WorldWideScience

Sample records for national cancer centre

  1. Regional cancer centre demonstrates voluntary conformity with the national Radiation Oncology Practice Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Stephen; Last, Andrew; Fu, Kenneth; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2015-06-01

    Radiation Oncology Practice Standards have been developed over the last 10 years and were published for use in Australia in 2011. Although the majority of the radiation oncology community supports the implementation of the standards, there has been no mechanism for uniform assessment or governance. North Coast Cancer Institute's public radiation oncology service is provided across three main service centres on the north coast of NSW. With a strong focus on quality management, we embraced the opportunity to demonstrate conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. The Local Health District's Clinical Governance units were engaged to perform assessments of our conformity with the standards and this was signed off as complete on 16 December 2013. The process of demonstrating conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards has enhanced the culture of quality in our centres. We have demonstrated that self-assessment utilising trained auditors is a viable method for centres to demonstrate conformity. National implementation of the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards will benefit individual centres and the broader radiation oncology community to improve the service delivered to our patients.

  2. Regional cancer centre demonstrates voluntary conformity with the national Radiation Oncology Practice Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manley, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.manley@ncahs.health.nsw.gov.au; Last, Andrew; Fu, Kenneth; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; Shakespeare, Thomas P [North Coast Cancer Institute, Lismore, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Radiation Oncology Practice Standards have been developed over the last 10 years and were published for use in Australia in 2011. Although the majority of the radiation oncology community supports the implementation of the standards, there has been no mechanism for uniform assessment or governance. North Coast Cancer Institute's public radiation oncology service is provided across three main service centres on the north coast of NSW. With a strong focus on quality management, we embraced the opportunity to demonstrate conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. The Local Health District's Clinical Governance units were engaged to perform assessments of our conformity with the standards and this was signed off as complete on 16 December 2013. The process of demonstrating conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards has enhanced the culture of quality in our centres. We have demonstrated that self-assessment utilising trained auditors is a viable method for centres to demonstrate conformity. National implementation of the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards will benefit individual centres and the broader radiation oncology community to improve the service delivered to our patients.

  3. Regional cancer centre demonstrates voluntary conformity with the national Radiation Oncology Practice Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, Stephen; Last, Andrew; Fu, Kenneth; Greenham, Stuart; Kovendy, Andrew; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    Radiation Oncology Practice Standards have been developed over the last 10 years and were published for use in Australia in 2011. Although the majority of the radiation oncology community supports the implementation of the standards, there has been no mechanism for uniform assessment or governance. North Coast Cancer Institute's public radiation oncology service is provided across three main service centres on the north coast of NSW. With a strong focus on quality management, we embraced the opportunity to demonstrate conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards. The Local Health District's Clinical Governance units were engaged to perform assessments of our conformity with the standards and this was signed off as complete on 16 December 2013. The process of demonstrating conformity with the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards has enhanced the culture of quality in our centres. We have demonstrated that self-assessment utilising trained auditors is a viable method for centres to demonstrate conformity. National implementation of the Radiation Oncology Practice Standards will benefit individual centres and the broader radiation oncology community to improve the service delivered to our patients

  4. Histologic heterogeneity of triple negative breast cancer: A National Cancer Centre Database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Matthew N; Yang, George Q; Oliver, Daniel E; Liveringhouse, Casey L; Ahmed, Kamran A; Orman, Amber G; Laronga, Christine; Hoover, Susan J; Khakpour, Nazanin; Costa, Ricardo L B; Diaz, Roberto

    2018-06-02

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive disease, but recent studies have identified heterogeneity in patient outcomes. However, the utility of histologic subtyping in TNBC has not yet been well-characterised. This study utilises data from the National Cancer Center Database (NCDB) to complete the largest series to date investigating the prognostic importance of histology within TNBC. A total of 729,920 patients (pts) with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC), medullary breast carcinoma (MedBC), adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) or apocrine breast carcinoma (ABC) treated between 2004 and 2012 were identified in the NCDB. Of these, 89,222 pts with TNBC that received surgery were analysed. Kaplan-Meier analysis, log-rank testing and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression were utilised with overall survival (OS) as the primary outcome. MBC (74.1%), MedBC (60.6%), ACC (75.7%), ABC (50.1%) and ILC (1.8%) had significantly different proportions of triple negativity when compared to IDC (14.0%, p < 0.001). TNBC predicted an inferior OS in IDC (p < 0.001) and ILC (p < 0.001). Lumpectomy and radiation (RT) were more common in MedBC (51.7%) and ACC (51.5%) and less common in MBC (33.1%) and ILC (25.4%), when compared to IDC (42.5%, p < 0.001). TNBC patients with MBC (HR 1.39, p < 0.001), MedBC (HR 0.42, p < 0.001) and ACC (HR 0.32, p = 0.003) differed significantly in OS when compared to IDC. Our results indicate that histologic heterogeneity in TNBC significantly informs patient outcomes and thus, has the potential to aid in the development of optimum personalised treatments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. National Centre for Ag

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2014-10-08

    Oct 8, 2014 ... Technology and Research in Irrigation and Drainage/Food and Agriculture. Organization of the United Nations. Bralts, V.F., Edwards, D.M. and Kesner,. C.D. (1985). Field Evaluation of. Drip/Trickle Irrigation Submain Units. In: Drip/Trickle Irrigation in Action. Proceedings of the Third International. Drip/Trickle ...

  6. Evaluation of directional vacuum-assisted breast biopsy: Report for the National Breast Cancer Centre final report, CHERE Project Report No 21

    OpenAIRE

    Marion Haas; Lorraine Ivancic

    2003-01-01

    This project was commissioned by the National Breast Cancer Centre (NBCC). The objectives of the project, as set out in the call for expressions of interest, were to determine: 1. The costs associated with the introduction and use of directional vacuum-assisted breast biopsy(DVA breast biopsy) in Australia; and 2. Whether directional vacuum-assisted breast biopsy used for diagnostic purposes is cost-effectivein Australia when compared to core biopsy. The motivation for commissioning the proje...

  7. Thyroid cancer: experiences at the Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeep, V.M.; Gangadharan, P.; Nair, Krishnan M.

    1999-01-01

    Above 300 thyroid cancers are seen at the Regional Cancer Centre annually. There has been an increase in the number of TC registered over the years. This is at least partly due to improved diagnostic services and availability of 131 I therapy. Almost 90 % of the cases seen at the Centre are well-differentiated cancers

  8. National Centre for Radioactive Ion Beams (NCRIB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintalapudi, S.N.

    1999-01-01

    Radioactive Ion (nuclear) Beams have become prolific recently. Nuclear physics and associated subjects have staged a comeback to almost the beginning with the advent of RIB. A dedicated National Centre for RIB (NCRIB) proposed, discussed at several forums and under serious consideration is described

  9. National Centre for Radioactive Ion Beams (NCRIB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintalapudi, S.N.

    1999-01-01

    A dedicated National Centre for RIB (NCRIB) proposed discussed at several forums is presented. The production of (RIB) radioactive ion beams and applications of beams leading to competitive studies in nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, condensed matter, bio-science and radioactive isotope production etc. are mentioned

  10. Establishing a National Nuclear Security Support Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-02-01

    The responsibility for creating and sustaining a nuclear security regime for the protection of nuclear and other radiological material clearly belongs to the State. The nuclear security regime resembles the layers of an onion, with the equipment and personnel securing the borders and ports representing the outer layer, and nuclear power, research reactors and nuclear medicine facilities representing the inner layers, and the actual target material representing the core. Components of any nuclear security regime include not only technological systems, but the human resources needed to manage, operate, administer and maintain equipment, including hardware and software. This publication provides practical guidance on the establishment and maintenance of a national nuclear security support centre (NSSC) as a means to ensure nuclear security sustainability in a State. An NSSC's basic purpose is to provide a national focal point for passing ownership of nuclear security knowledge and associated technical skills to the competent authorities involved in nuclear security. It describes processes and methodologies that can be used by a State to analyse the essential elements of information in a manner that allows several aspects of long term, systemic sustainability of nuclear security to be addressed. Processes such as the systematic approach to training, sometimes referred to as instructional system design, are the cornerstone of the NSSC concept. Proper analysis can provide States with data on the number of personnel requiring training and instructors needed, scale and scope of training, technical and scientific support venues, and details on the type and number of training aids or simulators required so that operational systems are not compromised in any way. Specific regulatory guidance, equipment or technology lists, or specifications/design of protection systems are not included in this publication. For such details, the following IAEA publications should be consulted

  11. "Getting Practical" and the National Network of Science Learning Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Georgina; Langley, Mark; Skilling, Gus; Walker, John

    2011-01-01

    The national network of Science Learning Centres is a co-ordinating partner in the Getting Practical--Improving Practical Work in Science programme. The principle of training provision for the "Getting Practical" programme is a cascade model. Regional trainers employed by the national network of Science Learning Centres trained the cohort of local…

  12. Bringing cancer care closer to home: Mauritania opens first nuclear medicine centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    The opening of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania’s first ever nuclear medicine centre with IAEA support in late 2014 will lead to improved access to modern diagnostics and treatment, as well as lower costs. The new facility is part of the country’s National Oncology Centre, which opened in 2010, with support from the IAEA. The centres offer comprehensive services in diagnosing, treating and managing cancer and other diseases in Mauritania and the surrounding region.

  13. Building National Infrastructures for Patient-Centred Digital Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseng, Anne; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2015-01-01

    Patient-centred digital services are increasingly gaining impact in the healthcare sector. The premise is that patients will be better equipped for taking care of their own health through instant access to relevant information and by enhanced electronic communication with healthcare providers. One...... infrastructure theory, we highlight the enabling and constraining dynamics when designing and building a national infrastructure for patient-centred digital services. Furthermore, we discuss how such infrastructures can accommodate further development of services. The findings show that the Danish national e...

  14. The South African National Accelerator Centre and its research programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Y. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    An overview of the South African National Accelerator Centre and its research activities is given with emphasis on medium energy nuclear physics and nuclear data measurements for medical use. Also presented is a preliminary result of {sup 40}Ca(p,p`x) spectrum measurement for 392 MeV which has been carried out at RCNP, Osaka University, under the South Africa-Japan collaborative programme. (author)

  15. Rosatom's Crisis Response Centre within the national nuclear safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, S.N.; Komarovskij, A.V.; Moskalev, V.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Rosatom Corporation includes a number of subsidiaries associated with nuclear energy use as well as with the military, scientific, technological, nuclear and radiation safety management aspects. The Rosatom Corporation has a well-established and efficient industry-wide system of emergency prevention and response, whose purpose is to ensure safe functioning of the nuclear industry, protection of personnel, the public and nature from potential dangers; it is also a functional subsystem of the unified national system of emergency prevention and response. Overall management of the system is performed by Director General of the Rosatom Corporation, overall methodological management - by the Department of Licensing, Nuclear and Radiation Safety; everyday management of the emergency prevention and response system, round-the-clock monitoring and informational support - by the Rosatom Crisis and Response Centre (CRC). CRC acts as the national focal point for warning and communication in Russia, which provides continuous round-the-clock preparedness to cooperate with the IAEA's Incident and Emergency Centre using the formats of the ENATOM international emergency response system, similar national crisis response centres abroad [ru

  16. Psycho-oncological care in certified cancer centres--a nationwide analysis in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Susanne; Dieng, Sebastian; Wesselmann, Simone

    2013-06-01

    Over the last few years, a nationwide voluntary certification system for cancer centres has been established in Germany. To qualify for certification, cancer centres must provide psycho-oncological care to every patient who needs it. The aim of this study was to find out how many patients have been treated by a psycho-oncologist in the certified centres. All cancer centres in Germany that were re-certified in 2010 provided data documenting how many patients with primary cancer received at least 30 min of psycho-oncological consultation in 2009. Data from n = 456 certified cancer centres were available. In the centres, a total of 36,165 patients were seen by a psycho-oncologist for at least 30 min, representing 37.3% of all patients in the centres. The highest percentage of patients who received psycho-oncological care was found in breast cancer centres (66.7%), and the lowest in prostate cancer centres (6.8%). Half of the patients (50.0%) in gynaecological cancer centres, 37.7% in colon cancer centres and 25.4% in lung cancer centres received psycho-oncological care. Compared with non-certified centres, the proportion of patients receiving psycho-oncological care in certified cancer centres has increased. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Proposed medical applications of the National Accelerator Centre facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.T.L.

    1982-01-01

    The National Accelerator Centre is at present under construction at Faure, near Cape Town. The complex will house a 200 MeV separated-sector cyclotron which will provide high quality beams for nuclear physics and related diciplines as well as high intensity beams for medical use. The medical aspects catered for will include particle radiotherapy, isotope production and possibly proton radiography. A 30-bed hospital is to be constructed on the site. Building operations are well advanced and the medical facilities should be available for use by the end of 1984

  18. The CTBT National Data Centre: Roles And Functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faisal Izwan Abdul Rashid; Noriah Jamal; Mohd Azmi Sidid Omar; Azlinda Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Following the signature of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) on 23 July 1998, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) was designated as the CTBT National Authority in Malaysia. Subsequently, Malaysia ratified the treaty on 17 January 2008. Following the ratification, a CTBT National Data Centre (CTBT-NDC) was established at Nuclear Malaysia. The objective of this paper is to elaborate the unique roles and functions of CTBT-NDC which provide technical support to the CTBT National Authority in carrying out its roles under CTBT as well as promoting the uses of International Monitoring System (IMS) data and International Data Centre (IDC) products for civil and scientific applications. With regards to the verification of events suspected to be a nuclear weapon test, CTBT-NDC performs waveform data analysis using IMS data and IDC products produced by IDC in order to verify the nature of such event. The waveform data analysis could include seismic, hydro acoustic and infra sound data. In addition, an atmospheric transport modeling on possible release of radionuclide particles originated from the nuclear weapon test location is also performed to forecast the global dispersion of radionuclide smoke. The findings from these analyses will be used as technical advice to the CTBT National Authority. Apart from verification purposes, CTBT-NDC also promotes the benefits of IMS data and IDC products for civil and scientific applications such as earth studies, improvement of disaster management and etc. In summary, CTBT NDC plays a unique role in supporting CTBT National Authority to carried out its functions under CTBT as well as promote the full use of IMS data and IDC products for civil and scientific applications. (author)

  19. Social marketing ethics: report prepared for the National Social Marketing Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Eagle, L.; National Social Marketing Centre

    2009-01-01

    This report has been developed by Professor Lynn Eagle from the Bristol Social Marketing Centre, Bristol Business School University of West of England with contributions from\\ud staff at the National Social Marketing Centre.

  20. Resource variation in colorectal surgery: a national centre level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, T M; Lee, M J; Senapati, A; Brown, S R

    2017-07-01

    Delivery of quality colorectal surgery requires adequate resources. We set out to assess the relationship between resources and outcomes in English colorectal units. Data were extracted from the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland resource questionnaire to profile resources. This was correlated with Hospital Episode Statistics outcome data including 90-day mortality and readmissions. Patient satisfaction measures were extracted from the Cancer Experience Patient Survey and compared at unit level. Centres were divided by workload into low, middle and top tertile. Completed questionnaires were received from 75 centres in England. Service resources were similar between low and top tertiles in access to Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (CEPOD) theatre, level two or three beds per 250 000 population or the likelihood of having a dedicated colorectal ward. There was no difference in staffing levels per 250 000 unit of population. Each 10% increase in the proportion of cases attempted laparoscopically was associated with reduced 90-day unplanned readmission (relative risk 0.94, 95% CI 0.91-0.97, P colorectal ward (relative risk 0.85, 95% CI 0.73-0.99, P = 0.040) was also associated with a significant reduction in unplanned readmissions. There was no association between staffing or service factors and patient satisfaction. Resource levels do not vary based on unit of population. There is benefit associated with increased use of laparoscopy and a dedicated surgical ward. Alternative measures to assess the relationship between resources and outcome, such as failure to rescue, should be explored in UK practice. Colorectal Disease © 2017 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. Comparison of children’s food and beverage intakes with national recommendations in New York City child-care centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, L Beth; Breck, Andrew; Khan, Laura Kettel

    2016-01-01

    Objective The present study compared foods and beverages provided to and consumed by children at child-care centres in New York City (NYC) with national nutrition recommendations. Design The study used survey, observational and centre record data collected from child-care centres. Food and beverage intakes from two days of observation and amounts of energy and nutrients were estimated using the US National Cancer Institute’s Automated Self-Administered 24 h Recall system. Setting Meal and snack time at 108 child-care centres in low-income communities in NYC. Subjects Children aged 3–4 years old in classrooms selected by the directors of the participating child-care centres. Results Foods and beverages provided to and consumed by children (n 630) met >50% of the Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) for most nutrients. Intakes of fibre and vitamins D and E were Foods and beverages provided >50% of the recommended average daily intake amounts for total grains, fruits and fruit juices, and dairy, but foods and vegetables. Intake of oils was below the allowance for energy levels, but foods and beverages with solid fats and added sugars exceeded the limits by 68%. Conclusions Providing more whole grains, vegetables and low-fat dairy and fewer foods with solid fats and added sugars may improve children’s diet quality when at child-care centres. Centre staff may need training, resources and strategies in order to meet the nutrition recommendations. PMID:27280552

  2. Regional Centres for Space Science and Technology Education and ICG Information Centres affiliated to the United Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadimova, S.; Haubold, H. J.

    2009-06-01

    Based on resolutions of the United Nations General Assembly, Regional Centres for Space Science and Technology Education were established in India, Morocco, Nigeria, Brazil and Mexico. Simultaneously, education curricula were developed for the core disciplines of remote sensing, satellite communications, satellite meteorology, and space and atmospheric science. This paper provides a brief summary on the status of the operation of the regional centres with a view to use them as information centres of the International Committee on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (ICG), and draws attention to their educational activities.

  3. Seismological investigation of the National Data Centre Preparedness Exercise 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestermann, Nicolai; Hartmann, Gernot; Ross, J. Ole; Ceranna, Lars

    2015-04-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) prohibits all kinds of nuclear explosions conducted on Earth - underground, underwater or in the atmosphere. The verification regime of the CTBT is designed to detect any treaty violation. While the data of the International Monitoring System (IMS) is collected, processed and technically analyzed at the International Data Centre (IDC) of the CTBT-Organization, National Data Centres (NDC) of the member states provide interpretation and advice to their government concerning suspicious detections. The NDC Preparedness Exercises (NPE) are regularly performed dealing with fictitious treaty violations to practice the combined analysis of CTBT verification technologies. These exercises should help to evaluate the effectiveness of analysis procedures applied at NDCs and the quality, completeness and usefulness of IDC products for example. The exercise trigger of NPE2013 is a combination of a tempo-spatial indication pointing to a certain waveform event and simulated radionuclide concentrations generated by forward Atmospheric Transport Modelling based on a fictitious release. For the waveform event the date (4 Sept. 2013) is given and the region is communicated in a map showing the fictitious state of "Frisia" at the Coast of the North Sea in Central Europe. The potential connection between the waveform and radionuclide evidence remains unclear for exercise participants. The verification task was to identify the waveform event and to investigate potential sources of the radionuclide findings. The final question was whether the findings are CTBT relevant and justify a request for On-Site-Inspection in "Frisia". The seismic event was not included in the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) of the IDC. The available detections from the closest seismic IMS stations lead to a epicenter accuracy of about 24 km which is not sufficient to specify the 1000 km2 inspection area in case of an OSI. With use of data from local stations and

  4. Use of Lidocaine Patches for Neuropathic Pain in a Comprehensive Cancer Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Ann Fleming

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are few reports of the use of the lidocaine 5% patch (L5%P for neuropathic pain (NP in the cancer patient. Within a comprehensive cancer centre, L5%P has been prescribed by the Pain and Palliative Care Service (Peter McCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia for selected patients with NP since 2001.

  5. National Cancer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... programs, and connect with NCI researchers via Twitter chats. Facebook Connect with NCI on its Facebook page to get updates on cancer information, including the latest research, and engage with us on topics of interest to you. View this video on YouTube. On October 18 at 12:00 ...

  6. [The National Reference Centres and Reference Laboratories. Importance and tasks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laude, G; Ammon, A

    2005-09-01

    Since 1995, the German Federal Ministry for Health and Social Security funds National Reference Centres (NRC) for the laboratory surveillance of important pathogens and syndromes. Which pathogens or syndromes are selected to be covered by a NRC depends on their epidemiological relevance, the special diagnostic tools, problems with antimicrobial resistance and necessary infection control measures. Currently, there are 15 NRC, which are appointed for a period of 3 years (currently from January 2005 through December 2007). Towards the end of their appointment all NRC are evaluated by a group of specialists. The assessment of their achievements is guided by a catalogue of tasks for the NRC. In addition to the NRC, a total of 50 laboratories are appointed which provide specialist expertise for additional pathogens in order to have a broad range of pathogens for which specialist laboratories are available. Their predominant task is to give advice and support for special diagnostic problems. Both NRC and the specialist laboratories are important parts of the network for infectious disease epidemiology.

  7. National audit of radioactivity measurements in Nuclear Medicine Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindra, Anuradha; Kulkarni, D.B.; Joseph, Leena; Babu, D.A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Routine activity measurements of radiopharmaceutical solutions in Nuclear Medicine Centres (NMC) are carried out with the help of radionuclide calibrators (RC). These solutions are either ingested or injected to the patient for diagnosis or therapy. However, for the realization of an optimized examination, the activity of these radiopharmaceuticals must be determined accurately before administering it to patients. The primary standards are maintained by Radiation Standards Section, Radiological Physics and Advisory Division. National audit programmes of Iodine -131 activity measurements with RCs are conducted biannually to establish traceability to national standards and to check the status of nuclear medicine practice followed at the NMC. The results of fifteenth audit of 131 I activity measurements with RC are presented in this paper. Questionnaires were sent to two hundred and thirty three NMCs in-the country. One hundred and nine NMC's agreed for participation and accordingly, glass vials containing radioactive 131 I solution of nominal activity of 100 MBq were procured from Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology, Mumbai. The radioactivity in each vial was determined with high pressure re-entrant gamma ionisation chamber (GIC), a secondary standard maintained by this laboratory. The sensitivity coefficient of GIC is traceable to the primary standard. The standardized radioactive solution of 131 I in glass vial was sent to each participant. Measurements results were reported in the reporting form sent. This audit was conducted in four schedules in Jan 2013. One hundred and sixty six results were received from one hundred and nine participants as many participants took measurements on more than one isotope calibrator

  8. Statistical study on cancer patients of Korea cancer centre hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Kee Hwa; Mok, Kang Sung [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    The total number of malignant neoplasms included in this study 53,566 cases(14.1%) among 379,582 patients from 1984 to 1993. On sex, females with 51.3% were much more than males with 48.7%. The highest proportion of cancer patients by age was 35.0% in males and 28.4% in females, respectively for 50-59 age group. The most frequent primary site among males was found to be stomach with 33.2%, followed by liver(15.1%), lung(14.9%), esophagus(5.3%) and larynx(3.3%). In females, the first order was uterine cervix with 37.8%, followed by stomach(16.5%), breast(14.8%), thyroid gland(4.3%) and lung (3.8%). The proportion of malignant neoplasms diagnosed by histology made up 67.0%, whereas 20.2% was diagnosed by clinical investigation(X-ray, CT, MRI etc). Among the cancer patients initially diagnosed in this hospital, the proportion of malignant neoplasms by the extent of disease was 3.7% for patient with carcinoma-in-situ, 58.7% for patients with localized involvement, 18.4% for patients with regional involvement and 11.1% for patients with distant involvement. Among the cancer patients initially treatment in this hospital, the proportion of malignant neoplasms by the method of treatment was 27.5% for surgery, 22.5% for radiotherapy and 30.1% for chemotherapy. The proportion of cancer patients traced to death was only to 3.6%, 1,944 cases. Among them, 72.5% survived for less than 1 year. 17 figs, 7 tabs, 28 refs. (Author).

  9. Statistical study on cancer patients of Korea cancer centre hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soo Yong; Kim, Kee Hwa; Kang Sung Mok

    1994-12-01

    The total number of malignant neoplasms included in this study 53,566 cases(14.1%) among 379,582 patients from 1984 to 1993. On sex, females with 51.3% were much more than males with 48.7%. The highest proportion of cancer patients by age was 35.0% in males and 28.4% in females, respectively for 50-59 age group. The most frequent primary site among males was found to be stomach with 33.2%, followed by liver(15.1%), lung(14.9%), esophagus(5.3%) and larynx(3.3%). In females, the first order was uterine cervix with 37.8%, followed by stomach(16.5%), breast(14.8%), thyroid gland(4.3%) and lung (3.8%). The proportion of malignant neoplasms diagnosed by histology made up 67.0%, whereas 20.2% was diagnosed by clinical investigation(X-ray, CT, MRI etc). Among the cancer patients initially diagnosed in this hospital, the proportion of malignant neoplasms by the extent of disease was 3.7% for patient with carcinoma-in-situ, 58.7% for patients with localized involvement, 18.4% for patients with regional involvement and 11.1% for patients with distant involvement. Among the cancer patients initially treatment in this hospital, the proportion of malignant neoplasms by the method of treatment was 27.5% for surgery, 22.5% for radiotherapy and 30.1% for chemotherapy. The proportion of cancer patients traced to death was only to 3.6%, 1,944 cases. Among them, 72.5% survived for less than 1 year. 17 figs, 7 tabs, 28 refs. (Author)

  10. A national benchmarking survey of student counselling centres/units ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study further found that the majority of counselling centres/units had one or more staff members with specialised training in areas such as HIV/AIDS counselling, sexual abuse counselling and multicultural counselling. In 2007, these counselling centres/units saw on average 18 per cent of enrolled students as ...

  11. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: National Drug Dependence Treatment Centre, India--a profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Rajat; Dhawan, Anju; Chopra, Anita

    2013-10-01

    The National Drug Dependence Treatment Centre (NDDTC) is a part of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, a premier autonomous medical university in India. This article provides an account of its origin and its contribution to the field of substance use disorder at the national and international levels. Since its establishment, the NDDTC has played a major role in the development of various replicable models of care, the training of post-graduate students of psychiatry, research, policy development and planning. An assessment of the magnitude of drug abuse in India began in the early 1990s and this was followed by a National Survey on Extent, Patterns and Trends of Drug Abuse in 2004. Several models of clinical care have been developed for population subgroups in diverse settings. The centre played an important role in producing data and resource material which helped to scale up opioid substitution treatment in India. A nationwide database on the profile of patients seeking treatment (Drug Abuse Monitoring System) at government drug treatment centres has also been created. The centre has provided valuable inputs for the Government of India's programme planning. Besides clinical studies, research has also focused on pre-clinical studies. Capacity-building is an important priority, with training curricula and resource material being developed for doctors and paramedical staff. Many of these training programmes are conducted in collaboration with other institutions in the country. The NDDTC has received funding from several national and international organizations for research and scientific meetings, and, most recently (2012), it has been designated as a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Substance Abuse. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. Management of fertility preservation in young breast cancer patients in a large breast cancer centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenz, B; Neunhoeffer, E; Henes, M; Lessmann-Bechle, S; Krämer, B; Fehm, Tanja

    2010-11-01

    The increase of breast cancer in young women under 40 years and the increasing age of women at the time of the birth of their first child underlines the importance to implement counselling for fertility-preserving strategies in the management of breast cancer care. We present the fertility-preserving procedures performed after routine counselling for primary breast cancer patients in a large certified breast cancer centre. Since November 2006, patients aged below 40 years with histologically confirmed breast cancer are routinely counselled on fertility-preserving possibilities before breast surgery and chemotherapy in the fertility centre of the University Women's Hospital in Tuebingen. The recommendations are based on the treatment recommendations of the network FertiPROTEKT. During the last 40 months, 56 primary breast cancer patients were counselled. Forty-one of these patients were hormone receptor positive. Thirty-four patients (63%) underwent fertility-preserving strategies. The majority of the patients (n = 22) decided on ovarian tissue cryopreservation. GnRH protection was performed in 14 patients. In 12 patients an ovarian stimulation protocol was initiated to cryopreserve fertilized or unfertilized oocytes. A combination of different fertility-preserving methods was performed in 12 patients. The preservation of ovarian function and fertility are of great importance to young breast cancer patients. Counselling on fertility-preserving strategies is therefore critical in these patients and should be routinely performed.

  13. Performance of the ocean state forecast system at Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, T.M.B.; Sirisha, P.; Sandhya, K.G.; Srinivas, K.; SanilKumar, V.; Sabique, L.; Nherakkol, A.; KrishnaPrasad, B.; RakhiKumari; Jeyakumar, C.; Kaviyazhahu, K.; RameshKumar, M.; Harikumar, R.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Nayak, S.

    The reliability of the operational Ocean State Forecast system at the Indian National Centre for Ocean Information Services (INCOIS) during tropical cyclones that affect the coastline of India is described in this article. The performance...

  14. Pakistan’s national Centre of Excellence contributes to sustaining nuclear security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, Aabha

    2016-01-01

    Pakistani front line officers and first responders are in a better position to fight illicit trafficking in nuclear and other radioactive materials, as well as to use advanced radiation detection and monitoring equipment, thanks to training they have received at the country’s Centre of Excellence for Nuclear Security. This is just one of the benefits the country has reaped from the Centre, which is collaborating with the growing International Network for Nuclear Security Training and Support Centres (NSSC Network), building national capacity through training and strengthening technical and scientific support programmes. Since the establishment of the Centre of Excellence, Pakistan has organized training courses on nuclear security for personnel from national and regional organizations. The Centre of Excellence also offers technical support to personnel involved in the maintenance and upgrade of facilities, with a focus on enhancing technical and scientific skills and quality control of equipment.

  15. Towards Establishing of National Centre of Synchrotron Radiation in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodziej, J.J.; Szymonski, M.

    2004-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation facilities (SRF) are established part of contemporary world research landscape. They facilitate fast advances of life, health, and physical sciences as well as development of new technologies. The extent of synchrotron radiation (SR) use has been growing up steadily for the last two decades all over the world and it is anticipated that the growth will continue in future. Growing community of SR users has generated increasing demand for the beam-time in infrared, vacuum UV and X-ray ranges. In response, many new SR facilities are now being constructed and planned, not only in large countries of strong economy but also in developing countries. It is expected that such trends will be followed in other parts of the world. No doubt, the ''cutting edge'' of research activity will continue to create the demand for beams of higher brightness, flux and photon energy but it is predictable that the increasing fraction of research done presently with laboratory radiation sources will be shifting towards small-scale SR facilities. Several hundred Polish scientists, a meaningful fraction of all SR users, take part in experiments using synchrotron sources all over the world. Many of them belong to the Polish Synchrotron Radiation Society - an active body promoting the use of SR. Present European Union priorities include knowledge, research and innovation as the key priorities and a pillar of development and stable welfare of Europe. Poland as a new member of EU will have to conform to the EU policy. The government strategy assumes a fast increase of investments in research and development sector starting from 2005. No other scientific research installations has had such major impact on advances in science an technology as the SRF. It is obvious that the time is ripe now for establishing a National Centre of Synchrotron Radiation in Poland. Recently, several Polish educational and research institutions constituted around the idea of Polish SRF. The initiative

  16. Descriptive epidemiology of colorectal cancer in University Malaya Medical Centre, 2001 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaji, Bello Arkilla; Moy, Foong Ming; Roslani, April Camilla; Law, Chee Wei

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most frequent cancer in Malaysia. Nevertheless, there is little information on treatment and outcomes nationally. We aimed to determine the demographic, clinical and treatment characteristics of colorectal cancer patients treated at the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) as part of a larger project on survival and quality of life outcomes. Medical records of 1,212 patients undergoing treatment in UMMC between January 2001 and December 2010 were reviewed. A retrospective-prospective cohort study design was used. Research tools included the National Cancer Patient Registration form. Statistical analysis included means, standard deviations (SD), proportions, chi square, t-test/ ANOVA. P-value significance was set at 0.05. The male: female ratio was 1.2:1. The mean age was 62.1 (SD12.4) years. Patients were predominantly Chinese (67%), then Malays (18%), Indians (13%) and others (2%). Malays were younger than Chinese and Indians (mean age 57 versus 62 versus 62 years, p<0.001). More females (56%) had colon cancers compared to males (44%) (p=0.022). Malays (57%) had more rectal cancer compared to Chinese (45%) and Indians (49%) (p=0.004). Dukes' stage data weres available in 67%, with Dukes' C and D accounting for 64%. Stage was not affected by age, gender, ethnicity or tumor site. Treatment modalities included surgery alone (40%), surgery and chemo/radiotherapy 32%, chemo and radiotherapy (8%) and others (20%). Significant ethnic differences in age and site distribution, if verified in population-based settings, would support implementation of preventive measures targeting those with the greatest need, at the right age.

  17. Regional Centres for Space Science and Technology Education Affiliated to the United Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, A. J. A.; Haubold, H. J.

    2010-05-01

    Based on resolutions of the United Nations General Assembly, Regional Centres for space science and technology education were established in India, Morocco, Nigeria, Brazil and Mexico. Simultaneously, education curricula were developed for the core disciplines of remote sensing, satellite communications, satellite meteorology, and space and atmospheric science. This paper provides a brief report on the status of the operation of the Regional Centres and draws attention to their educational activities.

  18. Ethical dilemmas of a large national multi-centre study in Australia: time for some consistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Andrea; Currey, Judy; Worrall-Carter, Linda; Stewart, Simon

    2008-08-01

    To examine the impact and obstacles that individual Institutional Research Ethics Committee (IRECs) had on a large-scale national multi-centre clinical audit called the National Benchmarks and Evidence-based National Clinical guidelines for Heart failure management programmes Study. Multi-centre research is commonplace in the health care system. However, IRECs continue to fail to differentiate between research and quality audit projects. The National Benchmarks and Evidence-based National Clinical guidelines for Heart failure management programmes study used an investigator-developed questionnaire concerning a clinical audit for heart failure programmes throughout Australia. Ethical guidelines developed by the National governing body of health and medical research in Australia classified the National Benchmarks and Evidence-based National Clinical guidelines for Heart failure management programmes Study as a low risk clinical audit not requiring ethical approval by IREC. Fifteen of 27 IRECs stipulated that the research proposal undergo full ethical review. None of the IRECs acknowledged: national quality assurance guidelines and recommendations nor ethics approval from other IRECs. Twelve of the 15 IRECs used different ethics application forms. Variability in the type of amendments was prolific. Lack of uniformity in ethical review processes resulted in a six- to eight-month delay in commencing the national study. Development of a national ethics application form with full ethical review by the first IREC and compulsory expedited review by subsequent IRECs would resolve issues raised in this paper. IRECs must change their ethics approval processes to one that enhances facilitation of multi-centre research which is now normative process for health services. The findings of this study highlight inconsistent ethical requirements between different IRECs. Also highlighted are the obstacles and delays that IRECs create when undertaking multi-centre clinical audits

  19. Realization of Data Archiving for CTBT Beijing National Data Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Juan; Shi Jianfang; Wang Xiaoming; Liu Junmin; Qiu Hongmao; Zhang Bo; Lu Yuanglei; Xu Jin

    2009-01-01

    It is very important issue for the large scale real time data processing system to archive data. The method of data are archiving in the paper is to facilitate the permanent storages and retrieval of all data arriving at the NDC. The data in the operation file system and the database references to the data in the operation database will be deleted automatically after the system has verified archived data is identical with original data. The data archiving operations have been realized in China National Data Center. (authors)

  20. Colorectal Cancer Profile in a Tertiary Care Centre, Bangalore, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailaja Suryadevara, , , ,

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Colorectal cancers are a common disease of oncological practice. A raising incidence is seen in Asian population. It is one of the cancers where screening and early diagnosis are possible. Very few articles are there about the cancer scenario in India. A study of the disease profile helps in screening, early diagnosis and management of the disease in developing countries. Aim: To study the cancer presentation in our population which can help in developing strategies for better control of disease. Material and Methods: Medical records of 171 patients registered at Kidwai Hospital from 2010 to 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Data including age at presentation, sex, location of the cancer and stage at presentation were analyzed. Results: The male to female ratio was 1.26:1 in rectal cancer. In colon cancer the ratio was 1:1.3. The mean age at presentation was 47 years in males and 51 years in females in colorectal cancers together. Thirty eight percent of the patients were less than 45 years old. Eighty percent of the cases were rectal cancers. In 71% of rectal cancers the growth was located within 5cm from anal verge (AV. Stage III was the commonest stage of presentation. Abdominoperineal resection (APR was the commonest surgical procedure done. Inoperability was highest with lower rectal cancer. Conclusion: Younger age at presentation, low lying rectal cancers and advanced stage at presentation were observed in our study group which includes predominantly rural population. Rectal cancers are the most common cancers referred among colorectal cancers. Screening for colorectal cancers and early evaluation of symptomatic cases need to be encouraged. Patients should be educated regarding this. Screening strategies, etiopathogenesis and genetic abnormalities in colorectal cancer patients need to be defined in developing countries.

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine for cancer patients: results of the EPAAC survey on integrative oncology centres in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Elio; Vita, Alessandra; Baccetti, Sonia; Di Stefano, Mariella; Voller, Fabio; Zanobini, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    The Region of Tuscany Health Department was included as an associated member in WP7 "Healthcare" of the European Partnership for Action Against Cancer (EPAAC), initiated by the EU Commission in 2009. The principal aim was to map centres across Europe prioritizing those that provide public health services and operating within the national health system in integrative oncology (IO). A cross-sectional descriptive survey design was used to collect data. A questionnaire was elaborated concerning integrative oncology therapies to be administered to all the national health system oncology centres or hospitals in each European country. These institutes were identified by convenience sampling, searching on oncology websites and forums. The official websites of these structures were analysed to obtain more information about their activities and contacts. Information was received from 123 (52.1 %) out of the 236 centres contacted until 31 December 2013. Forty-seven out of 99 responding centres meeting inclusion criteria (47.5 %) provided integrative oncology treatments, 24 from Italy and 23 from other European countries. The number of patients seen per year was on average 301.2 ± 337. Among the centres providing these kinds of therapies, 33 (70.2 %) use fixed protocols and 35 (74.5 %) use systems for the evaluation of results. Thirty-two centres (68.1 %) had research in progress or carried out until the deadline of the survey. The complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) more frequently provided to cancer patients were acupuncture 26 (55.3 %), homeopathy 19 (40.4 %), herbal medicine 18 (38.3 %) and traditional Chinese medicine 17 (36.2 %); anthroposophic medicine 10 (21.3 %); homotoxicology 6 (12.8 %); and other therapies 30 (63.8 %). Treatments are mainly directed to reduce adverse reactions to chemo-radiotherapy (23.9 %), in particular nausea and vomiting (13.4 %) and leucopenia (5 %). The CAMs were also used to reduce pain and fatigue (10.9

  2. Product development within the framework of a National Casting Technology Centre

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Du Preez, WB

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for a state of the art advanced National Casting Technology Centre (NCTC) has been widely supported throughout industry and recognised as an important facilitator in the growth of the foundry industry. This initiative also aligns itself...

  3. National data centres and other means of regional cooperation in Africa: prospects and benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masawi, L.

    2002-01-01

    Participation in regional cooperation by Bulawayo National Data Centre in Zimbabwe is noted. East and Southern Africa Working Group (ESAWORG) is given as an example of such cooperation. The coming of CTBT is expected to strengthen the said group together with regional cooperation. Expected new developments are listed

  4. Prevalence, risk factors and clinical implications of malnutrition in French Comprehensive Cancer Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressoir, M; Desné, S; Berchery, D; Rossignol, G; Poiree, B; Meslier, M; Traversier, S; Vittot, M; Simon, M; Gekiere, J P; Meuric, J; Serot, F; Falewee, M N; Rodrigues, I; Senesse, P; Vasson, M P; Chelle, F; Maget, B; Antoun, S; Bachmann, P

    2010-01-01

    Background: This epidemiological observational study aimed at determining the prevalence of malnutrition in non-selected adults with cancer, to identify risk factors of malnutrition and correlate the results with length of stay and 2-month mortality. Methods: This prospective multicentre 1-day study conducted in 17 French Comprehensive Cancer Centres included 1545 patients. Body mass index (BMI), weight loss (WL) in the past 6 months and age were routinely recorded according to the French national recommendations for hospitalised patients; malnutrition was rated as absent, moderate or severe according to the level of WL and BMI. Age, sex, tumour site, type of hospitalisation and treatment, disease stage, World Health Organisation performance status (PS) and antibiotic therapy were the potential malnutrition risk factors tested. Follow-up at 2 months allowed to determine the correlation with length of stay and mortality. Results: Malnutrition was reported in 30.9% of patients, and was rated as severe in 12.2%. In multivariate analysis, only pre-existing obesity (BMI⩾30), PS ⩾2 and head-and-neck or upper digestive cancers were associated with increased risk of malnutrition. Antibiotics use was significantly higher in malnourished patients (35.5 vs 22.8% Pmalnutrition was independently associated with mortality. The median length of stay was 19.3±19.4 days for malnourished patients vs 13.3±19.4 days for others (Pmalnutrition in our cancer patient population perhaps because of a misidentification or a delay in nutrition support in this category of patients. PMID:20160725

  5. Exploring the trend in referrals for consideration of CRS and HIPEC to understand the attitudes of clinicians in the development of a national cancer centre programme in peritoneal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weining; Tan, Grace Hwei Ching; Skanthakumar, Thakshayeni; Chia, Claramae Shulyn; Soo, Khee Chee; Teo, Melissa Ching Ching

    2017-10-30

    Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) improve survival in selected patients with peritoneal metastases. However, only some patients who are potentially eligible for the procedure are considered and referred to the appropriate surgical department. By studying the trends of patients being considered for CRS and HIPEC in our centre, we hope to better understand the demographics of our patient cohort and the attitudes of physicians involved towards CRS and HIPEC. Patients who were presented and discussed at our institution's multidisciplinary tumour board (MDTB) for consideration of CRS and HIPEC, between 5 January 2011 and 16 December 2015, were identified from the institutional database and included in the study. Patient demographics and clinico-pathological data were retrospectively collected from electronic records and clinical charts. A total of 407 patients were presented at the MDTB for consideration of CRS and HIPEC. Referrals were most commonly from oncology-related departments (65.8%, n = 268). This was followed by referrals from other hospitals (15.0%, n = 61), overseas self-referrals (12.0%, n = 49) and non-oncologic departments within the same institution (7.1%, n = 29). Referrals made by oncology-related departments and overseas self-referrals showed an increasing trend over the years. Of the patients discussed, 197 patients (48.4%) were recommended for CRS and HIPEC, and 134 (68.0%) successfully underwent the procedure. There is growing acceptance of CRS and HIPEC in patients and oncologic-related departments. However, consideration of this procedure as a treatment option remains low in non-oncologic departments. Dissemination of information and well-defined clinical recommendations may help physicians identify and select potentially eligible patients for consideration of CRS and HIPEC.

  6. Familial testicular cancer in a single-centre population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, DJA; Sleijfer, DT; Sijmons, RH; van der Graaf, WTA; Sluiter, WJ; Hoekstra, HJ; Schraffordt Koops, H.

    Familial occurrence of testicular cancer suggests a genetic predisposition to the disease. A genetic susceptibility may also be reflected by the occurrence of bilateral testicular neoplasms and the high rates of urogenital developmental anomalies in families prone to testicular cancer. In this

  7. National data centre preparedness exercise 2015 (NPE2015): MY-NDC progress result and experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Faisal Izwan Abdul; Zolkaffly, Muhammed Zulfakar

    2017-01-01

    Malaysia has established the National Data Centre (MY-NDC) in December 2005. MY-NDC is tasked to perform the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty (CTBT) data management as well as providing relevant information for Treaty related events to the Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) as the CTBT National Authority. In the late 2015, MY-NDC has participated in the National Data Centre Preparedness Exercise 2015 (NPE 2015) which aims to access the level of readiness at MY-NDC. This paper aims at presenting the progress result of NPE 2015 as well as highlighting MY-NDC experience in NPE 2015 compared to previous participation in NPE 2013. MY-NDC has utilised available resources for NPE 2015. In NPE 2015, MY-NDC has performed five type of analyses compared with only two analyses in NPE 2013. Participation in the NPE 2015 has enabled MY-NDC to assess its capability and identify rooms for improvement.

  8. Location | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research campus is located 50 miles northwest of Washington, D.C., and 50 miles west of Baltimore, Maryland, in Frederick, Maryland. Satellite locations include leased and government facilities extending s

  9. Bico 2: second national intercomparison campaign of WBC centres working in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, C.M.; Battisti, P.; Tarroni, G.

    1998-01-01

    During the period November 1994 - May 1995 the coordinating group of WBC centres working in Italy organised the 2. national intercalibration and intercomparison campaign. A BOMAB phantom was used filled with four radionuclides gel solution with gamma energy emissions ranging between 100 keV and 2 MeV. 17 out of 21 Italian WBC centres took part in the campaign. Through the intercalibration, organised according to internationally accepted methodologies, each WBC centre could check its own calibration procedures. many intermediate data, collected for the methodologies and measurement procedures intercomparison, permitted analyses and comparison of uncertainly causes in a WBC measurement of the internal contamination. A proposal of MDA definition and assessment procedure resulted from the intercomparison campaign [it

  10. Cervical cancer screening in women referred to healthcare centres in Tabriz, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshbaf-Khalili, Azizeh; Salehi-Pourmehr, Hanieh; Shahnazi, Mahnaz; Yaghoubi, Sina; Gahremani-Nasab, Parvaneh

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among Iranian women and among the few cancers that could be easily diagnosed in the pre-malignant stage. We aimed to assess the status of cervical cancer screening in women referred to health care centres in Tabriz, northwest Iran. This descriptive-analytical study was done on 441 women referred to health care centres of Tabriz, northwest Iran. The centres were selected using the multi-stage cluster sampling method. The participants were selected from the active records of those centres. A questionnaire regarding the socio-demographic characteristics and cervical cancer screening and reasons for referring or not referring for screening was completed by the participants A P marriage or having sexual intercourse at a young age, history of obvious cervical infection, cautery, cryotherapy or repeated curettage), age and type of family planning] in screening was controlled. Suitable and continuous educational programmes especially for high risk women should be implemented through the health care services. Preparing educational brochures and pamphlets and providing adequate training on the necessity of early referral and marriage counseling could also be effective in improving woman's awareness and performance.

  11. Second Malignant Neoplasms in Childhood Cancer Survivors Treated in a Tertiary Paediatric Oncology Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jia Wei; Yeap, Frances Sh; Chan, Yiong Huak; Yeoh, Allen Ej; Quah, Thuan Chong; Tan, Poh Lin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction : One of the most feared complications of childhood cancer treatment is second malignant neoplasms (SMNs). This study evaluates the incidence, risk factors and outcomes of SMNs in a tertiary paediatric oncology centre in Singapore. Materials and Methods : A retrospective review was conducted on patients diagnosed with childhood cancer under age 21 and treated at the National University Hospital, Singapore, from January 1990 to 15 April 2012. Case records of patients with SMNs were reviewed. Results : We identified 1124 cases of childhood cancers with a median follow-up of 3.49 (0 to 24.06) years. The most common primary malignancies were leukaemia (47.1%), central nervous system tumours (11.7%) and lymphoma (9.8%). Fifteen cases developed SMNs, most commonly acute myeloid leukaemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 7). Median interval between the first and second malignancy was 3.41 (0.24 to 18.30) years. Overall 20-year cumulative incidence of SMNs was 5.3% (95% CI, 0.2% to 10.4%). The 15-year cumulative incidence of SMNs following acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was 4.4% (95% CI, 0% to 8.9%), significantly lower than the risk after osteosarcoma of 14.2% (95% CI, 0.7% to 27.7%) within 5 years ( P <0.0005). Overall 5-year survival for SMNs was lower than that of primary malignancies. Conclusion : This study identified factors explaining the epidemiology of SMNs described, and found topoisomerase II inhibitor use to be a likely risk factor in our cohort. Modifications have already been made to our existing therapeutic protocols in osteosarcoma treatment. We also recognised the importance of other risk management strategies, including regular long-term surveillance and early intervention for detected SMNs, to improve outcomes of high risk patients.

  12. Molecular image in biomedical research. Molecular imaging unit of the National Cancer Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Bruzon, J.; Mulero Anhiorte, F.

    2010-01-01

    This article has two basic objectives. firstly, it will review briefly the most important imaging techniques used in biomedical research indicting the most significant aspects related to their application in the preclinical stage. Secondly, it will present a practical application of these techniques in a pure biomedical research centre (not associated to a clinical facility). Practical aspects such as organisation, equipment, work norms, shielding of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) Imaging Unit will be shown. This is a pioneering facility in the application of these techniques in research centres without any dependence or any direct relationship with other hospital Nuclear Medicine services. (Author) 7 refs.

  13. 76 FR 14675 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ...-7565, [email protected] . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Molecular... Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  14. 75 FR 5092 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    ... . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Quantitative Cell-Based Imaging....396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  15. 78 FR 50068 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Strategic Plan; Proposed Organizational Change: Division..., Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis... Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS...

  16. Laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy: experience of a Gynaecological Cancer Centre in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanjgaokar, Vrunda C; Wright, Jeremy T; Murphy, Damian J; Mann, Christopher H

    2012-04-01

    The role of laparoscopic lymphadenectomy in the management of gynaecological cancers has been established over the last two decades, having been first described in Dargent and Selvat (L'envahissement ganglionnaire pelvin. Medsi-Mcgraw Hill, Paris, 1989). It has been shown that laparoscopic lymphadenectomy can be performed in the majority of patients and is associated with a low complication rate. However, the technique continues to be undertaken in only a relatively small number of Gynaecological Cancer Centres in the UK owing to the long learning curve and wide variations in training. At the Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust Gynaecological Cancer Centre in the Greater Midlands Cancer Network laparoscopic lymphadenectomy has been performed since 1999 in the management of early cervical and high grade endometrial cancers. We have undertaken a retrospective audit (1999-2009) of these 42 cases to assess the feasibility of the procedure as well as to assess the complication rate. We are presenting the first reported series of exclusive laparoscopic transperitoneal lymphadenectomies from a Gynaecological Cancer Centre in the UK.

  17. Introduction of the national centre for research and application of renewable energy sources

    OpenAIRE

    Smitkova, Miroslava; Eleschova, Zaneta; Hajducek, Peter; Janicek, Frantisek; Minovski, Dragan; Sarac, Vasilija

    2011-01-01

    Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava acquired financial support from the European Fund for Regional Development for the establishment of the National Centre for Research and Application of Renewable Energy Sources in the framework of the “Operation Program Research and Development”. Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (STU) is a research oriented university contributing to the development and spreading of scientific knowledge. Paper deals with the presentation o...

  18. Cancer Research UK | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cancer Research UK. https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/. Initiative de recherche sur la dimension économique de la lutte antitabac. L'Initiative de recherche sur la dimension économique de la lutte antitabac finance la recherche novatrice sur les politiques fiscales qui appuient la lutte antitabac dans les pays à faible revenu ...

  19. Is the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre (MSKCC) sarcoma nomogram useful in an Asian population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Deanna Wan Jie; Tan, Grace Hwei Ching; Chia, Claramae Shulyn; Lim, Cindy Xindi; Chee, Soo Khee; Quek, Richard Hong Hui; Farid, Mohamad; Teo, Melissa Ching Ching

    2017-10-01

    A nomogram for prediction of 12-year sarcoma-specific survival has been developed based on patients with soft tissue sarcomas treated in Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Centre (MSKCC). We aim to evaluate the predictive accuracy of the MSKCC sarcoma nomogram in a cohort of patients treated at an Asian institution. This has not been validated in an Asian population and thus its universal applicability remains unproven. Between 1990 and 2013, 840 adult patients underwent treatment for primary soft tissue sarcoma (STS) at the National Cancer Centre Singapore. Patients who presented with locally recurrent or metastatic disease were excluded from the analysis. The variables included in the MSKCC nomogram included age at diagnosis, tumor size, histologic grade, histologic subtype, depth and site. A total of 399 patients were left for analysis. The nomogram was validated by assessing its extent of discrimination and level of calibration. All patients had deep tumors. Disease occurred most commonly in the lower extremity (n = 149 [37.3%]), the most common histologic subtype was "Others" (angiosarcoma, ewing's sarcoma, endometrial stromal sarcoma, sarcoma NOS [not otherwise specified] and rhabdomyosarcoma). Sixty-four percent of all patients had high-grade tumors while 36% had low-grade tumors. The median patient age at diagnosis was 54 years (range: 17-88 years). The median follow up time for all patients and surviving patients were 29 (range: 1-174) and 33 (range: 1-157) months, respectively. The observed 5- and 10-year sarcoma-specific survival were 55% and 33%, respectively. The concordance index was 0.71. For level of calibration, the observed correspondence between predicted and actual outcomes suggest that the MSKCC nomogram generally predicts well for patients with higher survival probability, but consistently overpredicts survival for the other groups, in our cohort of patients. The MSKCC sarcoma nomogram was found to be accurate in terms of extent of discrimination

  20. France: National INIS Centre: New Directions and Main Achievements in an Evolving Context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surmont, Jérôme; Mouffron, Odile

    2015-01-01

    In a letter dated October 8, 1969 and addressed to the Director General of the IAEA, the French Governor of the IAEA Board of Governors gave his official consent for France to participate in the newborn INIS. At the same time, it was decided to establish the France National INIS Centre at the premises of the Central Documentation Department, located at the Saclay Nuclear Research Centre (French Atomic Energy Commission - CEA), near Paris. Forty-five years later, the Central Documentation has become the “Information Valorization Service” (SVI in French) which incorporates INIS, the CEA-Saclay Scientific Library and several other scientific and technical information-related activities (archives, scientific watch, collaborative work, bibliometric surveys, etc.). This brief look back over the last 20 years of the France National INIS Centre allows us to measure how far we have come and what choices we have had to make in a constantly evolving context. We have particularly stressed what, in our view, represents the most important mission of INIS, which is the preservation and dissemination of nuclear knowledge, in particular through the coverage and full text archiving of conferences and grey literature documents, with special attention paid to PhD Theses

  1. Engaging nurses in genetics: the strategic approach of the NHS National Genetics Education and Development Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Maggie; Tonkin, Emma; Burke, Sarah

    2008-04-01

    The UK government announced the establishment of an NHS National Genetics Education and Development Centre in its Genetics White Paper. The Centre aims to lead and coordinate developments to enhance genetics literacy of health professionals. The nursing program takes a strategic approach based on Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior, using the UK nursing genetics competences as the platform for development. The program team uses innovative approaches to raise awareness of the relevance of genetics, working collaboratively with policy stakeholders, as key agents of change in promoting competence. Providing practical help in preparing learning and teaching resources lends further encouragement. Evaluation of the program is dependent on gathering baseline data, and the program has been informed by an education needs analysis. The challenges faced are substantial and necessitate international collaboration where expertise and resources can be shared to produce a global system of influence to facilitate the engagement of non-genetic nurses.

  2. Bibliometric analyses of publications from Centres of Excellence funded by the Danish National Research Foundation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Jesper Wiborg; Costas, Rodrigo; Henriksen, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    research. The main focus of the evaluation is on the Centre of Excellence (CoE) scheme and the impact it has had on the Danish research system. The key topics addressed are the role of the DNRF in the Danish research funding system, research quality, research training and recruitment, internationalisation......, the interaction with host institutions, and the governance and management of the DNRF. The evaluation concludes that the DNRF has had a very positive impact on the quality of research in Denmark and recommends that the foundation is re-funded. The evaluation is based on a bibliometric study, self......-assessment report by DNRF, numerous interviews and desk studies. Appendix 5: Bibliometric analyses of publications from Centres of Excellence funded by the Danish National Research Foundation...

  3. Changing epidemiology of AA amyloidosis: clinical observations over 25 years at a single national referral centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Thirusha; Pinney, Jennifer H; Gilbertson, Janet A; Hutt, David F; Rowczenio, Dorota M; Mahmood, Shameem; Sachchithanantham, Sajitha; Fontana, Marianna; Youngstein, Taryn; Quarta, Candida C; Wechalekar, Ashutosh D; Gillmore, Julian D; Hawkins, Philip N; Lachmann, Helen J

    2017-09-01

    Systemic AA amyloidosis is a serious complication of chronic inflammation; however, there are relatively few published data on its incidence. We investigated the changing epidemiology of AA amyloidosis over a 25-year period at a single national referral centre. We conducted a retrospective study of all patients diagnosed with AA amyloidosis who had attended the centre between 1990 and 2014 inclusive. Six hundred and twenty-five patients were studied in three cohorts: C1: 1990-1997; C2: 1998-2006; C3: 2007-2014. Mean age at presentation increased from 46 in C1 to 56 in C3 (p AA amyloidosis over a quarter of a century, reflecting advances in therapeutics and overall management of complex chronic disease in an ageing population. AA amyloidosis of uncertain aetiology presents an emerging major problem. Newer techniques such as next-generation sequencing may aid diagnosis and effective treatment, thereby improving overall survival.

  4. Database INIS and up-grade of the INIS National Centre of the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.; Rajec, P.

    2008-01-01

    Authors deals with the history, present and future of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). The INIS is the world leading information system on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The INIS is operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in collaboration with 119 Member States and 23 co-operating international organisations. In the INIS database there are about 3.0 million items and among them 700 000 non-conventional literature (scientific reports, dissertations, brochures and patents). The INIS databases can be obtained from Local INIS centre, trough Internet and by prescription. In the second part the operation and history of the INIS National Centre of the Slovak Republic as well as up-grade of its HW and SW are presented. (authors)

  5. National and international guidelines for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liv Bjerre Juul; Wille-Jørgensen, P

    2014-01-01

    , this might not be the case between guidelines. No formal evaluation of the contrasting guidance has been reported. METHOD: A systematic search for national and international guidelines on rectal cancer was performed. Eleven guidelines were identified for further analysis. RESULTS: There was no consensus...... concerning the definition of rectal cancer. Ten of the 11 guidelines use the TNM staging system and there was general agreement regarding the recommendation of MRI and CT in rectal cancer. There was consensus concerning a multidisciplinary approach, preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and total mesorectal...

  6. 75 FR 62297 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ... National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A.... During National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we reaffirm our commitment to supporting breast cancer... coverage for a pre-existing condition or charged higher premiums. During National Breast Cancer Awareness...

  7. 76 FR 9353 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ....gov . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Molecular Pharmacodynamic... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  8. 78 FR 30933 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    ... Emphasis Panel; Validation and Advanced Development of Emerging Molecular Analysis Technologies for Cancer..., Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  9. 75 FR 14172 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Nucleic Acid Analysis for the Molecular Characterization of... Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  10. 77 FR 19674 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies for Cancer (R21). Date: June 26... Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  11. 76 FR 52960 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... Emphasis Panel, Mechanisms of Cell Signaling in Cancer. Date: October 13-14, 2011. Time: 3 to 5 p.m. Agenda..., Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  12. 'Smashed by the National Health'? A Closer Look at the Demise of the Pioneer Health Centre, Peckham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conford, Philip

    2016-04-01

    The Pioneer Health Centre, based in South London before and after the Second World War, remains a source of interest for advocates of a positive approach to health promotion in contrast with the treatment of those already ill. Its closure in 1950 for lack of funds has been blamed on the then recently established National Health Service, but this article argues that such an explanation is over-simplified and ignores a number of other factors. The Centre had struggled financially during the 1930s and tried to gain support from the Medical Research Council. The Council appeared interested in the Centre before the war, but was less sympathetic in the 1940s. Around the time of its closure and afterwards, the Centre was also involved in negotiations with London County Council; these failed because the Centre's directors would not accept the changes which the Council would have needed to make. Unpublished documents reveal that the Centre's directors were uncompromising and that their approach to the situation antagonised their colleagues. Changes in medical science also worked against the Centre. The success of sulphonamide drugs appeared to render preventive medicine less significant, while the development of statistical techniques cast doubt on the Centre's experimental methods. The Centre was at the heart of the nascent organic farming movement, which opposed the rapid growth of chemical cultivation. But what might be termed 'chemical triumphalism' was on the march in both medicine and agriculture, and the Centre was out of tune with the mood of the times.

  13. Lessons learned implementing a province-wide smoking cessation initiative in Ontario's cancer centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W K; Truscott, R; Cameron, E; Peter, A; Reid, R; Selby, P; Smith, P; Hey, A

    2017-06-01

    A large body of evidence clearly shows that cancer patients experience significant health benefits with smoking cessation. Cancer Care Ontario, the provincial agency responsible for the quality of cancer services in Ontario, has undertaken a province-wide smoking cessation initiative. The strategies used, the results achieved, and the lessons learned are the subject of the present article. Evidence related to the health benefits of smoking cessation in cancer patients was reviewed. A steering committee developed a vision statement for the initiative, created a framework for implementation, and made recommendations for the key elements of the initiative and for smoking cessation best practices. New ambulatory cancer patients are being screened for their smoking status in each of Ontario's 14 regional cancer centres. Current or recent smokers are advised of the benefits of cessation and are directed to smoking cessation resources as appropriate. Performance metrics are captured and used to drive improvement through quarterly performance reviews and provincial rankings of the regional cancer centres. Regional smoking cessation champions, commitment from Cancer Care Ontario senior leadership, a provincial secretariat, and guidance from smoking cessation experts have been important enablers of early success. Data capture has been difficult because of the variety of information systems in use and non-standardized administrative and clinical processes. Numerous challenges remain, including increasing physician engagement; obtaining funding for key program elements, including in-house resources to support smoking cessation; and overcoming financial barriers to access nicotine replacement therapy. Future efforts will focus on standardizing processes to the extent possible, while tailoring the approaches to the populations served and the resources available within the individual regional cancer programs.

  14. The National Centre of Systems Reliability and some aspects of its future activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourne, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The National Centre of Systems Reliability (NCSR) has been set up to enhance the work of the Systems Reliability Service (SRS), which during its four years of operation by the UKAEA has offered to industry expertise in the quantification of reliability of systems in various technological applications. An outline is presented of the background to the establishment of the NCSR, including a brief summary of the work of the SRS. Certain aspects of the future activities of the NCSR particularly in relation to research and collaboration with universities are discussed. (U.K.)

  15. Wind Resource Assessment – Østerild National Test Centre for Large Wind Turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Brian Ohrbeck; Courtney, Michael; Mortensen, Niels Gylling

    2014-01-01

    This report presents a wind resource assessment for the seven test stands at the Østerild National Test Centre for Large Wind Turbines in Denmark. Calculations have been carried out mainly using wind data from three on-site wind lidars. The generalized wind climates applied in the wind resource calculations for the seven test stands are based on correlations between a short period of on-site wind data from the wind lidars with a long-term reference. The wind resource assessment for the seven ...

  16. Breast cancer scenario in a regional cancer centre in Eastern India over eight years--still a major public health problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Karabi; Choudhuri, Maitrayee; Guha, Subhas; Biswas, Jaydip

    2012-01-01

    In spite of screening and early diagnostic tests, the upward trend of breast cancer has become a matter of great concern in both developed and developing countries. The data collected by Population Based Cancer Registry in Chittaranjan National Cancer Institute, a regional cancer centre in Kolkata, from 1997 to 2004 gives an insight about the scenario of breast cancer in this part of Eastern India. The total no of female breast cancer cases were steadily increasing from 1997 to 2001 and only slightly lower from 2002 to 2004. and majority were in the 40-49 year old age group during this period. The next most commonly affected age group was 50-59 years. Regarding the distribution according to treatment, the main modality was surgery and radiotherapy followed by combined surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy and then combined surgery and chemotherapy. The commonest type was ductal followed by lobular cancer. In this eight year study in CNCI, status of patients on last day of the respective year was assessed. Number of patients alive was 43.5% in 1997. The percentage gradually increased up to 2000 and then gradually decreased to 47.4% in 2004. Also with every passing year, percentage mortality gradually decreased from 25.7% in 1997 to 16.8% in 2004. Better pattern of care (diagnosis and treatment) was reflected in this picture. However, lost to follow up, which also implies non compliance to treatment, increased to 30.8% in 1997 to 35.8% in 2004. Due to the small number of male breast cancers, only female cases were considered. In conclusion, breast cancer continues to be a major problem in Kolkata, India.

  17. Poster - 26: Electronic Waiting Room Management for a busy Cancer Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kildea, John; Hijal, Tarek [McGill University Health Center (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    We describe an electronic waiting room management system that we have developed and deployed in our cancer centre. Our system connects with our electronic medical records systems, gathers data for a machine learning algorithm to predict future patient waiting times, and is integrated with a mobile phone app. The system has been in operation for over nine months and has led to reduced lines, calmer waiting rooms and overwhelming patient and staff satisfaction.

  18. Poster - 26: Electronic Waiting Room Management for a busy Cancer Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kildea, John; Hijal, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    We describe an electronic waiting room management system that we have developed and deployed in our cancer centre. Our system connects with our electronic medical records systems, gathers data for a machine learning algorithm to predict future patient waiting times, and is integrated with a mobile phone app. The system has been in operation for over nine months and has led to reduced lines, calmer waiting rooms and overwhelming patient and staff satisfaction.

  19. In 2011 Valencia will house the first Spanish centre for the treatment of cancer with protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobalina, B.

    2008-01-01

    The most advanced countries are beginning to apply a new type of radiotherapy, more powerful and specific than that currently in use, based on the use of protons. The first Spanish centre to be equipped with a complex facility of this type will be the Valencian Institute of Medical Physics, which will be able to treat 2,000 patients a year. This radiotherapy technique is especially suitable for the treatment of cancers in children and cerebral and ocular cancers, which affect some 8,000 patients a year in Spain. (Author)

  20. Classification of a palliative care population in a comprehensive cancer centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benthien, K.S; Nordly, M.; Videbæk, K.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purposes of the present study were to classify the palliative care population (PCP) in a comprehensive cancer centre by using information on antineoplastic treatment options and to analyse associations between socio-demographic factors, cancer diagnoses, treatment characteristics...... and receiving specialist palliative care (SPC). METHODS: This is a cross-sectional screening study of patients with cancer in the Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital for 6 months. Patients were assessed to be included in the DOMUS study: a randomised controlled trial...... of accelerated transition to SPC at home (NCT01885637). The PCP was classified as patients with incurable cancer and limited or no antineoplastic treatment options. Patients with performance status 2-4 were further classified as the essential palliative care population (EPCP). RESULTS: During the study period...

  1. Radiobiological and PK assays at advance Centre for Training Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastri, Goda Jayant; Gota, Vikram

    2014-01-01

    Radiobiological, pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies are of paramount importance for drug development and more so in the development of newer radiation modulators. Radiobiological studies have now graduated from simple cell survival and viability assays to more complex molecular and imaging studies to study radiation modulation both in in-vitro and in-vivo models. Tata Memorial Centre and its research centre (ACTREC) is a premiere cancer centre in India dedicated to cancer research. The Department of Radiation Oncology treats approximately 7000 new patients in a year and is uniquely placed to do both translational radiation and clinical research in the field of drug development. The Clinical Biology Lab of the Department of Radiation Oncology at ACTREC in collaboration with other labs at ACTREC has standardized cell survival assays, DNA damage assays such as Gamma H2AX assay (by flow as well as confocal microscopy), Micronuclei assay and COMET assays using CASP software for quantification. We have also done apoptotic assays. These assays have been conducted for development newer drug formulations (for e.g liposomal radiosensitizers). We also have a strong imaging division having sophisticated microscopes (confocal and single molecule super resolution microscopes) for in-vitro optical imaging and a dedicated preclinical PET/CT/SPECT for in-vivo imaging. The clinical 3T MRI and PET/CT is being used to study the effect of hypoxia in various cancers

  2. Introduction of the colorectal cancer screening program: results from a single centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Nina C A; Bahadoer, Renu R; Bastiaannet, Esther; Holman, Fabian A; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, Elma; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Peeters, Koen C M J

    2018-06-19

    In 2014, a national colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program was launched in the Netherlands. It is difficult to assess for the individual CRC patient whether the oncological benefits of surgery will outweigh the morbidity of the procedure, especially in early lesions. This study compares patient and tumour characteristics between screen-detected and non-screen-detected patients. Secondly, we present an overview of treatment options and clinical dilemmas when treating patients with early stage colorectal disease. Between January 2014 and December 2016, all patients with non-malignant polyps or CRC who were referred to the Department of Surgery of the Leiden University Medical Centre in the Netherlands were included. Baseline characteristics, type of treatment and short-term outcomes of patients with screen-detected and non-screen-detected colorectal tumours were compared. A total of 426 patients were included, of whom 240 (56.3%) were identified by screening. Non-screen-detected patients more often had comorbidity (p=0.03), the primary tumour was more often located in the rectum (p=0.001) and there was a higher rate of metastatic disease (p<0.001). Among 354 surgically treated patients, postoperative adverse events did not significantly differ between the two groups (p=0.38). Of 46 patients with T1 CRC in the endoscopic resection specimen, 23 underwent surgical resection of which only 30.4% had residual invasive disease at colectomy. Despite differences in comorbidity and stage, surgical outcome of patients with screen-detected tumours compared to non-screen-detected tumours was not significantly different. Considering its limited oncological benefits as well as the rate of adverse events, surgery for non-malignant polyps and T1 CRC should be considered carefully. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. 78 FR 57400 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    ... Organizational Engagement; and Proposed Organizational Change: Division of Extramural Activities. Place: National....396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399...

  4. 76 FR 31619 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SBIR Phase IIB...: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: National Institutes of Health, 6116 Executive...

  5. 78 FR 54745 - National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A... Cancer Awareness Month, we remember those lost to prostate cancer, offer our support to patients and... the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 2013 as National Prostate Cancer Awareness...

  6. 75 FR 54451 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A... claim more lives than any other gynecologic cancer. During National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, we... and other cancers. Across the Federal Government, we are working to promote awareness of ovarian...

  7. 78 FR 28235 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... Basal- like Breast Cancer. Date: June 13, 2013. Time: 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  8. 77 FR 33476 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Biopsy Instruments and Devices That Preserve Molecular Profiles... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  9. 78 FR 61805 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-04

    ... National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A... from it. As we observe National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we salute the women and men who dedicate... October 2013 as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. I encourage citizens, government agencies, private...

  10. 77 FR 55099 - National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A... thousands of lives every year. During National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, we remember those we have... their lifetimes. As we mark National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, let us support the families who...

  11. 78 FR 54741 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A... of women will die of this disease. During National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, we lend our... of the United States, do hereby proclaim September 2013 as National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month. I...

  12. 77 FR 60605 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A... their lives to the disease. During National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we honor those we have lost... of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 2012 as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. I...

  13. Role of the National Cancer Institute in the National Cancer Program on environmental carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flamm, W.G.

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: the need for the National Cancer Institute to coordinate all cancer-related activities at the federal level and the desirability of programming so as to exploit the best opportunities for alleviating the mortality, morbidity, and incidence of cancer in the United States; need for assessing opportunities for prevention of environmental carcinogenesis; creation of the Smoking and Health Program in the NCI; development of cancer atlases from a nationwide survey; and role of the NCI with respect to waterborne carcinogens. (HLW)

  14. Automation and Networking of Public Libraries in India Using the E-Granthalaya Software from the National Informatics Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoria, Ram Kumar; Upadhyay, P. K.; Moni, Madaswamy

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the development of the library management system, e-Granthalaya, for public libraries in India. This is an initiative of the Indian government's National Informatics Centre (NIC). The paper outlines the challenges and the potential of a full-scale deployment of this software at a national level. Design/methodology/approach:…

  15. Action plan for the comprehensive nuclear-test-ban treaty (CTBT) Malaysian National Data Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashillah Baharuddin; Alawiah Musa; Roslan Mohd Ali

    2007-01-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is a keystone of the international regime on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and an essential basis for the pursuit of nuclear disarmament. Its total ban of any nuclear weapon test explosion moreover will restrict the development and qualitative improvement of nuclear weapons and end the development of advanced new types of these weapons. One of the key features of this treaty is the development of an International Monitoring System (IMS) to detect any nuclear weapon test. The IMS comprises a network of 321 monitoring stations and 16 radionuclide laboratories that monitor the Earth for evidence of nuclear explosions. It uses four verification methods, including seismic, hydroacoustic and infrasound, in addition to radionuclide monitoring of the underground, underwater and atmosphere environments, respectively, whereas, radionuclide monitoring can detect radioactive debris vented from atmospheric, underground or underwater nuclear explosions. Malaysia signed the CTBT on 23 July 1998, and is currently in the process of drafting a national CTBT Act to facilitate ratification. As provided for under the Treaty, one of the radionuclide-monitoring stations (Rain) under the IMS will be located in Malaysia. The station is under the responsibility of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency, as the National Authority for the CTBT. The operation of the IMS is supported by an International Data Centre (IDC) CTBT, which is based at the headquarters of the Preparatory Commission for the CTBT Organization (CTBTO) in Vienna. To facilitate the acquisition of data from the IMS for the purposes of verifying compliance with the Treaty in general, and to enable Malaysia to benefit from the scientific applications of the data obtainable from the IDC, a CTBT National Data Centre (NDC) is the process of being established in Malaysia , which is targeted to be fully operational by the third quarter of 2007. (Author)

  16. Quality of life and symptoms in patients with malignant diseases admitted to a comprehensive cancer centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömgren, Lene Annette Sand; Niemann, Carsten Utoft; Tange, Ulla Brix

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Quality of life and symptomatology in patients with malignancies admitted to comprehensive cancer centres are rarely investigated. Thus, this study aimed to investigate symptomatology and health-related quality of life of inpatients with cancer. METHODS: A prospective, cross......-sample test, rank tests and Fisher's exact test. RESULTS: One hundred twenty-four patients were analysed, mean age = 59 years (SD = 13.7), 42 % admitted to haematological department; lung cancer was the most frequent diagnosis (15 %). Low health-related quality of life and severe symptom burden, especially...... in oncology patients (P = 0.0194 and 0.0064, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Patients in the wards of haematology and oncology had pronounced symptomatology and low quality of life. A more systematic focus on the amelioration of problems with functioning and symptoms among inpatients with malignant diseases...

  17. 77 FR 4052 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, NCI SPORE in Breast, Endometrial, and... Special Emphasis Panel, The Role of Microbial Metabolites in Cancer Prevention and Etiology. Date: March..., Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer...

  18. 75 FR 20370 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ... Special Emphasis Panel, Breast Cancer Biology. Date: May 20, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To..., [email protected] . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Molecular... Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control...

  19. 78 FR 55750 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... Innovative Molecular Analysis Technology Development for Cancer Research (R21). Date: October 24, 2013. Time...: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Integrative Cancer Biology. Date: October 29, 2013. Time... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  20. A Single Centre Retrospective Evaluation of Laparoscopic Rectal Resection with TME for Rectal Cancer: 5-Year Cancer-Specific Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Quarati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic colon resection has established its role as a minimally invasive approach to colorectal diseases. Better long-term survival rate is suggested to be achievable with this approach in colon cancer patients, whereas some doubts were raised about its safety in rectal cancer. Here we report on our single centre experience of rectal laparoscopic resections for cancer focusing on short- and long-term oncological outcomes. In the last 13 years, 248 patients underwent minimally invasive approach for rectal cancer at our centre. We focused on 99 stage I, II, and III patients with a minimum follow-up period of 5 years. Of them 43 had a middle and 56 lower rectal tumor. Laparoscopic anterior rectal resection was performed in 71 patients whereas laparoscopic abdomino-perineal resection in 28. The overall mortality rate was 1%; the overall morbidity rate was 29%. The 5-year disease-free survival rate was 69.7%, The 5-year overall survival rate was 78.8%.

  1. Database INIS and INIS National Centre of the Slovak Republic. Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.

    2007-01-01

    Author in this paper deals with the history, present and future of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). The INIS is the world leading information system on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The INIS is operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in collaboration with 117 Member States and 23 co-operating international organisations. The collection of inputs and the dissemination of outputs to users are decentralised. Data processing and output production are centralised in the INIS Secretariat. This is very comprehensive coverage and effective method of handling information on different languages. In the INIS database there are more than 2.8 million items and among them 700 000 non-conventional literature (scientific reports, dissertations, brochures and patents). The INIS databases can be obtained from Local INIS centre, trough Internet and by prescription. In this paper in detail the information that can be obtained from INIS database and how that can be done in Slovakia is discussed. The second part deals with the work and history of the INIS National Centre of the Slovak Republic (author)

  2. Ethnic Variations in Gastric cancer in a tertiary care centre of Sikkim in North-East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamtha, Sangey Chhophel; Tripathi, Manish Kumar; Bhutia, Karma Doma; Karthak, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of gastric cancer is multifactorial. Marked differences in the incidence of gastric cancer among different ethnic groups living in the same geographical area have been observed. This study looked at ethnic and dietary factors in patients with gastric cancer diagnosed at a tertiary referral centre in Sikkim over a period of one year. Patients of 60 years and above were included in the study and divided into four ethnic groups : Bhutias, Lepchas, Rais and other groups. 211 cases underwent upper GI endoscopy and 32 were diagnosed to have gastric cancer. Gastric cancer incidence was highest in Bhutia ethnic group. A trend towards higher intake of smoked meats, fermented vegetables, salt tea, and H.pylori positivity in the Bhutia ethnic group was associated with higher incidence of gastric cancer as compared to other ethnic groups. The study with a referral centre bias showed that Bhutia ethnic group had a higher incidence of gastric cancer as compared to other ethnic groups.

  3. Mental disorders in cancer patients: observations at a tertiary care centre in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.; Syed, G.M.S.; Siddiqui, K.S.

    2002-01-01

    To study the frequencies of metal disorders among adult cancer patients in relation to their age, gender, marital status and type of malignancy. Socio-demographic characteristics and cancer diagnoses were recorded on a data capture form. diagnoses of metal disorders were made on the basis of diagnostic and statistical manual (DSM-IV) fourth edition. Shuakat Khanum Memorial Hospital and Research Centre. Two hundred and twenty newly diagnosed cancer patients were interviewed by a clinical psychologist before commencing any cancer treatment. Diagnosis of any metal disorder was transcribed using DSM-IV criteria and data thus collected were analyzed using SPSS for Windows. Observed frequencies of various metal disorders were compared with respect to patient's age, gender, martial status and type of cancer. Sixty five percent patients presented with various mental disorder. Adjusting disorders and mood disorders accounted for 34% each, while anxiety disorder was seen in 30% and remaining had delirium and somatoform disorders. Mental disorders were more common in males, and in younger age group. The oncologist and physicians treating cancer patients should carefully evaluate their patients for symptom of associated mental disorder and provide the required clinical support. (author)

  4. Risk factors for prostate cancer in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subahir, Mohd Nizam; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Zainuddin, Zulkifli Md

    2009-01-01

    In Malaysia, prostate cancer is ranked 6th among male cancer and expected to increase in the future. Several factors have shown to be related to prostate cancer such as sociodemographic, lifestyle, diet, occupational exposure, medical and health status. This is the first time a similar study was conducted in Malaysia to recognize the risk factors for prostate cancer patients who came for treatment at University Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC). Prostate cancer cases diagnosed between 2003 and 2008 which met with the inclusion criteria were included in the study. One hundred and twelfth (112) pairs of cases and controls matched by age and ethnicity were analysed. McNemar Odds Ratios (OR(M)) were calculated using McNemar Calculator software for univariate analysis while conditional logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis, both using SPSS version 12.0. Most of the prostate cancer patients (68.8%) that came for treatment in UKMMC were above 70 years old. The majority were Chinese (50.0%) followed by Malay (46.4%) and Indian (3.6%). Multivariate analysis showed cases were more likely to have a first-degree relative with a history of cancer (OR= 3.77, 95% CI= 1.19-11.85), to have been exposed to pesticides (OR= 5.57, 95% CI= 1.75-17.78) and consumed more meat (OR= 12.23, 95% CI= 3.89-39.01). Significantly reduced risks of prostate cancer were noted among those consuming more vegetables (OR= 0.12, 95% CI= 0.02-0.84), more tomatoes (OR= 0.35, 95% CI= 0.13-0.93) and those who had frequent sexual intercourse (OR= 0.44, 95% CI= 0.19-0.96). Some lifestyle and occupation factors are strong predictors of the occurrence of prostate cancer among patients in UKMMC. More importantly, with the identification of the potentially modifiable risk factors, proper public health intervention can be improved.

  5. The epidemiology and type of medication errors reported to the National Poisons Information Centre of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Nicola; Duggan, Edel; Williams, David J P; Tracey, Joseph A

    2011-07-01

    Medication errors are widely reported for hospitalised patients, but limited data are available for medication errors that occur in community-based and clinical settings. Epidemiological data from poisons information centres enable characterisation of trends in medication errors occurring across the healthcare spectrum. The objective of this study was to characterise the epidemiology and type of medication errors reported to the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC) of Ireland. A 3-year prospective study on medication errors reported to the NPIC was conducted from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2009 inclusive. Data on patient demographics, enquiry source, location, pharmaceutical agent(s), type of medication error, and treatment advice were collated from standardised call report forms. Medication errors were categorised as (i) prescribing error (i.e. physician error), (ii) dispensing error (i.e. pharmacy error), and (iii) administration error involving the wrong medication, the wrong dose, wrong route, or the wrong time. Medication errors were reported for 2348 individuals, representing 9.56% of total enquiries to the NPIC over 3 years. In total, 1220 children and adolescents under 18 years of age and 1128 adults (≥ 18 years old) experienced a medication error. The majority of enquiries were received from healthcare professionals, but members of the public accounted for 31.3% (n = 736) of enquiries. Most medication errors occurred in a domestic setting (n = 2135), but a small number occurred in healthcare facilities: nursing homes (n = 110, 4.68%), hospitals (n = 53, 2.26%), and general practitioner surgeries (n = 32, 1.36%). In children, medication errors with non-prescription pharmaceuticals predominated (n = 722) and anti-pyretics and non-opioid analgesics, anti-bacterials, and cough and cold preparations were the main pharmaceutical classes involved. Medication errors with prescription medication predominated for adults (n = 866) and the major medication

  6. The epidemiology and type of medication errors reported to the National Poisons Information Centre of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Nicola

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Medication errors are widely reported for hospitalised patients, but limited data are available for medication errors that occur in community-based and clinical settings. Epidemiological data from poisons information centres enable characterisation of trends in medication errors occurring across the healthcare spectrum. AIM: The objective of this study was to characterise the epidemiology and type of medication errors reported to the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC) of Ireland. METHODS: A 3-year prospective study on medication errors reported to the NPIC was conducted from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2009 inclusive. Data on patient demographics, enquiry source, location, pharmaceutical agent(s), type of medication error, and treatment advice were collated from standardised call report forms. Medication errors were categorised as (i) prescribing error (i.e. physician error), (ii) dispensing error (i.e. pharmacy error), and (iii) administration error involving the wrong medication, the wrong dose, wrong route, or the wrong time. RESULTS: Medication errors were reported for 2348 individuals, representing 9.56% of total enquiries to the NPIC over 3 years. In total, 1220 children and adolescents under 18 years of age and 1128 adults (>\\/= 18 years old) experienced a medication error. The majority of enquiries were received from healthcare professionals, but members of the public accounted for 31.3% (n = 736) of enquiries. Most medication errors occurred in a domestic setting (n = 2135), but a small number occurred in healthcare facilities: nursing homes (n = 110, 4.68%), hospitals (n = 53, 2.26%), and general practitioner surgeries (n = 32, 1.36%). In children, medication errors with non-prescription pharmaceuticals predominated (n = 722) and anti-pyretics and non-opioid analgesics, anti-bacterials, and cough and cold preparations were the main pharmaceutical classes involved. Medication errors with prescription medication predominated for

  7. UK National Data Centre archive of seismic recordings of (presumed) underground nuclear tests 1964-1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, John; Peacock, Sheila

    2016-04-01

    The year 1996 has particular significance for forensic seismologists. This was the year when the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) was signed in September at the United Nations, setting an international norm against nuclear testing. Blacknest, as a long time seismic centre for research into detecting and identifying underground explosions using seismology, provided significant technical advice during the CTBT negotiations. Since 1962 seismic recordings of both presumed nuclear explosions and earthquakes from the four seismometer arrays Eskdalemuir, Scotland (EKA), Yellowknife, Canada (YKA), Gauribidanur, India (GBA), and Warramunga, Australia (WRA) have been copied, digitised, and saved. There was a possibility this archive would be lost. It was decided to process the records and catalogue them for distribution to other groups and institutions. This work continues at Blacknest but the archive is no longer under threat. In addition much of the archive of analogue tape recordings has been re-digitised with modern equipment, allowing sampling rates of 100 rather than 20 Hz.

  8. Measurement strategies for the Dutch Nuclear Emergency Response System of the National Poisons Control Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Oostrum, I.E.A.; Joore, J.C.A.; Meulenbelt, J.; Savelkoul, T.J.F.

    1997-04-01

    The measurement strategy applicable to Public Health in case of a Nuclear Emergency affecting the Netherlands is presented. Within the framework of the Dutch Nuclear Emergency Response System (NPK, abbreviated in Dutch) the National Poisons Control Centre of the RIVM/AZU has an advisory obligation towards the Ministry of Public Health, Welfare and Sports (WVS). This role comprises advice to relevant ministries, coordination of the measurement strategies and advice on persons to be reviewed, i.e. physical, biological and clinical dosimetry. The choice of dosimetric methods and measurements to be achieved in case of a larger scale nuclear emergency in the Netherlands is discussed. An actual plan of handling is presented for this measurement plan. Intervention levels defined in NPK 1991 serve as guidelines for successive actions to be performed by regional health services. 8 figs., 6 tabs., 81 refs

  9. Mushroom poisoning in Ireland: the collaboration between the National Poisons Information Centre and expert mycologists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Nicola

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Occasionally, mycologist assistance is requested to reliably identify mushroom species in symptomatic cases where there is a concern that a toxic species is involved. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of mushroom poisoning in Ireland, to describe the working arrangement between the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC) and professional mycologists and to present a case series detailing the circumstances when mycologists were consulted. METHODS: Computerised records from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and data on patient demographics, circumstances, and mushroom species collated. In 1999, the NPIC established a national registry of volunteer professional mycologists who are available 24 h\\/day for mushroom identification. The NPIC staff liaises directly with the mycologist and arranges transport of mushroom material. Digital photographic images are requested if there is likely to be a delay in arranging transportation of mushroom material, and the images are subsequently emailed to a mycologist. Five cases of suspected mushroom poisoning were chosen to demonstrate the inter-professional collaboration between the NPIC and mycologists. RESULTS: From 2004 to 2009, the NPIC was consulted about 70 cases of suspected mushroom exposures. Forty-five children ingested unknown mushrooms, 12 adults and 2 children ingested hallucinogenic mushrooms and 11 adults ingested wild toxic mushrooms that were incorrectly identified or confused with edible species. The mycologists were consulted 10 times since 1999. In this series, Amanita species were identified in two cases. In three cases, the species identified were Clitocybe nebularis, Coprinus comatus and Panaeolina foenisecii, respectively, and serious poisoning was excluded. Incorrect mushroom identification by a health care professional using the Internet occurred in two cases. The mycologists assisted Poisons Information Centres in Northern Ireland and the

  10. Mushroom poisoning in Ireland: The collaboration between the National Poisons Information Centre and expert mycologists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Nicola

    2011-03-01

    Background. Occasionally, mycologist assistance is requested to reliably identify mushroom species in symptomatic cases where there is a concern that a toxic species is involved. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of mushroom poisoning in Ireland, to describe the working arrangement between the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC) and professional mycologists and to present a case series detailing the circumstances when mycologists were consulted. Methods. Computerised records from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and data on patient demographics, circumstances, and mushroom species collated. In 1999, the NPIC established a national registry of volunteer professional mycologists who are available 24 h\\/day for mushroom identification. The NPIC staff liaises directly with the mycologist and arranges transport of mushroom material. Digital photographic images are requested if there is likely to be a delay in arranging transportation of mushroom material, and the images are subsequently emailed to a mycologist. Five cases of suspected mushroom poisoning were chosen to demonstrate the inter-professional collaboration between the NPIC and mycologists. Results. From 2004 to 2009, the NPIC was consulted about 70 cases of suspected mushroom exposures. Forty-five children ingested unknown mushrooms, 12 adults and 2 children ingested hallucinogenic mushrooms and 11 adults ingested wild toxic mushrooms that were incorrectly identified or confused with edible species. The mycologists were consulted 10 times since 1999. In this series, Amanita species were identified in two cases. In three cases, the species identified were Clitocybe nebularis, Coprinus comatus and Panaeolina foenisecii, respectively, and serious poisoning was excluded. Incorrect mushroom identification by a health care professional using the Internet occurred in two cases. The mycologists assisted Poisons Information Centres in Northern Ireland

  11. International benchmarking of specialty hospitals. A series of case studies on comprehensive cancer centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Benchmarking is one of the methods used in business that is applied to hospitals to improve the management of their operations. International comparison between hospitals can explain performance differences. As there is a trend towards specialization of hospitals, this study examines the benchmarking process and the success factors of benchmarking in international specialized cancer centres. Methods Three independent international benchmarking studies on operations management in cancer centres were conducted. The first study included three comprehensive cancer centres (CCC), three chemotherapy day units (CDU) were involved in the second study and four radiotherapy departments were included in the final study. Per multiple case study a research protocol was used to structure the benchmarking process. After reviewing the multiple case studies, the resulting description was used to study the research objectives. Results We adapted and evaluated existing benchmarking processes through formalizing stakeholder involvement and verifying the comparability of the partners. We also devised a framework to structure the indicators to produce a coherent indicator set and better improvement suggestions. Evaluating the feasibility of benchmarking as a tool to improve hospital processes led to mixed results. Case study 1 resulted in general recommendations for the organizations involved. In case study 2, the combination of benchmarking and lean management led in one CDU to a 24% increase in bed utilization and a 12% increase in productivity. Three radiotherapy departments of case study 3, were considering implementing the recommendations. Additionally, success factors, such as a well-defined and small project scope, partner selection based on clear criteria, stakeholder involvement, simple and well-structured indicators, analysis of both the process and its results and, adapt the identified better working methods to the own setting, were found. Conclusions The improved

  12. Overview of childhood cancers at a regional cancer centre in North-East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Munlima; Krishnatreya, Manigreeva; Bhuyan, Cidananda; Saikia, Bhargab Jyoti; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Nandy, Pintu; Hazarika, Monalisha; Roy, Partha Sarathi

    2014-01-01

    Childhood cancers are relatively uncommon in comparison to adult cancers. There is no literature available to shed light on clinic-pathological types and patterns of care for childhood cancers in our population in North-East India. In this analysis we therefore tried to determine the common childhood cancers diagnosed in our institute, clinical profile of the patients, types of treatment and compliance, and median survival estimates. Leukemia was most common, followed by retinoblastoma, central nervous system tumours and lymphomas. Ascertaining the clinic-pathological profile of childhood cancers in our population is essential for allocation and management of resources for this small but important group of patients.

  13. Design-corrected variation by centre in mortality reduction in the ERSPC randomised prostate cancer screening trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakama, Matti; Moss, Sue M; Stenman, Ulf-Hakan; Roobol, Monique J; Zappa, Marco; Carlsson, Sigrid; Randazzo, Marco; Nelen, Vera; Hugosson, Jonas

    2017-06-01

    Objectives To calculate design-corrected estimates of the effect of screening on prostate cancer mortality by centre in the European Randomised Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC). Setting The ERSPC has shown a 21% reduction in prostate cancer mortality in men invited to screening with follow-up truncated at 13 years. Centres either used pre-consent randomisation (effectiveness design) or post-consent randomisation (efficacy design). Methods In six centres (three effectiveness design, three efficacy design) with follow-up until the end of 2010, or maximum 13 years, the effect of screening was estimated as both effectiveness (mortality reduction in the target population) and efficacy (reduction in those actually screened). Results The overall crude prostate cancer mortality risk ratio in the intervention arm vs control arm for the six centres was 0.79 ranging from a 14% increase to a 38% reduction. The risk ratio was 0.85 in centres with effectiveness design and 0.73 in those with efficacy design. After correcting for design, overall efficacy was 27%, 24% in pre-consent and 29% in post-consent centres, ranging between a 12% increase and a 52% reduction. Conclusion The estimated overall effect of screening in attenders (efficacy) was a 27% reduction in prostate cancer mortality at 13 years' follow-up. The variation in efficacy between centres was greater than the range in risk ratio without correction for design. The centre-specific variation in the mortality reduction could not be accounted for by the randomisation method.

  14. The completeness of cancer treatment data on the National Health Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, Jason; Sarfati, Diana; Dennett, Elizabeth; Koea, Jonathan

    2013-08-30

    The New Zealand Ministry of Health (MoH) maintains a number of National Collections, which contain data on diagnoses, procedures and service provision for patients. There are concerns that these collections may underestimate the provision of cancer treatment, but the extent to which this is true is largely unknown. In this brief report, we focus on the Auckland region to illustrate the extent to which the National Collections undercount receipt of surgery in patients with breast, colon or renal cancer, and receipt of chemo- and/or radiotherapy for breast cancer patients with regional extent of disease (all diagnosed 2006-2008). We collected treatment data from the National collections and augmented this with data from Cancer Centres, breast cancer registers, private hospitals and personal clinician databases. The National Collections were used to determine 'baseline' treatment data, and we then compared receipt of treatment to that observed on the augmented dataset. We found that the National Collections undercounted receipt of surgery by 13-19%, and receipt of chemo- or radiotherapy for breast cancer patients by 18% and 16% respectively. Our observations clearly point toward (1) a non-reporting private hospital 'effect' on surgery data completeness; and (2) underreporting of adjuvant therapy to the MoH by service providers.

  15. 76 FR 62285 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A... Care Act also established a committee tasked with advancing awareness and prevention of breast cancer... States, do hereby proclaim October 2011 as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. I encourage citizens...

  16. 75 FR 56455 - National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... Part V The President Proclamation 8556--National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, 2010... Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Each... children. During National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, we honor the young lives taken too soon and the...

  17. 76 FR 55551 - National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A... observe National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, we renew our commitment to reducing the impact of prostate cancer on our country by raising awareness and supporting research that will lead to better ways...

  18. 77 FR 55095 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A... leave in our hearts will be deeply felt forever. During National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, we... campaign, we are working to raise awareness about the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer. The Affordable...

  19. 77 FR 55091 - National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Every year, thousands of children across America are diagnosed with cancer--an often life... September 2012 as National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. I encourage all Americans to join me in...

  20. Survey of HNPCC Management Analysis of Responses from 18 International Cancer Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chow Elizabeth

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Eighteen international cancer centres responded to a questionnaire designed to determine clinic practices regarding the management of Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC. Areas covered include definition, clinical intakes, pre-genetic testing for microsatellite instability (MSI or expression of mismatch repair (MMR genes by immunohistochemistry (IHC, mutational analysis, consent practices, counselling, surveillance planning, and surgical decision making. In the absence of a firm evidence base, some management practices were variable, with local access to funding and other resources being influential. More consistent responses were evident for management practices with a stronger evidence base from previous clinical research. This document provides important information to guide the management of HNPCC patients, allow comparisons to be made between the approaches of various clinics to HNPCC families, and define management issues that need to be addressed in clinical research.

  1. CLINICORADIOLOGICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL CORRELATION OF LUNG CANCER PATIENTS PRESENTING TO A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehak Sawhney

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide since 1985, both in terms of incidence and mortality. Globally, lung cancer is the largest contributor to new cancer diagnoses and cancer-related deaths. The aim of the study is to study the clinical, radiological and pathological features of patients diagnosed with lung carcinoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS This observational and cross-sectional study was conducted at Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences (HIMS, which is a large tertiary centre of Uttarakhand on 77 patients of proven lung carcinoma diagnosed over a period of February 2015 to March 2016. The clinical history of the patients was recorded in detail along with the radiological and pathological findings. Ethical clearance certificate was obtained from the ethical committee. RESULTS The study included a total of 77 patients of proven lung carcinoma. Out of the total patients, 70 were males and 7 were females. Cough was the most common symptom. Smoking was the commonest addiction (89.61% in the patients. Non-small cell carcinoma was seen in 59 patients while small cell carcinoma was seen in 23.38% of the cases. Amongst the total patients of non-small cell carcinoma, the maximum number of patients had squamous cell carcinoma (56%. CONCLUSION This study showed that smoking is a principle risk factor in causation of lung carcinoma. Lung cancer should be suspected in an old person presenting with cough and other symptoms such as malaise, weight loss etc. Squamous cell carcinoma is still the most common histological type of lung cancer in India.

  2. Hospital-Based Cancer Profile at the Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badar, F.; Mahmood, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine a frequency distribution of the type and clinical profile of cancer cases registered at the Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre (SKMCH and RC). Study Design: A retrospective, observational study. Place and Duration of Study: The SKMCH and RC, Lahore, from December 1994 to December 2012. Methodology: The time period taken into consideration for the three most common diagnoses was December 1994 - December 2012. Summaries were obtained for gender, age-group, and cancer type on: (i) all age-groups, both genders combined; (ii) adults (> 18 years); (iii) adult males (> 18 years); (iv) adult females (> 18 years); and (v) children (18 years). For a subset of cases registered between January 2004 to December 31, 2012 (9 years), summaries on cancers, age, addiction, family history, disease stage, and grade were obtained for the above groups. Statistical Package for Social Sciences, version 19, was used to analyze the data. Results: The most common malignancies, for the 18-year time period, among adults, were those of breast (11,848/ 49,765, 23.81%), lip and oral cavity (3, 291/49, 765, 6.61%), and liver and intrahepatic bile ducts (2, 836/49, 765, 5.70%). Conclusion: Hospital-based results obtained from various oncology hospital and departments, can be considered as an effective way forward in getting a preview of cancer burden in the region. (author)

  3. An evaluation of the behaviour-change techniques used on Canadian cancer centre Web sites to support physical activity behaviour for breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, B D; Zammit, K; Fong, A J; Sabiston, C M

    2017-12-01

    Cancer centre Web sites can be a useful tool for distributing information about the benefits of physical activity for breast cancer (bca) survivors, and they hold potential for supporting health behaviour change. However, the extent to which cancer centre Web sites use evidence-based behaviour change techniques to foster physical activity behaviour among bca survivors is currently unknown. The aim of our study was to evaluate the presentation of behaviour-change techniques on Canadian cancer centre Web sites to promote physical activity behaviour for bca survivors. All Canadian cancer centre Web sites ( n = 39) were evaluated by two raters using the Coventry, Aberdeen, and London-Refined (calo-re) taxonomy of behaviour change techniques and the eEurope 2002 Quality Criteria for Health Related Websites. Descriptive statistics were calculated. The most common behaviour change techniques used on Web sites were providing information about consequences in general (80%), suggesting goal-setting behaviour (56%), and planning social support or social change (46%). Overall, Canadian cancer centre Web sites presented an average of M = 6.31 behaviour change techniques (of 40 that were coded) to help bca survivors increase their physical activity behaviour. Evidence of quality factors ranged from 90% (sites that provided evidence of readability) to 0% (sites that provided an editorial policy). Our results provide preliminary evidence that, of 40 behaviour-change techniques that were coded, fewer than 20% were used to promote physical activity behaviour to bca survivors on cancer centre Web sites, and that the most effective techniques were inconsistently used. On cancer centre Web sites, health promotion specialists could focus on emphasizing knowledge mobilization efforts using available research into behaviour-change techniques to help bca survivors increase their physical activity.

  4. Manche centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    After a general presentation of radioactivity and radioactive wastes and of the French national agency for the management of radioactive wastes (ANDRA), this brochure gives a general overview of the Manche low- and medium-level radioactive waste disposal centre: principles of storage safety, waste containers (first confinement barrier), storage facility and cover (second confinement barrier), the underground (third confinement barrier), the impact of the centre on its environment, and the control of radioactivity in the vicinity of the centre. (J.S.)

  5. CGPD: Cancer Genetics and Proteomics Database - A Dataset for Computational Analysis and Online Cancer Diagnostic Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rizwan Riaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer Genetics and Proteomics Database (CGPD is a repository for genetics and proteomics data of those Homo sapiens genes which are involved in Cancer. These genes are categorized in the database on the basis of cancer type. 72 genes of 13 types of cancers are considered in this database yet. Primers, promoters and peptides of these genes are also made available. Primers provided for each gene, with their features and conditions given to facilitate the researchers, are useful in PCR amplification, especially in cloning experiments. CGPD also contains Online Cancer Diagnostic Center (OCDC. It also contains transcription and translation tools to assist research work in progressive manner. The database is publicly available at http://www.cgpd.comyr.com.

  6. 78 FR 20213 - National Cancer Control Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... our risk of developing cancer by maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly, limiting alcohol... benefits. Together, our Nation is moving forward in the fight against cancer. As we recommit to improving...

  7. 75 FR 54453 - National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... family history. According to the National Cancer Institute, avoiding smoking, losing weight, maintaining a healthy diet, and exercising may all help prevent certain cancers. We must ensure that more men...

  8. The Hellenic National Tsunami Warning Centre (HL-NTWC): Recent updates and future developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Nikolaos S.; Charalampakis, Marinos

    2014-05-01

    The Hellenic NTWC (HL-NTWC) was established officially by Greek Law in September 2010. HL-NTWC is hosted at the National Observatory of Athens, Institute of Geodynamics (NOA-IG), which also operates a 24/7 earthquake monitoring service in Greece and coordinates the newly established Hellenic Unified National Seismic Network. NOA-IG and HL-NTWC Operational Centre is linked to the Civil Protection Operational Centre and serves as the official alerting agency to the General Secretariat for Civil Protection in Greece, regarding earthquake events and tsunami watch. Since August 2012, HL-NTWC acts as Candidate Tsunami Watch Provider (CTWP) under the UNESCO IOC - ICG NEAMTWS tsunami warning system (NEAM: North-Eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and connected seas) and offers its services to the NEAMTWS system. HL-NTWC has participated in all Communication Test Exercises (CTE) under NEAMTWS and also it has provided tsunami scenarios for extended system testing exercises such as NEAMWAVE12. Some of the recent developments at HL-NTWC in Greece include: deployment of new tide gauge stations for tsunami watch purposes, computation of tsunami scenarios and extending the database in use, improving alerting response times, earthquake magnitude estimation and testing newly established software modules for tsunami and earthquake alerting (i.e. Early-Est, SeisComP3 etc.) in Greece and the Eastern Mediterranean. Although funding today is limited, an advantage of the participation in important EC funded research projects, i.e. NERIES, NERA, TRANSFER, NEAMTIC and ASTARTE, demonstrates that collaboration of top class Research Institutions that care to produce important and useful results in the research front in Europe, can facilitate towards developing and operating top class Operational Centers, useful for Civil Protection purposes in regions in need. Last, it is demonstrated that HL-NTWC collaboration with important key role Research Centers in the Security and Safety issues (e

  9. Drug-induced chest pain and myocardial infarction. Reports to a national centre and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Ottervanger (Jan Paul); J.H.P. Wilson (Paul); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To analyse reports of drug-induced myocardial infarction and chest pain sent to a national reporting centre. To review which drugs were suspected of exhibiting these adverse events and what mechanisms were involved. Methods: During the 20-year period 1975 through 1994, a

  10. Epistaxis and other haemorrhagic events associated with the smoking cessation medicine varenicline : a case series from two national pharmacovigilance centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison-Woolrych, Mira; Harmark, Linda; Tan, Ming; Maggo, Simran; van Grootheest, Kees

    Purpose To present a case series of haemorrhagic events associated with varenicline identified from the New Zealand (NZ) and Netherlands national pharmacovigilance centres and propose a possible mechanism for these adverse events. Methods Reports of epistaxis and other haemorrhagic events (in all

  11. Research on the Danish Longitudinal Survey of Children (DALSC) at the Danish National Centre for Social Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Mai Heide

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews research results obtained using the Danish Longitudinal Survey of Children born in 1995 (DALSC), which is placed at SFI, the Danish National Centre for Social Research. DALSC aims to gain insight into children’s growing-up conditions in contemporary society. DALSC consists of...

  12. In Pursuit of a Multi-lateral Dialogue - the Swiss National Centre for Climate Services (NCCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiko Hama, Angela; Croci-Maspoli, Mischa; Liniger, Mark; Schwierz, Cornelia; Stöckli, Reto; Fischer, Andreas; Gubler, Stefanie; Kotlarski, Sven; Rossa, Andrea; Zubler, Elias; Appenzeller, Christof

    2017-04-01

    Kick-starting, fostering and maintaining a dialogue between primarily public and academic actors involved in the co-design, co-delivery and use of climate services is at the core of Switzerland's National Centre for Climate Services (NCCS), which was founded in late 2015 in recognition of the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS). This coordination and innovation mechanism is a concerted national effort comprised of seven Federal Agencies and Institutes and further partners from academia committed to implementing the Framework at national to subnational level and creating synergies the world over. The NCCS is to be regarded as vital alongside the Swiss National Adaptation Strategy, and it also contributes to putting words into action with respect to the UN's Sustainable Development Goals, the UNFCCC and the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. The services of the Centre provide information to support policy-makers from national to local level as well as the private sector and society at large in minimising their risks, maximising opportunities and optimising costs in the context of climate change and variability. They are indispensable for setting effective mitigation and adaptation measures and for instigating societal transformation. Hence, the goals of the NCCS are to bundle the existing climate services of the Swiss Federation, co-create new tailored solutions with users, act as a network agent and knowledge broker - to boost climate literacy and enable climate-sensitive decision-making leading to increased resilience. The services reflect the specificities and requirements of the Alpine region and its particular challenges and vulnerabilities. Pursuing a participatory approach, the NCCS has brought together essential key players, acted as a sounding board for governmental stakeholders and their needs, and accordingly defined and populated six priority themes in line with the priority areas of the GFCS. These themes are: natural hazards, health

  13. Management of Cervical Cancer: Strategies for Limited-Resource Centres - A Guide for Radiation Oncologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among women globally, even though it is the cancer with the greatest demonstrated potential for secondary prevention. In some regions of the world the incidence is alarmingly high, such as in sub-Saharan Africa, some countries in Latin America, India and South-East Asia. This disease is highly preventable and curable at a relatively low risk and low cost when screening of asymptomatic women is available, together with appropriate diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. In developing clinical guidelines, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has selected forms of cancer or clinical situations that are very common in low and middle income Member States and for which radiation oncologists consistently express a need for guidance. Clinical guidelines for the management of cervical cancer do exist in the published literature. However, these guidelines have usually been developed in and for affluent environments where all modern diagnosis and treatment modalities are available for the practitioner. In limited resource environments, the radiation oncologist is faced with the question, what would be the minimally acceptable line of action with the limited resources available? Clinical guidelines focusing on low and middle income countries provide a practical tool to these practitioners. This publication is aimed at the radiation oncologist working in centres with limited resources and treating a large number of patients with cervical cancer on a daily basis. The approach and techniques are intended to be simple, feasible and resource sparing to the extent that this is possible when dealing with a complex treatment modality. The Division of Human Health is placing special emphasis on the subject of cervical cancer, which is addressed not only in this guide but also in regional training courses and coordinated research projects on the subject

  14. The production of cyclotron radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals at the national accelerator centre in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walt, T.N. van der

    1998-01-01

    Accelerator radioisotopes have been manufactured in South Africa since 1965 with the 30 MeV cyclotron at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) in Pretoria. After its closure in 1988, the radioisotope production programme was continued at the National Accelerator Centre (NAC) with the 200 MeV separated sector cyclotron (SCC) utilizing the 66 MeV proton beam, which is shared with the neutron therapy programme during part of the week. A variety of radiopharmaceuticals, such as 18 F-FDG, 67 Ga-citrate, a 67 Ga-labelled resin. 111 In-chloride, 111 In-oxine and 111 In-labelled resin. 123 I-sodium iodide and 123 I-labelled compounds, 201 Tl-chloride, as well as the 81 Rb/ 81m Kr gas generator, are prepared for use in the nuclear medicine departments of 12 State hospitals and about 28 private nuclear medicine clinics in South Africa. A few longer-lived radioisotopes, such as 22 Na, 55 Fe and 139 Ce, are also produced for research or industrial use. A research and development programme is running to develop new production procedures to produce radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals, or to improve existing production procedures. As part of a programme to utilize the beam time optimally, the production of some other radioisotopes is investigated. (author)

  15. MAAGs (Medical Audit Advisory Groups): the Eli Lilly National Clinical Audit Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R; Fraser, R

    1993-01-01

    Outlines the framework for promoting audit in general practice, created as one part of the health service reforms. Medical Audit Advisory Groups (MAAGs) were set up in each district with the aim of participation in audit of all general practitioners by April 1992. The activities undertaken have included those recommended by the Department of Health; the most significant of these being the appointment of lay facilitators who are able to assist general practitioners and primary care teams co-operate over efforts to improve the quality of care, and may offer one means of introducing some of the methods of total quality management into general practice. Discusses the problems which remain: audit is not yet sufficiently systematic, interface audit with secondary care is at a very early stage, the ways to involve managers and patients in audit remain to be clarified, and there is little evidence of the consequences of audit in terms of improved care. The Eli Lilly National Clinical Audit Centre has been set up within the Department of General Practice, University of Leicester, in order to address these issues.

  16. Medical applications of accelerators at Tata Memorial Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinshaw, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Tata Memorial Centre constitutes the national comprehensive cancer centre for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and research on cancer. It is well equipped with sophisticated state-of-the-art equipment capable of delivering External Beam Radiotherapy (Ebert) and Brachytherapy. Nearly 400 patients receive Ebert daily at the institute from a team of highly skilled and dedicated radiation oncologists, medical physicists and technologists, making it one of the busiest centres in the country

  17. 75 FR 3242 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Special Emphasis Panel, Developing Research Capacity in Africa for the Studies on HIV-Associated... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated...

  18. Global Impact | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Through its direct support of clinical research, Frederick National Laboratory activities are not limited to national programs. The labis actively involved in more than 400 domestic and international studies related to cancer; influenza, HIV, E

  19. 76 FR 57748 - National Cancer Institute Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Boulevard... Crystal City, 2799 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA 22202. Contact Person: Sergei Radaev, PhD..., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National...

  20. Incorporating person centred care principles into an ongoing comprehensive cancer management program: An experiential account

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallath Nandini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research indicates a definite positive impact on treatment outcomes when an integrative approach that focuses on symptom control and quality of life is provided along with the standard therapeutic regimens. However implementation or practice of this approach is not seen widely due to the culture of medical training and practice. This article presents the initial development of a program for incorporating integrative care principles into an ongoing comprehensive cancer care program at a tertiary centre. The key purpose of the program being to develop, facilitate, and establish comprehensive and holistic processes including palliative care principles, that would positively enhance the quantity and quality of life of the person with disease, as well as create an environment that reflects and sustains this approach. The vision, objectives, goals, strategies, activities and results within the 7 months of implementation are documented. The new learnings gained during the process have also been noted in the hope that the model described may be used to conceptualize similar care giving facilities in other centres.

  1. Monitoring the delivery of cancer care: Commission on Cancer and National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richelle T; Stewart, Andrew K; Winchester, David P

    2012-07-01

    The primary objective of the Commission on Cancer (CoC) is to ensure the delivery of comprehensive, high-quality care that improves survival while maintaining quality of life for patients with cancer. This article examines the initiatives of the CoC toward achieving this goal, utilizing data from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) to monitor treatment patterns and outcomes, to develop quality measures, and to benchmark hospital performance. The article also highlights how these initiatives align with the Institute of Medicine's recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care and briefly explores future projects of the CoC and NCDB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. National Native American Breast Cancer Survivor's Network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burhansstipanov, Linda

    2002-01-01

    .... The purpose of this project is to improve the survival from breast cancer and quality of life after being diagnosed with breast cancer for both the patient and loved ones of the cancer patient...

  3. National Native American Breast Cancer Survivor's Network

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burhansstipanov, Linda

    2003-01-01

    .... The purpose of this project is to improve the survival from breast cancer and quality of life after being diagnosed with breast cancer for both the patient and loved ones of the cancer patient...

  4. ‘Smashed by the National Health’? A Closer Look at the Demise of the Pioneer Health Centre, Peckham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conford, Philip

    2016-01-01

    The Pioneer Health Centre, based in South London before and after the Second World War, remains a source of interest for advocates of a positive approach to health promotion in contrast with the treatment of those already ill. Its closure in 1950 for lack of funds has been blamed on the then recently established National Health Service, but this article argues that such an explanation is over-simplified and ignores a number of other factors. The Centre had struggled financially during the 1930s and tried to gain support from the Medical Research Council. The Council appeared interested in the Centre before the war, but was less sympathetic in the 1940s. Around the time of its closure and afterwards, the Centre was also involved in negotiations with London County Council; these failed because the Centre’s directors would not accept the changes which the Council would have needed to make. Unpublished documents reveal that the Centre’s directors were uncompromising and that their approach to the situation antagonised their colleagues. Changes in medical science also worked against the Centre. The success of sulphonamide drugs appeared to render preventive medicine less significant, while the development of statistical techniques cast doubt on the Centre’s experimental methods. The Centre was at the heart of the nascent organic farming movement, which opposed the rapid growth of chemical cultivation. But what might be termed ‘chemical triumphalism’ was on the march in both medicine and agriculture, and the Centre was out of tune with the mood of the times. PMID:26971599

  5. Initiation of non-invasive ventilation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and clinical practice guidelines: Single-centre, retrospective, descriptive study in a national reference centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georges, Marjolaine; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Llontop, Claudia; Shoukri, Amr; Salachas, François; Similowski, Thomas; Morelot-Panzini, Capucine; Gonzalez-Bermejo, Jésus

    2017-02-01

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), respiratory muscle weakness leads to respiratory failure. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) maintains adequate ventilation in ALS patients. NIV alleviates symptoms and improves survival. In 2006, French guidelines established criteria for NIV initiation based on limited evidence. Their impact on clinical practice remains unknown. Our objective was to describe NIV initiation practices of the main French ALS tertiary referral centre with respect to guidelines. In this retrospective descriptive study, 624 patients followed in a single national reference centre began NIV between 2005 and 2013. We analysed criteria used to initiate NIV, including symptoms, PaCO 2 , forced vital capacity, maximal inspiratory pressures and time spent with SpO 2 NIV initiation, 90% of patients were symptomatic. Median PaCO 2 was 48 mmHg. The main criterion to initiate NIV was 'symptoms' followed by 'hypercapnia' in 42% and 34% of cases, respectively. NIV was initiated on functional parameters in only 5% of cases. Guidelines were followed in 81% of cases. In conclusion, despite compliance with French guidelines, the majority of patients are treated at the stage of symptomatic daytime hypoventilation, which suggests that NIV is initiated late in the course of ALS. Whether this practice could be improved by changing guidelines or increasing respiratory-dedicated resources remains to be determined.

  6. Experience of the Irish National Centre for hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia 2003-2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Bhuachalla, C F

    2012-01-31

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a group of autosomal dominant disorders of vascular structure. The Irish National Centre for HHT at the Mercy University Hospital, Cork, Ireland was founded in 2003. From 2003 to 2008, screening of 164 patients with contrast echocardiography, thoracic computerised tomography (CT) and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has identified 88 patients with definite HHT, 72 (82%) of whom had epistaxis, 70 (80%) had telangiectasia and 81 (92%) had a first-degree relative with HHT. We sought to describe the manifestations of HHT in an Irish population and to determine differences between internationally reported data. The HHT patient database was analysed to describe demographics, clinical manifestations and interventional procedures performed in all referred patients. Contrast echocardiography and\\/or CT were performed in 86 patients with definite HHT, identifying 27 patients (31%) with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (pAVMs). Nineteen patients with single or multiple pAVMs had 28 embolisation procedures performed, with 1-6 pAVMs embolised per procedure. Cerebral MRI was performed in 78 (89%) patients and 2 (2.3%) had cerebral arteriovenous malformations (cAVMs). HHT prevalence is thought to be 1 in 2500-8000, suggesting that there are many undiagnosed cases in Irish patients. Internationally published data suggest a prevalence of 15-35% for pAVMs and 10-23% for cAVMs in patients with HHT. While the prevalence of pAVMs in our group is consistent with these data, the prevalence of cAVMs is considerably lower, suggesting that Irish patients with HHT may differ genotypically and phenotypically from those in other countries.

  7. 78 FR 54737 - National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Every September, America renews our commitment to curing childhood cancer and offers our support... cancer each year, and it remains the leading cause of death by disease for American children under 15...

  8. 76 FR 5597 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Vaccine for Prevention of HIV Infection. Date: February 24, 2011... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute... concerning individuals associated with the grant applications and/or contract proposals, the disclosure of...

  9. HIV serostatus and tumor differentiation among patients with cervical cancer at Bugando Medical Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matovelo Dismas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence for the association between Human immunodeficiency virus infection and cervical cancer has been contrasting, with some studies reporting increased risk of cervical cancer among HIV positive women while others report no association. Similar evidence from Tanzania is scarce as HIV seroprevalence among cervical cancer patients has not been rigorously evaluated. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between HIV and tumor differentiation among patients with cervical cancer at Bugando Medical Centre and Teaching Hospital in Mwanza, North-Western Tanzania. Methods This was a descriptive analytical study involving suspected cervical cancer patients seen at the gynaecology outpatient clinic and in the gynaecological ward from November 2010 to March 2011. Results A total of 91 suspected cervical cancer patients were seen during the study period and 74 patients were histologically confirmed with cervical cancer. The mean age of those confirmed of cervical cancer was 50.5 ± 12.5 years. Most patients (39 of the total 74–52.7% were in early disease stages (stages IA-IIA. HIV infection was diagnosed in 22 (29.7% patients. On average, HIV positive women with early cervical cancer disease had significantly more CD4+ cells than those with advanced disease (385.8 ± 170.4 95% CI 354.8-516.7 and 266.2 ± 87.5, 95% CI 213.3-319.0 respectively p = 0.042. In a binary logistic regression model, factors associated with HIV seropositivity were ever use of hormonal contraception (OR 5.79 95% CI 1.99-16.83 p = 0.001, aged over 50 years (OR 0.09 95% CI 0.02-0.36 p = 0.001, previous history of STI (OR 3.43 95% CI 1.10-10.80 p = 0.035 and multiple sexual partners OR 5.56 95% CI 1.18-26.25 p = 0.030. Of these factors, only ever use of hormonal contraception was associated with tumor cell differentiation (OR 0.16 95% CI 0.06-0.49 p = 0.001. HIV seropositivity was weakly associated with

  10. Role of the national INIS centre in the knowledge preservation programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashkova, N.; Georgieva, A.

    2004-01-01

    Possible ways of involvement of a small INIS Centre (on the example of the Bulgarian Centre) in the IAEA Knowledge Preservation Programme are discussed. The specific of the INIS activities, experience, and established access to scientific resources in the country present a good base for the extension of the Centre's functions towards nuclear knowledge accumulation and providing information about research and training programmes, as well as access to factual information in the nuclear field. Approaches for organising of the resources identification and developing of tools for management of information not included in the INIS database are suggested. As a first step, Bulgarian INIS Centre has identified some of the areas with accumulated knowledge as well as universities and institutes with valuable ongoing research. A local database for technical and scientific documentation is under development. (authors)

  11. Radiation therapy for oligorecurrence in prostate cancer. Preliminary results of our centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Ruiz de León, C; Ramírez Backhaus, M; Sobrón Bustamante, M; Casaña, J; Arribas, L; Rubio-Briones, J

    2017-12-01

    There is growing interest in the use of more aggressive therapeutic modalities for treating metastatic prostate cancer. In this study, we examine the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for patients with oligorecurrent prostate cancer. We analysed the biochemical response and toxicity of patients who underwent this therapy at our centre. We selected patients who experienced oligorecurrence between January 2015 to December 2016 and were administered SBRT. The association of androgen deprivation (AD) was left in each case to the decision of the tumour committee. We describe the clinical situation at diagnosis of oligorecurrence, the treatment administered and the biochemical response. We considered a biochemical response to be a 50% reduction in the absolute prostate-specific antigen (PSA) readings. SBRT was administered to 11 patients with bone (82%) and/or lymph node oligometastasis (18%). The treatment regimen for bone oligometastasis was 27Gy divided into 3 sessions, while the treatment for lymph node oligometastasis reached 70Gy. Seven patients had no treatment at the time of diagnosis, 2 were in the castration-resistant phase, 1 patient was in the off phase of intermittent AD, and 1 patient had adjuvant AD for pN1. Seven patients presented a biochemical response with a PSA reduction of 75-100%. The response was not assessable in 4 patients due to the continuing adjuvant AD. With a mean follow-up of 10.5 months, only 2 patients had progressed. Grade 1 gastrointestinal toxicity was detected in only 1 patient. Our data suggest that the use of SBRT in carefully selected patients with metastatic oligorecurrence of prostate cancer can achieve biochemical response and potentially delay progression and the use of systemic treatments. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. [Internal quality control of the blood products in the Lomé National Blood Transfusion Centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fétéké, L; Mawussi, K; Lakté, P; Kuéviakoe, I M; Haudrechy, D; Ségbéna, A Y

    2008-07-01

    Evaluate the conformity of blood red cells units prepared in the Lomé CNTS with European norms concerning volume, haemoglobin content and haematocrite. Measure the conservation of the haemostatic properties and the rate of haemostasis factors V and VIII in the fresh frozen plasma. Measure the rate of residual cells in the plasma. In the year 2006, from March 1st to April 15th, we analysed the quality of 135 units of whole blood, red blood cells (RBC) and plasma from blood donors in the Lomé National Blood Transfusion Centre. The quality control had concerned: the volume of whole blood units; the volume, the haemoglobin content and the haematocrite of red blood cells units; the volume, the prothrombin rate, the cephalin with activator time (TCA), the rate of haemostasis factors V and VIII and the number of residual cells (red cells, leucocytes and platelets) in the plasma. Among the 135 units of whole blood which were controlled, 50.57% were in conformity with the norms concerning the volume. The red blood cells units were in conformity with norms concerning their volume, their haemoglobin content and their haematocrite respectively in 21.48%, 80.75% and 20% of the cases. The volume of 75.56% of the plasma units controlled were conform with the norm. All of the plasma units were conform with the norm concerning the number of residual platelets while the number of residual red blood cells and leucocytes were conform respectively in 80.74% and 60%. The percentage of conformity concerning the prothrombin rate, the TCA, the coagulation factor V and the factor VIII were respectively 66.67; 97.78; 48.89 and 47.4 before freezing, and 54.81; 88.14; 64.44; 84.44 a month after freezing. To improve the quality of the new blood products of the Lomé CNTS, some correctives actions must be applied concerning the adequate volume of blood which must be collected from the donors, the position of the blood bags in during the centrifugation and the volume of plasma which must be

  13. Impact of the introduction of weekly radiotherapy quality assurance meetings at one UK cancer centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammer, C V; Allerton, R; Churn, M; Joseph, M; Koh, P; Sayers, I; King, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The complexity of radiotherapy planning is increasing rapidly. Delivery and planning is subject to detailed quality assurance (QA) checks. The weakest link is often the oncologists' delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV). Weekly departmental meetings for radiotherapy QA (RTQA) were introduced into the Royal Wolverhampton Hospital, Wolverhampton, UK, in October 2011. This article describes the impact of this on patient care. Methods: CTVs for megavoltage photon radiotherapy courses for all radical, adjuvant and palliative treatments longer than five fractions (with the exception of two field tangential breast treatments not enrolled into clinical trials) were reviewed in the RTQA meeting. Audits were carried out in January 2012 (baseline) and September 2013, each over a 4-week period. Adherence to departmental contouring protocols was assessed and the number of major and minor alterations following peer review were determined. Results: There was no statistically significant difference for major alterations between the two study groups; 8 alterations in 80 patients (10%) for the baseline audit vs 3 alterations from 72 patients (4.2%) in the second audit (p = 0.17). A trend towards a reduction in alterations following peer review was observed. There has, however, been a change in practice resulting in a reduction in variation in CTV definition within our centre and greater adherence to protocols. There is increasing confidence in the quality and constancy of care delivered. Conclusion: Introduction of a weekly QA meeting for target volume definition has facilitated consensus and adoption of departmental clinical guidelines within the unit. Advances in knowledge: The weakest areas in radiotherapy are patient selection and definition of the CTV. Engagement in high-quality RTQA is paramount. This article describes the impact of this in one UK cancer centre. PMID:25251520

  14. 15th March 2011 - Singapore National Research Foundation Permanent Secretary(National Research and Development)T. M. Kian signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and visiting CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    15th March 2011 - Singapore National Research Foundation Permanent Secretary(National Research and Development)T. M. Kian signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and visiting CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

  15. Wealth, Health Expenditure, and Cancer: A National Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahoud, Jad; Semaan, Adele; Rieber, Alyssa

    2016-08-01

    The US health care system is characterized by high health expenditures with penultimate outcomes. This ecological study evaluates the associations between wealth, health expenditure, and cancer outcomes at the state level. We extracted gross domestic product (GDP) and health expenditure per capita from the 2009 Bureau of Economic Analysis and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, respectively. Using data from the NCI, we retrieved colorectal cancer (CRC), breast cancer, and all-cancer age-adjusted rates and computed mortality/incidence (M/I) ratios. We used the Spearman's rank correlation to determine the association between the financial indicators and cancer outcomes, and we constructed geographic distribution maps to describe these associations. GDP per capita significantly correlated with lower M/I ratios for all cancers, breast cancer, and CRC. As for health expenditure per capita, preliminary analysis highlighted a rift between the Northeastern and Southern states, which translated into worse breast and all-cancer outcomes in Southern states. Further analysis showed that higher health expenditure significantly correlated with decreased breast cancer M/I ratio. However, CRC outcomes were not significantly affected by health expenditure, nor were all-cancer outcomes. All cancers, breast cancer, and CRC outcomes significantly correlated with wealth, whereas only breast cancer correlated with higher health expenditure. Future research is needed to evaluate the potential role of policies in optimizing resource allocation in the states' efforts against CRC and minimizing disparities in interstate cancer outcomes. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  16. 77 FR 76057 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ..., Scientific Review Officer, Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...--Institutional Training and Education Institutional Training and Education Grant. Date: February 25-26, 2013...

  17. The surgical management of male breast cancer: Time for an easy access national reporting database?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M.T. Staruch

    2016-08-01

    Discussion: We report a series of seven cases of male breast cancer encountered over three years, evaluating patient demographics as well as treatment and outcomes. In our series patients were managed with mastectomy. New evidence is questioning the role of mastectomy against breast conserving surgery in male patients. Furthermore there is a lack of reporting infrastructure for national data capture of the benefits of surgical modalities. Literature review highlights the varied clinical experience between units that remains reported as podium presentation but not published. The establishment of an online international reporting registry would allow for efficient analysis of surgical outcomes to improve patient care from smaller single centres. This would facilitate large scale meta analysis by larger academic surgical centres.

  18. The National LGBT Cancer Action Plan: A White Paper of the 2014 National Summit on Cancer in the LGBT Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolies, Liz; Sigurdsson, Hrafn Oli; Walland, Jonathan; Radix, Asa; Rice, David; Buchting, Francisco O.; Sanchez, Nelson F.; Bare, Michael G.; Boehmer, Ulrike; Cahill, Sean; Griebling, Tomas L.; Bruessow, Diane; Maingi, Shail

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite growing social acceptance of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and transgender (LGBT) persons and the extension of marriage rights for same-sex couples, LGBT persons experience stigma and discrimination, including within the healthcare system. Each population within the LGBT umbrella term is likely at elevated risk for cancer due to prevalent, significant cancer risk factors, such as tobacco use and human immunodeficiency virus infection; however, cancer incidence and mortality data among LGBT persons are lacking. This absence of cancer incidence data impedes research and policy development, LGBT communities' awareness and activation, and interventions to address cancer disparities. In this context, in 2014, a 2-day National Summit on Cancer in the LGBT Communities was convened by a planning committee for the purpose of accelerating progress in identifying and addressing the LGBT communities' concerns and needs in the spheres of cancer research, clinical cancer care, healthcare policy, and advocacy for cancer survivorship and LGBT health equity. Summit participants were 56 invited persons from the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada, representatives of diverse identities, experiences, and knowledge about LGBT communities and cancer. Participants shared lessons learned and identified gaps and remedies regarding LGBT cancer concerns across the cancer care continuum from prevention to survivorship. This white paper presents background on each of the Summit themes and 16 recommendations covering the following: sexual orientation and gender identity data collection in national and state health surveys and research on LGBT communities and cancer, the clinical care of LGBT persons, and the education and training of healthcare providers.

  19. Annual report April 1974-March 1975 of the Gama Research Centre National Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Activities at the Gama Research Centre for the period of April 1974-March 1975, covering works at the Laboratory of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, at the Reactor Laboratory, at the Laboratory of Chemistry, and at the Laboratory of Process Technology, are described. The Center's personnel and financial accounts are also given. (RUW)

  20. A single centre experience with sequential and concomitant chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced stage IV tonsillar cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coyle Catherine

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemo-radiotherapy offers an alternative to primary surgery and adjuvant therapy for the management of locally advanced stage IV squamous cell carcinomas of the tonsil. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of the outcomes of 41 patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil treated non-surgically at the Yorkshire Cancer Centre between January 2004 and December 2005. Due to long radiotherapy waiting times, patients received induction chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil followed by either cisplatin concurrent chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy alone. Results Median age was 55 years (range 34-76 years and 28 (68% patients were male. 35/41 patients (85% received 2 or more cycles of induction chemotherapy. Following induction chemotherapy, 32/41 patients (78% had a clinical response. Concomitant chemotherapy was given to 30/41 (73%. All patients received the planned radiotherapy dose with no delays. There were no treatment related deaths. Six (15% patients had gastrostomy tubes placed before treatment, and 22 (54% required nasogastric tube placement during or after treatment for nutritional support. 17 patients required unplanned admissions during treatment for supportive care. At 4 months post treatment assessment 35 out of 41 (85% patients achieved complete clinical and radiographic response. Median follow-up is 38 months (8-61 months. Local and regional control rate in complete responders at 3 years was 91%. Distant metastases have been found in 4 (9.8% patients. Three year progression-free survival rate in all patients is 75%. The 3-year cause specific survival and overall survival are 75% and 66% respectively. Conclusion Cisplatin-based induction and concurrent chemoradiotherapy provides excellent tumour control with acceptable toxicity for patients with locally advanced tonsillar cancer.

  1. The cumulative risk of false-positive screening results across screening centres in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, M., E-mail: Marta.Roman@kreftregisteret.no [Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo (Norway); Department of Women and Children’s Health, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Skaane, P., E-mail: PERSK@ous-hf.no [Department of Radiology, Oslo University Hospital Ullevaal, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Hofvind, S., E-mail: Solveig.Hofvind@kreftregisteret.no [Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo (Norway); Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Health Science, Oslo (Norway)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We found variation in early performance measures across screening centres. • Radiologists’ performance may play a key role in the variability. • Potential to improve the effectiveness of breast cancer screening programs. • Continuous surveillance of screening centres and radiologists is essential. - Abstract: Background: Recall for assessment in mammographic screening entails an inevitable number of false-positive screening results. This study aimed to investigate the variation in the cumulative risk of a false positive screening result and the positive predictive value across the screening centres in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program. Methods: We studied 618,636 women aged 50–69 years who underwent 2,090,575 screening exams (1996–2010. Recall rate, positive predictive value, rate of screen-detected cancer, and the cumulative risk of a false positive screening result, without and with invasive procedures across the screening centres were calculated. Generalized linear models were used to estimate the probability of a false positive screening result and to compute the cumulative false-positive risk for up to ten biennial screening examinations. Results: The cumulative risk of a false-positive screening exam varied from 10.7% (95% CI: 9.4–12.0%) to 41.5% (95% CI: 34.1–48.9%) across screening centres, with a highest to lowest ratio of 3.9 (95% CI: 3.7–4.0). The highest to lowest ratio for the cumulative risk of undergoing an invasive procedure with a benign outcome was 4.3 (95% CI: 4.0–4.6). The positive predictive value of recall varied between 12.0% (95% CI: 11.0–12.9%) and 19.9% (95% CI: 18.3–21.5%), with a highest to lowest ratio of 1.7 (95% CI: 1.5–1.9). Conclusions: A substantial variation in the performance measures across the screening centres in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program was identified, despite of similar administration, procedures, and quality assurance requirements. Differences in the

  2. The cumulative risk of false-positive screening results across screening centres in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, M.; Skaane, P.; Hofvind, S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We found variation in early performance measures across screening centres. • Radiologists’ performance may play a key role in the variability. • Potential to improve the effectiveness of breast cancer screening programs. • Continuous surveillance of screening centres and radiologists is essential. - Abstract: Background: Recall for assessment in mammographic screening entails an inevitable number of false-positive screening results. This study aimed to investigate the variation in the cumulative risk of a false positive screening result and the positive predictive value across the screening centres in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program. Methods: We studied 618,636 women aged 50–69 years who underwent 2,090,575 screening exams (1996–2010. Recall rate, positive predictive value, rate of screen-detected cancer, and the cumulative risk of a false positive screening result, without and with invasive procedures across the screening centres were calculated. Generalized linear models were used to estimate the probability of a false positive screening result and to compute the cumulative false-positive risk for up to ten biennial screening examinations. Results: The cumulative risk of a false-positive screening exam varied from 10.7% (95% CI: 9.4–12.0%) to 41.5% (95% CI: 34.1–48.9%) across screening centres, with a highest to lowest ratio of 3.9 (95% CI: 3.7–4.0). The highest to lowest ratio for the cumulative risk of undergoing an invasive procedure with a benign outcome was 4.3 (95% CI: 4.0–4.6). The positive predictive value of recall varied between 12.0% (95% CI: 11.0–12.9%) and 19.9% (95% CI: 18.3–21.5%), with a highest to lowest ratio of 1.7 (95% CI: 1.5–1.9). Conclusions: A substantial variation in the performance measures across the screening centres in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program was identified, despite of similar administration, procedures, and quality assurance requirements. Differences in the

  3. Credentialing of radiotherapy centres for a clinical trial of adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer (TROG 10.01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kron, Tomas; Pham, Daniel; Roxby, Paul; Rolfo, Aldo; Foroudi, Farshad

    2012-01-01

    Background: Daily variations in bladder filling make conformal treatment of bladder cancer challenging. On-line adaptive radiotherapy with a choice of plans has been demonstrated to reduce small bowel irradiation in single institution trials. In order to support a multicentre feasibility clinical trial on adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer (TROG 10.01) a credentialing programme was developed for centres wishing to participate. Methods: The credentialing programme entails three components: a facility questionnaire; a planning exercise which tests the ability of centres to create three adaptive plans based on a planning and five cone beam CTs; and a site visit during which image quality, imaging dose and image guidance procedures are assessed. Image quality and decision making were tested using customised inserts for a Perspex phantom (Modus QUASAR) that mimic different bladder sizes. Dose was assessed in the same phantom using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). Results: All 12 centres participating in the full credentialing programme were able to generate appropriate target volumes in the planning exercise and identify the correct target volume and position the bladder phantom in the phantom within 3 mm accuracy. None of the imaging doses exceeded the limit of 5 cGy with a CT on rails system having the lowest overall dose. Conclusion: A phantom mimicking the decision making process for adaptive radiotherapy was found to be well suited during site visits for credentialing of centres participating in a clinical trial of adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer. Combined with a planning exercise the site visit allowed testing the ability of centres to create adaptive treatment plans and make appropriate decisions based on the volumetric images acquired at treatment.

  4. Technical Service Agreement (TSA) | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR) scientists provide services and solutions to collaborators through the Technical Services Program, whose portfolio includes more than 200 collaborations with more than 80 partners. The Frederi

  5. A multi-centre evaluation of oral cancer in Southern and Western Nigeria: an African oral pathology research consortium initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omitola, Olufemi Gbenga; Soyele, Olujide Oladele; Sigbeku, Opeyemi; Okoh, Dickson; Akinshipo, Abdulwarith Olaitan; Butali, Azeez; Adeola, Henry Ademola

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths among African populations. Lack of standard cancer registries and under-reporting has inaccurately depicted its magnitude in Nigeria. Development of multi-centre collaborative oral pathology networks such as the African Oral Pathology Research Consortium (AOPRC) facilitates skill and expertise exchange and fosters a robust and systematic investigation of oral diseases across Africa. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, we have leveraged the auspices of the AOPRC to examine the burden of oral cancer in Nigeria, using a multi-centre approach. Data from 4 major tertiary health institutions in Western and Southern Nigeria was generated using a standardized data extraction format and analysed using the SPSS data analysis software (version 20.0; SPSS Inc. Chicago, IL). Of the 162 cases examined across the 4 centres, we observed that oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) occurred mostly in the 6 th and 7 th decades of life and maxillary were more frequent than mandibular OSCC lesions. Regional variations were observed both for location, age group and gender distribution. Significant regional differences was found between poorly, moderately and well differentiated OSCC (p value = 0.0071). A multi-centre collaborative oral pathology research approach is an effective way to achieve better insight into the patterns and distribution of various oral diseases in men of African descent. The wider outlook for AOPRC is to employ similar approaches to drive intensive oral pathology research targeted at addressing the current morbidity and mortality of various oral diseases across Africa.

  6. An epidemiological study of cancer incidence and mortality among nuclear industry workers at Lucas Heights Science and Technology centre in collaboration with IARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib, R.R.; Kaldor, J.

    1999-01-01

    An epidemiological study is being undertaken at Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) where the only nuclear reactor in Australia has been in operation since 1958. The study is part of an international collaborative study coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), and has dual objectives, first to assess whether workers at LHSTC have had different levels of mortality or cancer incidence from the New South Wales and the Australian populations, and second, as part of the IARC study, to estimate as precisely as possible, through collaboration with IARC, the risk of contracting cancer from low-level, long-term exposure to ionising radiation. The research project is a retrospective cohort study based on records of employment and exposure to radiation kept at LHSTC since 1957. Electronic linkage of all the available dosimetry and employment information with national registers of cancer incidence and mortality is being undertaken for the cohort of LHSTC workers, to allow for a passive follow-up of more than 7000 workers employed from 1957 onwards

  7. Cancer incidence and mortality in Mongolia - National Registry Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandagdorj, Tuvshingerel; Sanjaajamts, Erdenechimeg; Tudev, Undarmaa; Oyunchimeg, Dondov; Ochir, Chimedsuren; Roder, David

    2010-01-01

    The National Cancer Registry of Mongolia began as a hospital-based registry in the early 1960s but then evolved to have a population-wide role. The Registry provides the only cancer data available from Mongolia for international comparison. The descriptive data presented in this report are the first to be submitted on cancer incidence in Mongolia to a peer-reviewed journal. The purpose was to describe cancer incidence and mortality for all invasive cancers collectively, individual primary sites, and particularly leading sites, and consider cancer control opportunities. This study includes data on new cancer cases registered in Mongolia in 2003-2007. Incidence and mortality rates were calculated as mean annual numbers per 100,000 residents. Age-standardized incidence (ASR) and age-standardized mortality (ASMR) rates were calculated from age-specific rates by weighting directly to the World Population standard. Between 2003 and 2007, 17,271 new cases of invasive cancer were recorded (52.2% in males, 47.7% in females). The five leading primary sites in males were liver, stomach, lung, esophagus, and colon/rectum; whereas in females they were liver, cervix, stomach, esophagus and breast. ASRs were lower in females than males for cancers of the liver at 63.0 and 99.1 per 100,000 respectively; cancers of the stomach at 19.1 and 42.1 per 100,000 respectively; and cancers of the lung at 8.3 and 33.2 per 100,000 respectively. Liver cancer was the most common cause of death in each gender, the ASMR being lower for females than males at 60.6 compared with 94.8 per 100,000. In females the next most common sites of cancer death were the stomach and esophagus, whereas in males, they were the stomach and lung. Available data indicate that ASRs of all cancers collectively have increased over the last 20 years. Rates are highest for liver cancer, at about four times the world average. The most common cancers are those with a primary site of liver, stomach and esophagus, for which

  8. Trends in intensity modulated radiation therapy use for locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network centers

    OpenAIRE

    Marsha Reyngold, MD, PhD; Joyce Niland, PhD; Anna ter Veer, MS; Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD; Lily Lai, MD; Joshua E. Meyer, MD; Steven J. Nurkin, MD, MS; Deborah Schrag, MD, MPH; John M. Skibber, MD, FACS; Al B. Benson, MD; Martin R. Weiser, MD; Christopher H. Crane, MD; Karyn A. Goodman, MD, MS

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been rapidly incorporated into clinical practice because of its technological advantages over 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT). We characterized trends in IMRT utilization in trimodality treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network cancer centers between 2005 and 2011. Methods and materials: Using the prospective National Comprehensive Cancer Network Colorectal Cancer Database, ...

  9. 78 FR 64222 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... Conference Call). Contact Person: Robert Bird, Ph.D., Chief, Resources and Training Review Branch, Division....D., Scientific Review Officer, Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute...

  10. 78 FR 8156 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute... proposals. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, Montgomery County Conference Center... Institute, NIH, 6116 Executive Blvd., Suite 703, Room 7072, Bethesda, md 20892-8329, 301-594-1408, Stoicaa2...

  11. 77 FR 68136 - National Cancer Institute Amended; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... Regency Bethesda Hotel, Old Georgetown Room, One Metro Center, Bethesda, MD 20814. The NCAB ad hoc... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute..., Building 31C, Wing C, Conference Room 10, 31 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 which was published in the...

  12. Frederick National Laboratory's Contribution to ATOM | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    As a founding member organization of ATOM, the Frederick National Laboratory will contribute scientific expertise in precision oncology, computational chemistry and cancer biology, as well as support for open sharing of data sets and predictive model

  13. Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Multidisciplinary Management at the Colombian National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garavito, Gloria; Llamas O, Augusto; Cadena, Enrique; De Los Reyes, Amelia

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common malignant disease of the endocrine system. Two hundred and twenty-one new cases were diagnosed at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia (NCI) in 2006, roughly 4% of all new cancer cases. Weekly multidisciplinary decision-making meetings on thyroid cancer management have been held at the NCI since 1994. This article covers the body of knowledge gathered through 14 years of interdisciplinary collaboration where experience has been combined with the best available evidence.

  14. International Energy Agency's Heat Pump Centre (IEA-HPC) Annual National Team Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broders, M. A.

    1992-09-01

    The traveler, serving as Delegate from the United States Advanced Heat Pump National Team, participated in the activities of the fourth IEA-HPC National Team Working Group meeting. Highlights of this meeting included review and discussion of 1992 IEA-HPC activities and accomplishments, introduction of the Switzerland National Team, and development of the 1993 IEA-HPC work program. The traveler also gave a formal presentation about the Development and Activities of the IEA Advanced Heat Pump U.S. National Team.

  15. The risk of transfusion-transmitted viral infections at the Gabonese National Blood Transfusion Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rerambiah, Leonard Kounegnigan; Rerambiah, Laurence Essola; Bengone, Calixte; Djoba Siawaya, Joel F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Blood transfusions carry the risk of transmitting blood-borne infections. In contrast to the situation in the developed world, there is a limited number of studies examining this problem in sub-Saharan Africa. In this study we aimed to calculate the risks of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection from units of blood issued by the Gabonese Blood Transfusion Centre between 2009 and 2011. Materials and methods All the donations were tested for infectious diseases and the seroconversion incidence rates of HIV, HBV and HCV were calculated. The residual risk of transfusion-associated transmission for each virus was calculated by multiplying the seroconversion rates by the window period expressed in fractions of a year. Results The risks of becoming infected with HIV, HCV, and HBV in subjects receiving units of blood from the Gabonese Blood Transfusion Centre were 64.7, 207.94 and 534.53 per million donations, respectively. Conclusions This study, which is the first to quantify the true risks of transfusion-transmitted infections in Gabon, reveals and confirms the need to reinforce preventative and screening strategies to improve transfusion safety in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24333085

  16. Consumer attitudes towards the establishment of a national Australian familial cancer research database by the Inherited Cancer Connect (ICCon) Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Laura; Mitchell, Gillian; Thrupp, Letitia; Petelin, Lara; Richardson, Kate; Mascarenhas, Lyon; Young, Mary-Anne

    2018-01-01

    Clinical genetics units hold large amounts of information which could be utilised to benefit patients and their families. In Australia, a national research database, the Inherited Cancer Connect (ICCon) database, is being established that comprises clinical genetic data held for all carriers of mutations in cancer predisposition genes. Consumer input was sought to establish the acceptability of the inclusion of clinical genetic data into a research database. A qualitative approach using a modified nominal group technique was used to collect data through consumer forums conducted in three Australian states. Individuals who had previously received care from Familial Cancer Centres were invited to participate. Twenty-four consumers participated in three forums. Participants expressed positive attitudes about the establishment of the ICCon database, which were informed by the perceived benefits of the database including improved health outcomes for individuals with inherited cancer syndromes. Most participants were comfortable to waive consent for their clinical information to be included in the research database in a de-identified format. As major stakeholders, consumers have an integral role in contributing to the development and conduct of the ICCon database. As an initial step in the development of the ICCon database, the forums demonstrated consumers' acceptance of important aspects of the database including waiver of consent.

  17. Identifying and controlling a multiresistant pseudomonas aeruginosa outbreak in a latin-american cancer centre and its associated risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Alberto Cortes

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important and frightening microorganism for patients suffering from cancer. Multiresistant P. aeruginosa (MRPA may appear as a consequence of exposure to multiple antibiotics or from a breakdown in infection control practices. This article reports an MRPA outbreak in a cancer treatment centre and the consequent case control study. Mechanical ventilation was identified as being the main risk factor for developing MRPA colonisation or infection; molecular analysis confirmed the outbreak. A multifaceted strategy was adopted, involving reinforcing hand-washing practices, contact isolation, antibiotic restriction and suction devices for mechanically-ventilated patients. MRPA was controlled and the outbreak ended. Such strategy may be effective in controlling MRPS in low-resource environments amongst high risk cancer patients.

  18. Patients with advanced and metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with targeted therapy in the Czech Republic: twenty cancer centres, six agents, one database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poprach, Alexandr; Bortlíček, Zbyněk; Büchler, Tomáš; Melichar, Bohuslav; Lakomý, Radek; Vyzula, Rostislav; Brabec, Petr; Svoboda, Marek; Dušek, Ladislav; Gregor, Jakub

    2012-12-01

    The incidence and mortality of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in the Czech Republic are among the highest in the world. Several targeted agents have been recently approved for the treatment of advanced/metastatic RCC. Presentation of a national clinical database for monitoring and assessment of patients with advanced/metastatic RCC treated with targeted therapy. The RenIS (RENal Information System, http://renis.registry.cz ) registry is a non-interventional post-registration database of epidemiological and clinical data of patients with RCC treated with targeted therapies in the Czech Republic. Twenty cancer centres eligible for targeted therapy administration participate in the project. As of November 2011, six agents were approved and reimbursed from public health insurance, including bevacizumab, everolimus, pazopanib, sorafenib, sunitinib, and temsirolimus. As of 10 October 2011, 1,541 patients with valid records were entered into the database. Comparison with population-based data from the Czech National Cancer Registry revealed that RCC patients treated with targeted therapy are significantly younger (median age at diagnosis 59 vs. 66 years). Most RenIS registry patients were treated with sorafenib and sunitinib, many patients sequentially with both agents. Over 10 % of patients were also treated with everolimus in the second or third line. Progression-free survival times achieved were comparable to phase III clinical trials. The RenIS registry has become an important tool and source of information for the management of cancer care and clinical practice, providing comprehensive data on monitoring and assessment of RCC targeted therapy on a national level.

  19. Spatial analyses identify the geographic source of patients at a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shu-Chih; Kanarek, Norma; Fox, Michael G; Guseynova, Alla; Crow, Shirley; Piantadosi, Steven

    2010-02-01

    We examined the geographic distribution of patients to better understand the service area of the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, a designated National Cancer Institute (NCI) comprehensive cancer center located in an urban center. Like most NCI cancer centers, the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center serves a population beyond city limits. Urban cancer centers are expected to serve their immediate neighborhoods and to address disparities in access to specialty care. Our purpose was to learn the extent and nature of the cancer center service area. Statistical clustering of patient residence in the continental United States was assessed for all patients and by gender, cancer site, and race using SaTScan. Primary clusters detected for all cases and demographically and tumor-defined subpopulations were centered at Baltimore City and consisted of adjacent counties in Delaware, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, New Jersey and New York, and the District of Columbia. Primary clusters varied in size by race, gender, and cancer site. Spatial analysis can provide insights into the populations served by urban cancer centers, assess centers' performance relative to their communities, and aid in developing a cancer center business plan that recognizes strengths, regional utility, and referral patterns. Today, 62 NCI cancer centers serve a quarter of the U.S. population in their immediate communities. From the Baltimore experience, we might project that the population served by these centers is actually more extensive and varies by patient characteristics, cancer site, and probably cancer center services offered.

  20. Palliative Care Use Among Patients With Solid Cancer Tumors: A National Cancer Data Base Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osagiede, Osayande; Colibaseanu, Dorin T; Spaulding, Aaron C; Frank, Ryan D; Merchea, Amit; Kelley, Scott R; Uitti, Ryan J; Ailawadhi, Sikander

    2018-01-01

    Palliative care has been increasingly recognized as an important part of cancer care but remains underutilized in patients with solid cancers. There is a current gap in knowledge regarding why palliative care is underutilized nationwide. To identify the factors associated with palliative care use among deceased patients with solid cancer tumors. Using the 2016 National Cancer Data Base, we identified deceased patients (2004-2013) with breast, colon, lung, melanoma, and prostate cancer. Data were described as percentages. Associations between palliative care use and patient, facility, and geographic characteristics were evaluated through multivariate logistic regression. A total of 1 840 111 patients were analyzed; 9.6% received palliative care. Palliative care use was higher in the following patient groups: survival >24 months (17% vs 2%), male (54% vs 46%), higher Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score (16% vs 8%), treatment at designated cancer programs (74% vs 71%), lung cancer (76% vs 28%), higher grade cancer (53% vs 24%), and stage IV cancer (59% vs 13%). Patients who lived in communities with a greater percentage of high school degrees had higher odds of receiving palliative care; Central and Pacific regions of the United States had lower odds of palliative care use than the East Coast. Patients with colon, melanoma, or prostate cancer had lower odds of palliative care than patients with breast cancer, whereas those with lung cancer had higher odds. Palliative care use in solid cancer tumors is variable, with a preference for patients with lung cancer, younger age, known insurance status, and higher educational level.

  1. System of radiation monitoring of nuclear hazardous facilities in Institute of Atomic Energy of National Nuclear Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azarov, V.A.; Meshin, M.M.; Shuklin, G.S.

    1996-01-01

    Issues of radiation monitoring (RM) at reactor complex of Inst. of Atomic Energy (IAE) are discussed in report. The National Nuclear Centre's reactor base consists of 2 complexes situated in 2 different locations: Bajkal-1 and IGR. So far as IAE has common mythology for RM at all hazardous nuclear facilities the issues of RM for Baikal-1 and IGR Radiation monitoring system includes: - personal dosimetric control of personnel, maintaining the reactor systems and research laboratories; RM of industrial buildings; - RM of technical areas of technical area of the facility; sanitary system of dosimetry control (DC); etc. The description of stationary DC system of the complex based on 'System' facility are given. Baikal is surround by sanitary area with radius of 5 km and with its centre in the reactor location. Complexity of studying the radiation status on the territory of Baikal-1 and its surroundings is the result of nuclear testing conducted at the test site in the past, reactor operation with open exhaust of coolant into atmosphere while testing on Nuclear Rocket Engines program as well as global fall out of radionuclides

  2. The materials production and processing facility at the Spanish National Centre for fusion technologies (TechnoFusion)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, A.; Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R.; Hernandez, M.T.; Jimenez-Rey, D.; Roman, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Perlado, M.; Ibarra, A.

    2011-01-01

    In response to the urgent request from the EU Fusion Program, a new facility (TechnoFusion) for research and development of fusion materials has been planned with support from the Regional Government of Madrid and the Ministry of Science and Innovation of Spain. TechnoFusion, the National Centre for Fusion Technologies, aims screening different technologies relevant for ITER and DEMO environments while promoting the contribution of international companies and research groups into the Fusion Programme. For this purpose, the centre will be provided with a large number of unique facilities for the manufacture, testing (a triple-beam multi-ion irradiation, a plasma-wall interaction device, a remote handling for under ionizing radiation testing) and analysis of critical fusion materials. Particularly, the objectives, semi-industrial scale capabilities and present status of the TechnoFusion Materials Production and Processing (MPP) facility are presented. Previous studies revealed that the MPP facility will be a very promising infrastructure for the development of new materials and prototypes demanded by the fusion technology and therefore some of them will be here briefly summarized.

  3. The materials production and processing facility at the Spanish National Centre for fusion technologies (TechnoFusion)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A., E-mail: rpp@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Fisica, UC3M, Avda de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R. [Departamento de Fisica, UC3M, Avda de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Hernandez, M.T. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Jimenez-Rey, D. [CMAM, UAM, C/Faraday 3, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Roman, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Garcia-Cortes, I. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Perlado, M. [IFN, ETSII, UPM, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ibarra, A. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    In response to the urgent request from the EU Fusion Program, a new facility (TechnoFusion) for research and development of fusion materials has been planned with support from the Regional Government of Madrid and the Ministry of Science and Innovation of Spain. TechnoFusion, the National Centre for Fusion Technologies, aims screening different technologies relevant for ITER and DEMO environments while promoting the contribution of international companies and research groups into the Fusion Programme. For this purpose, the centre will be provided with a large number of unique facilities for the manufacture, testing (a triple-beam multi-ion irradiation, a plasma-wall interaction device, a remote handling for under ionizing radiation testing) and analysis of critical fusion materials. Particularly, the objectives, semi-industrial scale capabilities and present status of the TechnoFusion Materials Production and Processing (MPP) facility are presented. Previous studies revealed that the MPP facility will be a very promising infrastructure for the development of new materials and prototypes demanded by the fusion technology and therefore some of them will be here briefly summarized.

  4. Current management of intracerebral haemorrhage in China: a national, multi-centre, hospital register study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heeley Emma L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to examine current practice of the management and secondary prevention of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH in China where the disease is more common than in Western populations. Methods Data on baseline characteristics, management in-hospital and post-stroke, and outcome of ICH patients are from the ChinaQUEST (QUality Evaluation of Stroke Care and Treatment study, a multi-centre, prospective, 62 hospital registry in China during 2006-07. Results Nearly all ICH patients (n = 1572 received an intravenous haemodiluting agent such as mannitol (96% or a neuroprotectant (72%, and there was high use of intravenous traditional Chinese medicine (TCM (42%. Neurosurgery was undertaken in 137 (9% patients; being overweight, having a low Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score on admission, and Total Anterior Circulation Syndrome (TACS clinical pattern on admission, were the only baseline factors associated with this intervention in multivariate analyses. Neurosurgery was associated with nearly three times higher risk of death/disability at 3 months post-stroke (odd ratio [OR] 2.60, p Conclusions The management of ICH in China is characterised by high rates of use of intravenous haemodiluting agents, neuroprotectants, and TCM, and of antihypertensives for secondary prevention. The controversial efficacy of these therapies, coupled with the current lack of treatments of proven benefit, is a call for action for more outcomes based research in ICH.

  5. Acute thiopurine overdose: analysis of reports to a National Poison Centre 1995-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gregoriano

    Full Text Available Literature regarding acute human toxicity of thiopurines is limited to a handful of case reports. Our objectives were to describe all cases of overdose with thiopurines reported to the Swiss Toxicological Information Centre between 1995-2013. A retrospective analysis was performed to determine circumstances, magnitude, management and outcome of overdose with these substances. A total of 40 cases (14 paediatric were reported (azathioprine, n = 35; 6-mercaptopurine, n = 5. Of these, 25 were with suicidal intent, 12 were accidental and 3 were iatrogenic errors. The magnitude of overdose ranged from 1.5 to 43 (median 8 times the usual dose in adults. Twelve cases (30% had attributable symptoms. The majority of these were minor and included gastrointestinal complaints and liver function test and blood count abnormalities. Symptoms were experienced by patients who took at least 1.5-times their usual daily thiopurine dose. Overdoses over two or more consecutive days, even if of modest size, were less well tolerated. One case of azathioprine and allopurinol co-ingestion over consecutive days led to agranulocytosis. Decontamination measures were undertaken in 11 cases (10 activated charcoal, 1 gastric lavage and these developed fewer symptoms than untreated patients. This study shows that acute overdoses with thiopurines have a favourable outcome in the majority of cases and provides preliminary evidence that gastrointestinal decontamination with activated charcoal may reduce symptom development after overdose of these substances if patients present to medical services soon after ingestion.

  6. The Development of National Beef-Cattle Population in Relation to Beef-Cattle Population at the Centre and Non Centre Area, and the Policy of National Development Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sodiq

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were (1 to find out the development of beef-cattle population at national level, at the Centre Area of Population (CAP and Non Centre Area of Population (NCAP, (2 to assess the relation between population of national beef-cattle and beef-cattle population at CAP and NCAP, (3 to study the policy of beef-cattle development program in Indonesia. The target of this study addressed to the Directorate General of Livestock Services, Republic of Indonesia. A literature review and communication methods were applied in this study. Descriptive and regression analysis were used for data analysis.  The study revealed that: (1 During 1995-2005, beef-cattle population at national level, CAP and NCAP were unstable.  Due to financial crises (1997, the population at national and CAP tended to decrease, but the population at NCAP was relatively constant.  During 2003-2005, national population tended to increase (0.83% per year, and that figure was less than national target (1.05%,  (2 Population of national beef-cattle (Y was highly related (r2: 0,95; MSE: 108508 to the population of beef-cattle at NCAP (X;  Y = 4764492 + 0.896 X;  (3 An increase in beef-cattle population during 2000-2005 was due to an increase in calving and cattle importation. Slaughtering of cows should be controlled to increase calving. The evaluation results of beef self-sufficiency program revealed that there were failures in achieving main goals of the program. It is recommended that to improve the contribution of CAP to national needs, the development of cattle population should be focused in those areas.  The evaluation results of beef self-sufficiency program could be considered in the future policy in term of the development cattle population. Some causes of the policy failures: (1 the formulated policy was not equipped with detailed operation plans. The program formulation was limited to title and goal without elaborating the way to achieve the

  7. Radiotherapy of invasive breast cancer: French national guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnard, S.; Mazeau-Woynar, V.; Verdoni, L.; Cutuli, B.; Fourquet, A.; Giard, S.; Hennequin, C.; Leblanc-Onfroy, M.

    2012-01-01

    The French National Cancer Institute (INCa) and Societe francaise de senologie et pathologie mammaire (SFSPM), in collaboration with a multidisciplinary experts group, have published the French national clinical practice guidelines on a selection of 11 currently debated questions regarding the management of invasive breast cancer. Those guidelines are based on a comprehensive analysis of the current published evidence dealing with those issues, secondly reviewed by 100 reviewers. Radiotherapy was concerned by five of the 11 questions: indications for the boost after whole gland irradiation; hypo-fractionated radiotherapy; partial breast irradiation; indications for mammary internal nodes irradiation, and indications of radiotherapy after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. (authors)

  8. Evaluation of a pilot 'peer support' training programme for volunteers in a hospital-based cancer information and support centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnane, Nicole Anne; Waters, Trish; Aranda, Sanchia

    2011-01-01

    Volunteers from Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (Peter Mac) Patient Information and Support Centre (PISC) assist the Cancer Support Nurse by helping patients and families/carers find information and provide face-to-face peer support. Benefits of shared personal experiences between volunteer and patient are clearly different from professional support. Volunteers require specific skill sets and detailed preparation for this role. Volunteers completed a 3-day training programme adapted from the Cancer Council Victoria's 'Cancer Connect Telephone Peer Support Volunteer' training programme. The focus was role expectations and boundaries for peer support volunteers, debriefing, communication skills training, support services, complementary and alternative therapies and internet information. Assessment included a quiz and observation for a range of competencies. Role-play with simulated patients developed appropriate support skills. Eight volunteers participated. Pre-training questionnaires revealed all volunteers highly self-rated existing skills supporting people affected by cancer. During training, volunteers recognised these skills were inadequate. All agreed that role-play using an actor as a 'simulated patient' helped develop communication skills; however, the experience proved challenging. Post-training all reported increased knowledge of role definition and boundaries, supportive communication skills, supports available for patients and families/carers and importance of self-care. Facilitators recommended seven of the eight participants be accredited PISC Peer Support Volunteers. One volunteer was assessed unsuitable for consistently overstepping the boundaries of the peer support role and withdrew from training. Success of the programme resulted in a trained 'face-to-face peer support volunteer' group better equipped for their role. Sixteen months following training, all who completed the programme remain active volunteers in the PISC. Planned educational updates

  9. The United Nations University: The Concept, History, Structure, Financing, Objectives, Centres and Programmes. Guest Editorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, J.

    2000-01-01

    The United Nations University (UNU) is an international academic organization which brings together leading international scholars to tackle world problems. This article describes for South African scholars, institutions, governments, and their agencies the importance of the work being undertaken by the UNU and encourages their participation. (EV)

  10. Nacionalismo no centro e na periferia do capitalismo Nationalism at the centre and periphery of Capitalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Bresser-Pereira

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, inicialmente, argumento que o nacionalismo é uma das ideologias das sociedades modernas conjuntamente com o liberalismo, o socialismo, o eficientismo e o ambientalismo. Em seguida, na primeira seção, defino a nação como a forma de sociedade politicamente organizada que nasce com a revolução capitalista e leva à formação dos estados-nação, e o nacionalismo como a ideologia correspondente: seu objetivo é a autonomia e o desenvolvimento econômico nacional. Na segunda seção, distingo o nacionalismo dos países centrais daquele dos países periféricos; enquanto nos primeiros o nacionalismo é implícito, nos periféricos ou é explícito ou então deriva para o cosmopolitismo. Na terceira, argumento que, embora o imperialismo seja inevitável entre países fortes e fracos, ele mudará de características na medida em que essa relação de forças se modificar graças ao nacionalismo dos dominados. Ainda nessa seção, faço uma breve referência ao Brasil. Finalmente, volto às ideologias do capitalismo para mostrar que, ao contrário das demais, o nacionalismo é uma ideologia particularista - o que aumenta a resistência a ela e facilita a tarefa de dominação dos países centrais. Não obstante, o nacionalismo não morre porque é um princípio organizador da sociedade capitalista.In this work I show that nationalism, together with liberalism, socialism, efficientism and the environmentalism, is one of the ideologies of the modern societies. In the first section, I define nation as the form of society politically organized that is born with the Capitalist Revolution and leads to the formation of the nation-state, and nationalism as the corresponding ideology: its objective is the autonomy and the national economic development. In the second section, I distinguish the nationalism of the central countries from that one of the peripheral countries; while in the first the nationalism is implicit, in the peripherals is

  11. Argonne National Laboratory: An example of a US nuclear research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear era was ushered in 1942 with the demonstration of a sustained nuclear chain reaction in Chicago Pile 1 facility. The USA then set up five large national multi disciplinary laboratories for developing nuclear technology for civilian use and three national laboratories for military applications. Reactor development, including prototype construction, was the main focus of the Argonne National Laboratory. More than 100 power reactors operating in the USA have benefited from R and D in the national laboratories. However, currently the support for nuclear power has waned. With the end of the cold war there has also been a need to change the mission of laboratories involved in military applications. For all laboratories of the Department of Energy (DOE) the mission, which was clearly focused earlier on high risk, high payoff long term R and D has now become quite diffused with a number of near term programmes. Cost and mission considerations have resulted in shutting down of many large facilities as well as auxiliary facilities. Erosion of infrastructure has also resulted in reduced opportunities for research which means dwindling of interest in nuclear science and engineering among the younger generation. The current focus of nuclear R and D in the DOE laboratories is on plant life extension, deactivation and decommissioning, spent fuel management and waste management. Advanced aspects include space nuclear applications and nuclear fusion R and D. At the Argonne National Laboratory, major initiatives for the future would be in the areas of science, energy, environment and non-proliferation technologies. International collaboration would be useful mechanisms to achieve cost effective solutions for major developmental areas. These include reactor operation and safety, repositories for high level nuclear waste, reactor system decommissioning, large projects like a nuclear fusion reactor and advanced power reactors. The IAEA could have a positive role in these

  12. Fast neutrons in the treatment of head and neck cancers: the results of a multi-centre randomly controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.; Arnott, S.J.; Orr, J.A.; Kerr, G.R.; Schmitt, G.

    1984-01-01

    The results are presented of a multi-centre randomly controlled trial of fast neutron irradiation and mega-voltage X-rays in the treatment of patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. No significant difference was observed in local tumour control rates. Salvage surgery was performed in a similar number of patients in the two groups. Late morbidity was also similar in the two treatment groups. Patients in a subgroup with cancer of the larynx treated by photons had a significantly better survival than those in the neutron treated group. (Auth.)

  13. Clinical characteristics of bladder cancer in patients with spinal cord injury: the experience from a single centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böthig, Ralf; Kurze, Ines; Fiebag, Kai; Kaufmann, Albert; Schöps, Wolfgang; Kadhum, Thura; Zellner, Michael; Golka, Klaus

    2017-06-01

    Life expectancy for people with spinal cord injury has shown a marked increase due to modern advances in treatment methods and in neuro-urology. However, since life expectancy of people with paralysis increases, the risk of developing of urinary bladder cancer is gaining importance. Single-centre retrospective evaluation of patient data with spinal cord injuries and proven urinary bladder cancer and summary of the literature. Between 1998 and 2014, 24 (3 female, 21 male) out of a total of 6599 patients with spinal cord injury were diagnosed with bladder cancer. The average age at bladder cancer diagnosis was 57.67 years, which is well below the average for bladder cancer cases in the general population (male: 73, female: 77). All but one patient had a latency period between the onset of the spinal paralysis and tumour diagnosis of more than 10 years. The median latency was 29.83 years. The median survival for these patients was 11.5 months. Of the 24 patients, 19 (79%) had muscle invasive bladder cancer at ≥T2 at the time of diagnosis. The type of neurogenic bladder (neurogenic detrusor overactivity or acontractility) and the form of bladder drainage do not appear to influence the risk. Long-term indwelling catheter drainage played only a minor role in the investigated patients. The significantly younger age at onset and the frequency of invasive tumours at diagnosis indicate that spinal cord injury influences bladder cancer risk and prognosis as well. Early detection of bladder cancer in patients with spinal cord injury remains a challenge.

  14. Lung cancer care trajectory at a Canadian centre: an evaluation of how wait times affect clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasymjanova, G; Small, D; Cohen, V; Jagoe, R T; Batist, G; Sateren, W; Ernst, P; Pepe, C; Sakr, L; Agulnik, J

    2017-10-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the most common cancers in Canada, with approximately 28,400 new cases diagnosed each year. Although timely care can contribute substantially to quality of life for patients, it remains unclear whether it also improves patient outcomes. In this work, we used a set of quality indicators that aim to describe the quality of care in lung cancer patients. We assessed adherence with existing guidelines for timeliness of lung cancer care and concordance with existing standards of treatment, and we examined the association between timeliness of care and lung cancer survival. Patients with lung cancer diagnosed between 2010 and 2015 were identified from the Pulmonary Division Lung Cancer Registry at our centre. We demonstrated that the interdisciplinary pulmonary oncology service successfully treated most of its patients within the recommended wait times. However, there is still work to be done to decrease variation in wait time. Our results demonstrate a significant association between wait time and survival, supporting the need for clinicians to optimize the patient care trajectory. It would be helpful for Canadian clinicians treating patients with lung cancer to have wait time guidelines for all treatment modalities, together with standard definitions for all time intervals. Any reductions in wait times should be balanced against the need for thorough investigation before initiating treatment. We believe that our unique model of care leads to an acceleration of diagnostic steps. Avoiding any delay associated with referral to a medical oncologist for treatment could be an acceptable strategy with respect to reducing wait time.

  15. Ion Beam Facilities at the National Centre for Accelerator based Research using a 3 MV Pelletron Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, T.; Patel, Shiv P.; Chandra, P.; Bajpai, P. K.

    A 3.0 MV (Pelletron 9 SDH 4, NEC, USA) low energy ion accelerator has been recently installed as the National Centre for Accelerator based Research (NCAR) at the Department of Pure & Applied Physics, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya, Bilaspur, India. The facility is aimed to carried out interdisciplinary researches using ion beams with high current TORVIS (for H, He ions) and SNICS (for heavy ions) ion sources. The facility includes two dedicated beam lines, one for ion beam analysis (IBA) and other for ion implantation/ irradiation corresponding to switching magnet at +20 and -10 degree, respectively. Ions with 60 kV energy are injected into the accelerator tank where after stripping positively charged ions are accelerated up to 29 MeV for Au. The installed ion beam analysis techniques include RBS, PIXE, ERDA and channelling.

  16. Initiatives in national and international collaborations at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viyogi, Yogendra Pathak; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2008-01-01

    Over the last two decades VECC scientists, under the leadership of their director Bikash Sinha, have pursued experimental physics studies under international collaboration programmes, which would not have been possible with the existing facilities at home. The collaboration extended from RIKEN (Japan) in the east to CERN (Switzerland) in the west. It spanned the energy scales from a few tens of MeV per nucleon to several hundred GeV per nucleon and the physics topics on one extreme being the structure of exotic nuclei and their decay modes and on other extreme being the phase transition of hadronic matter and the formation of quark gluon plasma. The dynamic leadership of Dr. Sinha not only helped to shed the initial inhibitions towards such activities, going beyond the national frontiers, but also gave a new dimension to the experimental physics research in the country. It helped to organize an Indian team of scientists from various national institutes and universities. It paved way for full scale funding of the projects and set the trend that enabled many other Indian groups to join several international collaborations in various fields. Here we reflect on the evolution of these national and international collaboration programmes and the physics, technological and sociological benefits resulting from these activities. (author)

  17. Estimation of National Colorectal-Cancer Incidence Using Claims Databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantin, C.; Benzenine, E.; Hagi, M.; Auverlot, B.; Cottenet, J.; Binquet, M.; Compain, D.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the accuracy of the colorectal-cancer incidence estimated from administrative data. Methods. We selected potential incident colorectal-cancer cases in 2004-2005 French administrative data, using two alternative algorithms. The first was based only on diagnostic and procedure codes, whereas the second considered the past history of the patient. Results of both methods were assessed against two corresponding local cancer registries, acting as “gold standards.” We then constructed a multivariable regression model to estimate the corrected total number of incident colorectal-cancer cases from the whole national administrative database. Results. The first algorithm provided an estimated local incidence very close to that given by the regional registries (646 versus 645 incident cases) and had good sensitivity and positive predictive values (about 75% for both). The second algorithm overestimated the incidence by about 50% and had a poor positive predictive value of about 60%. The estimation of national incidence obtained by the first algorithm differed from that observed in 14 registries by only 2.34%. Conclusion. This study shows the usefulness of administrative databases for countries with no national cancer registry and suggests a method for correcting the estimates provided by these data.

  18. Application of an incident taxonomy for radiation therapy: Analysis of five years of data from three integrated cancer centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenham, Stuart; Manley, Stephen; Turnbull, Kirsty; Hoffmann, Matthew; Fonseca, Amara; Westhuyzen, Justin; Last, Andrew; Aherne, Noel J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2018-01-01

    To develop and apply a clinical incident taxonomy for radiation therapy. Capturing clinical incident information that focuses on near-miss events is critical for achieving higher levels of safety and reliability. A clinical incident taxonomy for radiation therapy was established; coding categories were prescription, consent, simulation, voluming, dosimetry, treatment, bolus, shielding, imaging, quality assurance and coordination of care. The taxonomy was applied to all clinical incidents occurring at three integrated cancer centres for the years 2011-2015. Incidents were managed locally, audited and feedback disseminated to all centres. Across the five years the total incident rate (per 100 courses) was 8.54; the radiotherapy-specific coded rate was 6.71. The rate of true adverse events (unintended treatment and potential patient harm) was 1.06. Adverse events, where no harm was identified, occurred at a rate of 2.76 per 100 courses. Despite workload increases, overall and actual rates both exhibited downward trends over the 5-year period. The taxonomy captured previously unidentified quality assurance failures; centre-specific issues that contributed to variations in incident trends were also identified. The application of a taxonomy developed for radiation therapy enhances incident investigation and facilitates strategic interventions. The practice appears to be effective in our institution and contributes to the safety culture. The ratio of near miss to actual incidents could serve as a possible measure of incident reporting culture and could be incorporated into large scale incident reporting systems.

  19. Organ Preservation Using Contact Radiotherapy for Early Rectal Cancer: Outcomes of Patients Treated at a Single Centre in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadda, A S; Martin, A; Killeen, S; Hunter, I A

    2017-03-01

    Contact radiotherapy for early rectal cancer uses 50 kV X-rays to treat rectal cancers under direct vision. We present data of a series of patients treated at a single centre with prospective follow-up and functional assessment. All patients were treated at the Queen's Centre for Oncology, Hull, UK between September 2011 and October 2015. Patients received a biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver/pelvis, computed tomography of the chest and endorectal ultrasound. Patients were deemed to be either unfit for radical surgery or refused it due to the need for a permanent stoma. Follow-up consisted of 3 monthly flexible sigmoidoscopy and MRI of the liver/pelvis and 12 monthly computed tomography of the chest. In total, 42 patients were treated with contact radiotherapy ± external beam chemo/radiotherapy without any primary surgical excision. The median age was 78 years (range 50-94 years). Local recurrence-free survival was 88%, disease-free survival was 86% and overall survival was 88% with a median follow-up of 24 months (range 5-54 months). The median time to recurrence was 12 months (range 4-14 months). The estimated 30 day surgical mortality for this cohort with radical surgery was 12%. Mortality from the contact radiotherapy procedure was 0%. Functional outcomes as investigated by the Low Anterior Resection Syndrome (LARS) score were good, with 65% having no LARS. Contact radiotherapy for early rectal cancer is a safe, well-tolerated outpatient procedure, allowing organ preservation, with excellent oncological and functional outcomes. For elderly co-morbid patients with suitable rectal cancers this should be considered as a standard of care. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. C ERVICAL CANCER SCREENING: KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE AND PRACTICES IN A PRIMARY HEALTH CENTRE S IN RURAL INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhivya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Cervical cancer is the most common preventable cancer noted in Indian women , having a major impact on their lives. Approximately , 70% of people reside in villages in India. Hence, the objectives of this study were to find the knowledge of women regarding cervical cancer, to determine attitude and practices towards screening. METHODS : A cross - sectional study was conducted in Primary Health Centre , Periapodu, Tamil Nadu, India between January 2015 and May 2015 where 1670 participants between the ages of 21 - 65 years were randomly chosen by selecting every 3 rd woman attending the PHC for any reason. After exclusion, 1200 participants were included in the study. RESULTS : Mean age of the study population was 45.3 years. An awa reness of 75.42% was noted for cervical cancer, 43.25% for Human Papillomavirus and 32.42% that it was vaccine preventable, the major source of information being Healthcare Providers (70%. Despite 50.58% thinking that they were at risk of cervical cancer, only 31% had undergone a pap smear. However, 69.96% of the unscreened population were ready to undergo screening. Independent predictors for doing Pap test included age >35, higher parity, literacy and adequate knowledge of cervical cancer screening ( P <0. 05. CONCLUSION: This study shows a low level of knowledge, attitude and practice on cervical cancer among women in rural India. Increasing women’s awareness would be a first step in the long chain of conditions to attain a lower incidence and mortality

  1. 75 FR 48699 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Initial Review Group, Subcommittee I--Career Development, NCI-I Career Development. Date: September 21, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and.... Contact Person: Sergei Radaev, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Resources and Training Review Branch...

  2. 76 FR 1625 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-11

    ... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Initial Review Group; Subcommittee I--Career Development, Career Development. Date: February 22-23, 2011. Time: February 22, 2011, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate to review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Alexandria Old Town...

  3. 78 FR 27408 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ...., as amended. The contract proposals and the discussions could disclose confidential trade secrets or... with the contract proposals, the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SBIR Topic 304...

  4. 75 FR 7489 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ...., as amended. The grant applications and/or contract proposals and the discussions could disclose... concerning individuals associated with the grant applications and/or contract proposals, the disclosure [email protected] . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, SBIR Topic 258...

  5. 76 FR 69744 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... and Therapeutic Agents Enabled by Nanotechnology. Date: November 29, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference... Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer...

  6. Research awareness, attitudes and barriers among clinical staff in a regional cancer centre. Part 1: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, B; Coltart, K; Hutchison, C; McJury, M; Morrison, A; Paterson, C; Thomson, M

    2017-09-01

    Research is of key importance in delivering high-quality patient care through evidence-based practice. Attitude towards research and barriers to research can have an impact on research activity. A survey was conducted to establish the levels of research awareness and attitudes among clinical staff groups in this regional cancer centre and identify any barriers to participation in research. The survey consisted of 26 questions and was distributed electronically and completed online. The response rate was 22.3% (n = 123). All participants felt that clinical research will help the regional cancer centre develop and progress treatments in the future. A positive attitude towards research was evident and consistent across professional groups. The main identified barriers to research included lacking the required knowledge, skills and training, lacking support from managers, and lack of opportunity or time to be involved in research, in particular for allied health professionals. However, there appears to be the foundation of a healthy research culture for nurses supported by management. The results of the survey support the implementation of an action plan based on the recommendations of this journal article. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. National Working Group Meeting on ALK diagnostics in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Wendy; Fox, Stephen; O'Toole, Sandra; Morey, Adrienne; Frances, Glenn; Pavlakis, Nick; O'Byrne, Kenneth; Dettrick, Andrew; Leong, Trishe; Rathi, Vivek; Spagnolo, Dominic; Hemmings, Chris; Singh, Mahendra; Moffat, David; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Wilner, Keith; Buller, Richard; Pitman Lowenthal, Susan; Arifeen, Shams; Binko, Justin; Alam, Mahmood

    2014-04-01

    The global landscape of molecular testing is rapidly changing, with the recent publication of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/College of American Pathologists (CAP) guidelines and the ALK Atlas. The IASLC/CAP guidelines recommend that tumors from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) be tested for ALK rearrangements in addition to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. The spur for this recommendation is the availability of novel therapies that target these rearrangements. This article is based on coverage of a Pfizer-sponsored National Working Group Meeting on ALK Diagnostics in Lung Cancer, held around the 15th World Lung Cancer Conference, in Sydney on October 31, 2013. It is based on the presentations given by the authors at the meeting and the discussion that ensued. The content for this article was discussed and agreed on by the authors. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity. National institute on alcohol and drugs policies, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjeira, Ronaldo; Mitsuhiro, Sandro Sendin

    2012-04-01

    The National Institute of Public Policy for Alcohol and Other Drugs (INPAD) is based at the Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil, and was created to collect scientific evidence regarding epidemiology, develop new therapeutic approaches, study health economics and provide education to subsidize the proper measures to change the Brazilian scenario of alcohol and drug consumption. Policies directed towards the control of alcohol and drugs in Brazil are fragmented, poorly enforced and therefore ineffective. The unregulated market of alcohol in Brazil has contributed to the worsening health of the Brazilian population. Since 1994, INPAD has participated actively in academic debates and discussions about alcohol and drug policies and their effects on the political welfare of the country. Many scientific papers and books have been published on this subject, and the internet and other media have provided excellent opportunities for the dissemination of specialized information to the general population. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Completeness and validity in a national clinical thyroid cancer database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Londero, Stefano Christian; Mathiesen, Jes Sloth; Krogdahl, Annelise

    2014-01-01

    cancer database: DATHYRCA. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: National prospective cohort. Denmark; population 5.5 million. Completeness of case ascertainment was estimated by the independent case ascertainment method using three governmental registries as a reference. The reabstracted record method was used...... to appraise the validity. For validity assessment 100 cases were randomly selected from the DATHYRCA database; medical records were used as a reference. RESULT: The database held 1934 cases of thyroid carcinoma and completeness of case ascertainment was estimated to 90.9%. Completeness of registration......BACKGROUND: Although a prospective national clinical thyroid cancer database (DATHYRCA) has been active in Denmark since January 1, 1996, no assessment of data quality has been performed. The purpose of the study was to evaluate completeness and data validity in the Danish national clinical thyroid...

  10. Lab Plays Central Role in Groundbreaking National Clinical Trial in Precision Medicine | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Molecular Characterization Laboratory at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research lies at the heart of an ambitious new approach for testing cancer drugs that will use the newest tools of precision medicine to select the best treatme

  11. Laparoscopic surgery for rectal cancer: a single-centre experience of 120 cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Good, Daniel W

    2011-10-01

    For colorectal surgeons, laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery poses a new challenge. The defence of the questionable oncological safety tempered by the impracticality of the long learning curve is rapidly fading. As a unit specialising in minimally invasive surgery, we have routinely undertaken rectal cancer surgery laparoscopically since 2005.

  12. 3 CFR 8408 - Proclamation 8408 of August 31, 2009. National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2009 8408 Proclamation 8408 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8408 of August 31, 2009 Proc. 8408 National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2009By the President... will be diagnosed with prostate cancer. National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month is an opportunity to...

  13. Scenario design and basic analysis of the National Data Centre Preparedness Exercise 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ole; Ceranna, Lars; Hartmann, Gernot; Gestermann, Nicolai; Bönneman, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) prohibits all kinds of nuclear explosions. For the detection of treaty violations the International Monitoring System (IMS) operates stations observing seismic, hydroacoustic, and infrasound signals as well as radioisotopes in the atmosphere. While the IMS data is collected, processed and technically analyzed in the International Data Center (IDC) of the CTBT-Organization, National Data Centers (NDC) provide interpretation and advice to their government concerning suspicious detections occurring in IMS data. NDC Preparedness Exercises (NPE) are regularly performed dealing with fictitious treaty violations to practice the combined analysis of CTBT verification technologies and for the mutual exchange of information between NDC and also with the IDC. The NPE2010 and NPE2012 trigger scenarios were based on selected seismic events from the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) serving as starting point for fictitious Radionuclide dispersion. The main task was the identification of the original REB event and the discrimination between earthquakes and explosions as source. The scenario design of NPE2013 differs from those of previous NPEs. The waveform event selection is not constrained to events in the REB. The exercise trigger is a combination of a tempo-spatial indication pointing to a certain waveform event and simulated radionuclide concentrations generated by forward Atmospheric Transport Modelling based on a fictitious release. For the waveform event the date (4 Sept. 2013) is given and the region is communicated in a map showing the fictitious state of "Frisia" at the Coast of the North Sea in Central Europe. The synthetic radionuclide detections start in Vienna (8 Sept, I-131) and Schauinsland (11 Sept, Xe-133) with rather low activity concentrations and are most prominent in Stockholm and Spitsbergen mid of September 2013. Smaller concentrations in Asia follow later on. The potential connection between the waveform and

  14. A French national breast and thyroid cancer screening programme for survivors of childhood, adolescent and young adult (CAYA) cancers - DeNaCaPST programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoor-Goldschmidt, Charlotte; Drui, Delphine; Doutriaux, Isabelle; Michel, Gérard; Auquier, Pascal; Dumas, Agnès; Berger, Claire; Bernier, Valérie; Bohrer, Sandrine; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Filhon, Bruno; Fresneau, Brice; Freycon, Claire; Stefan, Dinu; Helfre, Sylvie; Jackson, Angela; Kerr, Christine; Laprie, Anne; Leseur, Julie; Mahé, Marc-André; Oudot, Caroline; Pluchard, Claire; Proust, Stéphanie; Sudour-Bonnange, Hélène; Vigneron, Céline; Lassau, Nathalie; Schlumberger, Martin; Conter, Cécile Faure; de Vathaire, Florent

    2017-05-12

    Survival of childhood, adolescent and young adult (CAYA) cancers has increased with progress in the management of the treatments and has reached more than 80% at 5 years. Nevertheless, these survivors are at great risk of second cancers and non-malignant co-morbidities in later life. DeNaCaPST is a non-interventional study whose aim is to organize a national screening for thyroid cancer and breast cancer in survivors of CAYA cancers. It will study the compliance with international recommendations, with the aim, regarding a breast screening programme, of offering for every woman living in France, at equal risk, an equal screening. DeNaCaPST trial is coordinated by the INSERM 1018 unit in cooperation with the LEA (French Childhood Cancer Survivor Study for Leukaemia) study's coordinators, the long term follow up committee and the paediatric radiation committee of the SFCE (French Society of Childhood Cancers). A total of 35 centres spread across metropolitan France and la Reunion will participate. FCCSS (French Childhood Cancer Survivor Study), LEA and central registry will be interrogated to identify eligible patients. To participate, centers agreed to perform a complete "long-term follow-up consultations" according to good clinical practice and the guidelines of the SFCE (French Society of Children Cancers). As survival has greatly improved in childhood cancers, detection of therapy-related malignancies has become a priority even if new radiation techniques will lead to better protection for organs at risk. International guidelines have been put in place because of the evidence for increased lifetime risk of breast and thyroid cancer. DeNaCaPST is based on these international recommendations but it is important to recognize that they are based on expert consensus opinion and are supported by neither nonrandomized observational studies nor prospective randomized trials in this specific population. Over-diagnosis is a phenomenon inherent in any screening program and

  15. Frederick National Laboratory Rallies to Meet Demand for Zika Vaccine | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research is producing another round of Zika vaccine for ongoing studies to determine the best delivery method and dosage. This will lay the groundwork for additional tests to see if the vaccine prevents i

  16. The burden of prostate cancer in Asian nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Cullen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this review, the International Agency for Research on Cancer′s cancer epidemiology databases were used to examine prostate cancer (PCa age-standardized incidence rates (ASIR in selected Asian nations, including Cancer Incidence in Five Continents (CI5 and GLOBOCAN databases, in an effort to determine whether ASIRs are rising in regions of the world with historically low risk of PCa development. Materials and Methods: Asian nations with adequate data quality were considered for this review. PCa ASIR estimates from CI5 and GLOBOCAN 2008 public use databases were examined in the four eligible countries: China, Japan, Korea and Singapore. Time trends in PCa ASIRs were examined using CI5 Volumes I-IX. Results: While PCa ASIRs remain much lower in the Asian nations examined than in North America, there is a clear trend of increasing PCa ASIRs in the four countries examined. Conclusion: Efforts to systematically collect cancer incidence data in Asian nations must be expanded. Current CI5 data indicate a rise in PCa ASIR in several populous Asian countries. If these rates continue to rise, it is uncertain whether there will be sufficient resources in place, in terms of trained personnel and infrastructure for medical treatment and continuum of care, to handle the increase in PCa patient volume. The recommendation by some experts to initiate PSA screening in Asian nations could compound a resource shortfall. Obtaining accurate estimates of PCa incidence in these countries is critically important for preparing for a potential shift in the public health burden posed by this disease.

  17. An evaluation on the impact of national cancer wait targets on a (UK) radiotherapy department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Neill

    2012-01-01

    The radiotherapy department in this evaluation has been working towards full compliance with national cancer wait targets (CWT) since their implementation. 31 and 62 day targets set a maximum time frame for cancer patients to commence treatment. This evaluation explored the impact of these targets on staff and patients within the radiotherapy department and their overall impact on the radiotherapy service. Methods: This evaluation followed a mixed method approach of sequential triangulation. Qualitative data collection and analysis dominate findings but existing quantitative data, available within the department, was used to support the overall findings. Staff and patient interviews were used to establish attitudes to and experiences of the CWT initiative in relation to radiotherapy treatment. Quantitative data was taken from the local Cancer Centre CWT database that tracks patients referred for radiotherapy. Findings and Conclusion: Qualitative data analysis identified four main themes: pressure, appropriateness of target lengths, quality of treatment provided and efficiency of working practices within the department. Responses within these themes were both positive and negative with patients mainly the former and staff the latter. Quantitative evaluation found an increased monitoring and management burden from the CWT initiative, primarily for administrative, clerical and managerial staff. The main impact of the CWT initiative was an increase in pressure on staff due to reduced time to prepare and deliver treatment. Patients felt the initiative had not impacted negatively on their care and experienced a reduction in anxiety due to a reduction in waiting time.

  18. Experiencing Health Advocacy During Cervical Cancer Awareness Week: A National Initiative for Obstetrics and Gynaecology Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Glenn; Finlayson, Sarah; Luna, Vilma; Miller, Dianne; Fung-Kee-Fung, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada requires that residents demonstrate competence in health advocacy (HA). We sought to develop and implement a national educational module for obstetrics and gynaecology residents to address the role of HA. This pilot program was centred on cervical cancer prevention, which lends itself to applying the principles of advocacy. An educational module was developed and disseminated to all obstetrics and gynaecology residency programs in Canada. The module describes options for HA involving cervical dysplasia screening, such as an outreach clinic or a forum for public/student education, which were to be implemented during Cervical Cancer Awareness Week. The measures of success were the number of programs implementing the curriculum, number of residents who participated, diversity of projects implemented, individuals (patients or learners) reached by the program, and the overall experience of the trainees. Three programs implemented the curriculum in 2011, one in 2012, and seven in 2013. After three years, the module has involved seven of 16 medical schools, over 100 residents, and thousands of women either directly or indirectly. Additionally, attributes of HA experienced by the residents were identified: teamwork, leadership, increased systems knowledge, increased social capital within the community, creativity, innovation, and adaptability. We have demonstrated that an educational module can be implemented nationally, helping our residents fulfill their HA requirements. Other specialties could use this module in building HA into their own programs.

  19. Eurocan plus report: feasibility study for coordination of national cancer research activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The EUROCAN+PLUS Project, called for by the European Parliament, was launched in October 2005 as a feasibility study for coordination of national cancer research activities in Europe. Over the course of the next two years, the Project process organized over 60 large meetings and countless smaller meetings that gathered in total over a thousand people, the largest Europe-wide consultation ever conducted in the field of cancer research.Despite a strong tradition in biomedical science in Europe, fragmentation and lack of sustainability remain formidable challenges for implementing innovative cancer research and cancer care improvement. There is an enormous duplication of research effort in the Member States, which wastes time, wastes money and severely limits the total intellectual concentration on the wide cancer problem. There is a striking lack of communication between some of the biggest actors on the European scene, and there are palpable tensions between funders and those researchers seeking funds.It is essential to include the patients' voice in the establishment of priority areas in cancer research at the present time. The necessity to have dialogue between funders and scientists to establish the best mechanisms to meet the needs of the entire community is evident. A top priority should be the development of translational research (in its widest form), leading to the development of effective and innovative cancer treatments and preventive strategies. Translational research ranges from bench-to-bedside innovative cancer therapies and extends to include bringing about changes in population behaviours when a risk factor is established.The EUROCAN+PLUS Project recommends the creation of a small, permanent and independent European Cancer Initiative (ECI). This should be a model structure and was widely supported at both General Assemblies of the project. The ECI should assume responsibility for stimulating innovative cancer research and facilitating processes

  20. Comparing local TV news with national TV news in cancer coverage: an exploratory content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chul-Joo; Long, Marilee; Slater, Michael D; Song, Wen

    2014-12-01

    The authors compared local TV news with national TV news in terms of cancer coverage using a nationally representative sample of local nightly TV and national network TV (i.e., ABC, CBS, NBC, and CNN) cancer news stories that aired during 2002 and 2003. Compared with national TV news, local TV cancer stories were (a) much shorter in length, (b) less likely to report on cancer prevention (i.e., preventive behaviors and screening tests), and (c) less likely to reference national organizations (i.e., National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Food and Drug Administration) that have made clear recommendations about ways to prevent cancer. The implications of these findings for health communication research and cancer education were discussed.

  1. Opioid consumption before and after the establishment of a palliative medicine unit in an Egyptian cancer centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsirafy, Samy A; Ibrahim, Noha Y; Abou-Elela, Enas N

    2012-01-01

    Opioid consumption before and after the establishment of a palliative medicine unit (PMU) in an Egyptian cancer centre was reviewed. A comparison of consumption during the year before the PMU was established to consumption during the third year after the PMU's establishment revealed that morphine consumption increased by 698 percent, fentanyl by 217 percent, and tramadol by 230 percent. Expressed in defined daily dose (DDD) and adjusted for 1,000 new cancer patients, consumption increased by 460 percent, from 4,678 DDD/1,000 new patients to 26,175 DDD/1,000 new patients. Expressed in grams of oral morphine equivalent (g OME), consumption increased by 644 percent, from 233 g OME/1,000 new patients to 1,731 g OME/1,000 new patients. The establishment of the PMU was associated with an increase in opioid consumption, especially morphine, which is an indicator of improvement in cancer pain control. The expression of opioid consumption in OME in addition to DDD may provide further information, especially when weak opioids are included in the analysis.

  2. Population-based geographic access to parent and satellite National Cancer Institute Cancer Center Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Wang, Fahui

    2017-09-01

    Satellite facilities of National Cancer Institute (NCI) cancer centers have expanded their regional footprints. This study characterized geographic access to parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities nationally overall and by sociodemographics. Parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities, which were geocoded in ArcGIS, were ascertained. Travel times from every census tract in the continental United States and Hawaii to the nearest parent and satellite facilities were calculated. Census-based population attributes were used to characterize measures of geographic access for sociodemographic groups. From the 62 NCI cancer centers providing clinical care in 2014, 76 unique parent locations and 211 satellite locations were mapped. The overall proportion of the population within 60 minutes of a facility was 22% for parent facilities and 32.7% for satellite facilities. When satellites were included for potential access, the proportion of some racial groups for which a satellite was the closest NCI cancer center facility increased notably (Native Americans, 22.6% with parent facilities and 39.7% with satellite facilities; whites, 34.8% with parent facilities and 50.3% with satellite facilities; and Asians, 40.0% with parent facilities and 54.0% with satellite facilities), with less marked increases for Hispanic and black populations. Rural populations of all categories had dramatically low proportions living within 60 minutes of an NCI cancer center facility of any type (1.0%-6.6%). Approximately 14% of the population (n = 43,033,310) lived more than 180 minutes from a parent or satellite facility, and most of these individuals were Native Americans and/or rural residents (37% of Native Americans and 41.7% of isolated rural residents). Racial/ethnic and rural populations showed markedly improved geographic access to NCI cancer center care when satellite facilities were included. Cancer 2017;123:3305-11. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American

  3. Diet Quality of Cancer Survivors and Non-Cancer Individuals: Results from a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Liu, Shanshan; John, Esther; Must, Aviva; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Background Patterns of poor nutritional intake may exacerbate elevated morbidity experienced by cancer survivors. It remains unclear whether cancer survivors adhere to existing dietary guidelines, and whether survivors’ diet differs from individuals without cancer long-term. Methods We evaluated dietary intake and quality in 1,533 adult cancer survivors in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2010 and compared that to 3,075 individuals without a history of cancer who were matched to cancer survivors by age, gender, and race/ethnicity. Dietary intake was assessed using 24-hour dietary recalls. The Healthy Eating Index (HEI)-2010 was used to evaluate diet quality. Results The mean HEI-2010 total score was 47.2 (SD=0.5) in cancer survivors and 48.3 (SD=0.4) in non-cancer individuals (p=0.03). Compared to non-cancer individuals, cancer survivors had a significantly lower score of empty calories (13.6 vs. 14.4, p=0.001), which corresponds to worse adherence to dietary intake of calories from solid fats, alcohol and added sugars. Cancer survivors also had a significantly lower dietary intake of fiber than non-cancer individuals (15.0 vs. 15.9 grams/day, p=0.02). Survivors’ mean dietary intakes of vitamin D, vitamin E, potassium, fiber, and calcium were 31%, 47%, 55%, 60%, and 73% in relation to the recommended intake whereas the mean dietary intake of saturated fat and sodium was 112% and 133% of the recommended intake. Conclusions Cancer survivors had a poor adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and their intake patterns were worse than those in the general population for empty calories and fiber. PMID:26624564

  4. A new risk prediction model for critical care: the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David A; Parry, Gareth J; Carpenter, James R; Short, Alasdair; Rowan, Kathy

    2007-04-01

    To develop a new model to improve risk prediction for admissions to adult critical care units in the UK. Prospective cohort study. The setting was 163 adult, general critical care units in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, December 1995 to August 2003. Patients were 216,626 critical care admissions. None. The performance of different approaches to modeling physiologic measurements was evaluated, and the best methods were selected to produce a new physiology score. This physiology score was combined with other information relating to the critical care admission-age, diagnostic category, source of admission, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation before admission-to develop a risk prediction model. Modeling interactions between diagnostic category and physiology score enabled the inclusion of groups of admissions that are frequently excluded from risk prediction models. The new model showed good discrimination (mean c index 0.870) and fit (mean Shapiro's R 0.665, mean Brier's score 0.132) in 200 repeated validation samples and performed well when compared with recalibrated versions of existing published risk prediction models in the cohort of patients eligible for all models. The hypothesis of perfect fit was rejected for all models, including the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC) model, as is to be expected in such a large cohort. The ICNARC model demonstrated better discrimination and overall fit than existing risk prediction models, even following recalibration of these models. We recommend it be used to replace previously published models for risk adjustment in the UK.

  5. Experiences with the implementation of a national teaching qualification in university medical centres and veterinary medicine in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Willemina M Ineke; Zanting, Anneke

    2015-02-01

    In 2008, a compulsory national basic teaching qualification was introduced for all university teachers in the Netherlands. At that time all eight University Medical Centres (UMCs) and the only Faculty of Veterinary Medicine had adopted or were setting up teacher development programmes. This study explores how these programmes relate to each other and to the basic teaching qualification. To gather information on teacher development programmes in the UMCs and the Veterinary Medicine Faculty an online survey was filled out by teacher development representatives from each of them. The programmes had main features in common (e.g. competency based and portfolio assessment), but differed somewhat in contents according to the local situation. Importantly, they had all been formally accepted as equivalent to the basic teaching qualification. We consider the freedom to tailor the qualifications to the medical context as well as to the local situation of the UMCs and the Veterinary Medicine Faculty one of the major success factors and the well-established collaboration between teacher development representatives of the UMCs and the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine as another. Challenges for the future include embedding the teacher development programmes in the institutional organizations and maintaining and further developing the programmes and the competencies of the qualified teachers, e.g. in a senior qualification.

  6. Innovation and the English National Health Service: a qualitative study of the independent sector treatment centre programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Simon; Allen, Pauline; Bartlett, Will; Pérotin, Virginie

    2011-08-01

    Over the past two decades, an international trend of exposing public health services to different forms of economic organisation has emerged. In the English National Health Service (NHS), care is currently provided through a quasi-market including 'diverse' providers from the private and third sector. The predominant scheme through which private sector companies have been awarded NHS contracts is the Independent Sector Treatment Centre (ISTC) programme. ISTCs were designed to produce innovative models of service delivery for elective care and stimulate innovation among incumbent NHS providers. This paper investigates these claims using qualitative data on the impact of an ISTC upon a local health economy (LHE) composed of NHS organisations in England. Using the case of elective orthopaedic surgery, we conducted semi-structured interviews with senior managers from incumbent NHS providers and an ISTC in 2009. We show that ISTCs exhibit a different relationship with frontline clinicians because they counteract the power of professional communities associated with the NHS. This has positive and negative consequences for innovation. ISTCs have introduced new routines unencumbered by the extant norms of professional communities, but they appear to represent weaker learning environments and do not reproduce cooperation across organisational boundaries to the same extent as incumbent NHS providers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Worksite Health Education Workshop as Empowerment Intervention for Health Promotion in the National Research Centre of Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagat Mohamed Amer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The study aimed to assess worksite health education workshops as a successful tool for health promotion of employees. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A one day workshop was held for individuals engaged in research activities in the National research Centre of Egypt at the worksite. Its main objective was to highlight the nature, causes, symptoms and management of job stress. Participants were asked to fill a personality assessment sheet, a self-reported questionnaire for job satisfaction. Other questionnaires for assessment of falsification of type and some socio-demographic data were filled by the attendants. A concise survey was introduced at the end of the workshop for feedback collection. RESULTS: Attendants of the workshop were 36 subjects mainly females (94.4%. Mean age was 40.5 years with 63.9% of participants at their postdoctoral studies stage. Participants were at midway in the scale of job satisfaction (3.3 and did not suffer from falsification (0.3. The feedback survey score (11.5 showed great acceptance for the intervention. Special interest in the topic of stress was reported by 35.1% of attendants who found it the best item in the workshop and the interactive manipulation came next as declared by 18.9% of the participants. CONCLUSION: Worksite health education workshops seem to be a successful practice for empowerment in the Egyptian workplace.

  8. Implementing the ESC/ERS pulmonary hypertension guidelines: real-life cases from a national referral centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Montani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH comprises a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by increased pulmonary vascular resistance that results in progressive right ventricular failure. In order to translate current evidence into routine clinical practice, the European Society of Cardiology (ESC and the European Respiratory Society (ERS have recently jointly proposed evidence-based guidelines for the optimal management of different PH patient groups. This article describes a series of clinical cases of PH due to various aetiologies that were referred to a large national PH expert referral centre. In each case, the assessment and therapeutic approach undertaken is described in the context of the new ECS/ERS guidelines. The routine diagnostic work-up of suspected idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH and recommended treatments for patients with functional class II, III and IV disease is emphasised. Familial screening and management of heritable PAH is discussed. Appropriate investigation and therapeutic strategies for patients with chronic thromboembolic disease and PH that is associated with congenital heart disease, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease and systemic sclerosis are also highlighted.

  9. The flat‐funding years and the National Cancer Institute: Consequences for cancer research

    OpenAIRE

    Hitt, Emma

    2008-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), the principal federal agency for cancer research and training in the US, has contended with a flat budget since 2004, which according to the institute's director is preventing the organisation from keeping pace with the increasing costs of biomedical research. Although the impact of these budget shortfalls are still being debated, Niederhuber believes these so‐called “flat‐funding years” may pave the way for worrying future trends, resulting in a paucity o...

  10. Gynecologic Cancer Prevention and Control in the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program: Progress, Current Activities, and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Sherri L.; Lakhani, Naheed; Brown, Phaeydra M.; Larkin, O. Ann; Moore, Angela R.; Hayes, Nikki S.

    2013-01-01

    Gynecologic cancer confers a large burden among women in the United States. Several evidence-based interventions are available to reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality from these cancers. The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) is uniquely positioned to implement these interventions in the US population. This review discusses progress and future directions for the NCCCP in preventing and controlling gynecologic cancer.

  11. Gynecologic cancer prevention and control in the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program: progress, current activities, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sherri L; Lakhani, Naheed; Brown, Phaeydra M; Larkin, O Ann; Moore, Angela R; Hayes, Nikki S

    2013-08-01

    Gynecologic cancer confers a large burden among women in the United States. Several evidence-based interventions are available to reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality from these cancers. The National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) is uniquely positioned to implement these interventions in the US population. This review discusses progress and future directions for the NCCCP in preventing and controlling gynecologic cancer.

  12. Status of proton treatment facility at National Cancer Center, Kashiwa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, T.; Kohmura, I.; Kataoka, S.; Nonaka, H.; Kimura, T.; Sato, T.; Nishio, T.; Shimbo, M.; Ogino, T.; Ikeda, H.

    2001-01-01

    Proton treatment facility at National Cancer Center Hospital East (Kashiwa) has two rotating gantry ports and one horizontal fixed port. In order to provide the same dose distribution at different gantry angles, the beam optics from the accelerator (235 MeV cyclotron) to the entrance of nozzle is specially tuned. Recently developed automatic tuning method of beam alignment can realize a sequential treatment at three irradiation ports. (author)

  13. Parental cancer: Characteristics of users of child-centred counselling versus individual psycho-oncological treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhestern, Laura; Geertz, Wiebke; Schulz-Kindermann, Frank; Bergelt, Corinna

    2018-03-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the characteristics of users of a specific child-centred counselling service (COSIP) and to compare those to parents using an individual psycho-oncological treatment (PO). We conducted a retrospective analysis on data of users of COSIP and users of PO. Database was the routine assessment (demographic and disease-related characteristics, GAD-7, PHQ-9, EORTC QLQ-C30, and current concerns) of an outpatient psycho-oncological clinic with additional child-centred counselling. A total of 151 patients and 49 partners with children ≤21 years were included. We conducted descriptive analyses and group comparisons. Fifty-nine patients and partners used COSIP only or additionally to individual psycho-oncological service. PO users were more depressed and were more anxious than COSIP users. Patients using PO reported worse emotional functioning than patients using COSIP. Partners using PO reported worse global quality of life and more symptoms of fatigue than partners using COSIP. With regard to current concerns, patients using COSIP reported child-related issues more frequently than PO users. PO users reported symptoms of anxiety, depressive symptoms, or exhaustion more frequently than COSIP users. The findings demonstrate that patients and partners self-referring to PO or COSIP are highly burdened. COSIP users experience different psychosocial burden than PO users. As poor mental state of parents is a risk factor for the development of mental problems in children, parents using only PO may benefit from additional child-centred support. Accordingly, the need for COSIP should be assessed continuously during PO of patients with children ≤21 years. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Effect of patient choice and hospital competition on service configuration and technology adoption within cancer surgery: a national, population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ajay; Lewis, Daniel; Mason, Malcolm; Purushotham, Arnie; Sullivan, Richard; van der Meulen, Jan

    2017-11-01

    There is a scarcity of evidence about the role of patient choice and hospital competition policies on surgical cancer services. Previous evidence has shown that patients are prepared to bypass their nearest cancer centre to receive surgery at more distant centres that better meet their needs. In this national, population-based study we investigated the effect of patient mobility and hospital competition on service configuration and technology adoption in the National Health Service (NHS) in England, using prostate cancer surgery as a model. We mapped all patients in England who underwent radical prostatectomy between Jan 1, 2010, and Dec 31, 2014, according to place of residence and treatment location. For each radical prostatectomy centre we analysed the effect of hospital competition (measured by use of a spatial competition index [SCI], with a score of 0 indicating weakest competition and 1 indicating strongest competition) and the effect of being an established robotic radical prostatectomy centre at the start of 2010 on net gains or losses of patients (difference between number of patients treated in a centre and number expected based on their residence), and the likelihood of closing their radical prostatectomy service. Between Jan 1, 2010, and Dec 31, 2014, 19 256 patients underwent radical prostatectomy at an NHS provider in England. Of the 65 radical prostatectomy centres open at the start of the study period, 23 (35%) had a statistically significant net gain of patients during 2010-14. Ten (40%) of these 23 were established robotic centres. 37 (57%) of the 65 centres had a significant net loss of patients, of which two (5%) were established robotic centres and ten (27%) closed their radical prostatectomy service during the study period. Radical prostatectomy centres that closed were more likely to be located in areas with stronger competition (highest SCI quartile [0·87-0·92]; p=0·0081) than in areas with weaker competition. No robotic surgery centre

  15. Breast cancer patients' presentation for oncological treatment: a single centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinkuolie, Akinbolaji Andrew; Etonyeaku, Amarachukwu Chiduziem; Olasehinde, Olalekan; Arowolo, Olukayode Adeolu; Babalola, Rereloluwa Nicodemus

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer patients are presenting at advanced stages for oncological treatment in Nigeria and World Health Organization predicted developing countries' breast cancer incidence and mortality to increase by year 2020. Prospective observational hospital based study that enrolled breast cancer patients from catchment area of an oncology service hospital in Nigeria between 2007 and 2013. Patients' demographics, breast cancer burden and health care giver presentation variables were analysed for causal factors of seeking medical help and what determines commencement of effective oncological treatment. Forty-six patients were enrolled, 19.6% of them presented primarily to oncologist while 80.4% presented secondarily for oncological treatment. There is a significant difference in presentation time for oncological treatment (t = -3.56, df = 42.90, p = 0.001) between primary (M =11.56 ± 5.21 weeks) and secondary presentation (M= 52.56 ± 10.27weeks). Tumor burden of those that presented secondarily were significantly more advanced (U = 78.5, p = 0.011) and, univariate analysis reveals that: patients' matrimonial setting, breast cancer awareness and mode of discovery of breast symptoms are patient related factors that determines their choice of health care providers and, determinant of effective oncological treatment is patient first contact health care provider. Patients' bio-characteristics that determine their choice of health care provider should be incorporated into community breast cancer sensitization drives. Additionally, there is a need for a government agency assign the task of accrediting and defining scope of enterprise of health care institutions and their health care providers in our pluralist health system.

  16. Breast cancer patients’ presentation for oncological treatment: a single centre study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinkuolie, Akinbolaji Andrew; Etonyeaku, Amarachukwu Chiduziem; Olasehinde, Olalekan; Arowolo, Olukayode Adeolu; Babalola, Rereloluwa Nicodemus

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer patients are presenting at advanced stages for oncological treatment in Nigeria and World Health Organization predicted developing countries’ breast cancer incidence and mortality to increase by year 2020. Methods Prospective observational hospital based study that enrolled breast cancer patients from catchment area of an oncology service hospital in Nigeria between 2007 and 2013. Patients’ demographics, breast cancer burden and health care giver presentation variables were analysed for causal factors of seeking medical help and what determines commencement of effective oncological treatment. Results Forty-six patients were enrolled, 19.6% of them presented primarily to oncologist while 80.4% presented secondarily for oncological treatment. There is a significant difference in presentation time for oncological treatment (t = -3.56, df = 42.90, p = 0.001) between primary (M =11.56 ± 5.21 weeks) and secondary presentation (M= 52.56 ± 10.27weeks). Tumor burden of those that presented secondarily were significantly more advanced (U = 78.5, p = 0.011) and, univariate analysis reveals that: patients’ matrimonial setting, breast cancer awareness and mode of discovery of breast symptoms are patient related factors that determines their choice of health care providers and, determinant of effective oncological treatment is patient first contact health care provider. Conclusion Patients’ bio-characteristics that determine their choice of health care provider should be incorporated into community breast cancer sensitization drives. Additionally, there is a need for a government agency assign the task of accrediting and defining scope of enterprise of health care institutions and their health care providers in our pluralist health system. PMID:27642404

  17. Systematic immunohistochemical screening for Lynch syndrome in colorectal cancer: a single centre experience of 486 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumstein, Valentin; Vinzens, Fabrizio; Zettl, Andreas; Heinimann, Karl; Koeberle, Dieter; von Flüe, Markus; Bolli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 cause autosomal dominantly inherited Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome patients and their families benefit from life-saving intensive cancer surveillance. Approximately one in 30 colorectal cancers arises in the setting of Lynch syndrome. The aim of this study was to assess the detection rate of Lynch syndrome at our institution after introduction of systematic immunohistochemical screening for MMR deficiency in colorectal cancers from 2011 to 2015. Following the recommendations by the Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention working group all colorectal cancers were immunohistochemically stained for the presence of MMR proteins MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6, independent of clinical criteria. In the case of loss of MLH1, the somatic BRAF mutation V600E was assessed with molecular testing and/or immunohistochemistry. Clinical follow-up of potential Lynch syndrome carriers (patients with tumours showing loss of MLH1 expression with absence of BRAFV600E, loss of PMS2, MSH2 or MSH6) was evaluated. Of all patients (n = 486), loss of MMR protein expression was found in 73 (15.0%) tumours. Twenty-eight (6.0%) were classified as potential Lynch syndrome carriers. Of the genetically tested potential Lynch syndrome carriers (10 out of 28 patients), 40% were first diagnosed with Lynch syndrome. Implementation of systematic immunohistochemistry screening for Lynch syndrome showed that 6% of colorectal cancers were potentially Lynch-syndrome related. Tumour board protocols should systematically contain information on MMR status of all colorectal cancers and, in MMR deficient cases, include clear recommendations for genetic counselling for all potential Lynch syndrome patients.

  18. Definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy concurrent with systemic therapy for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: Outcomes from an integrated regional Australian cancer centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahbari, Reza M.; McKay, Michael; Dwyer, Patrick; Winkley, Lauren; Hill, Jacques; Last, Andrew; Tahir, Abdul R.M.; Shakespeare, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) incidence has increased over the past two decades largely because of an increase in human papilloma virus (HPV)-related OPSCC. We report here outcomes of definitive radiation therapy for OPSCC with simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in a regional Australian cancer centre. We retrospectively reviewed electronic medical records (EMR) of all patients treated with IMRT for head and neck cancer. We included patients who received a curative intent IMRT for OPSCC (2010–2014). Of 61 patients, 80% were men, and the median age was 57 years. Ninety percent of our patients received concurrent systemic therapy, and 68% were p16 positive. The median radiotherapy dose received was 70 Gy in 35 fractions. The median follow up for surviving patients was 22 months. Twenty-four month actuarial data show that the loco-regional recurrence free, metastasis-free MFS, cancer-specific (CaSS) and overall survival percentages were 98.3%, 92.6%, 91% and 90.3%, respectively. We did not observe grades 4 or 5 acute or late toxicities, and 10 patients (16.2%) exhibited persistent grade 3 toxicity 6 months after completing the treatment. The results from curative IMRTs for OPSCC delivered in a regional cancer centre are comparable with results published by tertiary referral centres. A long-term follow up of this patient cohort will continue for further analyses and comparisons with tertiary centres.

  19. Adult testicular cancer: Two decades of Saudi national data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abomelha, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding testicular cancer among Saudis as well as the nonexistent of published national data. Furthermore, a substantial increase of the incidence of testicular cancer among Saudis was lately noted. The aim of the study is to determine the trends and patterns of testicular cancer among adult Saudis using national data over a period of 20 years. The national database of the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR) on testicular cancer over the last two decades was studied including epidemiological and histological patterns. The 1004 cases of testicular cancer among adult Saudis reported by the SCR will be the subject of this study. From 1994 to 2013, 1004 cases of testicular cancer among adult Saudis were reported to the SCR, with a steadily significant increase in incidence rate reaching an annual rate of 94 cases in 2013. Age of the patients ranged 15-93 years with a mean of 34.5 years. The most affected age group was 20-34 years, where 51% of all testicular cancer accumulated. Around 85% of testicular cancer is germ cell tumors, while paratesticular and gonadal stromal tumors represent 15%. Of all testicular cancer, seminomas were seen in 40.7%, nonseminomas in 44.6%. Notably, 70.4% of the cases in the first decade were seminomas, while in the second decade 65.9% of the cases were nonseminomas. The subtypes of the nonseminomas were a mixed tumor in 51.6%, embryonal carcinoma in 19.9%, yolk sac tumor in 12.3%, germinomas in 6.7%, teratomas in 6%, and choriocarcinomas in 3.6%. Lymphomas (34.7%) and rhabdomyosarcomas (23.6%) are on the top of the paratesticular tumor group. The Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results summary stage of seminomas was localized in 61.6%, regional in 19.8%, and distant in 12.6%, while of nonseminomas was 48%, 15.5%, and 28.5%, respectively. Localized and distant status of seminomas improved over the studied period by 12% and 4% respectively, while this trend was not seen in nonseminomas. The incidence rate is on rising

  20. Clinicopathological Pattern of Penile Cancer in a Tertiary Care Centre in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipesh K Gupta

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Penile carcinoma is primarily a disease of old. Growth over glans penis is the most common presentation and partial penectomy is feasible in most of the patients to allow oncological cure while preserving the organ for its native function. Keywords: inguinal lymph node dissection; partial penectomy; penile cancer.

  1. Frequency of venous thromboembolism events during acute inpatient rehabilitation in a comprehensive cancer centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy H. Ng

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Cancer patients with low FIM transfer scores and lower extremity oedema are at higher risk of venous thromboembolism. Patients with these clinical findings at admission may require measures for more aggressive surveillance for the presence of venous thromboembolism. Patients with venous thromboembolism had an increased length of stay in rehabilitation, but ultimately did not have significant differences in FIM score changes.

  2. Treatment deintensification in human papillomavirus-positive oropharynx cancer: Outcomes from the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghlou, Shayan; Yu, Phoebe K; Otremba, Michael D; Park, Henry S; Bhatia, Aarti; Zogg, Cheryl K; Mehra, Saral; Yarbrough, Wendell G; Judson, Benjamin L

    2018-02-15

    The growing epidemic of human papillomavirus-positive (HPV+) oropharyngeal cancer and the favorable prognosis of this disease etiology have led to a call for deintensified treatment for some patients with HPV+ cancers. One of the proposed methods of treatment deintensification is the avoidance of chemotherapy concurrent with definitive/adjuvant radiotherapy. To the authors' knowledge, the safety of this form of treatment de-escalation is unknown and the current literature in this area is sparse. The authors investigated outcomes after various treatment combinations stratified by American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) eighth edition disease stage using patients from the National Cancer Data Base. A retrospective study of 4443 patients with HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer in the National Cancer Data Base was conducted. Patients were stratified into AJCC eighth edition disease stage groups. Multivariate Cox regressions as well as univariate Kaplan-Meier analyses were conducted. For patients with stage I disease, treatment with definitive radiotherapy was associated with diminished survival compared with chemoradiotherapy (hazard ratio [HR], 1.798; P = .029), surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy (HR, 2.563; P = .002), or surgery with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (HR, 2.427; P = .001). For patients with stage II disease, compared with treatment with chemoradiotherapy, patients treated with a single-modality (either surgery [HR, 2.539; P = .009] or radiotherapy [HR, 2.200; P = .030]) were found to have poorer survival. Among patients with stage III disease, triple-modality therapy was associated with improved survival (HR, 0.518; P = .024) compared with treatment with chemoradiotherapy. Deintensification of treatment from chemoradiotherapy to radiotherapy or surgery alone in cases of HPV+ AJCC eighth edition stage I or stage II disease may compromise patient safety. Treatment intensification to triple-modality therapy for patients with stage III disease may improve survival in

  3. National Trends in the Epidemiology of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: A National Cancer Data Base Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddoughi, Sahar A; Abdelsattar, Zaid M; Blackmon, Shanda H

    2018-02-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) remains an aggressive malignancy that is difficult to cure. However, the treatment paradigm of MPM has evolved, and the national practice patterns are unknown. This study examined the national trends in the epidemiology, national treatment patterns, and survival of patients with this disease. We identified all patients (n = 19,134) with MPM from the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2013. We analyzed patient, tumor characteristics, and treatment patterns using descriptive statistics and used Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models to estimate survival stratified by the type of therapy administered. Four histologic subtypes were represented in the National Cancer Data Base, these included sarcomatoid (n = 2,355 [12.3%]), epithelioid (n = 6,858 [35.8%]), biphasic (n = 13,617 [11%]), and not otherwise specified (n = 8,560 [44.7%]). Across all subtypes, the prevalence of mesothelioma was highest among white men. Sarcomatoid had the worst survival (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.2; p Data Base. Although survival remains poor, multimodality therapy with surgical resection is associated with the best survival for MPM. Further research is needed to improve survival and overall patient outcomes. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. External validation of the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC) risk prediction model in critical care units in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David A; Lone, Nazir I; Haddow, Catriona; MacGillivray, Moranne; Khan, Angela; Cook, Brian; Rowan, Kathryn M

    2014-01-01

    Risk prediction models are used in critical care for risk stratification, summarising and communicating risk, supporting clinical decision-making and benchmarking performance. However, they require validation before they can be used with confidence, ideally using independently collected data from a different source to that used to develop the model. The aim of this study was to validate the Intensive Care National Audit & Research Centre (ICNARC) model using independently collected data from critical care units in Scotland. Data were extracted from the Scottish Intensive Care Society Audit Group (SICSAG) database for the years 2007 to 2009. Recoding and mapping of variables was performed, as required, to apply the ICNARC model (2009 recalibration) to the SICSAG data using standard computer algorithms. The performance of the ICNARC model was assessed for discrimination, calibration and overall fit and compared with that of the Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II model. There were 29,626 admissions to 24 adult, general critical care units in Scotland between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2009. After exclusions, 23,269 admissions were included in the analysis. The ICNARC model outperformed APACHE II on measures of discrimination (c index 0.848 versus 0.806), calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow chi-squared statistic 18.8 versus 214) and overall fit (Brier's score 0.140 versus 0.157; Shapiro's R 0.652 versus 0.621). Model performance was consistent across the three years studied. The ICNARC model performed well when validated in an external population to that in which it was developed, using independently collected data.

  5. A single-centre cohort study of National Early Warning Score (NEWS) and near patient testing in acute medical admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Tom E F; Torrance, Hew D T; Cron, Nicholas; Vaid, Nidhi; Emmanuel, Julian

    2016-11-01

    The utility of an early warning score may be improved when used with near patient testing. However, this has not yet been investigated for National Early Warning Score (NEWS). We hypothesised that the combination of NEWS and blood gas variables (lactate, glucose or base-excess) was more strongly associated with clinical outcome compared to NEWS alone. This was a prospective cohort study of adult medical admissions to a single-centre over 20days. Blood gas results and physiological observations were recorded at admission. NEWS was calculated retrospectively and combined with the biomarkers in multivariable logistic regression models. The primary outcome was a composite of mortality or critical care escalation within 2days of hospital admission. The secondary outcome was hospital length of stay. After accounting for missing data, 15 patients out of 322 (4.7%) died or were escalated to the critical care unit. The median length of stay was 4 (IQR 7) days. When combined with lactate or base excess, NEWS was associated with the primary outcome (OR 1.18, p=0.01 and OR 1.13, p=0.03). However, NEWS alone was more strongly associated with the primary outcome measure (OR 1.46, pglucose was not associated with the primary outcome. Neither NEWS nor any combination of NEWS and a biomarker were associated with hospital length of stay. Admission NEWS is more strongly associated with death or critical care unit admission within 2days of hospital admission, compared to combinations of NEWS and blood-gas derived biomarkers. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ten-year surveillance of nosocomial bloodstream infections: trends of aetiology and antimicrobial resistance in a comprehensive cancer centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passerini, R; Ghezzi, Tl; Sandri, Mt; Radice, D; Biffi, R

    2011-01-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are one of the major life-threatening infectious conditions in cancer patients and are responsible for prolonged hospital stays, high healthcare costs and significant mortality. Several clinical trials have reported an improved survival in patients treated with appropriate empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Early detection of pathogens and determination of their susceptibility are essential for the optimization of treatment. Variability between hospitals is substantial and requires the individual analysis of local trends. The aim of this study is to assess the local epidemiology of BSI in a single cancer centre over a 10-year period. Retrospective microbiological surveillance of all febrile/infective episodes occurring in oncological and surgical patients in a high-volume cancer centre between January 1999 and December 2008 were considered. Patients' data were collected, processed and analyzed using the epidemiological resource of the Virtuoso Plus software (Metafora Informatica Srl, Milano, Italy). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, including the two-tailed test of significance, was used to investigate trends of incidence and rate of antibiotic resistance over the 10-year period. A total of 13,058 blood cultures (BCs) were performed in 2,976 patients. BCs were positive in 2,447 tests, representing 740 infective/febrile episodes: 358 (48%) in medical oncology and 382 (52%) in surgical wards. Gram-positives were responsible for the majority of episodes in oncological and surgical divisions (about 63% and 55%, respectively). Gram-positives were also the most common organism in non-catheter-related BSIs (CRBSIs) both in medical oncology (75%) and in surgical divisions (50%). Enterococci showed an increased resistance to levofloxacin, from 5.6% to 25.7% (p = 0.02) and to erythromycin, from 41.7% to 61.4%, (p = 0.05). Similarly, coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) developed resistance to levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin

  7. Implementation of intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy for cervical cancers at the Alexis Vautrin Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renard-Oldrini, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    As platinum salt based concomitant conformational radiotherapy and chemotherapy have been used as a standard treatment for cervical cancers but resulted in digestive and haematological toxicities, this research thesis reports the application of intensity-modulated conformational radiation therapy. After having recalled some epidemiological, anatomical aspects, diagnosis and treatments aspects regarding cervical cancer, the author presents this last treatment technique (principles, benefits, practical implementation). The author discusses results obtained by an experiment during which seven patients have been treated by simple conformational radiation therapy, and four by intensity-modulated conformational radiation therapy. Results are discussed in terms of volumes (clinical target volume, growth target volume, planned target volume), dosimetric results, toxicities (urine and skin), weight loss [fr

  8. Prostate carcinoma: results of radiation therapy in the French Cancer Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allain, Y.M.; Bolla, M.; Douchez, J.; Gary-Bobo, J.; Geslin, J.; Huart, J.; Mazeron, J.J.; Mathieu, G.

    1985-01-01

    From 1975 to 1982, 597 patients with localized prostatic adenocarcinoma were treated using external beam irradiation in one of 6 cooperating centers. The mean patient age was 67 years. The 5 and 10 years actuarial survivals (including all causes of death) were 70% and 40% respectively. The adjusted survival rates become 86% at 5 years and 61% at 10 years when only death due to cancer is taken into consideration. Despite the fact that patients with stage A1 and A2 disease show different patterns of lymphatic spread, the actuarial and adjusted 8 years survivals were identical for both staging groups, in this study, 57% and 90% respectively. It is significant that the majority of patients in both group A1 and in group A2 received irradiation to the pelvic lymph nodes as well as the prostate. Patients with stage B1 disease showed a 7 years actuarial survival of 53% and an 82% survival adjusted for death due to cancer only. Patients in both group B2 and group C, showed an identical 10 year actuarial survival rate of 49%. However, without CT scanning, it is difficult to differentiate between these 2 staging groups. Patients with stage C2 disease showed 10 years actuarial and adjusted survival rates of 20% and 40% respectively. The local recurrence rate after primary radiation therapy did not exceed 11% in any patient group. These data demonstrate, once again, that the dogma pertaining to the radioresistance of prostatic cancer is outdated [fr

  9. Cervical cancer risk levels in Turkey and compliance to the national cervical cancer screening standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Açikgöz, Ayla; Ergör, Gül

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer screening with Pap smear test is a cost-effective method. The Ministry of Health in Turkey recommends that it be performed once every five years after age 35. The purpose of this study was to determine the cervical cancer risk levels of women between 35 and 69, and the intervals they have the Pap smear test, and to investigate the relation between the two. This study was performed on 227 women aged between 35 and 69 living in Balçova District of İzmir province. Using the cervical cancer risk index program of Harvard School of Public Health, the cervical cancer risk level of 70% of the women was found below average, 22.1% average, and 7.9% above average. Only 52% of the women have had Pap smear test at least once in their lives. The percentage screening regularly in conformity with the national screening standard was 39.2%. Women in the 40-49 age group, were married, conformed significantly more (pducation and decreased with the cervical cancer risk level (pducation level, menstruation state of the women and the economic level of the family. Not having the Pap smear test in conformity with the national cervical cancer screening standard in 35-39 age group was 2.52 times more than 40-49 age group, while it was 3.26 times more in 60-69 age group (pducation level might cause not having Pap smear test. Under these circumstances, the cervical cancer risk levels should be determined and the individuals should be informed. Providing Pap smear test screening service to individuals in the target group of national screening standard, as a public service may resolve the inequalities due to age and educational differences.

  10. Impact of cancer support groups on childhood cancer treatment and abandonment in a private pediatric oncology centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arathi Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To analyze the impact of two cancer support groups in the treatment and abandonment of childhood cancer. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective review of children with cancer funded and non-funded who were treated at Kanchi Kamakoti CHILDS Trust Hospital from 2010 to 2013. A total of 100 patients were funded, 57 by Ray of Light Foundation and 43 by Pediatric Lymphoma Project and 70 non-funded. Results: The total current survival of 80%, including those who have completed treatment and those currently undergoing treatment, is comparable in both the groups. Abandonment of treatment after initiating therapy was not seen in the financially supported group whereas abandonment of treatment after initiation was seen in one child in the non-funded group. Conclusions: Besides intensive treatment with good supportive care, financial support also has an important impact on compliance and abandonment in all socioeconomic strata of society. Financial support from private cancer support groups also has its impact beyond the patient and family, in reducing the burden on government institutions by non-governmental funding in private sector. Improvement in the delivery of pediatric oncology care in developing countries could be done by financial support from the private sector.

  11. "A small cog in a large wheel": an exploratory study into the experiences of porters, ward clerks and domestics working in an English Cancer Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Hazel; Froggatt, Katherine; McClinton, Pam

    2003-09-01

    The effect of working in an oncology environment on nurses has been widely researched but the experiences of non-clinical staff such as ancillary workers in the oncology environment have rarely been examined. This exploratory study had three aims: to explore ancillary workers' understandings of cancer, their experiences of working in a Cancer Centre and their training and support needs. Working within a naturalistic paradigm, a descriptive exploratory design was utilised employing in-depth interviews and drawing on aspects of grounded theory for data analysis. Findings indicated that these ancillary workers lacked an in-depth understanding of cancer. The experience of working in a Cancer Centre appeared to bring both costs and benefits to these ancillary workers. These ancillary workers enjoyed the level of contact they have with patients in a Cancer Centre and subsequently ascribed great value to their jobs. However, they felt that health-care professional colleagues did not always value their contribution to the care of patients. There are implications for nurses and other health-care staff working in oncology alongside these ancillary staff in terms of valuing and supporting them in the work that they do.

  12. Colorectal cancer patients in a tertiary referral centre in Malaysia: a five year follow-up review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mohd Radzniwan A; Aziz, Aznida Firzah Abdul; Ahmad, Saharuddin; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Sagap, Ismail

    2009-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the major malignancies in the world. In Malaysia, CRC is fast becoming the commonest cause of cancer death. Its etiology is complex, involving both environmental and genetic factors. This study looked at the profile and outcome of five-year follow-up of patients with CRC. Retrospective case review study done on CRC patients at University Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Patientsandapos; socio-demographic characteristics, modalities of treatment, cancer characteristics and outcome at 5-year follow up were extracted from the case records. A total of 107 case records of patients were analyzed. Peak age of CRC presentation was 40-69 years (71.1%). Male to female ratio was 1.2:1 with Chinese predominance (52.3%). Anaemia and its related symptoms including per rectal bleeding was the commonest clinical presentation. The median duration of clinical presentation was 13 weeks (IQR 21.8). More than two-thirds presented as non-emergency cases (69.2%). Most patients presented with Dukes C stage (40.2%). The overall 5-year survival rate was 40% with local recurrence rate of 19.6%. Metastasis after curative-intend treatment (surgery with adjuvant therapy) developed in 26% of patients. Lower recurrence (p = 0.016, OR = 0.205) and metastatic disease (p = 0.02, OR = 0.24) found among the Chinese patients. Almost half of the patients defaulted follow up care (43%), most often within the first year of treatment (22.4%) and the Chinese were the least likely to default (p= 0.04, OR = 0.45). Socio-demographic profile of CRC patients in UKMMC is comparable to Asia pacific region. Apparent delay in seeking treatment gives rise to poor overall survival and local recurrence rates.

  13. 3 CFR 8407 - Proclamation 8407 of August 31, 2009. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2009 8407 Proclamation 8407 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8407 of August 31, 2009 Proc. 8407 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2009By the President... the disease with grace and dignity. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month honors all those affected...

  14. 3 CFR 8425 - Proclamation 8425 of September 30, 2009. National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2009 8425 Proclamation 8425 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8425 of September 30, 2009 Proc. 8425 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2009By the President... United States. As we observe National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we salute the brave Americans who...

  15. Staging cancer of the uterus: A national audit of MRI accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, K.A.; Drinkwater, K.J.; Frost, C.; Remedios, D.; Barter, S.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To report the results of a nationwide audit of the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) staging in uterine body cancer when staging myometrial invasion, cervical extension, and lymph node spread. Materials and methods: All UK radiology departments were invited to participate using a web-based tool for submitting anonymized data for a 12 month period. MRI staging was compared with histopathological staging using target accuracies of 85, 86, and 70% respectively. Results: Of the departments performing MRI staging of endometrial cancer, 37/87 departments contributed. Targets for MRI staging were achieved for two of the three standards nationally with diagnostic accuracy for depth of myometrial invasion, 82%; for cervical extension, 90%; and for pelvic nodal involvement, 94%; the latter two being well above the targets. However, only 13/37 (35%) of individual centres met the target for assessing depth of myometrial invasion, 31/36 (86%) for cervical extension and 31/34 (91%) for pelvic nodal involvement. Statistical analysis demonstrated no significant difference for the use of intravenous contrast medium, but did show some evidence of increasing accuracy in assessment of depth of myometrial invasion with increasing caseload. Conclusion: Overall performance in the UK was good, with only the target for assessment of depth of myometrial invasion not being met. Inter-departmental variation was seen. One factor that may improve performance in assessment of myometrial invasion is a higher caseload. No other clear factor to improve performance were identified.

  16. Staging cancer of the uterus: A national audit of MRI accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, K.A., E-mail: k.duncan@nhs.net [Clinical Radiology Audit Committee, Royal College of Radiologists, London (United Kingdom); Drinkwater, K.J. [Clinical Radiology Audit Committee, Royal College of Radiologists, London (United Kingdom); Frost, C. [Department of Medical Statistics, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London (United Kingdom); Remedios, D.; Barter, S. [Clinical Radiology Audit Committee, Royal College of Radiologists, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    Aim: To report the results of a nationwide audit of the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) staging in uterine body cancer when staging myometrial invasion, cervical extension, and lymph node spread. Materials and methods: All UK radiology departments were invited to participate using a web-based tool for submitting anonymized data for a 12 month period. MRI staging was compared with histopathological staging using target accuracies of 85, 86, and 70% respectively. Results: Of the departments performing MRI staging of endometrial cancer, 37/87 departments contributed. Targets for MRI staging were achieved for two of the three standards nationally with diagnostic accuracy for depth of myometrial invasion, 82%; for cervical extension, 90%; and for pelvic nodal involvement, 94%; the latter two being well above the targets. However, only 13/37 (35%) of individual centres met the target for assessing depth of myometrial invasion, 31/36 (86%) for cervical extension and 31/34 (91%) for pelvic nodal involvement. Statistical analysis demonstrated no significant difference for the use of intravenous contrast medium, but did show some evidence of increasing accuracy in assessment of depth of myometrial invasion with increasing caseload. Conclusion: Overall performance in the UK was good, with only the target for assessment of depth of myometrial invasion not being met. Inter-departmental variation was seen. One factor that may improve performance in assessment of myometrial invasion is a higher caseload. No other clear factor to improve performance were identified.

  17. Should money follow the patient: Financial implication for being the National Centre for the Treatment and Management of Pelvic and Acetabular Fractures in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, M E

    2013-03-13

    BACKGROUND: Pelvic and acetabular fractures are complex injuries requiring specialist treatment. Our institution is the National Centre for Treatment and Management of these injuries. AIM: To audit all referrals to our institution over a 6-month period and calculate the cost incurred by being the national referral centre. METHODS: Retrospective review of database, and subsequent allocation of Casemix points to assess total cost of treatment for each patient referred to our institution. RESULTS: 103 patients referred with pelvic or acetabular fracture for operative management. The furthest referral distance was 181miles. Over-all, the length of stay was 15.4 days. The average inclusive cost for a referral to our unit for operative management was €16,302. CONCLUSION: Pelvic and acetabular fractures are complex injuries that require specialist referral unit management. However for these units to remain sustainable money needs to "follow the patient".

  18. The Text of the Agency's Agreement with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Concerning the Joint Operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1969-10-20

    The text of the agreement between the Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) concerning the joint operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste, which was signed by the Director General of the Agency on 3 July and by the Director General of UNESCO on 15 July 1969, is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The agreement will enter into force on 1 January 1970.

  19. The Text of the Agency's Agreement with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Concerning the Joint Operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    The text of the agreement between the Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) concerning the joint operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste, which was signed by the Director General of the Agency on 3 July and by the Director General of UNESCO on 15 July 1969, is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The agreement will enter into force on 1 January 1970.

  20. Pediatric testicular cancer: Two decades of Saudi national data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abomelha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric testicular cancer is exceedingly rare. There are no data available touching Saudi children. The aim of the study is to determine the trends and patterns of testicular cancer among Saudi children over a period of 20 years. The national database of the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR on pediatric testicular cancer over the last two decades was examined including epidemiological and histological patterns. From 1994 to 2013, 82 cases of testicular cancer among Saudi children aged 1–14 years were accumulated at the SCR. The annual percentage change rate was 3.3%. Of all cases, 62% appeared within the first 2 years of life. Seminomas were seen in 39%, nonseminomas in 40.3%, and paratesticular tumors in 20.7%. No gonadal stromal tumors observed. About 91% of the seminomas accrued in the first decade (1994–2003, while all nonseminomas fell in the last decade (2004–2013. The most common subtypes of the nonseminomas were yolk sac tumors and mixed tumors. More than 80% of the paratesticular tumors were rhabdomyosarcomas and lymphomas. The SEER summary stage of seminomas was localized in 56%, regional in 22%, and distant in 16%, while of nonseminomas was 56%, 16%, and 28%, respectively, and no stage improvement over the studied period was noted. No temporal trend in incidence rate was observed. The most affected age group was the first 2 years of life. Noteworthy was the high incidence of seminoma and the low rate of teratomas and stromal tumors, when compared to Western data. Notable was the dominance of the seminomas in the first decade and of the nonseminomas in the second decade. At the time of diagnosis, nonseminomas were more advanced than seminomas. No stage improvement noted over the studied period.

  1. Radiation with cisplatin or carboplatin for locally advanced cervix cancer: the experience of a tertiary cancer centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Au-Yeung, George; Mileshkin, Linda; Rischin, Danny; Bernshaw, David M.; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Narayan, Kailash

    2013-01-01

    Definitive treatment with concurrent cisplatin and radiation is the standard of care for locally advanced cervix cancer. The optimal management of patients with a contraindication to cisplatin has not been established. We conducted a retrospective audit of concurrent chemotherapy in a cohort of patients with locally advanced cervix cancer. All patients with locally advanced cervix cancer treated with definitive radiation were entered into a prospective database. Information regarding their demographics, stage, histology, recurrence and survival were recorded. Pharmacy records were reviewed to determine concurrent chemotherapy use. A total of 442 patients were included in the audit. Two hundred sixty-nine patients received cisplatin, 59 received carboplatin and 114 received no concurrent chemotherapy. Overall survival was significantly improved with the use of concurrent cisplatin compared with radiation alone (adjusted hazard ratio 0.53, P=0.001), as was disease-free survival and rate of distant failure. The use of carboplatin was not associated with any significant benefit in terms of overall survival or disease-free survival. The results of this audit are consistent with the known significant survival benefit with concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy. However, there did not appear to be any significant benefit with carboplatin although there were potential confounding factors. The available evidence in the literature would favour the use of non-platinum chemotherapy rather than carboplatin in patients with contraindications to cisplatin.

  2. Effect of hospital volume on processes of breast cancer care: A National Cancer Data Base study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Tina W F; Pezzin, Liliana E; Li, Jianing; Sparapani, Rodney; Laud, Purushuttom W; Nattinger, Ann B

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine variations in delivery of several breast cancer processes of care that are correlated with lower mortality and disease recurrence, and to determine the extent to which hospital volume explains this variation. Women who were diagnosed with stage I-III unilateral breast cancer between 2007 and 2011 were identified within the National Cancer Data Base. Multiple logistic regression models were developed to determine whether hospital volume was independently associated with each of 10 individual process of care measures addressing diagnosis and treatment, and 2 composite measures assessing appropriateness of systemic treatment (chemotherapy and hormonal therapy) and locoregional treatment (margin status and radiation therapy). Among 573,571 women treated at 1755 different hospitals, 38%, 51%, and 10% were treated at high-, medium-, and low-volume hospitals, respectively. On multivariate analysis controlling for patient sociodemographic characteristics, treatment year and geographic location, hospital volume was a significant predictor for cancer diagnosis by initial biopsy (medium volume: odds ratio [OR] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.05-1.25; high volume: OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.14-1.49), negative surgical margins (medium volume: OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.06-1.24; high volume: OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.13-1.44), and appropriate locoregional treatment (medium volume: OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.07-1.17; high volume: OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.09-1.24). Diagnosis of breast cancer before initial surgery, negative surgical margins and appropriate use of radiation therapy may partially explain the volume-survival relationship. Dissemination of these processes of care to a broader group of hospitals could potentially improve the overall quality of care and outcomes of breast cancer survivors. Cancer 2017;123:957-66. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  3. Vinorelbine plus 3-weekly trastuzumab in metastatic breast cancer: a single-centre phase 2 trial

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    Staiano Maria

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After two studies reporting response rates higher than 70% in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer with weekly trastuzumab and vinorelbine, we planned a phase 2 study to test activity of the same combination, with trastuzumab given every 3 weeks. Methods Patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (3+ at immunohistochemistry or positive at fluorescence in situ hybridization, PS ≤2, normal left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF and no more than one chemotherapy line for metastatic disease were eligible. Vinorelbine (30 mg/m2 was given on days 1&8 every 21 and trastuzumab (8 mg/kg day 1, then 6 mg/kg every 21 days. A single-stage phase 2 design, with p0 = 0.45, p1 = 0.65, type I and II error = 0.10, was applied; 22 objective responses were required in 39 patients. Results From Nov 2002 to May 2005, 50 patients were enrolled, with a median age of 54 years (range 31–81. Among 40 patients eligible for response assessment, there were 7 complete and 13 partial responses (overall response rate 50%; 95% exact CI 33.8–66.2; 11 patients had disease stabilization, lasting more than 6 months in 10 cases. Response rate did not vary according to patients and tumor characteristics, type and amount of previous chemotherapy. Within the whole series, median progression-free survival was 9.6 months (95% CI 7.3–12.3, median overall survival 22.7 months (95% CI 19.5-NA. Fifteen patients (30% developed brain metastases at a median time of 12 months (range 1–25. There was one toxic death due to renal failure in a patient receiving concomitant pamidronate. Twenty-three patients (46% had grade 3–4 neutropenia, 2 (4% grade 3 anemia, 4 (8% febrile neutropenia. Two patients stopped treatment because of grade 2 decline of LVEF and one patient because of grade 2 liver toxicity concomitant with a grade 1 decline of LVEF. One patient stopped trastuzumab after 50 cycles because of grade 1 decline of LVEF. Conclusion Although lower

  4. Poisonous plants in New Zealand: a review of those that are most commonly enquired about to the National Poisons Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Robin J; Beasley, D Michael G; Lambie, Bruce S; Wilkins, Gerard T; Schep, Leo J

    2012-12-14

    New Zealand has a number of plants, both native and introduced, contact with which can lead to poisoning. The New Zealand National Poisons Centre (NZNPC) frequently receives enquiries regarding exposures to poisonous plants. Poisonous plants can cause harm following inadvertent ingestion, via skin contact, eye exposures or inhalation of sawdust or smoked plant matter. The purpose of this article is to determine the 15 most common poisonous plant enquiries to the NZNPC and provide a review of current literature, discussing the symptoms that might arise upon exposure to these poisonous plants and the recommended medical management of such poisonings. Call data from the NZNPC telephone collection databases regarding human plant exposures between 2003 and 2010 were analysed retrospectively. The most common plants causing human poisoning were selected as the basis for this review. An extensive literature review was also performed by systematically searching OVID MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar. Further information was obtained from book chapters, relevant news reports and web material. For the years 2003-2010 inclusive, a total of 256,969 enquiries were received by the NZNPC. Of these enquiries, 11,049 involved exposures to plants and fungi. The most common poisonous plant enquiries, in decreasing order of frequency, were: black nightshade (Solanum nigrum), arum lily (Zantedeschia aethiopica), kowhai (Sophora spp.), euphorbia (Euphorbia spp.), peace lily (Spathiphyllum spp.), agapanthus (Agapanthus spp.), stinking iris (Iris foetidissima), rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum), taro (Colocasia esculentum), oleander (Nerium oleander), daffodil (Narcissus spp.), hemlock (Conium maculatum), karaka (Corynocarpus laevigatus), foxglove (Digitalis purpurea) and ongaonga/New Zealand tree nettle (Urtica ferox). The combined total of enquiries for these 15 species was 2754 calls (representing approximately 25% of all enquiries regarding plant exposures). The signs

  5. Cytoreductive prostate radiotherapy in oligometastatic prostate cancer: a single centre analysis of toxicity and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giulia; Marvaso, Giulia; Augugliaro, Matteo; Zerini, Dario; Fodor, Cristiana; Musi, Gennaro; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja

    2017-01-01

    The current standard of care for patients with metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa) at diagnosis is androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with or without anti-androgen and chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to define the role of a local radiotherapy (RT) treatment in the mPCa setting. We retrospectively reviewed data of patients with PCa and bone oligometastases at diagnosis treated in our institution with ADT followed by cytoreductive prostate-RT with or without RT on metastases. Biochemical and clinical failure (BF, CF), overall survival (OS) and RT-toxicity were assessed. We identified 22 patients treated with ADT and external-beam RT on primary between June 2008 and March 2016. All of them but four were also treated for bone metastases. RT on primary with moderately and extremely hypofractionated regimes started after 10.3 months (3.9-51.7) from ADT. After a median follow-up of 26.4 months (10.3-55.5), 20 patients are alive. Twelve patients showed BF after a median time of 23 months (14.5-104) and CF after a median of 23.6 months (15.3-106.1) from the start of ADT. Three patients became castration resistant, starting a new therapy; median time to castration resistance was 31.03 months (range: 29.9-31.5 months). According to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC), only one patient developed acute grade 3 genitourinary toxicity. No late grade >2 adverse events were observed. Prostate RT in oligometastatic patients is safe and offers long-lasting local control. When compared to ADT alone, RT on primary seems to improve biochemical control and long-term survival; however, this hypothesis should be investigated in prospective studies. Further research is warranted.

  6. Iodine-131 treatment strategy in papillary and follicular thyroid cancers at Centre Antoine Lacassagne (Nice)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussiere, F.

    2003-01-01

    We report on iodine-131 treatment strategy in 1207 papillary and 250 follicular thyroid cancers admitted at our institution between 1976 and 2001. At the time of diagnosis, 51 patients (3.5%) had already metastases. The rest were 155 (11 %) pT4, 619 (44.6 %) pT1 588 (42,6 %) pT2, 26 pT3, 5 pT0 and 4 pTx. All patients underwent quasi-total thyroidectomy. Lymph node dissection was performed in most patients except in 49.7 %n of pT1 and 33% of pT2. Lastly, multifocal thyroid lesions were found in 28.5% of pT1 and 27,6 % of pT2. 80 patients did not receive radio-iodine (among them 60 were pT1 pN0 or pNx). 1114 patients received one therapeutic dose of 3.7 GBq of 131-iodine 6 to 8 weeks post surgery. 181 patients were treated twice (89 for remnants and 92 for disease progression). 82 patients received at least 3 doses and 5 up to 7 doses. 116 deaths were recorded, 59 (4 %) were related to thyroid cancer. The relatively poor prognosis of the follicular form is confirmed with 15.2 % deaths. This study needs to be further analysed focusing oil the follow-up of pT1 patients in order to redefine the indications of iodine therapy in that group. (author)

  7. Regional implementation of a national cancer policy: taking forward multiprofessional, collaborative cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, A; Makin, W; Walker, B; Dublon, G

    1998-09-01

    The vision of the Calman-Hine paper is of patient-centred care, delivered by co-ordinated services which have genuine partnerships with each other. There is integration of other providers of support, to meet psychological and non-clinical needs. There is access to palliative care when required, from diagnosis onwards, and not just in the terminal stage. Effective communications and networks are the keys to making this vision a reality. Our recommendations are based upon in-depth discussions with purchasers, doctors and nurses, and others involved with cancer services within hospitals or the community across the region. They reflect the priorities placed on the development of good practice. Purchasers and providers should work together to implement these guidelines.

  8. Changes in acute response to radiation after implementation of new national guidelines for head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C. R.; Bertelsen, Anders; Zukauskaite, R.

    2015-01-01

    of volume of CTV1 for most institutions which previously used different margins. Change in CTV1 volume definition could influence the risk and time evolution of adverse effects e.g. mucositis. This study investigates change in acute response during RT in a centre where GTV to CTV1 margin was increased from......Purpose/Objective: New national guidelines (GL) for radiotherapy (RT) of head and neck cancer (HNC) were implemented at the beginning of 2013. One purpose of the new GL was to nationally standardise the expansion from GTV to high risk CTV (CTV1). This standardisation has resulted in change...... endpoints were dichotomized, grade 0- 1 vs 2+ or 0-2 vs 3+. Potential change in actuarial cumulative incidence (One minus the Kaplan Meier estimator) of mucositis was tested using the log-rank test. To stratify for the potential effect between non-accelerated (5 fx/w) and accelerated (6/10 fx/w) treatments...

  9. Leveraging National Cancer Institute Programmatic Collaboration for Uterine Cervix Cancer Patient Accrual in Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A. Kunos

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Women in the U.S. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (PR have a higher age-adjusted incidence rate for uterine cervix cancer than the U.S. mainland as well as substantial access and economic barriers to cancer care. The National Cancer Institute (NCI funds a Minority/Underserved NCI Community Oncology Research Program in PR (PRNCORP as part of a national network of community-based health-care systems to conduct multisite cancer clinical trials in diverse populations. Participation by the PRNCORP in NCI’s uterine cervix cancer clinical trials, however, has remained limited. This study reports on the findings of an NCI site visit in PR to assess barriers impeding site activation and accrual to its sponsored gynecologic cancer clinical trials. Qualitative, semi-structured individual, and group interviews were conducted at six PRNCORP-affiliated locations to ascertain: long-term trial accrual objectives; key stakeholders in PR that address uterine cervix cancer care; key challenges or barriers to activating and to enrolling patients in NCI uterine cervix cancer treatment trials; and resources, policies, or procedures in place or needed on the island to support NCI-sponsored clinical trials. An NCI-sponsored uterine cervix cancer radiation–chemotherapy intervention clinical trial (NCT02466971, already activated on the island, served as a test case to identify relevant patient accrual and site barriers. The site visit identified five key barriers to accrual: (1 lack of central personnel to coordinate referrals for treatment plans, medical tests, and medical imaging across the island’s clinical trial access points; (2 patient insurance coverage; (3 lack of a coordinated brachytherapy schedule at San Juan-centric service providers; (4 limited credentialed radiotherapy machines island-wide; and (5 too few radiology medical physicists tasked to credential trial-specified positron emission tomography scanners island-wide. PR offers a unique opportunity to

  10. Contact X-ray Therapy for Rectal Cancer: Experience in Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Nice, 2002-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, Jean-Pierre; Ortholan, Cecile; Benezery, Karene; Ginot, Aurelie; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Benchimol, Daniel; Francois, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of using contact X-ray (CXR), which has been used in the Centre-Lacassagne since 2002 for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 44 patients were treated between 2002 and 2006 using four distinct clinical approaches. Patients with Stage T1N0 tumors were treated with transanal local excision (TLE) and adjuvant CXR (45 Gy in three fractions) (n = 7). The 11 inoperable (or who had refused surgery) patients with Stage T2-T3 disease were treated with CXR plus external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Those with Stage T3N0-N2 tumors were treated with preoperative CXR plus EBRT (with or without concurrent chemotherapy) followed by surgery (n = 21). Finally, the patients with Stage T2 disease were treated with CXR plus EBRT followed by TLE (n = 5). Results: The median follow-up was 25 months. In the 7 patients who underwent TLE first, no local failure was observed, and their anorectal function was good. Of the 11 inoperable patients who underwent CXR plus EBRT alone, 10 achieved local control. In the third group (preoperative CXR plus EBRT), anterior resection was performed in 16 of 21 patients. Complete sterilization of the operative specimen was seen in 4 cases (19%). No local recurrence occurred. Finally, of the 5 patients treated with CXR plus EBRT followed by TLE, a complete or near complete clinical response was observed in all. TLE with a R0 resection margin was performed in all cases. The rectum was preserved with good function in all 5 patients. Conclusion: These early results have confirmed that CXR combined with surgery (or alone with EBRT) can play a major role in the conservative and curative treatment of rectal cancer

  11. National Practice Patterns for Clinical T1N0 Nasopharyngeal Cancer in the Elderly: A National Cancer Data Base Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Carl M; Lin, Chi; Adeberg, Sebastian; Gupta, Mrigank; Zhen, Weining; Verma, Vivek

    2018-03-01

    The standard of care for T1N0 nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) is definitive radiation therapy (RT). However, practice patterns in the elderly may not necessarily follow national guidelines. Herein, we investigated national practice patterns for T1N0 NPC. The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) was queried for clinical T1N0 primary NPC cases (2004-2013) in patients ≥70 years old. Patient, tumor, and treatment parameters were extracted. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to compare overall survival (OS) between patients receiving RT versus those under observation. Logistic regression was used to examine variables associated with receipt of RT. Cox proportional hazards modeling determined variables associated with OS. Landmark analysis of patients surviving 1 year or more was performed to assess survival differences between groups. In total, data of 147 patients were analyzed. RT was delivered to 89 patients (61%), whereas 58 (39%) patients underwent observation. On multivariable analysis, older patients were less likely to receive RT (p=0.003), but there were no differences between groups in terms of Charlson-Deyo comorbidity index. Median and 5-year OS in patients receiving RT versus those under observation were 71 and 33 months, and 59% and 48% (p=0.011), respectively. For patients surviving 1 year or more (n=96), there was a strong trend showing that receipt of RT was associated with better median and 5-year OS. This National Data Base analysis shows that observation is relatively common for T1N0 NPC in the elderly, but is associated with poorer survival. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  12. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy for advanced ovarian and peritoneal cancers in patients following interval debulking surgery or primary cytoreductive surgery: Tom Baker Cancer Centre experience from 2006 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory; Lucero, Carlos Aspe; Chu, Pamela; Nation, Jill; Ghatage, Prafull

    2010-03-01

    To describe our experience with cisplatin- and paclitaxel-based IP chemotherapy in patients treated initially with either neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval debulking surgery (IDS) or primary cytoreductive surgery (PCRS). We performed a retrospective review of the records of 67 patients (38 IDS, 29 PCRS) enrolled in the intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy program at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre between 2006 and 2009. Information pertaining to patient demographics, IP chemotherapy toxicity, and catheter complications was extracted, and the median time to recurrence was calculated. Most patients in the study were aged 50 to 70 years and had a diagnosis of stage III serous ovarian cancer. Overall, 295/393 IP cycles (75%) were successfully administered. The proportion of patients completing six cycles of chemotherapy in the IDS and PCRS groups was 53% and 59%, respectively. Frequent (> 25%) Grade 1 to 2 chemotherapy toxicities included fatigue, peripheral neuropathy, and nausea. Catheter complications were observed in 34% of patients (23/67). The recurrence rates for patients completing four or more cycles of IP chemotherapy in the IDS and PCRS groups were 58% and 35%, respectively, with the median time to recurrence approximately one year. Although IP chemotherapy is well tolerated in both IDS and PCRS patients, the median time to recurrence is shorter than expected.

  13. Reproductive Tract infections and Premalignant Lesions of Cervix: Evidence from Women Presenting at the Cancer Detection Centre of the Indian Cancer Society, Delhi, 2000-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Subhojit; Pahwa, Parika; Mishra, Arti; Govil, Jyotsna; Dhillon, Preet K

    2016-10-01

    Burden of cervical cancer (CC) is highest for women in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Human papillomavirus (HPV) is implicated as the necessary cause of CC although a number of other factors aid the long process of CC development. One among them is the presence of reproductive tract infections (RTIs). This study investigated the associations between RTIs and CC from India. This study utilized secondary data from the Cancer Detection Centre of the ICS, Delhi. Data were accessed from MS access database and were analyzed using MS Excel and SPSS 16.0. Multivariate analysis using unconditional logistic regression produced odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). This study used data from 11,427 women over a period of 2000-2012. Women with RTIs had Candida, Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) or coccoid infections with all having similar prevalence (~4-5 %). 9.4 % of women had premalignant lesions of cervix; ASCUS was most common (7.9 %) followed by LSIL (1.3 %). TV was significantly associated with ASCUS, LSIL and all premalignant lesions of cervix (P Lack of awareness and hygiene, and limited access to gynecologists in LMICs lead to frequent and persistent RTIs which aid and abet HPV infection and CC occurrence. These also need to be addressed to reduce CC and RTIs among women in LMICs.

  14. Trends in intensity modulated radiation therapy use for locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha Reyngold, MD, PhD

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Although most patients with stage II-III rectal cancer at queried National Cancer Institute–designated cancer centers between 2005 and 2011 received 3-dimensional CRT, significant and increasing numbers received IMRT. IMRT utilization is highly variable among institutions and not uniform among sociodemographic groups but may be more consistently embraced in specific clinical settings. Given this trend, comparative-effectiveness research is needed to evaluate the benefits of IMRT for rectal cancer.

  15. ERYTHROPOIETIN TREATMENT FOR ANEMIA IN CHILDREN WITH CANCER – SINGLE CENTRE EXPERIENCES

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    Polona Mali

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anemia, a common complication during treatment of malignant disease in children, was frequently treated with red blood cell transfusions. Several studies have shown, that the introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin (rh EPO for treating anemia in patients has been effective in reducing the need for transfusions. Variable doses of EPO from 150 to 900 IU/kg body weight have been used usually three times weekly. Recently some studies showed equally effective once weekly administration of EPO with proposed doses for children of 450 to 600 IU/ kg body weight.Efficacy and safety of once weekly EPO therapy was tested in 8/10 children treated in our Unit for solid tumors and nonHodgkin’s lymphoma. In this article we would like to present our one year experience with EPO treatment.Patients and methods. Patients have subcutaneously received the EPO dose of 600 UI/ kg body weight once weekly. Hemoglobin response and transfusion needs before and during treatment with EPO were analyzed.Results. Response was seen in 7/8 of patient, with increased hemoglobin level and lower transfusion needs. Only one patient was poor responder at first, but responded perfect after twice weekly EPO application. No adverse reaction related to EPO therapy was observed.Conclusions. Our experience with treating anemia in pediatric cancer patients who undergo intensive and aggressive chemotherapy treatment regimens are good and promising. Once weekly dosage regimen is child friendly and acceptable way of treating anemia.

  16. Diagnosing cancer in primary care: results from the National Cancer Diagnosis Audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Ruth; McPhail, Sean; Witt, Jana; Shand, Brian; Abel, Gary A; Hiom, Sara; Rashbass, Jem; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Rubin, Greg

    2018-01-01

    Background Continual improvements in diagnostic processes are needed to minimise the proportion of patients with cancer who experience diagnostic delays. Clinical audit is a means of achieving this. Aim To characterise key aspects of the diagnostic process for cancer and to generate baseline measures for future re-audit. Design and setting Clinical audit of cancer diagnosis in general practices in England. Method Information on patient and tumour characteristics held in the English National Cancer Registry was supplemented by information from GPs in participating practices. Data items included diagnostic timepoints, patient characteristics, and clinical management. Results Data were collected on 17 042 patients with a new diagnosis of cancer during 2014 from 439 practices. Participating practices were similar to non-participating ones, particularly regarding population age, urban/rural location, and practice-based patient experience measures. The median diagnostic interval for all patients was 40 days (interquartile range [IQR] 15–86 days). Most patients were referred promptly (median primary care interval 5 days [IQR 0–27 days]). Where GPs deemed diagnostic delays to have occurred (22% of cases), patient, clinician, or system factors were responsible in 26%, 28%, and 34% of instances, respectively. Safety netting was recorded for 44% of patients. At least one primary care-led investigation was carried out for 45% of patients. Most patients (76%) had at least one existing comorbid condition; 21% had three or more. Conclusion The findings identify avenues for quality improvement activity and provide a baseline for future audit of the impact of 2015 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance on management and referral of suspected cancer. PMID:29255111

  17. Diagnosing cancer in primary care: results from the National Cancer Diagnosis Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Ruth; McPhail, Sean; Witt, Jana; Shand, Brian; Abel, Gary A; Hiom, Sara; Rashbass, Jem; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Rubin, Greg

    2018-01-01

    Continual improvements in diagnostic processes are needed to minimise the proportion of patients with cancer who experience diagnostic delays. Clinical audit is a means of achieving this. To characterise key aspects of the diagnostic process for cancer and to generate baseline measures for future re-audit. Clinical audit of cancer diagnosis in general practices in England. Information on patient and tumour characteristics held in the English National Cancer Registry was supplemented by information from GPs in participating practices. Data items included diagnostic timepoints, patient characteristics, and clinical management. Data were collected on 17 042 patients with a new diagnosis of cancer during 2014 from 439 practices. Participating practices were similar to non-participating ones, particularly regarding population age, urban/rural location, and practice-based patient experience measures. The median diagnostic interval for all patients was 40 days (interquartile range [IQR] 15-86 days). Most patients were referred promptly (median primary care interval 5 days [IQR 0-27 days]). Where GPs deemed diagnostic delays to have occurred (22% of cases), patient, clinician, or system factors were responsible in 26%, 28%, and 34% of instances, respectively. Safety netting was recorded for 44% of patients. At least one primary care-led investigation was carried out for 45% of patients. Most patients (76%) had at least one existing comorbid condition; 21% had three or more. The findings identify avenues for quality improvement activity and provide a baseline for future audit of the impact of 2015 National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance on management and referral of suspected cancer. © British Journal of General Practice 2018.

  18. Oral cancer: the association between nation-based alcohol-drinking profiles and oral cancer mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Stefano; Scully, Crispian

    2005-09-01

    The unclear association between different nation-based alcohol-drinking profiles and oral cancer mortality was investigated using, as observational units, 20 countries from Europe, Northern America, Far Eastern Asia, with cross-nationally comparable data. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were run with male age-standardised, mortality rate (ASMR) as explanatory variable and annual adult alcohol consumption, adult smoking prevalence, life expectancy, as explanatory. Large between-country differences in ASMR (range, 0.88-6.87 per 100,000) were found, but the mean value was similar to the global estimate (3.31 vs. 3.09 per 100,000). Differences in alcohol consumption (2.06-21.03 annual litres per capita) and in distribution between beverages were reported. Wine was the most prevalent alcoholic beverage in 45% of cases. Significant increases in ASMR for every litre of pure ethanol (0.15 per 100,000; 95 CI, 0.01-0.29) and spirits (0.26 per 100,000; 95 CI, 0.03-0.49), non-significant effects for beer and wine were estimated. The impact of alcohol on oral cancer deaths would be higher than expected and the drinking profile could affect cancer mortality, probably because of the different drinking pattern of spirit drinkers, usually consuming huge alcohol quantities on single occasions, and the different concentrations of ethanol and cancer-preventing compounds such as polyphenols, in the various beverages.

  19. Pushing the Child Centred Approach in Myanmar: The Role of Cross National Policy Networks and the Effects in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, Marie

    2011-01-01

    In Myanmar schools, rote learning is the norm. International aid and education organisations based in the country have been trying to promote the child centred approach (CCA) as a much more progressive form of teaching and learning. The CCA is being rolled out principally through monastic school networks aided by international and national…

  20. Impact of 68Ga-DOTA-Peptide PET/CT on the Management of Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumour (GI-NET): Malaysian National Referral Centre Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Teik Hin; Boey, Ching Yeen; Lee, Boon Nang

    2018-04-01

    The National Cancer Institute is the only referral centre in Malaysia that provides 68 Ga-DOTA-peptide imaging. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of 68 Ga-DOTA-peptide PET/CT on the management of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours (GI-NET). A cross-sectional study was performed to review the impact of 68 Ga-DOTA-peptide ( 68 Ga-DOTATATE or 68 Ga-DOTATOC) PET/CT on patients with biopsy-proven GI-NET between January 2011 and December 2015. Suspected NET was excluded. Demographic data, tumoral characteristics, change of disease stage, pre-PET intended management and post-PET management were evaluated. Over a 5-year period, 82 studies of 68 Ga-DOTA-peptide PET/CT were performed on 44 GI-NET patients. The most common primary site was the rectum (50.0%) followed by the small bowel, stomach and colon. Using WHO 2010 grading, 40.9% of patients had low-grade (G1) tumour, 22.7% intermediate (G2) and 4.5% high (G3). Of ten patients scheduled for pre-operative staging, 68 Ga-DOTA-peptide PET/CT only led to therapeutic change in three patients. Furthermore, false-negative results of 68 Ga-DOTA-peptide PET/CT were reported in one patient after surgical confirmation. However, therapeutic changes were seen in 20/36 patients (55.6%) scheduled for post-surgical restaging or assessment of somatostatin analogue (SSA) eligibility. When 68 Ga-DOTA-peptide PET/CT was used for monitoring disease progress during systemic treatment (sandostatin, chemotherapy, everolimus and PRRT) in metastatic disease, impact on management modification was seen in 19/36 patients (52.8%), of which 84.2% had inter-modality change (switch to everolimus, chemotherapy or PRRT) and 15.8% had intra-modality change (increased SSA dosage). 68 Ga-DOTA-peptide PET/CT has a significant impact on management decisions in GI-NET patients as it can provide additional information on occult metastasis/equivocal lesions and supply the clinician an opportunity to select patients for targeted therapy.

  1. Preventing work-related stress among staff working in children's cancer Principal Treatment Centres in the UK: a brief survey of staff support systems and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, B; Gibson, F; Bayliss, J; Mukherjee, S

    2018-03-01

    Growing evidence of the association between health professionals' well-being and patient and organisational outcomes points to the need for effective staff support. This paper reports a brief survey of the UK's children's cancer Principal Treatment Centres (PTCs) regarding staff support systems and practices. A short on-line questionnaire, administered in 2012-2013, collected information about the availability of staff support interventions which seek to prevent work-related stress among different members of the multi-disciplinary team (MDT). It was completed by a member of staff with, where required, assistance from colleagues. All PTCs (n = 19) participated. Debriefs following a patient death was the most frequently reported staff support practice. Support groups were infrequently mentioned. There was wide variability between PTCs, and between professional groups, regarding the number and type of interventions available. Doctors appear to be least likely to have access to support. A few Centres routinely addressed work-related stress in wider staff management strategies. Two Centres had developed a bespoke intervention. Very few Centres were reported to actively raise awareness of support available from their hospital's Occupational Health department. A minority of PTCs had expert input regarding staff support from clinical psychology/liaison psychiatry. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Radiological and pathological findings of interval cancers in a multi-centre, randomized, controlled trial of mammographic screening in women from age 40-41 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, A.J.; Kutt, E.; Record, C.; Waller, M.; Bobrow, L.; Moss, S.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to analyse the radiographic findings of the screening mammograms of women with interval cancer who participated in a multi-centre, randomized, controlled trial of mammographic screening in women from age 40-48 years. Materials and methods: The screening and diagnostic mammograms of 208 women with interval cancers were reviewed. Abnormalities were classified as malignant, subtle and non-specific. Results: Eighty-seven (42%) of women had true, 66 (32%) occult and 55 (26%) false-negative interval cancers. The features most frequently missed or misinterpreted were granular microcalcification (38%), asymmetric density (27%) and distortion (22%). Thirty-seven percent of abnormal previous screens were classified as malignant, 39% subtle change and 21% as non-specific. Granular calcifications were significantly more common on the diagnostic mammograms of false-negative interval cancers than those of true interval cancers (28 versus 14%, p = 0.04). Occult interval cancers were more likely to be <10 mm and <15 mm in invasive pathological size than other interval cancers (p = 0.03 and 0.005, respectively). True interval cancers were more likely to be histologically grade 3 than other interval cancers (p = 0.04). Women who developed true and false-negative interval cancers had similar background patterns, but women with occult cancers had a higher proportion of dense patterns (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Interval cancers in a young screening population have a high proportion of occult lesions that are small and occur in dense background patterns. The proportion of interval cancers that are false negative is similar that seen in older populations and granular microcalcification is the commonest missed mammographic feature

  3. Socio-demographic and other patient characteristics associated with time between colonoscopy and surgery, and choice of treatment centre for colorectal cancer: a retrospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Goldsbury, David; Harris, Mark Fort; Pascoe, Shane; Olver, Ian; Barton, Michael; Spigelman, Allan; O'Connell, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate key patient clinical and demographic characteristics associated with time between colonoscopy and surgery, and choice of treatment centre for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. This will add to the little published research examining the pathway following CRC diagnosis and prior to surgery. Design Retrospective cohort analysis of linked data. Setting A population-based sample of people diagnosed August 2004 to December 2007 in New South Wales, Australia. Participants ...

  4. Definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy concurrent with systemic therapy for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: Outcomes from an integrated regional Australian cancer centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud Rahbari, Reza; Winkley, Lauren; Hill, Jacques; Tahir, Abdul Rahim Mohammed; McKay, Michael; Last, Andrew; Shakespeare, Thomas P; Dwyer, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) incidence has increased over the past two decades largely because of an increase in human papilloma virus (HPV)-related OPSCC. We report here outcomes of definitive radiation therapy for OPSCC with simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in a regional Australian cancer centre. We retrospectively reviewed electronic medical records (EMR) of all patients treated with IMRT for head and neck cancer. We included patients who received a curative intent IMRT for OPSCC (2010-2014). Of 61 patients, 80% were men, and the median age was 57 years. Ninety percent of our patients received concurrent systemic therapy, and 68% were p16 positive. The median radiotherapy dose received was 70 Gy in 35 fractions. The median follow up for surviving patients was 22 months. Twenty-four month actuarial data show that the loco-regional recurrence free, metastasis-free MFS, cancer-specific (CaSS) and overall survival percentages were 98.3%, 92.6%, 91% and 90.3%, respectively. We did not observe grades 4 or 5 acute or late toxicities, and 10 patients (16.2%) exhibited persistent grade 3 toxicity 6 months after completing the treatment. The results from curative IMRTs for OPSCC delivered in a regional cancer centre are comparable with results published by tertiary referral centres. A long-term follow up of this patient cohort will continue for further analyses and comparisons with tertiary centres. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  5. Disparities in Geographic Accessibility of National Cancer Institute Cancer Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanqing; Fu, Cong; Onega, Tracy; Shi, Xun; Wang, Fahui

    2017-11-11

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Centers form the backbone of the cancer care system in the United States since their inception in the early 1970s. Most studies on their geographic accessibility used primitive measures, and did not examine the disparities across urbanicity or demographic groups. This research uses an advanced accessibility method, termed "2-step floating catchment area (2SFCA)" and implemented in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), to capture the degree of geographic access to NCI Cancer Centers by accounting for competition intensity for the services and travel time between residents and the facilities. The results indicate that urban advantage is pronounced as the average accessibility is highest in large central metro areas, declines to large fringe metro, medium metro, small metro, micropolitan and noncore rural areas. Population under the poverty line are disproportionally concentrated in lower accessibility areas. However, on average Non-Hispanic White have the lowest geographic accessibility, followed by Hispanic, Non-Hispanic Black and Asian, and the differences are statistically significant. The "reversed racial disadvantage" in NCI Cancer Center accessibility seems counterintuitive but is consistent with an influential prior study; and it is in contrast to the common observation of co-location of concentration of minority groups and people under the poverty line.

  6. A model for facilitating translational research and development in China: Call for establishing a Hong Kong Branch of the Chinese National Engineering Research Centre for Biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Bian

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With significant improvements in living standards in China and the aging population that accompanies these improvements, the market demand for high-quality orthopaedic biomaterials for clinical applications is tremendous and growing rapidly. There are major efforts to promote cooperation between different scientific institutes with complementary strengths for the further development of the biomaterial industry in China to achieve the technological level of developed countries. An excellent example is that the Ministry of Science and Technology of the People's Republic of China (MOST; Beijing, China established the Chinese National Engineering Research Centres (CNERCs, which serve as a major initiative in driving basic and applied technological research and development (R&D in mainland China. To create a win-win situation with Hong Kong, the MOST and the Hong Kong Innovation and Technology Commission are jointly establishing the Hong Kong Branch of the CNERCs. Through an amicable arrangement, the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK; Shatin, Hong Kong and the Chinese National Engineering Research Centre for Biomaterials (i.e., Main Centre in Chengdu, People's Republic of China have decided to apply to establish the Hong Kong Branch of the CNERC for Biomaterials at the CUHK. The effort in establishing the Hong Kong Branch of Biomaterials seeks to promote further collaboration with the Main Centre with the goals of promoting synergy and a win-win cooperation between mainland China and Hong Kong in scientific research, talent cultivation, clinically driven novel biomaterials product design, and preclinical and clinical testing. It will thus become a model for the successful collaboration between the Hong Kong research institutions and the mainland CNERCs in the area of biomaterials. Such initiatives will facilitate close collaboration in translational medicine associated with biomaterial development and application.

  7. Real-life treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer with regorafenib: a single-centre review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotfrit, J; Vickers, M; Sud, S; Asmis, T; Cripps, C; Goel, R; Hsu, T; Jonker, D; Goodwin, R

    2017-08-01

    Various tyrosine kinase signalling pathways affect the development and progression of colorectal cancer (crc). In clinical trials, regorafenib has been associated with a survival benefit in metastatic crc (mcrc). We assessed the safety and efficacy of regorafenib in real-world patients. In a retrospective review of patients with mcrc treated with regorafenib at our institution from 2013 to 2015, patient demographics, treatment, and survival data were collected. Progression-free survival (pfs) and overall survival (os) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. In total, 48 patients were offered regorafenib, and 35 (73%) started treatment. Of the patients who started regorafenib, 57% were men. Median age in the cohort was 61 years, and all patients had a performance status in the range 0-2. Time from diagnosis of mcrc to regorafenib treatment was more than 18 months in 71% of patients. Starting dose was 160 mg in 54% of the patients, 120 mg in 40%, and 80 mg in 6%. Dose reductions occurred in 34% of the patients, and interruptions, in 29%. Best response was progressive disease (60%) and stable disease (17%); response in the rest of the patients was unknown. The most common adverse events on regorafenib (any grade) were fatigue (57%), hyperbilirubinemia (43%), thrombocytopenia (37%), anorexia (31%), and hypertension (31%). The most common grade 3 or 4 adverse events were fatigue (29%), hypophosphatemia (17%), weight loss (11%), and hyperbilirubinemia (9%). Common reasons for discontinuing regorafenib included progressive disease (51%) and toxicity (26%). In patients treated with regorafenib, pfs was 2.4 months (95% confidence interval: 1.8 to 3.3 months) and os was 5.6 months (95% confidence interval: 3.7 to 8.9 months). No factors were associated with survival in univariate or multivariate analysis. In a real-world setting, regorafenib is associated with survival similar to that reported in the randomized controlled trials, but at the expense of toxicity leading

  8. 9 August 2011 - United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights N. Pillay signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    9 August 2011 - United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights N. Pillay signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  9. 77 FR 19024 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI SPORE in Lymphoma, Leukemia, Brain, Esophageal and Gastrointestinal..., Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer...

  10. 77 FR 70170 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... with the proposed research projects, the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted..., Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398...

  11. 78 FR 41072 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... with the proposed research projects, the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted..., Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398...

  12. Centre for Education, Training, & Research in Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (CETREE) of Malaysia: Educating the Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Kamarulazizi; Hilme, Khairur Rahim Ahmad

    2007-10-01

    Centre for Education, Training, and Research in Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (CETREE), was established in the year 2000, in Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM). CETREE is a not-for-profit organization that was part of the Malaysian Government's continuous effort in promoting sustainable development. The centre's main task is to tackle issues and problems that are slowing the potential growth of RE & EE utilizations in Malaysia. CETREE and the Government of Malaysia, with funding and supports from Danish International Development Assistance (DANIDA) and USM, has been working together closely in applying trans-disciplinary educational methods and approaches for the teaching of RE & EE that are compatible with Malaysian. Through association with various entities such as Energy Centre of Malaysia (PTM), Energy Commission of Malaysia (ST), Malaysia Electricity Supply Industry Trust Account (MESITA); CETREE was able to successfully promote sustainable development through education and training. Significant accomplishments made by CETREE include introducing RE and EE as part of Malaysian secondary schools and universities education; conducting energy related courses for professionals; and generating awareness via campaign in the mass media and CETREE's mobile-exhibition-unit road-tour.

  13. Being prepared to verify the CTBT-Atmospheric Transport modeling and radionuclide analysis at the Austrian National Data Centre during the NDC Preparedness Exercise 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotawa, Gerhard; Schraick, Irene

    2010-05-01

    An explosion in the Kara-Zhyra mine in Eastern Kazakhstan on 28 November 2009 around 07:20 UTC was recorded by both the CTBTO seismic and infrasound networks. This event triggered a world-wide preparedness exercise among the CTBTO National Data Centres. Within an hour after the event was selected by the German NDC, a computer program developed by NDC Austria based on weather forecasts from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and from the U.S. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) was started to analyse what Radionuclide Stations of the CTBTO International Monitoring System (IMS) would be potentially affected by the release from a nuclear explosion at this place in the course of the following 3-10 days. These calculations were daily updated to consider the observed state of the atmosphere instead of the predicted one. Based on these calculations, automated and reviewed radionuclide reports from the potentially affected stations as produced by the CTBTO International Data Centre (IDC) were looked at. An additional analysis of interesting spectra was provided by the Seibersdorf Laboratories. Based on all the results coming in, no evidence whatsoever was found that the explosion in Kazakhstan was nuclear. This is in accordance with ground truth information saying that the event was caused by the detonation of more than 53 Tons of explosives as part of mining operations. A number of conclusions can be drawn from this exercise. First, the international, bilateral as well as national mechanisms and procedures in place for such an event worked smoothly. Second, the products and services from the CTBTO IDC proved to be very useful to assist the member states in their verification efforts. Last but not least, issues with the availability of data from IMS radionuclide stations do remain.

  14. Consumption of added fats and oils in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) centres across 10 European countries as assessed by 24-hour dietary recalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linseisen, J; Bergström, E; Gafá, L; González, C A; Thiébaut, A; Trichopoulou, A; Tumino, R; Navarro Sánchez, C; Martínez Garcia, C; Mattisson, I; Nilsson, S; Welch, A; Spencer, E A; Overvad, K; Tjønneland, A; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Kesse, E; Miller, A B; Schulz, M; Botsi, K; Naska, A; Sieri, S; Sacerdote, C; Ocké, M C; Peeters, P H M; Skeie, G; Engeset, D; Charrondière, U R; Slimani, N

    2002-12-01

    To evaluate the consumption of added fats and oils across the European centres and countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). 24-Hour dietary recalls were collected by means of standardised computer-guided interviews in 27 redefined EPIC centres across 10 European countries. From an initial number of 36 900 subjects, single dietary recalls from 22 924 women and 13 031 men in the age range of 35-74 years were included. Mean daily intake of added fats and oils varied between 16.2 g (Varese, Italy) and 41.1 g (Malmö, Sweden) in women and between 24.7 g (Ragusa, Italy) and 66.0 g (Potsdam, Germany) in men. Total mean lipid intake by consumption of added fats and oils, including those used for sauce preparation, ranged between 18.3 (Norway) and 37.2 g day-1 (Greece) in women and 28.4 (Heidelberg, Germany) and 51.2 g day-1 (Greece) in men. The Mediterranean EPIC centres with high olive oil consumption combined with low animal fat intake contrasted with the central and northern European centres where fewer vegetable oils, more animal fats and a high proportion of margarine were consumed. The consumption of added fats and oils of animal origin was highest in the German EPIC centres, followed by the French. The contribution of added fats and oils to total energy intake ranged from 8% in Norway to 22% in Greece. The results demonstrate a high variation in dietary intake of added fats and oils in EPIC, providing a good opportunity to elucidate the role of dietary fats in cancer aetiology.

  15. Resisting "National Breast Cancer Awareness Month": The Rhetoric of Counterpublics and Their Cultural Performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzullo, Phaedra C.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1984, October has been recognized in the U.S. as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. In 1997, the Toxic Links Coalition of the Bay Area, California, began organizing annual "Stop Cancer Where It Starts" tours to counter attempts to obscure the environmentally-linked causes of cancer. By drawing on research including participant…

  16. Report to the nation finds continuing declines in cancer death rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Death rates from all cancers combined for men, women, and children continued to decline in the United States between 2004 and 2008, according to the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2008. The overall rate of new cancer diagnoses,

  17. Single-Centre Experience with Percutaneous Cryoablation of Breast Cancer in 23 Consecutive Non-surgical Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Lara, Christine Tunon de; Buy, Xavier; Ferron, Stéphane; Hurtevent, Gabrielle; Fournier, Marion; Debled, Marc; Palussière, Jean

    2015-01-01

    AimTo present our single-centre prospective experience on the use of cryoablation (CA) applied to treat primary breast cancer (BC) in a cohort of patients unsuitable for surgical treatment.Materials and MethodsTwenty-three consecutive post-menopausal female patients (median age 85 years; range 56–96) underwent percutaneous CA of unifocal, biopsy-proven BC, under ultrasound/computed tomography (US/CT) guidance. Clinical and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) follow-ups were systematically scheduled at 3, 12, 18 and 24 months. Local tumour control was assessed by comparing baseline and follow-up DCE-MRI.ResultsTwenty-three BC (median size 14 mm) were treated under local anaesthesia (78.3 %) or local anaesthesia and conscious sedation (21.7 %). Median number of cryo-probes applied per session was 2.0. A “dual-freezing” protocol was applied for the first ten patients and a more aggressive “triple-freezing” protocol for the remaining 13. Median follow-up was 14.6 months. Five patients recurred during follow-up and two were successfully re-treated with CA. Five patients presented immediate CA-related complications: four hematomas evolved uneventfully at 3-month follow-up and one skin burn resulted in skin inflammation and skin retraction at 3 and 12 months, respectively.ConclusionsPercutaneous CA is safe and well tolerated for non-resected elderly BC patients. Procedures can be proposed under local anaesthesia only. Given the insulation properties of the breast gland, aggressive CA protocols are required. Prospective studies are needed to better understand the potential role of CA in the local treatment of early BC

  18. Single-Centre Experience with Percutaneous Cryoablation of Breast Cancer in 23 Consecutive Non-surgical Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: r.cazzato@unicampus.it [Institut Bergonié, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Department of Medical Imaging (France); Lara, Christine Tunon de, E-mail: c.tunondelara@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Department of Surgery (France); Buy, Xavier, E-mail: x.buy@bordeaux.unicancer.fr; Ferron, Stéphane, E-mail: s.ferron@bordeaux.unicancer.fr; Hurtevent, Gabrielle, E-mail: g.hurtevent@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Department of Medical Imaging (France); Fournier, Marion, E-mail: m.fournier@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Department of Surgery (France); Debled, Marc, E-mail: m.debled@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Department of Medical Oncology (France); Palussière, Jean, E-mail: j.palussiere@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Department of Medical Imaging (France)

    2015-10-15

    AimTo present our single-centre prospective experience on the use of cryoablation (CA) applied to treat primary breast cancer (BC) in a cohort of patients unsuitable for surgical treatment.Materials and MethodsTwenty-three consecutive post-menopausal female patients (median age 85 years; range 56–96) underwent percutaneous CA of unifocal, biopsy-proven BC, under ultrasound/computed tomography (US/CT) guidance. Clinical and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) follow-ups were systematically scheduled at 3, 12, 18 and 24 months. Local tumour control was assessed by comparing baseline and follow-up DCE-MRI.ResultsTwenty-three BC (median size 14 mm) were treated under local anaesthesia (78.3 %) or local anaesthesia and conscious sedation (21.7 %). Median number of cryo-probes applied per session was 2.0. A “dual-freezing” protocol was applied for the first ten patients and a more aggressive “triple-freezing” protocol for the remaining 13. Median follow-up was 14.6 months. Five patients recurred during follow-up and two were successfully re-treated with CA. Five patients presented immediate CA-related complications: four hematomas evolved uneventfully at 3-month follow-up and one skin burn resulted in skin inflammation and skin retraction at 3 and 12 months, respectively.ConclusionsPercutaneous CA is safe and well tolerated for non-resected elderly BC patients. Procedures can be proposed under local anaesthesia only. Given the insulation properties of the breast gland, aggressive CA protocols are required. Prospective studies are needed to better understand the potential role of CA in the local treatment of early BC.

  19. Archives of the Dance (22): Pioneer Women – early British modern dancers (the National Resource Centre for Dance, University of Surrey).

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Pioneer Women was an AHRC-funded project based on archives held at the National Resource Centre for Dance, University of Surrey. Two of the largest collections, those on Madge Atkinson and Natural Movement, and Ruby Ginner’s Revived (later Classical) Greek Dance, are categorized and interrogated for not only what they reveal of the work of these two dance artists, but also for how they resonate with dominant cultural trends in the arts. The research privileges a much under-explored or theoriz...

  20. Coordinated protection of the population in emergencies in Switzerland: The National Emergency Operations Centre (NAZ) and the Emergency Organisation Radioactivity (EOR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, H.H.

    1992-01-01

    As consequence of the nuclear weapons tests Switzerland has since 30 years expert commissions, concepts, monitoring networks, monitoring and emergency teams for the protection of the population following radiological accidents of all types inside or outside the country. Thus Chernobyl hit a prepared country - except information. The Radiological Emergency Organisation (EOR) and its National Emergency Operations Centre (NAZ) have up-to-date legal bases, concepts and operational means. Besides radiological events, NAZ deals also with chemical accidents, satellite, satellite crashes and dam breaks. Unique is the coordinated use of the combined means of civil authorities, civil defense and army in all strategic cases. (author)

  1. Cancer in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children : A case series from the Children's Cancer Group and the National Cancer Institute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granovsky, MO; Mueller, BU; Nicholson, HS; Rosenberg, PS; Rabkin, CS

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and the clinical outcome of patients with these tumors. Methods: We retrospectively surveyed the Children's Cancer Group (CCG) and the National Cancer institute (NCI) for cases of cancer that

  2. The Premenopausal Breast Cancer Collaboration: A pooling project of studies participating in the National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Hazel B.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Wright, Lauren B.; McGowan, Craig; Brook, Mark N.; McClain, Kathleen M.; Jones, Michael E.; Adami, Hans-Olov; Agnoli, Claudia; Baglietto, Laura; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Blot, William J.; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Butler, Lesley; Chen, Yu; Doody, Michele M.; Dossus, Laure; Eliassen, A. Heather; Giles, Graham G.; Gram, Inger T.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoffman-Bolton, Judy; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J.; Kirsh, Victoria A.; Kitahara, Cari M.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Larsson, Susanna C.; Lund, Eiliv; Ma, Huiyan; Merritt, Melissa A.; Milne, Roger L.; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Ozasa, Kotaro; Palmer, Julie R.; Peeters, Petra H.; Riboli, Elio; Rohan, Thomas E.; Sadakane, Atsuko; Sund, Malin; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Vatten, Lars; Visvanathan, Kala; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Willett, Walter C.; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Sandler, Dale P.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cancer diagnosis among premenopausal women around the world. Unlike rates in postmenopausal women, incidence rates of advanced breast cancer have increased in recent decades for premenopausal women. Progress in identifying contributors to breast cancer risk among premenopausal women has been constrained by the limited numbers of premenopausal breast cancer cases in individual studies and resulting low statistical power to subcategorize exposures or to study specific subtypes. The Premenopausal Breast Cancer Collaborative Group was established to facilitate cohort-based analyses of risk factors for premenopausal breast cancer by pooling individual-level data from studies participating in the United States National Cancer Institute Cohort Consortium. This paper describes the Group, including the rationale for its initial aims related to pregnancy, obesity, and physical activity. We also describe the 20 cohort studies with data submitted to the Group by June 2016. The infrastructure developed for this work can be leveraged to support additional investigations. PMID:28600297

  3. The national cancer institute (NCI) and cancer biology in a 'post genome world'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klausner, Richard D.

    1996-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) exists to reduce the burden of all cancers through research and discovery. Extensive restructuring of the NCI over the past year has been aimed at assuring that the institution functions in all ways to promote opportunities for discovery in the laboratory, in the clinic, and in the community. To do this well requires the difficult and almost paradoxical problem of planning for scientific discovery which, in turn is based on the freedom to pursue the unanticipated. The intellectual and structural landscape of science is changing and it places new challenges, new demands and new opportunities for facilitating discovery. The nature of cancer as a disease of genomic instability and of accumulated genetic change, coupled with a possibility of the development of new technologies for reading, utilizing, interpreting and manipulating the genome of single cells, provides unprecedented opportunities for a new type of high through-put biology that will change the nature of discovery, cancer detection, diagnosis, prognosis, therapeutic decision-making and therapeutic discovery. To capture these new opportunities will require attention to be paid to integrate the development of technology and new scientific discoveries with the ability to apply advances rapidly and efficiently through clinical trials

  4. 76 FR 576 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ...; Development of Molecular Diagnostics Assay to Detect Basal- like Breast Cancer. Date: February 15, 2011. Time... Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Collaborative Research in Integrative Cancer Biology and the Tumor... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  5. Prevalence of bone marrow necrosis in Egyptian cancer patients referring to the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgamal, B.M.; Rashed, R.A.; Raslan, H.N.

    2011-01-01

    Bone marrow necrosis; Egyptian cancer patients Abstract Background: Bone marrow necrosis is a relatively rare entity which has been associated with a poor prognosis. It is most commonly found in patients with neoplastic disorders and severe infections. Methods: study comprised examination of 5043 bone marrow biopsy specimens performed at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, over 7 years period (March 2004-March 2011). It included 5 years retrospective (2867 archived samples) and 2 years prospective (2176 samples). Results: Bone marrow necrosis was diagnosed in fifteen out of 5043 examined specimens with a percentage of 0.3% and ranged from mild to massive according to semiquantitative estimation. Prognosis of all patients was poor with survival not exceeding 6 months from the date of marrow necrosis diagnosis. Conclusion: In Egyptian patients, bone marrow necrosis in association with malignancy is a rare disorder which is accompanied by a poor outcome

  6. 7. meeting of the Atomic and Molecular Data Centre Network, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 9-11 November 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.J.

    1988-02-01

    This is a brief summary report of the Seventh Atomic and Molecular Data Centre Network Meeting convened by the IAEA at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 9-11 November 1987. The goal of the Centre is to provide coordination of the international management of atomic and molecular data pertinent to controlled fusion research and technology. The meeting was attended by twelve representatives of centres from six member states. The meeting resulted in five conclusions: (i) the establishment of a single international atomic and molecular collision data base was stressed to be the short-term priority for the data centre network; (ii) the Specialists' Meeting on ''Atomic and Molecular Data for Plasma Edge Studies'' was reviewed, and the proposal for the formation of a coordinated research programme on the production and evaluation of atomic and molecular data for plasma edge studies as a means of generating the needed data for fusion research was endorsed; (iii) it was recommended that the recent report entitled ''Recommended Data on Atomic Collision Processes Involving Iron Ions'' be published as a special supplement to the Nuclear Fusion journal, 1987. This unit was asked to investigate the possibility to provide data covering recombination processes for iron ions which were not included in the recommended data base; (iv) the participants felt that a meeting covering the Atomic and Molecular and fusion data base was timely and important for maximizing the efficient usage of the Atomic and Molecular collision data base. The convening of a Specialists' Meeting on carbon and oxygen ion collision data was also discussed. Finally, (v) it was proposed that the Atomic and Molecular Data Unit should fully address all discrepancies within the recommended data base. Nine status and progress reports are summarized in the Appendices to the present summary report. Refs, 1 fig., tabs

  7. Survival As a Quality Metric of Cancer Care: Use of the National Cancer Data Base to Assess Hospital Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Lawrence N; Palis, Bryan E; McCabe, Ryan; Mallin, Kathy; Loomis, Ashley; Winchester, David; McKellar, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Survival is considered an important indicator of the quality of cancer care, but the validity of different methodologies to measure comparative survival rates is less well understood. We explored whether the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) could serve as a source of unadjusted and risk-adjusted cancer survival data and whether these data could be used as quality indicators for individual hospitals or in the aggregate by hospital type. The NCDB, an aggregate of > 1,500 hospital cancer registries, was queried to analyze unadjusted and risk-adjusted hazards of death for patients with stage III breast cancer (n = 116,787) and stage IIIB or IV non-small-cell lung cancer (n = 252,392). Data were analyzed at the individual hospital level and by hospital type. At the hospital level, after risk adjustment, few hospitals had comparative risk-adjusted survival rates that were statistically better or worse. By hospital type, National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers had risk-adjusted survival ratios that were statistically significantly better than those of academic cancer centers and community hospitals. Using the NCDB as the data source, survival rates for patients with stage III breast cancer and stage IIIB or IV non-small-cell lung cancer were statistically better at National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers when compared with other hospital types. Compared with academic hospitals, risk-adjusted survival was lower in community hospitals. At the individual hospital level, after risk adjustment, few hospitals were shown to have statistically better or worse survival, suggesting that, using NCDB data, survival may not be a good metric to determine relative quality of cancer care at this level.

  8. The National Oesophagogastric Cancer Awareness Campaign: a locality outcome analysis from County Durham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Sara; Awadelkarim, Bidour; Dhar, Anjan

    2017-10-01

    Oesophageal and gastric cancer is common. Despite advances in investigation and treatment, the outcomes from these cancers remain poor. As part of the Be Clear On Cancer Campaign, the Department of Health runs the National Oesophagogastric Cancer Campaign each year, with key messages of (1) 'Having heartburn most days, for 3 weeks or more could be a sign of cancer' and (2) 'if food is sticking when you swallow, tell your doctor'. We evaluated the effect of the National Oesophagogastric Cancer Campaign in our locality. Reviewing new referrals from primary care for upper gastrointestinal symptoms during the campaign period, and a period thereafter, we found that there was no significant impact of the campaign in the diagnosis of oesophagogastric cancers. Furthermore, it increased routine waiting times for elective gastroscopies in our endoscopy units. We believe that alternative strategies need to be considered for earlier detection of oesophagogastric cancer.

  9. Mapping HPV Vaccination and Cervical Cancer Screening Practice in the Pacific Region-Strengthening National and Regional Cervical Cancer Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, J; McKenzie, J; Buenconsejo-Lum, L E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide background information for strengthening cervical cancer prevention in the Pacific by mapping current human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and cervical cancer screening practices, as well as intent and barriers to the introduction and maintenance of national HPV vaccinatio...... of prevention programs, operational research and advocacy could strengthen political momentum for cervical cancer prevention and avoid risking the lives of many women in the Pacific....

  10. Presentation of the CEA's crisis national organization: coordination centre in case of crisis, crisis technical teams, intervention means, and so on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pectorin, X.

    2010-01-01

    After having briefly recalled the existence of a legal framework for crisis management organisation, this report briefly describes how the CEA plans the crisis management. This management is based on the definition of critical scenarios, on the building up of a crisis management team, and on the elaboration of crisis management operational documents. It evokes the alert organisation and the triggering of crisis management. Then, it describes the CEA's national crisis organisation with its main crisis management structures, the role and the operation of the Crisis Coordination Centre (CCC, the decision body), the role and operation of the Central Crisis Technical Teams (ETC-C, Equipes Techniques de Crise Centrales), the role of field interveners (various rescue, protection, health care and technical teams) and of other additional intervention actors. It evokes the objectives of the various exercises which are organised every year at the internal, national or international level

  11. [The design and development of a quality system for the diagnosis of exotic animal diseases at the National Centre for Animal and Plant Health in Cuba].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oca, N Montes; Villoch, A; Pérez Ruano, M

    2004-12-01

    A quality system for the diagnosis of exotic animal diseases was developed at the national centre for animal and plant health (CENSA), responsible for coordinating the clinical, epizootiological and laboratory diagnosis of causal agents of exotic animal diseases in Cuba. A model was designed on the basis of standard ISO 9001:2000 of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), standard ISO/IEC 17025:1999 of ISO and the International Electrotechnical Commission, recommendations of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and other regulatory documents from international and national organisations that deal specifically with the treatment of emerging diseases. Twenty-nine standardised operating procedures were developed, plus 13 registers and a checklist to facilitate the evaluation of the system. The effectiveness of the quality system was confirmed in the differential diagnosis of classical swine fever at an animal virology laboratory in Cuba.

  12. Cancer incidence among workers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acquavella, J.J.; Wilkinson, G.S.; Wiggs, L.D.; Reyes-Waxweiler, M.; Key, C.R.; Tietjen, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of cancer incidence among Los Alamos workers was reported at the Sixteenth Mid-Year Topical Symposium of the Health Physics Society. Cancer incidence was especially low among Anglo-American males for cancer of the lung and oral cancer, cancer sites commonly associated with cigarette smoking. No cases of cancer of the lung, oral cavity, pancreas, or bladder were observed among Anglo-American females in the population. Standardized incidence ratios for cancer of the breast and cancer of the uterine corpus exceeded one; however, these findings were not statistically significant. These findings are consistent with expectation for a population of high socioeconomic class, such as the Laboratory work force. Therefore, working conditions at the Laboratory do not appear to have affected cancer incidence in this population. 1 reference, 2 tables

  13. Physical activity and sedentary behavior of cancer survivors and non-cancer individuals: results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Roy B; Phillips, Allison; Herrick, Kirsten; Helou, Marieka; Rafie, Carlin; Anscher, Mitchell S; Mikkelsen, Ross B; Ning, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Increasing physical activity and decreasing sedentary behavior are associated with a higher quality of life and lower mortality rates for cancer survivors, a growing population group. Studies detailing the behavior of cancer survivors are limited. Therefore, we investigated physical activity and sedentary behavior of cancer survivors using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2010. Participants were those who provided physical activity and sedentary behavior data. Those who were pregnant, physical activity, compared to non-cancer participants. These patterns are similar for breast and prostate cancer survivors, with prostate cancer survivors more likely to engage in physical activity for more than one hour per day (OR = 1.98, 95% CI (1.05, 3.71)). Our findings suggest that cancer survivors tend to have more physical activity, but they are also more likely to engage in sedentary behavior.

  14. The Aube centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    This educational booklet is devoted to a general presentation of the Aube radioactive wastes storage centre. After a short presentation of the Andra, the French national agency for the management of radioactive wastes, it gives some general information about radioactive wastes (origin, classification), containers (quality assurance and different types), wastes transportation (planning, safety), and about the Aube centre itself: description, treatment and conditioning of drums (compacting and injection), storage facilities, geological situation of the site, and environmental controls. (J.S.)

  15. Early outcomes for rectal cancer surgery in the republic of ireland following a national centralization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, John P; Coffey, J Calvin; Boyle, Emily; Keane, Frank; McNamara, Deborah A

    2013-10-01

    Following a national audit of rectal cancer management in 2007, a national centralization program in the Republic of Ireland was initiated. In 2010, a prospective evaluation of rectal cancer treatment and early outcomes was conducted. A total of 29 colorectal surgeons in 14 centers prospectively collated data on all patients with rectal cancer who underwent curative surgery in 2010. Data were available on 447 patients who underwent proctectomy with curative intent for rectal cancer in 2010; 23.7 % of patients underwent abdominoperineal excision. The median number of lymph nodes identified was 12. The 30-day mortality rate was 1.1 %. Compared with 2007, there was a reduction in positive circumferential margin rate (15.8 vs 4.5 %, P rectal cancer. Patients undergoing rectal cancer surgery in hospitals following a national centralization initiative received high-quality surgery. Significant heterogeneity exists in radiotherapy administration, and evidence-based guidelines should be developed and implemented.

  16. Laparoscopic Complete Mesocolic Excision versus Open Complete Mesocolic Excision for Transverse Colon Cancer: Long-Term Survival Results of a Prospective Single Centre Non-Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storli, Kristian Eeg; Eide, Geir Egil

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) used in the treatment of transverse colon cancer has been questioned on the basis of the technical challenges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the medium- and long-term clinical and survival outcomes after laparoscopic and open CME for transverse colon cancer and to compare the 2 approaches. This study was a retrospective non-randomized study of patients with prospectively registered data on open and laparoscopic CME for transverse colon cancer tumour-node-metastasis stages I-III operated on between 2007 and 2014. This was a single-centre study in a community teaching hospital. A total of 56 patients with transverse colon cancer were included, excluding those with tumours in the colonic flexures. The outcome aims were 4-year time to recurrence (TTR) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). Morbidity was also measured. The 4-year TTR was 93.9% in the laparoscopic group and 91.3% in the open group (p = 0.71). The 4-year CSS was 97.0% in the laparoscopic group and 91.3% in the open group (p = 0.42). This was a prospective single-institution study with a small sample size. Results of the study suggest that the laparoscopic CME approach might be the preferred approach for transverse colon cancer, especially regarding its benefits in terms of short-term morbidity, length of stay and oncological outcome. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Fox Chase Cancer Center's Genitourinary Division: a national resource for research, innovation and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzzo, Robert G; Horwitz, Eric M; Plimack, Elizabeth R

    2016-04-01

    Founded in 1904, Fox Chase Cancer Center remains committed to its mission. It is one of 41 centers in the country designated as a Comprehensive Cancer Center by the National Cancer Institute, is a founding member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, holds the magnet designation for nursing excellence, is one of the first to establish a family cancer risk assessment program, and has achieved national distinction because of the scientific discoveries made there that have advanced clinical care. Two of its researchers have won Nobel prizes. The Genitourinary Division is nationally recognized and viewed as one of the top driving forces behind the growth of Fox Chase due to its commitment to initiating and participating in clinical trials, its prolific contributions to peer-reviewed publications and presentations at scientific meetings, its innovations in therapies and treatment strategies, and its commitment to bringing cutting-edge therapies to patients.

  18. Impact of national cancer policies on cancer survival trends and socioeconomic inequalities in England, 1996-2013: population based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachet, Bernard; Belot, Aurélien; Maringe, Camille; Coleman, Michel P

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the effectiveness of the NHS Cancer Plan (2000) and subsequent national cancer policy initiatives in improving cancer survival and reducing socioeconomic inequalities in survival in England. Design Population based cohort study. Setting England. Population More than 3.5 million registered patients aged 15-99 with a diagnosis of one of the 24 most common primary, malignant, invasive neoplasms between 1996 and 2013. Main outcome measures Age standardised net survival estimates by cancer, sex, year, and deprivation group. These estimates were modelled using regression model with splines to explore changes in the cancer survival trends and in the socioeconomic inequalities in survival. Results One year net survival improved steadily from 1996 for 26 of 41 sex-cancer combinations studied, and only from 2001 or 2006 for four cancers. Trends in survival accelerated after 2006 for five cancers. The deprivation gap observed for all 41 sex-cancer combinations among patients with a diagnosis in 1996 persisted until 2013. However, the gap slightly decreased for six cancers among men for which one year survival was more than 65% in 1996, and for cervical and uterine cancers, for which survival was more than 75% in 1996. The deprivation gap widened notably for brain tumours in men and for lung cancer in women. Conclusions Little evidence was found of a direct impact of national cancer strategies on one year survival, and no evidence for a reduction in socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival. These findings emphasise that socioeconomic inequalities in survival remain a major public health problem for a healthcare system founded on equity. PMID:29540358

  19. Impact of national cancer policies on cancer survival trends and socioeconomic inequalities in England, 1996-2013: population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarchakou, Aimilia; Rachet, Bernard; Belot, Aurélien; Maringe, Camille; Coleman, Michel P

    2018-03-14

    To assess the effectiveness of the NHS Cancer Plan (2000) and subsequent national cancer policy initiatives in improving cancer survival and reducing socioeconomic inequalities in survival in England. Population based cohort study. England. More than 3.5 million registered patients aged 15-99 with a diagnosis of one of the 24 most common primary, malignant, invasive neoplasms between 1996 and 2013. Age standardised net survival estimates by cancer, sex, year, and deprivation group. These estimates were modelled using regression model with splines to explore changes in the cancer survival trends and in the socioeconomic inequalities in survival. One year net survival improved steadily from 1996 for 26 of 41 sex-cancer combinations studied, and only from 2001 or 2006 for four cancers. Trends in survival accelerated after 2006 for five cancers. The deprivation gap observed for all 41 sex-cancer combinations among patients with a diagnosis in 1996 persisted until 2013. However, the gap slightly decreased for six cancers among men for which one year survival was more than 65% in 1996, and for cervical and uterine cancers, for which survival was more than 75% in 1996. The deprivation gap widened notably for brain tumours in men and for lung cancer in women. Little evidence was found of a direct impact of national cancer strategies on one year survival, and no evidence for a reduction in socioeconomic inequalities in cancer survival. These findings emphasise that socioeconomic inequalities in survival remain a major public health problem for a healthcare system founded on equity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. 76 FR 42719 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... with the proposed research projects, the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted... and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  1. 76 FR 10381 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... with the proposed research projects, the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted... and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  2. A designated centre for people with disabilities operated by National Association of Housing for Visually Impaired Limited, Co. Dublin

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bennett, Annemarie E

    2014-08-06

    Adults with an intellectual disability have poorer diets than the general adult population. The Able 2 Cook 4 Health cookery course aims to improve the diets of adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability. This study aims to evaluate the course by obtaining the views of course participants and the views of managers hosting the course. Thirty course participants took part in focus groups. Five managers hosting the course participated in a semi-structured interview. Positive features of the course included the group cooking, social interaction and course instructors. Collaboration between centres hosting the course and participants\\' home environment is needed to help transfer the skills learned to all home settings. The Able 2 Cook 4 Health cookery course provided participants with an important social outlet to learn essential occupational skills. These findings could particularly influence the diets of adults with an intellectual disability moving into independent living.

  3. Occupation and lung cancer mortality in a nationally representative U.S. Cohort: The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David J; Fleming, Lora E; Leblanc, William G; Arheart, Kristopher L; Chung-Bridges, Katherine; Christ, Sharon L; Caban, Alberto J; Pitman, Terry

    2006-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the risk of lung cancer mortality in a nationally representative sample of U.S. workers by occupation. National Death Index linkage identified 1812 lung cancer deaths among 143,863 workers who participated in the 1987, 1988, and 1990-1994 National Health Interview Surveys. Current and former smoking status was predictive of lung cancer mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 15.1 and 3.8, respectively). Occupations with significantly higher risk for age- and smoking-adjusted lung cancer mortality included heating/air/refrigeration mechanics (HR = 3.0); not specified mechanics and repairers (HR = 2.8); financial records processing occupations (HR = 1.8); freight, stock, and materials handlers (HR = 1.5); and precision production occupations (HR = 1.4). Although tobacco use continues to be the single most important risk factor for lung cancer mortality, occupational exposure to lung carcinogens should be targeted as well to further reduce the burden of lung cancer.

  4. Validation of the Malayalam version of Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs pain scale in cancer patients in the Regional Cancer Centre, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoukkathali Anzar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The Self-administered Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (S-LANSS is a 7-item self-report scale developed to identify pain which is of predominantly neuropathic origin. The aim of this study was to develop a Malayalam version of the LANSS and to test its validity and reliability in chronic pain patients. Methodology: We enrolled 101 Malayalam-speaking chronic pain patients who visited the Division of Palliative Medicine, Regional Cancer Centre, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India. The translated version of S- LANSS was constructed by standard means. Fifty-one neuropathic pain and fifty nociceptive pain patients were identified by an independent pain physician and were subjected to the new pain scale by a palliative care nurse who was blinded to the diagnosis. The “gold standard diagnosis” is what the physician makes after clinical examination. Its validation, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were determined. Results: Fifty-one neuropathic pain and fifty nociceptive pain patients were subjected to the Malayalam version of S-LANSS pain scale for validity testing. The agreement by Cohen's Kappa 0.743, Chi-square test P < 0.001, sensitivity 89.58, specificity 84.91, positive predictive value 84.31, negative predictive value 90.00, accuracy by 87.13, and likelihood ratio 5.94. Conclusion: The Malayalam version of S-LANSS pain scale is a validated screening tool for identifying neuropathic pain in chronic pain patients in Malayalam-speaking regions.

  5. Prostate Cancer in South Africa: Pathology Based National Cancer Registry Data (1986–2006 and Mortality Rates (1997–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Babb

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the most common male cancers globally; however little is known about prostate cancer in Africa. Incidence data for prostate cancer in South Africa (SA from the pathology based National Cancer Registry (1986–2006 and data on mortality (1997–2009 from Statistics SA were analysed. World standard population denominators were used to calculate age specific incidence and mortality rates (ASIR and ASMR using the direct method. Prostate cancer was the most common male cancer in all SA population groups (excluding basal cell carcinoma. There are large disparities in the ASIR between black, white, coloured, and Asian/Indian populations: 19, 65, 46, and 19 per 100 000, respectively, and ASMR was 11, 7, 52, and 6 per 100 000, respectively. Prostate cancer was the second leading cause of cancer death, accounting for around 13% of male deaths from a cancer. The average age at diagnosis was 68 years and 74 years at death. For SA the ASIR increased from 16.8 in 1986 to 30.8 in 2006, while the ASMR increased from 12.3 in 1997 to 16.7 in 2009. There has been a steady increase of incidence and mortality from prostate cancer in SA.

  6. Prostate cancer in South Africa: pathology based national cancer registry data (1986-2006) and mortality rates (1997-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Chantal; Urban, Margaret; Kielkowski, Danuta; Kellett, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common male cancers globally; however little is known about prostate cancer in Africa. Incidence data for prostate cancer in South Africa (SA) from the pathology based National Cancer Registry (1986-2006) and data on mortality (1997-2009) from Statistics SA were analysed. World standard population denominators were used to calculate age specific incidence and mortality rates (ASIR and ASMR) using the direct method. Prostate cancer was the most common male cancer in all SA population groups (excluding basal cell carcinoma). There are large disparities in the ASIR between black, white, coloured, and Asian/Indian populations: 19, 65, 46, and 19 per 100 000, respectively, and ASMR was 11, 7, 52, and 6 per 100 000, respectively. Prostate cancer was the second leading cause of cancer death, accounting for around 13% of male deaths from a cancer. The average age at diagnosis was 68 years and 74 years at death. For SA the ASIR increased from 16.8 in 1986 to 30.8 in 2006, while the ASMR increased from 12.3 in 1997 to 16.7 in 2009. There has been a steady increase of incidence and mortality from prostate cancer in SA.

  7. National and Subnational Population-Based Incidence of Cancer in Thailand: Assessing Cancers with the Highest Burdens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shama Virani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In Thailand, five cancer types—breast, cervical, colorectal, liver and lung cancer—contribute to over half of the cancer burden. The magnitude of these cancers must be quantified over time to assess previous health policies and highlight future trajectories for targeted prevention efforts. We provide a comprehensive assessment of these five cancers nationally and subnationally, with trend analysis, projections, and number of cases expected for the year 2025 using cancer registry data. We found that breast (average annual percent change (AAPC: 3.1% and colorectal cancer (female AAPC: 3.3%, male AAPC: 4.1% are increasing while cervical cancer (AAPC: −4.4% is decreasing nationwide. However, liver and lung cancers exhibit disproportionately higher burdens in the northeast and north regions, respectively. Lung cancer increased significantly in northeastern and southern women, despite low smoking rates. Liver cancers are expected to increase in the northern males and females. Liver cancer increased in the south, despite the absence of the liver fluke, a known factor, in this region. Our findings are presented in the context of health policy, population dynamics and serve to provide evidence for future prevention strategies. Our subnational estimates provide a basis for understanding variations in region-specific risk factor profiles that contribute to incidence trends over time.

  8. Bico 2: second national intercomparison campaign of WBC centres working in Italy; Bico 2: la seconda campagna MIDIA di interconfronto dei WBC operanti in Italia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellani, C.M.; Battisti, P.; Tarroni, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `Ezio Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dip. Ambiente

    1998-12-31

    During the period November 1994 - May 1995 the coordinating group of WBC centres working in Italy organised the 2. national intercalibration and intercomparison campaign. A BOMAB phantom was used filled with four radionuclides gel solution with gamma energy emissions ranging between 100 keV and 2 MeV. 17 out of 21 Italian WBC centres took part in the campaign. Through the intercalibration, organised according to internationally accepted methodologies, each WBC centre could check its own calibration procedures. many intermediate data, collected for the methodologies and measurement procedures intercomparison, permitted analyses and comparison of uncertainly causes in a WBC measurement of the internal contamination. A proposal of MDA definition and assessment procedure resulted from the intercomparison campaign. [Italiano] Il Coordinamento dei Centri WBC operanti in Italia ha organizzato la seconda campagna di intercalibrazione ed interconfronto nazionale basata sulle misure di un fantoccio BOMAB riempito con una soluzione radioattiva gelificata contenente 4 radionuclidi con emissioni gamma nell`intervallo energetico compreso fra 100 keV e 2 MeV. Alla campagna, che si e` svolta fra novembre 1994 e maggio 1995, hanno partecipato 17 dei 21 Centri WBC censiti in Italia. L`intercalibrazione e` stata organizzata secondo criteri ormai consolidati in campo internazionale ed ha permesso ad ognuno dei partecipanti di verificare le proprie procedure di calibrazione. Per l`interconfronto delle procedure e dei metodi di misura impiegati e` stata raccolta una serie di dati intermedi che hanno consentito di analizzare e confrontare le fonti di incertezza insite nella misura di contaminazione interna nell`uomo tramite WBC. Cio` ha infine reso possibile una proposta di definizione e di procedura di determinazione del valore della minima attivita` rivelabile (MDA) in accordo con le piu` recenti tendenze in campo internazionale.

  9. Estimation of content of anti-TB drugs supplied at centres of the Revised National TB Control Programme in Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Geetha; Chandrasekaran, Vedachalam; Hemanth Kumar, Agibothu Kupparam; Dewan, Puneet; Swaminathan, Soumya; Thomas, Aleyamma

    2013-09-01

    To determine the content of certain antituberculosis (TB) drugs supplied at TB treatment centres of the Revised National TB Control Programme (RNTCP) in the state of Tamil Nadu, India. Eight districts across the state were selected, and the following drugs were collected from five settings (District TB centre, TB unit, designated microscopy centres, DOT providers) in each district: rifampicin (150 and 450 mg), isoniazid (300 mg), pyrazinamide (500 and 750 mg), ethambutol (400 and 600 mg), ethionamide (250 mg), levofloxacin (500 mg) and cycloserine (250 mg). A maximum of 10 tablets/capsules were collected from each setting. The drugs were coded prior to analysis. All drugs were assayed by validated spectrophotometric methods. The acceptable limits for drug content were taken as 90-110% of the stated content. More than 90% of tablets of rifampicin 450 mg, isoniazid 300 mg, pyrazinamide 500 and 750 mg, ethambutol 400 and 600 mg and ethionamide 250 mg were within acceptable limits. Eighty per cent of rifampicin 150 mg, 21% of cycloserine 250 mg and 87% of levofloxacin 500 mg were within acceptable limits. The mean cycloserine content was below the acceptable limit in all districts, the mean drug content being 200 mg (range: 108-245 mg). This systematic study showed that the stated drug content of cycloserine was not reached in all districts. Deterioration of cycloserine could be minimised by storing the drug in refrigerators. The geographical location of the districts had no influence on the drug content. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline with Low-dose Computed 
Tomography (2018 version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua ZHOU

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in China. The results from a randomized controlled trial using annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT in specific high-risk groups demonstrated a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality. The aim of tihs study is to establish the China National lung cancer screening guidelines for clinical practice. Methods The China lung cancer early detection and treatment expert group (CLCEDTEG established the China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline with multidisciplinary representation including 4 thoracic surgeons, 4 thoracic radiologists, 2 medical oncologists, 2 pulmonologists, 2 pathologist, and 2 epidemiologist. Members have engaged in interdisciplinary collaborations regarding lung cancer screening and clinical care of patients with at risk for lung cancer. The expert group reviewed the literature, including screening trials in the United States and Europe and China, and discussed local best clinical practices in the China. A consensus-based guidelines, China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline (CNLCSG, was recommended by CLCEDTEG appointed by the National Health and Family Planning Commission, based on results of the National Lung Screening Trial, systematic review of evidence related to LDCT screening, and protocol of lung cancer screening program conducted in rural China. Results Annual lung cancer screening with LDCT is recommended for high risk individuals aged 50-74 years who have at least a 20 pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past five years. Individualized decision making should be conducted before LDCT screening. LDCT screening also represents an opportunity to educate patients as to the health risks of smoking; thus, education should be integrated into the screening process in order to assist smoking cessation. Conclusion A lung cancer screening guideline is recommended for the high-risk population in China

  11. [China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline with Low-dose Computed 
Tomography (2018 version)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Fan, Yaguang; Wang, Ying; Qiao, Youlin; Wang, Guiqi; Huang, Yunchao; Wang, Xinyun; Wu, Ning; Zhang, Guozheng; Zheng, Xiangpeng; Bu, Hong; Li, Yin; Wei, Sen; Chen, Liang'an; Hu, Chengping; Shi, Yuankai; Sun, Yan

    2018-02-20

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in China. The results from a randomized controlled trial using annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in specific high-risk groups demonstrated a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality. The aim of tihs study is to establish the China National lung cancer screening guidelines for clinical practice. The China lung cancer early detection and treatment expert group (CLCEDTEG) established the China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline with multidisciplinary representation including 4 thoracic surgeons, 4 thoracic radiologists, 2 medical oncologists, 2 pulmonologists, 2 pathologist, and 2 epidemiologist. Members have engaged in interdisciplinary collaborations regarding lung cancer screening and clinical care of patients with at risk for lung cancer. The expert group reviewed the literature, including screening trials in the United States and Europe and China, and discussed local best clinical practices in the China. A consensus-based guidelines, China National Lung Cancer Screening Guideline (CNLCSG), was recommended by CLCEDTEG appointed by the National Health and Family Planning Commission, based on results of the National Lung Screening Trial, systematic review of evidence related to LDCT screening, and protocol of lung cancer screening program conducted in rural China. Annual lung cancer screening with LDCT is recommended for high risk individuals aged 50-74 years who have at least a 20 pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past five years. Individualized decision making should be conducted before LDCT screening. LDCT screening also represents an opportunity to educate patients as to the health risks of smoking; thus, education should be integrated into the screening process in order to assist smoking cessation. A lung cancer screening guideline is recommended for the high-risk population in China. Additional research , including LDCT combined with biomarkers, is

  12. Influence of national centralization of oesophagogastric cancer on management and clinical outcome from emergency upper gastrointestinal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markar, S R; Mackenzie, H; Wiggins, T; Askari, A; Karthikesalingam, A; Faiz, O; Griffin, S M; Birkmeyer, J D; Hanna, G B

    2018-01-01

    In England in 2001 oesophagogastric cancer surgery was centralized. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether centralization of oesophagogastric cancer to high-volume centres has had an effect on mortality from different emergency upper gastrointestinal conditions. The Hospital Episode Statistics database was used to identify patients admitted to hospitals in England (1997-2012). The influence of oesophagogastric high-volume cancer centre status (20 or more resections per year) on 30- and 90-day mortality from oesophageal perforation, paraoesophageal hernia and perforated peptic ulcer was analysed. Over the study interval, 3707, 12 441 and 56 822 patients with oesophageal perforation, paraoesophageal hernia and perforated peptic ulcer respectively were included. There was a passive centralization to high-volume cancer centres for oesophageal perforation (26·9 per cent increase), paraoesophageal hernia (19·5 per cent increase) and perforated peptic ulcer (23·0 per cent increase). Management of oesophageal perforation in high-volume centres was associated with a reduction in 30-day (HR 0·58, 95 per cent c.i. 0·45 to 0·74) and 90-day (HR 0·62, 0·49 to 0·77) mortality. High-volume cancer centre status did not affect mortality from paraoesophageal hernia or perforated peptic ulcer. Annual emergency admission volume thresholds at which mortality improved were observed for oesophageal perforation (5 patients) and paraoesophageal hernia (11). Following centralization, the proportion of patients managed in high-volume cancer centres that reached this volume threshold was 88·0 per cent for oesophageal perforation, but only 30·3 per cent for paraoesophageal hernia. Centralization of low incidence conditions such as oesophageal perforation to high-volume cancer centres provides a greater level of expertise and ultimately reduces mortality. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Motivation for orthognathic treatment and anticipated satisfaction levels-a two-centre cross-national audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patcas, Raphael; Cunningham, Susan J; Shute, Justin; Lloyd, Timothy; Obwegeser, Joachim A; Arjomand, Lida; Sharma, Sujata

    2017-06-01

    This audit investigated factors which motivate patients to seek orthognathic treatment, assessed how confident patients were that they would be satisfied with the outcome of treatment, and explored possible influencing factors. Questionnaires were distributed to pre-surgical patients at two centres (United Kingdom and Switzerland); questions asked what patients wished to gain from orthognathic treatment and how confident they were that they would be satisfied with treatment outcome. Gender, age and location were recorded as demographic variables, and type of malocclusion was also recorded. A total of 202 questionnaires were returned (UK, n = 149; Switzerland, n = 53). Reported motivating factors focused on improvements in aesthetics (specified and unspecified) (UK vs. Switzerland: 91.3% vs. 83.0%), function (72.5% vs. 66.0%), psychosocial health (51.7% vs. 20.8%), speech (4.0% vs. 7.5%), alleviation of pain (5.4% vs. 17%) and normalization of breathing (1.3% vs. 7.5%). No significant relationships were observed relative to patient age, gender or malocclusion. The anticipated satisfaction levels were generally high (86.5% vs. 89.9%). Although the distribution of motivational factors varied between the two sites, it did not affect the anticipated satisfaction level. Patients were generally confident that they would be satisfied with their treatment outcome and that their reasons for seeking treatment would be addressed. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. All rights reserved.

  14. From Cancer Screening to Treatment: Service Delivery and Referral in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline W.; Hanson, Vivien; Johnson, Gale D.; Royalty, Janet E.; Richardson, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income and underserved women through a network of providers and health care organizations. Although the program serves women 40-64 years old for breast cancer screening and 21-64 years old for cervical cancer screening, the priority populations are women 50-64 years old for breast cancer and women who have never or rarely been screened for cervical cancer. From 1991 through 2011, the NBCCEDP provided screening and diagnostic services to more than 4.3 million women, diagnosing 54,276 breast cancers, 2554 cervical cancers, and 123,563 precancerous cervical lesions. A critical component of providing screening services is to ensure that all women with abnormal screening results receive appropriate and timely diagnostic evaluations. Case management is provided to assist women with overcoming barriers that would delay or prevent follow-up care. Women diagnosed with cancer receive treatment through the states' Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Programs (a special waiver for Medicaid) if they are eligible. The NBCCEDP has performance measures that serve as benchmarks to monitor the completeness and timeliness of care. More than 90% of the women receive complete diagnostic care and initiate treatment less than 30 days from the time of their diagnosis. Provision of effective screening and diagnostic services depends on effective program management, networks of providers throughout the community, and the use of evidence-based knowledge, procedures, and technologies. PMID:25099897

  15. Efficacy of night-time compression for breast cancer related lymphedema (LYNC): protocol for a multi-centre, randomized controlled efficacy trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeely, Margaret L.; Campbell, Kristin L.; Webster, Marc; Kuusk, Urve; Tracey, Karen; Mackey, John

    2016-01-01

    Lymphedema is a prevalent long-term effect of breast cancer treatment that is associated with reduced quality of life. More recent observational data suggest that the addition of night-time compression to day-time use of a compression garment results in better long-term control of arm lymphedema. The primary objectives of the randomized controlled phase of the trial are to determine the efficacy of night-time compression on arm lymphedema volume maintenance and quality of life in breast cancer survivors who have completed intensive reduction treatment for their lymphedema. The study will be a parallel 3-arm, multi-centre randomized fast-track trial. A total of 120 women with breast cancer related lymphedema will be recruited from 3 centres in Canada and randomized to group 1: Day-time compression garment alone or Group 2: Day-time compression garment + night-time compression bandaging or Group 3: Day-time compression garment + use of a night-time compression system garment. The duration of the primary intervention period will be 12 weeks. The follow-up period after the intervention (weeks 13 to 24) will follow a longitudinal observational design. The primary outcome variables: differences from baseline to week 12 in arm volume and quality of life (Lymphoedema Functioning, Disability and Health Questionnaire: Lymph-ICF). Secondary outcomes include bioimpedance analysis, sleep disturbance and self-efficacy. All measurements are standardized and will be performed prior to randomization, and at weeks 6, 12, 18 and 24. The use of night-time compression as a self-management strategy for chronic breast cancer related lymphedema is seen as an innovative approach to improve long-term control over the condition. This trial aims to advance the knowledge on self-management strategies for lymphedema

  16. The use of gold markers and electronic portal imaging for radiotherapy verification in prostate cancer patients: Sweden Ghana Medical Centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Felix Acquah

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The success of radiotherapy cancer treatment delivery depends on the accuracy of patient setup for each fraction. A significant problem arises from reproducing the same patient position and prostate location during treatment planning for every fraction of the treatment process. To analyze the daily movements of the prostate, gold markers are implanted in the prostate and portal images taken and manually matched with reference images to locate the prostate. Geometrical and fiducial markers are annotated onto a highly quality generated digitally reconstructed radiographs, that are compared with portal images acquired right before treatment dose delivery. A 0 and 270 degree treatment fields are used to calculate prostate shifts for all prostate cancer patients undergoing treatment at the Sweden Ghana Medical Centre, using an iViewGT portal imaging device. After aligning of the marker positions onto the reference images, the set-up deviations corrections are displayed and an on-line correction procedure applied. The measured migrations of the prostate markers are below the threshold of 3 mm for the main plans and 2 mm for the boost plans. With daily electronic portal imaging combined with gold markers, provides an objective method for verifying and correcting the position of the prostate immediately prior to radiation delivery.--------------------------------------------Cite this article as: Acquah GF. The use of gold markers and electronic portal imaging for radiotherapy verification in prostate cancer patients: Sweden Ghana Medical Centre experience. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(1:020112.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0201.12

  17. School Programs To Prevent Smoking: The National Cancer Institute Guide to Strategies That Succeed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Thomas J.

    This guide to school-based smoking prevention programs for educators is the product of five years of work to prevent cancer. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is currently funding 23 coordinated intervention trials directed at youth. Although not all the studies are complete, sufficient results are available to recommend the most effective…

  18. 3 CFR 8354 - Proclamation 8354 of April 1, 2009. National Cancer Control Month, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... America A Proclamation We have achieved remarkable progress in the fight against cancer. Miracles in... Prevention, and academic and other institutions. The Federal Government plays an indispensable role in... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Proclamation 8354 of April 1, 2009. National Cancer...

  19. 78 FR 2678 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request (60-Day FRN): The National Cancer Institute (NCI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... Request (60-Day FRN): The National Cancer Institute (NCI) SmokefreeTXT (Text Message) Program Evaluation..., Behavioral Scientist/ Health Science Administrator, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, 6130... text message smoking cessation intervention designed for young adult smokers ages 18-29. The Smokefree...

  20. 75 FR 79010 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... Leukemia, and Myeloma. Date: February 2-3, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate...; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395...

  1. 77 FR 5029 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... Community; Cancer Drug Shortages: Economic, Regulatory, and Manufacturing Issues; The Role of the Cancer... security, NIH has instituted stringent procedures for entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport shuttles will be inspected before being allowed on campus. Visitors...

  2. 77 FR 36564 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... Prevention Method: State of the, Science and Evidence. Place: Hilton San Francisco Financial District, 750... applicable, the business or professional affiliation of the interested person. Information is also available... Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396...

  3. 77 FR 64526 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of individual investigators, the disclosure of... Cancer Advisory Board, Ad hoc Subcommittee on Communications. Open: November 28, 2012, 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Agenda: Discussion on Cancer Information and Communications. Place: Hyatt Regency Bethesda, One...

  4. 75 FR 44274 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Nanotechnology Imaging and Sensing Platforms for Improved Diagnosis of Cancer. Date: August 31, 2010. Time: 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate... 20852 (Telephone Conference Call). Contact Person: Kenneth L. Bielat, PhD, Scientific Review Officer...

  5. Surgical timing after chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, analysis of technique (STARRCAT): results of a feasibility multi-centre randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J D; Ewings, P; Falk, S; Cooper, E J; Roach, H; West, N P; Williams-Yesson, B A; Hanna, G B; Francis, N K

    2016-10-01

    The optimal time of rectal resection after long-course chemoradiotherapy (CRT) remains unclear. A feasibility study was undertaken for a multi-centre randomized controlled trial evaluating the impact of the interval after chemoradiotherapy on the technical complexity of surgery. Patients with rectal cancer were randomized to either a 6- or 12-week interval between CRT and surgery between June 2012 and May 2014 (ISRCTN registration number: 88843062). For blinded technical complexity assessment, the Observational Clinical Human Reliability Analysis technique was used to quantify technical errors enacted within video recordings of operations. Other measured outcomes included resection completeness, specimen quality, radiological down-staging, tumour cell density down-staging and surgeon-reported technical complexity. Thirty-one patients were enrolled: 15 were randomized to 6 and 16-12 weeks across 7 centres. Fewer eligible patients were identified than had been predicted. Of 23 patients who underwent resection, mean 12.3 errors were observed per case at 6 weeks vs. 10.7 at 12 weeks (p = 0.401). Other measured outcomes were similar between groups. The feasibility of measurement of operative performance of rectal cancer surgery as an endpoint was confirmed in this exploratory study. Recruitment of sufficient numbers of patients represented a challenge, and a proportion of patients did not proceed to resection surgery. These results suggest that interval after CRT may not substantially impact upon surgical technical performance.

  6. Radioecological studies at the National Accelerator Centre based on the determination of 129I by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Gutierrez, J. M.; Gomez-Guzman, J. M.; Chamizo, E.; Santos, F. J.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2006 a compact system of mass spectrometry with Accelerator (AMS) is installed at the National Center of Accelerators, Seville. After an initial set-up and study have been opening many lines of research in fields such as archeology, geology, paleontology, oceanography, oceanography, internal dosimetry and characterization of radioactive waste, among others. In particular, based on the measurement of 1 29I have made contributions to the field of radioecology and radiation protection. In this work they are summarized and presented some of these investigations. (Author)

  7. Privacy Policy | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The privacy of our users is of utmost importance to Frederick National Laboratory. The policy outlined below establishes how Frederick National Laboratory will use the information we gather about you from your visit to our website. We may coll

  8. Institutional Support : Centre for Research and Technology ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    year-old science and technology research centre at Maseno University in western Kenya. The Centre focuses on science and technology research to influence both national policies and development practices at the community level. Currently ...

  9. Quality of prostate cancer screening information on the websites of nationally recognized cancer centers and health organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manole, Bogdan-Alexandru; Wakefield, Daniel V; Dove, Austin P; Dulaney, Caleb R; Marcrom, Samuel R; Schwartz, David L; Farmer, Michael R

    2017-12-24

    The purpose of this study was to survey the accessibility and quality of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening information from National Cancer Institute (NCI) cancer center and public health organization Web sites. We surveyed the December 1, 2016, version of all 63 NCI-designated cancer center public Web sites and 5 major online clearinghouses from allied public/private organizations (cancer.gov, cancer.org, PCF.org, USPSTF.org, and CDC.gov). Web sites were analyzed according to a 50-item list of validated health care information quality measures. Web sites were graded by 2 blinded reviewers. Interrater agreement was confirmed by Cohen kappa coefficient. Ninety percent of Web sites addressed PSA screening. Cancer center sites covered 45% of topics surveyed, whereas organization Web sites addressed 70%. All organizational Web pages addressed the possibility of false-positive screening results; 41% of cancer center Web pages did not. Forty percent of cancer center Web pages also did not discuss next steps if a PSA test was positive. Only 6% of cancer center Web pages were rated by our reviewers as "superior" (eg, addressing >75% of the surveyed topics) versus 20% of organizational Web pages. Interrater agreement between our reviewers was high (kappa coefficient = 0.602). NCI-designated cancer center Web sites publish lower quality public information about PSA screening than sites run by major allied organizations. Nonetheless, information and communication deficiencies were observed across all surveyed sites. In an age of increasing patient consumerism, prospective prostate cancer patients would benefit from improved online PSA screening information from provider and advocacy organizations. Validated cancer patient Web educational standards remain an important, understudied priority. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. 75 FR 17839 - National Cancer Control Month, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... consumption, avoiding tobacco, exercising regularly, and maintaining a nutritious diet, we can each reduce our risk of developing cancer. I encourage all who are struggling to quit smoking to visit SmokeFree.gov...

  11. 76 FR 55209 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... month, we remember the mothers, sisters, and daughters we have lost to ovarian cancer, and we extend our... the women, families, and professionals working to end this disease. The Centers for Disease Control...

  12. Symptoms and problems in a nationally representative sample of advanced cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anna Thit; Petersen, Morten Aagaard; Pedersen, Lise

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the need for palliative care among advanced cancer patients who are not in specialist palliative care. The purpose was to identify prevalence and predictors of symptoms and problems in a nationally representative sample of Danish advanced cancer patients. Patients with cancer...... or not were associated with several symptoms and problems. This is probably the first nationally representative study of its kind. It shows that advanced cancer patients in Denmark have symptoms and problems that deserve attention and that some patient groups are especially at risk....... predictors. In total, 977 (60%) patients participated. The most frequent symptoms/problems were fatigue (57%; severe 22%) followed by reduced role function, insomnia and pain. Age, cancer stage, primary tumour, type of department, marital status and whether the patient had recently been hospitalized...

  13. The National Cancer Institute's Physical Sciences - Oncology Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Michael Graham

    In 2009, the NCI launched the Physical Sciences - Oncology Centers (PS-OC) initiative with 12 Centers (U54) funded through 2014. The current phase of the Program includes U54 funded Centers with the added feature of soliciting new Physical Science - Oncology Projects (PS-OP) U01 grant applications through 2017; see NCI PAR-15-021. The PS-OPs, individually and along with other PS-OPs and the Physical Sciences-Oncology Centers (PS-OCs), comprise the Physical Sciences-Oncology Network (PS-ON). The foundation of the Physical Sciences-Oncology initiative is a high-risk, high-reward program that promotes a `physical sciences perspective' of cancer and fosters the convergence of physical science and cancer research by forming transdisciplinary teams of physical scientists (e.g., physicists, mathematicians, chemists, engineers, computer scientists) and cancer researchers (e.g., cancer biologists, oncologists, pathologists) who work closely together to advance our understanding of cancer. The collaborative PS-ON structure catalyzes transformative science through increased exchange of people, ideas, and approaches. PS-ON resources are leveraged to fund Trans-Network pilot projects to enable synergy and cross-testing of experimental and/or theoretical concepts. This session will include a brief PS-ON overview followed by a strategic discussion with the APS community to exchange perspectives on the progression of trans-disciplinary physical sciences in cancer research.

  14. Delivering prostate cancer prevention messages to the public: how the National Cancer Institute (NCI) effectively spread the word about the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croker, Kara Smigel; Ryan, Anne; Morzenti, Thuy; Cave, Lynn; Maze-Gallman, Tamara; Ford, Leslie

    2004-01-01

    The Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial was the first clinical trial to show that a direct intervention (5 mg of finasteride daily for 7 years) could reduce a man's risk of developing prostate cancer. Initial results also suggested that men taking finasteride had an increased risk of developing what appeared to be higher-grade disease (Gleason score 7-10). The National Cancer Institute has a congressional mandate to communicate health information to the public and has established methods to reach the public directly and to reach information intermediaries in the media, professional societies, and advocacy groups. The groundbreaking yet complicated results of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial were widely disseminated by National Cancer Institute using the social marketing and public-relations strategies and tactics detailed here. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  15. Guidelines for a national epidemiological surveillance system of thyroid cancer in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    At the request of the French Department of Health, a multidisciplinary Thyroid Cancer Committee, coordinated by the French Public Health Agency analysed the observed increase of thyroid cancer incidence in France and outlined the limits of the present case registration system. This Committee set up guidelines to improve the national surveillance system of thyroid cancer. The Committee analysed 4 models for the incidence survey, 3 of which have been excluded: a poor cost-benefit ratio precludes the constitution of a national registry dedicated to thyroid cancer; however, the Committee has recommended this model that still exists for thyroid cancer of the youth(under 19 years old), a national system base exclusively on pathological data would only be relevant after significant improvement of data collection, obligatory of all cases of thyroid cancer is inappropriate considering the fit prognosis of this cancer. A two level system is proposed with continuous registration of incident caes through the National Hospital Discharge survey, specific focused analysis of clinical and pathological data in case of a cluster alert in any given area. Whatever the system, it seems necessary to in general: propose a unique health registration number per patient, improve access to medical data, organize a national standardised collection of pathological findings, follow up the diagnosis practices related to thyroid cancer that have an impact on incidence rates. In conclusion, a reliable incidence survey and a follow up of diagnostic practices and of risk factors may provide a relevant model of epidemiological survey of thyroid cancers in France but such a system requires a long lasting strategic and financial involvement. (author)

  16. Evaluation of cancer incidence among employees at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acquavella, J.F.; Wilkinson, G.S.; Wiggs, L.D.; Tietjen, G.L.; Key, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    As part of the National Plutonium Workers Study, cancer incidence for 1969 to 1978 among employees of the Los Alamos National Laboratory was investigated. Incident cancers were identified by a computer match of the Los Alamos employed roster against New Mexico Tumor Registry files. The resulting numbers of total and site-specific cancers were compared to the numbers expected based on incidence rates for the State of New Mexico, specific for age, sex, ethnicity, and calendar period. For Anglo males, significantly fewer cancers than expected (SIR = 0.60, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.79) were found. This resulted from marked deficits of smoking-related cancers, particularly lung (2 observed, 19.4 expected) and oral (1 observed, 6.5 expected) cancer. Similarly, no smoking-related cancers were detected among Anglo females, though they had a slight nonsignificant excess of breast cancer (14 observed, 9.1 expected) and a suggestive excess of cancer of the uterine corpus (2 observed, 0.25 expected). The pattern of cancerincidence among Anglo employees is typical of high social class populations and not likely related to the Los Alamos working environment

  17. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Eiliv

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1 triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3. Methods We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II, European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, Multiethnic Cohort (MEC, Nurses' Health Study (NHS, and Women's Health Study (WHS. Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Results Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Conclusion Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians.

  18. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canzian, Federico; Calle, Eugenia E; Chanock, Stephen; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Dossus, Laure; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Haiman, Christopher A; Hankinson, Susan E; Hoover, Robert; Hunter, David J; Isaacs, Claudine; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lenner, Per; Lund, Eiliv; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Quiros, Jose R; Riboli, Elio; Stram, Daniel O; Thomas, Gilles; Thun, Michael J; Cox, David G; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Gils, Carla H van; Ziegler, Regina G; Henderson, Katherine D; Henderson, Brian E; Berg, Christine; Bingham, Sheila; Boeing, Heiner; Buring, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1) triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR) in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3). We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS) in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II), European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), Multiethnic Cohort (MEC), Nurses' Health Study (NHS), and Women's Health Study (WHS). Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone) were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians

  19. Lessons learned from the operation of a LILW National disposal centre: The Cabril and the Spanish case - 16029

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Mariano; Gomez, Fernando; Garcia, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    Spain occupies a relatively important position in experience in the field of LILW management. The management of LILW in Spain may be defined as an integrated system encompassing the entire spectrum; from production controls, removal and transport, to disposal. In this system, a clear definition of the responsibilities of each of the people involved plays a fundamental role. ENRESA, the organization in charge of radioactive waste management in Spain, has been operating the El Cabril LILW disposal facility since 1992, this installation being a key component in the national LILW management programme. Over the years ENRESA has acquired significant operating experience from a multi-disciplinary point of view, including technical, economic and social aspects. To date, since the design phase of the facility and over more than fifteen years, ENRESA has adopted a series of decisions and has undertaken programmes and activities that have allowed the installation to evolve into the reality that it now is. The aim of this paper is to present the lessons learned from a strategic point of view and in relation to the most relevant and significant aspects that have facilitated the normal operation of the facility, and the development of specific solutions to the challenges posed by the performance of activities, and the emerging needs of the Spanish programme. (authors)

  20. Pattern of External Breast Prosthesis Use by Post Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients in India: Descriptive Study from Tertiary Care Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Ramu, D.; Ramesh, Rakesh S.; Manjunath, Suraj; Shivakumar; Goel, Vipin; Hemnath, G. N.; Alexander, Annie

    2015-01-01

    In India, Breast cancer is now the most common cancer in urban and 2nd most common in rural areas [1]. The incidence is rising, more younger women are getting affected and due to increase in survival rates there is an increase in the total number of women suffering from breast Cancer. So far there are no studies evaluating the pattern of breast prosthesis use in Indian scenario. The aim of this study is to address the patterns of external breast prosthesis used in India and view of Indian wom...

  1. Oral cavity and lip cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerawala, C; Roques, T; Jeannon, J-P; Bisase, B

    2016-05-01

    This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. It provides recommendations on the assessment and management of patients with cancer of the oral cavity and the lip. Recommendations • Surgery remains the mainstay of management for oral cavity tumours. (R) • Tumour resection should be performed with a clinical clearance of 1 cm vital structures permitting. (R) • Elective neck treatment should be offered for all oral cavity tumours. (R) • Adjuvant radiochemotherapy in the presence of advanced neck disease or positive margins improves control rates. (R) • Early stage lip cancer can be treated equally well by surgery or radiation therapy. (R).

  2. Adoption of Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A National Cancer Data Base Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Elyn H. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Mougalian, Sarah S. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Rutter, Charles E.; Evans, Suzanne B. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Yu, James B., E-mail: james.b.yu@yale.edu [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship of patient, hospital, and cancer characteristics with the adoption of hypofractionation in a national sample of patients diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of breast cancer patients in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004-2011 who were treated with radiation therapy and met eligibility criteria for hypofractionation. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of hypofractionation (vs conventional fractionation). Results: We identified 13,271 women (11.7%) and 99,996 women (88.3%) with early-stage breast cancer who were treated with hypofractionation and conventional fractionation, respectively. The use of hypofractionation increased significantly, with 5.4% of patients receiving it in 2004 compared with 22.8% in 2011 (P<.001 for trend). Patients living ≥50 miles from the cancer reporting facility had increased odds of receiving hypofractionation (odds ratio 1.57 [95% confidence interval 1.44-1.72], P<.001). Adoption of hypofractionation was associated with treatment at an academic center (P<.001) and living in an area with high median income (P<.001). Hypofractionation was less likely to be used in patients with high-risk disease, such as increased tumor size (P<.001) or poorly differentiated histologic grade (P<.001). Conclusions: The use of hypofractionation is rising and is associated with increased travel distance and treatment at an academic center. Further adoption of hypofractionation may be tempered by both clinical and nonclinical concerns.

  3. Adoption of Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A National Cancer Data Base Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Elyn H.; Mougalian, Sarah S.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Rutter, Charles E.; Evans, Suzanne B.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Gross, Cary P.; Yu, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship of patient, hospital, and cancer characteristics with the adoption of hypofractionation in a national sample of patients diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of breast cancer patients in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004-2011 who were treated with radiation therapy and met eligibility criteria for hypofractionation. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of hypofractionation (vs conventional fractionation). Results: We identified 13,271 women (11.7%) and 99,996 women (88.3%) with early-stage breast cancer who were treated with hypofractionation and conventional fractionation, respectively. The use of hypofractionation increased significantly, with 5.4% of patients receiving it in 2004 compared with 22.8% in 2011 (P<.001 for trend). Patients living ≥50 miles from the cancer reporting facility had increased odds of receiving hypofractionation (odds ratio 1.57 [95% confidence interval 1.44-1.72], P<.001). Adoption of hypofractionation was associated with treatment at an academic center (P<.001) and living in an area with high median income (P<.001). Hypofractionation was less likely to be used in patients with high-risk disease, such as increased tumor size (P<.001) or poorly differentiated histologic grade (P<.001). Conclusions: The use of hypofractionation is rising and is associated with increased travel distance and treatment at an academic center. Further adoption of hypofractionation may be tempered by both clinical and nonclinical concerns

  4. Economic independence in survivors of cancer diagnosed at a young age: A Norwegian national cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnes, Maria W; Lie, Rolv Terje; Bjørge, Tone; Syse, Astri; Ruud, Ellen; Wesenberg, Finn; Moster, Dag

    2016-12-15

    The impact of cancer on socioeconomic outcomes is attracting attention as the number of survivors of cancer in young age continues to rise. This study examines economic independence in a national cohort of survivors of cancer at a young age in Norway. Through the linkage of several national registries, the study cohort comprised 1,212,013 individuals born in Norway during 1965 through 1985, of which 5440 had received a cancer diagnosis before age 25 years. Follow-up was through 2007, and the main outcomes were receipt of governmental financial assistance, employment, income, and occupation. Analytic methods included Cox proportional hazard regression, log-binomial regression, and quantile regression models. Individuals in the cancer survivor group had an increased probability of receiving governmental financial assistance (men: hazard ratio [HR], 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-1.5; women: HR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.6) and of not being employed (men: HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.7; women: HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.6) compared with those in the noncancer group. Income discrepancies were particularly pronounced for survivors of central nervous system tumors. There was no difference in representation in higher skilled occupations. Survivors of cancer at a young age in Norway had an increased risk of being economically dependent and unemployed. This was evident in several tumor groups and was most pronounced in female survivors. There were only small differences in income or representation in higher skilled occupations for most employed survivors compared with the noncancer group. The current results are important for understanding the impact of a cancer diagnosis at a young age on subsequent job market outcomes. Cancer 2016;122:3873-3882. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

  5. 77 FR 5032 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... Initiatives; RFA and RFP Concept Reviews; and Scientific Presentations. Place: National Institutes of Health... Group(s); and Budget Presentations; Reports of Special Initiatives; RFA and RFP Concept Reviews; and Scientific Presentations. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, 31 Center Drive, 6th Floor, Conf...

  6. The Role of National Adult Education Centre in Curriculum Development in Somalia in Selected Government Primary Adult Schools of Mogadisho. African Studies in Curriculum Development and Evaluation, No. 109.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Ismail F. S.

    A study of curriculum development in Somalia focused on the role of the National Adult Education Centre (NAEC) and involvement of teachers and inspectors. The sample consisted of 80 Mogadisho primary adult school teachers. Information sources were related literature, teacher questionnaires, and unstructured interviews with school inspectors,…

  7. The Agency's Agreement with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization concerning the Joint Operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste. Extension of the Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    By an exchange of letters between the Directors General of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the Agency, the duration of the agreement between the two organizations concerning the joint operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste has been extended until 31 December 1986.

  8. The Agency's Agreement with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization concerning the Joint Operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste. Extension of the Agreement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1983-02-15

    By an exchange of letters between the Directors General of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the Agency, the duration of the agreement between the two organizations concerning the joint operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste has been extended until 31 December 1986.

  9. Profile of e-patients: analysis of their cancer information-seeking from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghye; Kwon, Nahyun

    2010-10-01

    Researchers have yet to fully understand how competent e-patients are in selecting and using health information sources, or, more importantly, who e-patients are. This study attempted to uncover how cancer e-patients differ from other cancer information seekers in terms of their sociodemographic background, social networks, information competence, and selection of cancer information sources. We analyzed data from the National Cancer Institute's 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey, and a series of chi-square tests showed that factors that distinguished cancer e-patients from other cancer information seekers were age, gender, education, employment status, health insurance, and membership in online support groups. They were not different in the other factors measured by the survey. Our logistic regression analysis revealed that the e-patients were older and talked about their health issues with friends or family more frequently compared with online health information seekers without cancer. While preferring information from their doctors over the Internet, e-patients used the Internet as their primary source. In contrast to previous literature, we found little evidence that e-patients were savvy health information consumers who could make informed decisions on their own health. The findings of this study addressed a need for a better design and delivery of health information literacy programs for cancer e-patients.

  10. 78 FR 66034 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... consideration of personnel qualifications and performance and the competence of individual investigators... Cancer Advisory Board; Ad hoc Subcommittee on Communications. Open: December 9, 2013, 7:45 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. Agenda: Discussion on Communications. Place: Hyatt Regency Bethesda, One Bethesda Metro Center...

  11. Evaluating compliance to Kenya national cancer guidelines on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal ... Duration from index breast clinic review to surgery was 64.0 ±114.4 days. Documentation on findings from clinical assessment varied between 24.8 to 86.4%. ... place to track as well as prioritize patients with breast cancer in terms of investigations and surgical interventions in a timely manner.

  12. Cancer of the penis at Kenyatta National Hospital | Magoha | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eleven other patients had radiotherapy either alone or combined with chemotherapy. Two patients had circumcision only and inguinal lymphadenectomy was effected on five patients after penectomy and radiotherapy. Conclusion: Penile cancer is rare and the least common urological malignancy in this locality. It occurs in ...

  13. 75 FR 7489 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Legacy Hotel and Meeting Center, 1775 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact Person: Lalita D. Palekar, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and... Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI Cancer Nanotechnology Training (R25) and Career Development Award (K99...

  14. A multi-centred randomised trial of radical surgery versus adjuvant chemoradiotherapy after local excision for early rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borstlap, W. A. A.; Tanis, P. J.; Koedam, T. W. A.; Marijnen, C. A. M.; Cunningham, C.

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer surgery is accompanied with high morbidity and poor long term functional outcome. Screening programs have shown a shift towards more early staged cancers. Patients with early rectal cancer can potentially benefit significantly from rectal preserving therapy. For the earliest stage cancers, local excision is sufficient when the risk of lymph node disease and subsequent recurrence is below 5 %. However, the majority of early cancers are associated with an intermediate risk of lymph node involvement (5–20 %) suggesting that local excision alone is not sufficient, while completion radical surgery, which is currently standard of care, could be a substantial overtreatment for this group of patients. In this multicentre randomised trial, patients with an intermediate risk T1-2 rectal cancer, that has been locally excised using an endoluminal technique, will be randomized between adjuvant chemo-radiotherapylimited to the mesorectum and standard completion total mesorectal excision (TME). To strictly monitor the risk of locoregional recurrence in the experimental arm and enable early salvage surgery, there will be additional follow up with frequent MRI and endoscopy. The primary outcome of the study is three-year local recurrence rate. Secondary outcomes are morbidity, disease free and overall survival, stoma rate, functional outcomes, health related quality of life and costs. The design is a non inferiority study with a total sample size of 302 patients. The results of the TESAR trial will potentially demonstrate that adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is an oncological safe treatment option in patients who are confronted with the difficult clinical dilemma of a radically removed intermediate risk early rectal cancer by polypectomy or transanal surgery that is conventionally treated with subsequent radical surgery. Preserving the rectum using adjuvant radiotherapy is expected to significantly improve morbidity, function and quality of life if compared to completion

  15. Associations of cancer site and type with occupation and industry from the Third National Cancer Survey Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R R; Stegens, N L; Goldsmith, J R

    1977-10-01

    From the Third National Cancer Survey (TNCS) Interview Study of 7,518 incident cases, lifetime histories of occupations and industries were studied for associations with specific cancer sites and types while controlling for age, sex, race, education, use of cigarettes or alcohol, and geographic location. Lung cancer patients were found more often than expected among several categories including trucking, air transportation, wholesaling, painting, building construction, building maintenance, and manufacturing (furniture, transportation equipment, and food products). Controlling for cigarette smoking did not change these associations. Leukemia and multiple myeloma were associated with sales personnel of both sexes, whereas lymphomas and Hodgkin's disease were excessive among women working in the medical industry. Other associations included rectal cancer with several retail industries; prostate cancer with ministers, farmers, plumbers, and coal miners; malignant melanoma with school teachers; and invasive cervical cancer with women working in hotels and restaurants. Breast cancer patients were more common among women who were teachers or other professionals and who worked in business and finance (even after controlling for education). Many other findings are presented in detailed tables. Results are reported mainly as a research resource for use by other investigators doing work in this field. Suggestions are given for future studies.

  16. The outcome of a multi-centre feasibility study of online adaptive radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer TROG 10.01 BOLART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Pham, Daniel; Rolfo, Aldo; Bressel, Mathias; Tang, Colin I.; Tan, Alex; Turner, Sandra; Hruby, George; Williams, Stephen; Hayne, Dickon; Lehman, Margot; Skala, Marketa; Jose, Chakiath C.; Gogna, Kumar; Kron, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is feasible across multiple Radiation Oncology departments using different imaging, delivery and recording technology. Materials and methods: A multi-centre feasibility study of online adaptive radiotherapy, using a choice of three “plan of the day”, was conducted at 12 departments. Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer were included. Departments were activated if part of the pilot study or after a site-credentialing visit. There was real time review of the first two cases from each department. Results: 54 patients were recruited, with 50 proceeding to radiotherapy. There were 43 males and 7 females with a mean age of 78 years. The tumour stages treated included T1 (1 patient), T2 (35), T3 (10) and T4 (4). One patient died of an unrelated cause during radiotherapy. The three adaptive plans were created before the 10th fraction in all cases. In 8 (16%) of the patients, a conventional plan using a ‘standard’ CTV to PTV margin of 1.5 cm was used for one or more fractions where the pre-treatment bladder CTV was larger than any of the three adaptive plans. The bladder CTV extended beyond the PTV on post treatment imaging in 9 (18%) of the 49 patients. Conclusions: From a technical perspective an online adaptive radiotherapy technique can be instituted in a multi-centre setting. However, without further bladder filling control or imaging, a CTV to PTV margin of 7 mm is insufficient

  17. The development of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer at Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre (ARMC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joon, D.L.; Mantle, C.; Viotto, A.; Rolfo, A.; Rykers, K.; Fernando, W.; Grace, M.; Liu, G.; Quong, G.; Feigen, M.; Wada, M.; Joon, M.L.; Fogarty, G.; Chao, M.W.; Khoo, V.

    2003-01-01

    To describe the protocol development of the IMRT program for prostate cancer at the ARMC. A series of protocols were defined and developed to facilitate the delivery of intensity modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer. These included the following: 1. Physical Simulation including bowel and bladder preparation and immobilization 2. Image Acquisition including CT and MRI simulation scans with image co-registration 3. Contouring Definitions including target and organ at risk volumes as well as IMRT optimization and evaluation volumes 4. Radiotherapy Planning including constraint definition, inverse planning and CMS Focus specific parameters 5. DICOM RT interface including data transfer between CMS Focus and the Elekta Linac Desktop record and verify system 6. Verification including action limits and pre-treatment online EPID verification 7. Radiotherapy Delivery being that of step and shoot 8. Quality Assurance including physics testing and documentation The protocol development and testing has lead to the precise clinical delivery of IMRT for prostate cancer at ARMC that exceeds most of the parameters that were previously measured with our conventional and 3D conformal radiotherapy. Further development is now underway to allow it to be implemented as the routine treatment of prostate cancer at ARMC. The clinical implementation of IMRT for prostate cancer involves a collaborative team approach including radiation oncologists, radiation therapists, and radiation physics. This is necessary to develop the appropriate protocols and quality assurance for precision radiotherapy that is required for IMRT

  18. The ideal Atomic Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mas, R.

    1965-01-01

    The author presents considerations which should prove to be of interest to all those who have to design, to construct and to operate a nuclear research centre. A large number of the ideas presented can also be applied to non-nuclear scientific research centres. In his report the author reviews: various problems with which the constructor is faced: ground-plan, infrastructure, buildings and the large units of scientific equipment in the centre, and those problems facing the director: maintenance, production, supplies, security. The author stresses the relationship which ought to exist between the research workers and the management. With this aim in view he proposes the creation of National School for Administration in Research which would train administrative executives for public or private organisations; they would be specialised in the fields of fundamental or applied research. (author) [fr

  19. 76 FR 26310 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... Group(s); and Budget Presentations. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, 31 Center Drive... entrance onto the NIH campus. All visitor vehicles, including taxicabs, hotel, and airport shuttles will be...

  20. Material Transfer Agreement (MTA) | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Material Transfer Agreements are appropriate for exchange of materials into or out of the Frederick National Laboratory for research or testing purposes, with no collaborative research by parties involving the materials.

  1. Screening mammography. A missed clinical opportunity? Results of the NCI [National Cancer Institute] Breast Cancer Screening Consortium and national health interview survey studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    Data from seven studies sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) were used to determine current rates of breast cancer screening and to identify the characteristics of and reasons for women not being screened. All seven studies were population-based surveys of women aged 50 to 74 years without breast cancer. While over 90% of non-Hispanic white respondents had regular sources of medical care, 46% to 76% had a clinical breast examination within the previous year, and only 25% to 41% had a mammogram. Less educated and poorer women had fewer mammograms. The two most common reasons women gave for never having had a mammogram were that they did not known they needed it and that their physician had not recommended it. Many physicians may have overlooked the opportunity to recommend mammography for older women when performing a clinical breast examination and to educate their patients about the benefit of screening mammography

  2. The cataract national data set electronic multi-centre audit of 55,567 operations: case-mix adjusted surgeon's outcomes for posterior capsule rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, J M; Taylor, H; Qureshi, K; Smith, R; Johnston, R L

    2011-08-01

    To develop a methodology for case-mix adjustment of surgical outcomes for individual cataract surgeons using electronically collected multi-centre data conforming to the cataract national data set (CND). Routinely collected anonymised data were remotely extracted from electronic patient record (EPR) systems in 12 participating NHS Trusts undertaking cataract surgery. Following data checks and cleaning, analyses were carried out to risk adjust outcomes for posterior capsule rupture rates for individual surgeons, with stratification by surgical grade. A total of 406 surgeons from 12 NHS Trusts submitted data on 55,567 cataract operations between November 2001 and July 2006 (86% from January 2004). In all, 283 surgeons contributed data on >25 cases, providing 54,319 operations suitable for detailed analysis. Case-mix adjusted results of individual surgeons are presented as funnel plots for all surgeons together, and separately for three different grades of surgeon. Plots include 95 and 99.8% confidence limits around the case-mix adjusted outcomes for detection of surgical outliers. Routinely collected electronic data conforming to the CND provides sufficient detail for case-mix adjustment of cataract surgical outcomes. The validation of these risk indicators should be carried out using fresh data to confirm the validity of the risk model. Once validated this model should provide an equitable approach for peer-to-peer comparisons in the context of revalidation.

  3. Causes of death in hospitalised HIV-infected patients at a National Referral Centre in Singapore: a retrospective review from 2008 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chen Seong; Lo, Francis A; Cavailler, Philippe; Ng, Oon Tek; Lee, Cheng Chuan; Leo, Yee Sin; Chua, Arlene C

    2012-12-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has improved outcomes for individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This study describes the causes of death in hospitalised HIV-positive patients from 2008 to 2010 in Tan Tock Seng Hospital, the national referral centre for HIV management in Singapore. Data were retrospectively collected from HIV-positive patients who died in Tan Tock Seng Hospital from January 2008 to December 2010. Sixty-seven deaths occurred in the study period. A majority of patients died of non-acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining illnesses (54.7%). The median CD4 count was 39.5 (range, 20.0 to 97.0), and 7 patients had HIV viral loads of <200 copies/mL. There were 27 deaths due to opportunistic infections, 27 due to non AIDS-defining infections, 4 due to non AIDS-associated malignancies. This study also describes 3 deaths due to cardiovascular events, and 1 due to hepatic failure. Patients who had virologic suppression were more likely to die from non AIDS-defining causes. Causes of death in HIV-positive patients have changed in the HAART era. More research is required to further understand and address barriers to testing and treatment to further improve outcomes in HIV/AIDS.

  4. Morphological, Phenological And Agronomical Characterisation Of Variability Among Common Bean (Phaseolus Vulgaris L. Local Populations From The National Centre For Plant Genetic Resources: Polish Genebank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boros Lech

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work was to analyse the morphological, phenological and agronomical variability among common bean local populations from The National Centre for Plant Genetic Resources, Polish Genebank, in order to know the relation among them, and to identify potentially useful accessions for future production and breeding. A considerable genotypic variation for number of seeds per plant, number of pods per plant and weight of seeds per plant were found. Studied bean accessions differed significantly in terms of thousand seeds weight (TSW as well as severity of bacterial halo blight and anthracnose, the major bean diseases. The lowest genotypic diversity was found for the percentage of protein in the seeds, the length of the vegetation period and lodging. The cluster analysis allowed identification of five groups of bean accessions. Genotypes from the first cluster (POLPOD 98-77, KOS 002 and Raba cv. and from the second cluster (WUKR 06-573a, KRA 4, WUKR 06-0534 together with Prosna cv. are of the highest usefulness for breeding purposes. There was no grouping of local populations depending on region of origin.

  5. Male breast cancer: a nation-wide population-based comparison with female breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautrup, Marianne D; Thorup, Signe S; Jensen, Vibeke; Bokmand, Susanne; Haugaard, Karen; Hoejris, Inger; Jylling, Anne-Marie B; Joernsgaard, Hjoerdis; Lelkaitis, Giedrius; Oldenburg, Mette H; Qvamme, Gro M; Soee, Katrine; Christiansen, Peer

    2018-05-01

    Describe prognostic parameters of Danish male breast cancer patients (MBCP) diagnosed from 1980-2009. Determine all-cause mortality compared to the general male population and analyze survival/mortality compared with Danish female breast cancer patients (FBCP) in the same period. The MBCP cohort was defined from three national registers. Data was extracted from medical journals. Data for FBCP is from the DBCG database. Overall survival (OS) was quantified by Kaplan-Meier estimates. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated based on mortality rate among patients relative to the mortality rate in the general population. The association between SMR and risk factors were analyzed in univariate and multivariable Poisson regression models. Separate models for each gender were used for the analyses. We found a marked difference in OS for the two genders. For the total population of MBCP, 5- and 10-year survivals were 55.1% and 31.7%, respectively. For FBCP, the corresponding figures were 76.8% and 59.3%. Median age at diagnosis for FBCP was 61 years and 70 years for MBCP. By applying SMR, the difference in mortality between genders equalized and showed pronounced age-dependency. For males <40 years, SMR was 9.43 and for females 19.56 compared to SMR for males 80 + years (0.95) and females 80 + years (0.89). During the period 1980-2009, the risk of dying gradually decreased for FBCP (p < .0001). The risk 1980-1984 was 35% higher than 2005-2009 (RR 1.35). Although the risk of dying for MBCP was also lowest in 2005-2009, there was no clear tendency (p = .1439). The risk was highest in 1990-1994 (RR =2.48). We found better OS for FBCP than for MBCP. But SMR showed similar mortality rate for the two genders, except for very young FBCP, who had higher SMR. Furthermore, significantly improved survival over time for FBCP was observed, with no clear tendency for MBCP.

  6. National program of breast cancer early detection in Brod-Posavina County (East Croatia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurišić, Irena; Kolovrat, Ana; Mitrečić, Drago; Cvitković, Ante

    2014-09-01

    Results of the National Program of Breast Cancer Early Detection in Brod-Posavina County during the 2006-2012 period are presented. Response rate in two National Program cycles, cancers detected according to factors such as first and last menstruation, age at cancer detection, deliveries and mammography findings according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) before diagnosis verification were analyzed. Data were obtained from the software connecting Public Health Institutes via Ministry of Health server and questionnaires filled out by the women presenting for screening and processed by the method of descriptive statistics. Mammography findings were classified according to the BI-RADS classification. In two National Program cycles during the 2006-2012 period, women aged 50-69 were called for mammography screening. In the first cycle, the response rate in Brod-Posavina County was 53.2%, with 71 cancers detected at a mean age of 61.3 years. In the second cycle, the response rate was 57.0%, with 44 cancers detected at a mean age of 62.5 years. In the first and second cycles, there were 21.1% and 14.3% of mammography findings requiring additional work-up (BI-RADS 0), respectively. Particular risk factors such as early menarche, late menopause, parity, positive family history and presence of benign breast lesions were not demonstrated in women with verified cancer. There was no increase in the incidence of breast cancer per 100,000 inhabitants in the Brod-Posavina County following implementation of the National Program. In conclusion, efforts should be focused on increasing public health awareness, ensuring appropriate professional staff engaged in screening, and improving medical care in order to reduce the time elapsed from establishing suspicion to confirming the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  7. Investigating the job satisfaction of healthcare providers at primary healthcare centres in Lebanon: A national cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alameddine, Mohamad; Baroud, Maysa; Kharroubi, Samer; Hamadeh, Randa; Ammar, Walid; Shoaib, Hikma; Khodr, Hiba

    2017-11-01

    Low job satisfaction is linked to higher staff turnover and intensified shortages in healthcare providers (HCP). This study investigates the level of, and factors associated with, HCP job satisfaction in the national primary healthcare (PHC) network in Lebanon. The study adopts a cross-sectional design to survey HCP at 99 PHC centres distributed across the country between October 2013 and May 2014. The study questionnaire consisted of four sections: socio-demographics/professional background, employment characteristics, level of job satisfaction (Measure of Job Satisfaction scale) and level of professional burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory-HSS scale). A total of 1,000 providers completed the questionnaire (75.8% response rate). Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to identify factors significantly associated with job satisfaction. Findings of the study highlight an overall mean job satisfaction score of 3.59 (SD 0.54) indicating that HCP are partially satisfied. Upon further examination, HCP were least satisfied with pay, training and job prospects. Gender, age, career plans, salary, exposure to violence, and level of burnout were significantly associated with the overall level of job satisfaction which was also associated with increased likelihood to quit. Overall, the study highlights how compensation, development and protection of PHC HCP can influence their job satisfaction. Recommendations include the necessity of developing a nationally representative committee, led by the Ministry of Public Health, to examine the policies and remuneration scales within the PHC sector and suggest mechanisms to bridge the pay differential with other sectors. The effective engagement of key stakeholders with the development, organisation and evaluation of professional development programmes offered to HCP in the PHC sector remains crucial. Concerned stakeholders should assess and formulate initiatives and programmes that enrich the physical, psychological

  8. Cohort Profile: the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden and Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hemelrijck, Mieke; Wigertz, Annette; Sandin, Fredrik; Garmo, Hans; Hellström, Karin; Fransson, Per; Widmark, Anders; Lambe, Mats; Adolfsson, Jan; Varenhorst, Eberhard; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Stattin, Pär

    2013-08-01

    In 1987, the first Regional Prostate Cancer Register was set up in the South-East health-care region of Sweden. Other health-care regions joined and since 1998 virtually all prostate cancer (PCa) cases are registered in the National Prostate Cancer Register (NPCR) of Sweden to provide data for quality assurance, bench marking and clinical research. NPCR includes data on tumour stage, Gleason score, serum level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and primary treatment. In 2008, the NPCR was linked to a number of other population-based registers by use of the personal identity number. This database named Prostate Cancer data Base Sweden (PCBaSe) has now been extended with more cases, longer follow-up and a selection of two control series of men free of PCa at the time of sampling, as well as information on brothers of men diagnosed with PCa, resulting in PCBaSe 2.0. This extension allows for studies with case-control, cohort or longitudinal case-only design on aetiological factors, pharmaceutical prescriptions and assessment of long-term outcomes. The NPCR covers >96% of all incident PCa cases registered by the Swedish Cancer Register, which has an underreporting of <3.7%. The NPCR is used to assess trends in incidence, treatment and outcome of men with PCa. Since the national registers linked to PCBaSe are complete, studies from PCBaSe 2.0 are truly population based.

  9. McCormick to Aid Frederick National Laboratory in Developing RAS Cancer Genetics Initiative | Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank McCormick, Ph.D., director of the Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of California, San Francisco, and associate dean of the UCSF School of Medicine, has signed a consulting agreement with SAIC-Frederick Inc. to w

  10. Well-directed inclusion of hematology in African national cancer control plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Meaghann; Yao, Atteby J J; Renner, Lorna; Harif, Mhamed; Lam, Catherine G

    2017-07-01

    In the context of a convergent call for noncommunicable disease integration in the global agenda, recognizing cross-cutting needs and opportunities in national strategies across disease fields with shared priorities in low- and middle-income settings can enhance sustainable development approaches. We reviewed publicly available cancer control plans in Africa to evaluate for inclusion of hematology needs and shared service priorities. Pediatric data remain sparse in cancer control plans. While continental Africa represents incredible diversity, recognizing shared priorities and opportunity for collaboration between oncology and hematology services and across age groups may guide prioritized cancer control efforts and reduce programmatic redundancies in resource-limited settings. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Les sources de l’histoire du patrimoine cultuel dans la seconde moitié du XXe siècle au Centre national des archives de l’Église de France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Barbiche

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Fondé en 1973, installé à Issy-les-Moulineaux, le Centre national des archives de l'Église de France, service de la Conférence des évêques de France, est l'équivalent des Archives nationales pour l'État. Ses fonds datent majoritairement de la seconde moitié du XXe siècle, à quelques exceptions près. Dépôt central des archives de la Conférence épiscopale, le CNAEF reçoit ses archives et celles des comités qui en dépendent, mais aussi des dons divers (archives de mouvements ou de personnalités.Les documents touchant à l'histoire de l'art se trouvent plus particulièrement dans la section CO, répartis essentiellement dans les fonds du Comité national des constructions d'églises, le Comité national d'art sacré et le Centre national de pastorale liturgique. Ces fonds ne sont pas classés mais des répertoires sommaires sont consultables sur place, sachant que les délais de communication des documents varient entre 50 et 70 ans.The Centre national des archives de l’Eglise de France, the national archive centre for the French church, was founded in 1973 and is located today in the Paris suburb of Issy-les-Moulineaux. For the Catholic church in France, it is the equivalent of the national archives. With a few earlier exceptions, most of its holdings date from the second half of the 20th century. It is the central repository for the papers of the Episcopal Conference, and manages the papers of this institution and of the various committees attached to it. It also receives archives and papers by way of gifts from other organisations or personalities. The documents relating to art history are to be found mainly in the CO section, in particular in the papers of the Comité national des constructions d’églises (church building, the Comité national d’art sacré (sacred art and the Centre national de pastorale liturgique (pastoral liturgy. These holdings are not well ordered and certain documents cannot be divulged for 50 or

  12. Fuel cycle centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, M.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of co-locating and integrating fuel cycle facilities at one site is discussed. This concept offers considerable advantages, especially in minimizing the amount of radioactive material to be transported on public roads. Safeguards and physical protection as relating to such an integrated system of facilities are analysed in detail, also industrial and commercial questions. An overall risk-benefit evaluation turns out to be in favour of fuel cycle centres. These centres seem to be specifically attractive with regard to the back end of the fuel cycle, including on-site disposal of radioactive wastes. The respective German approach is presented as an example. Special emphasis is given to the site selection procedures in this case. Time scale and cost for the implementation of this concept are important factors to be looked at. Since participation of governmental institutions in these centres seems to be indispensable their respective roles as compared to industry must be clearly defined. The idea of adjusting fuel cycle centres to regional rather than national use might be an attractive option, depending on the specific parameters in the region, though results of existing multinational ventures are inconclusive in this respect. Major difficulties might be expected e.g. because of different national safety regulations and standards as well as commercial conditions among partner countries. Public acceptance in the host country seems to be another stumbling block for the realization of this type of multinational facilities

  13. Second primary cancers after adjuvant radiotherapy in early breast cancer patients: A national population based study under the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantzau, Trine; Mellemkjær, Lene; Overgaard, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To analyze the long-term risk of second primary solid non-breast cancer in a national population-based cohort of 46,176 patients treated for early breast cancer between 1982 and 2007. Patients and methods: All patients studied were treated according to the national guidelines of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. The risk of second primary cancers was estimated by Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) and multivariate Cox regression models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) among irradiated women compared to non-irradiated. All irradiated patients were treated on linear accelerators. Second cancers were a priori categorized into two groups; radiotherapy-associated- (oesophagus, lung, heart/mediastinum, pleura, bones, and connective tissue) and non-radiotherapy-associated sites (all other cancers). Results: 2358 second cancers had occurred during the follow-up. For the radiotherapy-associated sites the HR among irradiated women was 1.34 (95% CI 1.11–1.61) with significantly increased HRs for the time periods of 10–14 years (HR 1.55; 95% CI 1.08–2.24) and ⩾15 years after treatment (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.14–2.81). There was no increased risk for the non-radiotherapy-associated sites (HR 1.04; 95% CI 0.94–1.1). The estimated attributable risk related to radiotherapy for the radiotherapy-associated sites translates into one radiation-induced second cancer in every 200 women treated with radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiotherapy treated breast cancer patients have a small but significantly excess risk of second cancers

  14. Non-melanoma skin cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newlands, C; Currie, R; Memon, A; Whitaker, S; Woolford, T

    2016-05-01

    This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. This paper provides consensus recommendations on the management of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck region on the basis of current evidence. Recommendations • Royal College of Pathologists minimum datasets for NMSC should be adhered to in order to improve patient care and help work-force planning in pathology departments. (G) • Tumour depth is of critical importance in identifying high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), and should be reported in all cases. (R) • Appropriate imaging to determine the extent of primary NMSC is indicated when peri-neural involvement or bony invasion is suspected. (R) • In the clinically N0 neck, radiological imaging is not beneficial, and a policy of watchful waiting and patient education can be adopted. (R) • Patients with high-risk NMSC should be treated by members of a skin cancer multidisciplinary team (MDT) in secondary care. (G) • Non-infiltrative basal cell carcinoma (BCC) skin cancer prevention measures. (G) • Patients who have had a single completely excised BCC or low-risk cSCC can be discharged after a single post-operative visit. (G) • Patients with an excised high-risk cSCC should be reviewed three to six monthly for two years, with further annual review depending upon clinical risk. (G) • Those with recurrent or multiple BCCs should be offered annual review. (G).

  15. 77 FR 24969 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... Emphasis Panel; SBIR Topic 255 Development of Anticancer Agents Meeting I. Date: May 14, 2012. Time: 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: National Institutes of Health... Panel; SBIR Topic 255 Development of Anticancer Agents Meeting II. Date: May 15, 2012. Time: 12 p.m. to...

  16. 77 FR 31628 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ...., as amended. The grant applications/contract proposals and the discussions could disclose confidential...; SBIR Phase IIB: Bridge Awards to Accelerate the Development of Commercialization. Date: June 25, 2012.... Time: 12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: National...

  17. 77 FR 28613 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... Nanotechnology. Date: July 11-12, 2012. Time: 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant.... to 3:30 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: National Institutes of Health... Call). Contact Person: Adriana Stoica, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics...

  18. 75 FR 21645 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ... Therapeutics Based on Nanotechnology, Phase II. Date: June 1, 2010. Time: 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Agenda: To review..., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Renaissance M Street Hotel, 1143 New Hampshire Avenue, NW...

  19. European multi-centre case-control study on risk factors for rare cancers of unknown aetiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Afonso, Noemia; Kaerlev, Linda

    2005-01-01

    To search for occupational risk factors, we conducted a case-control study in nine European countries of cancers of the small intestine, male gall bladder, thymus, bone, male breast, melanoma of the eye, and mycosis fungoides. Recruitment was population based in Denmark, Latvia, France, Germany...... recruited 3374 population (61% interviewed) and 1284 colon cancer controls (86% interviewed). It was possible to undertake this complicated study across Europe, but we encountered three main problems. It was difficult to ensure complete case ascertainment, for population controls, we found a clear divide......, Italy, and Sweden, from hospital areas in Spain and Portugal, and from one United Kingdom (UK) hospital. We recruited 1457 cases (84% interviewed). Numbers identified corresponded to those in the EUROCIM database for Denmark, but were below those observed for France, Italy and Sweden in the database. We...

  20. Pattern of External Breast Prosthesis Use by Post Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients in India: Descriptive Study from Tertiary Care Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramu, D; Ramesh, Rakesh S; Manjunath, Suraj; Shivakumar; Goel, Vipin; Hemnath, G N; Alexander, Annie

    2015-12-01

    In India, Breast cancer is now the most common cancer in urban and 2nd most common in rural areas [1]. The incidence is rising, more younger women are getting affected and due to increase in survival rates there is an increase in the total number of women suffering from breast Cancer. So far there are no studies evaluating the pattern of breast prosthesis use in Indian scenario. The aim of this study is to address the patterns of external breast prosthesis used in India and view of Indian women on such prosthesis after mastectomy for breast cancer. This was a descriptive longitudinal study. In this study we interviewed (telephonic) 63 people, after three years of completing treatment under The Department of Surgical Oncology, St. Johns medical college, Bangalore. Among the study group, 27 members (40 %) were using various prosthesis, rest 36 women were not using any type of prosthesis. Among the users of prosthesis, silicon prosthesis was used by 6 women, padded cups by 8 women, cloth or cotton by 12 women and 1 woman used other type of prosthesis. Most women use simple items like cloth and cotton (44 %). Next most commonly used prosthesis are padded cups(). Only 22 % of women were found using silicon prosthesis in this study. Most of the well educated patients used external prosthesis either in the form of silicon prosthesis or padded cups. Most of women below age of 50 used external breast prosthesis. Use of prosthesis was more in urban compared to rural population (48 % vs 25 %). Prosthesis users worried more about the body image than women not using prosthesis. 25 % of women using prosthesis had body image issues where as only 5 % of non prosthesis users had such problems. Prosthesis users need improvement in terms of comfort, size, shape and affordability. Most common reasons for not using prosthesis are age, lack of motivation and awareness. Less than half of the women included in this study used external prosthesis after mastectomy for breast cancer

  1. Introduction of a breast cancer care programme including ultra short hospital stay in 4 early adopter centres: framework for an implementation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kok, Mascha; Frotscher, Caroline N A; van der Weijden, Trudy; Kessels, Alfons G H; Dirksen, Carmen D; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Roukema, Jan A; Bell, Antoine V R J; van der Ent, Fred W; von Meyenfeldt, Maarten F

    2007-07-02

    Whereas ultra-short stay (day care or 24 hour hospitalisation) following breast cancer surgery was introduced in the US and Canada in the 1990s, it is not yet common practice in Europe. This paper describes the design of the MaDO study, which involves the implementation of ultra short stay admission for patients after breast cancer surgery, and evaluates whether the targets of the implementation strategy are reached. The ultra short stay programme and the applied implementation strategy will be evaluated from the economic perspective. The MaDO study is a pre-post-controlled multi-centre study, that is performed in four hospitals in the Netherlands. It includes a pre and post measuring period of six months each with six months of implementation in between in at least 40 patients per hospital per measurement period. Primary outcome measure is the percentage of patients treated in ultra short stay. Secondary endpoints are the percentage of patients treated according to protocol, degree of involvement of home care nursing, quality of care from the patient's perspective, cost-effectiveness of the ultra short stay programme and cost-effectiveness of the implementation strategy. Quality of care will be measured by the QUOTE-breast cancer instrument, cost-effectiveness of the ultra short stay programme will be measured by means of the EuroQol (administered at four time-points) and a cost book for patients. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed from a societal perspective. Cost-effectiveness of the implementation strategy will be measured by determination of the costs of implementation activities. This study will reveal barriers and facilitators for implementation of the ultra short stay programme. Moreover, the results of the study will provide information about the cost-effectiveness of the ultra short stay programme and the implementation strategy. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN77253391.

  2. Diet quality of cancer survivors and noncancer individuals: Results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Liu, Shanshan; John, Esther M; Must, Aviva; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2015-12-01

    Patterns of poor nutritional intake may exacerbate the elevated morbidity experienced by cancer survivors. It remains unclear whether cancer survivors adhere to existing dietary guidelines and whether survivors' diets differ from those of individuals without cancer over the long term. The authors evaluated dietary intake and quality in 1533 adult cancer survivors who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999 to 2010 compared with dietary intake and quality in 3075 individuals who had no history of cancer and were matched to the cancer survivors by age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Dietary intake was assessed using 24-hour dietary recalls. The 2010 Healthy Eating Index (HEI-2010) was used to evaluate diet quality. The mean ± standard deviation HEI-2010 total score was 47.2 ± 0.5 in the cancer survivors and 48.3 ± 0.4 in the noncancer group (P = .03). Compared with the noncancer group, cancer survivors had a significantly lower score for empty calories (13.6 vs 14.4; P = .001), which corresponded to worse adherence to dietary intake of calories from solid fats, alcohol, and added sugars. Cancer survivors also had significantly lower dietary intake of fiber than the noncancer group (15.0 vs 15.9 g per day; P = .02). In relation to recommended intake, survivors' mean dietary intake of vitamin D, vitamin E, potassium, fiber, and calcium was 31%, 47%, 55%, 60%, and 73%, respectively; whereas their mean dietary intake of saturated fat and sodium was 112% and 133%, respectively, of the recommended intake. Cancer survivors had poor adherence to the US Department of Agriculture 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and their intake patterns were worse than those in the general population for empty calories and fiber. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  3. Risk prediction model for colorectal cancer: National Health Insurance Corporation study, Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aesun Shin

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Incidence and mortality rates of colorectal cancer have been rapidly increasing in Korea during last few decades. Development of risk prediction models for colorectal cancer in Korean men and women is urgently needed to enhance its prevention and early detection. METHODS: Gender specific five-year risk prediction models were developed for overall colorectal cancer, proximal colon cancer, distal colon cancer, colon cancer and rectal cancer. The model was developed using data from a population of 846,559 men and 479,449 women who participated in health examinations by the National Health Insurance Corporation. Examinees were 30-80 years old and free of cancer in the baseline years of 1996 and 1997. An independent population of 547,874 men and 415,875 women who participated in 1998 and 1999 examinations was used to validate the model. Model validation was done by evaluating its performance in terms of discrimination and calibration ability using the C-statistic and Hosmer-Lemeshow-type chi-square statistics. RESULTS: Age, body mass index, serum cholesterol, family history of cancer, and alcohol consumption were included in all models for men, whereas age, height, and meat intake frequency were included in all models for women. Models showed moderately good discrimination ability with C-statistics between 0.69 and 0.78. The C-statistics were generally higher in the models for men, whereas the calibration abilities were generally better in the models for women. CONCLUSIONS: Colorectal cancer risk prediction models were developed from large-scale, population-based data. Those models can be used for identifying high risk groups and developing preventive intervention strategies for colorectal cancer.

  4. Risk prediction model for colorectal cancer: National Health Insurance Corporation study, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Aesun; Joo, Jungnam; Yang, Hye-Ryung; Bak, Jeongin; Park, Yunjin; Kim, Jeongseon; Oh, Jae Hwan; Nam, Byung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Incidence and mortality rates of colorectal cancer have been rapidly increasing in Korea during last few decades. Development of risk prediction models for colorectal cancer in Korean men and women is urgently needed to enhance its prevention and early detection. Gender specific five-year risk prediction models were developed for overall colorectal cancer, proximal colon cancer, distal colon cancer, colon cancer and rectal cancer. The model was developed using data from a population of 846,559 men and 479,449 women who participated in health examinations by the National Health Insurance Corporation. Examinees were 30-80 years old and free of cancer in the baseline years of 1996 and 1997. An independent population of 547,874 men and 415,875 women who participated in 1998 and 1999 examinations was used to validate the model. Model validation was done by evaluating its performance in terms of discrimination and calibration ability using the C-statistic and Hosmer-Lemeshow-type chi-square statistics. Age, body mass index, serum cholesterol, family history of cancer, and alcohol consumption were included in all models for men, whereas age, height, and meat intake frequency were included in all models for women. Models showed moderately good discrimination ability with C-statistics between 0.69 and 0.78. The C-statistics were generally higher in the models for men, whereas the calibration abilities were generally better in the models for women. Colorectal cancer risk prediction models were developed from large-scale, population-based data. Those models can be used for identifying high risk groups and developing preventive intervention strategies for colorectal cancer.

  5. HIGH PREVALENCE OF AGENT ORANGE EXPOSURE AMONG THYROID CANCER PATIENTS IN THE NATIONAL VA HEALTHCARE SYSTEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Karen T; Sawicki, Mark P; Wang, Marilene B; Hershman, Jerome M; Leung, Angela M

    2016-06-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy and the most rapidly increasing cancer in the U.S. Little is known regarding the epidemiology and characteristics of patients with thyroid cancer within the national Veterans Health Administration (VHA) integrated healthcare system. The aim of this study was to further understand the characteristics of thyroid cancer patients in the VHA population, particularly in relation to Agent Orange exposure. This is a descriptive analysis of the VA (Veterans Affairs) Corporate Data Warehouse database from all U.S. VHA healthcare sites from October1, 1999, to December 31, 2013. Information was extracted for all thyroid cancer patients based on International Classification of Diseases-ninth revision diagnosis codes; histologic subtypes of thyroid cancer were not available. There were 19,592 patients (86% men, 76% white, 58% married, 42% Vietnam-era Veteran) in the VHA system with a diagnosis of thyroid cancer within this 14-year study period. The gender-stratified prevalence rates of thyroid cancer among the Veteran population during the study period were 1:1,114 (women) and 1:1,023 (men), which were lower for women but similar for men, when compared to the U.S. general population in 2011 (1:350 for women and 1:1,219 for men). There was a significantly higher proportion of self-reported Agent Orange exposure among thyroid cancer patients (10.0%), compared to the general VHA population (6.2%) (PAgent Orange exposure compared to the overall national VA patient population. T4 = thyroxine TCDD = 2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin TSH = thyroid-stimulating hormone VA = Veterans Affairs VHA = Veterans Health Administration.

  6. Bone scintigraphy in prostate cancer: a French national survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boneu, A.; Corone, C.; Giammarile, F.; Lumbroso, J.; Resche, I.

    1997-01-01

    A national survey has been performed in France concerning bone scan in prostatic carcinoma. Its aim was to define methods of performing examinations, criteria of analysis of imaging results and indications of radionuclide imaging in initial evaluation and post-therapeutic follow-up of the disease. Replies are given and recommendations are proposed in order to improve imaging quality, optimize interpretation and rationalize prescription of bone scintigraphy in case of prostatic carcinoma. (authors)

  7. Comparing cancer screening estimates: Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System and National Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Ann Goding; Liu, Benmei; Siegel, Rebecca L; Jemal, Ahmedin; Fedewa, Stacey A

    2018-01-01

    Cancer screening prevalence from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), designed to provide state-level estimates, and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), designed to provide national estimates, are used to measure progress in cancer control. A detailed description of the extent to which recent cancer screening estimates vary by key demographic characteristics has not been previously described. We examined national prevalence estimates for recommended breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screening using data from the 2012 and 2014 BRFSS and the 2010 and 2013 NHIS. Treating the NHIS estimates as the reference, direct differences (DD) were calculated by subtracting NHIS estimates from BRFSS estimates. Relative differences were computed by dividing the DD by the NHIS estimates. Two-sample t-tests (2-tails), were performed to test for statistically significant differences. BRFSS screening estimates were higher than those from NHIS for breast (78.4% versus 72.5%; DD=5.9%, pNHIS, each survey has a unique and important role in providing information to track cancer screening utilization among various populations. Awareness of these differences and their potential causes is important when comparing the surveys and determining the best application for each data source. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Current radiography and tomography applications at Necsa and an envisaged upgrade towards a proposed South African national centre for radiography and tomography (SANCRAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radebe, M.J.; De Beer, F.C.

    2008-01-01

    An upgrade of the current Radiography and Tomography Research facilities is envisaged to enhance the group's support for Necsa's mission to undertake and support nuclear research and utilize penetrating radiation for the benefit of mankind. It is envisage that the SANCRAT will host neutron-, X-ray- and gamma ray penetrating radiation imaging infrastructures that can be utilized by researchers from industry as well as post graduate students from higher educational institutions. Modelling for the upgrade to a multifunctional neutron radiography and tomography facility has been underway. Upgrade plans and implementation has also begun for a 250 kV X-ray radiography set-up, that will exist independent from the neutron facility. Future expansion entails catering for a micro-focus X-ray -, and gamma ray radiography and tomography facilities. The current facilities available consist of one infrastructure facility based on two sources of penetrating radiation, i.e. SAFARI-1 research nuclear reactor as thermal neutron source and a 100 kV X-ray generator. This facility, which hosts the only operational neutron tomography R and D facility in the Southern Hemisphere and in Africa, are being extensively utilized by post graduate students and industry. The facility sees application in a wide range of scientific and engineering disciplines, amongst which is nuclear, geosciences, palaeontology, civil, mechanical, chemical, etc. This paper focus on case studies engaged at the current radiography and tomography facilities over the past 2 years as well as describing the envisaged upgrade initiatives to a fully equipped national centre. (authors)

  9. Current radiography and tomography applications at Necsa and an envisaged upgrade towards a proposed South African national centre for radiography and tomography (SANCRAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radebe, M.J.; De Beer, F.C. [Necsa - South African Nuclear Energy Corporation Limited, P. O.Box 582, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa)

    2008-07-01

    An upgrade of the current Radiography and Tomography Research facilities is envisaged to enhance the group's support for Necsa's mission to undertake and support nuclear research and utilize penetrating radiation for the benefit of mankind. It is envisage that the SANCRAT will host neutron-, X-ray- and gamma ray penetrating radiation imaging infrastructures that can be utilized by researchers from industry as well as post graduate students from higher educational institutions. Modelling for the upgrade to a multifunctional neutron radiography and tomography facility has been underway. Upgrade plans and implementation has also begun for a 250 kV X-ray radiography set-up, that will exist independent from the neutron facility. Future expansion entails catering for a micro-focus X-ray -, and gamma ray radiography and tomography facilities. The current facilities available consist of one infrastructure facility based on two sources of penetrating radiation, i.e. SAFARI-1 research nuclear reactor as thermal neutron source and a 100 kV X-ray generator. This facility, which hosts the only operational neutron tomography R and D facility in the Southern Hemisphere and in Africa, are being extensively utilized by post graduate students and industry. The facility sees application in a wide range of scientific and engineering disciplines, amongst which is nuclear, geosciences, palaeontology, civil, mechanical, chemical, etc. This paper focus on case studies engaged at the current radiography and tomography facilities over the past 2 years as well as describing the envisaged upgrade initiatives to a fully equipped national centre. (authors)

  10. The effect of nitisinone on homogentisic acid and tyrosine: a two-year survey of patients attending the National Alkaptonuria Centre, Liverpool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, Anna M; Hughes, Andrew T; Davison, Andrew S; Devine, Jean; Usher, Jeannette; Curtis, Sarah; Khedr, Milad; Gallagher, James A; Ranganath, Lakshminarayan R

    2017-05-01

    Background Alkaptonuria is a rare, debilitating autosomal recessive disorder affecting tyrosine metabolism. Deficiency of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase leads to increased homogentisic acid which is deposited as ochronotic pigment. Clinical sequelae include severe early onset osteoarthritis, increased renal and prostate stone formation and cardiac complications. Treatment has been largely based on analgaesia and arthroplasty. The National Alkaptonuria Centre in Liverpool has been using 2 mg nitisinone (NTBC) off-license for all patients in the United Kingdom with alkaptonuria and monitoring the tyrosine metabolite profiles. Methods Patients with confirmed alkaptonuria are commenced on 2 mg dose (alternative days) of NTBC for three months with daily dose thereafter. Metabolite measurement by LC-MS/MS is performed at baseline, day 4, three-months, six-months and one-year post-commencing NTBC. Thereafter, monitoring and clinical assessments are performed annually. Results Urine homogentisic acid concentration decreased from a mean baseline 20,557 µmol/24 h (95th percentile confidence interval 18,446-22,669 µmol/24 h) by on average 95.4% by six months, 94.8% at one year and 94.1% at two year monitoring. A concurrent reduction in serum homogentisic acid concentration of 83.2% compared to baseline was also measured. Serum tyrosine increased from normal adult reference interval to a mean ± SD of 594 ± 184 µmol /L at year-two monitoring with an increased urinary excretion from 103 ± 81 µmol /24 h at baseline to 1071 ± 726 µmol /24 h two years from therapy. Conclusions The data presented represent the first longitudinal survey of NTBC use in an NHS service setting and demonstrate the sustained effect of NTBC on the tyrosine metabolite profile.

  11. Breast Cancer Survivors Report Similar Concerns Related to Return to Work in Developed and Developing Nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shi-Xiang; Liu, Jun-E; Cheng, Andy S K; Xiao, Shu-Qin; Su, Ya-Li; Feuerstein, Michael

    2018-02-14

    Aim To determine whether breast cancer survivors (BCS) at work following the diagnosis and/or treatment of breast cancer, in a rapidly developing country such as China experience similar to return to work challenges as reported in nations with established return to work (RTW) policy and procedures for employees with cancer. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 BCS who returned to work following diagnosis and/or primary cancer treatment. An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis was used to investigate responses. Results Three recurring themes emerged: (1) challenges at work related to residual effects of diagnosis and/or primary treatment; (2) positive and negative responses from employers and/or supervisors; and (3) positive and negative responses from co-workers/colleagues. Although several participants experienced a high level of workplace support, there was a subgroup that did report challenges related to symptom burden, cognitive limitations, and both positive and negative responses by employers and co-workers were reported. Conclusions Findings indicate similar challenges in BCS who RTW during and/or following cancer treatment in both rapidly developing and developed nations. Results suggest that regardless of the existence of workplace policies and practices related to RTW for workers with a history of cancer, a subgroup of BCS experience similar challenges when returning to work. These findings highlight the international nature of RTW challenges and suggest the need for more global efforts to develop and evaluate workplace interventions to assist with these similarities.

  12. Breast cancer screening with digital breast tomosynthesis - 4 year experience and comparison with national data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huay-Ben Pan

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: There was a 32.2% increase in CDR and a 17.8% decrease in RR when DBT was used as an adjunct to DM, as compared to DM alone. CDRs were approximately twofold better than national average data. DBT was more effective at detecting cancer in ductal carcinoma in situ and stage 1.

  13. Mexico’s National Cancer Control Plan: From Development to Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute and the Center for Global Health have had a long-standing and successful partnership with INCan, and at their request are identifying new or enhanced ways to provide technical support by way of resources, training, and collaborative programs to facilitate the implementation of the NCCP.

  14. Oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - mouth; Mouth cancer; Head and neck cancer; Squamous cell cancer - mouth; Malignant neoplasm - oral ... National Cancer Institute. PDQ lip and oral cavity cancer ... September 25, 2015. www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/hp/lip- ...

  15. Patient and family involvement in decision making for management of cancer patients at a centre in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jia An; Quah, Yan Ling; Yang, Grace Meijuan; Menon, Sumytra; Radha Krishna, Lalit Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The practice of patient autonomy within the prevailing bioethical framework in the West appears increasingly at odds with the prominent influence of the family in medical decision making in the Asian culture. The actual extent of involvement of patient versus the family in the decision making process for cancer management in clinical practice is largely unknown in Asia. (1) To describe patient and family involvement in healthcare decision making in actual practice, and to determine whether those practices are consistent with Singapore law; and (2) to act as a pilot for a larger prospective study examining the preferences of cancer patients on the decision making process, and the reasons for excluding patients from that process. A retrospective review of patients who died in an oncology ward in Singapore General Hospital from February to April 2011. Patient and family involvement in discussions on (1) disclosure of diagnosis, (2) initial treatment decisions and (3) initiation of a 'maximum ward management' order was evaluated by reviewing case notes completed by healthcare professionals. Data were collected for 55 patients. Involvement of patients and families at first disclosure of diagnosis was noted in 61% and 64% of cases, respectively. In 12% of cases, the family requested withholding of the diagnosis from the patient. 86% of patients were involved in the initial treatment decisions, and their family was involved in 65% of cases. Only 9% of the 32 alert patients were consulted in end of life decisions. Factors associated with lower patient involvement were advanced age and inability to speak English. While most cancer patients are involved in the healthcare decision making process during the early phase, familial involvement gains prominence as the disease progresses. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. National Economic Conditions and Patient Insurance Status Predict Prostate Cancer Diagnosis Rates and Management Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Adam B; Conti, Rena M; Eggener, Scott E

    2016-05-01

    The recent Great Recession from December 2007 to June 2009 presents a unique opportunity to examine whether the incidence of nonpalpable prostate cancer decreases while conservative management for nonpalpable prostate cancer increases during periods of national economic hardship. We derived rates of national monthly diagnosis and conservative management for screen detected, nonpalpable prostate cancer and patient level insurance status from the SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results) database from 2004 to 2011. We derived monthly statistics on national unemployment rates, inflation, median household income and S&P 500® closing values from government sources. Using linear and logistic multivariable regression we measured the correlation of national macroeconomic conditions with prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment patterns. We evaluated patient level predictors of conservative management to determine whether being insured by Medicaid or uninsured increased the use of conservative management. Diagnosis rates correlated positively with the S&P 500 monthly close (coefficient 24.90, 95% CI 6.29-43.50, p = 0.009). Conservative management correlated negatively with median household income (coefficient -49.13, 95% CI -69.29--28.98, p management compared to that in men with private insurance. As indicated by a significant interaction term being diagnosed during the Great Recession increased the Medicaid insurance predictive value of conservative management (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.02-1.68, p = 0.037). National economic hardship was associated with decreased diagnosis rates of nonpalpable prostate cancer and increased conservative management. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Aube centre; Le Centre de l`Aube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This educational booklet is devoted to a general presentation of the Aube radioactive wastes storage centre. After a short presentation of the Andra, the French national agency for the management of radioactive wastes, it gives some general information about radioactive wastes (origin, classification), containers (quality assurance and different types), wastes transportation (planning, safety), and about the Aube centre itself: description, treatment and conditioning of drums (compacting and injection), storage facilities, geological situation of the site, and environmental controls. (J.S.)

  18. Contributions and Limitations of National Cervical Cancer Screening Program in Korea: A Retrospective Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hyun Lee, MPH

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the contributions and limitations of the cervical cancer screening test with accuracy in Korea. Methods: This was a retrospective observational study. The study population consisted of all participants who underwent cervical cancer screening test from 2009 to 2014. The data were obtained from National Health Information Database (NHID which represents medical use records of most Koreans. As the indices for contributions and limitations of the screening test, crude detection rate, incidence rate of interval cancer, sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value were used. Results: The crude detection rate of screening test per 100,000 participants increased from 100.7 in 2009 to 102.1 in 2014. The incidence rate of interval cancer per 100,000 negatives decreased from 13.0 in 2009 to 10.2 in 2014. The sensitivities of screening test were 88.7% in 2009 and 91.2% in 2014, and the specificities were 98.5% in 2009 and 97.7% in 2014. The positive predictive value of screening decreased from 6.2% in 2009 to 4.3% in 2014. Conclusion: The Korean national cervical cancer screening program has improved in accuracy and has contributed to detection of early stage of cervical cancer over the years. Along with efforts to promote participation in cancer screening programs, quality control over the screening program should be enhanced. Keywords: carcinoma in situ, early detection of cancer, Papanicolaou test, sensitivity and specificity, uterine cervical neoplasms

  19. Meeting the Challenge: The National Cancer Institute's Central Institutional Review Board for Multi-Site Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massett, Holly A; Hampp, Sharon L; Goldberg, Jacquelyn L; Mooney, Margaret; Parreco, Linda K; Minasian, Lori; Montello, Mike; Mishkin, Grace E; Davis, Catasha; Abrams, Jeffrey S

    2018-03-10

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued a new policy that requires a single institutional review board (IRB) of record be used for all protocols funded by the NIH that are carried out at more than one site in the United States, effective January 2018. This policy affects several hundred clinical trials opened annually across the NIH. Limited data exist to compare the use of a single IRB to that of multiple local IRBs, so some institutions are resistant to or distrustful of single IRBs. Since 2001, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has funded a central IRB (CIRB) that provides human patient reviews for its extensive national cancer clinical trials program. This paper presents data to show the adoption, efficiencies gained, and satisfaction of the CIRB among NCI trial networks and reviews key lessons gleaned from 16 years of experience that may be informative for others charged with implementation of the new NIH single-IRB policy.

  20. Asbestos-related occupational cancers compensated under the Spanish National Insurance System, 1978-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gómez, Montserrat; Menéndez-Navarro, Alfredo; López, Rosario Castañeda

    2015-01-01

    In 1978, asbestos-related occupational cancers were added to the Spanish list of occupational diseases. However, there are no full accounts of compensated cases since their inclusion. To analyze the cases of asbestos-related cancer recognized as occupational in Spain between 1978 and 2011. Cases were obtained from the Spanish Employment Ministry. Specific incidence rates by year, economic activity, and occupation were obtained. We compared mortality rates of mesothelioma and bronchus and lung cancer mortality in Spain and the European Union. Between 1978 and 2011, 164 asbestos-related occupational cancers were recognized in Spain, with a mean annual rate of 0·08 per 10(5) employees (0·13 in males, 0·002 in females). Under-recognition rates were an estimated 93·6% (males) and 99·7% (females) for pleural mesothelioma and 98·8% (males) and 100% (females) for bronchus and lung cancer. In Europe for the year 2000, asbestos-related occupational cancer rates ranged from 0·04 per 10(5) employees in Spain to 7·32 per 10(5) employees in Norway. These findings provide evidence of gross under-recognition of asbestos-related occupational cancers in Spain. Future work should investigate cases treated in the National Healthcare System to better establish the impact of asbestos on health in Spain.

  1. Evaluation of the National Skin Cancer Campaign: a Swiss experience of Euromelanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberherr, Sven; Seyed Jafari, S Morteza; Cazzaniga, Simone; Bianchi, Enrica; Schlagenhauff, Bettina; Tscharner, Gion; Hafner, Jürg; Mainetti, Carlo; Lapointe, Anne-Karine; Hunger, Robert E

    2017-10-24

    Skin cancer is a burden to healthcare and patients worldwide. The incidence of skin cancer has been rising during recent decades and this trend is expected to continue in the future. Numerous risk factors have been identified and prevention strategies developed. The Euromelanoma campaign is a pan-European skin cancer prevention programme, targeted to both primary and secondary prevention of malignant melanoma. The current study aimed to evaluate the results of the Swiss skin cancer screening day 2016. A questionnaire was used to obtain data on characteristics and suspected skin cancers of all participants. Follow-up of patients with suspicious lesions was performed 3 to 6 months later. During the campaign, 2795 people were screened. Of the screened individuals, 157 participants (58% female, 42% male; mean age 58.8 years) underwent further evaluations; 6 cutaneous malignant melanomas, 21 basal cell carcinomas and 2 squamous cell carcinomas were detected. Detection rates were 0.21% for cutaneous melanoma, 0.75% for basal cell carcinoma and 0.07% for squamous cell carcinoma. Our study provides an up-to-date evaluation of the Swiss Euromelanoma campaign 2016. The results are mostly in line with data from other European studies. Considering the morbidity, mortality and financial and social impact of skin cancer, the capacity to raise awareness of risk factors, skin cancer prevention methods and educating high-risk and at-risk individuals, we may assume that a National Screening Day has a crucial impact on the public health system.

  2. Enrollment Trends and Disparity Among Patients With Lung Cancer in National Clinical Trials, 1990 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Herbert H.; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.; Wong, Melisa L.; Cheng, Perry; Ganti, Apar Kishor; Sargent, Daniel J.; Zhang, Ying; Hu, Chen; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Redman, Mary W.; Manola, Judith B.; Schilsky, Richard L.; Cohen, Harvey J.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Adjei, Alex A.; Gandara, David; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Vokes, Everett E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Under-representation of elderly, women, and racial/ethnic minority patients with cancer in clinical trials is of national concern. The goal of this study was to characterize enrollment trends and disparities by age, sex, and race/ethnicity in lung cancer trials. Methods We analyzed data for 23,006 National Cancer Institute cooperative group lung cancer trial participants and 578,476 patients with lung cancer from the SEER registry from 1990 to 2012. The enrollment disparity difference (EDD) and enrollment disparity ratio (EDR) were calculated on the basis of the proportion of each subgroup in the trial population and the US lung cancer population. Annual percentage changes (APCs) in the subgroup proportions in each population were compared over time. Results Enrollment disparity for patients ≥ 70 years of age with non–small-cell lung cancer improved from 1990 to 2012 (test of parallelism, P = .020), with a remaining EDD of 0.22 (95% CI, 0.19 to 0.25) and EDR of 1.65 (95% CI, 1.51 to 1.82) in 2010 to 2012. No improvement was seen for elderly patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), with an APC of 0.20 (P = .714) among trial participants, despite a rising proportion of elderly patients with SCLC in the US population (APC, 0.32; P = .020). Enrollment disparity for women with lung cancer improved overall, with the gap closing by 2012 (EDD, 0.03 [95% CI, 0.00 to 0.06]; EDR, 1.07 [95% CI, 1.00 to 1.16]). Enrollment disparities persisted without significant improvement for elderly women, blacks, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics. Conclusion Under-representation in lung cancer trials improved significantly from 1990 to 2012 for elderly patients with non–small-cell lung cancer and for women, but ongoing efforts to improve the enrollment of elderly patients with SCLC and minorities are needed. Our study highlights the importance of addressing enrollment disparities by demographic and disease subgroups to better target under-represented groups of

  3. Text of the agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization concerning the joint operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization concerning the Joint Operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 25 February 1993 and by the UNESCO General Conference on 16 November 1993

  4. Text of the agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Government of the Republic of Italy concerning the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Government of the Republic of Italy concerning the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency`s Board of Governors on 25 February 1993, by the UNESCO General Conference on 16 November 1993, and ratified by the Italian Parliament on 2 January 1995.

  5. Text of the agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Government of the Republic of Italy concerning the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Government of the Republic of Italy concerning the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 25 February 1993, by the UNESCO General Conference on 16 November 1993, and ratified by the Italian Parliament on 2 January 1995

  6. Breast and cervical cancers diagnosed and stage at diagnosis among women served through the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacqueline W; Royalty, Janet; Henley, Jane; White, Arica; Richardson, Lisa C

    2015-05-01

    To assess cancers diagnosed and the stage of cancer at the time of diagnosis among low-income, under-insured, or uninsured women who received services through the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP). Using the NBCCEDP database, we examined the number and percent of women diagnosed during 2009-2011 with in situ breast cancer, invasive breast cancer, and invasive cervical cancer by demographic and clinical characteristics, including age, race and ethnicity, test indication (screening or diagnostic), symptoms (for breast cancer), and screening history (for cervical cancer). We examined these characteristics by stage at diagnosis, a new variable included in the database obtained by linking with state-based central cancer registries. There were 11,569 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, 1,988 with in situ breast cancer, and 583 with invasive cervical cancer through the NBCCEDP. Women who reported breast symptoms or who had diagnostic mammography were more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, and at a later stage, than those who did not have symptoms or who had screening mammography. Women who had been rarely or never screened for cervical cancer were more likely to be diagnosed with cervical cancer, and at a later stage, than women who received regular screenings. Women served through the NBCCEDP who have not had prior screening or who have symptoms were more often diagnosed with late-stage disease.

  7. Effectiveness of a Hospital-Based Work Support Intervention for Female Cancer Patients – A Multi-Centre Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminga, Sietske J.; Verbeek, Jos H. A. M.; Bos, Monique M. E. M.; Fons, Guus; Kitzen, Jos J. E. M.; Plaisier, Peter W.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective One key aspect of cancer survivorship is return-to-work. Unfortunately, many cancer survivors face problems upon their return-to-work. For that reason, we developed a hospital-based work support intervention aimed at enhancing return-to-work. We studied effectiveness of the intervention compared to usual care for female cancer patients in a multi-centre randomised controlled trial. Methods Breast and gynaecological cancer patients who were treated with curative intent and had paid work were randomised to the intervention group (n = 65) or control group (n = 68). The intervention involved patient education and support at the hospital and improvement of communication between treating and occupational physicians. In addition, we asked patient's occupational physician to organise a meeting with the patient and the supervisor to make a concrete gradual return-to-work plan. Outcomes at 12 months of follow-up included rate and time until return-to-work (full or partial), quality of life, work ability, work functioning, and lost productivity costs. Time until return-to-work was analyzed with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results Return-to-work rates were 86% and 83% (p = 0.6) for the intervention group and control group when excluding 8 patients who died or with a life expectancy of months at follow-up. Median time from initial sick leave to partial return-to-work was 194 days (range 14–435) versus 192 days (range 82–465) (p = 0.90) with a hazard ratio of 1.03 (95% CI 0.64–1.6). Quality of life and work ability improved statistically over time but did not differ statistically between groups. Work functioning and costs did not differ statistically between groups. Conclusion The intervention was easily implemented into usual psycho-oncological care and showed high return-to-work rates. We failed to show any differences between groups on return-to-work outcomes and quality of life scores. Further research is needed to study which aspects of

  8. Multi-centre European study of breakthrough cancer pain: pain characteristics and patient perceptions of current and potential management strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Andrew; Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Andersen, Steen

    2011-01-01

    This study involved 320 cancer patients from four Northern European countries. Patients with breakthrough pain were questioned about the characteristics of their pain, the current management of their pain, and the acceptability/utility of alternative routes of administration. The median number...... of episodes was 3/day. Forty-four percent patients reported incident-type pain, 39% spontaneous-type pain, and 17% a combination of these pains. The median duration was 60 min, and the median time to peak intensity was 15 min. Three percent patients reported "mild" pain, 37% "moderate" pain, and 60% "severe......" pain. Ninety percent patients stated that the pain interfered with their daily activities. All patients were using opioids as rescue medication (mainly oral morphine/oxycodone), whilst 28% patients were using non-opioids, and 50% patients were using non-pharmacological interventions. Only 55% patients...

  9. A national survey of lung cancer specialists' views on low-dose CT screening for lung cancer in Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wook Shin

    Full Text Available Lung cancer specialists play an important role in designing and implementing lung cancer screening. We aimed to describe their 1 attitudes toward low-dose lung computed tomography (LDCT screening, 2 current practices and experiences of LDCT screening and 3 attitudes and opinions towards national lung cancer screening program (NLCSP. We conducted a national web-based survey of pulmonologists, thoracic surgeons, medical oncologists, and radiological oncologists who are members of Korean Association for Lung Cancer (N = 183. Almost all respondents agreed that LDCT screening increases early detection (100%, improves survival (95.1%, and gives a good smoking cessation counseling opportunity (88.6%. Most were concerned about its high false positive results (79.8% and the subsequent negative effects. Less than half were concerned about radiation hazard (37.2%. Overall, most (89.1% believed that the benefits outweigh the risks and harms. Most (79.2% stated that they proactively recommend LDCT screening to those who are eligible for the current guidelines, but the screening propensity varied considerably. The majority (77.6% agreed with the idea of NLCSP and its beneficial effect, but had concerns about the quality control of CT devices (74.9%, quality assurance of radiologic interpretation (63.3%, poor access to LDCT (56.3%, and difficulties in selecting eligible population using self-report history (66.7%. Most (79.2% thought that program need to be funded by a specialized fund rather than by the National Health Insurance. The opinions on the level of copayment for screening varied. Our findings would be an important source for health policy decision when considering for NLCSP in Korea.

  10. Factors Affecting Concordance between Radiological and Histological Findings in Invasive Lobular Carcinoma - Experience from a National Cancer Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Sinn, Duaa; O'Driscoll, Donal; Murphy, Maurice

    2017-05-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) is characterized by an infiltrative discohesive growth pattern, making it difficult to accurately assess both clinically and by imaging studies. Despite favourable biological characteristics, challenges remain in the surgical treatment of ILC. We aimed to evaluate radiology/histology concordance and identify histological and biological parameters on core biopsies that may predict final tumour histology and guide surgical treatment decisions. The radiology and histology reports for all newly diagnosed cases of ILC were analysed. The biopsy and resection histological slides for all the surgical cases were reviewed. 75 new cases of ILC were diagnosed over a 2-year period. 48 patients underwent surgery of whom 25% had 2 or more operations. There was discordance between radiological and histological tumour focality and tumour size in 35 and 40%, respectively. The correlation between radiology/histology discordance and E-cadherin expression was statistically significant. However, the correlation between radiology/histology discordance and menopausal status, breast density, pattern of invasion, presence of lobular intraepithelial neoplasia (LIN), hormonal status, and Ki67 were not statistically significant. Histological and biological factors in ILC, with the exception of E-cadherin expression, do not seem to play a significant role in radiology/histology discordance. However, larger studies are needed to further corroborate these findings.

  11. MORBIDITY OF SENTINEL LYMPH NODE BIOPSY (SLNB ALONE VERSUS SLNB AND COMPLETION AXILLARY LYMPH NODE DISSECTION AFTER BREAST CANCER SURGERY- A PROSPECTIVE SINGLE CENTRE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythilidevi Sappa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND ALND after breast cancer surgery is associated with considerable morbidity. We hypothesised- 1 The morbidity in patients undergoing SLN biopsy only is significantly lower compared with those after SLN and completion ALND level I and II; and 2 The intermediate survival rates, local and axillary recurrence rates were significantly equivalent in both the groups. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients with early stage breast cancer (pT1 and pT2 ≤3 cm, cN0 were included between April 2010 and April 2016 in this prospective single centre study. All patients underwent SLN biopsy. In all patients with SLN macrometastases and most patients with SLN micrometastases (43 of 68 or isolated tumour cells (11 of 19, a completion ALND was performed. Postoperative morbidity was assessed based on a standardised protocol. RESULTS SLN biopsy alone was performed in 449 patients, whereas 210 patients underwent SLN and completion ALND. The median follow-ups were 31.0 and 29.5 months for the SLN and SLN and completion ALND groups, respectively. Intermediate-term follow-up information was available from 635 of 659 patients (96.4% of enrolled patients. The following results were found in the SLN versus SLN and completion ALND group- Presence of lymphoedema (3.5% vs. 19.1%, P <0.0001, impaired shoulder range of motion (3.5% vs. 11.3%, P <0.0001, shoulder/arm pain (8.1% vs. 21.1%, P <0.0001 and numbness (10.9% vs. 37.7%, P <0.0001. CONCLUSION The morbidity after SLN biopsy alone is not negligible, but significantly lower compared with ALND. The intermediate survival rates, local and axillary recurrence rates were equivalent in SLNB only and SLNB plus completion ALND groups.

  12. Pattern and Distribution of Colorectal Cancer in Tanzania: A Retrospective Chart Audit at Two National Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard K. Katalambula

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Colorectal cancer (CRC is a growing public health concern with increasing rates in countries with previously known low incidence. This study determined pattern and distribution of CRC in Tanzania and identified hot spots in case distribution. Methods. A retrospective chart audit reviewed hospital registers and patient files from two national institutions. Descriptive statistics, Chi square (χ2 tests, and regression analyses were employed and augmented by data visualization to display risk variable differences. Results. CRC cases increased sixfold in the last decade in Tanzania. There was a 1.5% decrease in incidences levels of rectal cancer and 2% increase for colon cancer every year from 2005 to 2015. Nearly half of patients listed Dar es Salaam as their primary residence. CRC was equally distributed between males (50.06% and females (49.94%, although gender likelihood of diagnosis type (i.e., rectal or colon was significantly different (P=0.027. More than 60% of patients were between 40 and 69 years. Conclusions. Age (P=0.0183 and time (P=0.004 but not gender (P=0.0864 were significantly associated with rectal cancer in a retrospective study in Tanzania. Gender (P=0.0405, age (P=0.0015, and time (P=0.0075 were all significantly associated with colon cancer in this study. This retrospective study found that colon cancer is more prevalent among males at a relatively younger age than rectal cancer. Further, our study showed that although more patients were diagnosed with rectal cancer, the trend has shown that colon cancer is increasing at a faster rate.

  13. Cancer Information Seeking Among Adult New Zealanders: a National Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Rosalina; McNoe, Bronwen; Iosua, Ella; Reeder, Anthony; Egan, Richard; Marsh, Louise; Robertson, Lindsay; Maclennan, Brett; Dawson, Anna; Quigg, Robin; Petersen, Anne-Cathrine

    2018-06-01

    Organisations seeking to establish themselves as leading cancer information sources for the public need to understand patterns and motivators for information seeking. This study describes cancer information seeking among New Zealanders through a national cross-sectional survey conducted in 2014/15 with a population-based sample of adults (18 years and over). Participants were asked if they had sought information about cancer during the past 12 months, the type of information they sought, what prompted them to look for information and ways of getting information they found helpful. Telephone interviews were completed by 1064 participants (588 females, 476 males, 64% response rate). Of these, 33.8% of females and 23.3% of males (total, 29.2%) had searched for information about cancer over the past year. A search was most frequently prompted by a cancer diagnosis of a family member or friend (43.3%), a desire to educate themselves (17.5%), experience of potential symptoms or a positive screening test (9.4%), family history of cancer (8.9%) or the respondent's own cancer diagnosis (7.7%). Across the cancer control spectrum, the information sought was most commonly about treatment and survival (20.2%), symptoms/early detection (17.2%) or risk factors (14.2%), although many were general or non-specific queries (50.0%). The internet was most commonly identified as a helpful source of information (71.7%), followed by health professionals (35.8%), and reading material (e.g. books, pamphlets) (14.7%).This study provides a snapshot of cancer information seeking in New Zealand, providing valuable knowledge to help shape resource delivery to better meet the diverse needs of information seekers and address potential unmet needs, where information seeking is less prevalent.

  14. Nutritional status of cancer patients admitted for chemotherapy at the National Kidney and Transplant Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, J E; Domingo, F; Luna, C A; Berroya, R M; Catli, C A; Ginete, J K; Sanchez, O S; Juat, N J; Tiangco, B J; Jamias, J D

    2010-11-01

    Malnutrition is common among cancer patients. This study aimed to determine the overall prevalence of malnutrition among patients undergoing chemotherapy and to determine the predictors of malnutrition among cancer patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 88 cancer patients admitted for chemotherapy at the National Kidney and Transplant Institute, Philippines, from October to November 2009. Subjective Global Assessment (SGA), anthropometric data and demographic variables were obtained. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA and logistic regression analysis were performed between the outcome and variables. A total of 88 cancer patients were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 55.7 +/- 14.8 years. The mean duration of illness was 9.7 +/- 8.7 months and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 22.9 kg/m2. The mean Karnofsky performance status was 79.3. 29.55 percent of the patients had breast cancer as the aetiology of their illness. 38 patients (43.2 percent) had SGA B and four (4.5 percent) had SGA C, giving a total malnutrition prevalence of 47.7 percent. The patients were statistically different with regard to their cancer stage (p is less than 0.001), weight (p is 0.01), BMI (p is 0.004), haemoglobin level (p is 0.001) and performance status by Karnofsky score (p is less than 0.001), as evaluated by ANOVA. Logistic regression analysis showed that cancer stage and Karnofsky performance score were predictors of malnutrition. About 47.7 percent of cancer patients suffer from malnutrition, as classified by SGA. Only cancer stage and Karnofsky performance status scoring were predictive of malnutrition in this select group of patients.

  15. Pattern and Distribution of Colorectal Cancer in Tanzania: A Retrospective Chart Audit at Two National Hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katalambula, L. K.; Buza, J.; Mpolya, E.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a growing public health concern with increasing rates in countries with previously known low incidence. This study determined pattern and distribution of CRC in Tanzania and identified hot spots in case distribution. Methods. A retrospective chart audit reviewed hospital registers and patient files from two national institutions. Descriptive statistics, Chi square (x 2 ) tests, and regression analyses were employed and augmented by data visualization to display risk variable differences. Results. CRC cases increased sixfold in the last decade in Tanzania. There was a 1.5% decrease in incidences levels of rectal cancer and 2% increase for colon cancer every year from 2005 to 2015. Nearly half of patients listed Dar es Salaam as their primary residence. CRC was equally distributed between males (50.06%) and females (49.94%), although gender likelihood of diagnosis type (i.e., rectal or colon) was significantly different ( P= 0.027). More than 60% of patients were between 40 and 69 years. Conclusions. Age ( P= 0.0183) and time () but not gender ( P = 0.0864) were significantly associated with rectal cancer in a retrospective study in Tanzania. Gender ( P = 0.0405), age ( P = 0.0015), and time ( P = 0.0075) were all significantly associated with colon cancer in this study. This retrospective study found that colon cancer is more prevalent among males at a relatively younger age than rectal cancer. Further, our study showed that although more patients were diagnosed with rectal cancer, the trend has shown that colon cancer is increasing at a faster rate.

  16. National evaluation of multidisciplinary quality metrics for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, John D; Speedy, Sedona E; Ferris, Robert L; Rademaker, Alfred W; Patel, Urjeet A; Samant, Sandeep

    2017-11-15

    The National Quality Forum has endorsed quality-improvement measures for multiple cancer types that are being developed into actionable tools to improve cancer care. No nationally endorsed quality metrics currently exist for head and neck cancer. The authors identified patients with surgically treated, invasive, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004 to 2014 and compared the rate of adherence to 5 different quality metrics and whether compliance with these quality metrics impacted overall survival. The metrics examined included negative surgical margins, neck dissection lymph node (LN) yield ≥ 18, appropriate adjuvant radiation, appropriate adjuvant chemoradiation, adjuvant therapy within 6 weeks, as well as overall quality. In total, 76,853 eligible patients were identified. There was substantial variability in patient-level adherence, which was 80% for negative surgical margins, 73.1% for neck dissection LN yield, 69% for adjuvant radiation, 42.6% for adjuvant chemoradiation, and 44.5% for adjuvant therapy within 6 weeks. Risk-adjusted Cox proportional-hazard models indicated that all metrics were associated with a reduced risk of death: negative margins (hazard ratio [HR] 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-0.76), LN yield ≥ 18 (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.89-0.96), adjuvant radiation (HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.64-0.70), adjuvant chemoradiation (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.79-0.88), and adjuvant therapy ≤6 weeks (HR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.89-0.96). Patients who received high-quality care had a 19% reduced adjusted hazard of mortality (HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.79-0.83). Five head and neck cancer quality metrics were identified that have substantial variability in adherence and meaningfully impact overall survival. These metrics are appropriate candidates for national adoption. Cancer 2017;123:4372-81. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  17. Readiness for Implementation of Lung Cancer Screening. A National Survey of Veterans Affairs Pulmonologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukey, Melissa H; Clark, Jack A; Bolton, Rendelle; Kelley, Michael J; Slatore, Christopher G; Au, David H; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2016-10-01

    To mitigate the potential harms of screening, professional societies recommend that lung cancer screening be conducted in multidisciplinary programs with the capacity to provide comprehensive care, from screening through pulmonary nodule evaluation to treatment of screen-detected cancers. The degree to which this standard can be met at the national level is unknown. To assess the readiness of clinical facilities in a national healthcare system for implementation of comprehensive lung cancer screening programs, as compared with the ideal described in policy recommendations. This was a cross-sectional, self-administered survey of staff pulmonologists in pulmonary outpatient clinics in Veterans Health Administration facilities. The facility-level response rate was 84.1% (106 of 126 facilities with pulmonary clinics); 88.7% of facilities showed favorable provider perceptions of the evidence for lung cancer screening, and 73.6% of facilities had a favorable provider-perceived local context for screening implementation. All elements of the policy-recommended infrastructure for comprehensive screening programs were present in 36 of 106 facilities (34.0%); the most common deficiencies were the lack of on-site positron emission tomography scanners or radiation oncology services. Overall, 26.5% of Veterans Health Administration facilities were ideally prepared for lung cancer screening implementation (44.1% if the policy recommendations for on-site positron emission tomography scanners and radiation oncology services were waived). Many facilities may be less than ideally positioned for the implementation of comprehensive lung cancer screening programs. To ensure safe, effective screening, hospitals may need to invest resources or coordinate care with facilities that can offer comprehensive care for screening through downstream evaluation and treatment of screen-detected cancers.

  18. Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: The Addition of Systemic Chemotherapy to Radiotherapy Led to an Observed Improvement in Survival—A Single Centre Experience and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie M. Lowe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC is rare yet accounts for up to 50% of all thyroid cancer deaths. This study reviews outcomes of patients with confirmed ATC referred to a tertiary oncology centre plus reviews the literature to explore how poor outcomes may be improved. Materials and Methods. The management and outcomes of 20 patients with ATC were reviewed. Results. Median age at diagnosis was 69.5 years. 19 patients died due to ATC, 40% of whom died from asphyxiation. Median survival for all cases was 59 days. Patients who had previous surgery prior to other treatment modalities had a longer median survival overall compared to those who had not had previous surgery (142 days compared to 59 days and produced the one long-term survivor. Chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy (without previous surgery was associated with longer median survival (220 days. Palliative radiotherapy alone did not decrease the rate of death by asphyxiation when compared to other single modality treatments. Conclusion. Multimodality treatment including surgery when feasible remains the best strategy to improve survival and prevent death from asphyxiation in the management of ATC. The addition of chemotherapy to our institutional protocol led to improved survival but prognosis remains very poor.

  19. Data from a national lung cancer registry contributes to improve outcome and quality of surgery: Danish results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik; Palshof, Torben; Østerlind, Kell

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In 1998 The Danish Lung Cancer Group published the first edition of guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. A national registry was implemented in the year 2000 with the primary objective to monitor the implementation of these guidelines and nationwide to secure and impr......OBJECTIVE: In 1998 The Danish Lung Cancer Group published the first edition of guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. A national registry was implemented in the year 2000 with the primary objective to monitor the implementation of these guidelines and nationwide to secure...... has decreased from 23% to 11%. The proportion of patients having surgery within 14 days from referral has increased from 69% to 87%. CONCLUSIONS: Establishment of a national lung cancer group with the primary tasks to implement updated national guidelines and to secure valid registration of clinical...

  20. International research centre launched

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    ), and (secretary) Prof. A. Sanielevici (IAEA). Prof. Salam is Director of the research centre, and Prof. Budini Deputy Director. Establishment of the Centre was first proposed in 1960, and after plans had been worked out, the IAEA Board of Governors approved the programme in June 1963. The Italian Government has lent its support and co-operation ; it is providing a building for the needs of the Centre, and staff housing, and is supplying staff services and $28,000 a year for fellowships as well as an annual contribution of $250,000 for five years. The IAEA Budget for 1965 includes a similar amount of $278,000 for the Centre. The Centre plans to work in close collaboration with the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN); the United Nations Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organisation is also a party to the Centre and is making contributions

  1. The pattern of substance use disorder in the United Arab Emirates in 2015: results of a National Rehabilitation Centre cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alblooshi, Hiba; Hulse, Gary K; El Kashef, Ahmed; Al Hashmi, Hanan; Shawky, Mansour; Al Ghaferi, Hamad; Al Safar, Habiba; Tay, Guan K

    2016-05-13

    Substance use disorder (SUD) is a global problem with no boundaries, which also afflicts individuals from countries of the Arabian Peninsula. Data from this region is limited. In an effort to develop targeted prevention and intervention initiatives in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), it was necessary to identify the nature of substance use by describing the characteristics of those using different substances. Consequently, this study in the UAE was conceived to describe the pattern of SUD in a first-ever cohort that was systematically recruited from the country's National Rehabilitation Centre (NRC) in Abu Dhabi. Two hundred and fifty male patients were recruited from the NRC. Information on substance use was collected using a questionnaire that was completed at an interview with patients who consented to participate. The questionnaire was based on information that the study was designed to capture. It was reviewed by members of institutional ethics committees and approved prior to use. Two hundred and fifty male subjects from the Emirates Family Registry (EFR) were used as a comparison group. In the cohort studied, SUD correlated with smoking and marital status. Poly-substance users formed the majority of the cohort (84.4 %) with various combinations of substances identified across different age groups. Opioid and alcohol were the most common substances used. The use of pharmaceutical opioids, primarily Tramadol (67.2 % of opioid users), was higher among the youngest age group studied (<30 years old), while older opioid users (≥30 years old) commonly used illicit opioids (Heroin). The use of prescribed medication for non-medical use also included Pregabalin (mean of 8.3 capsules ± 0.5 per day), Procyclidin (6.1 tablets + 0.6 per day) and Carisoprodol (4.2 tablets ± 0.4 per day) and was again highest in the age group below 30 years. This 2015 study highlights the importance of examining the pattern of poly-substance use in a population in order

  2. Treatment Outcome of Carcinoma Vulva Ten-Year Experience from a Tertiary Cancer Centre in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakthiushadevi Jeevarajan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Carcinoma vulva is a rare disease accounting for 1.3% of all gynaecological malignancies. The present study is a 10-year retrospective review of our experience of the surgical options, morbidity, failure pattern, and survival for invasive carcinoma vulva. Materials and Methods. Retrospective analysis of case records of 39 patients who underwent surgery for invasive vulval cancer between 2004 and 2013 in the Department of Surgical Oncology at the Government Royapettah Hospital, Chennai. Results. The median age was 55 years. Radical vulvectomy was the preferred surgery. 31 patients underwent lymphadenectomy. Seroma formation and groin skin necrosis were the most common postoperative complications. With a median follow-up of 32 months, 8 patients (20.5% developed recurrence (systemic = 1, regional = 4, and local = 3. The estimated 5-year disease-free survival (DFS was 65.4% and the overall survival (OS was 85.1%. On univariate analysis, stage and lymph node involvement significantly affected OS. Nodal involvement with extracapsular spread (ECS significantly affected both DFS and OS. Conclusion. The treatment of carcinoma vulva should be individualized with multidisciplinary cooperation. The paucity of data, especially from India, necessitates the need for more studies, preferably multicentric, keeping in mind the low prevalence.

  3. Treatment Outcome of Carcinoma Vulva Ten-Year Experience from a Tertiary Cancer Centre in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, Sakthiushadevi; Duraipandian, Amudhan; Kottayasamy Seenivasagam, Rajkumar; Shanmugam, Subbiah; Ramamurthy, Rajaraman

    2017-01-01

    Carcinoma vulva is a rare disease accounting for 1.3% of all gynaecological malignancies. The present study is a 10-year retrospective review of our experience of the surgical options, morbidity, failure pattern, and survival for invasive carcinoma vulva. Retrospective analysis of case records of 39 patients who underwent surgery for invasive vulval cancer between 2004 and 2013 in the Department of Surgical Oncology at the Government Royapettah Hospital, Chennai. The median age was 55 years. Radical vulvectomy was the preferred surgery. 31 patients underwent lymphadenectomy. Seroma formation and groin skin necrosis were the most common postoperative complications. With a median follow-up of 32 months, 8 patients (20.5%) developed recurrence (systemic = 1, regional = 4, and local = 3). The estimated 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 65.4% and the overall survival (OS) was 85.1%. On univariate analysis, stage and lymph node involvement significantly affected OS. Nodal involvement with extracapsular spread (ECS) significantly affected both DFS and OS. The treatment of carcinoma vulva should be individualized with multidisciplinary cooperation. The paucity of data, especially from India, necessitates the need for more studies, preferably multicentric, keeping in mind the low prevalence.

  4. Relationship between Metabolic Syndrome and History of Cervical Cancer among a US National Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaranda, Eribeth K; Shokar, Navkiran; Ortiz, Melchor

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic changes present in the metabolic syndrome (MetS) have been associated with increased risk of pancreatic and colon cancers; however, there is little information about the association between MetS and cervical cancer risk. We performed a case-control study using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) between 1999-2010. We identified women 21 years of age and older, of which an estimated 585,924 (2.3% of the sample) self-reported a history of cervical cancer (cases). About half (48.6%) of cases and 33.2% of controls met criteria for MetS. Logistic regression analysis showed increased odds of history of cervical cancer among women with MetS (OR = 1.9; 95% CI 1.06, 3.42; P value ≤ 0.05) for the risk of history of cervical cancer among women with MetS while adjusting for other known risk factors (high number of lifetime sexual partners, multiparty, history of hormonal contraceptive use, and history of smoking) (AOR = 1.82; 95% CI 1.02, 3.26; P value ≤ 0.05). In this US surveyed population we found increased odds of history of cervical cancer among subjects with MetS.

  5. Factors Affecting Adjuvant Therapy in Stage III Pancreatic Cancer—Analysis of the National Cancer Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridula Krishnan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adjuvant therapy after curative resection is associated with survival benefit in stage III pancreatic cancer. We analyzed the factors affecting the outcome of adjuvant therapy in stage III pancreatic cancer and compared overall survival with different modalities of adjuvant treatment. Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients with stage III pancreatic cancer listed in the National Cancer Database (NCDB who were diagnosed between 2004 and 2012. Patients were stratified based on adjuvant therapy they received. Unadjusted Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression analysis were performed. Results: We analyzed a cohort included 1731 patients who were recipients of adjuvant therapy for stage III pancreatic cancer within the limits of our database. Patients who received adjuvant chemoradiation had the longest postdiagnosis survival time, followed by patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy, and finally patients who received no adjuvant therapy. On multivariate analysis, advancing age and patients with Medicaid had worse survival, whereas Spanish origin and lower Charlson comorbidity score had better survival. Conclusions: Our study is the largest trial using the NCDB addressing the effects of adjuvant therapy specifically in stage III pancreatic cancer. Within the limits of our study, survival benefit with adjuvant therapy was more apparent with longer duration from date of diagnosis.

  6. Impact of national guidelines on brachytherapy monotherapy practice patterns for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yolanda D; Paciorek, Alan T; Martin, Neil E; D'Amico, Anthony V; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Nguyen, Paul L

    2014-03-15

    In 1999 and 2000, 2 national guidelines recommended brachytherapy monotherapy (BT) primarily for treatment of low-risk prostate cancer but not high-risk prostate cancer. This study examined rates of BT use before and after publication of these guidelines, as compared with 4 other treatment options. From 1990 to 2011, 8128 men with localized prostate cancer (≤ T3cN0M0) were treated definitively within the Cancer of the Prostate Strategic Urologic Research Endeavor (CaPSURE) registry with 1 of 5 primary treatments: BT, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), EBRT with androgen deprivation therapy, EBRT+BT, or radical prostatectomy. Men were categorized into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups based on the guidelines' risk-group definitions. Within each risk group, logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) comparing BT with other treatment options between the 1990-1998 and 1999-2011 periods, adjusting for age, disease characteristics, and clinic type. In total, 1117 men received BT alone for low- (n = 658), intermediate- (n = 244), or high-risk disease (n = 215). BT comprised 6.1% of all treatments in 1990-1998 versus 16.6% in 1999-2011 (P guidelines did not appear to influence practice patterns, as BT monotherapy use increased relative to other treatments from the 1990-1998 to 1999-2011 periods in unfavorable risk groups including men with high-risk prostate cancer. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  7. Dysphagia training after head and neck cancer fails to follow legislation and national recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredslund, Sara Vinther; Høgdal, Nina; Christensen, Malene Bæk

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dysphagia is a known sequela after head and neck cancer (HNC) and causes malnutrition, aspiration pneumonia and a reduced quality of life. Due to improved survival rates, the number of patients with sequelae is increasing. Evidence on the ideal HNC-specific rehabilitation of dysphagia...... is lacking, but several studies indicate that early initiation is crucial. The aim of this study was to map the existing dysphagia rehabilitation programmes for HNC patients in Denmark. METHODS: Occupational therapists (OTs), oncologists and surgeons from five hospitals participated in a nationwide...... questionnaire-based survey, along with OTs from 39 municipal health centres. RESULTS: HNC patients rarely receive preventive occupational therapy before treatment, and hospital-based OTs mainly attend to HNC patients undergoing surgery. Far from all oncology and surgical departments complete the required...

  8. Cancer survival for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians: a national study of survival rates and excess mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, John R; Zhang, Xiaohua; Baade, Peter; Griffiths, Kalinda; Cunningham, Joan; Roder, David M; Coory, Michael; Jelfs, Paul L; Threlfall, Tim

    2014-01-31

    National cancer survival statistics are available for the total Australian population but not Indigenous Australians, although their cancer mortality rates are known to be higher than those of other Australians. We aimed to validate analysis methods and report cancer survival rates for Indigenous Australians as the basis for regular national reporting. We used national cancer registrations data to calculate all-cancer and site-specific relative survival for Indigenous Australians (compared with non-Indigenous Australians) diagnosed in 2001-2005. Because of limited availability of Indigenous life tables, we validated and used cause-specific survival (rather than relative survival) for proportional hazards regression to analyze time trends and regional variation in all-cancer survival between 1991 and 2005. Survival was lower for Indigenous than non-Indigenous Australians for all cancers combined and for many cancer sites. The excess mortality of Indigenous people with cancer was restricted to the first three years after diagnosis, and greatest in the first year. Survival was lower for rural and remote than urban residents; this disparity was much greater for Indigenous people. Survival improved between 1991 and 2005 for non-Indigenous people (mortality decreased by 28%), but to a much lesser extent for Indigenous people (11%) and only for those in remote areas; cancer survival did not improve for urban Indigenous residents. Cancer survival is lower for Indigenous than other Australians, for all cancers combined and many individual cancer sites, although more accurate recording of Indigenous status by cancer registers is required before the extent of this disadvantage can be known with certainty. Cancer care for Indigenous Australians needs to be considerably improved; cancer diagnosis, treatment, and support services need to be redesigned specifically to be accessible and acceptable to Indigenous people.

  9. The impact of distance and duration of travel on participation rates and participants' satisfaction: results from a pilot study at one study centre in Pretest 2 of the German National Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Aparna; Akmatov, Manas K; Kindler, Florentina; Kemmling, Yvonne; Kreienbrock, Lothar; Krause, Gérard; Pessler, Frank

    2015-08-21

    In this pilot study within the Pretest 2 phase of the German National Cohort, we aimed to (1) test the hypothesis that distance and duration of travel to a study centre may affect participation rates and participants' satisfaction and (2) to obtain data that would help to select recruitment areas around the study centre Hannover with the greatest projected participation rate for the main study. Mixed urban/suburban environment in Northern Germany with approximately 600,000 inhabitants. 4 recruitment areas with divergent estimated mean distances (range, 7-40 km) and duration of travel to the study centre Hannover were selected. 1050 men and women (ratio, 1:1), aged 20-69 years, were randomly selected from the population registries of the 4 recruitment areas and invited by mail to participate in the Pretest 2 study programme at the study centre Hannover, covering a variety of questionnaire-based and physical assessments. 166 individuals participated (16%). All 166 participants completed a travel questionnaire containing 5 items relating to travel duration and satisfaction, amounting to a participation rate of 100% in the questionnaire-based part of the study. Participation rates in the Pretest 2 programme at the study centre Hannover by area ranged from 11% (area farthest from the study centre, estimated median distance 38 km) to 18% (nearest area, 2 km). The odds of non-participation were highest in the area farthest from the study centre (adjusted OR 2.06; p=0.01; CI 1.28 to 3.32). Nonetheless, 97% of participants were satisfied with travel duration. Increasing distance was associated with a lower participation rate. However, acceptance of duration of travel was high, irrespective of distance or duration. Thus, recruiting in farther away locations may select individuals with a greater frustration tolerance for travel to the study centre, perhaps due to a greater interest in participating in health-oriented studies and thus different health-related behaviour

  10. National Nuclear Research Institute Annual Report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The report highlights the activities of the National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission for the year 2013, grouped under the following headings: Centres under the institute namely Nuclear Reactors Research Centre (NRRC); Accelerator Research Centre (ARC); Engineering Services Centre (ESC); National Radioactive Waste Management Centre (NRWMC); Nuclear Chemistry and Environmental Research Centre (NCERC); Nuclear Applications Centre (NAC) and National Data Centre (NDC). (A. B.)

  11. Adjuvant chemo radiation in completely resected gastric cancer: experience of the National Cancer Institute of Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isa O, Nicolas; Russo N, Moises; Lopez V, Hernan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gastric cancer is one of the most lethal tumors in the Chilean population. Aim: To report the results of adjuvant chemoradiotherapy in advanced gastric cancer. Material and Methods: Review of medical records of patients with locoregionally advanced gastric cancer, subjected to a curative resection and treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The treatment was based on he INT 0116/SSWOG protocol, which includes 5-fluorouracil as a single agent. Patients were followed for a median of 58 months. Results: The records of 168 patients (99 men) treated between 2004 nd 2011, were reviewed. Median survival as 41 months. Median lapses between surgery and onset of chemo and radiotherapy were 12 and 17 weeks, respectively. Overall three and five years survival was 53 and 41%, respectively. On multivariate analysis the factors associated with a lower survival were an antral location of the tumor, presence of signet ring cells and more than 5 involved lymph nodes. Conclusions: Three and five years survival of gastric cancer patients subjected to adjuvant chemoradiotherapy was 53 and 41% respectively.These results are similar to those reported elsewhere

  12. 2014 Korean Liver Cancer Study Group-National Cancer Center Korea Practice Guideline for the Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The guideline for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was first developed in 2003 and revised in 2009 by the Korean Liver Cancer Study Group and the National Cancer Center, Korea. Since then, many studies on HCC have been carried out in Korea and other countries. In particular, a substantial body of knowledge has been accumulated on diagnosis, staging, and treatment specific to Asian characteristics, especially Koreans, prompting the proposal of new strategies. Accordingly, the new guideline presented herein was developed on the basis of recent evidence and expert opinions. The primary targets of this guideline are patients with suspicious or newly diagnosed HCC. This guideline provides recommendations for the initial treatment of patients with newly diagnosed HCC. PMID:25995680

  13. Therapy Related AML/MDS Following Treatment for Childhood Cancer: Experience from a Tertiary Care Centre in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Chintan; Jain, Sandeep; Kapoor, Gauri

    2018-01-01

    Therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (t-AML/MDS) is a devastating late effect of cancer treatment. There is limited data on incidence of t-AML/MDS from India. We retrospectively studied pediatric t AML/MDS at our institute between January 1996 and December 2015. Among 1285 children, 8 patients developed t-AML with a median age of 15.5 years. Overall incidence of t-AML/MDS was 0.62% [0.99% (4/402) in solid tumours and 0.45% (4/883) in leukemia/lymphoma, P  = 0.26] with 6390 patient years of follow up. Primary malignancy included sarcoma [bone (2), soft tissue (2)], B-non-Hodgkin lymphoma (2) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (2). The median cumulative equivalent doses of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and etoposide were 6.8, 270 and 2.5 gm/m 2 respectively. Two patients received radiotherapy [rhabdomyosarcoma (50 Gy), synovial sarcoma (45 Gy)]. The median latency period to develop t-AML/MDS was 24 months (range 16.5-62 months). Most common FAB morphology was M4/M5 (7/8) and cytogenetic abnormality was MLL rearrangement (4/8). Five patients opted for treatment, 4 achieved remission out of which 2 patients are alive and disease free. Short latency periods, absence of pre-leukemic phase and 11q23 translocations were characteristic in the patients with t-AML/MDS. In view of poor outcome with conventional therapy, novel strategies and prevention need to be considered.

  14. Inhalative steroids as an individual treatment in symptomatic lung cancer patients with radiation pneumonitis grade II after radiotherapy – a single-centre experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henkenberens, C.; Janssen, S.; Lavae-Mokhtari, M.; Leni, K.; Meyer, A.; Christiansen, H.; Bremer, M.; Dickgreber, N.

    2016-01-01

    To assess efficacy of our single-centre experience with inhalative steroids (IS) in lung cancer patients with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) grade II. Between 05/09 and 07/10, 24 patients (female, n = 8; male, n = 16) with lung cancer (non-small cell lung carcinoma [NSCLC]: n = 19; small cell lung cancer [SCLC]: n = 3; unknown histology: n = 2) and good performance status (ECOG ≤1) received definitive radiotherapy to the primary tumour site and involved lymph nodes with concurrent chemotherapy (n = 18), sequential chemotherapy (n = 2) or radiation only (n = 4) and developed symptomatic RP grade II during follow-up. No patient presented with oxygen requiring RP grade III. The mean age at diagnosis was 66 years (range: 50–82 years). Nine patients suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) before treatment, and 18 patients had a smoking history (median pack years: 48). The mean lung dose was 15.5 Gy (range: 3.0–23.1 Gy). All patients were treated with IS. If a patient’s clinical symptoms did not significantly improve within two weeks of IS therapy initiation, their treatment was switched to oral prednisolone. All 24 patients were initially treated with a high dose IS (budesonide 800 μg 1-0-1) for 14 days. Of the patients, 18 showed a significant improvement of clinical symptoms and 6 patients did not show significant improvement of clinical symptoms and were classified as non-responders to IS. Their treatment was switched to oral steroids after two weeks (starting with oral prednisolone, 0.5 mg/kg bodyweight; at least 50 mg per day). All of these patients responded to the prednisolone. None of non-responders presented with increased symptoms of RP and required oxygen and / or hospitalization (RP grade III). The median follow-up after IS treatment initiation was 18 months (range: 4–66 months). The median duration of IS treatment and prednisolone treatment was 8.2 months (range: 3.0–48.3 months) and 11.4 months (range: 5.0–44

  15. Improving quality of breast cancer surgery through development of a national breast cancer surgical outcomes (BRCASO research database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiello Bowles Erin J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common measures of surgical quality are 30-day morbidity and mortality, which poorly describe breast cancer surgical quality with extremely low morbidity and mortality rates. Several national quality programs have collected additional surgical quality measures; however, program participation is voluntary and results may not be generalizable to all surgeons. We developed the Breast Cancer Surgical Outcomes (BRCASO database to capture meaningful breast cancer surgical quality measures among a non-voluntary sample, and study variation in these measures across providers, facilities, and health plans. This paper describes our study protocol, data collection methods, and summarizes the strengths and limitations of these data. Methods We included 4524 women ≥18 years diagnosed with breast cancer between 2003-2008. All women with initial breast cancer surgery performed by a surgeon employed at the University of Vermont or three Cancer Research Network (CRN health plans were eligible for inclusion. From the CRN institutions, we collected electronic administrative data including tumor registry information, Current Procedure Terminology codes for breast cancer surgeries, surgeons, surgical facilities, and patient demographics. We supplemented electronic data with medical record abstraction to collect additional pathology and surgery detail. All data were manually abstracted at the University of Vermont. Results The CRN institutions pre-filled 30% (22 out of 72 of elements using electronic data. The remaining elements, including detailed pathology margin status and breast and lymph node surgeries, required chart abstraction. The mean age was 61 years (range 20-98 years; 70% of women were diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma, 20% with ductal carcinoma in situ, and 10% with invasive lobular carcinoma. Conclusions The BRCASO database is one of the largest, multi-site research resources of meaningful breast cancer surgical quality data

  16. The prognostic value of lymph node ratio in a national cohort of rectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, J; Jess, P; Roikjaer, O

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the prognostic implications of the lymph node ratio (LNR) in curative resected rectal cancer. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: It has been proposed that the LNR has a high prognostic impact in colorectal cancer, but the lymph node ratio has not been evaluated exclusively for rectal......-adjuvant treatment had been given. RESULTS: In a multivariate analysis the pN status, ypN status and lymph node yield were found to be independent prognostic factors for overall survival, irrespective of neo-adjuvant therapy. The LNR was also found to be a significant prognostic factor with a Hazard Ratio ranging...... cancer in a large national cohort study. METHODS: All 6793 patients in Denmark diagnosed with stage I to III adenocarcinoma of the rectum, and so treated in the period from 2003 to 2011, were included in the analysis. The cohort was divided into two groups according to whether or not neo...

  17. Vaginal Radical Trachelectomy for early stage cervical cancer. Results of the Danish National Single Center Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerberg, L; Høgdall, C; Loft, A

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present and evaluate an unselected national single center strategy with fertility preserving trachelectomy in cervical cancer. In 2003 nationwide single-center referral of women for trachelectomies was agreed upon between all Danish departments performing cervical cancer surgery...... a total of 77 pregnancies. Of the 72 women 40 were referred to fertility treatment. First and second trimester miscarriage rates were 21.6% and 2.7%, respectively. A total of 53 children were born of which 41 were delivered after gestational week 34. CONCLUSION: This unselected national single center...... of 120 unselected consecutive VRTs were assessed. To obtain complete follow-up about fertility treatment, pregnancy and obstetric outcome the women filled out an electronic questionnaire. Median follow-up: 55.7 months. RESULTS: 85.8% of the patients had stage IB1 disease, 68.3% squamous cell carcinomas...

  18. Environmental dose in the Nuclear Medicine Department of the National Institute of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres U, C. L.; Avila A, O. L.; Medina V, L. A.; Buenfil B, A. E.; Brandan S, M. E.; Trujillo Z, F. E.; Gamboa de Buen, I.

    2009-01-01

    The dosimeters TLD-100 and TLD-900 were used to know the levels of environmental dose in areas of the Nuclear Medicine Department of the National Institute of Cancer. The dosimeters calibration was carried out in the Metrology Department of the National Institute of Nuclear Research. The radioisotopes used in the studied areas are 131 I, 18 F, 67 Ga, 99m Tc, 111 In, 201 Tl and 137 Cs with gamma energies between 93 and 662 KeV. Dosimeters were placed during five months in the diagnostic, injection, waiting and PET rooms as well as hot room, waste room, enclosed corridors to patient rooms treated with 131 I and 137 Cs and witness dosimeters to know the bottom. The values found vary between 0.3 and 70 major times that those of bottom. The maximum doses were measured in the waste room and in the enclosed corridor to the patient rooms with cervical uterine cancer treated with 137 Cs. (Author)

  19. Time trends, improvements and national auditing of rectal cancer management over an 18-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodeda, K; Johansson, R; Zar, N; Birgisson, H; Dahlberg, M; Skullman, S; Lindmark, G; Glimelius, B; Påhlman, L; Martling, A

    2015-09-01

    The main aims were to explore time trends in the management and outcome of patients with rectal cancer in a national cohort and to evaluate the possible impact of national auditing on overall outcomes. A secondary aim was to provide population-based data for appraisal of external validity in selected patient series. Data from the Swedish ColoRectal Cancer Registry with virtually complete national coverage were utilized in this cohort study on 29 925 patients with rectal cancer diagnosed between 1995 and 2012. Of eligible patients, nine were excluded. During the study period, overall, relative and disease-free survival increased. Postoperative mortality after 30 and 90 days decreased to 1.7% and 2.9%. The 5-year local recurrence rate dropped to 5.0%. Resection margins improved, as did peri-operative blood loss despite more multivisceral resections being performed. Fewer patients underwent palliative resection and the proportion of non-operated patients increased. The proportions of temporary and permanent stoma formation increased. Preoperative radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy became more common as did multidisciplinary team conferences. Variability in rectal cancer management between healthcare regions diminished over time when new aspects of patient care were audited. There have been substantial changes over time in the management of patients with rectal cancer, reflected in improved outcome. Much indirect evidence indicates that auditing matters, but without a control group it is not possible to draw firm conclusions regarding the possible impact of a quality control registry on faster shifts in time trends, decreased variability and improvements. Registry data were made available for reference. Colorectal Disease © 2015 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. Radiation Dose Escalation in Esophageal Cancer Revisited: A Contemporary Analysis of the National Cancer Data Base, 2004 to 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Jeffrey V. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Chen, Shuai [Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bassetti, Michael F. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Yu, Menggang [Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Harari, Paul M.; Ritter, Mark A. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Baschnagel, Andrew M., E-mail: baschnagel@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of radiation dose escalation on overall survival (OS) for patients with nonmetastatic esophageal cancer treated with concurrent radiation and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with stage I to III esophageal cancer treated from 2004 to 2012 were identified from the National Cancer Data Base. Patients who received concurrent radiation and chemotherapy with radiation doses of ≥50 Gy and did not undergo surgery were included. OS was compared using Cox proportional hazards regression and propensity score matching. Results: A total of 6854 patients were included; 3821 (55.7%) received 50 to 50.4 Gy and 3033 (44.3%) received doses >50.4 Gy. Univariate analysis revealed no significant difference in OS between patients receiving 50 to 50.4 Gy and those receiving >50.4 Gy (P=.53). The dose analysis, binned as 50 to 50.4, 51 to 54, 55 to 60, and >60 Gy, revealed no appreciable difference in OS within any group compared with 50 to 50.4 Gy. Subgroup analyses investigating the effect of dose escalation by histologic type and in the setting of intensity modulated radiation therapy also failed to reveal a benefit. Propensity score matching confirmed the absence of a statistically significant difference in OS among the dose levels. The factors associated with improved OS on multivariable analysis included female sex, lower Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score, private insurance, cervical/upper esophagus location, squamous cell histologic type, lower T stage, and node-negative status (P<.01 for all analyses). Conclusions: In this large national cohort, dose escalation >50.4 Gy did not result in improved OS among patients with stage I to III esophageal cancer treated with definitive concurrent radiation and chemotherapy. These data suggest that despite advanced contemporary treatment techniques, OS for patients with esophageal cancer remains unaltered by escalation of radiation dose >50.4 Gy, consistent with the results of

  1. The importance of dietary change for men diagnosed with and at risk of prostate cancer: a multi-centre interview study with men, their partners and health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Kerry N L; Donovan, Jenny L; Horwood, Jeremy; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Parker, Chris; Wade, Julia; Lane, Athene

    2014-05-03

    The diagnosis of prostate cancer (PC) can provide a trigger for dietary change, and there is evidence that healthier diets may improve quality of life and clinical outcomes. However, men's views about dietary change in PC survivorship are largely unknown. This multi-centre qualitative interview study explored men's views about dietary change in PC survivorship, to better understand motivations for, and barriers to, achieving desired changes. The role of radical and active surveillance treatments on dietary change and the influence of men's partners were examined. Focus groups also evaluated stakeholder opinion, including healthcare professionals, about the provision of dietary advice to PC patients. A multi-centre interview study explored views about diet and motivations for, and barriers to, dietary change in men at elevated risk or diagnosed with PC following prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing. 58 men and 11 partners were interviewed. Interviews and focus groups were undertaken with 11 healthcare professionals, 5 patients and 4 partners to evaluate stakeholders' opinions about the feasibility and acceptability of providing dietary advice to PC patients. Data were analysed using methods of constant comparison and thematic analysis. Over half of diagnosed men reported making dietary changes, primarily to promote general or prostate health or facilitate coping, despite their uncertainty about diet-PC links. Interest in dietary advice was high. Information needs varied depending on treatment received, with men on active surveillance more frequently modifying their diet and regarding this as an adjunct therapy. Men considered their partners integral to implementing changes. Provision of dietary advice to men diagnosed with PC was considered by healthcare professionals and men to be feasible and appropriate in the context of a holistic 'care package'. Many men make positive dietary changes after PC diagnosis, which are perceived by men and their partners to bring

  2. Evaluation of data quality at the National Cancer Registry of Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhov, Anton; Bray, Freddie; Ferlay, Jacques; Fedorenko, Zoya; Goulak, Liudmyla; Gorokh, Yevgeniy; Soumkina, Olena; Znaor, Ariana

    2018-04-01

    Cancer notification has been mandatory in Ukraine since 1953, with the National Cancer Registry of Ukraine (NCRU) established in 1996. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the data quality at the NCRU. Qualitative and semi-quantitative methods were used to assess the comparability, completeness, validity and timeliness of cancer incidence data from the NCRU for the period 2002-2012. Cancer registration procedures at the NCRU are in accordance with international standards and recommendations. Semi-quantitative methods suggested the NCRU's data was reasonably complete, although decreases in age-specific incidence and mortality rates in the elderly indicated some missing cases at older ages. The proportion of microscopically-verified cases increased from 73.6% in 2002 to 82.3% in 2012, with death-certificate-only (DCO) proportions stable at around 0.1% and unknown stage recorded in 9.6% of male and 7.5% of female solid tumours. Timeliness was considered acceptable, with reporting >99% complete within a turn-around time of 15 months. While timely reporting of national data reflects the advantages of a mandatory data collection system, a low DCO% and observed age-specific declines suggest possible underreporting of incidence and mortality data, particularly at older ages. Overall, the evaluation indicates that the data are reasonably comparable and thus may be used to describe the magnitude of the cancer burden in Ukraine. Given its central role in monitoring and evaluation of cancer control activities, ensuring the sustainability of NCRU operations throughout the process of healthcare system reform is of utmost importance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer in Australia and New Zealand: Report on a survey of radiotherapy centres and the proceedings of a consensus workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, K.-H.; Duchesne, G.; See, A.; Berry, M.

    2004-01-01

    There is an increasing use of 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in the radiotherapeutic management of prostate cancer. The Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group carried out a survey of Australian and New Zealand radiotherapy centres in the preparation of a consensus workshop. Of the 19 centres that were represented, there were 24 radiation oncologists, 16 radiation therapists and 12 medical physicists. The survey collected demographic information and data on the practices undertaken at those centres when delivering curative radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. There was much variation in the delivery of treatment in the areas of patient set-up, contouring of target volumes and organs of interest during computer planning, the techniques and the dose constraints used in these techniques, the use of adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy and the quality assurance processes used in monitoring effects of treatment. This variability reflects the range of data in the published literature. Emerging trends of practices were also identified. This is a first report on a multi-disciplinary approach to the development of guidelines in 3DCRT of prostate cancer. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  4. Clinical auditing as an instrument for quality improvement in breast cancer care in the Netherlands : The national NABON Breast Cancer Audit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bommel, Annelotte C.M.; Spronk, Pauline E.R.; Vrancken Peeters, Marie-Jeanne T.F.D.; Jager, Agnes; Lobbes, Marc; Maduro, John H.; Mureau, Marc A.M.; Schreuder, Kay; Smorenburg, Carolien; Verloop, Janneke; Westenend, Pieter J.; Wouters, Michel W.J.M.; Siesling, Sabine; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C.G.; van Dalen, Thijs

    2017-01-01

    Background In 2011, the NABON Breast Cancer Audit (NBCA) was instituted as a nation-wide audit to address quality of breast cancer care and guideline adherence in the Netherlands. The development of the NBCA and the results of 4 years of auditing are described. Methods Clinical and pathological

  5. Australia's National Bowel Cancer Screening Program: does it work for Indigenous Australians?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katzenellenbogen Judith M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a lower incidence of bowel cancer overall, Indigenous Australians are more likely to be diagnosed at an advanced stage when prognosis is poor. Bowel cancer screening is an effective means of reducing incidence and mortality from bowel cancer through early identification and prompt treatment. In 2006, Australia began rolling out a population-based National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP using the Faecal Occult Blood Test. Initial evaluation of the program revealed substantial disparities in bowel cancer screening uptake with Indigenous Australians significantly less likely to participate in screening than the non-Indigenous population. This paper critically reviews characteristics of the program which may contribute to the discrepancy in screening uptake, and includes an analysis of organisational, structural, and socio-cultural barriers that play a part in the poorer participation of Indigenous and other disadvantaged and minority groups. Methods A search was undertaken of peer-reviewed journal articles, government reports, and other grey literature using electronic databases and citation snowballing. Articles were critically evaluated for relevance to themes that addressed the research questions. Results The NBCSP is not reaching many Indigenous Australians in the target group, with factors contributing to sub-optimal participation including how participants are selected, the way the screening kit is distributed, the nature of the test and comprehensiveness of its contents, cultural perceptions of cancer and prevailing low levels of knowledge and awareness of bowel cancer and the importance of screening. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the population-based approach to implementing bowel cancer screening to the Australian population unintentionally excludes vulnerable minorities, particularly Indigenous and other culturally and linguistically diverse groups. This potentially contributes to exacerbating

  6. Lumboaortic radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer. Experience of the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santini B, Alejandro; Becerra S, Sergio; Gayan G, Patricio; Carcamo I, Marcela; Bianchi G, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Background: Uterine cancer is still a prevalent disease in Chile. Is common to treat patients with tumors in stages IIB and IIIB where the risk of pelvic and paraortic limph node involvement is very high. Its treatment is radio-chemotherapy. Objective: To present a retrospective analysis of patients that suffered cervix-uterine cancer who were treated with radiotherapy including the aortic-lumbar area. Methods: From the revision of patients who were treated of cervix-uterine cancer between the years 1995 and 2007, 39 were treated including aortic-lumbar chains. Evolution and toxicity were analyzed. Two radiotherapy techniques were used. The first one, during the nineties, included two parallel previous and later and opposed fields, and a second technique, currently used, where pelvis and paraortic are radiated at the same time through four lateral (AP-PA) fields. Results: The dosimeter analysis of both techniques shows that there is a higher volume of radiated normal tissue with the two fields techniques, mainly in the small bowel. On the other hand, the toxicity was significantly different being today's technique less toxic and showing low gastrointestinal

  7. Nonmelanoma skin cancer visits and procedure patterns in a nationally representative sample: national ambulatory medical care survey 1995-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysong, Ashley; Linos, Eleni; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Arron, Sarah T; Gladstone, Hayes; Tang, Jean Y

    2013-04-01

    The rising incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is well documented, but data are limited on the number of visits and treatment patterns of NMSC in the outpatient setting. To evaluate practice and treatment patterns of NMSC in the United States over the last decade and to characterize differences according to sex, age, race, insurance type, and physician specialty. Adults with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, diagnosis of NMSC were included in this cross-sectional survey study of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey between 1995 and 2007. Primary outcomes included population-adjusted NMSC visit rates and odds ratios of receiving a procedure for NMSC using logistic regression. Rates of NMSC visits increased between 1995 and 2007. The number of visits was significantly higher in men, particularly those aged 65 and older. Fifty-nine percent of NMSC visits were associated with a procedure, and the individuals associated with that visit were more likely to be male, to be seen by a dermatologist, and to have private-pay insurance. Nonmelanoma skin cancer visit rates increased from 1995 to 2007 and were higher in men than women. Visits to a dermatologist are more likely to be associated with a procedure for NMSC, and there may be discrepancies in treatment patterns based on insurance type and sex. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cost of Services Provided by the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekwueme, Donatus U.; Subramanian, Sujha; Trogdon, Justin G.; Miller, Jacqueline W.; Royalty, Janet E.; Li, Chunyu; Guy, Gery P.; Crouse, Wesley; Thompson, Hope; Gardner, James G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) is the largest cancer screening program for low-income women in the United States. This study updates previous estimates of the costs of delivering preventive cancer screening services in the NBCCEDP. METHODS We developed a standardized web-based cost-assessment tool to collect annual activity-based cost data on screening for breast and cervical cancer in the NBCCEDP. Data were collected from 63 of the 66 programs that received funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the 2006/2007 fiscal year. We used these data to calculate costs of delivering preventive public health services in the program. RESULTS We estimated the total cost of all NBCCEDP services to be $296 (standard deviation [SD], $123) per woman served (including the estimated value of in-kind donations, which constituted approximately 15% of this total estimated cost). The estimated cost of screening and diagnostic services was $145 (SD, $38) per women served, which represented 57.7% of the total cost excluding the value of in-kind donations. Including the value of in-kind donations, the weighted mean cost of screening a woman for breast cancer was $110 with an office visit and $88 without, the weighted mean cost of a diagnostic procedure was $401, and the weighted mean cost per breast cancer detected was $35,480. For cervical cancer, the corresponding cost estimates were $61, $21, $415, and $18,995, respectively. CONCLUSIONS These NBCCEDP cost estimates may help policy makers in planning and implementing future costs for various potential changes to the program. PMID:25099904

  9. Can the National Health Service Cancer Plan timeline be applied to colorectal hepatic metastases?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jones, Claire

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The National Health Service (NHS) Cancer Plan guidelines recommend a maximum 2-week wait from referral to first appointment, and 2 months from referral to treatment for primary cancers. However, there are currently no guidelines available for metastatic disease. In the UK, nearly half of all colorectal cancer patients develop hepatic metastases. Timely, surgical resection offers the potential for cure. The aim of this study was to audit current practice for colorectal liver metastases in a regional hepatobiliary unit, and compare this to the NHS Cancer Plan standards for primary disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of the unit\\'s database was performed for all hepatic metastases referrals from January 2006 to December 2008. The dates of referral, first appointment, investigations and initiation of treatment, along with patient\\'s age and sex, were recorded on Microsoft Excel and analysed. Time was expressed as mean +\\/- SD in days. RESULTS: A total of 102 patients with hepatic metastases were identified. Five were excluded due to incomplete data. The average time from referral to first appointment was 10.6 +\\/- 9.4 days and the average time from referral to treatment was 38.5 +\\/- 28.6 days. Seventy-five (72.7%) had surgical intervention, of whom 37 also had chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: The data compare favourably to the NHS Cancer Plan guidelines for primary malignancy, demonstrating that a regional hepatobiliary unit is capable of delivering a service for colorectal liver metastases that adheres to the NHS Cancer Plan. Therefore, the NHS Cancer Plan can be applied to this cohort.

  10. The Regina Elena National Cancer Institute process of accreditation according to the standards of the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Stefano; Di Turi, Annunziata; Caolo, Giuseppina; Pignatelli, Adriana C; Papa, Elena; Branca, Marta; Cerimele, Marina; De Maria, Ruggero

    2015-01-01

    The accreditation process is, on the one hand, a tool used to homogenize procedures, rendering comparable and standardized processes of care, and on the other, a methodology employed to develop a culture of quality improvement. Although not yet proven by evidence-based studies that health outcomes improve as a result of an accreditation to excellence, it is undeniable that better control of healthcare processes results in better quality and safety of diagnostic and therapeutic pathways. The Regina Elena National Cancer Institute underwent the accreditation process in accordance with the standards criteria set by the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI), and it has recently completed the process, acquiring its designation as a Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC). This was an invaluable opportunity for the Regina Elena Institute to create a more cohesive environment, to widely establish a culture of quality, to implement an institutional information system, and to accelerate the process of patient involvement in strategic decisions. The steps of the process allowed us to evaluate the performance and the organization of the institute and put amendments in place designed to be adopted through 26 improvement actions. These actions regarded several aspects of the institute, including quality culture, information communication technology system, care, clinical trials unit, disease management team, nursing, and patient empowerment and involvement. Each area has a timeline. We chose to present the following 3 improvement actions: clinical trial center, computerized ambulatory medical record, and centrality of patient and humanization of clinical pathway.

  11. Variation in primary site resection practices for advanced colon cancer: a study using the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Mark A; Pradarelli, Jason C; Krell, Robert W; Regenbogen, Scott E; Suwanabol, Pasithorn A

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of metastatic colon cancer may be driven as much by practice patterns as by features of disease. To optimize management, there is a need to better understand what is determining primary site resection use. We evaluated all patients with stage IV cancers in the National Cancer Data Base from 2002 to 2012 (50,791 patients, 1,230 hospitals). We first identified patient characteristics associated with primary tumor resection. Then, we assessed nationwide variation in hospital resection rates. Overall, 27,387 (53.9%) patients underwent primary site resection. Factors associated with resection included younger age, having less than 2 major comorbidities, and white race (P primary tumor resection rates ranged from 26.0% to 87.8% with broad differences across geographical areas and hospital accreditation types. There is statistically significant variation in hospital rates of primary site resection. This demonstrates inconsistent adherence to guidelines in the presence of conflicting evidence regarding resection benefit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. NCI QuitPal, an App from the National Cancer Institute | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Health National Cancer Institute What if the tools you need to quit smoking were as easy ... habits with an easy-to-use calendar Includes motivational reminders that coincide with progress, Sends health milestones ...

  13. Reimbursements and frequency of tests in privately insured testicular cancer patients in the United States: Implications to national guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H Kamel

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Testicular cancer is not an inexpensive disease. Surgery is the less utilized than radiation and chemotherapy despite lower cost. This may have implications to national guidelines and training since these treatments often carry the same grade of recommendation.

  14. National Cancer Data Base Analysis of Radiation Therapy Consolidation Modality for Cervical Cancer: The Impact of New Technological Advancements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Beant S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Lin, Jeff F. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Krivak, Thomas C. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Sukumvanich, Paniti; Laskey, Robin A.; Ross, Malcolm S.; Lesnock, Jamie L. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To utilize the National Cancer Data Base to evaluate trends in brachytherapy and alternative radiation therapy utilization in the treatment of cervical cancer, to identify associations with outcomes between the various radiation therapy modalities. Methods and Materials: Patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer in the National Cancer Data Base who received treatment from January 2004 to December 2011 were analyzed. Overall survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to identify factors associated with type of boost radiation modality used and its impact on survival. Results: A total of 7654 patients had information regarding boost modality. A predominant proportion of patients were Caucasian (76.2%), had stage IIIB (48.9%) disease with squamous (82.0%) histology, were treated at academic/research centers (47.7%) in the South (34.8%), and lived 0 to 5 miles (27.9%) from the treating facility. A majority received brachytherapy (90.3%). From 2004 to 2011, brachytherapy use decreased from 96.7% to 86.1%, whereas intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) use increased from 3.3% to 13.9% in the same period (P<.01). Factors associated with decreased brachytherapy utilization included older age, stage IVA disease, smaller tumor size, later year of diagnosis, lower-volume treatment centers, and facility type. After controlling for significant factors from survival analyses, IMRT or SBRT boost resulted in inferior overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.55; P<.01) as compared with brachytherapy. In fact, the survival detriment associated with IMRT or SBRT boost was stronger than that associated with excluding chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 1.61′ 95% confidence interval, 1.27-2.04′ P<.01). Conclusions: Consolidation brachytherapy is a critical treatment component for

  15. PMD2HD--a web tool aligning a PubMed search results page with the local German Cancer Research Centre library collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohne-Lang, Andreas; Lang, Elke; Taube, Anke

    2005-06-27

    Web-based searching is the accepted contemporary mode of retrieving relevant literature, and retrieving as many full text articles as possible is a typical prerequisite for research success. In most cases only a proportion of references will be directly accessible as digital reprints through displayed links. A large number of references, however, have to be verified in library catalogues and, depending on their availability, are accessible as print holdings or by interlibrary loan request. The problem of verifying local print holdings from an initial retrieval set of citations can be solved using Z39.50, an ANSI protocol for interactively querying library information systems. Numerous systems include Z39.50 interfaces and therefore can process Z39.50 interactive requests. However, the programmed query interaction command structure is non-intuitive and inaccessible to the average biomedical researcher. For the typical user, it is necessary to implement the protocol within a tool that hides and handles Z39.50 syntax, presenting a comfortable user interface. PMD2HD is a web tool implementing Z39.50 to provide an appropriately functional and usable interface to integrate into the typical workflow that follows an initial PubMed literature search, providing users with an immediate asset to assist in the most tedious step in literature retrieval, checking for subscription holdings against a local online catalogue. PMD2HD can facilitate literature access considerably with respect to the time and cost of manual comparisons of search results with local catalogue holdings. The example presented in this article is related to the library system and collections of the German Cancer Research Centre. However, the PMD2HD software architecture and use of common Z39.50 protocol commands allow for transfer to a broad range of scientific libraries using Z39.50-compatible library information systems.

  16. Sci-Thur PM – Brachytherapy 02: Positional accuracy in Pd-103 permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) brachytherapy at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre (TBCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, Amy; Watt, Elizabeth; Peacock, Michael; Husain, Siraj; Meyer, Tyler; Roumeliotis, Michael [University of Calgary, Tom Baker Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: This retrospective study aims to quantify the positional accuracy of seed delivery in permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) brachytherapy at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre (TBCC). Methods: Treatment planning and post-implant CT scans for 5 patients were rigidly registered using the MIM Symphony™ software (MIM Software, Cleveland, OH) and used to evaluate differences between planned and implanted seed positions. Total and directional seed displacements were calculated for each patient in a clinically relevant ‘needle coordinate system’, defined relative to the angle of fiducial needle insertion. Results: The overall average total seed displacement was 10±8 mm. Systematic seed displacements were observed in individual patients and the magnitude and direction of these offsets varied among patients. One patient showed a significant directional seed displacement in the shallow-deep direction compared with the other four patients. With the exception of this one patient outlier, no significant systematic directional displacements in the needle coordinate system were observed for this cohort; the average directional displacements were −1±5 mm, 2±3 mm, and −2±4 mm in the shallow-deep, up-down, and right-left directions respectively. Conclusion: With the exception of one patient outlier, the magnitude of seed displacements were relatively consistent among patients. The results indicate that the shallow-deep direction possesses the largest uncertainty for the seed delivery method used at the TBCC. The relatively large uncertainty in seed placement in this direction is expected, as this is the direction of needle insertion. Further work will involve evaluating deflections of delivered needle tracks from their planned positions.

  17. The impact of PET-CT in suspected recurrent ovarian cancer: A prospective multi-centre study as part of the Australian PET Data Collection Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulham, M J; Carter, J; Baldey, A; Hicks, R J; Ramshaw, J E; Gibson, M

    2009-03-01

    To assess the impact of FDG PET-CT on the management of patients with suspected recurrent ovarian cancer and to determine the incremental information provided by PET-CT. This was a prospective, multi-centre, cohort study. Ninety women (mean age 59.9 years; age range 35-85 years) with a previous history of treated epithelial ovarian carcinoma and suspected recurrence based on elevated CA-125, anatomical imaging or clinical symptoms were studied with FDG PET-CT across two States. Referring doctors were asked to specify a management plan pre-PET, if management was altered after PET-CT and, the impact (rated - none, low, medium, high) of PET-CT on patient management. The pre-PET management plan could include radiotherapy, chemotherapy, surgery, and 'other' including observation. Patients were followed at 6 and 12 months and clinical status, evidence of recurrence and progression were recorded. Patients were referred by 34 individual specialists. At least 168 additional sites of disease in 61 patients (68%), not identified by conventional imaging were identified by PET-CT. In 77% the additional lesions were located below the diaphragm and most were nodal or peritoneal. PET-CT affected management in 60% (49% high, 11% medium impact). Patients where more disease was detected with PET-CT were more likely to progress in the following 12 months. For women with previously treated ovarian carcinoma with recurrent disease, PET-CT can: a) alter management in close to 60% of patients, b) detect more sites of disease than abdominal and pelvic CT, c) is superior in the detection of nodal, peritoneal and subcapsular liver disease and d) offers the opportunity for technology replacement in this setting.

  18. Clinical–Pathologic Stage Discrepancy in Bladder Cancer Patients Treated With Radical Cystectomy: Results From the National Cancer Data Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Phillip J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Lin, Chun Chieh; Jemal, Ahmedin [Surveillance and Health Services Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Shipley, William U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fedewa, Stacey A. [Surveillance and Health Services Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Kibel, Adam S. [Division of Urology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rosenberg, Jonathan E. [Genitourinary Oncology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kamat, Ashish M. [Division of Surgery, Department of Urology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Virgo, Katherine S. [Department of Health Policy and Management, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Blute, Michael L. [Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zietman, Anthony L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A., E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To examine the accuracy of clinical staging and its effects on outcome in bladder cancer (BC) patients treated with radical cystectomy (RC), using a large national database. Methods and Materials: A total of 16,953 patients with BC without distant metastases treated with RC from 1998 to 2009 were analyzed. Factors associated with clinical–pathologic stage discrepancy were assessed by multivariate generalized estimating equation models. Survival analysis was conducted for patients treated between 1998 and 2004 (n=7270) using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: At RC 41.9% of patients were upstaged, whereas 5.9% were downstaged. Upstaging was more common in females, the elderly, and in patients who underwent a more extensive lymphadenectomy. Downstaging was less common in patients treated at community centers, in the elderly, and in Hispanics. Receipt of preoperative chemotherapy was highly associated with downstaging. Five-year overall survival rates for patients with clinical stages 0, I, II, III, and IV were 67.2%, 62.9%, 50.4%, 36.9%, and 27.2%, respectively, whereas those for the same pathologic stages were 70.8%, 75.8%, 63.7%, 41.5%, and 24.7%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, upstaging was associated with increased 5-year mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.80, P<.001), but downstaging was not associated with survival (HR 0.88, P=.160). In contrast, more extensive lymphadenectomy was associated with decreased 5-year mortality (HR 0.76 for ≥10 lymph nodes examined, P<.001), as was treatment at an National Cancer Institute–designated cancer center (HR 0.90, P=.042). Conclusions: Clinical–pathologic stage discrepancy in BC patients is remarkably common across the United States. These findings should be considered when selecting patients for preoperative or nonoperative management strategies and when comparing the outcomes of bladder sparing approaches to RC.

  19. Variation in Definitive Therapy for Localized Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Among National Comprehensive Cancer Network Institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Luca F. [Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire (United States); Jagsi, Reshma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Bobiak, Sarah N.; Zornosa, Carrie [National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Fort Washington, Pennsylvania (United States); D' Amico, Thomas A. [Department of Surgery, Division of Thoracic Surgery, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Pisters, Katherine M. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dexter, Elisabeth U. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (United States); Niland, Joyce C. [Department of Information Sciences, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California (United States); Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kapadia, Nirav S., E-mail: Nirav.S.Kapadia@hitchcock.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: This study determined practice patterns in the staging and treatment of patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) member institutions. Secondary aims were to determine trends in the use of definitive therapy, predictors of treatment type, and acute adverse events associated with primary modalities of treatment. Methods and Materials: Data from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Oncology Outcomes Database from 2007 to 2011 for US patients with stage I NSCLC were used. Main outcome measures included patterns of care, predictors of treatment, acute morbidity, and acute mortality. Results: Seventy-nine percent of patients received surgery, 16% received definitive radiation therapy (RT), and 3% were not treated. Seventy-four percent of the RT patients received stereotactic body RT (SBRT), and the remainder received nonstereotactic RT (NSRT). Among participating NCCN member institutions, the number of surgeries-to-RT course ratios varied between 1.6 and 34.7 (P<.01), and the SBRT-to-NSRT ratio varied between 0 and 13 (P=.01). Significant variations were also observed in staging practices, with brain imaging 0.33 (0.25-0.43) times as likely and mediastinoscopy 31.26 (21.84-44.76) times more likely for surgical patients than for RT patients. Toxicity rates for surgical and for SBRT patients were similar, although the rates were double for NSRT patients. Conclusions: The variations in treatment observed among NCCN institutions reflects the lack of level I evidence directing the use of surgery or SBRT for stage I NSCLC. In this setting, research of patient and physician preferences may help to guide future decision making.

  20. National Cancer Database Analysis of Proton Versus Photon Radiation Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Kristin A., E-mail: kristin.higgins@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); O' Connell, Kelli [Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Liu, Yuan [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Gillespie, Theresa W. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Surgery, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); McDonald, Mark W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Pillai, Rathi N. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Patel, Kirtesh R.; Patel, Pretesh R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Owonikoko, Taofeek K. [Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Belani, Chandra P. [Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Pennsylvania University, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); and others

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes and predictors associated with proton radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the National Cancer Database. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Database was queried to capture patients with stage I-IV NSCLC treated with thoracic radiation from 2004 to 2012. A logistic regression model was used to determine the predictors for utilization of proton radiation therapy. The univariate and multivariable association with overall survival were assessed by Cox proportional hazards models along with log–rank tests. A propensity score matching method was implemented to balance baseline covariates and eliminate selection bias. Results: A total of 243,822 patients (photon radiation therapy: 243,474; proton radiation therapy: 348) were included in the analysis. Patients in a ZIP code with a median income of <$46,000 per year were less likely to receive proton treatment, with the income cohort of $30,000 to $35,999 least likely to receive proton therapy (odds ratio 0.63 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44-0.90]; P=.011). On multivariate analysis of all patients, non-proton therapy was associated with significantly worse survival compared with proton therapy (hazard ratio 1.21 [95% CI 1.06-1.39]; P<.01). On propensity matched analysis, proton radiation therapy (n=309) was associated with better 5-year overall survival compared with non-proton radiation therapy (n=1549), 22% versus 16% (P=.025). For stage II and III patients, non-proton radiation therapy was associated with worse survival compared with proton radiation therapy (hazard ratio 1.35 [95% CI 1.10-1.64], P<.01). Conclusions: Thoracic radiation with protons is associated with better survival in this retrospective analysis; further validation in the randomized setting is needed to account for any imbalances in patient characteristics, including positron emission tomography–computed tomography staging.

  1. Variation in Definitive Therapy for Localized Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Among National Comprehensive Cancer Network Institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle, Luca F.; Jagsi, Reshma; Bobiak, Sarah N.; Zornosa, Carrie; D'Amico, Thomas A.; Pisters, Katherine M.; Dexter, Elisabeth U.; Niland, Joyce C.; Hayman, James A.; Kapadia, Nirav S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study determined practice patterns in the staging and treatment of patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) member institutions. Secondary aims were to determine trends in the use of definitive therapy, predictors of treatment type, and acute adverse events associated with primary modalities of treatment. Methods and Materials: Data from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Oncology Outcomes Database from 2007 to 2011 for US patients with stage I NSCLC were used. Main outcome measures included patterns of care, predictors of treatment, acute morbidity, and acute mortality. Results: Seventy-nine percent of patients received surgery, 16% received definitive radiation therapy (RT), and 3% were not treated. Seventy-four percent of the RT patients received stereotactic body RT (SBRT), and the remainder received nonstereotactic RT (NSRT). Among participating NCCN member institutions, the number of surgeries-to-RT course ratios varied between 1.6 and 34.7 (P<.01), and the SBRT-to-NSRT ratio varied between 0 and 13 (P=.01). Significant variations were also observed in staging practices, with brain imaging 0.33 (0.25-0.43) times as likely and mediastinoscopy 31.26 (21.84-44.76) times more likely for surgical patients than for RT patients. Toxicity rates for surgical and for SBRT patients were similar, although the rates were double for NSRT patients. Conclusions: The variations in treatment observed among NCCN institutions reflects the lack of level I evidence directing the use of surgery or SBRT for stage I NSCLC. In this setting, research of patient and physician preferences may help to guide future decision making.

  2. Radon mitigation in private dwellings. Summary of measures under the National Action Plan against Cancer in Norway 1999-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aanestad, K.; Strand, T.; Hoegmo, T.; Skjennem, M.; Jensen, C. L.; Hoelsbrekken, S.

    2006-01-01

    The report summarizes the remedial measurements carried out under the National Action Plan against Cancer in Norway in the period 1999-2003.The cost effectiveness of the state subsidized remedial measures against radon is evaluated. Other measurements under the National Action Plan against Cancer have also been evaluated, such as measurements of radon in 38.000 dwellings in 158 municipalities, information measures, and actions to increase radon mitigation competence in the building construction industry and in the municipalities. (Author)

  3. Plant collecting program in Southeast Asia under the sponsorship of the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) (1986-1991)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soejarto, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    Under the funding from the United States National Cancer Institute (NCI)¹, a program was undertaken to collect plant samples in Southeast Asia to be tested for their cancer- and AIDS-arresting properties, for the period of September 1, 1986 through August 31, 1991. The program was implemented with

  4. Gene-environment interactions in cancer epidemiology: a National Cancer Institute Think Tank report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Carolyn M; Mechanic, Leah E; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Kraft, Peter; Gillanders, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Cancer risk is determined by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of common (minor allele frequency [MAF] > 0.05) and less common (0.01 Think Tank" on January 10-11, 2012. The objective of the Think Tank was to facilitate discussions on (1) the state of the science, (2) the goals of G × E interaction studies in cancer epidemiology, and (3) opportunities for developing novel study designs and analysis tools. This report summarizes the Think Tank discussion, with a focus on contemporary approaches to the analysis of G × E interactions. Selecting the appropriate methods requires first identifying the relevant scientific question and rationale, with an important distinction made between analyses aiming to characterize the joint effects of putative or established genetic and environmental factors and analyses aiming to discover novel risk factors or novel interaction effects. Other discussion items include measurement error, statistical power, significance, and replication. Additional designs, exposure assessments, and analytical approaches need to be considered as we move from the current small number of success stories to a fuller understanding of the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  5. Creating a "culture of research" in a community hospital: Strategies and tools from the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimond, Eileen P; St Germain, Diane; Nacpil, Lianne M; Zaren, Howard A; Swanson, Sandra M; Minnick, Christopher; Carrigan, Angela; Denicoff, Andrea M; Igo, Kathleen E; Acoba, Jared D; Gonzalez, Maria M; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-06-01

    The value of community-based cancer research has long been recognized. In addition to the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical and Minority-Based Oncology Programs established in 1983, and 1991 respectively, the National Cancer Institute established the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program in 2007 with an aim of enhancing access to high-quality cancer care and clinical research in the community setting where most cancer patients receive their treatment. This article discusses strategies utilized by the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program to build research capacity and create a more entrenched culture of research at the community hospitals participating in the program over a 7-year period. To facilitate development of a research culture at the community hospitals, the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program required leadership or chief executive officer engagement; utilized a collaborative learning structure where best practices, successes, and challenges could be shared; promoted site-to-site mentoring to foster faster learning within and between sites; required research program assessments that spanned clinical trial portfolio, accrual barriers, and outreach; increased identification and use of metrics; and, finally, encouraged research team engagement across hospital departments (navigation, multidisciplinary care, pathology, and disparities) to replace the traditionally siloed approach to clinical trials. The health-care environment is rapidly changing while complexity in research increases. Successful research efforts are impacted by numerous factors (e.g. institutional review board reviews, physician interest, and trial availability). The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program sites, as program participants, had access to the required resources and support to develop and implement the strategies described. Metrics are an important component yet often challenging to

  6. Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011, Featuring Incidence of Breast Cancer Subtypes by Race/Ethnicity, Poverty, and State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Betsy A; Sherman, Recinda L; Howlader, Nadia; Jemal, Ahmedin; Ryerson, A Blythe; Henry, Kevin A; Boscoe, Francis P; Cronin, Kathleen A; Lake, Andrew; Noone, Anne-Michelle; Henley, S Jane; Eheman, Christie R; Anderson, Robert N; Penberthy, Lynne

    2015-06-01

    The American Cancer Society (ACS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Cancer Institute (NCI), and North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collaborate annually to produce updated, national cancer statistics. This Annual Report includes a focus on breast cancer incidence by subtype using new, national-level data. Population-based cancer trends and breast cancer incidence by molecular subtype were calculated. Breast cancer subtypes were classified using tumor biomarkers for hormone receptor (HR) and human growth factor-neu receptor (HER2) expression. Overall cancer incidence decreased for men by 1.8% annually from 2007 to 2011 [corrected]. Rates for women were stable from 1998 to 2011. Within these trends there was racial/ethnic variation, and some sites have increasing rates. Among children, incidence rates continued to increase by 0.8% per year over the past decade while, like adults, mortality declined. HR+/HER2- breast cancers, the subtype with the best prognosis, were the most common for all races/ethnicities with highest rates among non-Hispanic white women, local stage cases, and low poverty areas (92.7, 63.51, and 98.69 per 100000 non-Hispanic white women, respectively). HR+/HER2- breast cancer incidence rates were strongly, positively correlated with mammography use, particularly for non-Hispanic white women (Pearson 0.57, two-sided P < .001). Triple-negative breast cancers, the subtype with the worst prognosis, were highest among non-Hispanic black women (27.2 per 100000 non-Hispanic black women), which is reflected in high rates in southeastern states. Progress continues in reducing the burden of cancer in the United States. There are unique racial/ethnic-specific incidence patterns for breast cancer subtypes; likely because of both biologic and social risk factors, including variation in mammography use. Breast cancer subtype analysis confirms the capacity of cancer registries to adjust national collection

  7. Disparities in receipt of care for high-grade endometrial cancer: A National Cancer Data Base analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregar, Amy J; Alejandro Rauh-Hain, J; Spencer, Ryan; Clemmer, Joel T; Schorge, John O; Rice, Laurel W; Del Carmen, Marcela G

    2017-04-01

    To examine patterns of care and survival for Hispanic women compared to white and African American women with high-grade endometrial cancer. We utilized the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) to identify women diagnosed with uterine grade 3 endometrioid adenocarcinoma, carcinosarcoma, clear cell carcinoma and papillary serous carcinoma between 2003 and 2011. The effect of treatment on survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Factors predictive of outcome were compared using the Cox proportional hazards model. 43,950 women were eligible. African American and Hispanic women had higher rates of stage III and IV disease compared to white women (36.5% vs. 36% vs. 33.5%, p<0.001). African American women were less likely to undergo surgical treatment for their cancer (85.2% vs. 89.8% vs. 87.5%, p<0.001) and were more likely to receive chemotherapy (36.8% vs. 32.4% vs. 32%, p<0.001) compared to white and Hispanic women. Over the entire study period, after adjusting for age, time period of diagnosis, region of the country, urban or rural setting, treating facility type, socioeconomic status, education, insurance, comorbidity index, pathologic stage, histology, lymphadenectomy and adjuvant treatment, African American women had lower overall survival compared to white women (Hazard Ratio 1.21, 95% CI 1.16-1.26). Conversely, Hispanic women had improved overall survival compared to white women after controlling for the aforementioned factors (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.80-0.93). Among women with high-grade endometrial cancer, African American women have lower all-cause survival while Hispanic women have higher all-cause survival compared to white women after controlling for treatment, sociodemographic, comorbidity and histopathologic variables. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiation Dose Escalation in Esophageal Cancer Revisited: A Contemporary Analysis of the National Cancer Data Base, 2004 to 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brower, Jeffrey V.; Chen, Shuai; Bassetti, Michael F.; Yu, Menggang; Harari, Paul M.; Ritter, Mark A.; Baschnagel, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of radiation dose escalation on overall survival (OS) for patients with nonmetastatic esophageal cancer treated with concurrent radiation and chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with stage I to III esophageal cancer treated from 2004 to 2012 were identified from the National Cancer Data Base. Patients who received concurrent radiation and chemotherapy with radiation doses of ≥50 Gy and did not undergo surgery were included. OS was compared using Cox proportional hazards regression and propensity score matching. Results: A total of 6854 patients were included; 3821 (55.7%) received 50 to 50.4 Gy and 3033 (44.3%) received doses >50.4 Gy. Univariate analysis revealed no significant difference in OS between patients receiving 50 to 50.4 Gy and those receiving >50.4 Gy (P=.53). The dose analysis, binned as 50 to 50.4, 51 to 54, 55 to 60, and >60 Gy, revealed no appreciable difference in OS within any group compared with 50 to 50.4 Gy. Subgroup analyses investigating the effect of dose escalation by histologic type and in the setting of intensity modulated radiation therapy also failed to reveal a benefit. Propensity score matching confirmed the absence of a statistically significant difference in OS among the dose levels. The factors associated with improved OS on multivariable analysis included female sex, lower Charlson-Deyo comorbidity score, private insurance, cervical/upper esophagus location, squamous cell histologic type, lower T stage, and node-negative status (P 50.4 Gy did not result in improved OS among patients with stage I to III esophageal cancer treated with definitive concurrent radiation and chemotherapy. These data suggest that despite advanced contemporary treatment techniques, OS for patients with esophageal cancer remains unaltered by escalation of radiation dose >50.4 Gy, consistent with the results of the INT-0123 trial. Furthermore, these data highlight that many radiation

  9. Discussion on 'Centres of excellence' in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riad, S.

    1999-01-01

    In Africa, Centres of Excellence should be oriented to build up scientific and technological capacity in the four topics of international Monitoring System related technologies, namely, seismic monitoring, hydro acoustic monitoring, infrasound monitoring and radionuclides monitoring. Training programs on these topics should be a major objective. A network of such centres should be established in a number of African countries. Centres should be equipped with means and materials for on-line course dispatch to interested training centres or research institutions. African centres should develop strong relationship among themselves through information and data exchange and sharing, harmonization of training programs. National data centres may be established as a component of the African Centre of Excellence. States Signatories may authorize the establishment of a specific fund to support the activities of the African center

  10. Cancer Trials Ireland (ICORG) 06-34: A multi-centre clinical trial using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy to reduce the toxicity of palliative radiation for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Ronan L; Armstrong, John G; Thirion, Pierre; Dunne, Mary; Finn, Marie; Small, Cormac; Byrne, Mary; O'Shea, Carmel; O'Sullivan, Lydia; Shannon, Aoife; Kelly, Emma; Hacking, Dayle J

    2018-05-01

    Cancer Trials Ireland (ICORG) 06-34: A multi-centre clinical trial using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy to reduce the toxicity of palliative radiation for lung cancer. NCT01176487. Trials of radiation therapy for the palliation of intra-thoracic symptoms from locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have concentrated on optimising fractionation and dose schedules. In these trials, the rates of oesophagitis induced by this "palliative" therapy have been unacceptably high. In contrast, this non-randomised, single-arm trial was designed to assess if more technically advanced treatment techniques would result in equivalent symptom relief and reduce the side-effect of symptomatic oesophagitis. Thirty-five evaluable patients with symptomatic locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC were treated using a three-dimensional conformal technique (3-DCRT) and standardised dose regimens of 39 Gy in 13 fractions, 20 Gy in 5 fractions or 17 Gy in 2 fractions. Treatment plans sought to minimise oesophageal dose. Oesophagitis was recorded during treatment, at two weeks, one month and three months following radiation therapy and 3-6 monthly thereafter. Mean dose to the irradiated oesophagus was calculated for all treatment plans. Five patients (14%) had experienced grade 2 oesophagitis or dysphagia or both during treatment and 2 other patients had these side effects at the 2-week follow-up. At follow-up of one month after therapy, there was no grade two or higher oesophagitis or dysphagia reported. 22 patients were eligible for assessment of late toxicity. Five of these patients reported oesophagitis or dysphagia (one had grade 3 dysphagia, two had grade 2 oesophagitis, one of whom also had grade 2 dysphagia). Quality of Life (QoL) data at baseline and at 1-month follow up were available for 20 patients. At 1-month post radiation therapy, these patients had slightly less trouble taking a short walk, less shortness of breath, did not feel as weak, had

  11. Project for the National Program of Early Diagnosis of Endometrial Cancer Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohîlțea, R E; Ancăr, V; Cirstoiu, M M; Rădoi, V; Bohîlțea, L C; Furtunescu, F

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer recorded a peak incidence in ages 60-64 years in Romania, reaching in 2013 the average value of 8.06/ 100,000 women, and 15.97/ 100,000 women within the highest risk age range, having in recent years an increasing trend, being higher in urban than in rural population. Annually, approximately 800 new cases are registered in our country. The estimated lifetime risk of a woman to develop endometrial cancer is of about 1,03%. Based on an abnormal uterine bleeding, 35% of the endometrial cancers are diagnosed in an advanced stage of the disease, with significantly diminished lifetime expectancy. Drafting a national program for the early diagnosis of endometrial cancer. We proposed a standardization of the diagnostic steps and focused on 4 key elements for the early diagnosis of endometrial cancer: investigation of abnormal uterine bleeding occurring in pre/ post-menopausal women, investigating features/ anomalies of cervical cytology examination, diagnosis, treatment and proper monitoring of precursor endometrial lesions or cancer associated endometrial lesions and screening high risk populations (Lynch syndrome, Cowden syndrome). Improving medical practice based on diagnostic algorithms addresses the four risk groups, by improving information system reporting and record keeping. Improving addressability cases by increasing the health education of the population will increase the rate of diagnosis of endometrial cancer in the early stages of the disease. ACOG = American Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, ASCCP = American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, PATT = Partial Activated Thromboplastin Time, BRCA = Breast Cancer Gene, CT = Computerized Tomography, IFGO = International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics, HLG = Hemoleucogram, HNPCC = Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (Lynch syndrome), IHC = Immunohistochemistry, BMI = Body Mass Index, INR = International Normalized Ratio, MSI = Microsatellites instability, MSI

  12. Awareness of cancer susceptibility genetic testing: the 2000, 2005, and 2010 National Health Interview Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Phuong L; Vadaparampil, Susan Thomas; Breen, Nancy; McNeel, Timothy S; Wideroff, Louise; Graubard, Barry I

    2014-05-01

    Genetic testing for several cancer susceptibility syndromes is clinically available; however, existing data suggest limited population awareness of such tests. To examine awareness regarding cancer genetic testing in the U.S. population aged ≥25 years in the 2000, 2005, and 2010 National Health Interview Surveys. The weighted percentages of respondents aware of cancer genetic tests, and percent changes from 2000-2005 and 2005-2010, overall and by demographic, family history, and healthcare factors were calculated. Interactions were used to evaluate the patterns of change in awareness between 2005 and 2010 among subgroups within each factor. To evaluate associations with awareness in 2005 and 2010, percentages were adjusted for covariates using multiple logistic regression. The analysis was performed in 2012. Awareness decreased from 44.4% to 41.5% (pAwareness increased between 2005 and 2010 in most subgroups, particularly among individuals in the South (pinteraction=0.03) or with a usual place of care (pinteraction=0.01). In 2005 and 2010, awareness was positively associated with personal or family cancer history and high perceived cancer risk, and inversely associated with racial/ethnic minorities, age 25-39 or ≥60 years, male gender, lower education and income levels, public or no health insurance, and no provider contact in 12 months. Despite improvement from 2005 to 2010, ≤50% of the U.S. adult population was aware of cancer genetic testing in 2010. Notably, disparities persist for racial/ethnic minorities and individuals with limited health care access or income. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. The natural history of Leydig cell testicular tumours: an analysis of the National Cancer Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, G J; Redmond, E J; Considine, S W; Omer, S I; Power, D; Sweeney, P

    2018-05-01

    Leydig cell tumour (LCT) of the testis is a rare histological subtype of stromal tumours, accounting for 1 to 3% of testicular neoplasms. The natural history of LCT is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and natural history of Leydig cell tumours (LCT) of the testes. A search of the National Cancer Registry of Ireland database was performed regarding Leydig cell testicular tumours. Recurrence free survival (RFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were analysed. Between 1994 and 2013, 2755 new cases of testicular cancer were diagnosed in Ireland. Of these, 22 (0.79%) were Leydig cell tumours. Nineteen were invasive (stage T1) and three were in situ (stage Tis). One patient developed a local recurrence following an organ preserving procedure and underwent a completion orchidectomy 107 days after initial diagnosis. No further treatment was required. There have been no disease-specific deaths. The 1-, 3- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 95.5, 88.2 and 73.3%, respectively. The 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) was 100% and the 5-year recurrence free survival (RFS) was 93.3%. From the National Cancer Registry, LCT has been shown to be a rare subtype of testicular tumour. Due to the relatively favourable natural history, it may be possible to tailor less aggressive surveillance regimens in these patients.

  14. Nutritional composition of the commonly consumed composite dishes for the Barbados National Cancer Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sangita; Harris, Rachel; Cao, Xia; Hennis, Anselm J M; Leske, M Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh

    2007-09-01

    To provide, for the first time, the calculated nutritional composition of 32 composite dishes commonly consumed in Barbados to enable dietary intake to be calculated from a Quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire developed specifically for this population to determine associations between diet and risk of prostate and breast cancer. Weighed recipes were collected in up to six different households for each of the 32 composite dishes. The average nutritional composition for these composite dishes was calculated using the US Department of Agriculture National Nutrient Database. One hundred and fifty-two weighed recipes were collected for 32 composite dishes: five were fish based, two were ground beef dishes, two were chicken based, two were offal based, two were lamb dishes, one was pork based, three were rice based, three were commonly consumed home-made drinks, and the remaining were miscellaneous items. A total of 152 weighed recipes were collected and we provide, for the first time, nutritional composition data for 32 commonly consumed food and drink items in Barbados. Such data are essential for assessing nutrient intake and determining associations between diet and prostate and breast cancer in the Barbados National Cancer Study.

  15. Racial Differences in Information Needs During and After Cancer Treatment: a Nationwide, Longitudinal Survey by the University of Rochester Cancer Center National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, Matthew; Peppone, Luke J; Roscoe, Joseph A; Kleckner, Ian R; Mustian, Karen M; Heckler, Charles E; Guido, Joseph J; Sborov, Mark; Bushunow, Peter; Onitilo, Adedayo; Kamen, Charles

    2018-02-01

    Before treatment, cancer patients need information about side effects and prognosis, while after treatment they need information to transition to survivorship. Research documenting these needs is limited, especially among racial and ethnic minorities. This study evaluated cancer patients' needs according to race both before and after treatment. We compared white (n = 904) to black (n = 52) patients receiving treatment at 17 National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) sites on their cancer-related concerns and need for information before and after cancer treatment. Two-sample t test and chi-squared analyses were used to assess group differences. Compared to white patients, black patients reported s