic Missile Warhead Protection Program (SWPP), and the Laser Cutter Workstation installed at Y-12.

  18. Experimental progress on virtual-cathode very high power microwave source development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.; Hoeberling, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution of rf accelerator technology toward high-power, high-current, low-emittance beams produces an ever-increasing demand for efficient, very high power microwave sources. The present klystron technology has performed very well but is not expected to produce reliable gigawatt peak-power units in the 1- to 10-GHz regime. Further major advancements must involve other types of sources. The reflexing electron sources can produce microwave powers at the gigawatt level and have demonstrated operation from 800 MHz to 40 GHz. Pulse length appears to be limited by electron-beam diode closure, and reflexing electron devices have been operated in a repetitively pulsed mode. An experiment is under way to investigate concepts to stabilize the frequency of the virtual cathode source. If one can successfully frequency and phase lock this source to an external signal, then this source can operate as a very high power microwave amplifier making it practical for accelerator applications. The progress on an experiment to test these concepts will be discussed

  19. Novel method to sample very high power CO2 lasers: II Continuing Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric, John; Seibert, Daniel B., II; Green, Lawrence I.

    2005-04-01

    For the past 28 years, the Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory (LHMEL) at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH, has worked with CO2 lasers capable of producing continuous energy up to 150 kW. These lasers are used in a number of advanced materials processing applications that require accurate spatial energy measurements of the laser. Conventional non-electronic methods are not satisfactory for determining the spatial energy profile. This paper describes continuing efforts in qualifying the new method in which a continuous, real-time electronic spatial energy profile can be obtained for very high power, (VHP) CO2 lasers.

  20. High-Power, High-Speed Electro-Optic Pockels Cell Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Justin; Battle, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Electro-optic modulators rely on a change in the index of refraction for the optical wave as a function of an applied voltage. The corresponding change in index acts to delay the wavefront in the waveguide. The goal of this work was to develop a high-speed, high-power waveguide- based modulator (phase and amplitude) and investigate its use as a pulse slicer. The key innovation in this effort is the use of potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) waveguides, making the highpower, polarization-based waveguide amplitude modulator possible. Furthermore, because it is fabricated in KTP, the waveguide component will withstand high optical power and have a significantly higher RF modulation figure of merit (FOM) relative to lithium niobate. KTP waveguides support high-power TE and TM modes - a necessary requirement for polarization-based modulation as with a Pockels cell. High-power fiber laser development has greatly outpaced fiber-based modulators in terms of its maturity and specifications. The demand for high-performance nonlinear optical (NLO) devices in terms of power handling, efficiency, bandwidth, and useful wavelength range has driven the development of bulk NLO options, which are limited in their bandwidth, as well as waveguide based LN modulators, which are limited by their low optical damage threshold. Today, commercially available lithium niobate (LN) modulators are used for laser formatting; however, because of photorefractive damage that can reduce transmission and increase requirements on bias control, LN modulators cannot be used with powers over several mW, dependent on wavelength. The high-power, high-speed modulators proposed for development under this effort will enable advancements in several exciting fields including lidarbased remote sensing, atomic interferometry, free-space laser communications, and others.

  1. Test Results From a High Power Linear Alternator Test Rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenough, Arthur G.; Hervol, David S.; Gardner, Brent G.

    2010-01-01

    Stirling cycle power conversion is an enabling technology that provides high thermodynamic efficiency but also presents unique challenges with regard to electrical power generation, management, and distribution. The High Power Linear Alternator Test Rig (HPLATR) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio is a demonstration test bed that simulates electrical power generation from a Stirling engine driven alternator. It implements the high power electronics necessary to provide a well regulated DC user load bus. These power electronics use a novel design solution that includes active rectification and power factor control, active ripple suppression, along with a unique building block approach that permits the use of high voltage or high current alternator designs. This report describes the HPLATR, the test program, and the operational results.

  2. Embedded control system for high power RF amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Deepak Kumar; Gupta, Alok Kumar; Jain, Akhilesh; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    RF power devices are usually very sensitive to overheat and reflected RF power; hence a protective interlock system is required to be embedded with high power solid state RF amplifiers. The solid state RF amplifiers have salient features of graceful degradation and very low mean time to repair (MTTR). In order to exploit these features in favour of lowest system downtime, a real-time control system is embedded with high power RF amplifiers. The control system is developed with the features of monitoring, measurement and network publishing of various parameters, historical data logging, alarm generation, displaying data to the operator and tripping the system in case of any interlock failure. This paper discusses the design philosophy, features, functions and implementation details of the embedded control system. (author)

  3. High-power green diode laser systems for biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, André

    spectroscopy and imaging, and fluorescence measurements. A major challenge in diode laser technology is to obtain high-power laser emission at wavelengths green spectral range is of high importance, for example, in dermatology or for direct pumping of ultrashort pulsed lasers...... in conjunction with optical coherence tomography, two-photon microscopy or coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. In order to provide high-power green diode laser emission, nonlinear frequency conversion of state-of-the-art near-infrared diode lasers represents a necessary means. However, the obtained...... output power of frequency doubled single emitters is limited by thermal effects potentially resulting in laser degradation and failure. In this work new concepts for power scaling of visible diode laser systems are introduced that help to overcome current limitations and enhance the application potential...

  4. Transient Plasma Photonic Crystals for High-Power Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, G; Spatschek, K H

    2016-06-03

    A new type of transient photonic crystals for high-power lasers is presented. The crystal is produced by counterpropagating laser beams in plasma. Trapped electrons and electrically forced ions generate a strong density grating. The lifetime of the transient photonic crystal is determined by the ballistic motion of ions. The robustness of the photonic crystal allows one to manipulate high-intensity laser pulses. The scheme of the crystal is analyzed here by 1D Vlasov simulations. Reflection or transmission of high-power laser pulses are predicted by particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a transient plasma photonic crystal may act as a tunable mirror for intense laser pulses. Generalizations to 2D and 3D configurations are possible.

  5. Active Photonic crystal fibers for high power applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin

    The photonic crystal ber technology provides means to realize bers optimized for high power operation, due to the large single-mode cores and the unique design exibility of the microstructure. The work presented in this thesis focuses on improving the properties of active photonic crystal bers...... contributed to the compounding of new and improved material compositions. The second part is an investigation of pump absorption in photonic crystal bers, demonstrating that the microstructure in photonic crystal bers improves the pump absorption by up to a factor of two compared to step-index bers....... This plays an important role in high power lasers and ampliers with respect to efficiency, packaging, and thermal handling. The third part of the work has involved developing tools for characterizing the mode quality and stability of large core bers. Stable, single-mode bers with larger cores are essential...

  6. Hollow-core fibers for high power pulse delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Lyngsø, Jens K.; Jakobsen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    picosecond pulses. A novel fiber with 7 tubes and a core of 30 mu m was fabricated and it is here described and characterized, showing remarkable low loss, low bend loss, and good mode quality. Its optical properties are compared to both a 10 mu m and a 18 mu m core diameter photonic band gap hollow......We investigate hollow-core fibers for fiber delivery of high power ultrashort laser pulses. We use numerical techniques to design an anti-resonant hollow-core fiber having one layer of non-touching tubes to determine which structures offer the best optical properties for the delivery of high power......-core fiber. The three fibers are characterized experimentally for the delivery of 22 picosecond pulses at 1032nm. We demonstrate flexible, diffraction limited beam delivery with output average powers in excess of 70W. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America...

  7. Benefits of quantum well intermixing in high power diode lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najda, Stephen P.; Bacchin, Gianluca; Qiu, Bocang; Liu, Xuefeng; Kowalski, Olek P.; Silver, Mark; McDougall, Stewart D.; Hamilton, Craig J.; Marsh, John H.

    2004-05-01

    Quantum well intermixing (QWI) can bring considerable benefits to the reliability and performance of high power laser diodes by intermixing the facet regions of the device to increase the band-gap and hence eliminate absorption, avoiding catastrophic optical damage (COD). The non-absorbing mirror (NAM) regions of the laser cavity can be up to ~20% of the cavity length, giving an additional benefit on cleave tolerances, to fabricate very large element arrays of high power, individually addressable, single mode lasers. As a consequence, large arrays of single mode lasers can bring additional benefits for packaging in terms of hybrization and integration into an optics system. Our QWI techniques have been applied to a range of material systems, including GaAs/AlGaAs, (Al)GaAsP/AlGaAs and InGaAs/GaAs.

  8. High power rf component testing for the NLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.

    1998-09-01

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC), the high power rf components must be capable of handling peak rf power levels in excess of 600 MW. In the current view of the NLC, even the rectangular waveguide components must transmit at least 300 MW rf power. At this power level, peak rf fields can greatly exceed 100 MV/m. The authors present recent results of high power tests performed at the Accelerator Structure Test Area (ASTA) at SLAC. These tests are designed to investigate the rf breakdown limits of several new components potentially useful for the NLC. In particular, the authors tested a new TE 01 --TE 10 circular to rectangular wrap-around mode converter, a modified (internal fin) Magic Tee hybrid, and an upgraded flower petal mode converter

  9. High-Power Microwave Transmission and Mode Conversion Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vernon, Ronald J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-08-14

    This is a final technical report for a long term project to develop improved designs and design tools for the microwave hardware and components associated with the DOE Plasma Fusion Program. We have developed basic theory, software, fabrication techniques, and low-power measurement techniques for the design of microwave hardware associated gyrotrons, microwave mode converters and high-power microwave transmission lines. Specifically, in this report we discuss our work on designing quasi-optical mode converters for single and multiple frequencies, a new method for the analysis of perturbed-wall waveguide mode converters, perturbed-wall launcher design for TE0n mode gyrotrons, quasi-optical traveling-wave resonator design for high-power testing of microwave components, and possible improvements to the HSX microwave transmission line.

  10. High-Power Electron Accelerators for Space (and other) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lewellen, John W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-23

    This is a presentation on high-power electron accelerators for space and other applications. The main points covered are: electron beams for space applications, new designs of RF accelerators, high-power high-electron mobility transistors (HEMT) testing, and Li-ion battery design. In summary, the authors have considered a concept of 1-MeV electron accelerator that can operate up to several seconds. This concept can be extended to higher energy to produce higher beam power. Going to higher beam energy requires adding more cavities and solid-state HEMT RF power devices. The commercial HEMT have been tested for frequency response and RF output power (up to 420 W). Finally, the authors are testing these HEMT into a resonant load and planning for an electron beam test in FY17.

  11. Electromagnetic pulses generated by high-power laser experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubrano-Lavaderci, F.; Dubois, J.L.; Gazave, J.; Raffestin, D.; Bazzoli, S.

    2013-01-01

    During high-power laser experiments, intense electromagnetic fields are produced. For future facilities, the field level is extrapolated from measurements performed on current experimental rooms. In the LMJ (Laser Mega Joule) target chamber with the high-power PETAL beam (Petawatt Aquitaine Laser), the expected field is about 1 MW/m for high laser intensity shots (higher than 10 19 W/cm 2 ). This is a harsh environment for electric equipments. For these short-pulse laser experiments, simulations show that electromagnetic pulses are due to charged particles emission during the shot, more exactly they are due to the resulting replacement currents that appear in the target chamber. This paper shows a simulation (with the numerical tool SOPHIE) of this phenomenon, in good agreement with experimental data from Titan and Omega-EP facilities. (authors)

  12. Advanced Manufacturing for Thermal and Environmental Control Systems: Achieving National Energy Goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogucz, Edward A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    2017-02-20

    This project was part of a regional initiative in the five counties of Central New York (CNY) that received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and four other federal agencies through the 2012 Advanced Manufacturing Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge (AMJIAC). The CNY initiative was focused on cultivating the emergent regional cluster in “Advanced Manufacturing for Thermal and Environmental Control (AM-TEC).” As one component of the CNY AM-TEC initiative, the DOE-funded project supported five research & development seed projects that strategically targeted: 1) needs and opportunities of CNY AM-TEC companies, and 2) the goal of DOE’s Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) to reduce energy consumption by 50% across product life-cycles over 10 years. The project also sought to fulfill the AMO mission of developing and demonstrating new, energy-efficient processing and materials technologies at a scale adequate to prove their value to manufacturers and spur investment. The five seed projects demonstrated technologies and processes that can reduce energy intensity and improve production as well as use less energy throughout their lifecycles. The project was conducted over three years in two 18-month budget periods. During the first budget period, two projects proposed in the original AMJAIC application were successfully completed: Seed Project 1 focused on saving energy in heat transfer processes via development of nano structured surfaces to significantly increase heat flux; Seed Project 2 addressed saving energy in data centers via subzero cooling of the computing processors. Also during the first budget period, a process was developed and executed to select a second round of seed projects via a competitive request for proposals from regional companies and university collaborators. Applicants were encouraged to form industry-academic partnerships to leverage experience and resources of public and private sectors in the CNY region. Proposals were

  13. A National Collaboratory To Advance The Science Of High Temperature Plasma Physics For Magnetic Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, Allen R.; Johnson, Christopher R.

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes the work of the University of Utah, which was a member of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it the NFC built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was itself a collaboration, itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, and Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. The complete finial report is attached as an addendum. The In the collaboration, the primary technical responsibility of the University of Utah in the collaboration was to develop and deploy an advanced scientific visualization service. To achieve this goal, the SCIRun Problem Solving Environment (PSE) is used on FusionGrid for an advanced scientific visualization service. SCIRun is open source software that gives the user the ability to create complex 3D visualizations and 2D graphics. This capability allows for the exploration of complex simulation results and the comparison of simulation and experimental data. SCIRun on FusionGrid gives the scientist a no-license-cost visualization capability that rivals present day commercial visualization packages. To accelerate the usage of SCIRun within the fusion community, a stand-alone application built on top of SCIRun was developed and deployed. This application, FusionViewer, allows users who are unfamiliar with SCIRun to quickly create

  14. A NATIONAL COLLABORATORY TO ADVANCE THE SCIENCE OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA PHYSICS FOR MAGNETIC FUSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen R. Sanderson; Christopher R. Johnson

    2006-08-01

    This report summarizes the work of the University of Utah, which was a member of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it the NFC built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was itself a collaboration, itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, and Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. The complete finial report is attached as an addendum. The In the collaboration, the primary technical responsibility of the University of Utah in the collaboration was to develop and deploy an advanced scientific visualization service. To achieve this goal, the SCIRun Problem Solving Environment (PSE) is used on FusionGrid for an advanced scientific visualization service. SCIRun is open source software that gives the user the ability to create complex 3D visualizations and 2D graphics. This capability allows for the exploration of complex simulation results and the comparison of simulation and experimental data. SCIRun on FusionGrid gives the scientist a no-license-cost visualization capability that rivals present day commercial visualization packages. To accelerate the usage of SCIRun within the fusion community, a stand-alone application built on top of SCIRun was developed and deployed. This application, FusionViewer, allows users who are unfamiliar with SCIRun to quickly create

  15. Free-electron masers vs. gyrotrons prospects for high-power sources at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Thumm, M K

    2002-01-01

    The possible applications of high-power millimeter (mm) and sub-mm waves from free-electron masers (FEMs) and gyro-devices span a wide range of technologies. The plasma physics community has already taken advantage of recent advances in applying high-power mm waves generated by long pulse or continuous wave (CW) gyrotron oscillators and short pulse very high-power FEMs in the areas of RF-plasma production, heating, non-inductive current drive, plasma stabilization and active plasma diagnostics for magnetic confinement thermonuclear fusion research, such as electron cyclotron resonance heating (28-170 GHz), electron cyclotron current drive , collective Thomson scattering , microwave transmission and heat-wave propagation experiments. Continuously frequency tunable FEMs could widen these fields of applications. Another important application of CW gyrotrons is industrial materials processing, e.g. sintering of high-performance functional and structural nanostructured ceramics. Sub-mm wave sources are employed in...

  16. High power operational experience with the LANSCE Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The heart of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a pulsed linear accelerator that is used to simultaneously provide H+ and H- beams to several user facilities. This accelerator contains two Cockcroft-Walton style injectors, a 100-MeV drift tube linac and an 800-MeV coupled cavity linac. This presentation will touch on various aspects of the high power operation including performance, tune-up strategy, beam losses and machine protection.

  17. Physics of high-power electron beam-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koidan, V. S.

    1996-03-01

    Results related to physics of collective interaction of a high-power relativistic electron beam with a magnetized plasma are presented. The main regularities of this process are given. The observed peculiarities of hot plasma producing by E-beam heating on the GOL-3 device are discussed. Some results on study of strong Langmuir turbulence by laser scattering method on GOL-M device are presented.

  18. Physics of high-power electron beam-plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koidan, V.S.

    1996-01-01

    Results related to physics of collective interaction of a high-power relativistic electron beam with a magnetized plasma are presented. The main regularities of this process are given. The observed peculiarities of hot plasma producing by E-beam heating on the GOL-3 device are discussed. Some results on study of strong Langmuir turbulence by laser scattering method on GOL-M device are presented. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  19. High-power laser diodes at various wavelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emanuel, M.A.

    1997-02-19

    High power laser diodes at various wavelengths are described. First, performance and reliability of an optimized large transverse mode diode structure at 808 and 941 nm are presented. Next, data are presented on a 9.5 kW peak power array at 900 nm having a narrow emission bandwidth suitable for pumping Yb:S-FAP laser materials. Finally, results on a fiber-coupled laser diode array at {approx}730 nm are presented.

  20. Treatment of multicomponent microbarographic signals excited by high power explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delclos, C.

    1986-04-01

    A method for analysis of microbarographic signals recorded on a sensor network is developed, the aim is the localization of the source with maximum accuracy. It is shown that the method using the interspectral matrix finds a direct application in the discrimination of waves from high power explosion in a noisy environment. Its powerfulness is demonstrated on actual signals (explosion of the volcano Mt St Helens) allowing interesting results on propagation mechanisms (Brunt period, Lamb modes and acoustic modes) [fr

  1. Lightning control system using high power microwave FEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiho, M.; Watanabe, A.; Kawasaki, S.; Ishizuka, H.; Takayama, K.; Kishiro, J.; Shindo, T.; Fujioka, T.

    1996-02-01

    A research project for developing a thunder lightning control system using an induction linac based high power microwave free electron laser (FEL) was started at JAERI. The system will produce a weakly ionized plasma rod in the atmosphere by high power microwaves and control a lightning path, away from, e.g., nuclear power stations and rocket launchers. It has been known that about 1 MW/cm 2 power density is enough for the atmospheric breakdown in the microwave region, which means that a high power microwave FEL with GW level output power is feasible for atmospheric breakdown, and accordingly is feasible for a thunder lightning control tool by making a conductive plasma channel in the atmosphere. From the microwave attenuation consideration in the atmosphere, FELs of 35 GHz (0.13 dB/km), 90 GHz (0.35 dB/km), 140 GHz (1.7 dB/km), and of 270 GHz (4.5 dB/km) are the best candidates for the system. Compared with other proposed lightning control systems using a visible or an ultraviolet laser, the system using microwave has the advantage that microwave has a smaller attenuation with rain or snow which always exists in the real atmospheric circumstances when lightning occurs. A detailed description and feasibility study of the system will be given.

  2. ''Del'fin'' high-power laser thermonuclear machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basov, N.G.; Krokhin, O.N.; Mikhailov, Yu.A.; Sklizkov, G.V.; Fedotov, S.I.

    The high-power 12-channel ''Del'fin'' laser device, designed for high-temperature heating of thermonuclear targets in a spherical irradiation geometry, is described. The device includes a neodymium laser with a maximum radiative energy of approximately 10 kJ, a light pulse lasting 10 -10 -- 10 -9 sec with an irradiation divergence of approximately 5.10 -4 rad, a vacuum chamber in which the laser radiation interacts with a plasma, and a set of devices for laser parameter and plasma diagnostics. The optical design and structural characteristics of the laser system are discussed. Designs for focusing the radiation on a target are analyzed, and the focusing system of the ''Del'fin'' device, permitting a high degree of symmetry of the spherical irradiation of the target with a maximum flux density of approximately 10 15 W/cm 2 on its surface, is described. Also discussed is the problem of realizing the maximum possibilities of heating of spherical thermonuclear targets with the radiation of high-power laser systems. The practically attainable laser radiation parameters are also considered. In the case of a laser system with a series-parallel arrangement of the amplification stages, relationships are obtained which make it possible to analyze the effect of the target and laser parameters on the magnitude of the maximum possible laser pulse energy in a spherical heating geometry. The results obtained were used in the design of the ''Del'fin'' high-power laser device

  3. High Energy Density Sciences with High Power Lasers at SACLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Ryosuke

    2013-10-01

    One of the interesting topics on high energy density sciences with high power lasers is creation of extremely high pressures in material. The pressures of more than 0.1 TPa are the energy density corresponding to the chemical bonding energy, resulting in expectation of dramatic changes in the chemical reactions. At pressures of more than TPa, most of material would be melted on the shock Hugoniot curve. However, if the temperature is less than 1eV or lower than a melting point at pressures of more than TPa, novel solid states of matter must be created through a pressured phase transition. One of the interesting materials must be carbon. At pressures of more than TPa, the diamond structure changes to BC and cubic at more than 3TPa. To create such novel states of matter, several kinds of isentropic-like compression techniques are being developed with high power lasers. To explore the ``Tera-Pascal Science,'' now we have a new tool which is an x-ray free electron laser as well as high power lasers. The XFEL will clear the details of the HED states and also efficiently create hot dense matter. We have started a new project on high energy density sciences using an XFEL (SACLA) in Japan, which is a HERMES (High Energy density Revolution of Matter in Extreme States) project.

  4. Graphene supercapacitor with both high power and energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Kannappan, Santhakumar; Pandian, Amaresh S.; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Yun Sung; Lu, Wu

    2017-11-01

    Supercapacitors, based on fast ion transportation, are specialized to provide high power, long stability, and efficient energy storage using highly porous electrode materials. However, their low energy density excludes them from many potential applications that require both high energy density and high power density performances. Using a scalable nanoporous graphene synthesis method involving an annealing process in hydrogen, here we show supercapacitors with highly porous graphene electrodes capable of achieving not only a high power density of 41 kW kg-1 and a Coulombic efficiency of 97.5%, but also a high energy density of 148.75 Wh kg-1. A high specific gravimetric and volumetric capacitance (306.03 F g-1 and 64.27 F cm-3) are demonstrated. The devices can retain almost 100% capacitance after 7000 charging/discharging cycles at a current density of 8 A g-1. The superior performance of supercapacitors is attributed to their ideal pore size, pore uniformity, and good ion accessibility of the synthesized graphene.

  5. Phase 1 environmental report for the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasing, T.J.; Brown, R.A.; Cada, G.F.; Easterly, C.; Feldman, D.L.; Hagan, C.W.; Harrington, R.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Ketelle, R.H.; Kroodsma, R.L.; McCold, L.N.; Reich, W.J.; Scofield, P.A.; Socolof, M.L.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1992-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a 330-MW(f) reactor, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support neutron scattering and nuclear physics experiments. ANS would provide a steady-state source of neutrons that are thermalized to produce sources of hot, cold, and very coal neutrons. The use of these neutrons in ANS experiment facilities would be an essential component of national research efforts in basic materials science. Additionally, ANS capabilities would include production of transplutonium isotopes, irradiation of potential fusion and fission reactor materials, activation analysis, and production of medical and industrial isotopes such as 252 Cf. Although ANS would not require licensing by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), DOE regards the design, construction, and operation of ANS as activities that would produce a licensable facility; that is, DOE is following the regulatory guidelines that NRC would apply if NRC were licensing the facility. Those guidelines include instructions for the preparation of an environmental report (ER), a compilation of available data and preliminary analyses regarding the environmental impacts of nuclear facility construction and operation. The ER, described and outlined in NRC Regulatory Guide 4.2, serves as a background document to facilitate the preparation of environmental impact statements (EISs). Using Regulatory Guide 4.2 as a model, this ANS ER provides analyses and information specific to the ANS site and area that can be adopted (and modified, if necessary) for the ANS EIS. The ER is being prepared in two phases. Phase 1 ER includes many of the data and analyses needed to prepare the EIS but does not include data or analyses of alternate sites or alternate technologies. Phase 2 ER will include the additional data and analyses stipulated by Regulatory Guide 4.2

  6. Phase 1 environmental report for the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Brown, R.A.; Cada, G.F.; Easterly, C.; Feldman, D.L.; Hagan, C.W.; Harrington, R.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Ketelle, R.H.; Kroodsma, R.L.; McCold, L.N.; Reich, W.J.; Scofield, P.A.; Socolof, M.L.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1992-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a 330-MW(f) reactor, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support neutron scattering and nuclear physics experiments. ANS would provide a steady-state source of neutrons that are thermalized to produce sources of hot, cold, and very coal neutrons. The use of these neutrons in ANS experiment facilities would be an essential component of national research efforts in basic materials science. Additionally, ANS capabilities would include production of transplutonium isotopes, irradiation of potential fusion and fission reactor materials, activation analysis, and production of medical and industrial isotopes such as {sup 252}Cf. Although ANS would not require licensing by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), DOE regards the design, construction, and operation of ANS as activities that would produce a licensable facility; that is, DOE is following the regulatory guidelines that NRC would apply if NRC were licensing the facility. Those guidelines include instructions for the preparation of an environmental report (ER), a compilation of available data and preliminary analyses regarding the environmental impacts of nuclear facility construction and operation. The ER, described and outlined in NRC Regulatory Guide 4.2, serves as a background document to facilitate the preparation of environmental impact statements (EISs). Using Regulatory Guide 4.2 as a model, this ANS ER provides analyses and information specific to the ANS site and area that can be adopted (and modified, if necessary) for the ANS EIS. The ER is being prepared in two phases. Phase 1 ER includes many of the data and analyses needed to prepare the EIS but does not include data or analyses of alternate sites or alternate technologies. Phase 2 ER will include the additional data and analyses stipulated by Regulatory Guide 4.2.

  7. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, Dan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014 Highlights • Rory Kennedy, Dan Ogden and Brenden Heidrich traveled to Germantown October 6-7, for a review of the Infrastructure Management mission with Shane Johnson, Mike Worley, Bradley Williams and Alison Hahn from NE-4 and Mary McCune from NE-3. Heidrich briefed the group on the project progress from July to October 2014 as well as the planned path forward for FY15. • Jim Cole gave two invited university seminars at Ohio State University and University of Florida, providing an overview of NSUF including available capabilities and the process for accessing facilities through the peer reviewed proposal process. • Jim Cole and Rory Kennedy co-chaired the NuMat meeting with Todd Allen. The meeting, sponsored by Elsevier publishing, was held in Clearwater, Florida, and is considered one of the premier nuclear fuels and materials conferences. Over 340 delegates attended with 160 oral and over 200 posters presented over 4 days. • Thirty-one pre-applications were submitted for NSUF access through the NE-4 Combined Innovative Nuclear Research Funding Opportunity Announcement. • Fourteen proposals were received for the NSUF Rapid Turnaround Experiment Summer 2014 call. Proposal evaluations are underway. • John Jackson and Rory Kennedy attended the Nuclear Fuels Industry Research meeting. Jackson presented an overview of ongoing NSUF industry research.

  8. Image processing for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard R.; Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Lowe-Webb, Roger; Miller-Kamm, Victoria; Orth, Charles; Roberts, Randy; Wilhelmsen, Karl

    2016-09-01

    The Advance Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a laser system that employs up to four petawatt (PW) lasers to produce a sequence of short-pulse kilo-Joule laser pulses with controllable delays that generate X-rays to provide backlighting for high-density internal confinement fusion (ICF) capsule targets. Multi-frame, hard-X-ray radiography of imploding NIF capsules is a capability which is critical to the success of NIF's missions. ARC is designed to employ up to eight backlighters with tens-of-picosecond temporal resolution, to record the dynamics and produce an X-ray "motion picture" of the compression and ignition of cryogenic deuterium-tritium targets. ARC will generate tens-of-picosecond temporal resolution during the critical phases of ICF shots. Additionally, ARC supports a variety of other high energy density experiments including fast ignition studies on NIF. The automated alignment image analysis algorithms use digital camera sensor images to direct ARC beams onto the tens-of-microns scale metal wires. This paper describes the ARC automatic alignment sequence throughout the laser chain from pulse initiation to target with an emphasis on the image processing algorithms that generate the crucial alignment positions for ARC. The image processing descriptions and flow diagrams detail the alignment control loops throughout the ARC laser chain beginning in the ARC high-contrast front end (HCAFE), on into the ARC main laser area, and ending in the ARC target area.

  9. Hurdles in clinical implementation of academic advanced therapy medicinal products: A national evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wilde, Sofieke; Veltrop-Duits, Louise; Hoozemans-Strik, Merel; Ras, Thirza; Blom-Veenman, Janine; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Zandvliet, Maarten; Meij, Pauline

    2016-06-01

    Since the implementation of the European Union (EU) regulation for advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) in 2009, only six ATMPs achieved marketing authorization approval in the EU. Recognizing the major developments in the ATMP field, starting mostly in academic institutions, we investigated which hurdles were experienced in the whole pathway of ATMP development towards clinical care. Quality interviews were executed with different stakeholders in The Netherlands involved in the ATMP development field, e.g. academic research groups, national authorities and patient organizations. Based on the hurdles mentioned in the interviews, questionnaires were subsequently sent to the academic principal investigators (PIs) and ATMP good manufacturing practice (GMP) facility managers to quantify these hurdles. Besides the familiar regulatory routes of marketing authorization (MA) and hospital exemption (HE), a part of the academic PIs perceived that ATMPs should become available by the Tissues and Cells Directive or did not anticipate on the next development steps towards implementation of their ATMP towards regular clinical care. The main hurdles identified were: inadequate financial support, rapidly evolving field, study-related problems, lacking regulatory knowledge, lack of collaborations and responsibility issues. Creating an academic environment stimulating and planning ATMP development and licensing as well as investing in expanding the relevant regulatory knowledge in academic institutions seems a prerequisite to develop ATMPs from bench to patient. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Advanced liquid metal reactor development at Argonne National Laboratory during the 1980s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, D.C.

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL'S) effort to pursue the exploitation of liquid metal cooled reactor (LMR) characteristics has given rise to the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept, and has produced substantial technical advancement in concept implementation which includes demonstration of high burnup capability of metallic fuel, demonstration of injection casting fabrication, integral demonstration of passive safety response, and technical feasibility of pyroprocessing. The first half decade of the 90's will host demonstration of the IFR closed fuel cycle technology at the prototype scale. The EBR-II reactor will be fueled with ternary alloy fuel in HT-9 cladding and ducts, and pyroprocessing and injection casting refabrication of EBR-II fuel will be conducted using near-commercial sized equipment at the Fuel cycle Facility (FCF) which is co-located adjacent to EBR-II. Demonstration will start in 1992. The demonstration of passive safety response achievable with the IFR design concept, (already done in EBR-II in 1986) will be repeated in the mid 90's using the IFR prototype recycle fuel from the FCF. The demonstration of scrubbing of the reprocessing fission product waste stream, with recycle of the transuranics to the reactor for consumption, will also occur in the mid 90's. 30 refs

  11. Review of the algal biology program within the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, Clifford J.; Sayre, Richard T.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Anderson, Daniel B.; Baxter, Ivan; Blaby, Ian K.; Brown, Judith K.; Carleton, Michael; Cattolico, Rose Ann; Dale, Taraka; Devarenne, Timothy P.; Downes, C. Meghan; Dutcher, Susan K.; Fox, David T.; Goodenough, Ursula; Jaworski, Jan; Holladay, Jonathan E.; Kramer, David M.; Koppisch, Andrew T.; Lipton, Mary S.; Marrone, Babetta L.; McCormick, Margaret; Molnár, István; Mott, John B.; Ogden, Kimberly L.; Panisko, Ellen A.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Polle, Juergen; Richardson, James W.; Sabarsky, Martin; Starkenburg, Shawn R.; Stormo, Gary D.; Teshima, Munehiro; Twary, Scott N.; Unkefer, Pat J.; Yuan, Joshua S.; Olivares, José A.

    2017-03-01

    In 2010,when the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB) consortiumbegan, littlewas known about themolecular basis of algal biomass or oil production. Very fewalgal genome sequenceswere available and efforts to identify the best-producing wild species through bioprospecting approaches had largely stalled after the U.S. Department of Energy's Aquatic Species Program. This lack of knowledge included how reduced carbon was partitioned into storage products like triglycerides or starch and the role played bymetabolite remodeling in the accumulation of energy-dense storage products. Furthermore, genetic transformation and metabolic engineering approaches to improve algal biomass and oil yields were in their infancy. Genome sequencing and transcriptional profiling were becoming less expensive, however; and the tools to annotate gene expression profiles under various growth and engineered conditions were just starting to be developed for algae. It was in this context that an integrated algal biology program was introduced in the NAABB to address the greatest constraints limiting algal biomass yield. This review describes the NAABB algal biology program, including hypotheses, research objectives, and strategies to move algal biology research into the twenty-first century and to realize the greatest potential of algae biomass systems to produce biofuels.

  12. Vibration considerations in the design of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), a new synchrotron radiation facility being built at Argonne National Laboratory, will provide the world's most brilliant X-ray beams for research in a wide range of technical fields. Successful operation of the APS requires an extremely stable positron closed orbit. Vibration of the storage ring quadrupole magnets, even in the submicron range, can lead to distortion of the positron closed orbit and to potentially unacceptable beam emittance growth, which results in degraded performance. This paper presents an overview of the technical approach used to minimize vibration response, beginning at the conceptual stage, through design and construction, and on to successful operation. Acceptance criteria relating to maximum allowable quadrupole magnet vibration are discussed. Soil properties are used to determine resonant frequencies of foundations and to predict attenuation characteristics. Two sources are considered to have the potential to excite the foundation: far-field sources, which are produced external to the facility, and near-field sources, which are produced within the facility. Measurements of ambient ground motion, monitored to determine far- field excitation, are presented. Ambient vibration was measured at several operating facilities within Argonne to gain insight on typical near-field excitation sources. Discussion covers the dynamic response characteristics of a prototypic magnet support structure to various excitations, including ambient floor motion, coolant flow, and magnet power. 19 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Vibration considerations in the design of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), a new synchrotron radiation facility being built at Argonne National Laboratory, will provide the world's most brilliant X-ray beams for research in a wide range of technical fields. Successful operation of the APS requires an extremely stable positron closed orbit. Vibration of the storage ring quadrupole magnets, even in the submicron range, can lead to distortion of the positron closed orbit and to potentially unacceptable beam emittance growth, which results in degraded performance. This paper presents an overview of the technical approach used to minimize vibration response, beginning at the conceptual stage, through design and construction, and on to successful operation. Acceptance criteria relating to maximum allowable quadrupole magnet vibration are discussed. Soil properties are used to determine resonant frequencies of foundations and to predict attenuation characteristics. Two sources are considered to have the potential to excite the foundation: far-field sources, which are produced external to the facility, and near-field sources, which are produced within the facility. Measurements of ambient ground motion, monitored to determine far- field excitation, are presented. Ambient vibration was measured at several operating facilities within Argonne to gain insight on typical near-field excitation sources. Discussion covers the dynamic response characteristics of a prototypic magnet support structure to various excitations, including ambient floor motion, coolant flow, and magnet power. 19 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  14. A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.; Abla, G.; Burruss, J.R.; Feibush, E.; Fredian, T.W.; Goode, M.M.; Greenwald, M.J.; Keahey, K.; Leggett, T.; Li, K.; McCune, D.C.; Papka, M.E.; Randerson, L.; Sanderson, A.; Stillerman, J.; Thompson, M.R.; Uram, T.; Wallace, G.

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) under the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing Program (SciDAC) to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. A five year project that was initiated in 2001, it built on the past collaborative work performed within the U.S. fusion community and added the component of computer science research done with the USDOE Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computer Research. The project was a collaboration itself uniting fusion scientists from General Atomics, MIT, and PPPL and computer scientists from ANL, LBNL, Princeton University, and the University of Utah to form a coordinated team. The group leveraged existing computer science technology where possible and extended or created new capabilities where required. Developing a reliable energy system that is economically and environmentally sustainable is the long-term goal of Fusion Energy Science (FES) research. In the U.S., FES experimental research is centered at three large facilities with a replacement value of over $1B. As these experiments have increased in size and complexity, there has been a concurrent growth in the number and importance of collaborations among large groups at the experimental sites and smaller groups located nationwide. Teaming with the experimental community is a theoretical and simulation community whose efforts range from applied analysis of experimental data to fundamental theory (e.g., realistic nonlinear 3D plasma models) that run on massively parallel computers. Looking toward the future, the large-scale experiments needed for FES research are staffed by correspondingly large, globally dispersed teams. The fusion program will be increasingly oriented toward the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) where even now, a decade before operation begins, a large

  15. High-Power Solid-State Lasers from a Laser Glass Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J H; Hayden, J S; Marker, A J

    2010-12-17

    Advances in laser glass compositions and manufacturing have enabled a new class of high-energy/high-power (HEHP), petawatt (PW) and high-average-power (HAP) laser systems that are being used for fusion energy ignition demonstration, fundamental physics research and materials processing, respectively. The requirements for these three laser systems are different necessitating different glasses or groups of glasses. The manufacturing technology is now mature for melting, annealing, fabricating and finishing of laser glasses for all three applications. The laser glass properties of major importance for HEHP, PW and HAP applications are briefly reviewed and the compositions and properties of the most widely used commercial laser glasses summarized. Proposed advances in these three laser systems will require new glasses and new melting methods which are briefly discussed. The challenges presented by these laser systems will likely dominate the field of laser glass development over the next several decades.

  16. Long distance high power optical laser fiber break detection and continuity monitoring systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinzler, Charles C.; Gray, William C.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2016-02-23

    A monitoring and detection system for use on high power laser systems, long distance high power laser systems and tools for performing high power laser operations. In particular, the monitoring and detection systems provide break detection and continuity protection for performing high power laser operations on, and in, remote and difficult to access locations.

  17. National Seabed Mapping Programmes Collaborate to Advance Marine Geomorphological Mapping in Adjoining European Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteys, X.; Guinan, J.; Green, S.; Gafeira, J.; Dove, D.; Baeten, N. J.; Thorsnes, T.

    2017-12-01

    Marine geomorphological mapping is an effective means of characterising and understanding the seabed and its features with direct relevance to; offshore infrastructure placement, benthic habitat mapping, conservation & policy, marine spatial planning, fisheries management and pure research. Advancements in acoustic survey techniques and data processing methods resulting in the availability of high-resolution marine datasets e.g. multibeam echosounder bathymetry and shallow seismic mean that geological interpretations can be greatly improved by combining with geomorphological maps. Since December 2015, representatives from the national seabed mapping programmes of Norway (MAREANO), Ireland (INFOMAR) and the United Kingdom (MAREMAP) have collaborated and established the MIM geomorphology working group) with the common aim of advancing best practice for geological mapping in their adjoining sea areas in north-west Europe. A recently developed two-part classification system for Seabed Geomorphology (`Morphology' and Geomorphology') has been established as a result of an initiative led by the British Geological Survey (BGS) with contributions from the MIM group (Dove et al. 2016). To support the scheme, existing BGS GIS tools (SIGMA) have been adapted to apply this two-part classification system and here we present on the tools effectiveness in mapping geomorphological features, along with progress in harmonising the classification and feature nomenclature. Recognising that manual mapping of seabed features can be time-consuming and subjective, semi-automated approaches for mapping seabed features and improving mapping efficiency is being developed using Arc-GIS based tools. These methods recognise, spatially delineate and morphologically describe seabed features such as pockmarks (Gafeira et al., 2012) and cold-water coral mounds. Such tools utilise multibeam echosounder data or any other bathymetric dataset (e.g. 3D seismic, Geldof et al., 2014) that can produce a

  18. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, Renae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014 Highlights Rory Kennedy and Sarah Robertson attended the American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting and Nuclear Technology Expo in Anaheim, California, Nov. 10-13. ATR NSUF exhibited at the technology expo where hundreds of meeting participants had an opportunity to learn more about ATR NSUF. Dr. Kennedy briefed the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO) on the workings of the ATR NSUF. • Rory Kennedy, James Cole and Dan Ogden participated in a reactor instrumentation discussion with Jean-Francois Villard and Christopher Destouches of CEA and several members of the INL staff. • ATR NSUF received approval from the NE-20 office to start planning the annual Users Meeting. The meeting will be held at INL, June 22-25. • Mike Worley, director of the Office of Innovative Nuclear Research (NE-42), visited INL Nov. 4-5. Milestones Completed • Recommendations for the Summer Rapid Turnaround Experiment awards were submitted to DOE-HQ Nov. 12 (Level 2 milestone due Nov. 30). Major Accomplishments/Activities • The University of California, Santa Barbara 2 experiment was unloaded from the GE-2000 at HFEF. The experiment specimen packs will be removed and shipped to ORNL for PIE. • The Terrani experiment, one of three FY 2014 new awards, was completed utilizing the Advanced Photon Source MRCAT beamline. The experiment investigated the chemical state of Ag and Pd in SiC shell of irradiated TRISO particles via X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Upcoming Meetings/Events • The ATR NSUF program review meeting will be held Dec. 9-10 at L’Enfant Plaza. In addition to NSUF staff and users, NE-4, NE-5 and NE-7 representatives will attend the meeting. Awarded Research Projects Boise State University Rapid Turnaround Experiments (14-485 and 14-486) Nanoindentation and TEM work on the T91, HT9, HCM12A and 9Cr ODS specimens has been completed at

  19. Advance care planning in 21st century Australia: a systematic review and appraisal of online advance care directive templates against national framework criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckett, Tim; Bhattarai, Priyanka; Phillips, Jane; Agar, Meera; Currow, David; Krastev, Yordanka; Davidson, Patricia M

    2015-11-01

    A drive to promote advance care planning at a population level has led to a proliferation of online advance care directive (ACD) templates but little information to guide consumer choice. The current study aimed to appraise the quality of online ACD templates promoted for use in Australia. A systematic review of online Australian ACD templates was conducted in February 2014. ACD templates were identified via Google searches, and quality was independently appraised by two reviewers against criteria from the 2011 report A National Frameworkfor Advance Care Directives. Bias either towards or against future medical treatment was assessed using criteria designed to limit subjectivity. Fourteen online ACD templates were included, all of which were available only in English. Templates developed by Southern Cross University best met the framework criteria. One ACD template was found to be biased against medical treatment--the Dying with Dignity Victoria Advance Healthcare Directive. More research is needed to understand how online resources can optimally elicit and record consumers' individual preferences for future care. Future iterations of the framework should address online availability and provide a simple rating system to inform choice and drive quality improvement.

  20. The Linac4 DTL Prototype: Low and High Power Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    De Michele, G; Marques-Balula, J; Ramberger, S

    2012-01-01

    The prototype of the Linac4 Drift Tube Linac (DTL) has undergone low power measurements in order to verify the RF coupling and to adjust the post-coupler lengths based on bead-pull and spectrum measurements. Following the installation at the test stand, the cavity has been subjected to high power operation at Linac4 and SPL duty cycles. Saturation effects and multipacting have been observed and linked to X-ray emission. Voltage holding is reported in the presence of magnetic fields from permanent magnet quadrupoles (PMQ) installed in the first drift tubes.

  1. Static and dynamic high power, space nuclear electric generating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetch, J.R.; Begg, L.L.; Koester, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Space nuclear electric generating systems concepts have been assessed for their potential in satisfying future spacecraft high power (several megawatt) requirements. Conceptual designs have been prepared for reactor power systems using the most promising static (thermionic) and the most promising dynamic conversion processes. Component and system layouts, along with system mass and envelope requirements have been made. Key development problems have been identified and the impact of the conversion process selection upon thermal management and upon system and vehicle configuration is addressed. 10 references

  2. Complex delay dynamics of high power quantum cascade oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillot, F.; Newell, T. C.; Gavrielides, A.; Carras, M.

    2017-08-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCL) have become the most suitable laser sources from the mid-infrared to the THz range. This work examines the effects of external feedback in different high power mid infrared QCL structures and shows that different conditions of the feedback wave can produce complex dynamics hence stabilization, destabilization into strong mode-competition or undamping nonlinear oscillations. As a dynamical system, reinjection of light back into the cavity also can also provoke apparition of chaotic oscillations, which must be avoided for a stable operation both at mid-infrared and THz wavelengths.

  3. Very high power THz radiation at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the production of high power (20 W average, ∼1 MW peak) broadband THz light based on coherent emission from relativistic electrons. We describe the source, presenting theoretical calculations and their experimental verification. For clarity we compare this source with that based on ultrafast laser techniques, and in fact the radiation has qualities closely analogous to those produced by such sources, namely that it is spatially coherent, and comprises short duration pulses with transform-limited spectral content. In contrast to conventional THz radiation, however, the intensity is many orders of magnitude greater due to the relativistic enhancement

  4. Novel design for a high power superconducting delay line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.J.; Caporaso, G.J.

    1997-05-08

    Potential designs for a high power superconducting delay line of approximately 10ms duration are described. The transmitted signal should have low dispersion and little attenuation to recapture the original signal. Such demands cannot be met using conventional metal conductors. This paper outlines a proposal for a new transmission line design using low temperature superconducting material which meets system specifications. The 25W line is designed to carry pulsed signals with an approximate rise time of 8 nsec and a maximum voltage of 25kV. Predicted electrical design and performance of the line is presented.

  5. Designs for a high power superconducting delay line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.J.; Caporaso, G.

    1997-06-26

    Potential designs for a high power superconducting delay line of approximately 10 microsecs duration are described. The transmitted signal should have low dispersion and little attenuation to recapture the original signal. Such demands cannot be met using conventional metal conductors. This paper outlines a proposal for a new transmission line design using low temperature superconducting material which meets system specifications. The 25 omega line is designed to carry pulsed signals with an approximate rise time of 8 nsec and a maximum voltage magnitude of 25 kV. Predicted electrical design and performance of the line will be presented.

  6. ELBE Center for High-Power Radiation Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Dr. Michel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the ELBE Center for High-Power Radiation Sources, the superconducting linear electron accelerator ELBE, serving  two free electron lasers, sources for intense coherent THz radiation, mono-energetic positrons, electrons, γ-rays, a neutron time-of-flight system as well as two synchronized ultra-short pulsed Petawatt laser systems are collocated. The characteristics of these beams make the ELBE center a unique research instrument for a variety of external users in fields ranging from material science over nuclear physics to cancer research, as well as scientists of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR.

  7. Theory and Modeling of High-Power Gyrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusinovich, Gregory Semeon [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-04-29

    This report summarized results of the work performed at the Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics of the University of Maryland (College Park, MD) in the framework of the DOE Grant “Theory and Modeling of High-Power Gyrotrons”. The report covers the work performed in 2011-2014. The research work was performed in three directions: - possibilities of stable gyrotron operation in very high-order modes offering the output power exceeding 1 MW level in long-pulse/continuous-wave regimes, - effect of small imperfections in gyrotron fabrication and alignment on the gyrotron efficiency and operation, - some issues in physics of beam-wave interaction in gyrotrons.

  8. Modeling, fabrication and high power optical characterization of plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Lysenko, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes modeling, fabrication and high power optical characterization of thin gold films embedded in silicon dioxide. The propagation vector of surface plasmon polaritons has been calculated by the effective index method for the wavelength range of 750-1700 nm and film thickness of 1...... from the linear propagation regime of surface plasmon polaritons at the average input power of 100 mW and above. Possible reasons for this deviation are heating of the waveguides and subsequent changes in the coupling and propagation losses....

  9. Very high power THz radiation at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, G.L.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Jordan, K.; Neil, George R.; Williams, G.P.

    2002-01-01

    We report the production of high power (20 watts average, ∼;1 Megawatt peak) broadband THz light based on coherent emission from relativistic electrons. We describe the source, presenting theoretical calculations and their experimental verification. For clarity we compare this source with one based on ultrafast laser techniques, and in fact the radiation has qualities closely analogous to that produced by such sources, namely that it is spatially coherent, and comprises short duration pulses with transform-limited spectral content. In contrast to conventional THz radiation, however, the intensity is many orders of magnitude greater due to the relativistic enhancement

  10. High power LEDs - technology status and market applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steranka, F.M.; Bhat, J.; Collins, D.; Cook, L.; Craford, M.G.; Fletcher, R.; Gardner, N.; Grillot, P.; Goetz, W.; Keuper, M.; Khare, R.; Kim, A.; Krames, M.; Harbers, G.; Ludowise, M.; Martin, P.S.; Misra, M.; Mueller, G.; Mueller-Mach, R.; Rudaz, S.; Shen, Y.C.; Steigerwald, D.; Subramanya, S.; Trottier, T.; Wierer, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    High power light emitting diodes (LEDs) continue to increase in output flux with the best III-nitride based devices today emitting over 150 lm of white, cyan, or green light. The key design features of such products will be covered with special emphasis on power packaging, flip-chip device design, and phosphor coating technology. The high-flux performance of these devices is enabling many new applications for LEDs. Two of the most interesting of these applications are LCD display backlighting and vehicle forward lighting. The advantages of LEDs over competing lighting technologies will be covered in detail. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. The high power RF system for the KEK booster synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezura, Eizi; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Kudo, Kikuo; Toda, Makoto; Ebihara, Kiyokazu.

    1977-03-01

    Design features and procedures of the high power RF system for the KEK booster synchrotron are described. The system consists of an RF power amplifier, a ferrite-loaded accelerating cavity and an automatic cavity-tuning system. The RF voltage program and the ferrite properties, which are the determining factors for the general design and the operational performance of the system, are discussed. Procedures for estimating the power requirements are presented for both the RF power amplifier and the ferrite bias supply. A general description of the system is also given. (auth.)

  12. Organic nonlinear crystals and high power frequency conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velsko, S.P.; Davis, L.; Wang, F.; Monaco, S.; Eimerl, D.

    1987-01-01

    The authors are searching for new second and third harmonic generators among the salts of organic acids and bases. They discuss the relevant properties of crystals from this group of compounds, including their nonlinear and phasematching characteristics, linear absorption, damage threshold and crystal growth. In addition, they summarize what is known concerning other nonlinear optical properties of these crystals, such as two-photon absorption, nonlinear refractive index, and stimulated Raman thresholds. A preliminary assessment is made of the potential of these materials for use in future high power, large aperture lasers such as those used for inertial confinement fusion experiments

  13. High power resonant tracking amplifier using admittance locking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, B; du Bruyn, T; Davies, J; Tapson, J

    2001-06-01

    A high power resonance tracking ultrasonic amplifier is described. The amplifier is a class D type inverter, configured as a half-bridge in which the output MOSFETs are driven into saturation when on. The resonance tracking system makes use of a new method of frequency locking; admittance locking is used to track the optimum power conversion frequency for the transducer. This new arrangement offers some advantages over phase locking and motional feedback methods. The system is capable of delivering up to 3 kW at up to 25 kHz in resonance tracking operation.

  14. High Efficiency Power Converter for Low Voltage High Power Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nymand, Morten

    The topic of this thesis is the design of high efficiency power electronic dc-to-dc converters for high-power, low-input-voltage to high-output-voltage applications. These converters are increasingly required for emerging sustainable energy systems such as fuel cell, battery or photo voltaic based......, and remote power generation for light towers, camper vans, boats, beacons, and buoys etc. A review of current state-of-the-art is presented. The best performing converters achieve moderately high peak efficiencies at high input voltage and medium power level. However, system dimensioning and cost are often...

  15. Techniques for preventing damage to high power laser components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stowers, I.F.; Patton, H.G.; Jones, W.A.; Wentworth, D.E.

    1977-09-01

    Techniques for preventing damage to components of the LASL Shiva high power laser system were briefly presented. Optical element damage in the disk amplifier from the combined fluence of the primary laser beam and the Xenon flash lamps that pump the cavity was discussed. Assembly and cleaning techniques were described which have improved optical element life by minimizing particulate and optically absorbing film contamination on assembled amplifier structures. A Class-100 vertical flaw clean room used for assembly and inspection of laser components was also described. The life of a disk amplifier was extended from less than 50 shots to 500 shots through application of these assembly and cleaning techniques

  16. Automated alignment of the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) target area at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Randy S.; Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Bliss, Erlan S.; Heebner, John E.; Leach, Richard R.; Orth, Charles D.; Rushford, Michael C.; Lowe-Webb, Roger R.; Wilhelmsen, Karl C.

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a petawatt-class, short-pulse laser system designed to provide x-ray backlighting of NIF targets. ARC uses four NIF beamlines to produce eight beamlets to create a sequence of eight images of an imploding fuel capsule using backlighting targets and diagnostic instrumentation. ARC employs a front end that produces two pulses, chirps the pulses out to 2 ns, and then injects the pulses into the two halves of each of four NIF beamlines. These pulses are amplified by NIF pre- and main amplifiers and transported to compressor vessels located in the NIF target area. The pulses are then compressed and pointed into the NIF target chamber where they impinge upon an array of backlighters. The interaction of the ARC laser pulses and the backlighting material produces bursts of high-energy x-rays that illuminate an imploding fuel capsule. The transmitted x-rays are imaged by diagnostic instrumentation to produce a sequence of radiograph images. A key component of the success of ARC is the automatic alignment system that accomplishes the precise alignment of the beamlets to avoid damaging equipment and to ensure that the beamlets are directed onto the tens-of-microns scale backlighters. In this paper, we describe the ARC automatic alignment system, with emphasis on control loops used to align the beampaths. We also provide a detailed discussion of the alignment image processing, because it plays a critical role in providing beam centering and pointing information for the control loops.

  17. Climate change is advancing spring onset across the U.S. national park system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, William B.; Rosemartin, Alyssa; Gerst, Katharine L.; Fisichelli, Nicholas A.; Ault, Toby R.; Schwartz, Mark D.; Gross, John E.; Weltzin, Jake F.

    2016-01-01

    Many U.S. national parks are already at the extreme warm end of their historical temperature distributions. With rapidly warming conditions, park resource management will be enhanced by information on seasonality of climate that supports adjustments in the timing of activities such as treating invasive species, operating visitor facilities, and scheduling climate-related events (e.g., flower festivals and fall leaf-viewing). Seasonal changes in vegetation, such as pollen, seed, and fruit production, are important drivers of ecological processes in parks, and phenology has thus been identified as a key indicator for park monitoring. Phenology is also one of the most proximate biological responses to climate change. Here, we use estimates of start of spring based on climatically modeled dates of first leaf and first bloom derived from indicator plant species to evaluate the recent timing of spring onset (past 10–30 yr) in each U.S. natural resource park relative to its historical range of variability across the past 112 yr (1901–2012). Of the 276 high latitude to subtropical parks examined, spring is advancing in approximately three-quarters of parks (76%), and 53% of parks are experiencing “extreme” early springs that exceed 95% of historical conditions. Our results demonstrate how changes in climate seasonality are important for understanding ecological responses to climate change, and further how spatial variability in effects of climate change necessitates different approaches to management. We discuss how our results inform climate change adaptation challenges and opportunities facing parks, with implications for other protected areas, by exploring consequences for resource management and planning.

  18. Research and Development of High-Power and High-Energy Electrochemical Storage Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No, author

    2014-04-30

    validation, implementation, and cost reduction. 2. Identification of the next viable technology with emphasis on the potential to meet USABC cost and operating temperature range goals. 3. Support high-risk, high-reward battery technology R&D. Specific to the Cooperative Agreement DE- FC26-05NT42403, addressing High-Energy and High Power Energy Storage Technologies, the USABC focus was on understanding and addressing the following factors (listed in priority of effort): • Cost: Reducing the current cost of lithium- ion batteries (currently about 2-3 times the FreedomCAR target ($20/kW). • Low Temperature Performance: Improving the discharge power and removing lithium plating during regenerative braking. • Calendar Life: Achieving 15-year life and getting accurate life prediction. • Abuse Tolerance: Developing a system level tolerance to overcharge, crush, and high temperature exposure. This Final Technical Report compilation is submitted in fulfillment of the subject Cooperative Agreement, and is intended to serve as a ready-reference for the outcomes of following eight categories of projects conducted by the USABC under award from the DOE’s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ) Vehicle Technologies Program: USABC DoE Final Report – DoE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-95EE50425 8 Protected Information 1. Electric Vehicle (EV) (Section A of this report) 2. Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) (Section B 3. Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) (Section C) 4. Low-Energy Energy Storage Systems (LEESS) (Section D) 5. Technology Assessment Program (TAP) (Section E) 6. Ultracapacitors (Section F) 7. 12 Volt Start-Stop (Section G) 8. Separators (Section H) The report summarizes the main areas of activity undertaken in collaboration with the supplier community and the National Laboratories. Copies of the individual supplier final reports are available upon request. Using project gap analysis versus defined USABC goals in each area, the report documents known technology limits

  19. Atrophy and anarchy: Third national survey of nursing skill-mix and advanced nursing practice in ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuber-Dochan, Wladyslawa J; Waterman, Christine G; Waterman, Heather A

    2006-12-01

    The aims of the study were to investigate the advanced nursing practice and the skill-mix of nurses working in ophthalmology. The expansion of new nursing roles in the United Kingdom in the past decade is set against the background of a nursing shortage. The plan to modernize the National Health Service and improve the efficiency and delivery of healthcare services as well as to reduce junior doctors' hours contributes towards a profusion of new and more specialized and advanced nursing roles in various areas of nursing including ophthalmology. A self-reporting quantitative questionnaire was employed. The study used comparative and descriptive statistical tests. The questionnaires were distributed to all ophthalmic hospitals and units in the United Kingdom. Hospital and unit managers were responsible for completing the questionnaires. Out of a total 181 questionnaires 117 were returned. There is a downward trend in the total number of nurses working in ophthalmology. The results demonstrate more nurses working at an advanced level. However, there is a general confusion regarding role interpretation at the advanced level of practice, evident through the wide range of job titles being used. There was inconsistency in the qualifications expected of these nurses. Whilst there are more nurses working at an advanced level this is set against an ageing workforce and an overall decline in the number of nurses in ophthalmology. There is inconsistency in job titles, grades, roles and qualifications for nurses who work at an advanced or higher level of practice. The Agenda for Change with its new structure for grading jobs in the United Kingdom may offer protection and consistency in job titles, pay and qualifications for National Health Service nurse specialists. The Nursing and Midwifery Council needs to provide clear guidelines to the practitioners on educational and professional requirements, to protect patients and nurses. The findings indicate that there is a need for

  20. Perspectives of high power ultrasound in food preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn; Silva, F. V. M.

    2018-04-01

    High Power ultrasound can be used to alter physicochemical properties and improve the quality of foods during processing due to a number of mechanical, chemical, and biochemical effects arising from acoustic cavitation. Cavitation creates pressure waves that inactivate microbes and de-agglomerate bacterial clusters or release ascospores from fungal asci. Bacterial and heat resistant fungal spores’ inactivation is a great challenge in food preservation due to their ability to survive after conventional food processing, causing food-borne diseases or spoilage. In this work, a showcase of application of high power ultrasound combined with heat or thermosonication, to inactivate bacterial spores i.e. Bacillus cereus spores in beef slurry and fungal spores i.e. Neosartorya fischeri ascospores in apple juice was presented and compared with thermal processing. Faster inactivation was achieved at higher TS (24 KHz, 0.33 W/g or W/mL) temperatures. Around 2 log inactivation was obtained for B. cereus spores after1 min (70 °C) and N. fischeri ascospores after 30 min (75 °C). Thermal treatments caused <1 log in B. Cereus after 2 min (70 °C) and no inactivation in N. Fischeri ascospores after 30 min (80 °C). In conclusion, temperature plays a significant role for TS spore inactivation and TS was more effective than thermal treatment alone. The mould spores were more resistant than the bacterial spores.

  1. Material Processing with High Power CO2-Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakowsky, Lothar

    1986-10-01

    After a period of research and development lasertechnique now is regarded as an important instrument for flexible, economic and fully automatic manufacturing. Especially cutting of flat metal sheets with high power C02-lasers and CNC controlled two or three axes handling systems is a wide spread. application. Three dimensional laser cutting, laser-welding and -heat treatment are just at the be ginning of industrial use in production lines. The main. advantages of laser technology. are - high. accuracy - high, processing velocity - law thermal distortion. - no tool abrasion. The market for laser material processing systems had 1985 a volume of 300 Mio S with growth rates between, 20 % and 30 %. The topic of this lecture are hiTrh. power CO2-lasers. Besides this systems two others are used as machining tools, Nd-YAG- and Eximer lasers. All applications of high. power CO2-lasers to industrial material processing show that high processing velocity and quality are only guaranteed in case of a stable intensity. profile on the workpiece. This is only achieved by laser systems without any power and mode fluctuations and by handling systems of high accuracy. Two applications in the automotive industry are described, below as examples for laser cutting and laser welding of special cylindrical motor parts.

  2. NdFeB magnets for high-power motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oswald, B.; Soell, M.; Berberich, A.

    1998-01-01

    The use of REM in electric motors especially in the case of servo drives is state of the art today. Whether permanent magnet types SmCo or NdFeB are also suitable for high power main drives has to be decided regarding criteria which apply to high power machines. In this paper operation characteristics of common electric motors and especially those of drives with controlled speed are presented. In the case of electric motors with REM, increased output power and high efficiency at the same time are to be expected in comparison to classical drives. This makes them attractive for a number of applications. However their speed range is restricted for fundamental reasons as normally weakening of field is not possible. It is to be expected that due to their advantages the use of permanent magnet motors for elevated output power also will increase. Besides other forms they can be used also as special design such as e.g. round or flat linear motors. Their power density (force density) makes them attractive for numerous applications in this form. A comparison between permanent magnet motors with superconducting motors made of bulk HTS material gives insight into the wide area of future design of electrical machines. (orig.)

  3. Optical Fiber for High-Power Optical Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Kurokawa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We examined optical fibers suitable for avoiding such problems as the fiber fuse phenomenon and failures at bends with a high power input. We found that the threshold power for fiber fuse propagation in photonic crystal fiber (PCF and hole-assisted fiber (HAF can exceed 18 W, which is more than 10 times that in conventional single-mode fiber (SMF. We considered this high threshold power in PCF and HAF to be caused by a jet of high temperature fluid penetrating the air holes. We showed examples of two kinds of failures at bends in conventional SMF when the input power was 9 W. We also observed the generation of a fiber fuse under a condition that caused a bend-loss induced failure. We showed that one solution for the failures at bends is to use optical fibers with a low bending loss such as PCF and HAF. Therefore, we consider PCF and HAF to be attractive solutions to the problems of the fiber fuse phenomenon and failures at bends with a high power input.

  4. BBO sapphire compound for high-power frequency conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothhardt, Carolin; Rothhardt, Jan; Klenke, Arno; Peschel, Thomas; Eberhardt, Ramona; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Lasers used for diverse applications from industry to fundamental science tend to increasing output powers. Some applications require frequency conversion via nonlinear optical crystals, which suffer from the formation of temperature gradients at high power operation which causes thermal lensing or destruction of the crystal due to tensile stresses. To avoid these unwanted effects we joined a beta barium borate (BBO) crystal with sapphire disks serving as effective heat spreaders due to their high thermal conductivity (thermal conductivity κ = 42 W/Km). Therefore, smooth and flat crystal surfaces were joined by plasma-activated bonding. The joining relies on covalent bonds, which are formed via a condensation reaction of the surfaces which are first connected by Van der Waals forces. The cleaned surfaces are activated by plasma and brought into contact, pressed together and heat treated at a temperature of about 100°C. Special attention has been paid to the cleaning of the surfaces. Therefor the surfaces have been evaluated before and after treatment by means of atomic force microscopy. A stable connection has been formed successfully, which has been tested in a proof of principle experiment and demonstrated efficient second harmonic generation at up to 253 W of input power. Compared to a bare single BBO crystal it could be shown that the temperature within the crystal compound is significantly reduced. Such hybrid structures pave the way for frequency conversion at kilowatts of average power for future high power lasers.

  5. Spallation Neutron Source High Power RF Installation and Commissioning Progress

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, Michael P; Bradley, Joseph T; Fuja, Ray E; Gurd, Pamela; Hardek, Thomas; Kang, Yoon W; Rees, Daniel; Roybal, William; Young, Karen A

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac will provide a 1 GeV proton beam for injection into the accumulator ring. In the normal conducting (NC) section of this linac, the Radio Frequency Quadupole (RFQ) and six drift tube linac (DTL) tanks are powered by seven 2.5 MW, 402.5 MHz klystrons and the four coupled cavity linac (CCL) cavities are powered by four 5.0 MW, 805 MHz klystrons. Eighty-one 550 kW, 805 MHz klystrons each drive a single cavity in the superconducting (SC) section of the linac. The high power radio frequency (HPRF) equipment was specified and procured by LANL and tested before delivery to ensure a smooth transition from installation to commissioning. Installation of RF equipment to support klystron operation in the 350-meter long klystron gallery started in June 2002. The final klystron was set in place in September 2004. Presently, all RF stations have been installed and high power testing has been completed. This paper reviews the progression of the installation and testing of the HPRF Sys...

  6. Hybrid simulation of electrode plasmas in high-power diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, Dale R.; Rose, David V.; Bruner, Nichelle; Clark, Robert E.; Oliver, Bryan V.; Hahn, Kelly D.; Johnston, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    New numerical techniques for simulating the formation and evolution of cathode and anode plasmas have been successfully implemented in a hybrid code. The dynamics of expanding electrode plasmas has long been recognized as a limiting factor in the impedance lifetimes of high-power vacuum diodes and magnetically insulated transmission lines. Realistic modeling of such plasmas is being pursued to aid in understanding the operating characteristics of these devices as well as establishing scaling relations for reliable extrapolation to higher voltages. Here, in addition to kinetic and fluid modeling, a hybrid particle-in-cell technique is described that models high density, thermal plasmas as an inertial fluid which transitions to kinetic electron or ion macroparticles above a prescribed energy. The hybrid technique is computationally efficient and does not require resolution of the Debye length. These techniques are first tested on a simple planar diode then applied to the evolution of both cathode and anode plasmas in a high-power self-magnetic pinch diode. The impact of an intense electron flux on the anode surface leads to rapid heating of contaminant material and diode impedance loss.

  7. Active beam integrator for high power coherent lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laguarta, F.; Armengol, J.; Vega, F.; Lupon, N. [Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Terrassa (Spain). Dept. d`Optica i Optometria

    1996-12-31

    In laser materials processing applications it is often necessary to work with uniform intensity distributions. This goal is quite difficult to achieve when dealing with high power laser beams, and becomes critical for a successful application involving surface heat treatment of non-metallic materials. The authors have designed and tested a very simple beam shaper for transforming the initial intensity distribution of a CO{sub 2} laser beam mode into a more uniform intensity profile. The beam shaper is a two-faceted mirror for active integration of high power coherent laser beams. After reflection in the faceted mirror, a TEM00 or TEM01 CO{sub 2} laser beam is divided into two beamlets that overlap to give a more uniform intensity distribution. A sharp interference pattern due to the high spatial coherence of the incident beam appears. This interference pattern is actively integrated by a high-frequency longitudinal displacement of one of the facets. This provides a change in the relative phase of the two beamlets, and consequently the interference pattern vibrates and its contribution to the intensity distribution averages out. When sweeping this distribution over a sample, a uniform amount of energy is deposited at every point of its surface. It must be emphasized that unlike multifaceted mirrors, the two-facet integrator may provide uniform intensity profiles over any working distance. Finally, as in other integration devices an imaging system may be used to obtain a spot of the shape and the size desired for a particular application.

  8. An explosively driven high-power microwave pulsed power system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, M A; Neuber, A A; Dickens, J C; Walter, J W; Kristiansen, M; Altgilbers, L L

    2012-02-01

    The increased popularity of high power microwave systems and the various sources to drive them is the motivation behind the work to be presented. A stand-alone, self-contained explosively driven high power microwave pulsed power system has been designed, built, and tested at Texas Tech University's Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics. The system integrates four different sub-units that are composed of a battery driven prime power source utilizing capacitive energy storage, a dual stage helical flux compression generator as the main energy amplification device, an integrated power conditioning system with inductive energy storage including a fast opening electro-explosive switch, and a triode reflex geometry virtual cathode oscillator as the microwave radiating source. This system has displayed a measured electrical source power level of over 5 GW and peak radiated microwaves of about 200 MW. It is contained within a 15 cm diameter housing and measures 2 m in length, giving a housing volume of slightly less than 39 l. The system and its sub-components have been extensively studied, both as integrated and individual units, to further expand on components behavior and operation physics. This report will serve as a detailed design overview of each of the four subcomponents and provide detailed analysis of the overall system performance and benchmarks.

  9. Metallic plates lens focalizing a high power microwave beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebuffi, L.

    1987-08-01

    A metallic grating composed of thin parallel plates opportunely spaced, permits to correct the phase of an incident high power microwave beam. In this work we show how it is possible to obtain a beam focalisation (lens), a beam deflection (prisma), or a variation in the polarization (polarizer) using parallel metallic plates. The main design parameters are here presented, in order to obtain the wanted phase modification keeping low the diffraction, the reflected power, the ohmic losses and avoiding breakdowns. Following the given criteria, a metallic plate lens has been realized to focalize the 200 KW, 100 msec 60 GHz beam used in the ECRH experiment on the TFR tokamak. The experimental beam concentration followed satisfactory the design requirements. In fact, the maximum intensity increased about twice the value without lens. In correspondence of this distance a reduction of the beam size of about 50% have been measured for the -3 dB radius. The lens supported high power tests without breakdowns or increase of the reflected power

  10. Research on calorimeter for high-power microwave measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hu; Ning, Hui; Yang, Wensen; Tian, Yanmin; Xiong, Zhengfeng; Yang, Meng; Yan, Feng; Cui, Xinhong

    2015-12-01

    Based on measurement of the volume increment of polar liquid that is a result of heating by absorbed microwave energy, two types of calorimeters with coaxial capacitive probes for measurement of high-power microwave energy are designed in this paper. The first is an "inline" calorimeter, which is placed as an absorbing load at the end of the output waveguide, and the second is an "offline" calorimeter that is placed 20 cm away from the radiation horn of the high-power microwave generator. Ethanol and high density polyethylene are used as the absorbing and housing materials, respectively. Results from both simulations and a "cold test" on a 9.3 GHz klystron show that the "inline" calorimeter has a measurement range of more than 100 J and an energy absorption coefficient of 93%, while the experimental results on a 9.3 GHz relativistic backward-wave oscillator show that the device's power capacity is approximately 0.9 GW. The same experiments were also carried out for the "offline" calorimeter, and the results indicate that it can be used to eliminate the effects of the shock of the solenoid on the measurement curves and that the device has a higher power capacity of 2.5 GW. The results of the numerical simulations, the "cold tests," and the experiments show good agreement.

  11. Reliability of high-power multimode pump modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflueger, Silke; Duesterberg, Richard L.; Rossin, Victor V.; Strite, Toby; Tai, Kuochou; Wolak, Edmund L.; Wong, Andre W.; Xu, Lei; Zucker, Erik

    2004-10-01

    Developers building high-power fiber lasers and diode pumped solid state lasers can receive significant benefits in thermal management and reliability by using single emitter multi-mode diodes in distributed pump architectures. This proposed distributed architecture relies on independent single emitter pump lasers and a modest level of pump redundancy. Driving the remaining diodes slightly harder componensates individual diode failures. A model of the ensemble lifetime based on module failure rates and power-scaling factors demonstrates that the distributed pump architecture requires random failure rates corresponding to better than 200,000h mean time between failure (MTBF), which meets typical industrial requirements. A high power, pigtailed, multi-mode pump module suitable for commercial applications is created through this model. Critical elements are based on telecom architectures, including the optical train and the fiber alignment. The module has a low thermal resistance of 4°C/W from the chip-on-sub-mount to the external heat sink, coupling efficiency of over 80% into 0.2 NA, and demonstrated reliable output power of over 5W cw with peak wavelengths near 915 nm. Individual pump modules are predicted to produce 5W cw output power with an MTBF of more than 400,000h. The relationship between anticipated MTBF requirements, test duration and test population is shown.

  12. High Power Density Power Electronic Converters for Large Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senturk, Osman Selcuk

    In large wind turbines (in MW and multi-MW ranges), which are extensively utilized in wind power plants, full-scale medium voltage (MV) multi-level (ML) voltage source converters (VSCs) are being more preferably employed nowadays for interfacing these wind turbines with electricity grids. For the......In large wind turbines (in MW and multi-MW ranges), which are extensively utilized in wind power plants, full-scale medium voltage (MV) multi-level (ML) voltage source converters (VSCs) are being more preferably employed nowadays for interfacing these wind turbines with electricity grids....... For these VSCs, high power density is required due to limited turbine nacelle space. Also, high reliability is required since maintenance cost of these remotely located wind turbines is quite high and these turbines operate under harsh operating conditions. In order to select a high power density and reliability...... VSC solution for wind turbines, first, the VSC topology and the switch technology to be employed should be specified such that the highest possible power density and reliability are to be attained. Then, this qualitative approach should be complemented with the power density and reliability...

  13. On life assessment of high reliability high power optical switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanjian; Chu, Peter

    2014-09-01

    High data rate and long range free space lasercom links require multi-watt optical transmitter power, which creates a need for high power redundancy switches to ensure high payload reliability. A high power optical switch (HPOS) with less than 0.15 dB loss and capable of switching more than 40 watts of optical power in a single mode fiber has been previously demonstrated in the Transformational Satellite Communication System program. Prototype switches, in either 1x2 or 2x2 configuration, have been subjected to pyro-shock test, vibration test, and vacuum operation. These switches showed no performance degradation as a result of these tests. Three prototypes went through 60,000 35-watt switching cycles and over 30 million low power switching cycles, and the switches showed no mechanical failure. The HPOS life is about 3.2 million switching cycles with a definition of 3-dB degradation in on/off extinction ratio, which is well suited for space applications.

  14. Design of a high power laser diode driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-jiang; Wang, Qian-qian; Liu, Li; Peng, Zhong

    2013-12-01

    Laser diodes are preferred light sources for compact non-scanning imaging laser radar systems due to their small volume and easiness to be integrated. Therefore, lots of present studies focus on research of modulation characteristics of highpower laser diodes. A high-frequency modulated driver for a compact non-scanning imaging laser radar system is described in this paper. It is based on linear constant current theory and can modulate a high power laser diode quasi-continuously. A high-speed operational amplifier is used to drive a power MOSFET, which can take full advantages of the power MOSFET-low driver current and good dynamic characteristics. In addition, an operational amplifier and PI (Proportion-Integration) control are applied in a negative feedback network to improve the current stability further. In order to avoid damaging the laser diode, a slow start circuit and over-current protection circuit have also been designed. The maximum current of the over-current protection circuit can be set according to the requirement. In addition, the power supply can also be switched between CW and QCW operating modes. When the high power semiconductor laser is modulated by large signal, some nonlinear effects will occur such as turn-on delay, relaxation oscillation and modulation chirp. Some theoretical analysis and experimental research on some nonlinear effects have also been done. Experimental results are consistent with theoretical analysis by using this driver for a 1W GaAs quantum well laser.

  15. Advances in outcomes measurement in rehabilitation medicine: current initiatives from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, David S; Carlozzi, Noelle E; Cella, David

    2011-10-01

    The articles in this supplement present recent advances in the measurement of patient-reported health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) outcomes. Specifically, these articles highlight the combined efforts of the National Institutes of Health, National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Center on Medical Rehabilitation Research, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, and Department of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service to improve HRQOL measurement. In addition, this supplement is intended to provide rehabilitation professionals with information about these efforts and the implications that these advances in outcomes measurement have for rehabilitation medicine and clinical practice. These new measurement scales use state-of-the-art method techniques, including item response theory and computerized adaptive testing. In addition, scale development involves both qualitative and quantitative methods, as well as the administration of items to hundreds or even thousands of research participants. The scales deliberately have been built with overlap of items between scales so that linkages and equivalency scores can be computed. Ultimately, these scales should facilitate direct comparison of outcomes instruments across studies and will serve as standard data elements across research trials without compromising the specificity of disease- or condition-targeted measures. This supplement includes the initial publications for many of these new measurement initiatives, each of which provides researchers and clinicians with better tools for evaluation of the efficacy of their interventions. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. High Power Mid-IR Laser Development 2.8 to 3.5 Microns

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advance the state of the art in continuous wave and pulsed IR distributed feedback (DFB) and optical parametric generation (OPG) lasers between 2.8 and 3.5 μm to...

  17. Q-Switched High Power Single Frequency 2 Micron Fiber Laser, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Accurate measurement of atmospheric parameters with high resolution needs advanced lasers. In this SBIR program we propose to develop innovative Q-switched high...

  18. Q-Switched High Power Single Frequency 2 Micron Fiber Laser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Accurate measurement of atmospheric parameters with high resolution needs advanced lasers. In this SBIR program we propose to develop innovative Q-switched high...

  19. Integrated Energetic Ion Mitigation for High Power Plasma Cathodes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation proposed is a hollow cathode that integrates mitigation methods to suppress wear to the keeper. Recent advances in the magnetic topology in Hall...

  20. A Cross-National Comparison of Reported Effort and Mathematics Performance in TIMSS Advanced

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklöf, Hanna; Pavešic, Barbara Japelj; Grønmo, Liv Sissel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to measure students' reported test-taking effort and the relationship between reported effort and performance on the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) Advanced mathematics test. This was done in three countries participating in TIMSS Advanced 2008 (Sweden, Norway, and Slovenia), and the…

  1. Development of modular scalable pulsed power systems for high power magnetized plasma experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, I. A.; Weber, T. E.; Adams, C. S.; Henderson, B. R.; Klim, A. J.

    2017-10-01

    New pulsed power switches and trigger drivers are being developed in order to explore higher energy regimes in the Magnetic Shock Experiment (MSX) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. To achieve the required plasma velocities, high-power (approx. 100 kV, 100s of kA), high charge transfer (approx. 1 C), low-jitter (few ns) gas switches are needed. A study has been conducted on the effects of various electrode geometries and materials, dielectric media, and triggering strategies; resulting in the design of a low-inductance annular field-distortion switch, optimized for use with dry air at 90 psig, and triggered by a low-jitter, rapid rise-time solid-state Linear Transformer Driver. The switch geometry and electrical characteristics are designed to be compatible with Syllac style capacitors, and are intended to be deployed in modular configurations. The scalable nature of this approach will enable the rapid design and implementation of a wide variety of high-power magnetized plasma experiments. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration. Approved for unlimited release, LA-UR-17-2578.

  2. 2008 USGS/NPS/NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL): Assateague Island National Seashore

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is a bare earth data set that was collected 24-25 March 2008 along the shoreline of the Assateague Island National Seashore in Maryland and Virginia. The data...

  3. Sun-downing and integration for the advancement of science and therapeutics: the National Institute on Substance Use Disorders (NISUD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, John

    2010-12-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the most prominent funding source for scientific research in the world. It is also a complex and diverse organization, having multiple institutes, centers and offices. NIH emphasizes the need for innovation and collaboration in research to discover critical knowledge, enhance health and prevent disease. Advancement in science requires not only sophisticated methods, but also logical organization. Here, an overview of ‘behavioral research’ (writ large) at NIH is presented, focusing upon the common trinity of ‘alcohol, tobacco/nicotine and other drugs’ and programmatic overlap across entities. Consideration is also given to the origins of institutes and their historical movement across organizational boundaries. Specific issues, concerns and advantages of integration of the National Institute on Drug Abuse and National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse are addressed. It is concluded that advances in understanding, treating and preventing substance use disorders would best be served by (1)review and integration of all related research throughout NIH, (2) logical placement of leadership for this activity in a single institute, here entitled the National Institute on Substance Use Disorders, and (3) close collaboration of this institute with its complementary partner, the National Institute on Mental Health. Thus, NIH can establish an organizational structure and collaborations reflecting the realities of the scientific and disease/health domains. This would make a prominent statement to the world scientific and health communities regarding NIH recognition of the need for innovation (scientific and organizational) and focus upon these myriad interrelated and costly problems.

  4. Failure modes in high-power lithium-ion batteries for use in hybrid electric vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostecki, R.; Zhang, X.; Ross Jr., P.N.; Kong, F.; Sloop, S.; Kerr, J.B.; Striebel, K.; Cairns, E.; McLarnon, F.

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program seeks to aid the development of high-power lithium-ion batteries for hybrid electric vehicles. Nine 18650-size ATD baseline cells were tested under a variety of conditions. The cells consisted of a carbon anode, LiNi 0.8 Co 0.2 O 2 cathode and DEC-EC-LiPF 6 electrolyte, and they were engineered for high-power applications. Selected instrumental techniques such as synchrotron IR microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, gas chromatography, etc. were used to characterize the anode, cathode, current collectors and electrolyte from these cells. The goal was to identify detrimental processes which lead to battery failure under a high-current cycling regime as well as during storage at elevated temperatures. The diagnostic results suggest that the following factors contribute to the cell power loss: (a) SEI deterioration and non-uniformity on the anode, (b) morphology changes, increase of impedance and phase separation on the cathode, (c) pitting corrosion on the cathode Al current collector, and (d) decomposition of the LiPF 6 salt in the electrolyte at elevated temperature

  5. High Power Operation of the JLab IR FEL Driver Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Beard; Stephen Benson; George Biallas; James Boyce; Donald Bullard; James Coleman; David Douglas; H. Dylla; Richard Evans; Pavel Evtushenko; Christopher Gould; Albert Grippo; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Carlos Hernandez-Garcia; J. Hovater; Kevin Jordan; John Klopf; Rui Li; Steven Moore; George Neil; Benard Poelker; Thomas Powers; Joseph Preble; Robert Rimmer; Daniel Sexton; Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Tennant; Richard Walker; Gwyn Williams; Shukui Zhang

    2007-08-01

    Operation of the JLab IR Upgrade FEL at CW powers in excess of 10 kW requires sustained production of high electron beam powers by the driver ERL. This in turn demands attention to numerous issues and effects, including: cathode lifetime; control of beamline and RF system vacuum during high current operation; longitudinal space charge; longitudinal and transverse matching of irregular/large volume phase space distributions; halo management; management of remnant dispersive effects; resistive wall, wake-field, and RF heating of beam vacuum chambers; the beam break up instability; the impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (both on beam quality and the performance of laser optics); magnetic component stability and reproducibility; and RF stability and reproducibility. We discuss our experience with these issues and describe the modus vivendi that has evolved during prolonged high current, high power beam and laser operation.

  6. High-power laser experiments to study collisionless shock generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakawa Y.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A collisionless Weibel-instability mediated shock in a self-generated magnetic field is studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation [Kato and Takabe, Astophys. J. Lett. 681, L93 (2008]. It is predicted that the generation of the Weibel shock requires to use NIF-class high-power laser system. Collisionless electrostatic shocks are produced in counter-streaming plasmas using Gekko XII laser system [Kuramitsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 175002 (2011]. A NIF facility time proposal is approved to study the formation of the collisionless Weibel shock. OMEGA and OMEGA EP experiments have been started to study the plasma conditions of counter-streaming plasmas required for the NIF experiment using Thomson scattering and to develop proton radiography diagnostics.

  7. High-power CW LINAC for food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimov, A.S.; Knapp, E.A.; Shvedunov, V.I.; Trower, W.P.

    2000-01-01

    The continuing high profile food poisoning incidents are beginning to attract food processors using electron and γ-ray sterilization technologies. The present method of choice uses radioactive isotopes but high-power electron particle accelerators are proving an increasingly attractive alternative. We are developing a family of compact industrial continuous wave linear accelerators which produce electrons with energies from 600 keV in increments of ∼600 keV and with beam power of 30 kW increasing in increments of 30 kW. Here, we describe the performance of our 1st section that accelerates 15 keV gun electrons to relativistic energies and then we sketch the design of the less demanding subsequent sections that we are now constructing

  8. High powered rocketry: design, construction, and launching experience and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Pryce; Curtis, Jarret; Bartel, Evan; Owens Cyr, Waycen; Lamsal, Chiranjivi

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the nuts and bolts of designing and building a high powered rocket have been presented. A computer simulation program called RockSim was used to design the rocket. Simulation results are consistent with time variations of altitude, velocity, and acceleration obtained in the actual flight. The actual drag coefficient was determined by using altitude back-tracking method and found to be 0.825. Speed of the exhaust determined to be 2.5 km s‑1 by analyzing the thrust curve of the rocket. Acceleration in the coasting phase of the flight, represented by the second-degree polynomial of a small leading coefficient, have been found to approach ‘-g’ asymptotically.

  9. High power electron beam accelerators for gas laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.G.; Martin, T.H.; Halbleib, J.A.

    1976-06-01

    A preliminary parameter investigation has been used to determine a possible design of a high-power, relativistic electron beam, transversely excited laser. Based on considerations of present and developing pulsed power technology, broad area diode physics and projected laser requirements, an exciter is proposed consisting of a Marx generator, pulse shaping transmission lines, radially converging ring diodes and a laser chamber. The accelerator should be able to deliver approximately 20 kJ of electron energy at 1 MeV to the 10 4 cm 2 cylindrical surface of a laser chamber 1 m long and 0.3 m in diameter in 24 ns with very small azimuthal asymmetry and uniform radial deposition

  10. Modeling lifetime of high power IGBTs in wind power applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busca, Cristian

    2011-01-01

    The wind power industry is continuously developing bringing to the market larger and larger wind turbines. Nowadays reliability is more of a concern than in the past especially for the offshore wind turbines since the access to offshore wind turbines in case of failures is both costly and difficult....... Lifetime modeling of future large wind turbines is needed in order to make reliability predictions about these new wind turbines early in the design phase. By doing reliability prediction in the design phase the manufacturer can ensure that the new wind turbines will live long enough. This paper represents...... an overview of the different aspects of lifetime modeling of high power IGBTs in wind power applications. In the beginning, wind turbine reliability survey results are briefly reviewed in order to gain an insight into wind turbine subassembly failure rates and associated downtimes. After that the most common...

  11. Evaluation of a high power inverter for potential space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guynes, B. V.; Lanier, J. R., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The ADM-006 inverter discussed utilizes a unique method of using power switching circuits to produce three-phase low harmonic content voltages without any significant filtering. This method is referred to as the power center approach to inverter design and is explained briefly. The results are presented of tests performed by MSFC to evaluate inverter performance, especially when required to provide power to nonlinear loads such as half or full wave rectified loads with capacitive filtering. Test preocedures and results are described. These tests show that the power center inverter essentially met or exceeded all of claims excluding voltage regulation (3.9 percent versus specified 3.3 percent) and would be a good candidate for high power inverter applications such as may be found on Space Station, Spacelab, etc.

  12. High power RF window deposition apparatus, method, and device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Lawrence R.; Lucovsky, Gerald; Zeller, Daniel

    2017-07-04

    A process for forming a coating for an RF window which has improved secondary electron emission and reduced multipactor for high power RF waveguides is formed from a substrate with low loss tangent and desirable mechanical characteristics. The substrate has an RPAO deposition layer applied which oxygenates the surface of the substrate to remove carbon impurities, thereafter has an RPAN deposition layer applied to nitrogen activate the surface of the substrate, after which a TiN deposition layer is applied using Titanium tert-butoxide. The TiN deposition layer is capped with a final RPAN deposition layer of nitridation to reduce the bound oxygen in the TiN deposition layer. The resulting RF window has greatly improved titanium layer adhesion, reduced multipactor, and is able to withstand greater RF power levels than provided by the prior art.

  13. Conceptual design of high power Ka-band radar transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanji, Alaudin; Hoppe, Daniel; Gillis, Peter

    1986-01-01

    A proposed conceptual design of a 400-kW CW Ka-band transmitter and associated microwave components to be used for planetary radar and serve as a prototype for future spacecraft uplinks is discussed. System requirements for such a transmitter are presented. Performance of the proposed high-power millimeter-wave tube, the gyroklystron, is discussed. Parameters of the proposed power amplifier, beam supply, and monitor and control devices are also presented. Microwave transmission-line components consisting of signal-monitoring devices, mode converter, and an overmoded corrugated feed are discussed. Finally, an assessment of the state-of-the-art technology to meet the system requirements is given, and possible areas of difficulty are summarized.

  14. High Power Diode Lasers with External Feedback: Overview and Prospects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Mingjun; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2012-01-01

    In summary, different external-cavity feedback techniques to improve the spatial beam quality and narrow the linewidth of the output beam from both BALs and TDLs are presented. Broad-area diode laser system with external-cavity feedback around 800 nm can produce several Watts of output power...... with a good beam quality. Tapered diode laser systems with external-cavity feedback around 800 and 1060 nm can deliver more than 2 W output power with diffraction-limited beam quality and can be operated in single-longitudinal mode. These high-brightness, narrow linewidth, and tunable external-cavity diode...... lasers emerge as the next generation of compact lasers that have the potential of replacing conventional high power laser systems in many existing applications....

  15. High-power UV-B LEDs with long lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rass, Jens; Kolbe, Tim; Lobo-Ploch, Neysha; Wernicke, Tim; Mehnke, Frank; Kuhn, Christian; Enslin, Johannes; Guttmann, Martin; Reich, Christoph; Mogilatenko, Anna; Glaab, Johannes; Stoelmacker, Christoph; Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Weyers, Markus; Kneissl, Michael

    2015-03-01

    UV light emitters in the UV-B spectral range between 280 nm and 320 nm are of great interest for applications such as phototherapy, gas sensing, plant growth lighting, and UV curing. In this paper we present high power UV-B LEDs grown by MOVPE on sapphire substrates. By optimizing the heterostructure design, growth parameters and processing technologies, significant progress was achieved with respect to internal efficiency, injection efficiency and light extraction. LED chips emitting at 310 nm with maximum output powers of up to 18 mW have been realized. Lifetime measurements show approximately 20% decrease in emission power after 1,000 operating hours at 100 mA and 5 mW output power and less than 30% after 3,500 hours of operation, thus indicating an L50 lifetime beyond 10,000 hours.

  16. Progress of compact Marx generators high power microwave source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinliang; Fan Xuliang; Bai Guoqiang; Cheng Xinbing

    2012-01-01

    The compact Marx generators, which can operate at a certain repetition frequency with small size, light weight, and high energy efficiency, are widely used in narrowband, wideband and ultra-wideband high power microwave (HPM) sources. This type of HPM source based on compact Marx generators is a worldwide research focus in recent years, and is important trend of development. The developments of this type of HPM source are described systemically in this paper. The output parameters and structural characteristics are reviewed, and the trends of development are discussed. This work provides reference and evidence for us to master the status of the HPM source based on compact Marx generators correctly and to explore its technical routes scientifically. (authors)

  17. High-power RF operations studies with the CRITS RFQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolme, G.O.; Keffeler, D.R.; Brown, V.W.

    1995-01-01

    High-current, cw linear accelerators have been proposed as spallation neutron source drivers for applications to tritium production, transmutation of nuclear waste, and safe nuclear power generation. Key features of these accelerators are high current (100 mA) low emittance-growth beam propagation, cw or high duty-factor operation, high efficiency, and minimal maintenance downtime. A 267.1 MHz, cw RFQ and klystrode based RF system were obtained from CRL and installed at LANL to support these next generation accelerator studies. The reconditioning of the RFQ accelerator section to its design power of 150 kW at 100% duty factor is being accomplished with studies focusing on the details of high-power RF structure operation, personnel and equipment safety systems integration, and RF controls integration

  18. Possible High Power Limitations From RF Pulsed Heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    1998-01-01

    One of the possible limitations to achieving high power in RF structures is damage to metal surfaces due to RF pulsed heating. Such damage may lead to degradation of RF performance. An experiment to study RF pulsed heating on copper has been developed at SLAC. The experiment consists of operating two pillbox cavities in the TE 011 mode using a 50 MW X-Band klystron. The estimated temperature rise of the surface of copper is 350 C for a power input of 20 MW to each cavity with a pulse length of 1.5 microseconds. Preliminary results from an experiment performed earlier are presented. A revised design for continued experiments is also presented along with relevant theory and calculations

  19. System considerations for airborne, high power superconducting generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southall, H.L.; Oberly, C.E.

    1979-01-01

    The design of rotating superconducting field windings in high power generators is greatly influenced by system considerations. Experience with two superconducting generators designed to produce 5 and 20 Mw resulted in a number of design restrictions. The design restrictions imposed by system considerations have not prevented low weight and high voltage power generation capability. The application of multifilament Nb;sub 3;Sn has permitted a large thermal margin to be designed into the rotating field winding. This margin permits the field winding to remain superconducting under severe system operational requirements. System considerations include: fast rotational startup, fast ramped magnetic fields, load induced transient fields and airborne cryogen logistics. Preliminary selection of a multifilament Nb;sub 3;Sn cable has resulted from these considerations. The cable will carry 864 amp at 8.5K and 6.8 Tesla. 10 refs

  20. Simulation of High Power Amplifier Calculation in VSAT System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indri Neforawati

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Arithmatical simulation of High Power Amplifier (HPA on VSAT system is a program which used to calculate the capacity of HPA as a working test of maximum power on each remote station of the VSAT network system, afterward can be obtained the available capacity value and power capacity used, therefore able to reallocate residual power below its available power spare. VSAT system can be used for several telecommunication application such as video broadcast, data broadcast,audio broadcast, banking operation, ATM and others. Due to the easy operational, maintanance and its instalment, VSAT system is more prifitable compare to ordinary terestrial band, its capability for multiservice application become more flexible in using its network. The software used is Visual Basic 6.0 version and database Microsoft Access. These software take a role as visualization and planning for remote station development and also power capasity needed for each remote in the calculation of HPA.

  1. Reliability of high power electron accelerators for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimek, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Accelerators applied for radiation processing are installed in industrial facilities where accelerator availability coefficient should be at the level of 95% to fulfill requirements according to industry standards. Usually the exploitation of electron accelerator reviles the number of short and few long lasting failures. Some technical shortages can be overcome by practical implementation the experience gained in accelerator technology development by different accelerator manufactures. The reliability/availability of high power accelerators for application in flue gas treatment process must be dramatically improved to meet industrial standards. Support of accelerator technology dedicated for environment protection should be provided by governmental and international institutions to overcome accelerator reliability/availability problem and high risk and low direct profit in this particular application. (author)

  2. High Efficiency Power Converter for Low Voltage High Power Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nymand, Morten

    The topic of this thesis is the design of high efficiency power electronic dc-to-dc converters for high-power, low-input-voltage to high-output-voltage applications. These converters are increasingly required for emerging sustainable energy systems such as fuel cell, battery or photo voltaic based...... energy systems. Applications include systems for emergency power back-up (UPS), de-centralized combined heat and power systems, traction applications such as hybrid electrical vehicles, forklift trucks and special applications such as low emission power generation for truck and ship containers...... be applied to all isolated boost type converters and, in principle, an unlimited number of power stages can be paralleled. Feasibility and operation of the new topology are demonstrated on a dual 3 kW and a quad 10 kW prototype converter. Measured peak efficiency is 98.2% and worst case minimum efficiency...

  3. Coherent beam combining architectures for high power tapered laser arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmel, G.; Janicot, S.; Hanna, M.; Decker, J.; Crump, P.; Erbert, G.; Witte, U.; Traub, M.; Georges, P.; Lucas-Leclin, G.

    2017-02-01

    Coherent beam combining (CBC) aims at increasing the spatial brightness of lasers. It consists in maintaining a constant phase relationship between different emitters, in order to combine them constructively in one single beam. We have investigated the CBC of an array of five individually-addressable high-power tapered laser diodes at λ = 976 nm, in two architectures: the first one utilizes the self-organization of the lasers in an interferometric extended-cavity, which ensures their mutual coherence; the second one relies on the injection of the emitters by a single-frequency laser diode. In both cases, the coherent combining of the phase-locked beams is ensured on the front side of the array by a transmission diffractive grating with 98% efficiency. The passive phase-locking of the laser bar is obtained up to 5 A (per emitter). An optimization algorithm is implemented to find the proper currents in the five ridge sections that ensured the maximum combined power on the front side. Under these conditions we achieve a maximum combined power of 7.5 W. In the active MOPA configuration, we can increase the currents in the tapered sections up to 6 A and get a combined power of 11.5 W, corresponding to a combining efficiency of 76%. It is limited by the beam quality of the tapered emitters and by fast phase fluctuations between emitters. Still, these results confirm the potential of CBC approaches with tapered lasers to provide a high-power and high-brightness beam, and compare with the current state-of-the-art with laser diodes.

  4. Spatial and Spectral Brightness Enhancement of High Power Semiconductor Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidner, Jordan Palmer

    The performance of high-power broad-area diode lasers is inhibited by beam filamentation induced by free-carrier-based self-focusing. The resulting beam degradation limits their usage in high-brightness, high-power applications such as pumping fiber lasers, and laser cutting, welding, or marking. Finite-difference propagation method simulations via RSoft's BeamPROP commercial simulation suite and a custom-built MATLAB code were used for the study and design of laser cavities that suppress or avoid filamentation. BeamPROP was used to design a tapered, passive, multi-mode interference cavity for the creation of a self-phase-locking laser array, which is comprised of many single-mode gain elements coupled to a wide output coupler to avoid damage from local high optical intensities. MATLAB simulations were used to study the effects of longitudinal and lateral cavity confinement on lateral beam quality in conventional broad-area lasers. This simulation was expanded to design a laser with lateral gain and index prescription that is predicted to operate at or above state-of-the-art powers while being efficiently coupled to conventional telecom single-mode optical fibers. Experimentally, a commercial broad-area laser was coupled in the far-field to a single-mode fiber Bragg grating to provide grating-stabilized single-mode laser feedback resulting in measured spectral narrowing for efficient pump absorption. Additionally a 19 GHz-span, spatially resolved, self-heterodyne measurement was made of a broad-area laser to study the evolution/devolution of the mode content of the emitted laser beam with increasing power levels.

  5. New generation of compact high power disk lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuchtenbeiner, Stefanie; Zaske, Sebastian; Schad, Sven-Silvius; Gottwald, Tina; Kuhn, Vincent; Kumkar, Sören; Metzger, Bernd; Killi, Alexander; Haug, Patrick; Speker, Nicolai

    2018-02-01

    New technological developments in high power disk lasers emitting at 1030 nm are presented. These include the latest generation of TRUMPF's TruDisk product line offering high power disk lasers with up to 6 kW output power and beam qualities of up to 4 mm*mrad. With these compact devices a footprint reduction of 50% compared to the previous model could be achieved while at the same time improving robustness and increasing system efficiency. In the context of Industry 4.0, the new generation of TruDisk lasers features a synchronized data recording of all sensors, offering high-quality data for virtual analyses. The lasers therefore provide optimal hardware requirements for services like Condition Monitoring and Predictive Maintenance. We will also discuss its innovative and space-saving cooling architecture. It allows operation of the laser under very critical ambient conditions. Furthermore, an outlook on extending the new disk laser platform to higher power levels will be given. We will present a disk laser with 8 kW laser power out of a single disk with a beam quality of 5 mm*mrad using a 125 μm fiber, which makes it ideally suited for cutting and welding applications. The flexibility of the disk laser platform also enables the realization of a wide variety of beam guiding setups. As an example a new scheme called BrightLine Weld will be discussed. This technology allows for an almost spatter free laser welding process, even at high feed rates.

  6. Proceedings of the two day national workshop on advanced materials for engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Alexis, S.; Jayakumar, S.

    2012-01-01

    The subjects like material preparation, material forming, material properties, materials testing, material mechanics, material structure, metal materials, non-metallic materials, composite materials, medical materials, chemical materials, food materials, electrician/electrical materials, building materials, biological materials, electronic/magnetic/optical materials, advanced materials applications in engineering are included in the workshop. Processing of advanced materials, studies on novel ceramic coatings, high strength, light weight and nanostructured materials are discussed in this proceedings. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  7. Free-electron masers vs. gyrotrons: prospects for high-power sources at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thumm, Manfred

    2002-01-01

    The possible applications of high-power millimeter (mm) and sub-mm waves from free-electron masers (FEMs) and gyro-devices span a wide range of technologies. The plasma physics community has already taken advantage of recent advances in applying high-power mm waves generated by long pulse or continuous wave (CW) gyrotron oscillators and short pulse very high-power FEMs in the areas of RF-plasma production, heating, non-inductive current drive, plasma stabilization and active plasma diagnostics for magnetic confinement thermonuclear fusion research, such as electron cyclotron resonance heating (28-170 GHz), electron cyclotron current drive , collective Thomson scattering , microwave transmission and heat-wave propagation experiments. Continuously frequency tunable FEMs could widen these fields of applications. Another important application of CW gyrotrons is industrial materials processing, e.g. sintering of high-performance functional and structural nanostructured ceramics. Sub-mm wave sources are employed in high-frequency broadband electron paramagnetic resonance and other types of spectroscopy. Future applications which await the development of novel high-power FEM amplifiers and gyro-amplifiers include high-resolution radar ranging and imaging in atmospheric and planetary science as well as deep-space and specialized satellite communications and RF drivers for next-generation high-gradient linear accelerators (supercolliders). The present paper reviews the state-of-the-art and future prospects of these recent applications of gyro-devices and FEMs and compares their specific advantages

  8. Free-electron masers vs. gyrotrons: prospects for high-power sources at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumm, Manfred

    2002-05-01

    The possible applications of high-power millimeter (mm) and sub-mm waves from free-electron masers (FEMs) and gyro-devices span a wide range of technologies. The plasma physics community has already taken advantage of recent advances in applying high-power mm waves generated by long pulse or continuous wave (CW) gyrotron oscillators and short pulse very high-power FEMs in the areas of RF-plasma production, heating, non-inductive current drive, plasma stabilization and active plasma diagnostics for magnetic confinement thermonuclear fusion research, such as electron cyclotron resonance heating (28-170 GHz), electron cyclotron current drive , collective Thomson scattering , microwave transmission and heat-wave propagation experiments. Continuously frequency tunable FEMs could widen these fields of applications. Another important application of CW gyrotrons is industrial materials processing, e.g. sintering of high-performance functional and structural nanostructured ceramics. Sub-mm wave sources are employed in high-frequency broadband electron paramagnetic resonance and other types of spectroscopy. Future applications which await the development of novel high-power FEM amplifiers and gyro-amplifiers include high-resolution radar ranging and imaging in atmospheric and planetary science as well as deep-space and specialized satellite communications and RF drivers for next-generation high-gradient linear accelerators (supercolliders). The present paper reviews the state-of-the-art and future prospects of these recent applications of gyro-devices and FEMs and compares their specific advantages.

  9. U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps pharmacists: making a difference in advancing the nation's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Louis; Wick, Jeannette; Figg, William Douglas; McClelland, Robert H; Shiber, Michael; Britton, James E; Ngo, Diem-Kieu H; Borders-Hemphill, Vicky; Mead, Christina; Zee, Jerry; Huntzinger, Paul

    2009-01-01

    To describe how U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) pharmacists serving in jobs that are normal for them, but considerably different than those found in the private sector, are making a difference in advancing the nation's health. Pharmacists who serve in the Commissioned Corps of PHS fill roles that are considerably different than their counterparts in the private sector. Their work takes them out from behind the counter and into the world. Pharmacy officers advance the health and safety of the nation by their involvement in the delivery of direct patient care to medically underserved people, national security, drug vigilance, research, and policy-making endeavors. PHS pharmacists fill essential public health leadership and service roles throughout the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and certain non-HHS federal agencies and programs. The Health Resources and Services Administration, National Institutes of Health, Federal Bureau of Prisons, Indian Health Service, Food and Drug Administration, and U.S. Coast Guard are among the many federal agencies in which pharmacy officers are assigned. In each setting, PHS pharmacists find traditional roles augmented with assignments and challenges that broaden the scope of their practice.

  10. Semiconductor laser engineering, reliability and diagnostics a practical approach to high power and single mode devices

    CERN Document Server

    Epperlein, Peter W

    2013-01-01

    This reference book provides a fully integrated novel approach to the development of high-power, single-transverse mode, edge-emitting diode lasers by addressing the complementary topics of device engineering, reliability engineering and device diagnostics in the same book, and thus closes the gap in the current book literature. Diode laser fundamentals are discussed, followed by an elaborate discussion of problem-oriented design guidelines and techniques, and by a systematic treatment of the origins of laser degradation and a thorough exploration of the engineering means to enhance the optical strength of the laser. Stability criteria of critical laser characteristics and key laser robustness factors are discussed along with clear design considerations in the context of reliability engineering approaches and models, and typical programs for reliability tests and laser product qualifications. Novel, advanced diagnostic methods are reviewed to discuss, for the first time in detail in book literature, performa...

  11. A Lumped Thermal Model Including Thermal Coupling and Thermal Boundary Conditions for High Power IGBT Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2018-01-01

    Detailed thermal dynamics of high power IGBT modules are important information for the reliability analysis and thermal design of power electronic systems. However, the existing thermal models have their limits to correctly predict these complicated thermal behavior in the IGBTs: The typically used...... thermal model based on one-dimensional RC lumps have limits to provide temperature distributions inside the device, moreover some variable factors in the real-field applications like the cooling and heating conditions of the converter cannot be adapted. On the other hand, the more advanced three......-dimensional thermal models based on Finite Element Method (FEM) need massive computations, which make the long-term thermal dynamics difficult to calculate. In this paper, a new lumped three-dimensional thermal model is proposed, which can be easily characterized from FEM simulations and can acquire the critical...

  12. Filter and window assemblies for high power insertion device synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khounsary, A.M.; Viccaro, P.J.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    The powerful beams of x-ray radiation generated by insertion devices at high power synchrotron facilities deposit substantial amounts of localized heat in the front end and optical components that they intercept. X-ray beams from undulator sources, in particular, are confined to very narrow solid angles and therefore impose very high absorbed heat fluxes. This paper is devoted to a detailed study of the design of windows for the Advanced Photon Source undulators and wigglers, emphasizing alternative design concepts, material considerations, and cooling techniques necessary for handling the high heat load of the insertion devices. Various designs are thermally and structurally analyzed by numerically simulating full-power operating conditions. This analysis also has relevance to the design and development of other beam line components which are subjected to the high heat loads of insertion devices

  13. Advance of the National Program of Radiological Protection and Safety for medical diagnostic with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdejo S, M.

    1999-01-01

    The National Program of Radiological Protection and Safety for medical diagnostic with X-ray (Programa Nacional de Proteccion y Seguridad Radiologica para diagnostico medico con rayos X) was initiated in the General Direction of Environmental Health (Direccion General de Salud Ambiental) in 1995. Task coordinated with different dependences of the Public Sector in collaboration between the Secretary of Health (Secretaria de Salud), the National Commission of Nuclear Safety and Safeguards (Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias) and, the National Institute of Nuclear Research (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares). The surveillance to the fulfilment of the standardization in matter of Radiological Protection and Safety in the medical diagnostic with X-rays has been obtained for an important advance in the Public sector and it has been arousing interest in the Private sector. (Author)

  14. 78 FR 28601 - National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences; Request for Comment on Proposed Methods for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... organizations including, but not limited to, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA..., Redundancy and Competition With Industry Activities SUMMARY: The National Institutes of Health (NIH) National... use to avoid duplication, redundancy and competition with industry activities. DATES: Comments...

  15. A National Initiative to Advance School Mental Health Performance Measurement in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Elizabeth Halsted; Stephan, Sharon Hoover; Lever, Nancy; Ereshefsky, Sabrina; Mosby, Amanda; Bohnenkamp, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Standardized health performance measurement has increasingly become an imperative for assuring quality standards in national health care systems. As compared to somatic health performance measures, behavioral health performance measures are less developed. There currently is no national standardized performance measurement system for monitoring…

  16. Interaction of high power ultrashort laser pulses with plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissler, M.

    2000-12-01

    The invention of short laser-pulses has opened a vast application range from testing ultra high-speed semiconductor devices to precision material processing, from triggering and tracing chemical reactions to sophisticated surgical applications in opthalmology and neurosurgery. In physical science, ultrashort light pulses enable researchers to follow ultrafast relaxation processes in the microcosm on time scale never before accessible and study light-matter-interactions at unprecedented intensity levels. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the interaction of ultrashort high power laser pulses with plasmas for a broad intensity range. First the ionization of atoms with intense laser fields is investigated. For sufficient strong and low frequent laser pulses, electrons can be removed from the core by a tunnel process through a potential barrier formed by the electric field of the laser. This mechanism is described by a well-established theory, but the interaction of few-cycle laser pulses with atoms can lead to regimes where the tunnel theory loses its validity. This regime is investigated and a new description of the ionization is found. Although the ionization plays a major role in many high-energy laser processes, there exist no simple and complete model for the evolution of laser pulses in field-ionizing media. A new propagation equation and the polarization response for field-ionizing media are presented and the results are compared with experimental data. Further the interaction of high power laser radiation with atoms result in nonlinear response of the electrons. The spectrum of this induced nonlinear dipole moment reaches beyond visible wavelengths into the x-ray regime. This effect is known as high harmonic generation (HHG) and is a promising tool for the generation of coherent shot wavelength radiation, but the conversions are still not efficient enough for most practical applications. Phase matching schemes to overcome the limitation are discussed

  17. High-Power Fiber Lasers Using Photonic Band Gap Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDomenico, Leo; Dowling, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    High-power fiber lasers (HPFLs) would be made from photonic band gap (PBG) materials, according to the proposal. Such lasers would be scalable in the sense that a large number of fiber lasers could be arranged in an array or bundle and then operated in phase-locked condition to generate a superposition and highly directed high-power laser beam. It has been estimated that an average power level as high as 1,000 W per fiber could be achieved in such an array. Examples of potential applications for the proposed single-fiber lasers include welding and laser surgery. Additionally, the bundled fibers have applications in beaming power through free space for autonomous vehicles, laser weapons, free-space communications, and inducing photochemical reactions in large-scale industrial processes. The proposal has been inspired in part by recent improvements in the capabilities of single-mode fiber amplifiers and lasers to produce continuous high-power radiation. In particular, it has been found that the average output power of a single strand of a fiber laser can be increased by suitably changing the doping profile of active ions in its gain medium to optimize the spatial overlap of the electromagnetic field with the distribution of active ions. Such optimization minimizes pump power losses and increases the gain in the fiber laser system. The proposal would expand the basic concept of this type of optimization to incorporate exploitation of the properties (including, in some cases, nonlinearities) of PBG materials to obtain power levels and efficiencies higher than are now possible. Another element of the proposal is to enable pumping by concentrated sunlight. Somewhat more specifically, the proposal calls for exploitation of the properties of PBG materials to overcome a number of stubborn adverse phenomena that have impeded prior efforts to perfect HPFLs. The most relevant of those phenomena is amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), which causes saturation of gain and power

  18. DOE HIGH-POWER SLIM-HOLE DRILLING SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. William C. Maurer; John H. Cohen; J. Chris Hetmaniak; Curtis Leitko

    1999-09-01

    This project used a systems approach to improve slim-hole drilling performance. A high power mud motor, having a double-length power section, and hybrid PDC/TSP drill bit were developed to deliver maximum horsepower to the rock while providing a long life down hole. This high-power slim-hole drilling system drills much faster than conventional slim-hole motor and bit combinations and holds significant potential to reduce slim-hole drilling costs. The oil and gas industries have been faced with downward price pressures since the 1980s. These pressures are not expected to be relieved in the near future. To maintain profitability, companies have had to find ways to reduce the costs of producing oil and gas. Drilling is one of the more costly operations in the production process. One method to reduce costs of drilling is to use smaller more mobile equipment. Slim holes have been drilled in the past using this principle. These wells can save money not only from the use of smaller drilling equipment, but also from reduced tubular costs. Stepping down even one casing size results in significant savings. However, slim holes have not found wide spread use for three reasons. First, until recently, the price of oil has been high so there were no forces to move the industry in this direction. Second, small roller bits and motors were not very reliable and they drilled slowly, removing much of the economic benefit. The third and final reason was the misconception that large holes were needed everywhere to deliver the desired production. Several factors have changed that will encourage the use of slim holes. The industry now favors any method of reducing the costs of producing oil and gas. In addition, the industry now understands that large holes are not always needed. Gas, in particular, can have high production rates in smaller holes. New materials now make it possible to manufacture improved bits and motors that drill for long periods at high rates. All that remains is to

  19. Control system for high power laser drilling workover and completion unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zediker, Mark S; Makki, Siamak; Faircloth, Brian O; DeWitt, Ronald A; Allen, Erik C; Underwood, Lance D

    2015-05-12

    A control and monitoring system controls and monitors a high power laser system for performing high power laser operations. The control and monitoring system is configured to perform high power laser operation on, and in, remote and difficult to access locations.

  20. Structural Change in Advanced Nations : A New Set of Stylised Facts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorgenson, Dale W.; Timmer, Marcel P.

    2011-01-01

    We provide new evidence on patterns of structural change in advanced economies, reconsidering the stylised facts put forward by Kaldor (1963), Kuznets (1971), and Maddison (1980). Since 1980, the services sector has overwhelmingly predominated in the economic activity of the European Union, Japan,

  1. High-Power Density SOFCs for Aviation Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) approach commercialization, interest in broader applications of this technology is mounting. While the first commercialized systems...

  2. A high power lithium thionyl chloride battery for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pinakin M.

    1993-03-01

    A high power, 28 V, 330 A h, active lithium thionyl chloride battery has been developed for use as main and payload power sources on an expendable launch vehicle. Nine prismatic cells, along with the required electrical components and a built-in heater system, are efficiently packaged resulting in significant weight savings over presently used silver-zinc batteries. The high rate capability is achieved by designing the cells with a large electrochemical surface area and impregnating an electrocatalyst, polymeric phthalocyanine, into the carbon cathodes. Passivation effects are reduced with the addition of sulfur dioxide into the thionyl chloride electrolyte solution. The results of conducting a detailed thermal analysis are utilized to establish the heater design parameters and the thermal insulation requirements of the battery. An analysis of cell internal pressure and vent characteristics clearly illustrates the margins of safety under different operating conditions. Performance of fresh cells is discussed using polarization scan and discharge data at different rates and temperatures. Self-discharge rate is estimated based upon test results on cells after storage. Results of testing a complete prototype battery are described.

  3. A high power lithium thionyl chloride battery for space applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, P.M. (Alliant Techsystems, Inc., Power Sources Center, Horsham, PA (United States))

    1993-03-15

    A high power, 28 V, 330 A h, active lithium thinoyl chloride battery has been developed for use as main and payload power sources on an expendable launch vehicle. Nine prismatic cells, along with the required electrical components and a built-in heater system, are efficiently packaged resulting in significant weight savings (>40%) over presently used silver-zinc batteries. The high rate capability is achieved by designing the cells with a large electrochemical surface area and impregnating an electrocatalyst, polymeric phthalocyanine, (CoPC)[sub n], into the carbon cathodes. Passivation effects are reduced with the addition of sulfur dioxide into the thionyl chloride electrolyte solution. The results of conducting a detailed thermal analysis are utilized to establish the heater design parameters and the thermal insulation requirements of the battery. An analysis of cell internal pressure and vent characteristics clearly illustrates the margins of safety under different operating conditions. Performance of fresh cells is discussed using polarization scan and discharge data at different rates and temperatures. Self-discharge rate is estimated based upon test results on cells after storage. Finally, the results of testing a complete prototype battery are described in detail. (orig.)

  4. Radiological Environmental Protection for LCLS-II High Power Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, James; Blaha, Jan; Cimeno, Maranda; Mao, Stan; Nicolas, Ludovic; Rokni, Sayed; Santana, Mario; Tran, Henry

    2017-09-01

    The LCLS-II superconducting electron accelerator at SLAC plans to operate at up to 4 GeV and 240 kW average power, which would create higher radiological impacts particularly near the beam loss points such as beam dumps and halo collimators. The main hazards to the public and environment include direct or skyshine radiation, effluent of radioactive air such as 13N, 15O and 41Ar, and activation of groundwater creating tritium. These hazards were evaluated using analytic methods and FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The controls (mainly extensive bulk shielding and local shielding around high loss points) and monitoring (neutron/photon detectors with detection capabilities below natural background at site boundary, site-wide radioactive air monitors, and groundwater wells) were designed to meet the U.S. DOE and EPA, as well as SLAC requirements. The radiological design and controls for the LCW systems [including concrete housing shielding for 15O and 11C circulating in LCW, 7Be and erosion/corrosion products (22Na, 54Mn, 60Co, 65Zn, etc.) captured in resin and filters, leak detection and containment of LCW with 3H and its waste water discharge; explosion from H2 build-up in surge tank and release of radionuclides] associated with the high power beam dumps are also presented.

  5. LCLS-II high power RF system overview and progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeremian, Anahid Dian

    2015-10-07

    A second X-ray free electron laser facility, LCLS-II, will be constructed at SLAC. LCLS-II is based on a 1.3 GHz, 4 GeV, continuous-wave (CW) superconducting linear accelerator, to be installed in the first kilometer of the SLAC tunnel. Multiple types of high power RF (HPRF) sources will be used to power different systems on LCLS-II. The main 1.3 GHz linac will be powered by 280 1.3 GHz, 3.8 kW solid state amplifier (SSA) sources. The normal conducting buncher in the injector will use four more SSAs identical to the linac SSAs but run at 2 kW. Two 185.7 MHz, 60 kW sources will power the photocathode dual-feed RF gun. A third harmonic linac section, included for linearizing the bunch energy spread before the first bunch compressor, will require sixteen 3.9 GHz sources at about 1 kW CW. A description and an update on all the HPRF sources of LCLS-II and their implementation is the subject of this paper.

  6. High power test of the input coupler KEKB SC cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsunobu, S.; Asano, K.; Furuya, T.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, T.; Ishi, Y.; Kijima, Y.; Sennyu, K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting cavity for the KEK B-factory needs a high power input coupler of more than 500 kW. This coupler is investigated. A coaxial antenna coupler is used as an input coupler, which is the same type as what has used for the TRISTAN SC cavities. The ceramic window of the coupler is a 152 D coaxial. The inner conductor is cooled by water and the outer conductor is cooled by cold He gas. To increase heat exchange efficiency and to prevent a local heating spot, Cu fins were attached on the outside surface of the outer conductor of the coupler. After 9 hours of RF conditioning, a CW traveling RF power of 800 kW could be successfully supplied to the first two couplers in a test bench for more than 30 minutes. Most of the processing time was spent to overcome the multipactoring level of 50 kW and 160 kW. The second two couplers were treated by ozonized ultra pure water rinsing, and the multipactoring level of 50 kW disappeared. After almost same conditioning time the second couplers reached 800 kW. Both pairs of coupler could be operated in a short time at 850 kW which is our klystron power limit. (author)

  7. Modeling of mode purity in high power gyrotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, S.Y.; Antonsen, T.M. Jr.; Saraph, G.P.

    1993-01-01

    Spurious mode generation at the same frequency of the operational mode in a high power gyrotron can significantly reduce the power handling capability and the stability of a gyrotron oscillator because these modes are usually not matched at the output window and thus have high absorption and reflection rates. To study the generation of this kind of mode, the authors developed a numerical model based on an existing multimode self-consistent time-dependent computer code. This model includes both TE and TM modes and accounts for mode transformations due to the waveguide inhomogeneity. With this new tool, they study the mode transformation in the gyrotron and the possibility of excitation of parasitic TE and TM modes in the up taper section due to the gyroklystron mechanism. Their preliminary results show moderate excitation of both TE and TM modes at the same frequency as the main operating mode at locations near their cutoff. Details of the model and further simulation results will be presented

  8. Recent progress in high-power slab lasers in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Recently, many solid-state lasers have been widely employed in Japanese industries, especially in the electronics industries for precise and reliable processing. To expand the use of solid-state lasers and to achieve higher processing speed, the authors are developing slab lasers of high power, high repetition rate, and high beam quality. Metal processing systems with optical fibers for large and complex 3-D work, multiwork station systems linked to only one laser with optical fibers, and compact x-ray sources for lithography are promising areas for such lasers. Surnitomo Metal Mining is growing Nd:GGG and Nd:YAG crystals 60 mm in diameter and 200 mm long. From 2 at.% Nd-doped GGG crystals without central core regions. The authors obtained two slab materials with dimensions of 35 X 9 X 192 and 55 X 15 X 213 mm/sup 3/. By using the smaller slab, they constructed a slab laser and obtained 370-W laser output power at 24-kW lamp input power and 10-pps repetition rate. Now they are constructing a 1-kW slab laser using the other larger size slab

  9. Hardening and welding with high-power diode lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Bodo; Herfurth, Hans-Joachim; Heinemann, Stefan

    2000-03-01

    Commercially available high power diode lasers (HPDLs) with output powers of up to 6 kW have been recognized as an interesting tool for industrial applications. In certain fields of application they offer many advantages over Nd:YAG and CO2 lasers because of their low maintenance, compact design and low capital costs. Examples of successful industrial implementation of HPDLs include plastic welding, surface hardening and heat conduction welding of stainless steel and aluminum. The joining of plastics with an HPDL offers the advantages of producing a weld seam with high strength, high consistency and superior appearance. One example is the keyless entry system introduced with the Mercedes E-class where the microelectronic circuits are embedded in a plastic housing. Other applications include instrument panels, cell phones, headlights and tail lights. Applications in the field of surface treatment of metals profit from the HPDL's inherent line-shaped focus and the homogeneous intensity distribution across this focus. An HPDL system is used within the industry to harden rails for coordinate measurement machines. This system contains a customized zoom optic to focus the laser light onto the rails. With the addition of a temperature control, even complex shapes can be hardened with a constant depth and minimum distortion.

  10. Radiological Environmental Protection for LCLS-II High Power Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu James

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The LCLS-II superconducting electron accelerator at SLAC plans to operate at up to 4 GeV and 240 kW average power, which would create higher radiological impacts particularly near the beam loss points such as beam dumps and halo collimators. The main hazards to the public and environment include direct or skyshine radiation, effluent of radioactive air such as 13N, 15O and 41Ar, and activation of groundwater creating tritium. These hazards were evaluated using analytic methods and FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The controls (mainly extensive bulk shielding and local shielding around high loss points and monitoring (neutron/photon detectors with detection capabilities below natural background at site boundary, site-wide radioactive air monitors, and groundwater wells were designed to meet the U.S. DOE and EPA, as well as SLAC requirements. The radiological design and controls for the LCW systems [including concrete housing shielding for 15O and 11C circulating in LCW, 7Be and erosion/corrosion products (22Na, 54Mn, 60Co, 65Zn, etc. captured in resin and filters, leak detection and containment of LCW with 3H and its waste water discharge; explosion from H2 build-up in surge tank and release of radionuclides] associated with the high power beam dumps are also presented.

  11. High-Power Solar Electric Propulsion for Future NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzella, David; Hack, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    NASA has sought to utilize high-power solar electric propulsion as means of improving the affordability of in-space transportation for almost 50 years. Early efforts focused on 25 to 50 kilowatt systems that could be used with the Space Shuttle, while later efforts focused on systems nearly an order of magnitude higher power that could be used with heavy lift launch vehicles. These efforts never left the concept development phase in part because the technology required was not sufficiently mature. Since 2012 the NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate has had a coordinated plan to mature the requisite solar array and electric propulsion technology needed to implement a 30 to 50 kilowatt solar electric propulsion technology demonstration mission. Multiple solar electric propulsion technology demonstration mission concepts have been developed based on these maturing technologies with recent efforts focusing on an Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission. If implemented, the Asteroid Redirect Vehicle will form the basis for a capability that can be cost-effectively evolved over time to provide solar electric propulsion transportation for a range of follow-on mission applications at power levels in excess of 100 kilowatts.

  12. Radiation safety with high power operation of EURISOL

    CERN Document Server

    Ridikas, D

    2007-01-01

    The European Community has launched the design study for a next generation RIB facility able to increase by a few orders of magnitude, the exotic beam intensity and availability in Europe. Forty institutes and laboratories within Europe, North America and Asia are taking part in this consortium, named EURISOL DS project (European Isotope Separation On Line Design Study). In EURISOL, four target stations are foreseen, three direct targets of approximately 100 kW of beam power and one multi-MW (MMW) target assembly, all driven by a high-power particle accelerator. In this MMW station, high-intensity RIBs of neutron-rich isotopes will be obtained by inducing fission in several actinide targets surrounding a liquid metal spallation neutron source. The envisaged increase in RIB intensities at EURISOL means a drastic increase of the radioactive inventory and corresponding radioprotection related issues. Safety aspects of the future RIB production targets (aiming at a few ~1015 fissions/s) will become decisive in li...

  13. Transportable high-energy high-power generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novac, B. M.; Smith, I. R.; Senior, P.; Parker, M.; Louverdis, G.

    2010-05-01

    High-power applications sometimes require a transportable, simple, and robust gigawatt pulsed power generator, and an analysis of various possible approaches shows that one based on a twin exploding wire array is extremely advantageous. A generator based on this technology and used with a high-energy capacitor bank has recently been developed at Loughborough University. An H-configuration circuit is used, with one pair of diagonally opposite arms each comprising a high-voltage ballast inductor and the other pair exploding wire arrays capable of generating voltages up to 300 kV. The two center points of the H configuration provide the output to the load, which is coupled through a high-voltage self-breakdown spark gap, with the entire autonomous source being housed in a metallic container. Experimentally, a load resistance of a few tens of Ohms is provided with an impulse of more than 300 kV, having a rise time of about 140 ns and a peak power of over 1.7 GW. Details of the experimental arrangement and typical results are presented and diagnostic measurements of the current and voltage output are shown to compare well with theoretical predictions based on detailed numerical modeling. Finally, the next stage toward developing a more powerful and energetic transportable source is outlined.

  14. Plasma potential mapping of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, Albert; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Sanders, Jason M.; Anders, Andre

    2011-12-20

    Pulsed emissive probe techniques have been used to determine the plasma potential distribution of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges. An unbalanced magnetron with a niobium target in argon was investigated for pulse length of 100 μs at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz, giving a peak current of 170 A. The probe data were taken with a time resolution of 20 ns and a spatial resolution of 1 mm. It is shown that the local plasma potential varies greatly in space and time. The lowest potential was found over the target’s racetrack, gradually reaching anode potential (ground) several centimeters away from the target. The magnetic pre-sheath exhibits a funnel-shaped plasma potential resulting in an electric field which accelerates ions toward the racetrack. In certain regions and times, the potential exhibits weak local maxima which allow for ion acceleration to the substrate. Knowledge of the local E and static B fields lets us derive the electrons’ E×B drift velocity, which is about 105 m/s and shows structures in space and time.

  15. Vacuum Window Design for High-Power Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Shaftan, T V

    2005-01-01

    One of the problems in the high-power lasers design is in outcoupling of a powerful laser beam out of a vacuum volume into atmosphere. Usually the laser device is located inside a vacuum tank. The laser radiation is transported to the outside world through the transparent vacuum window. While considered transparent, some of the light passing through the glass is absorbed and converted to heat. For most applications, these properties are academic curiosities; however, in multi-kilowatt lasers, the heat becomes significant and can lead to a failure. The absorbed power can result in thermal stress, reduction of light transmission and, consequently, window damage. Modern optical technology has developed different types of glass (Silica, BK7, diamond, etc.) that have high thermal conductivity and damage threshold. However, for kilo- and megawatt lasers the issue still remains open. In this paper we present a solution that may relieve the heat load on the output window. We discuss advantages and issues of this part...

  16. Fiber facet gratings for high power fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanek, Martin; Vanis, Jan; Baravets, Yauhen; Todorov, Filip; Ctyroky, Jiri; Honzatko, Pavel

    2017-12-01

    We numerically investigated the properties of diffraction gratings designated for fabrication on the facet of an optical fiber. The gratings are intended to be used in high-power fiber lasers as mirrors either with a low or high reflectivity. The modal reflectance of low reflectivity polarizing grating has a value close to 3% for TE mode while it is significantly suppressed for TM mode. Such a grating can be fabricated on laser output fiber facet. The polarizing grating with high modal reflectance is designed as a leaky-mode resonant diffraction grating. The grating can be etched in a thin layer of high index dielectric which is sputtered on fiber facet. We used refractive index of Ta2O5 for such a layer. We found that modal reflectance can be close to 0.95 for TE polarization and polarization extinction ratio achieves 18 dB. Rigorous coupled wave analysis was used for fast optimization of grating parameters while aperiodic rigorous coupled wave analysis, Fourier modal method and finite difference time domain method were compared and used to compute modal reflectance of designed gratings.

  17. Thick target for high-power ISOL facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricault, Pierre G.

    2016-06-01

    The future frontier of the Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) method is to increase the intensity of the Radioactive Isotope Beams (RIB) by many orders of magnitude in order to satisfy challenging experiments such as Rn-Electric Dipole Moment, Fr-Parity Non Conservation… and in general for radiative proton-capture relevant for nuclear astrophysics processes. The most direct method to obtain higher RIB intensity is to increase the driver beam intensity. New techniques were developed such as composite targets, where the target material is deposited onto a high thermal conductive substrate allowing a better heat dissipation. Combined with high-power target using radial finned for radiative cooling, these targets are capable of dissipating up to 20 kW depending on the target material operating temperature. Another method to increase RIB intensity is the use of indirect ISOL method, where secondary particle beam (n or γ) interacts with a fissile target material. By decoupling the power deposition in the system composed of a converter and ISOL target allows for much higher primary beam power. Indirect ISOL-target method permit reach several hundred of kW to MW of driver beam power, allowing the production of intense fission products beams. This paper reviews the thick ISOL target approach for producing intense radioactive ion beams.

  18. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Yoon W; Campisi, Isidoro E; Champion, Mark; Crofford, Mark; Davis, Kirk; Drury, Michael A; Fuja, Ray E; Gurd, Pamela; Kasemir, Kay-Uwe; McCarthy, Michael P; Powers, Tom; Shajedul Hasan, S M; Stirbet, Mircea; Stout, Daniel; Tang, Johnny Y; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V; Wezensky, Mark

    2005-01-01

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavitites have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducti...

  19. Discharge Physics of High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2010-10-13

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is pulsed sputtering where the peak power exceeds the time-averaged power by typically two orders of magnitude. The peak power density, averaged over the target area, can reach or exceed 107 W/m2, leading to plasma conditions that make ionization of the sputtered atoms very likely. A brief review of HIPIMS operation is given in a tutorial manner, illustrated by some original data related to the self-sputtering of niobium in argon and krypton. Emphasis is put on the current-voltage-time relationships near the threshold of self-sputtering runaway. The great variety of current pulse shapes delivers clues on the very strong gas rarefaction, self-sputtering runaway conditions, and the stopping of runaway due to the evolution of atom ionization and ion return probabilities as the gas plasma is replaced by metal plasma. The discussions are completed by considering instabilities and the special case of ?gasless? self-sputtering.

  20. Overview of High Power Vacuum Dry RF Load Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnykh, Anatoly [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-27

    A specific feature of RF linacs based on the pulsed traveling wave (TW) mode of operation is that only a portion of the RF energy is used for the beam acceleration. The residual RF energy has to be terminated into an RF load. Higher accelerating gradients require higher RF sources and RF loads, which can stably terminate the residual RF power. RF feeders (from the RF source though the accelerating section to the load) are vacuumed to transmit multi-megawatt high power RF. This overview will outline vacuumed RF loads only. A common method to terminate multi-MW RF power is to use circulated water (or other liquid) as an absorbing medium. A solid dielectric interface (a high quality ceramic) is required to separate vacuum and liquid RF absorber mediums. Using such RF load approaches in TW linacs is troubling because there is a fragile ceramic window barrier and a failure could become catastrophic for linac vacuum and RF systems. Traditional loads comprising of a ceramic disk have limited peak and average power handling capability and are therefore not suitable for high gradient TW linacs. This overview will focus on ''vacuum dry'' or ''all-metal'' loads that do not employ any dielectric interface between vacuum and absorber. The first prototype is an original design of RF loads for the Stanford Two-Mile Accelerator.

  1. Fusion reactor development using high power particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Y.

    1990-01-01

    The present paper outlines major applications of the ion source/accelerator to fusion research and also addresses the present status and future plans for accelerator development. Applications of ion sources/accelerators for fusion research are discussed first, focusing on plasma heating, plasma current drive, plasma current profile control, and plasma diagnostics. The present status and future plan of ion sources/accelerators development are then described focusing on the features of existing and future tokamak equipment. Positive-ion-based NBI systems of 100 keV class have contributed to obtaining high temperature plasmas whose parameters are close to the fusion break-even condition. For the next tokamak fusion devices, a MeV class high power neutral beam injector, which will be used to obtain a steady state burning plasma, is considered to become the primary heating and current drive system. Development of such a system is a key to realize nuclear fusion reactor. It will be entirely indebted to the development of a MeV class high current negative deuterium ion source/accelerator. (N.K.)

  2. Thermal shock tests of carbon materials with high power beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiba, M.; Araki, M.; Ando, T.; Jinbou, R.; Saidoh, M.; Suzuki, S.; Nakamura, K.; Tanaka, S.

    1992-01-01

    In tokamak machines, not only present machine but also future tokamak devices, off-normal events, so called plasma disruption, is considered as unavoidable phenomena. During the plasma disruption, plasma energy will deposit onto the surface of plasma facing components (PFC). Erosion induced by the disruption will be considered as primary limitation factor of life time of the PFCs. To evaluate erosion rate during the disruption, high power beam facilities have strongly been required. JAERI constructed an electron beam test facility to simulate the disruption heat load. The facility can produce an intense electron beam at a heat flux of up to 2000 MW/m 2 from 1 ms. Many carbon based materials, which have regarded at most promising armor materials, have been tested at the facility at a heat flux range from 300 MW/m 2 to 2000 MW/m 2 . The erosion depth of carbon-fiber-carbon composites (C/C composites) is ∼ 3 times larger than that of numerical prediction. Carbon based B 4 C-coated and B 4 C converted materials which have been developed at JAERI have also tested in the facility. The B 4 C converted C/C composites show high thermal shock resistance. (author)

  3. Glycol-Substitute for High Power RF Water Loads

    CERN Document Server

    Ebert, Michael

    2005-01-01

    In water loads for high power rf applications, power is dissipated directly into the coolant. Loads for frequencies below approx. 1GHz are ordinarily using an ethylene glycol-water mixture as coolant. The rf systems at DESY utilize about 100 glycol water loads with powers ranging up to 600kW. Due to the increased ecological awareness, the use of glycol is now considered to be problematic. In EU it is forbidden to discharge glycol into the waste water system. In case of cooling system leakages one has to make sure that no glycol is lost. Since it is nearly impossible to avoid any glycol loss in large rf systems, a glycol-substitute was searched for and found. The found sodium-molybdate based substitute is actually a additive for corrosion protection in water systems. Sodium-molybdate is ecologically harmless; for instance, it is also used as fertilizer in agriculture. A homoeopathic dose of 0.4% mixed into deionised water gives better rf absorption characteristics than a 30% glycol mixture. The rf coolant feat...

  4. High-power laser sources for industry and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Friedrich

    2007-06-01

    Despite the invention and availability of a wide variety of laser sources, only very few types have made their way into the industrial use, which very often requires reliable three shift running, high uptime and low running costs. Over a long time the CO II gas laser has dominated the high power material processing area and still holds with 41.1 % the biggest market share in that field. The most modern, most reliable and most cost efficient type of CO II laser is the diffusion cooled slab configuration, which provides almost diffraction limited beam quality and is nowadays available in a power range up to 8 kW. The advantage of solid state lasers is that their radiation can be guided through optical fibers, but they suffered from high cost and low efficiency. The appearance of diode lasers as a very efficient and reliable pumping source, however, has boosted solid state laser technology. Not only the beam quality and efficiency of the classical rod design could be improved by replacing broadband lamps by monochromatic diode lasers but furthermore, because of the high brilliance of the diode lasers, new concepts as the thin disc and the fiber laser could be realized. Especially the higher efficiency, reducing the running cost in conjunction with improved beam quality makes the solid state lasers the tool of the future, whenever 3D applications are under consideration.

  5. Development of Faraday rotators for high power glass laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kunio; Kato, Yoshiaki; Yamanaka, Chiyoe.

    1980-01-01

    As a new approach to nuclear fusion, laser-induced fusion has been recently highlighted. It is no exaggeration to say that the future success of this technique depends on the development of high power laser as the energy driver. Faraday rotators are used as photo-diodes to prevent amplifiers and oscillator assemblies from the possibility to be broken by reversely transmitting light. The authors were able to increase the isolation ratio by about 10 times as compared with conventional one by employing the large performance index, disc type Faraday glass, FR-5. In this paper, first, Faraday glasses which are the composing element of Faraday rotators and the optical characteristics of dielectric thin-film polarizers are described, and next, the design of a magnetic coil and its resulting coil characteristics are reported. Then the dominant causes limiting the isolation ratio of Faraday rotators are investigated, and it is clarified that the residual strain in Faraday glasses and the non-uniformity of magnetic field affect predominantly. The measured results are as follows: The magnetic flux densities required to rotate by 45 deg the polarizing plane of the light transmitted through the Faraday rotators A and B are both 27 kG; and the isolation ratios over the whole effective plane are 36 and 32 dB, respectively. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Adaptive metal mirror for high-power CO2 lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosch, Uwe-Klaus

    1996-08-01

    Spherical mirrors with a variable radius of curvature are used inside laser resonators as well as in the beam path between the laser and the workpiece. Commercially-available systems use piezoelectric actuators, or the pressure of the coolant, to deform the mirror surface. In both cases, the actuator and the cooling system influence each other. This interaction is avoided through the integration of the cooling system with the flexible mirror membrane. A multi- channel design leads to an optimized cooling effect, which is necessary for high power applications. The contour of the variable metal mirror depends on the mounting between the membrane and the mirror body and on the distribution of forces. Four cases of deformation can be distinguished for a circular elastic membrane. The realization of an adaptive metal mirror requires a technical compromise to be made. A mechanical construction is presented which combines an elastic hinge with the inlet and outlet of the coolant. For the deformation of the mirror membranes two actuators with different character of deformation are used. The superposition of the two deformations results in smaller deviations from the spherical surface shape than can be achieved using a single actuator. DC proportional magnets have been introduced as cheap and rigid actuators. The use of this adaptive mirror, either in a low pressure atmosphere of a gas laser resonator, or in an extra-cavity beam path is made possible through the use of a ventilation system.

  7. 78 FR 43745 - Expanding National Service Through Partnerships to Advance Government Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ...--Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor #0; #0; #0...' capacity to achieve their missions, efficiently use tax dollars, help individuals develop skills that will...

  8. S-band 300 W pulsed solid state microwave amplifier development for driving high power klystrons for electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohania, Praveen; Shrivastava, Purushottam; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2005-01-01

    S-Band Microwave electron accelerators like microtrons and linear accelerators need pulsed microwaves from few megawatts to tens of megawatts to accelerator the electrons to desired energy and intensity. Klystron tube based driver amplifiers were used to drive the high power klystrons, which need microwave power from few tens of watts to 1 kW depending on tube output power and gain. A endeavour was initiated at Centre for Advanced Technology to develop state of art solid state S-band microwave amplifiers indigenously to drive the klystron tubes. A modular design approach was used and individual modules up to 160 W power levels were developed and tested. Finally combining 160 W modules will give up to 300 W output power. Several more modules can be combined to achieve even high power levels. Present paper describes the developmental efforts of 300 W S-band solid-state amplifiers and related microwave technologies. (author)

  9. High-power, solid-state rf source for accelerator cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughan, D.R.; Mols, G.E.; Reid, D.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    During the past few years the Defense and Electronics Center of Westinghouse Electric Corporation has developed a solid-state, 250-kW peak, rf amplifier for use with the SPS-40 radar system. This system has a pulse length of 60 μs and operates across the frequency band from 400 to 450 MHz. Because of the potential use of such a system as an rf source for accelerator applications, a collaborative experiment was initiated between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Westinghouse to simulate the resonant load conditions of an accelerator cavity. This paper describes the positive results of that experiment as well as the solid-state amplifier architecture. It also explores the future of high-power, solid-state amplifiers as rf sources for accelerator structures

  10. Advances in high-power, Ultrashort pulse DPSSL technologies at HiLASE

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smrž, Martin; Novák, Ondřej; Mužík, Jiří; Turčičová, Hana; Chyla, Michal; Nagisetty, Siva S.; Vyvlečka, Michal; Roškot, Lukáš; Miura, Taisuke; Černohorská, Jitka; Sikocinski, Pawel; Chen, Liyuan; Huynh, Jaroslav; Severová, Patricie; Pranovich, Alina; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 10 (2017), s. 1-12, č. článku 1016. ISSN 2076-3417 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1602; GA ČR GA16-12960S; GA MŠk LM2015086; GA TA ČR(CZ) TG02010056 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 739573 Grant - others:OP VVV - HiLASE-CoE(XE) CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/15_006/0000674 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diode-pumped solid-state lasers (DPSSL) * high average power lasers * higher harmonic generation * Yb:YAG * mid-infrared radiation * thin-disk laser * picosecond pulses Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.679, year: 2016

  11. High power density systems used in advanced metallurgical applications and safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirji, K.V.; Ramesh, N.

    2016-01-01

    This topic concerns about the operation and development of electron beam (EB) machines utilized in metallurgical applications such as EB melting and EB welding. They are popular in purification of refractory metals and welding of their alloy components. In this equipment, EB generation, acceleration, harnessing and energy dissipation need to be performed under high vacuum conditions. The high voltage required for acceleration is generated by using 3 phase 415 Volts, 50 Hz ac power supply. The transformers used have to be specially designed to withstand frequent, high short circuit currents which result from discharges during processing. The high voltage rectifiers are similarly designed to cater to such duties, apart from generating high voltage with low ripple contents. Apart from trans-rectifiers, the cables need to be designed with proper termination at the gun to ensure safety of operating personnel, while ensuring ease of connection. Practical problems of electric discharges due to sudden evolution of gaseous and metallic impurities, proper dissipation of residual charge on cathode assembly and the EB gun need to be handled carefully. (author)

  12. Fundamental Materials Studies for Advanced High Power Microwave and Terahertz Vacuum Electronic Radiation Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Monte Carlo (EMC), a semi- classical technique used to numerically solve the Boltzmann transport equation in order to simulate carrier motion, coupled...calculating the inter-particle electrostatic force, are used for coupling electrodynamics with the carrier motion in a self-consistent manner. b...2014). [4] N. Sule, K.J. Willis, S.C. Hagness, I. Knezevic, “EMC/FDTD/MD simulation of carrier transport and electrodynamics in two-dimensinoal

  13. Advanced concepts for high-power, short-pulse CO2 laser development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Daniel F.; Hasson, Victor; von Bergmann, Hubertus; Chen, Yu-hsin; Schmitt-Sody, A.; Penano, Joseph R.

    2016-06-01

    Ultra-short pulse lasers are dominated by solid-state technology, which typically operates in the near-infrared. Efforts to extend this technology to longer wavelengths are meeting with some success, but the trend remains that longer wavelengths correlate with greatly reduced power. The carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is capable of delivering high energy, 10 micron wavelength pulses, but the gain structure makes operating in the ultra-short pulse regime difficult. The Naval Research Laboratory and Air Force Research Laboratory are developing a novel CO2 laser designed to deliver ~1 Joule, ~1 picosecond pulses, from a compact gain volume (~2x2x80 cm). The design is based on injection seeding an unstable resonator, in order to achieve high energy extraction efficiency, and to take advantage of power broadening. The unstable resonator is seeded by a solid state front end, pumped by a custom built titanium sapphire laser matched to the CO2 laser bandwidth. In order to access a broader range of mid infrared wavelengths using CO2 lasers, one must consider nonlinear frequency multiplication, which is non-trivial due to the bandwidth of the 10 micron radiation.

  14. Advanced payload concepts and system architecture for emerging services in Indian National Satellite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, E. P.; Rao, N. Prahlad; Sarkar, S.; Singh, D. K.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past two decades Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) has developed and operationalized satellites to generate a large capacity of transponders for telecommunication service use in INSAT system. More powerful on-board transmitters are built to usher-in direct-to-home broadcast services. These have transformed the Satcom application scenario in the country. With the proliferation of satellite technology, a shift in the Indian market is witnessed today in terms of demand for new services like Broadband Internet, Interactive Multimedia, etc. While it is imperative to pay attention to market trends, ISRO is also committed towards taking the benefits of technological advancement to all round growth of our population, 70% of which dwell in rural areas. The initiatives already taken in space application related to telemedicine, tele-education and Village Resource Centres are required to be taken to a greater height of efficiency. These targets pose technological challenges to build a large capacity and cost-effective satellite system. This paper addresses advanced payload concepts and system architecture along with the trade-off analysis on design parameters in proposing a new generation satellite system capable of extending the reach of the Indian broadband structure to individual users, educational and medical institutions and enterprises for interactive services. This will be a strategic step in the evolution of INSAT system to employ advanced technology to touch every human face of our population.

  15. Advances in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, E

    2009-10-15

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory - temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

  16. Thermal design and analysis of high power star sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The requirement for the temperature stability is very high in the star sensors as the high precision needs for the altitude information. Thermal design and analysis thus is important for the high power star sensors and their supporters. CCD, normally with Peltier thermoelectric cooler (PTC, is the most important sensor component in the star sensors, which is also the main heat source in the star sensors suite. The major objective for the thermal design in this paper is to design a radiator to optimize the heat diffusion for CCD and PTC. The structural configuration of star sensors, the heat sources and orbit parameters were firstly introduced in this paper. The influences of the geometrical parameters and coating material characteristics of radiators on the heat diffusion were investigated by heat flux analysis. Carbon–carbon composites were then chosen to improve the thermal conductivity for the sensor supporters by studying the heat transfer path. The design is validated by simulation analysis and experiments on orbit. The satellite data show that the temperatures of three star sensors are from 17.8 °C to 19.6 °C, while the simulation results are from 18.1 °C to 20.1 °C. The temperatures of radiator are from 16.1 °C to 16.8 °C and the corresponding simulation results are from 16.0 °C to 16.5 °C. The temperature variety of each star sensor is less than 2 °C, which satisfies the design objectives.

  17. High-power CMUTs: design and experimental verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaner, F Yalçin; Olçum, Selim; Oğuz, H Kağan; Bozkurt, Ayhan; Köymen, Hayrettin; Atalar, Abdullah

    2012-06-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have great potential to compete with piezoelectric transducers in high-power applications. As the output pressures increase, nonlinearity of CMUT must be reconsidered and optimization is required to reduce harmonic distortions. In this paper, we describe a design approach in which uncollapsed CMUT array elements are sized so as to operate at the maximum radiation impedance and have gap heights such that the generated electrostatic force can sustain a plate displacement with full swing at the given drive amplitude. The proposed design enables high output pressures and low harmonic distortions at the output. An equivalent circuit model of the array is used that accurately simulates the uncollapsed mode of operation. The model facilities the design of CMUT parameters for high-pressure output, without the intensive need for computationally involved FEM tools. The optimized design requires a relatively thick plate compared with a conventional CMUT plate. Thus, we used a silicon wafer as the CMUT plate. The fabrication process involves an anodic bonding process for bonding the silicon plate with the glass substrate. To eliminate the bias voltage, which may cause charging problems, the CMUT array is driven with large continuous wave signals at half of the resonant frequency. The fabricated arrays are tested in an oil tank by applying a 125-V peak 5-cycle burst sinusoidal signal at 1.44 MHz. The applied voltage is increased until the plate is about to touch the bottom electrode to get the maximum peak displacement. The observed pressure is about 1.8 MPa with -28 dBc second harmonic at the surface of the array.

  18. High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV40 Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempel, Jane [TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)

    2016-03-31

    TIAX has developed long-life lithium-ion cells that can meet and exceed the energy and power targets (200Wh/kg and 800W/kg pulse power) set out by DOE for PHEV40 batteries. To achieve these targets, we selected and scaled-up a high capacity version of our proprietary high energy and high power CAM-7® cathode material. We paired the cathode with a blended anode containing Si-based anode material capable of delivering high capacity and long life. Furthermore, we optimized the anode blend composition, cathode and anode electrode design, and selected binder and electrolyte compositions to achieve not only the best performance, but also long life. By implementing CAM-7 with a Si-based blended anode, we built and tested prototype 18650 cells that delivered measured specific energy of 198Wh/kg total energy and 845W/kg at 10% SOC (projected to 220Wh/kg in state-of-the-art 18650 cell hardware and 250Wh/kg in 15Ah pouch cells). These program demonstration cells achieved 90% capacity retention after 500 cycles in on-going cycle life testing. Moreover, we also tested the baseline CAM-7/graphite system in 18650 cells showing that 70% capacity retention can be achieved after ~4000 cycles (20 months of on-going testing). Ultimately, by simultaneously meeting the PHEV40 power and energy targets and providing long life, we have developed a Li-ion battery system that is smaller, lighter, and less expensive than current state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries.

  19. Beam transport optics for high-power laser systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Beam transport optics receive output energy from the laser cavity and deliver it to the work site. Depending on the application, this may require a few simple elements or large complex systems. Collection of the laser energy depends on the spatial and temporal energy distribution as well as the wavelength and polarization of the laser cavity and output coupler. Transport optics can perform a variety of functions, including beam formatting, frequency doubling, and distribution to one or more work sites while maintaining or even improving the beam quality. The beam may be delivered to work sites as focused spots or images, projected to distant targets, or propagated through various media for sensing or photochemical processing. Design may involve optical modeling of the system, including diffraction effects and thermal management. A Gaussian beam profile is often used for convenience in modeling. When deviations from this ideal profile need to be considered, it is necessary to characterize the laser beam in detail. Design of the transport system requires understanding of the interaction of the laser energy with optical materials and components. Practical considerations include mounting the optics without stress and with the stability suitable for the intended application. Requirements for beam direction, stability, size, shape, and quality dictate the design approach for each specific situation. Attention also must be given to reliability, environmental, and commercial requirements. Damage to optics in high-power laser systems is a common concern. Environmental problems such as atmospheric turbulence, contamination by dust or vapor from the work site or other sources, or absorption of water vapor can directly degrade beam quality. Other potentially significant optical performance effects may result from instability and aging of the optics, temperature, humidity, pressure, transmitted vibration, and contamination from the work site or other sources

  20. Multi-focus beam shaping of high power multimode lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Alexander; Volpp, Joerg; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2017-08-01

    Beam shaping of powerful multimode fiber lasers, fiber-coupled solid-state and diode lasers is of great importance for improvements of industrial laser applications. Welding, cladding with millimetre scale working spots benefit from "inverseGauss" intensity profiles; performance of thick metal sheet cutting, deep penetration welding can be enhanced when distributing the laser energy along the optical axis as more efficient usage of laser energy, higher edge quality and reduction of the heat affected zone can be achieved. Building of beam shaping optics for multimode lasers encounters physical limitations due to the low beam spatial coherence of multimode fiber-coupled lasers resulting in big Beam Parameter Products (BPP) or M² values. The laser radiation emerging from a multimode fiber presents a mixture of wavefronts. The fiber end can be considered as a light source which optical properties are intermediate between a Lambertian source and a single mode laser beam. Imaging of the fiber end, using a collimator and a focusing objective, is a robust and widely used beam delivery approach. Beam shaping solutions are suggested in form of optics combining fiber end imaging and geometrical separation of focused spots either perpendicular to or along the optical axis. Thus, energy of high power lasers is distributed among multiple foci. In order to provide reliable operation with multi-kW lasers and avoid damages the optics are designed as refractive elements with smooth optical surfaces. The paper presents descriptions of multi-focus optics as well as examples of intensity profile measurements of beam caustics and application results.

  1. High Power Factor Hybrid Rectifier | Odeh | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Technology. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 33, No 4 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  2. Terahertz radiation source using a high-power industrial electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-03-27

    Mar 27, 2017 ... 2Accelerator and Beam Physics Laboratory, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, ... electron beam-based sources, e.g., backward wave ..... THz wave [3,22]. The phase-sensitive imaging appli- cations require highly spatial or transverse coherent radiation [5,28,42]. THz undulator radiation in ...

  3. Modular Ultra-High Power Solar Array Architecture, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Deployable Space Systems, Inc. (DSS) will focus the proposed SBIR program on the development of a new highly-modularized and extremely-scalable solar array that...

  4. High Power Density, Lightweight Thermoelectric Metamaterials for Energy Harvesting

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermoelectric energy harvesting utilizes materials that generate an electrical current when subjected to a temperature gradient, or simply, a hot and cold source of...

  5. High Power, Thermally Optimized Blue Laser for Lidar, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To enable widespread and rapid airborne bathymetric lidar to adequate depths in many ocean regions a low-cost, rugged, and high energy pulsed laser source must be...

  6. High Power, Thermally Optimized Blue Laser for Lidar, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To enable widespread and rapid airborne bathymetric lidar to adequate depths in many ocean regions a low-cost, rugged, and high energy pulsed laser source must be...

  7. High Power Room Temperature Terahertz Local Oscillator, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The motivation of the proposed SBIR is to develop, demonstrate and commercialize a compact, low-mass, high output power (1-10 milliwatt), tunable source of CW THz...

  8. Education as eHealth Infrastructure: Considerations in Advancing a National Agenda for eHealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilberts, Sonya; Gray, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the role of education as infrastructure in large-scale ehealth strategies--in theory, in international practice and in one national case study. Education is often invisible in the documentation of ehealth infrastructure. Nevertheless a review of international practice shows that there is significant educational investment made…

  9. 75 FR 30044 - Partnerships To Advance the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... of the types of organizations of national scope that are especially encouraged to participate are... participation by Web meeting (requirements include: Computer, internet connection, and telephone, preferably... access to the meeting site and will not be able to attend the meeting in-person due to mandatory security...

  10. 77 FR 16840 - Partnerships to Advance the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... success of NORA. Some of the types of organizations of national scope that are especially encouraged to...: computer, Internet connection, and telephone, preferably with `mute' capability). An email confirming... meeting in-person due to mandatory security clearance procedures at the Patriots Plaza facility...

  11. 78 FR 30306 - Partnerships To Advance the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    ... enhance the success of NORA. Some of the types of organizations of national scope that are especially...: computer, Internet connection, and telephone, preferably with `mute' capability). An email confirming... meeting in-person due to mandatory security clearance procedures at the Patriots Plaza facility...

  12. 75 FR 63495 - Partnerships To Advance the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... enhance the success of NORA. Some of the types of organizations of national scope that are especially... include: computer, Internet connection, and telephone, preferably with `mute' capability) or in person. An... will not be able to attend the meeting in-person due to mandatory security clearance procedures at the...

  13. Transmission line pulse system for avalanche characterization of high power semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Michele; Ascione, Giovanni; De Falco, Giuseppe; Maresca, Luca; De Laurentis, Martina; Irace, Andrea; Breglio, Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    Because of the increasing in power density of electronic devices for medium and high power application, reliabilty of these devices is of great interest. Understanding the avalanche behaviour of a power device has become very important in these last years because it gives an indication of the maximum energy ratings which can be seen as an index of the device ruggedness. A good description of this behaviour is given by the static IV blocking characteristc. In order to avoid self heating, very relevant in high power devices, very short pulses of current have to be used, whose value can change from few milliamps up to tens of amps. The most used method to generate short pulses is the TLP (Transmission Line Pulse) test, which is based on charging the equivalent capacitance of a transmission line to high value of voltage and subsequently discharging it onto a load. This circuit let to obtain very short square pulses but it is mostly used for evaluate the ESD capability of semiconductor and, in this environment, it generates pulses of low amplitude which are not high enough to characterize the avalanche behaviour of high power devices . Advanced TLP circuit able to generate high current are usually very expensive and often suffer of distorption of the output pulse. In this article is proposed a simple, low cost circuit, based on a boosted-TLP configuration, which is capable to produce very square pulses of about one hundreds of nanosecond with amplitude up to some tens of amps. A prototype is implemented which can produce pulses up to 20A of amplitude with 200 ns of duration which can characterize power devices up to 1600V of breakdown voltage. Usage of microcontroller based logic make the circuit very flexible. Results of SPICE simulation are provided, together with experimental results. To prove the effectiveness of the circuit, the I-V blocking characteristics of two commercial devices, namely a 600V PowerMOS and a 1200V Trench-IGBT, are measured at different

  14. Nation-State Size, Ethnic Diversity and Economic Performance in the Advanced Capitalist Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patsiurkoa, Natalka; Campbell, John L.; Hall, John A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the proposition that the economic performance of advanced capitalist countries depends on their size and ethnic composition. As such it blends insights from two important literatures in comparative political economy. One is exemplified by the work of Peter Katzenstein, who wrote...... capitalist countries for the 1985 through 2007 period. Regression analysis confirms that ethnically homogenous countries tend to have stronger rates of economic growth during this period than ethnically heterogeneous countries but that neither the size of countries nor the interaction of size and ethnic...

  15. Proceedings of the national conference on critical and strategic materials for advanced technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The conference is totally devoted to all aspects of critical and strategic materials. The overall objectives of the symposium are to discuss: a) the key and enabling role of critical and strategic materials in advanced technologies; b) a sustainable supply and utilization of these materials; c) to bring into focus cross-cutting research and educational needs and scientific/technological grand challenges associated with the sustainable extraction, recovery, recycling, reuse, substitution and purification of critical materials and d) to communicate the research needs in this field to the scientists, technologists and government. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  16. Proceedings of third national symposium on recent advances in analytical sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-04-01

    The contributions made by analytical scientists have played critical roles in the areas ranging from the development of concepts and theories to a variety of practical applications such as mining, refining, fuel processing, fertilisers, food products, nano materials etc. The theme of the symposium 'Recent Advances in Analytical Sciences and Applications' is well significant in view of its importance in the design and development of new products as well as in the environmental monitoring and quality control in industrial manufacturing. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  17. LEO to GEO (and Beyond) Transfers Using High Power Solar Electric Propulsion (HP-SEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loghry, Christopher S.; Oleson, Steven R.; Woytach, Jeffrey M.; Martini, Michael C.; Smith, David A.; Fittje, James E.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Aimee; hide

    2017-01-01

    Rideshare, or Multi-Payload launch configurations, are becoming more and more commonplace but access to space is only one part of the overall mission needs. The ability for payloads to achieve their target orbits or destinations can still be difficult and potentially not feasible with on-board propulsion limitations. The High Power Solar Electric Propulsion (HP-SEP) Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) provides transfer capabilities for both large and small payload in excess of what is possible with chemical propulsion. Leveraging existing secondary payload adapter technology like the ESPA provides a platform to support Multi-Payload launch and missions. When coupled with HP-SEP, meaning greater than 30 kW system power, very large delta-V maneuvers can be accomplished. The HP-SEP OMV concept is designed to perform a Low Earth Orbit to Geosynchronous Orbit (LEO-GEO) transfer of up to six payloads each with 300kg mass. The OMV has enough capability to perform this 6 kms maneuver and have residual capacity to extend an additional transfer from GEO to Lunar orbit. This high deltaV capability is achieved using state of the art 12.5kW Hall Effect Thrusters (HET) coupled with high power roll up solar arrays. The HP-SEP OMV also provides a demonstration platform for other SEP technologies such as advanced Power Processing Units (PPU), Xenon Feed Systems (XFS), and other HET technologies. The HP-SEP OMV platform can be leveraged for other missions as well such as interplanetary science missions and applications for resilient space architectures.

  18. Advances in Modeling Direct-Drive Ignition at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, T. J. B.; Marozas, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    Polar direct drive (PDD) makes it possible to perform direct-drive-ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) while the facility is configured for indirect drive. We present for the first time PDD ignition-relevant target designs with decreased laser intensities. These designs include the physical effects of cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) and nonlocal heat transport, both of which substantially affect the target drive. In the PDD configuration, a multiwavelength detuning strategy was found to be effective in mitigating the loss of coupling caused by CBET, allowing for implosion speeds comparable to those of previous designs. Target designs will be presented that span the region from alpha-particle heating to ignition. In addition, ignition-relevant designs will also be discussed for use in symmetric direct drive on the NIF. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  19. The National Children's Study: a golden opportunity to advance the health of pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, Anne Drapkin; Little, Margaret Olivia; Faden, Ruth R

    2009-10-01

    With a $3 billion investment by the federal government, the National Children's Study (NCS) recently began recruitment. The NCS is a golden-and potentially missed-opportunity to study one of the most underrepresented populations in clinical research: pregnant women. As the nation's largest-ever study of children's health, the NCS will examine the effects of the environment on children from before birth to 21 years of age, with participants sampled primarily through women during pregnancy. Thus the NCS presents a rare opportunity to study the health of women during and after pregnancy, in addition to the health of their children. On both moral and policy grounds, we make the case for inclusion of women's health outcomes in the NCS.

  20. National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bio-Products Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivares, Jose A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baxter, Ivan [US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA)., Washington, DC (United States); Brown, Judith [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Carleton, Michael [Matrix Genetics, Seattle, WA (United States); Cattolico, Rose Anne [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Taraka, Dale [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Detter, John C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Devarenne, Timothy P. [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Dutcher, Susan K. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Fox, David T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Goodenough, Ursula [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Jaworski, Jan [Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); Kramer, David [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Lipton, Mary S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McCormick, Margaret [Matrix Genetics, Seattle, WA (United States); Merchant, Sabeeha [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Molnar, Istvan [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Panisko, Ellen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pellegrini, Matteo [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Polle, Juergen [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States). Brooklyn College; Sabarsky, Martin [Cellana, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Sayre, Richard T. [New Mexico Consortium, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Starkenburg,, Shawn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stormo, Gary [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Twary, Scott N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Unkefer, Clifford J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Unkefer, Pat J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yuan, Joshua S. [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Arnold, Bob [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Bai, Xuemei [Cellana, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Boeing, Wiebke [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Brown, Lois [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Gujarathi, Ninad [Reliance Industries Limited, Mumbai (India); Huesemann, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lammers, Pete [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Laur, Paul [Eldorado Biofuels, Santa Fe, NM (United States); Khandan, Nirmala [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Parsons, Ronald [Solix BioSystems, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Samocha, Tzachi [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Thomasson, Alex [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Unc, Adrian [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Waller, Pete [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Bonner, James [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States); Coons, Jim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fernando, Sandun [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Goodall, Brian [Valicor Renewables, Dexter, MI (United States); Kadam, Kiran [Valicor Renewables, Dexter, MI (United States); Lacey, Ronald [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Wei, Liu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Marrone, Babs [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nikolov, Zivko [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Trewyn, Brian [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Albrecht, Karl [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Capareda, Sergio [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Cheny, Scott [Diversified Energy, Gilbert, AZ (United States); Deng, Shuguang [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Elliott, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cesar, Granda [Terrabon, LLC, Bryan, TX (United States); Hallen, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lupton, Steven [UOP Honeywell Co, LLC, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Lynch, Sharry [UOP Honeywell Co, LLC, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Marchese, Anthony [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Nieweg, Jennifer [Albemarle Catilin, Ames, IA (United States); Ogden, Kimberly [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Oyler, James [Genifuel, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Reardon, Ken [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Roberts, William [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Sams, David [Albemarle Catilin, Ames, IA (United States); Schaub, Tanner [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Silks, Pete [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Archibeque, Shawn [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Foster, James [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Gaitlan, Delbert [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Lawrence, Addison [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Lodge-Ivey, Shanna [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Wickersham, Tyron [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Blowers, Paul [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Davis, Ryan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Downes, C. Meghan [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Dunlop, Eric [Pan Pacific Technologies Pty. Ltd., Adelaide (Australia); Frank, Edward [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Handler, Robert [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Newby, Deborah [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Pienkos, Philip [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Richardson, James [Texas Agrilife Research, College Station, TX (United States); Seider, Warren [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shonnard, David [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Skaggs, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The main objective of NAABB was to combine science, technology, and engineering expertise from across the nation to break down critical technical barriers to commercialization of algae-based biofuels. The approach was to address technology development across the entire value chain of algal biofuels production, from selection of strains to cultivation, harvesting, extraction, fuel conversion, and agricultural coproduct production. Sustainable practices and financial feasibility assessments ununderscored the approach and drove the technology development.

  1. Application of recent advanced technology in Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology (SVNIT), Surat

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, T. B.

    2007-01-01

    The modern age of information explosion poses stiff challenges in providing right information to right user in right time. In such a situation Information Technology (IT) comes to rescue of libraries and information centers. Today’s changing scenario in publishing and IT fields has forced the library and informational professionals to accept the changing demands placed on the profession today. In view of this changing scenario an attempt is made by Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Tec...

  2. Education as ehealth infrastructure: considerations in advancing a national agenda for ehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilberts, Sonya; Gray, Kathleen

    2014-03-01

    This paper explores the role of education as infrastructure in large-scale ehealth strategies-in theory, in international practice and in one national case study. Education is often invisible in the documentation of ehealth infrastructure. Nevertheless a review of international practice shows that there is significant educational investment made in implementing national ehealth agendas. Disparate views about the role of education are implicit in the ehealth strategy literature, while there is a shortage of evidence-based accounts of ehealth education. In the case of Australia, the benefits and challenges of a broadly collaborative approach to ehealth education are highlighted through activities of various types occurring on many levels to support the implementation of a national ehealth system. This paper concludes that although evidence-based practice is a given in other areas of healthcare, and although there are many published evaluations of ehealth usability and acceptance in the health informatics literature, there is surprisingly little evidence about what works and doesn't work with regard to the ehealth education.

  3. Accelerating Innovation that Enhances Resource Recovery in the Wastewater Sector: Advancing a National Testbed Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihelcic, James R; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Cornejo, Pablo K; Fisher, Aaron; Simon, A J; Snyder, Seth W; Zhang, Qiong; Rosso, Diego; Huggins, Tyler M; Cooper, William; Moeller, Jeff; Rose, Bob; Schottel, Brandi L; Turgeon, Jason

    2017-07-18

    This Feature examines significant challenges and opportunities to spur innovation and accelerate adoption of reliable technologies that enhance integrated resource recovery in the wastewater sector through the creation of a national testbed network. The network is a virtual entity that connects appropriate physical testing facilities, and other components needed for a testbed network, with researchers, investors, technology providers, utilities, regulators, and other stakeholders to accelerate the adoption of innovative technologies and processes that are needed for the water resource recovery facility of the future. Here we summarize and extract key issues and developments, to provide a strategy for the wastewater sector to accelerate a path forward that leads to new sustainable water infrastructures.

  4. 36th national systems conference on recent advancements in system modelling applications

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnan, J

    2013-01-01

    The book is a collection of peer-reviewed scientific papers submitted by active researchers in the 36th National System Conference (NSC 2012). NSC is an annual event of the Systems Society of India (SSI), primarily oriented to strengthen the systems movement and its applications for the welfare of humanity. A galaxy of academicians, professionals, scientists, statesman and researchers from different parts of the country and abroad are invited to attend the Conference. The book presents various research articles in the area of system modelling in all disciplines of engineering sciences as well as socio-economic systems. The book can be used as a tool for further research.

  5. A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, David P.; Abla, G.; Burruss, J. R.; Feibush, E.; Fredian, T. W.; Goode, M. M.; Greenwald, M. J.; Keahey, K.; Leggett, T.; Li, K.; McCune, D. C.; Papka, M. E.; Randerson, L.; Sanderson, A.; Stillerman, J.; Thompson, M. R.; Uram, T.; Wallace, G.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES Grid(FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP) provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid's resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.

  6. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC): Advancing the frontiers of computational science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, J. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) provides researchers with high-performance computing tools to tackle science`s biggest and most challenging problems. Founded in 1974 by DOE/ER, the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center was the first unclassified supercomputer center and was the model for those that followed. Over the years the center`s name was changed to the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center and then to NERSC; it was relocated to LBNL. NERSC, one of the largest unclassified scientific computing resources in the world, is the principal provider of general-purpose computing services to DOE/ER programs: Magnetic Fusion Energy, High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Health and Environmental Research, and the Office of Computational and Technology Research. NERSC users are a diverse community located throughout US and in several foreign countries. This brochure describes: the NERSC advantage, its computational resources and services, future technologies, scientific resources, and computational science of scale (interdisciplinary research over a decade or longer; examples: combustion in engines, waste management chemistry, global climate change modeling).

  7. A National Collaboratory to Advance the Science of High Temperature Plasma Physics for Magnetic Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schissel, David P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Abla, G. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Burruss, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Feibush, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Fredian, T. W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Goode, M. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Greenwald, M. J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Keahey, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Leggett, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Li, K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); McCune, D. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Papka, M. E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Randerson, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Sanderson, A. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Stillerman, J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Thompson, M. R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Uram, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wallace, G. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2012-12-20

    This report summarizes the work of the National Fusion Collaboratory (NFC) Project to develop a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for magnetic fusion research. The original objective of the NFC project was to develop and deploy a national FES Grid (FusionGrid) that would be a system for secure sharing of computation, visualization, and data resources over the Internet. The goal of FusionGrid was to allow scientists at remote sites to participate as fully in experiments and computational activities as if they were working on site thereby creating a unified virtual organization of the geographically dispersed U.S. fusion community. The vision for FusionGrid was that experimental and simulation data, computer codes, analysis routines, visualization tools, and remote collaboration tools are to be thought of as network services. In this model, an application service provider (ASP provides and maintains software resources as well as the necessary hardware resources. The project would create a robust, user-friendly collaborative software environment and make it available to the US FES community. This Grid's resources would be protected by a shared security infrastructure including strong authentication to identify users and authorization to allow stakeholders to control their own resources. In this environment, access to services is stressed rather than data or software portability.

  8. High-Powered, Ultrasonically Assisted Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert

    2013-01-01

    distance equal to the thickness of the material being welded. The TSW process can be significantly improved by reducing the draw forces. This can be achieved by reducing the friction forces between the weld workpieces and the containment plates. High-power ultrasonic (HPU) vibrations of the containment plates achieve friction reduction in the TSW process. Furthermore, integration of the HPU energy into the TSW stir rod can increase tool life of the stir rod, and can reduce shear forces to which the stir rod is subjected during the welding process. TSW has been used to successfully join 0.500-in (˜13-mm) thick commercially pure (CP) titanium, titanium 6AL- 4V, and titanium 6AL-4V ELI in weld joint lengths up to 9 ft (˜2.75-m) long. In addition, the TSW process was used to fabricate a sub-scale hexagonally shaped gun turret component for the U.S. Navy. The turret is comprised of six 0.5000-in (˜13-mm) thick angled welds. Each angled weld joint was prepared by machining the mating surfaces to 120deg. The angled weld joint was then fixtured using an upper and lower containment plate of the same geometry of the angled weld joint. The weld joint was then stirred by the stir rod as it and the upper and lower containment plates traverse through the angled joint prep.

  9. Effect of high power microwaves on rats locomotion and cognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seze, Rene de; Ammari, Mohamed; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: High power microwaves (HPM) are suspected to produce some behavioural deficits in rats, however very few studies have been published on this topics. The aim of our experiment was to determine if exposure to HPM could affect behaviour in locomotor (open field) and memory (objects recognition) tasks. Materials and methods: Exposure Six-weeks male rats were exposed to a 13 cm-diameter electromagnetic beam at 10 GHz ; radiation was emitted through 10 seconds trains of 1 ns-pulses at 100 Hz. Power of the source was 350 MW and peak-intensity of the field was 50 GW/m 2 (6100 kV/m) at 5 cm from the conical emitting horn. A single exposure was applied every 5 minutes for 1 h and the behavioural test was performed in the following hour. Time-averaged SAR over that period was estimated at 0.34 W/kg. Peak-power in one pulse was 95 MW/kg and in any second, 9.5 W/kg. Groups: A group of 12 individually exposed animals was compared to a group of 12 sham-exposed animals, set at the same place and in the same ambient conditions as the exposed animals, but omitting HPM emission. Behaviour: An open-field video-track was performed during the different phases. Each phase includes 3 successive trials of 5 min, with 3 minutes in between. Phase 1 studied spontaneous locomotor activity and animal anxiety by recording its position in the arena (periphery meaning anxiety). Phase 2 looked at exploratory behaviour, adding three objects in the field. Time spent close to the objects reflects curiosity. Phase 3 looked at habituation and spatial memory, changing an object from one quadrant (Nr.3) to another one (Nr.4). Phase 4 looked at memory and attention, changing one object by a new one in quadrant Nr.3. Measured parameters were, for any central or peripheral area, containing or not a previously present or a new object: time spent in a quadrant, number of crossed quadrants and run distance. Results and discussion: No significant difference was found for the different

  10. High power density yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Rahul

    Microbial fuel cells leverage whole cell biocatalysis to convert the energy stored in energy-rich renewable biomolecules such as sugar, directly to electrical energy at high efficiencies. Advantages of the process include ambient temperature operation, operation in natural streams such as wastewater without the need to clean electrodes, minimal balance-of-plant requirements compared to conventional fuel cells, and environmentally friendly operation. These make the technology very attractive as portable power sources and waste-to-energy converters. The principal problem facing the technology is the low power densities compared to other conventional portable power sources such as batteries and traditional fuel cells. In this work we examined the yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cell and developed methods to increase the power density from such fuel cells. A combination of cyclic voltammetry and optical absorption measurements were used to establish significant adsorption of electron mediators by the microbes. Mediator adsorption was demonstrated to be an important limitation in achieving high power densities in yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cells. Specifically, the power densities are low for the length of time mediator adsorption continues to occur. Once the mediator adsorption stops, the power densities increase. Rotating disk chronoamperometry was used to extract reaction rate information, and a simple kinetic expression was developed for the current observed in the anodic half-cell. Since the rate expression showed that the current was directly related to microbe concentration close to the electrode, methods to increase cell mass attached to the anode was investigated. Electrically biased electrodes were demonstrated to develop biofilm-like layers of the Baker's yeast with a high concentration of cells directly connected to the electrode. The increased cell mass did increase the power density 2 times compared to a non biofilm fuel cell, but the power density

  11. High SBS-Threshold Er/Yb Co-Doped Phosphate Glass Fiber Amplifiers for High Power, Sub-us Pulsed, Narrow Linewidth, All Fiber-Based Laser Transmitter, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In order to implement the monolithic high power narrow linewidth pulsed all fiber-based laser transmitter by using a MOPA configuration for NASA's active remote...

  12. A High-Powered View of the Filtration Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Sipos, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy is a powerful noninvasive imaging technique for the deep optical sectioning of living tissues. Its application in several intact tissues is a significant advance in our understanding of organ function, including renal pathophysiological mechanisms. The glomerulus, the filtering unit in the kidney, is one good example of a relatively inaccessible and complex structure, with cell types that are otherwise difficult to study at high resolution in their native environment. In this article, we address the application, advantages, and limitations of this imaging technology for the study of the glomerular filtration barrier and the controversy it recently generated regarding the glomerular filtration of macromolecules. More advanced and accurate multiphoton determinations of the glomerular sieving coefficient that are presented here dismiss previous claims on the filtration of nephrotic levels of albumin. The sieving coefficient of 70-kD dextran was found to be around 0.001. Using a model of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, increased filtration barrier permeability is restricted only to areas of podocyte damage, consistent with the generally accepted role of podocytes and the glomerular origin of albuminuria. Time-lapse imaging provides new details and important in vivo confirmation of the dynamics of podocyte movement, shedding, replacement, and the role of the parietal epithelial cells and Bowman's capsule in the pathology of glomerulosclerosis. PMID:20576805

  13. Democritos: preparing demonstrators for high power nuclear electric space propulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Masson, Frederic; Ruault, Jean-Marc; Worms, Jean-Claude; Detsis, Emmanouil; Beaurain, André; Lassoudiere, Francois; Gaia, Enrico; Tosi, Maria -Christina; Jansen, Frank; Bauer, Waldemar; Semenkin, Alexander; Tinsley, Tim; Hodgson, Zara

    2015-01-01

    The Democritos project aims at preparing demonstrators for a megawatt class nuclearelectric space propulsion. It is funded by Horizon 2020, the R&T program of the European Community. It is a new European and Russian project, including as partners: Nuclear National Laboratory (U.K.), DLR (Germany), The Keldysh Research Center (Russia), Thales Alenia Space Italia (Italy), Snecma (France), ESF (France) and CNES (France). IEAV (Brazil) will join as an observer. Democritos is the follo...

  14. Advanced R ampersand D for electron and photon beams at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, H.G.

    1989-08-01

    The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility consists of a 50-MeV linear accelerator and a laser system capable of generating short (a few picoseconds) laser pulses at both UV (266 nm) and infrared (10 μm) wavelengths. With these systems in place, the ATF has unique capabilities for the study of fundamental interactions between charged-particle beams and intense electromagnetic radiation. The principal research goals of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) axe the following. Laser Acceleration Program: We wig study the principles and techniques of particle acceleration at ultra-high frequencies (up to 30 THz) and with very high acceleration gradients (up to 1 GV/m). Production of Coherent Radiation: We wish to develop the next generation of photon sources with features like (a) short pulses (picoseconds or less), (b) coherence, and (c) high peak power. All of these attributes can be provided by free-electron lasers. High-brightness sources: A common denominator for the above programs is the need for electron beams with very small transverse and longitudinal emittances. We will devote a substantial amount of our resources to the production and understanding of electron beams that have these attributes. We will build advanced electron sources such as switched-power devices and rf guns with photocathodes. Important applications of this line of research include the development of high-luminosity linear colliders and free-electron lasers in the XUV regime

  15. Overview and status of the advanced photon source at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, M.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a state-of-the-art synchrotron light source facility dedicated to the production of extremely brilliant X-ray beams for research. Its super-intense X-ray beams will be used for many areas of research including industrial research, biological and medical research, defense-related research, and basic research. The APS X-ray beams will allow scientists to study smaller samples, more complex systems, faster reactions and processes, and gather data at a greater level of detail than has been possible to date. Creation of these beams begins with electron production by an electron with a thermionic cathode. The electrons are accelerated to 200 MeV by a linear accelerator (linac) and then impinge on a tungsten target. resulting in electron-positron pair production. The positrons are accelerated to 450 MeV in the remainder of the linac, then accumulated, damped, and transferred to a synchrotron which increases their energy to 7-GeV. The 7-GeV positrons are injected into a storage ring, where they pass through special magnets and emit X-rays of the desired quality. The APS is under construction at ANL at this time, and will begin operating for users in 1996. The accelerator and experimental facilities are described in this paper, and an overview of some of the experimental programs is given

  16. Advanced tokamak research at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility in support of ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, C. M.; DIII-D Team

    2005-01-01

    Fusion energy research aims to develop an economically and environmentally sustainable energy system. The tokamak, a doughnut shaped plasma confined by magnetic fields generated by currents flowing in external coils and the plasma, is a leading concept. Advanced Tokamak (AT) research in the DIII-D tokamak seeks to provide a scientific basis for steady-state high performance operation. This necessitates replacing the inherently pulsed inductive method of driving plasma current. Our approach emphasizes high pressure to maximize fusion gain while maximizing the self-driven bootstrap current, along with external current profile control. This requires integrated, simultaneous control of many characteristics of the plasma with a diverse set of techniques. This has already resulted in noninductive conditions being maintained at high pressure on current relaxation timescales. A high degree of physical understanding is facilitated by a closely coupled integrated modelling effort. Simulations are used both to plan and interpret experiments, making possible continued development of the models themselves. An ultimate objective is the capability to predict behaviour in future AT experiments. Analysis of experimental results relies on use of the TRANSP code via the FusionGrid, and our use of the FusionGrid will increase as additional analysis and simulation tools are made available.

  17. Advanced tokamak research at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility in support of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, C M

    2005-01-01

    Fusion energy research aims to develop an economically and environmentally sustainable energy system. The tokamak, a doughnut shaped plasma confined by magnetic fields generated by currents flowing in external coils and the plasma, is a leading concept. Advanced Tokamak (AT) research in the DIII-D tokamak seeks to provide a scientific basis for steady-state high performance operation. This necessitates replacing the inherently pulsed inductive method of driving plasma current. Our approach emphasizes high pressure to maximize fusion gain while maximizing the self-driven bootstrap current, along with external current profile control. This requires integrated, simultaneous control of many characteristics of the plasma with a diverse set of techniques. This has already resulted in noninductive conditions being maintained at high pressure on current relaxation timescales. A high degree of physical understanding is facilitated by a closely coupled integrated modelling effort. Simulations are used both to plan and interpret experiments, making possible continued development of the models themselves. An ultimate objective is the capability to predict behaviour in future AT experiments. Analysis of experimental results relies on use of the TRANSP code via the FusionGrid, and our use of the FusionGrid will increase as additional analysis and simulation tools are made available

  18. Advancements in Wind Integration Study Data Modeling: The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draxl, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Orwig, K.; Jones, W.; Searight, K.; Getman, D.; Harrold, S.; McCaa, J.; Cline, J.; Clark, C.

    2013-10-01

    Regional wind integration studies in the United States require detailed wind power output data at many locations to perform simulations of how the power system will operate under high-penetration scenarios. The wind data sets that serve as inputs into the study must realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of the simulated wind plants, as well as be time synchronized with available load profiles. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit described in this paper fulfills these requirements. A wind resource dataset, wind power production time series, and simulated forecasts from a numerical weather prediction model run on a nationwide 2-km grid at 5-min resolution will be made publicly available for more than 110,000 onshore and offshore wind power production sites.

  19. The National Center for Biomedical Ontology: Advancing Biomedicinethrough Structured Organization of Scientific Knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Daniel L.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Mungall, Chris J.; Misra,Sima; Westerfield, Monte; Ashburner, Michael; Sim, Ida; Chute,Christopher G.; Solbrig, Harold; Storey, Margaret-Anne; Smith, Barry; Day-Richter, John; Noy, Natalya F.; Musen, Mark A.

    2006-01-23

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology (http://bioontology.org) is a consortium that comprises leading informaticians, biologists, clinicians, and ontologists funded by the NIH Roadmap to develop innovative technology and methods that allow scientists to record, manage, and disseminate biomedical information and knowledge in machine-processable form. The goals of the Center are: (1) to help unify the divergent and isolated efforts in ontology development by promoting high quality open-source, standards-based tools to create, manage, and use ontologies, (2) to create new software tools so that scientists can use ontologies to annotate and analyze biomedical data, (3) to provide a national resource for the ongoing evaluation, integration, and evolution of biomedical ontologies and associated tools and theories in the context of driving biomedical projects (DBPs), and (4) to disseminate the tools and resources of the Center and to identify, evaluate, and communicate best practices of ontology development to the biomedical community. The Center is working toward these objectives by providing tools to develop ontologies and to annotate experimental data, and by developing resources to integrate and relate existing ontologies as well as by creating repositories of biomedical data that are annotated using those ontologies. The Center is providing training workshops in ontology design, development, and usage, and is also pursuing research in ontology evaluation, quality, and use of ontologies to promote scientific discovery. Through the research activities within the Center, collaborations with the DBPs, and interactions with the biomedical community, our goal is to help scientists to work more effectively in the e-science paradigm, enhancing experiment design, experiment execution, data analysis, information synthesis, hypothesis generation and testing, and understand human disease.

  20. National Institutes of Health Pathways to Prevention Workshop: Advancing the Research on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Carmen R; Cowan, Penney; Elk, Ronit; O'Neil, Kathleen M; Rasmussen, Angela L

    2015-06-16

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Pathways to Prevention Workshop: Advancing the Research on Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome was cosponsored by the NIH Office of Disease Prevention and the Trans-NIH Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Research Working Group. A multidisciplinary working group developed the agenda, and an Evidence-based Practice Center prepared an evidence report through a contract with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to facilitate the discussion. During the 1.5-day workshop, invited experts discussed the body of evidence and attendees had the opportunity to comment during open discussions. After weighing evidence from the evidence report, expert presentations, and public comments, an unbiased, independent panel prepared a draft report that identified research gaps and future research priorities. The report was posted on the NIH Office of Disease Prevention Web site for 4 weeks for public comment.

  1. Advances in public health accreditation readiness and quality improvement: evaluation findings from the National Public Health Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLees, Anita W; Thomas, Craig W; Nawaz, Saira; Young, Andrea C; Rider, Nikki; Davis, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Continuous quality improvement is a central tenet of the Public Health Accreditation Board's (PHAB) national voluntary public health accreditation program. Similarly, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention launched the National Public Health Improvement Initiative (NPHII) in 2010 with the goal of advancing accreditation readiness, performance management, and quality improvement (QI). Evaluate the extent to which NPHII awardees have achieved program goals. NPHII awardees responded to an annual assessment and program monitoring data requests. Analysis included simple descriptive statistics. Seventy-four state, tribal, local, and territorial public health agencies receiving NPHII funds. NPHII performance improvement managers or principal investigators. Development of accreditation prerequisites, completion of an organizational self-assessment against the PHAB Standards and Measures, Version 1.0, establishment of a performance management system, and implementation of QI initiatives to increase efficiency and effectiveness. Of the 73 responding NPHII awardees, 42.5% had a current health assessment, 26% had a current health improvement plan, and 48% had a current strategic plan in place at the end of the second program year. Approximately 26% of awardees had completed an organizational PHAB self-assessment, 72% had established at least 1 of the 4 components of a performance management system, and 90% had conducted QI activities focused on increasing efficiencies and/or effectiveness. NPHII appears to be supporting awardees' initial achievement of program outcomes. As NPHII enters its third year, there will be additional opportunities to advance the work of NPHII, compile and disseminate results, and inform a vision of high-quality public health necessary to improve the health of the population.

  2. The National Institute of Public Health: Shaping Public Policy to Advance Population Health in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Magaña-Valladares

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mexican School of Public Health was founded in 1922 by the Mexican government and was the first school of public health in Latin America. It has become one of the largest public health institutions in the developing world and is the leading institution for teaching, research and service to improve public health in Mexico and Latin America. The Institute is an important player in shaping public policy in Mexico through its mission-oriented research. Through its research initiatives, the Institute has influenced policies regarding tobacco, obesity, milk and flour fortification, malaria, cancer, environmental health, and other public health priority areas. The Institute responds to changing health workforce training needs. It currently offers 28 competency-based graduate degree programs and trains annually more than 10,000 in-service public health workers through continuing education courses. The Institute offers multiple educational formats to accomplish its mission, including face-to-face, virtual, and blended learning. It has been accredited by both national and international agencies and collaborates closely with international institutions. The Institute contributes to global health by promoting health equity, strengthening health systems, and generating evidence-based strategies to improve population health in Mexico, the Americas, and around the world.

  3. Proceedings of the national symposium on materials and processing: functional glass/glass-ceramics, advanced ceramics and high temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, A.; Sahu, A.K.; Viswanadham, C.S.; Ramanathan, S.; Hubli, R.C.; Kothiyal, G.P.

    2012-10-01

    With the development of materials science it is becoming increasingly important to process some novel materials in the area of glass, advanced ceramics and high temperature metals/alloys, which play an important role in the realization of many new technologies. Such applications demand materials with tailored specifications. Glasses and glass-ceramics find exotic applications in areas like radioactive waste storage, optical communication, zero thermal expansion coefficient telescopic mirrors, human safety gadgets (radiation resistance windows, bullet proof apparels, heat resistance components etc), biomedical (implants, hyperthermia treatment, bone cement, bone grafting etc). Advanced ceramic materials have been beneficial in biomedical applications due to their strength, biocompatibility and wear resistance. Non-oxide ceramics such as carbides, borides, silicides, their composites, refractory metals and alloys are useful as structural and control rod components in high temperature fission/ fusion reactors. Over the years a number of novel processing techniques like selective laser melting, microwave heating, nano-ceramic processing etc have emerged. A detailed understanding of the various aspects of synthesis, processing and characterization of these materials provides the base for development of novel technologies for different applications. Keeping this in mind and realizing the need for taking stock of such developments a National Symposium on Materials and Processing -2012 (MAP-2012) was planned. The topics covered in the symposium are ceramics, glass/glass-ceramics and metals and materials. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  4. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.) [pt

  5. Performance degradation of high-power lithium-ion cells-Electrochemistry of harvested electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, D. P.; Knuth, J. L.; Dees, D. W.; Bloom, I.; Christophersen, J. P.

    The performance of 18650-type high-power lithium-ion cells is being evaluated as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOEs) Advanced Technology Development (ATD) program. In this article, we present accelerated aging data acquired on 18650-cells containing LiNi 0.8Co 0.15Al 0.05O 2- or LiNi 0.8Co 0.1Al 0.1O 2-based positive electrodes, MAG-10 graphite-based negative electrodes, and 1.2-M LiPF 6 in EC:EMC (3:7 by wt.) electrolyte. Capacity and impedance data acquired on electrodes harvested from these cells highlight the contributions of the positive and negative electrodes to the degradation of cell performance. We also describe test methodologies used to examine the electrochemical characteristics of the harvested electrodes. Identifying and optimizing cell components responsible for performance degradation should enable the development of new lithium-ion cell chemistries that will meet the 15-year cell calendar life goal established by DOEs FreedomCar initiative.

  6. High-power corrugates waveguide components for mm-wave fusion heating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olstad, R.A.; Doane, J.L.; Moeller, C.P.; O'Neill, R.C.; Di Martino, M.

    1996-10-01

    Considerable progress has been made over the last year in the U.S., Japan, Russia, and Europe in developing high power long pulse gyrotrons for fusion plasma heating and current drive. These advanced gyrotrons typically operate at a frequency in the range 82 GHz to 170 GHz at nearly megawatt power levels for pulse lengths up to 5 s. To take advantage of these new microwave sources for fusion research, new and improved transmission line components are needed to reliably transmit microwave power to plasmas with minimal losses. Over the last year, General Atomics and collaborating companies (Spinner GmbH in Europe and Toshiba Corporation in Japan) have developed a wide variety of new components which meet the demanding power, pulse length, frequency, and vacuum requirements for effective utilization of the new generation of gyrotrons. These components include low-loss straight corrugated waveguides, miter bends, miter bend polarizers, power monitors, waveguide bellows, de breaks, waveguide switches, dummy loads, and distributed windows. These components have been developed with several different waveguide diameters (32, 64, and 89 mm) and frequency ranges (82 GHz to 170 GHz). This paper describes the design requirements of selected components and their calculated and measured performance characteristics

  7. Side-emitting high-power LEDs and their application in illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert S.

    2002-11-01

    Due to the rapid increase in flux performance from High Power LED's, illumination is an exciting growth market for solid state lighting. Today a white LED is 100+ Lm per device. This is approximately an order of magnitude below the kLm metric used for illumination applications. The radiation pattern from the LED is key in increasing the usable flux resulting in improved systems optical performance. This advancement in radiation pattern will allow new market opportunities, which were not yet feasible. In the future this effect of usable lumens will become more important as the flux per package increases. The radiation pattern of the LEDs can be controlled to optimize performance, appearance, and shape of the secondary optics. This advantage is unique to LEDs and can greatly improve system performance, control, and cosmetic appeal for the application. This paper will review the side emitting lens design, the integrated performance of this technology to secondary optics and how the Luxeon side emitter enables improved performance by creating more useable lumens.

  8. Antimicrobial brass coatings prepared on poly(ethylene terephthalate) textile by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying-Hung, E-mail: tieamo2002@gmail.com; Wu, Guo-Wei; He, Ju-Liang

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this work is to prepare antimicrobial, corrosion-resistant and low-cost Cu65Zn35 brass film on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabric by high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS), which is known to provide high-density plasma, so as to generate a strongly adherent film at a reduced substrate temperature. The results reveal that the brass film grows in a layer-plus-island mode. Independent of their deposition time, the obtained films retain a Cu/Zn elemental composition ratio of 1.86 and exhibit primarily an α copper phase structure. Oxygen plasma pre-treatment for 1 min before coating can significantly increase film adhesion such that the brass-coated fabric of Grade 5 or Grade 4–5 can ultimately be obtained under dry and wet rubbing tests, respectively. However, a deposition time of 1 min suffices to provide effective antimicrobial properties for both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. As a whole, the feasibility of using such advanced HIPIMS coating technique to develop durable antimicrobial textile was demonstrated. - Highlights: • Prepare antimicrobial, corrosion-resistant and low-cost Cu65Zn35 brass film on PET fabric by HIPIMS • Brass-coated fabric with excellent durability, even undergone rubbing and washing tests • Brass-coated fabric provides effective antimicrobial properties for E. coli and S. aureus. • After brass coating, PET fabric still retained its mechanical property.

  9. Antimicrobial brass coatings prepared on poly(ethylene terephthalate) textile by high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ying-Hung; Wu, Guo-Wei; He, Ju-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work is to prepare antimicrobial, corrosion-resistant and low-cost Cu65Zn35 brass film on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabric by high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS), which is known to provide high-density plasma, so as to generate a strongly adherent film at a reduced substrate temperature. The results reveal that the brass film grows in a layer-plus-island mode. Independent of their deposition time, the obtained films retain a Cu/Zn elemental composition ratio of 1.86 and exhibit primarily an α copper phase structure. Oxygen plasma pre-treatment for 1 min before coating can significantly increase film adhesion such that the brass-coated fabric of Grade 5 or Grade 4–5 can ultimately be obtained under dry and wet rubbing tests, respectively. However, a deposition time of 1 min suffices to provide effective antimicrobial properties for both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. As a whole, the feasibility of using such advanced HIPIMS coating technique to develop durable antimicrobial textile was demonstrated. - Highlights: • Prepare antimicrobial, corrosion-resistant and low-cost Cu65Zn35 brass film on PET fabric by HIPIMS • Brass-coated fabric with excellent durability, even undergone rubbing and washing tests • Brass-coated fabric provides effective antimicrobial properties for E. coli and S. aureus. • After brass coating, PET fabric still retained its mechanical property

  10. Deposition rates of high power impulse magnetron sputtering: Physics and economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Deposition by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is considered by some as the new paradigm of advanced sputtering technology, yet this is met with skepticism by others for the reported lower deposition rates, if compared to rates of more conventional sputtering of equal average power. In this contribution, the underlying physical reasons for the rate changes are discussed, including (i) ion return to the target and self-sputtering, (ii) the less-than-linear increase in the sputtering yield with increasing ion energy, (iii) yield changes due to the shift of species responsible for sputtering, (iv) changes due to greater film density, limited sticking, and self-sputtering on the substrate, (v) noticeable power losses in the switch module, (vi) changes in the magnetic balance and particle confinement of the magnetron due to self-fields at high current, and (vii) superposition of sputtering and sublimation/evaporation for selected materials. The situation is even more complicated for reactive systems where the target surface chemistry is a function of the reactive gas partial pressure and discharge conditions. While most of these factors imply a reduction in the normalized deposition rate, increased rates have been reported for certain conditions using hot targets and less poisoned targets. Finally, some points of economics and HIPIMS benefits are considered.

  11. Deposition Rates of High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering: Physics and Economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2009-11-22

    Deposition by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is considered by some as the new paradigm of advanced sputtering technology, yet this is met with skepticism by others for the reported lower deposition rates, if compared to rates of more conventional sputtering of equal average power. In this contribution, the underlying physical reasons for the rate changes are discussed, including (i) ion return to the target and self-sputtering, (ii) the less-than-linear increase of the sputtering yield with increasing ion energy, (iii) yield changes due to the shift of species responsible for sputtering, (iv) changes to due to greater film density, limited sticking, and self-sputtering on the substrate, (v) noticeable power losses in the switch module, (vi) changes of the magnetic balance and particle confinement of the magnetron due to self-fields at high current, and (vii) superposition of sputtering and sublimation/evaporation for selected materials. The situation is even more complicated for reactive systems where the target surface chemistry is a function of the reactive gas partial pressure and discharge conditions. While most of these factors imply a reduction of the normalized deposition rate, increased rates have been reported for certain conditions using hot targets and less poisoned targets. Finally, some points of economics and HIPIMS benefits considered.

  12. NASA Glenn Research Center Program in High Power Density Motors for Aeropropulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.; Kascak, Albert F.; Ebihara, Ben; Johnson, Dexter; Choi, Benjamin; Siebert, Mark; Buccieri, Carl

    2005-01-01

    Electric drive of transport-sized aircraft propulsors, with electric power generated by fuel cells or turbo-generators, will require electric motors with much higher power density than conventional room-temperature machines. Cryogenic cooling of the motor windings by the liquid hydrogen fuel offers a possible solution, enabling motors with higher power density than turbine engines. Some context on weights of various systems, which is required to assess the problem, is presented. This context includes a survey of turbine engine weights over a considerable size range, a correlation of gear box weights and some examples of conventional and advanced electric motor weights. The NASA Glenn Research Center program for high power density motors is outlined and some technical results to date are presented. These results include current densities of 5,000 A per square centimeter current density achieved in cryogenic coils, finite element predictions compared to measurements of torque production in a switched reluctance motor, and initial tests of a cryogenic switched reluctance motor.

  13. A high power accelerator driver system for spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jason, A.; Blind, B.; Channell, P.

    1996-01-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). For several years, the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) and the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) have provided a successful driver for the nearly 100-kW Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) source. The authors have studied an upgrade to this system. The goal of this effort was to establish a credible design for the accelerator driver of a next-generation source providing 1-MW of beam power. They have explored a limited subset of the possible approaches to a driver and have considered only the low 1-MW beam power. The next-generation source must utilize the optimum technology and may require larger neutron intensities than they now envision

  14. Generation and application of high power flattened Gaussian beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available power Flattened Gaussian Beams A. Forbes1,2,3, N. du Preez4, I.A, Litvin1,3 and L.R. Botha1,3 1 CSIR National Laser Centre 2 School of Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal 3 School of Physics, University of Stellenbosch 4 SDILasers (Pty) Ltd...C wzpinwrLpC wzpwrwzpRkrkzwzpiUzrU 2 1)1()( ),,(2exp)/(2)( )),,(/()),,(2/),,((exp),( 0 0 2 2 00 2 00 ∑ ∑ = =     −= Φ−× −−−Φ−= 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 -0.02 -0.015 -0.01 -0.005 0 0.005 0.01 0.015 0...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

  16. State Institution "National Research Center for Radiation Medicine of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine" - research activities and scientific advance in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyka, D; Sushko, V; Chumak, A; Buzunov, V; Talko, V; Yanovych, L

    2014-09-01

    Research activities and scientific advance achieved in 2013 at the State Institution "National Research Center for Radiation Medicine of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine" (NRCRM) concerning medical problems of the Chornobyl disaster, radiation medicine, radiobiology, radiation hygiene and epidemiology in collaboration with the WHO network of medical preparedness and assistance in radiation accidents are outlined in the annual report. Key points include the research results of XRCC1 and XPD gene polymorphism in thyroid cancer patients, CD38 gene GG genotype as a risk factor for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, frequency of 185delAG and 5382insC mutations in BRCA1 gene in women with breast cancer, cognitive function and TERF1, TERF2, TERT gene expression both with telomere length in human under the low dose radiation exposure. The "source-scattering/shielding structures- man" models for calculation of partial dose values to the eye lens and new methods for radiation risk assessment were developed and adapted. Radiation risks of leukemia including chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the cohort of liquidators were published according to the "case-control" study results after 20 years of survey. Increase of non-tumor morbidity in liquidators during the 1988-2011 with the maximum level 12-21 years upon irradiation was found. Incidence in evacuees appeared being of two-peak pattern i.e. in the first years after the accident and 12 years later. Experimental studies have concerned the impact of radio-modifiers on cellular systems, reproductive function in the population, features of the child nutrition in radiation contamination area were studied. Report also shows the results of scientific and organizational, medical and preventive work, staff training, and implementation of innovations. The NRCRM Annual Report was approved at the Scientific Council meeting of NAMS on March 3, 2014. D. Bazyka, V. Sushko, A. Chumak, V. Buzunov, V. Talko, L. Yanovych.

  17. The propagation of high power CW scanning electron beam in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, Sergey; Korenev, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    The question of propagation of high power electron beam in air presents the scientific and applied interests. The high power (80 kW) CW electron accelerator 'Rhodotron' with kinetic energy of electrons 5 and 10 MeV was used in the experiments. The experimental results for propagation of scanning electron beams in air are presented and discussed

  18. Characterization of a high-power/current pulsed magnetized arc discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zielinski, J. J.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Morgan, T. W.; D.C. Schram,; De Temmerman, G.

    2012-01-01

    A high-power pulsed magnetized arc discharge has been developed to allow the superimposition of a dc plasma and a high-power plasma impulse with a single plasma source. A capacitor bank (8400 mu F) is parallel-coupled to the current regulated power supply. The current is transiently increased from

  19. Uneven temperature effect evaluation in high-power IGBT inverter legs and relative test platform design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Haoze; Li, Wuhua; He, Xiangning

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a high-power IGBT testing platform for uneven temperature conditions and its design criteria. Considering the influence of layout parasitic parameters on the measurement results, commutation rules and independent junction temperature control, a universal high-power switching c...

  20. Quality and performance of laser cutting with a high power SM fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Morten; Selchau, Jacob; Olsen, F. O.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of high power single mode fiber lasers allows for a beam of high power and a good beam quality factor (M2 ” 1.2), compared to the multimode fiber lasers often utilised in macro laser metal cutting. This paper describes fundamental studies of macro laser metal cutting with a singl...

  1. Overview on thermal and mechanical challenges of high power RF electronic packaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, C.A.; Kregting, R.; Driel, W. van; Gielen, A.W.J.; Xiao, A.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    High Power RF electronics is one of the essential parts for wireless communication, including the personal communication, broadcasting, microwave radar, etc. Moreover, high efficient high power electronics has entered the ISM market, such as the power generator of microwave oven. Power electronics

  2. Design Methodology of High Power Distributed Amplifier Employing Broadband Impedance Transformer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narendra, Kumar; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Collantes, Juan Mari

    2009-01-01

    A novel topology of a high power distributed amplifier (DA) in combination with a broadband impedance transformer is presented. The advantages of the proposed topology are explored analytically and verified by a full-wave 3D simulations. Stability of the high power DA is verified with the pole-zero...

  3. Efficient, High-Power Mid-Infrared Laser for National Securityand Scientific Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiani, Leily S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-02

    The LLNL fiber laser group developed a unique short-wave-infrared, high-pulse energy, highaverage- power fiber based laser. This unique laser source has been used in combination with a nonlinear frequency converter to generate wavelengths, useful for remote sensing and other applications in the mid-wave infrared (MWIR). Sources with high average power and high efficiency in this MWIR wavelength region are not yet available with the size, weight, and power requirements or energy efficiency necessary for future deployment. The LLNL developed Fiber Laser Pulsed Source (FiLPS) design was adapted to Erbium doped silica fibers for 1.55 μm pumping of Cadmium Silicon Phosphide (CSP). We have demonstrated, for the first time optical parametric amplification of 2.4 μm light via difference frequency generation using CSP with an Erbium doped fiber source. In addition, for efficiency comparison purposes, we also demonstrated direct optical parametric generation (OPG) as well as optical parametric oscillation (OPO).

  4. High-power density miniscale power generation and energy harvesting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyshevski, Sergey Edward

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports design, analysis, evaluations and characterization of miniscale self-sustained power generation systems. Our ultimate objective is to guarantee highly-efficient mechanical-to-electrical energy conversion, ensure premier wind- or hydro-energy harvesting capabilities, enable electric machinery and power electronics solutions, stabilize output voltage, etc. By performing the advanced scalable power generation system design, we enable miniscale energy sources and energy harvesting technologies. The proposed systems integrate: (1) turbine which rotates a radial- or axial-topology permanent-magnet synchronous generator at variable angular velocity depending on flow rate, speed and load, and, (2) power electronic module with controllable rectifier, soft-switching converter and energy storage stages. These scalable energy systems can be utilized as miniscale auxiliary and self-sustained power units in various applications, such as, aerospace, automotive, biotechnology, biomedical, and marine. The proposed systems uniquely suit various submersible and harsh environment applications. Due to operation in dynamic rapidly-changing envelopes (variable speed, load changes, etc.), sound solutions are researched, proposed and verified. We focus on enabling system organizations utilizing advanced developments for various components, such as generators, converters, and energy storage. Basic, applied and experimental findings are reported. The prototypes of integrated power generation systems were tested, characterized and evaluated. It is documented that high-power density, high efficiency, robustness and other enabling capabilities are achieved. The results and solutions are scalable from micro (∼100 μW) to medium (∼100 kW) and heavy-duty (sub-megawatt) auxiliary and power systems.

  5. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Advance Directive Possession: Role of Demographic Factors, Religious Affiliation, and Personal Health Values in a National Survey of Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ivy A; Neuhaus, John M; Chiong, Winston

    2016-02-01

    Black and Hispanic older Americans are less likely than white older Americans to possess advance directives. Understanding the reasons for this racial and ethnic difference is necessary to identify targets for future interventions to improve advance care planning in these populations. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether racial and ethnic differences in advance directive possession are explained by other demographic factors, religious characteristics, and personal health values. A general population survey was conducted in a nationally representative sample using a web-enabled survey panel of American adults aged 50 and older (n = 2154). In a sample of older Americans, white participants are significantly more likely to possess advance directives (44.0%) than black older Americans (24.0%, p personal health values. These findings support targeted efforts to mitigate racial disparities in access to advance care planning.

  6. Microgravity Spray Cooling Research for High Powered Laser Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivich, Chad P.

    2004-01-01

    An extremely powerful laser is being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center for use on a satellite. This laser has several potential applications. One application is to use it for upper atmosphere weather research. In this case, the laser would reflect off aerosols in the upper atmosphere and bounce back to the satellite, where the aerosol velocities could be calculated and thus the upper atmosphere weather patterns could be monitored. A second application would be for the US. Air Force, which wants to use the laser strategically as a weapon for satellite defense. The Air Force fears that in the coming years as more and more nations gain limited space capabilities that American satellites may become targets, and the laser could protect the satellites. Regardless of the ultimate application, however, a critical step along the way to putting the laser in space is finding a way to efficiently cool it. While operating the laser becomes very hot and must be cooled to prevent overheating. On earth, this is accomplished by simply running cool tap water over the laser to keep it cool. But on a satellite, this is too inefficient. This would require too much water mass to be practical. Instead, we are investigating spray cooling as a means to cool the laser in microgravity. Spray cooling requires much less volume of fluid, and thus could be suitable for use on a satellite. We have inherited a 2.2 second Drop Tower rig to conduct our research with. In our experiments, water is pressurized with a compressed air tank and sprayed through a nozzle onto our test plate. We can vary the pressure applied to the water and the temperature of the plate before an experiment trial. The whole process takes place in simulated microgravity in the 2.2 second Drop Tower, and a high speed video camera records the spray as it hits the plate. We have made much progress in the past few weeks on these experiments. The rig originally did not have the capability to heat the test plate, but I did

  7. Development of High Power Amplifiers for Space and Ground-based Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández, Carlos Cilla

    -based amplifiers. They are efficient and provide very high power levels operating at low duty cycles. But they have a questionable longterm reliability, large footprints and they are not suitable for modern equipment with a decentralized transmitter, like a phase array system. Solid State Power Amplifier....... An efficient 100 W X-band hybrid high power amplifier using 0.25 µm gate length GaN technology was successfully designed, assembled and tested. The goal of the project was to develop a high power amplifier for X-band frequencies with capabilities to replace the vacuum tubes used in the radar systems designed...

  8. Applications of advanced kinetic collisional radiative modeling and Bremsstrahlung emission to quantitative impurity analysis on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Burgos, J. M.; Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Bell, R. E.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    An advanced kinetic collisional radiative model is used to predict beam into plasma charge-exchange visible and extreme UV (XUV ∽ 50 -700 Å ) light emission to quantify impurity density profiles on NSTX. This kinetic model is first benchmarked by predicting line-of-sight integrated emission for the visible λ = 5292.0 Å line of carbon (C VI n = 8 → 7), and comparing these predictions to absolute calibrated measurements from the active CHarge-Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy diagnostic (CHERS) on NSTX. Once benchmarked, the model is used to predict charge-exchange emission for the 182.1 Å line of carbon (C VI n = 3 → 2) that is used to scale Bremsstrahlung continuum emission in the UV/XUV region. The scaled Bremsstrahlung emission is used as a base to estimate an absolute intensity calibration curve of a XUV Transmission Grating-based Imaging Spectrometer (TGIS) diagnostic installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX and upgrade NSTX-U). The TGIS diagnostic operates in the wavelength region ∽ 50 -700 Å , and it is used to measure impurity spectra from charge-exchange emission. Impurity densities are estimated by fitting synthetic emission from the kinetic charge-exchange model to TGIS spectral measurements.

  9. 2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2009 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: (1) Facility and system description; (2) Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; (3) Groundwater monitoring data; (4) Status of compliance activities; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2010 permit year, approximately 164 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  10. 2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Mike

    2012-01-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  11. 2016 Annual Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Michael George [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This report describes conditions and information, as required by the state of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality Reuse Permit I-161-02, for the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Ponds located at Idaho National Laboratory from November 1, 2015–October 31, 2016. The effective date of Reuse Permit I-161-02 is November 20, 2014 with an expiration date of November 19, 2019. This report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Permit required groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Issues • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2016 permit year, 180.99 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Ponds. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest in well USGS-065, which is the closest downgradient well to the Cold Waste Ponds. Sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations decrease rapidly as the distance downgradient from the Cold Waste Ponds increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are significantly higher in well USGS-065 than in the other monitoring wells, both parameters remained below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in well USGS-065. The facility was in compliance with the Reuse Permit during the 2016 permit year.

  12. Analysis and Design Considerations of a High-Power Density, Dual Air Gap, Axial-Field Brushless, Permanent Magnet Motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chahee Peter

    1995-01-01

    Until recently, brush dc motors have been the dominant drive system because they provide easily controlled motor speed over a wide range, rapid acceleration and deceleration, convenient control of position, and lower product cost. Despite these capabilities, the brush dc motor configuration does not satisfy the design requirements for the U.S. Navy's underwater propulsion applications. Technical advances in rare-earth permanent magnet materials, in high-power semiconductor transistor technology, and in various rotor position-sensing devices have made using brushless permanent magnet motors a viable alternative. This research investigates brushless permanent magnet motor technology, studying the merits of dual-air gap, axial -field, brushless, permanent magnet motor configuration in terms of power density, efficiency, and noise/vibration levels. Because the design objectives for underwater motor applications include high-power density, high-performance, and low-noise/vibration, the traditional, simplified equivalent circuit analysis methods to assist in meeting these goals were inadequate. This study presents the development and verification of detailed finite element analysis (FEA) models and lumped parameter circuit models that can calculate back electromotive force waveforms, inductance, cogging torque, energized torque, and eddy current power losses. It is the first thorough quantification of dual air-gap, axial -field, brushless, permanent magnet motor parameters and performance characteristics. The new methodology introduced in this research not only facilitates the design process of an axial field, brushless, permanent magnet motor but reinforces the idea that the high-power density, high-efficiency, and low-noise/vibration motor is attainable.

  13. Research Advances: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Finds New Way to Detect Destructive Enzyme Activity--Hair Dye Relies on Nanotechnology--Ways to Increase Shelf Life of Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Angela G.

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in various research fields are described. Scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have found a new way to detect destructive enzyme activity, scientists in France have found that an ancient hair dye used by ancient people in Greece and Rome relied on nanotechnology and in the U.S. scientists are developing new…

  14. 2013 Advanced Placement Exam Participation and Performance for Students in Montgomery County Public Schools and Public School Students in the State of Maryland and the Nation. Memorandum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Geoffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    This memorandum provides data on the participation and performance of Advanced Placement (AP) exams taken by students in the Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) in the 2012-2013 school year as compared with those by public school students in Maryland and the nation. Generally, the number of AP exams taken by MCPS students in 2013…

  15. Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Avicola, K; Thompson, C A; Kartz, M W; Winters, S; Hartley, R; Wihelmsen, J; Dowla, F V; Carrano, C J; Bauman, B J; Pennington, D M; Lande, D; Sawvel, R M; Silva, D A; Cooke, J B; Brown, C G

    2001-02-21

    Programs at LLNL that involve large laser systems--ranging from the National Ignition Facility to new tactical laser weapons--depend on the maintenance of laser beam quality through precise control of the optical wavefront. This can be accomplished using adaptive optics, which compensate for time-varying aberrations that are often caused by heating in a high-power laser system. Over the past two decades, LLNL has developed a broad capability in adaptive optics technology for both laser beam control and high-resolution imaging. This adaptive optics capability has been based on thin deformable glass mirrors with individual ceramic actuators bonded to the back. In the case of high-power lasers, these adaptive optics systems have successfully improved beam quality. However, as we continue to extend our applications requirements, the existing technology base for wavefront control cannot satisfy them. To address this issue, this project studied improved modeling tools to increase our detailed understanding of the performance of these systems, and evaluated novel approaches to low-order wavefront control that offer the possibility of reduced cost and complexity. We also investigated improved beam control technology for high-resolution wavefront control. Many high-power laser systems suffer from high-spatial-frequency aberrations that require control of hundreds or thousands of phase points to provide adequate correction. However, the cost and size of current deformable mirrors can become prohibitive for applications requiring more than a few tens of phase control points. New phase control technologies are becoming available which offer control of many phase points with small low-cost devices. The goal of this project was to expand our wavefront control capabilities with improved modeling tools, new devices that reduce system cost and complexity, and extensions to high spatial and temporal frequencies using new adaptive optics technologies. In FY 99, the second year of

  16. High-Voltage and High-Power Multi-Power Source

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Ivor R

    2001-01-01

    ...: The contractor will develop a method of generating multiple high-power and high-voltage pulses, from the single discharge of a capacitor source, with the pulses produced by an array of specially...

  17. Study of In-Cylinder Reactions of High Power-Density Direct Injection Diesel Engines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jansons, M

    2004-01-01

    Direct-injection (DI) Diesel or compression-ignition (CI) engine combustion process is investigated when new design and operational strategies are employed in order to achieve a high power-density (HPD) engine...

  18. Diode pumped 1kHz high power Nd:YAG laser with excellent beam quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godfried, Herman; Godfried, H.P; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    1997-01-01

    The design and operation of a one kilohertz diode pumped all solid-state Nd:YAG master oscillator power amplifier system with a phase conjugate mirror is presented. The setup allows high power scaling without reduction in beam quality.

  19. High Speed Modulation, Beam Steering and Control of High Power Diode Lasers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moloney, J

    2000-01-01

    .... The full nonlinear pde model for high power wide aperture semiconductor lasers was reformulated theoretically so as to take advantage of speed and excellent parallel scaling of our ONYS2 in-house supercomputer...

  20. LWR spent fuel transmutation in a high power density fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Suemer.; Uebeyli, Mustafa

    2004-01-01

    The prospect of light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel incineration in a high power density fusion reactor has been investigated. The neutron wall load is taken at 10 MW/m 2 and a refractory alloy (W-5Re) is used in the first wall. Neutron transport calculations are conducted over an operation period of 48 months on a simple experimental hybrid blanket in a cylindrical geometry with the help of the SCALE4.3 system by solving the Boltzmann transport equation with the XSDRNPM code in 238 neutron groups and a S 8 -P 3 approximation. In the neutron rich environment, the tritium breeding ratio remains > 1.05 so that the tritium self-sufficiency is maintained for the fusion reactor. The presence of fissionable nuclear waste fuel in the investigated blanket causes significant energy amplification. The energy multiplication factor is ∼4 at startup and it increases steadily up to 5.55 during power plant operation so that even a modest fusion reactor can supply a significant quantity of electricity. In the course of nuclear waste incineration, most of the fissionable fuel is burnt in situ. In addition to that, excess fissile fuel production enhances the nuclear quality of the nuclear fuel. Starting with an initial cumulative fissile fuel enrichment (CFFE) value of the spent fuel of 2.172%, CFFE can reach 4% after an irradiation period of ∼12 months. Then the spent fuel becomes suitable for a new recharge in an LWR as a regenerated fuel. Further residence in the fusion blanket continues to upgrade the nuclear waste so that after 48 months, CFFE can reach such a high level (9%) that it becomes qualified to be used in a new type of the advanced high temperature reactors for the Generation-IV