WorldWideScience

Sample records for national airspace access

  1. 76 FR 32258 - Access to Aircraft Situation Display (ASDI) and National Airspace System Status Information (NASSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-03

    ..., Global Business Travel Association (GBTA), McAfee & Taft P.C. (a law firm), and Patton Boggs LLP (a law... complete information, due primarily to concerns of the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) to... business according to a published listing of service and schedule, general aviation operators do not. It is...

  2. Intelligent Autonomous Aerial Vehicles in the National Airspace, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Unmanned aerial systems (UAS) and, in particular, intelligent, autonomous aircraft operating in the National Airspace (NAS) have the potential to significantly...

  3. Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration in the National Airspace System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is an increasing need to fly Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) to perform missions of vital importance to national security...

  4. INTEGRATING UNMANNED AIRCRAFT VEHICLES IN THE ROMANIAN NATIONAL AIRSPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorana Alina Catinca POP

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of unmanned aerial vehicles in the Romanian civil airspace brings us back to the 1920's, when the first aircraft started to fly over the Romanian sky. Little did the legislators at that time know how to create the proper legal framework for the use of such machines so that all aspects related to their use be covered, as well as identify all potential risks and effects. Nowadays, UAVs are the new aircraft and it is a challenge for the legislators to properly identify the legal framework so that the safety and security of civil aviation are not affected. The paper will address the challenges the regulator faces in the integration of the UAVs in the Romanian civil airspace, developments and issues raised by the current regulation, as well as aspects related to the national regulations expected to enter into force at the end of 2015, beginning of 2016.

  5. Shadow Mode Assessment Using Realistic Technologies for the National Airspace (SMART NAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopardekar, Parimal H.

    2014-01-01

    Develop a simulation and modeling capability that includes: (a) Assessment of multiple parallel universes, (b) Accepts data feeds, (c) Allows for live virtual constructive distribute environment, (d) Enables integrated examinations of concepts, algorithms, technologies and National Airspace System (NAS) architectures.

  6. A systems approach for designing a radio station layout for the U.S. National Airspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boci, Erton S.

    Today's National Airspace System (NAS) is managed using an aging surveillance radar system. Current radar technology is not adequate to sustain the rapid growth of the commercial, civil, and federal aviation sectors and cannot be adapted to use emerging 21st century airspace surveillance technologies. With 87,000 flights to manage per day, America's ground based radar system has hit a growth ceiling. Consequently, the FAA has embarked on a broad-reaching effort called the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) that seeks to transform today's aviation airspace management and ensure increased safety and capacity in our NAS. This dissertation presents a systems approach to Service Volume (SV) engineering, a relatively new field of engineering that has emerged in support of the FAA's Automatic Dependent Surveillance -- Broadcast (ADS-B) Air Traffic Modernization Program. SV Engineering is responsible for radio station layout design that would provide the required radio frequency (RF) coverage over a set of Service Volumes, each which represents a section of controlled airspace that is served by a particular air control facility or service. The radio station layout must be optimized to meet system performance, safety, and interference requirements while minimizing the number of radio station sites required to provide RF coverage of the entire airspace of the Unites States. The interference level requirements at the victim (of interference) receivers are the most important and stringent requirements imposed on the ADS-B radio station layout and configuration. In this dissertation, we show a novel and practical way to achieve this optimality by developing and employing several key techniques such as such as reverse radio line-of-site (RLOS) and complex entity-relationship modeling, to address the greater challenges of engineering this complex system. Given that numerous NAS radar facilities are clustered together in relative close proximity to each other, we

  7. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project KDP-C Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindle, Laurie; Sakahara, Robert; Hackenberg, Davis; Johnson, William

    2017-01-01

    The topics discussed are the UAS-NAS project life-cycle and ARMD thrust flow down, as well as the UAS environments and how we operate in those environments. NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center at Edwards, CA, is leading a project designed to help integrate unmanned air vehicles into the world around us. The Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration in the National Airspace System project, or UAS in the NAS, will contribute capabilities designed to reduce technical barriers related to safety and operational challenges associated with enabling routine UAS access to the NAS. The project falls under the Integrated Systems Research Program office managed at NASA Headquarters by the agency's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate. NASA's four aeronautics research centers - Armstrong, Ames Research Center, Langley Research Center, and Glenn Research Center - are part of the technology development project. With the use and diversity of unmanned aircraft growing rapidly, new uses for these vehicles are constantly being considered. Unmanned aircraft promise new ways of increasing efficiency, reducing costs, enhancing safety and saving lives 460265main_ED10-0132-16_full.jpg Unmanned aircraft systems such as NASA's Global Hawks (above) and Predator B named Ikhana (below), along with numerous other unmanned aircraft systems large and small, are the prime focus of the UAS in the NAS effort to integrate them into the national airspace. Credits: NASA Photos 710580main_ED07-0243-37_full.jpg The UAS in the NAS project envisions performance-based routine access to all segments of the national airspace for all unmanned aircraft system classes, once all safety-related and technical barriers are overcome. The project will provide critical data to such key stakeholders and customers as the Federal Aviation Administration and RTCA Special Committee 203 (formerly the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics) by conducting integrated, relevant system-level tests to adequately address

  8. Announced Strategy Types in Multiagent RL for Conflict-Avoidance in the National Airspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebhuhn, Carrie; Knudson, Matthew D.; Tumer, Kagan

    2014-01-01

    The use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) in the national airspace is of growing interest to the research community. Safety and scalability of control algorithms are key to the successful integration of autonomous system into a human-populated airspace. In order to ensure safety while still maintaining efficient paths of travel, these algorithms must also accommodate heterogeneity of path strategies of its neighbors. We show that, using multiagent RL, we can improve the speed with which conflicts are resolved in cases with up to 80 aircraft within a section of the airspace. In addition, we show that the introduction of abstract agent strategy types to partition the state space is helpful in resolving conflicts, particularly in high congestion.

  9. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project FY16 Annual Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindle, Laurie; Hackenberg, Davis

    2016-01-01

    This presentation gives insight into the research activities and efforts being executed in order to integrate unmanned aircraft systems into the national airspace system. This briefing is to inform others of the UAS-NAS FY16 progress and future directions.

  10. Real-Time Safety Monitoring and Prediction for the National Airspace System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychoudhury, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    As new operational paradigms and additional aircraft are being introduced into the National Airspace System (NAS), maintaining safety in such a rapidly growing environment becomes more challenging. It is therefore desirable to have both an overview of the current safety of the airspace at different levels of granularity, as well an understanding of how the state of the safety will evolve into the future given the anticipated flight plans, weather forecasts, predicted health of assets in the airspace, and so on. To this end, we have developed a Real-Time Safety Monitoring (RTSM) that first, estimates the state of the NAS using the dynamic models. Then, given the state estimate and a probability distribution of future inputs to the NAS, the framework predicts the evolution of the NAS, i.e., the future state, and analyzes these future states to predict the occurrence of unsafe events. The entire probability distribution of airspace safety metrics is computed, not just point estimates, without significant assumptions regarding the distribution type and or parameters. We demonstrate our overall approach by predicting the occurrence of some unsafe events and show how these predictions evolve in time as flight operations progress.

  11. Encounter Models for the Littoral Regions of the National Airspace System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    radars. Therefore, it is important to characterize the oceanic environment beyond the range of these sensors—e.g., the Carribean Sea, northern coast of...ESC-TR-2010-051 Project Report CASSATT-2 Encounter Models for the Littoral Regions of the National Airspace System M.W. Edwards 15 September...2010 Lincoln Laboratory MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LEXINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS Prepared for the Department of Homeland Security under Air

  12. A Study of Future Communications Concepts and Technologies for the National Airspace System-Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, Denise S.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Wichgersm Joel M.; Haynes, Brian; Roy, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating current and anticipated wireless communications concepts and technologies that the National Airspace System (NAS) may need in the next 50 years. NASA has awarded three NASA Research Announcements (NAR) studies with the objective to determine the most promising candidate technologies for air-to-air and air-to-ground data exchange and analyze their suitability in a post-NextGen NAS environment. This paper will present progress made in the studies and describe the communications challenges and opportunities that have been identified as part of the study. NASA's NextGen Concepts and Technology Development (CTD) Project integrates solutions for a safe, efficient and high-capacity airspace system through joint research efforts and partnerships with other government agencies. The CTD Project is one of two within NASA's Airspace Systems Program and is managed by the NASA Ames Research Center. Research within the CTD Project is in support the 2011 NASA Strategic Plan Sub-Goal 4.1: Develop innovative solutions and advanced technologies, through a balanced research portfolio, to improve current and future air transportation. The focus of CTD is on developing capabilities in traffic flow management, dynamic airspace configuration, separation assurance, super density operations and airport surface operations. Important to its research is the development of human/automation information requirements and decisionmaking guidelines for human-human and human-machine airportal decision-making. Airborne separation, oceanic intrail climb/descent and interval management applications depend on location and intent information of surrounding aircraft. ADS-B has been proposed to provide the information exchange, but other candidates such as satellite-based receivers, broadband or airborne internet, and cellular communications are possible candidate's.

  13. Military Regulated Airspace: Atlantic / Gulf of Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Military regulated airspace areas depict the Air Traffic Control Assigned Airspace (ATCAA) and Airspace Corridor areas. The MarineCadastre.gov team worked with the...

  14. A Study of Future Communications Concepts and Technologies for the National Airspace System - Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, Denise S.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Haynes, Brian; Wichgers, Joel M.; Roy, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating current and anticipated wireless communications concepts and technologies that the National Airspace System (NAS) may need in the next 50 years. NASA has awarded three NASA Research Announcements (NAR) studies with the objective to determine the most promising candidate technologies for air-to-air and air-to-ground data exchange and analyze their suitability in a post-NextGen NAS environment. This paper will present progress made in the studies and describe the communications challenges and opportunities that have been identified during the studies' first year.

  15. A Study of Future Communications Concepts and Technologies for the National Airspace System - Part IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, Denise S.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Wichgers, Joel M.; Haynes, Brian; Roy, Aloke

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating current and anticipated wireless communications concepts and technologies that the National Airspace System (NAS) may need in the next 50 years. NASA has awarded three NASA Research Announcements (NAR) studies with the objective to determine the most promising candidate technologies for air-to-air and air-to-ground data exchange and analyze their suitability in a post-NextGen NAS environment. This paper will present the final results describing the communications challenges and opportunities that have been identified as part of the study.

  16. A Study of Future Communications Concepts and Technologies for the National Airspace System-Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, Denise S.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Wichgers, Joel M.; Haynes, Brian; Roy, Aloke

    2013-01-01

    The National Aviation and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating current and anticipated wireless communications concepts and technologies that the National Airspace System (NAS) may need in the next 50 years. NASA has awarded three NASA Research Announcements (NAR) studies with the objective to determine the most promising candidate technologies for air-to-air and air-to-ground data exchange and analyze their suitability in a post-NextGen NAS environment. This paper will present progress made in the studies and describe the communications challenges and opportunities that have been identified during the studies' first phase.

  17. A Preliminary Evaluation of Supersonic Transport Category Vehicle Operations in the National Airspace System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Matthew C.; Guminsky, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Several public sector businesses and government agencies, including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration are currently working on solving key technological barriers that must be overcome in order to realize the vision of low-boom supersonic flights conducted over land. However, once these challenges are met, the manner in which this class of aircraft is integrated in the National Airspace System may become a potential constraint due to the significant environmental, efficiency, and economic repercussions that their integration may cause. Background research was performed on historic supersonic operations in the National Airspace System, including both flight deck procedures and air traffic controller procedures. Using this information, an experiment was created to test some of these historic procedures in a current-day, emerging Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) environment and observe the interactions between commercial supersonic transport aircraft and modern-day air traffic. Data was gathered through batch simulations of supersonic commercial transport category aircraft operating in present-day traffic scenarios as a base-lining study to identify the magnitude of the integration problems and begin the exploration of new air traffic management technologies and architectures which will be needed to seamlessly integrate subsonic and supersonic transport aircraft operations. The data gathered include information about encounters between subsonic and supersonic aircraft that may occur when supersonic commercial transport aircraft are integrated into the National Airspace System, as well as flight time data. This initial investigation is being used to inform the creation and refinement of a preliminary Concept of Operations and for the subsequent development of technologies that will enable overland supersonic flight.

  18. Projected Demand and Potential Impacts to the National Airspace System of Autonomous, Electric, On-Demand Small Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Viken, Jeffrey K.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Dollyhigh, Samuel M.; Fenbert, James W.; Hartman, Christopher L.; Kwa, Teck-Seng; Moore, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Electric propulsion and autonomy are technology frontiers that offer tremendous potential to achieve low operating costs for small-aircraft. Such technologies enable simple and safe to operate vehicles that could dramatically improve regional transportation accessibility and speed through point-to-point operations. This analysis develops an understanding of the potential traffic volume and National Airspace System (NAS) capacity for small on-demand aircraft operations. Future demand projections use the Transportation Systems Analysis Model (TSAM), a tool suite developed by NASA and the Transportation Laboratory of Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Demand projections from TSAM contain the mode of travel, number of trips and geographic distribution of trips. For this study, the mode of travel can be commercial aircraft, automobile and on-demand aircraft. NASA's Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES) is used to assess NAS impact. This simulation takes a schedule that includes all flights: commercial passenger and cargo; conventional General Aviation and on-demand small aircraft, and operates them in the simulated NAS. The results of this analysis projects very large trip numbers for an on-demand air transportation system competitive with automobiles in cost per passenger mile. The significance is this type of air transportation can enhance mobility for communities that currently lack access to commercial air transportation. Another significant finding is that the large numbers of operations can have an impact on the current NAS infrastructure used by commercial airlines and cargo operators, even if on-demand traffic does not use the 28 airports in the Continental U.S. designated as large hubs by the FAA. Some smaller airports will experience greater demand than their current capacity allows and will require upgrading. In addition, in future years as demand grows and vehicle performance improves other non-conventional facilities such as short runways incorporated into

  19. Managing the integration and harmonization of national airspace for unmanned and manned systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, Hans

    This dissertation examines the leadership challenge created by the requirement to integrate unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) into the national airspace system (NAS). The lack of UAV-related federal rules and regulations is a primary factor prolonging this integration. This effort focuses primarily on the leadership portion of the solution and not the technological requirements. The research explores an adaptation of the complexity theory that offers a potential leadership framework for the government, industry, and academia to use for achieving the full integration of UAVs into the NAS. Due to the large number of stakeholders and the multitude of interrelated issues, a complexity-theory-leadership methodology was created and examined as a potential way to help the FAA accelerate their rule-making efforts. This dissertation focuses on United States UAV issues. The United States is one of the leaders in the unmanned systems arena, to include the first significant use of recoverable autonomous weaponized systems in combat. Issues such as airspace, airworthiness, social issues, privacy issues, regulations, and the lack of policies, procedures, or governance are universal for all countries that are active in this technology area. This qualitative dissertation makes use of the grounded theory methodology as it combines a literature review and research along with interviews with subject matter experts, and information gained from attending UAV related gatherings/discussions. The investigation uncovered significant FAA process impediments as well as some possible break through concepts that could work well with the complexity-theory-leadership methodology. Keywords: Complexity theory, leadership, change management, UAV, unmanned aerial vehicle, National Airspace, NAS, FAA, Federal Aviation Administration.

  20. Concept of Operations for Integrating Commercial Supersonic Transport Aircraft into the National Airspace System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Matthew C.

    2017-01-01

    Several businesses and government agencies, including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration are currently working on solving key technological barriers that must be overcome in order to realize the vision of low-boom supersonic flights conducted over land. However, once these challenges are met, the manner in which this class of aircraft is integrated in the National Airspace System may become a potential constraint due to the significant environmental, efficiency, and economic repercussions that their integration may cause. This document was developed to create a path for research and development that exposes the benefits and barriers of seamlessly integrating a class of CSTs into the NAS, while also serving as a Concept of Operations (ConOps) which posits a mid- to far-term solution (2025-2035) concept for best integrating CST into the NAS. Background research regarding historic supersonic operations in the National Airspace System, assumptions about design aspects and equipage of commercial supersonic transport (CST) aircraft, assumptions concerning the operational environment are described in this document. Results of a simulation experiment to investigate the interactions between CST aircraft and modern-day air traffic are disseminated and are used to generate scenarios for CST operations. Finally, technology needs to realize these operational scenarios are discussed.

  1. A Vision and Roadmap for Increasing User Autonomy in Flight Operations in the National Airspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, William B.; Hilb, Robert; Koczo, Stefan; Wing, David

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of Air Transportation is to move people and cargo safely, efficiently and swiftly to their destinations. The companies and individuals who use aircraft for this purpose, the airspace users, desire to operate their aircraft according to a dynamically optimized business trajectory for their specific mission and operational business model. In current operations, the dynamic optimization of business trajectories is limited by constraints built into operations in the National Airspace System (NAS) for reasons of safety and operational needs of the air navigation service providers. NASA has been developing and testing means to overcome many of these constraints and permit operations to be conducted closer to the airspace user's changing business trajectory as conditions unfold before and during the flight. A roadmap of logical steps progressing toward increased user autonomy is proposed, beginning with NASA's Traffic Aware Strategic Aircrew Requests (TASAR) concept that enables flight crews to make informed, deconflicted flight-optimization requests to air traffic control. These steps include the use of data communications for route change requests and approvals, integration with time-based arrival flow management processes under development by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), increased user authority for defining and modifying downstream, strategic portions of the trajectory, and ultimately application of self-separation. This progression takes advantage of existing FAA NextGen programs and RTCA standards development, and it is designed to minimize the number of hardware upgrades required of airspace users to take advantage of these advanced capabilities to achieve dynamically optimized business trajectories in NAS operations. The roadmap is designed to provide operational benefits to first adopters so that investment decisions do not depend upon a large segment of the user community becoming equipped before benefits can be realized. The issues of

  2. Serious Gaming for Test & Evaluation of Clean-Slate (Ab Initio) National Airspace System (NAS) Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, B. Danette; Alexandrov, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Incremental approaches to air transportation system development inherit current architectural constraints, which, in turn, place hard bounds on system capacity, efficiency of performance, and complexity. To enable airspace operations of the future, a clean-slate (ab initio) airspace design(s) must be considered. This ab initio National Airspace System (NAS) must be capable of accommodating increased traffic density, a broader diversity of aircraft, and on-demand mobility. System and subsystem designs should scale to accommodate the inevitable demand for airspace services that include large numbers of autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and a paradigm shift in general aviation (e.g., personal air vehicles) in addition to more traditional aerial vehicles such as commercial jetliners and weather balloons. The complex and adaptive nature of ab initio designs for the future NAS requires new approaches to validation, adding a significant physical experimentation component to analytical and simulation tools. In addition to software modeling and simulation, the ability to exercise system solutions in a flight environment will be an essential aspect of validation. The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Autonomy Incubator seeks to develop a flight simulation infrastructure for ab initio modeling and simulation that assumes no specific NAS architecture and models vehicle-to-vehicle behavior to examine interactions and emergent behaviors among hundreds of intelligent aerial agents exhibiting collaborative, cooperative, coordinative, selfish, and malicious behaviors. The air transportation system of the future will be a complex adaptive system (CAS) characterized by complex and sometimes unpredictable (or unpredicted) behaviors that result from temporal and spatial interactions among large numbers of participants. A CAS not only evolves with a changing environment and adapts to it, it is closely coupled to all systems that constitute the environment. Thus, the ecosystem that

  3. Wake Vortex Advisory System (WakeVAS) Evaluation of Impacts on the National Airspace System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Dollyhigh, Samuel M.

    2005-01-01

    This report is one of a series that describes an ongoing effort in high-fidelity modeling/simulation, evaluation and analysis of the benefits and performance metrics of the Wake Vortex Advisory System (WakeVAS) Concept of Operations being developed as part of the Virtual Airspace Modeling and Simulation (VAMS) project. A previous study, determined the overall increases in runway arrival rates that could be achieved at 12 selected airports due to WakeVAS reduced aircraft spacing under Instrument Meteorological Conditions. This study builds on the previous work to evaluate the NAS wide impacts of equipping various numbers of airports with WakeVAS. A queuing network model of the National Airspace System, built by the Logistics Management Institute, Mclean, VA, for NASA (LMINET) was used to estimate the reduction in delay that could be achieved by using WakeVAS under non-visual meteorological conditions for the projected air traffic demand in 2010. The results from LMINET were used to estimate the total annual delay reduction that could be achieved and from this, an estimate of the air carrier variable operating cost saving was made.

  4. The Proposed Use of Unmanned Aerial System Surrogate Research Aircraft for National Airspace System Integration Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Charles T., III

    2011-01-01

    Research is needed to determine what procedures, aircraft sensors and other systems will be required to allow Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) to safely operate with manned aircraft in the National Airspace System (NAS). This paper explores the use of Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Surrogate research aircraft to serve as platforms for UAS systems research, development, and flight testing. These aircraft would be manned with safety pilots and researchers that would allow for flight operations almost anywhere in the NAS without the need for a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Certificate of Authorization (COA). With pilot override capability, these UAS Surrogate aircraft would be controlled from ground stations like true UAS s. It would be possible to file and fly these UAS Surrogate aircraft in the NAS with normal traffic and they would be better platforms for real world UAS research and development over existing vehicles flying in restricted ranges or other sterilized airspace. These UAS surrogate aircraft could be outfitted with research systems as required such as computers, state sensors, video recording, data acquisition, data link, telemetry, instrumentation, and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B). These surrogate aircraft could also be linked to onboard or ground based simulation facilities to further extend UAS research capabilities. Potential areas for UAS Surrogate research include the development, flight test and evaluation of sensors to aide in the process of air traffic "see-and-avoid". These and other sensors could be evaluated in real-time and compared with onboard human evaluation pilots. This paper examines the feasibility of using UAS Surrogate research aircraft as test platforms for a variety of UAS related research.

  5. Human factors considerations for the integration of unmanned aerial vehicles in the National Airspace System : an analysis of reports submitted to the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Successful integration of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) operations into the National Airspace System requires the identification and mitigation of operational risks. This report reviews human factors issues that have been identified in operational as...

  6. Effects of future space vehicle operations on a single day in the National Airspace System : a fast-time computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This document describes the objectives, methods, analyses, and results of a study used to quantify the effects of future space operations : on the National Airspace System (NAS), and to demonstrate the possible benefits of one proposed strategy to mi...

  7. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project: KDP-A for Phase 2 Minimum Operational Performance Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindle, Laurie; Hackenberg, Davis L.

    2016-01-01

    UAS Integration in the NAS Project has: a) Developed Technical Challenges that are crucial to UAS integration, aligned with NASA's Strategic Plan and Thrusts, and support FAA standards development. b) Demonstrated rigorous project management processes through the execution of previous phases. c) Defined Partnership Plans. d) Established path to KDP-C. Request approval of Technical Challenges, execution of partnerships and plans, and execution of near-term FY17 activities. There is an increasing need to fly UAS in the NAS to perform missions of vital importance to National Security and Defense, Emergency Management, and Science. There is also an emerging need to enable commercial applications such as cargo transport (e.g. FedEx). Unencumbered NAS Access for Civil/Commercial UAS. Provide research findings, utilizing simulation and flight tests, to support the development and validation of DAA and C2 technologies necessary for integrating Unmanned Aircraft Systems into the National Airspace System.

  8. Impacts of technology on the capacity needs of the US national airspace system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausrotas, Raymond A.; Simpson, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    A review of the U.S. air transportation system is undertaken, focusing on airspace and airport capacity. Causes of delay and congestion are investigated. Aircraft noise is identified as the fundamental hindrance to capacity improvement. Research areas for NASA are suggested to improve capacity through technology.

  9. Interim Strategies for Flying UAVs in the U.S. National Airspace System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-02

    other airspace users, if any. – Method of communication between UAV operations team and ATC facilities – UAV behavior in case of loss of control link...operations team and ATC facilities • UAV behavior in case of loss of control link with UAV. • UAV control methodology • Method to avoid other

  10. Uncorrelated Encounter Model of the National Airspace System, Version 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    between two IFR aircraft in oceanic airspace. The reason for this is that one cannot observe encounters of sufficient fidelity in the available data...does not observe a sufficient number of encounters between instrument flight rules ( IFR ) and non- IFR traffic beyond 12 NM from the shore. 4 TABLE 1...Encounter model categories. Aircraft of Interest Intruder Aircraft Location Flight Rule IFR VFR Noncooperative Noncooperative Conventional

  11. Dynamic Airspace Configuration Tool (DACT), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Metron Aviation will develop optimization algorithms and an automated tool for performing dynamic airspace configuration under different operational scenarios. The...

  12. Transportation and access for sub-national island jurisdictions

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    The overall aim of this paper is to discern lessons from the category of sub-national island jurisdictions (SNIJs) which have in some way exploited and capitalized upon their airspace, territorial waters, seaports and harbours to solve their transportation problems as well as enhance their global economic competitiveness and development. The focus here is on sub-national island territories (larger than municipalities) which have and use, to varying degrees, their formal and ...

  13. Military Special Use Airspace: Atlantic / Gulf of Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Military Special Use Airspace is airspace of defined dimensions identified by an area on the surface of the earth wherein activities must be confined because of...

  14. National Radiobiology Archives Distributed Access user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, C.; Smith, S.; Prather, J.

    1991-11-01

    This User's Manual describes installation and use of the National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) Distributed Access package. The package consists of a distributed subset of information representative of the NRA databases and database access software which provide an introduction to the scope and style of the NRA Information Systems

  15. Transition Airspace Resource Management, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Similar to how the FAA's Terminal Flight Data Manager will bring runway use configuration support to a large number of airports in the National Airspace System,...

  16. Evaluating the Impact of Unrestricted Operation of Unmanned Aircraft Systems in the National Airspace System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) can be used for scientific, emergency management, and defense missions, among others. The existing federal air regulations,...

  17. National Radiobiology Archives distributed access programmer's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prather, J.C.; Smith, S.K.; Watson, C.R.

    1991-12-01

    The National Radiobiology Archives is a comprehensive effort to gather, organize, and catalog original data, representative specimens, and supporting materials related to significant radiobiology studies. This provides researchers with information for analyses which compare or combine results of these and other studies and with materials for analysis by advanced molecular biology techniques. This Programmer's Guide document describes the database access software, NRADEMO, and the subset loading script NRADEMO/MAINT/MAINTAIN, which comprise the National Laboratory Archives Distributed Access Package. The guide is intended for use by an experienced database management specialist. It contains information about the physical and logical organization of the software and data files. It also contains printouts of all the scripts and associated batch processing files. It is part of a suite of documents published by the National Radiobiology Archives

  18. Access to the Palais des Nations

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2004-01-01

    The United Nations Office at Geneva (UNOG) has informed CERN of very strict rules concerning access to the Palais des Nations that have recently come into effect in the framework of tightened security measures. Access is henceforth restricted to persons visiting the Palais on official business or for a guided tour. The presentation of a CERN card is no longer sufficient for such purposes. Those concerned must go either to the reception area at the Pregny entrance in the case of one-off visits or to the villa "Les Feuillantines" to be issued with an identity badge. UNOG wishes to thank the members of the CERN personnel and the beneficiaries of the Pension Fund for their understanding. Relations with the Host States Service http://www.cern.ch/relations/ Tel. 72848

  19. Trajectory Clustering with Applications to Airspace Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper presents a framework aimed at monitoring the behavior of aircraft in a given airspace. Trajectories that constitute typical operations are determined and...

  20. Share the Sky: Concepts and Technologies That Will Shape Future Airspace Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballin, Mark G.; Cotton, William; Kopardekar, Parimal

    2011-01-01

    The airspace challenge for the United States is to protect national sovereignty and ensure the safety and security of those on the ground and in the air, while at the same time ensuring the efficiency of flight, reducing the costs involved, protecting the environment, and protecting the freedom of access to the airspace. Many visions of the future NAS hold a relatively near-term perspective, focusing on existing uses of the airspace and assuming that new uses will make up a small fraction of total use. In the longer term, the skies will be filled with diverse and amazing new air vehicles filling our societal needs. Anticipated new vehicles include autonomous air vehicles acting both independently and in coordinated groups, unpiloted cargo carriers, and large numbers of personal air vehicles and small-scale point-to-point transports. These vehicles will enable new capabilities that have the potential to increase societal mobility, transport freight at lower cost and with lower environmental impact, improve the study of the Earth s atmosphere and ecosystem, and increase societal safety and security by improving or drastically lowering the cost of critical services such as firefighting, emergency medical evacuation, search and rescue, border and neighborhood surveillance, and the inspection of our infrastructure. To ensure that uses of the airspace can continue to grow for the benefit of all, a new paradigm for operations is needed: equitably and safely sharing the airspace. This paper is an examination of such a vision, concentrating on the operations of all types of air vehicles and future uses of the National Airspace. Attributes of a long-term future airspace system are provided, emerging operations technologies are described, and initial steps in research and development are recommended.

  1. 76 FR 12209 - Access to Aircraft Situation Display (ASDI) and National Airspace System Status Information (NASSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ..., property or company, including a threat of death, kidnapping or serious bodily harm against an individual... company, including a threat of death, kidnapping or serious bodily harm against an individual, a recent...

  2. National Airspace System : incomplete transition back to national maintenance and certification standards in the Federal Aviation Administration's Alaskan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-30

    FAA's Alaska Region has not fully returned to the national standards, but FAA officials believe that the transition will be completed by January 1, 2002. Seven of the 12 locations had finished updating maintenance and certification information into M...

  3. National Airspace System: Incomplete Transition Back to National Maintenance and Certification Standards in the Federal Aviation Administration's Alaskan Region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dillingham, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    .... Early in 2001, the Federal Labor Relations Authority ruled that FAA must revert back to the national maintenance and certification standards in the Alaskan Region because FAA had not negotiated...

  4. BIODIVERSITY OF NATIONAL SQUASH CULTIVAR ACCESSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Bukharov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The squash is one of  the most  ancient plants, bearing numerous qualities. The squash gave high yield and is unpretentious plant, the fruit of which is long-stored and can be used as boiled, stewed, baked, fried product, and be added to bread, mush and pudding, and be prepared as puree, jam, candied fruit and other meals. Owing to useful characteristics the squash is a valuable source or raw  material for  food  canning  industry,  for  health-care and functional foodstuff production. Its best cultivar accessions contain to 30% of dry matter, to 12% of sugars  and  to  36%  of  carotene.  The  species  of  squash includes 4 subspecies and 20 varieties. One accession that came from Spain in 1937 served as an initial breeding accession for many other table cultivars for long time. For 80 years of national breeding program the many cultivars for  table  use have been released. There are the classic cultivars, such as ‘Mramornaya’, ‘Stolovaya Zimnaya’,  Gribovskaya Zimnaya’,  ‘Donskaya  Sladkaya’, ‘Michurinskaya’ that are selected or developed from first Spanish accession. This richness and originality of cultivar squash accessions should be carefully preserved. There are the new generation cultivars, such as ‘Kroshka’, ‘Malishka’,    ‘Rossiyanka’,    ‘Konfetka’,    ‘Moskvichka’, ‘Vnuchka’ and many others, which are short-tendrils and suitable for  modern  mechanized cultivation  technology. Moreover the development of new cultivars, bearing resistance to biotic and abiotic stress is the main goal of nearest breeding program.

  5. 75 FR 57373 - Amendment to Class D Airspace; Miami Opa Locka Airport, FL, and Hollywood, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ...This action amends Class D airspace at Opa Locka Airport, Miami, FL; and Hollywood, FL, by correcting the geographic coordinates of the airport to aid in the navigation of our National Airspace System.

  6. ACES-Based Testbed and Bayesian Game-Theoretic Framework for Dynamic Airspace Configuration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR effort is focused on developing a Dynamic Airspace Configuration (DAC) concept where-in ARTCCs can benefit from re-configuring airspaces based on Traffic...

  7. National accessibility portal: an accessible information sharing portal for the South African disability sector

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Coetzee, L

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The National Accessibility Portal initiative is a large initiative aimed at improving the quality of life of people living with disabilities in South Africa. The initiative has several functional components, including the National Accessibility...

  8. 76 FR 65945 - Modification of Class B Airspace; Seattle, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... of defining the lateral boundaries using DME from a central VOR (SEA) should be used to define the... raising the floor of Area J from the proposed 5,000 feet mean sea level (MSL) to 6,000 feet MSL, revising... aviation easier access across the airspace. This Class B airspace area modification was initiated to ensure...

  9. On Integrating Unmanned Aircraft Systems into the National Airspace System Issues, Challenges, Operational Restrictions, Certification, and Recommendations

    CERN Document Server

    Dalamagkidis, Konstantinos; Piegl, Les A

    2012-01-01

    This book presents, in a comprehensive way, current unmanned aviation regulation, airworthiness certification, special aircraft categories, pilot certification, federal aviation requirements, operation rules, airspace classes and regulation development models. It discusses unmanned aircraft systems levels of safety derived mathematically based on the corresponding levels for manned aviation. It provides an overview of the history and current status of UAS airworthiness and operational regulation worldwide. Existing regulations have been developed considering the need for a complete regulatory framework for UAS. It focuses on UAS safety assessment and functional requirements, achieved in terms of defining an “Equivalent Level of Safety”, or ELOS, with that of manned aviation, specifying what the ELOS requirement entails for UAS regulations. To accomplish this, the safety performance of manned aviation is first evaluated, followed by a novel model to derive reliability requirements for achieving target lev...

  10. Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration into the National Airspace System Visual-Line-of-Sight Human-in-the-Loop Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Ghatas, Rania W.; Mcadaragh, Raymon; Burdette, Daniel W.; Comstock, James R.; Hempley, Lucas E.; Fan, Hui

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) project, research on integrating small UAS (sUAS) into the NAS was underway by a human-systems integration (HSI) team at the NASA Langley Research Center. Minimal to no research has been conducted on the safe, effective, and efficient manner in which to integrate these aircraft into the NAS. sUAS are defined as aircraft weighing 55 pounds or less. The objective of this human system integration team was to build a UAS Ground Control Station (GCS) and to develop a research test-bed and database that provides data, proof of concept, and human factors guidelines for GCS operations in the NAS. The objectives of this experiment were to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of flying sUAS in Class D and Class G airspace utilizing manual control inputs and voice radio communications between the pilot, mission control, and air traffic control. The design of the experiment included three sets of GCS display configurations, in addition to a hand-held control unit. The three different display configurations were VLOS, VLOS + Primary Flight Display (PFD), and VLOS + PFD + Moving Map (Map). Test subject pilots had better situation awareness of their vehicle position, altitude, airspeed, location over the ground, and mission track using the Map display configuration. This configuration allowed the pilots to complete the mission objectives with less workload, at the expense of having better situation awareness of other aircraft. The subjects were better able to see other aircraft when using the VLOS display configuration. However, their mission performance, as well as their ability to aviate and navigate, was reduced compared to runs that included the PFD and Map displays.

  11. Accessibility observations of visually impaired users using the South African National Accessibility Portal

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Coetzee, L

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Improving the accessibility of Internet web sites and portals is becoming more important as initiatives (such as the South African National Accessibility Portal), which address the marginalisation of persons with disabilities, gather momentum...

  12. Network Centric Transponders for Airspace Integration of UAVs Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The need for a small, lightweight, remotely-operable transponder for UAVs is identified. This would allow integration of UAVs into the national airspace while...

  13. Network Centric Transponders for Airspace Integration of UAVs Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A method and device for situational awareness for unmanned air vehicles is presented. This enables integration of UAVs into the national airspace in a safe manner,...

  14. UAS Demand Generator for Discrete Airspace Density, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A key component to solving many engineering challenges of UAS integration into the National Airspace System is the ability to state the numbers of forecasted UAS by...

  15. A Method for Assessing Airspace Efficiency in Super Density Operations Using an Airspace Phase State Approach Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — One of the challenges to assessing NextGen operational improvements in the National Airspace System (NAS) lies in the ability to understand and measure the...

  16. Trajectory Clustering and an Application to Airspace Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper presents a framework aimed at monitoring the behavior of aircraft in a given airspace. Trajectories that constitute typical operations are determined and...

  17. On-Demand Special Use Airspace, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We design and develope a Decision Support Tool (DST) that supports On-Demand Special Use Airspace (SUA) scheduling and flight plan optimization around SUA between...

  18. On-Demand Special Use Airspace, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We design and develop a Decision Support Tool (DST) that supports On-Demand Special Use Airspace (SUA) scheduling and flight plan optimization around SUA between...

  19. 75 FR 41077 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Monterey, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-15

    ... National Aeronautical Charting Office (NACO) to better clarify the legal description of controlled airspace...: History The FAA received a request from NACO to clarify the legal description of the existing Class E...

  20. Massively Parallel Processing for Dynamic Airspace Configuration, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Through extensive research conducted by Mosaic ATM in the area of Dynamic Airspace Configuration (DAC), we have identified the significant benefit of the use of...

  1. Access to the Sound Archives of the Bulgarian National Radio

    OpenAIRE

    Krandeva, Anelia; Emiryan, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the sound archives of the Bulgarian National Radio (BNR). The accesses to different sound archives are analyzed. A case study for preparing a radio presentation using the existing archives is outline.

  2. The National Senior Certificate: Implications for access to higher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultimately, the article also aims to examine the use of an additional measuring instrument (in conjunction with the National Senior Certificate final matriculation examination) to determine access to higher education. Attention is focused specifically on the Stellenbosch University Access Test. The results showed that grade ...

  3. National Radiobiology Archives Distributed Access user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, C.; Smith, S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Prather, J. (Linfield Coll., McMinnville, OR (United States))

    1991-11-01

    This User's Manual describes installation and use of the National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) Distributed Access package. The package consists of a distributed subset of information representative of the NRA databases and database access software which provide an introduction to the scope and style of the NRA Information Systems.

  4. National Open Access Policy of India (Draft) Ver. 3

    OpenAIRE

    Open Access India

    2017-01-01

    A draft ‘National Open Access Policy’ for India was prepared to be submitted to: Ministries Human Resource Development and Science & Technology, Government of India on 14th February, 2017, the 15th anniversary of the BOAI (Budapest open access Initiative).

  5. Autonomous, Safe Take-Off and Landing Operations for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in the National Airspace, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Unmanned aerial systems (UAS's) and in particular intelligent, autonomous rotorcraft and fixed-wing aircraft have the potential to significantly impact modern...

  6. Autonomous, Safe Take-Off and Landing Operations for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in the National Airspace, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Unmanned aerial systems (UAS) have the potential to significantly impact modern society. While the technology for unmanned air vehicles operating day in and day out...

  7. Unmanned Aircraft Systems: Federal Actions Needed to Ensure Safety and Expand Their Potential Uses Within the National Airspace System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dillingham, Gerald L; Spisak, Teresa; Fallon, Colin; Giebel, Jim; Gilman, Evan; Hooper, David; Khanna, Jamie; Lentini, Patty; Ormond, Josh; Panwar, Manhav

    2008-01-01

    .... Many factors support the potential for expanded use of UASs. For example, the nation's industrial base has expanded to support military operations and the number of trained UAS operators is increasing as personnel return from overseas duty...

  8. Canadian National Consultation on Access to Scientific Research Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Sabourin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In June 2004, an expert Task Force, appointed by the National Research Council Canada and chaired by Dr. David Strong, came together in Ottawa to plan a National Forum as the focus of the National Consultation on Access to Scientific Research Data. The Forum, which was held in November 2004, brought together more than seventy Canadian leaders in scientific research, data management, research administration, intellectual property and other pertinent areas. This article presents a comprehensive review of the issues, and the opportunities and the challenges identified during the Forum. Complex and rich arrays of scientific databases are changing how research is conducted, speeding the discovery and creation of new concepts. Increased access will accelerate such changes even more, creating other new opportunities. With the combination of databases within and among disciplines and countries, fundamental leaps in knowledge will occur that will transform our understanding of life, the world and the universe. The Canadian research community is concerned by the need to take swift action to adapt to the substantial changes required by the scientific enterprise. Because no national data preservation organization exists, may experts believe that a national strategy on data access or policies needs to be developed, and that a "Data Task Force" be created to prepare a full national implementation strategy. Once such a national strategy is broadly supported, it is proposed that a dedicated national infrastructure, tentatively called "Data Canada", be established, to assume overall leadership in the development and execution of a strategic plan.

  9. Identification and Analysis of Future Aeronautical Communications Candidates: A Study of Concepts and Technologies to Support the Aeronautical Communications Needs in the NextGen and Beyond National Airspace System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichgers, Joel M.; Mitchell, James P.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the results of future aeronautical communications research conducted by Rockwell Collins employees under NRA contract to NASA. The overall goal of this research was to identify and begin to evaluate communication technology candidates expected to meet the long-term aircraft-to-aircraft and aircraft-to-ground data communications needs of Air Traffic Management in the NextGen and beyond National Airspace System (NAS), considering how the NAS and communications technologies will evolve during a 50-year modernization time horizon.

  10. Access to Archives at the National Archives of Namibia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Backlogs in arrangement and description; a lengthy closure period of 30 years; and failure to clearly interpret issues of sensitivity, confidentiality and privacy were some of the challenges to administering access by the National Archives. The authors present a number of recommendations which include development of clear ...

  11. Fair Access to and Benefit Sharing of Genetic Resources : National ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Fair Access to and Benefit Sharing of Genetic Resources : National Policy Development (China, Jordan, Nepal, Peru). Local practices pertaining to biodiversity conservation, crop improvement and natural resource management are under stress. Existing laws and mechanisms - such as intellectual property rights (IPRs) ...

  12. Accessibility perspectives on enabling South African sign language in the South African National Accessibility Portal

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Coetzee, L

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available and services. One such mechanism is by embedding animated Sign Language in Web pages. This paper analyses the effectiveness and appropriateness of using this approach by embedding South African Sign Language in the South African National Accessibility Portal...

  13. National accessibility portal and facebook: a case study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, LL

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available networks in order to attract more viewers to a traditional website. This paper will describe how a Facebook application works, some of the problems which were encountered, and some statistics on traffic to the National Accessibility Portal.... The term “portal” can be ambiguous but in this context the author uses the term “portal” to mean a “single point of access to information on the Internet”. Facebook can be a type of user interface or frontend for another website by using the facility...

  14. 76 FR 1377 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mosby, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mosby, MO AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Mosby, MO. Decommissioning of the Mosby non-directional beacon (NDB) at Midwest National Air Center Airport, Mosby, MO, has made this action necessary for the...

  15. Monitoring access to nationally commissioned services in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coles Suzanne

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For over 20 years, the National Health Service in England has run a system of national planning for highly specialised healthcare services. The aim is to ensure that very rare diseases are treated, and very complex procedures performed, in only a few centres, each of which maintains a volume high enough to maintain excellent outcomes. The commissioning strategy for the provision of these national services in England is strongly centralising. Centralising does however create a duty to ensure that patients distant from the treatment centres are not thereby disadvantaged. The commissioning process ensures sufficient capacity to treat the entire national caseload of clinically eligible patients. The aim of this paper is to apply the Systematic Component of Variation (SCV to study access to services commissioned by the National Specialised Commissioning Team (NSCT in England. The discussion focuses on the potential explanations for a high level of systematic variation between areas and on the use of the SCV to support the monitoring and development of these nationally commissioned services. Method Data from nationally commissioned services for the year ending 2011 were received from treating hospital. Mid year age and sex appropriate population estimates were then obtained to provide denominator data. Data were analysed at the geographic level of strategic health authority. Results 30 services met all requirements for analysis. There is no apparent relationship between SCV and number of locations from which the service is provided. On inspection high SCV is more common among recently commissioned services. Discussion The importance of the SCV lies in its ability to support the development of highly specialised services. Once the random variation has been accounted for, the reasons for a systematic component can be explored. While no absolute cut- off exists, the SCV can be used to gauge and explore services that are potentially

  16. 36 CFR 1256.70 - What controls access to national security-classified information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HISTORICAL MATERIALS Access to Materials Containing National Security-Classified Information § 1256.70 What controls access to national security-classified information? (a) The declassification of and public access... Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552, as amended). (b) Public access to documents declassified in accordance with...

  17. The National Technical Association: A Hallmark for Access and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jearld, A., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    Minority Technical Organizations (MTO) are under-utilized as a valuable resource that can help develop the next generation of scientists and engineers. For over 90 years, the National Technical Association (NTA) (www.ntaonline.org) has been the premiere technical association for scientists, engineers, architects, technologist, educators, and technical business entrepreneurs for people of color, offering professional development, mentoring and awards recognition to technical professionals. NTA and its partners are developing a diverse workforce by emphasizing enhanced access opportunities to skills development for youth among underrepresented STEM populations. Established in 1925 by Charles Summer Duke, the first African American to receive an engineering degree from Harvard University, NTA served as the model organization for more than 40 other minority technical organizations that began forming in the 1970's. NTA has served as consultants to the US government on the status of African Americans in science and engineering. The first technical organization to establish community based technical mentoring programs targeting minorities, NTA shares information and assists institutions in identifying minority talent. Members developed the first science and engineering curriculum at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU's), and are working to produce more students with geoscience degrees to ensure greater career placement with increased minority participation in the geosciences. NTA addresses the lack of access, support, and the need for networking through the longest running annual conference for technical practitioners of color. A hallmark of NTA has been access and success through inter-organizational collaborations with communities of scholars, highly experienced professionals and students to discuss the definition of what is successful geoscience education, research, and employment.

  18. 76 FR 31822 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mosby, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mosby, MO AGENCY: Federal... Mosby, MO. Decommissioning of the Mosby non-directional beacon (NDB) at Midwest National Air Center Airport, Mosby, MO, has made this action necessary to enhance the safety and management of Instrument...

  19. ACES-Based Testbed and Bayesian Game-Theoretic Framework for Dynamic Airspace Configuration, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The key innovation in this effort is the development of algorithms and a framework for automated Dynamic Airspace Configuration (DAC) using a cooperative Bayesian...

  20. Dynamic Airspace Concepts for Integration of UAS into the NAS, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address these critical needs associated with the integration of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) into the airspace, we propose to conduct research on the...

  1. Airspace Simulation Through Indoor Operation of Subscale Flight Vehicles, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An indoor environment for simulating airspace operations will be designed. Highly maneuverable subscale vehicles can be used to simulate the dynamics of full-scale...

  2. Increasing NASA SSC Range Safety by Developing the Framework to Monitor Airspace and Enforce Restrictions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Engine testing at NASA SSC poses a significant risk to general aviation due to potential smoke and excessive turbulence. The airspace over Stennis has been...

  3. Cost-effectiveness of a national public access defibrillation programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Patrick S; Teljeur, Conor; Masterson, Siobhán; O'Neill, Michelle; Harrington, Patricia; Ryan, Máirín

    2015-06-01

    Proposed Irish legislation aimed at increasing survival from out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest (OHCA) mandates the provision of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in a comprehensive range of publicly accessible premises in urban and rural areas. This study estimated the clinical and cost effectiveness of the legislation, compared with alternative programme configurations involving more targeted AED placement. We used a cost-utility analysis to estimate the costs and consequences of public access defibrillation (PAD) programmes from a societal perspective, based on AED deployment by building type. Comparator programmes ranged from those that only included building types with the highest incidence of OHCA, to the comprehensive programme outline in the proposed legislation. Data on OHCA incidence and outcomes were obtained from the Irish Out-of-Hospital-Cardiac-Arrest Register (OHCAR). Costs were obtained from the Irish health service, device suppliers and training providers. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) for the most comprehensive PAD scheme was €928,450/QALY. The ICER for the most scaled-back programme involving AED placement in transport stations, medical practices, entertainment venues, schools (excluding primary) and fitness facilities was €95,640/QALY. A 40% increase in AED utilisation when OHCAs occur in a public area could potentially render this programme cost effective. National PAD programmes involving widespread deployment of static AEDs are unlikely to be cost-effective. To improve cost-effectiveness any prospective programmes should target locations with the highest incidence of OHCA and be supported by efforts to increase AED utilisation, such as improving public awareness, increasing CPR and AED training, and establishing an EMS-linked AED register. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 10 CFR 95.35 - Access to matter classified as National Security Information and Restricted Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Control of Information § 95.35 Access to matter classified as National Security Information and Restricted Data. (a... have access to matter revealing Secret or Confidential National Security Information or Restricted Data...

  5. Securing the Global Airspace System Via Identity-Based Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2015-01-01

    Current telecommunications systems have very good security architectures that include authentication and authorization as well as accounting. These three features enable an edge system to obtain access into a radio communication network, request specific Quality-of-Service (QoS) requirements and ensure proper billing for service. Furthermore, the links are secure. Widely used telecommunication technologies are Long Term Evolution (LTE) and Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX) This paper provides a system-level view of network-centric operations for the global airspace system and the problems and issues with deploying new technologies into the system. The paper then focuses on applying the basic security architectures of commercial telecommunication systems and deployment of federated Authentication, Authorization and Accounting systems to provide a scalable, evolvable reliable and maintainable solution to enable a globally deployable identity-based secure airspace system.

  6. How Do Layered Airspace Design Parameters Affect Airspace Capacity and Safety?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunil, E.; Hoekstra, J.M.; Ellerbroek, J.; Bussink, F; Vidosavljevic, A; Delhaye, D.; Nieuwenhuisen, D

    2016-01-01

    Airspace structure can be used as a procedural mechanism for a priori separation and organization of en-route air traffic. Although many studies have explored novel structuring methods to increase en-route airspace capacity, the relationship between the level of structuring of traffic and airspace

  7. University Supports for Open Access: A Canadian National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greyson, Devon; Vezina, Kumiko; Morrison, Heather; Taylor, Donald; Black, Charlyn

    2009-01-01

    The advent of policies at research-funding organizations requiring grantees to make their funded research openly accessible alters the life cycle of scholarly research. This survey-based study explores the approaches that libraries and research administration offices at the major Canadian universities are employing to support the…

  8. Global Web Accessibility Analysis of National Government Portals and Ministry Web Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goodwin, Morten; Susar, Deniz; Nietzio, Annika

    2011-01-01

    Equal access to public information and services for all is an essential part of the United Nations (UN) Declaration of Human Rights. Today, the Web plays an important role in providing information and services to citizens. Unfortunately, many government Web sites are poorly designed and have...... accessibility barriers that prevent people with disabilities from using them. This article combines current Web accessibility benchmarking methodologies with a sound strategy for comparing Web accessibility among countries and continents. Furthermore, the article presents the first global analysis of the Web...... accessibility of 192 United Nation Member States made publically available. The article also identifies common properties of Member States that have accessible and inaccessible Web sites and shows that implementing antidisability discrimination laws is highly beneficial for the accessibility of Web sites, while...

  9. Evaluation of ADS-B Surveillance Data to Identify Flight Operations with Reduced Safety Margin in the National Airspace System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As part of the FAA's plans for modernization of the Air Traffic Control (ATC) system, Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) will be the basis of the...

  10. ROSA P : The National Transportation Library’s Repository and Open Science Access Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The National Transportation Library (NTL) was founded as an all-digital repository of US DOT research reports, technical publications and data products. NTLs primary public offering is ROSA P, the Repository and Open Science Access Portal. An open...

  11. The Promotion of Access to Information Act (PAIA) and the National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Promotion of Access to Information Act (PAIA) and the National Archives of South Africa Act: A Comparative Analysis of the Previous and Present Statutes Governing Access to Archives and Public Records, with Special Focus on the Implications of PAIA for Public Archives Services.

  12. 78 FR 26243 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Easton, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ...-0394; Airspace Docket No. 12-AEA-8] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Easton, PA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class E Airspace at Easton, PA, as the... (NPRM) to amend Class E airspace at Easton, PA (78 FR 5152) Docket No. FAA-2012-0394. Interested parties...

  13. 78 FR 48297 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bedford, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ...-0359; Airspace Docket No. 13-AEA-7] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bedford, PA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class E Airspace at Bedford, PA, as...) to amend Class E airspace at Bedford County Airport, Bedford, PA. (78 FR 32213). Interested parties...

  14. 75 FR 63708 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Kalaupapa, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ...-0650; Airspace Docket No. 10-AWP-9] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Kalaupapa, HI AGENCY: Federal... airspace at Kalaupapa, HI, to accommodate aircraft using a new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning... Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to establish controlled airspace at Kalaupapa, HI (75 FR 49868...

  15. 76 FR 18041 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Kahului, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ...-1233; Airspace Docket No. 10-AWP-21] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Kahului, HI AGENCY: Federal... airspace at Kahului Airport, Kahului, HI, to accommodate aircraft using Area Navigation (RNAV) standard... establish controlled airspace at Kahului, HI (76 FR 3571). Interested parties were invited to participate in...

  16. 77 FR 66067 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Boone, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    ...-1432; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-25] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Boone, IA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class E airspace at Boone, IA... proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend Class E airspace for the Boone, IA, area, creating additional...

  17. 77 FR 4459 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Greenfield, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ...-0846; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-18] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Greenfield, IA AGENCY: Federal... Greenfield, IA. Decommissioning of the Greenfield non-directional beacon (NDB) at Greenfield Municipal... rulemaking to amend Class E airspace for Greenfield, IA, reconfiguring controlled airspace at Greenfield...

  18. 77 FR 66069 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Perry, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    ...-1435; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-28] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Perry, IA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class E airspace at Perry, IA... proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend Class E airspace for the Perry, IA, area, creating additional...

  19. 76 FR 58715 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Wrightstown, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    ...-0623; Airspace Docket No. 11-AEA-15] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Wrightstown, NJ AGENCY: Federal... Class E airspace for the Wrightstown, NJ, area, by changing Allaire Airport to Monmouth Executive Airport, Belmar, NJ. This action also updates the airspace descriptions to be in concert with the FAAs...

  20. 78 FR 27025 - Modification of Class B Airspace; Philadelphia, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... Philadelphia, PA, Class B airspace area to ensure the containment of large turbine-powered aircraft within...: Paul Gallant, Airspace Policy and ATC Procedures Group, Office of Airspace Services, Federal Aviation... airspace floor necessary in that area to achieve the containment of aircraft. Mixing PHL arrivals and VFR...

  1. 78 FR 48298 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Commerce, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ...-0269; Airspace Docket No. 13-ASW-3] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Commerce, TX AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class E airspace at Commerce, TX. Additional controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Area Navigation (RNAV...

  2. Dynamic airspace configuration algorithms for next generation air transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jian

    The National Airspace System (NAS) is under great pressure to safely and efficiently handle the record-high air traffic volume nowadays, and will face even greater challenge to keep pace with the steady increase of future air travel demand, since the air travel demand is projected to increase to two to three times the current level by 2025. The inefficiency of traffic flow management initiatives causes severe airspace congestion and frequent flight delays, which cost billions of economic losses every year. To address the increasingly severe airspace congestion and delays, the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) is proposed to transform the current static and rigid radar based system to a dynamic and flexible satellite based system. New operational concepts such as Dynamic Airspace Configuration (DAC) have been under development to allow more flexibility required to mitigate the demand-capacity imbalances in order to increase the throughput of the entire NAS. In this dissertation, we address the DAC problem in the en route and terminal airspace under the framework of NextGen. We develop a series of algorithms to facilitate the implementation of innovative concepts relevant with DAC in both the en route and terminal airspace. We also develop a performance evaluation framework for comprehensive benefit analyses on different aspects of future sector design algorithms. First, we complete a graph based sectorization algorithm for DAC in the en route airspace, which models the underlying air route network with a weighted graph, converts the sectorization problem into the graph partition problem, partitions the weighted graph with an iterative spectral bipartition method, and constructs the sectors from the partitioned graph. The algorithm uses a graph model to accurately capture the complex traffic patterns of the real flights, and generates sectors with high efficiency while evenly distributing the workload among the generated sectors. We further improve

  3. 75 FR 32857 - Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) and National Science and Mathematics Access To Retain Talent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 691 Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) and National Science and Mathematics Access To Retain Talent Grant (National Smart Grant) Programs CFR Correction In Title 34 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 400 to End, revised as of July 1, 2009, on page 978, in...

  4. Potential access to primary health care: what does the National Program for Access and Quality Improvement data show?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchôa, Severina Alice da Costa; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre; Fronteira, Inês Santos Estevinho; Coêlho, Ardigleusa Alves; Martiniano, Claudia Santos; Brandão, Isabel Cristina Araújo; Yamamura, Mellina; Maroto, Renata Melo

    2016-01-01

    to analyze the influence of contextual indicators on the performance of municipalities regarding potential access to primary health care in Brazil and to discuss the contribution from nurses working on this access. a multicenter descriptive study based on secondary data from External Evaluation of the National Program for Access and Quality Improvement in Primary Care, with the participation of 17,202 primary care teams. The chi-square test of proportions was used to verify differences between the municipalities stratified based on size of the coverage area, supply, coordination, and integration; when necessary, the chi-square test with Yates correction or Fisher's exact test were employed. For the population variable, the Kruskal-Wallis test was used. the majority of participants were nurses (n=15.876; 92,3%). Statistically significant differences were observed between the municipalities in terms of territory (p=0.0000), availability (p=0.0000), coordination of care (p=0.0000), integration (p=0.0000) and supply (p=0.0000), verifying that the municipalities that make up area 6 tend to have better performance in these dimensions. areas 4,5 and 6 performed better in every analyzed dimension, and the nurse had a leading role in the potential to access primary health care in Brazil.

  5. National Cancer Institute Formulary: A Public-Private Partnership Providing Investigators Access to Investigational Anticancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofaro, J V; Ansher, S S; Zwiebel, J A; Ivy, P; Conley, B; Abrams, J S; Doroshow, J H

    2017-05-01

    As part of the White House Cancer Moonshot Initiative, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has developed a drug formulary to provide investigational anticancer agents to the extramural research community. This article describes how the NCI Formulary functions, how researchers may apply for access to drugs in the formulary, and the NCI's initial goals for formulary participation. Approved investigators may apply for access to formulary agents at: https://nciformulary.cancer.gov. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  6. Local consequences of national policies - a spatial analysis of preferences for forest access reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Sofie Elberg; Lundhede, Thomas; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl

    2016-01-01

    to test whether peoples' preferences for restrictions in forest access is influenced by spatial heterogeneity in local forest presence and quality conditions. Combining survey data with GIS information we assess the size of local forest cover, distance to nearest forest and forest quality indicators...... in a radius of 2.5 km from respondent's residence. We demonstrate that a nationally framed policy implementing access reductions to protect wildlife may have heterogeneous welfare consequences which can be described by a general disutility for access reductions and dependency on local forest attributes...

  7. National Airspace Review. Implementation Plan. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Member Na 0.1 Busness Aicrut Asocitin Member Niirional Air Transport Associarion Member ADVISOR Y COMMITTEE F srtnn s Aviation Administration (FAA...Assiiciation (USPA) Association (AlA) iiAirline Agn,,ciati, (FiAA) Trantsport Canada (ATPI) International Air Transport Alnritl~lAicritt A (icainFAA...Line Pilots Association (ALPA) Aereo Mesicano Seneam lMEXICOi Figure 1-2 14 S’s’iii j [ . h, X’JK’ i.:Piz o’Vc, uach iulrwhere ii lI~ t~i .. )ur to

  8. 77 FR 56115 - Safety Zone for Fireworks Display, Potomac River, National Harbor Access Channel; Oxon Hill, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone for Fireworks Display, Potomac River, National Harbor Access Channel; Oxon Hill... within the National Harbor Access Channel at Oxon Hill in Prince Georges County, Maryland. This safety... National Resort Hotel, at Oxon Hill in Prince Georges County, Maryland, scheduled on September 12, 2012 at...

  9. Utilization of Flexible Airspace Structure in Flight Efficiency Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Mihetec

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available With increasing air traffic demand in the Pan-European airspace there is a need for optimizing the use of the airspace structure (civilian and military in a manner that would satisfy the requirements of civil and military users. In the area of Europe with the highest levels of air traffic (Core area 32% of the volume of airspace above FL 195 is shared by both civil and military users. Until the introduction of the concept of flexible use of airspace, flexible airspace structures were 24 hours per day unavailable for commercial air transport. Flexible use of airspace concept provides a substantial level of dynamic airspace management by the usage of conditional routes. This paper analyses underutilization of resources, flexible airspace structures in the Pan-European airspace, especially in the south-eastern part of the traffic flows (East South Axis, reducing the efficiency of flight operations, as result of delegating the flexible structures to military users. Based on previous analysis, utilization model for flexible use of airspace is developed (scenarios with defined airspace structure. The model is based on the temporal, vertical, and modular airspace sectorisation parameters in order to optimize flight efficiency. The presented model brings significant improvement in flight efficiency (in terms of reduced flight distance for air carriers that planned to fly through the selected flexible airspace structure (LI_RST-49.

  10. Unmanned Aerial Systems Traffic Management (UTM): Safely Enabling UAS Operations in Low-Altitude Airspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaewoo; Kopardekar, Parimal H.

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility where possible, and structure where necessary. Consider the needs of national security, safe airspace operations, economic opportunities, and emerging technologies. Risk-based approach based on population density, assets on the ground, density of operations, etc. Digital, virtual, dynamic, and as needed UTM services to manage operations.

  11. 76 FR 8281 - Amendment to Class B Airspace; Cleveland, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... final rule action. The development of the CLE Class B airspace modification was a dynamic, iterative... considered in the development of the proposed airspace action presented in the NPRM. As such, the proposed...

  12. Disparities in Geographic Accessibility of National Cancer Institute Cancer Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanqing; Fu, Cong; Onega, Tracy; Shi, Xun; Wang, Fahui

    2017-11-11

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Centers form the backbone of the cancer care system in the United States since their inception in the early 1970s. Most studies on their geographic accessibility used primitive measures, and did not examine the disparities across urbanicity or demographic groups. This research uses an advanced accessibility method, termed "2-step floating catchment area (2SFCA)" and implemented in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), to capture the degree of geographic access to NCI Cancer Centers by accounting for competition intensity for the services and travel time between residents and the facilities. The results indicate that urban advantage is pronounced as the average accessibility is highest in large central metro areas, declines to large fringe metro, medium metro, small metro, micropolitan and noncore rural areas. Population under the poverty line are disproportionally concentrated in lower accessibility areas. However, on average Non-Hispanic White have the lowest geographic accessibility, followed by Hispanic, Non-Hispanic Black and Asian, and the differences are statistically significant. The "reversed racial disadvantage" in NCI Cancer Center accessibility seems counterintuitive but is consistent with an influential prior study; and it is in contrast to the common observation of co-location of concentration of minority groups and people under the poverty line.

  13. Environmental impact analysis with the airspace concept evaluation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Stephen; Capozzi, Brian; DiFelici, John; Graham, Michael; Thompson, Terry; Miraflor, Raymond M. C.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center has developed the Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES), which is a fast-time simulation tool for evaluating Air Traffic Management (ATM) systems. This paper describes linking a capability to ACES which can analyze the environmental impact of proposed future ATM systems. This provides the ability to quickly evaluate metrics associated with environmental impacts of aviation for inclusion in multi-dimensional cost-benefit analysis of concepts for evolution of the National Airspace System (NAS) over the next several decades. The methodology used here may be summarized as follows: 1) Standard Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) noise and emissions-inventory models, the Noise Impact Routing System (NIRS) and the Emissions and Dispersion Modeling System (EDMS), respectively, are linked to ACES simulation outputs; 2) appropriate modifications are made to ACES outputs to incorporate all information needed by the environmental models (e.g., specific airframe and engine data); 3) noise and emissions calculations are performed for all traffic and airports in the study area for each of several scenarios, as simulated by ACES; and 4) impacts of future scenarios are compared to the current NAS baseline scenario. This paper also provides the results of initial end-to-end, proof-of-concept runs of the integrated ACES and environmental-modeling capability. These preliminary results demonstrate that if no growth is likely to be impeded by significant environmental impacts that could negatively affect communities throughout the nation.

  14. Assessing the National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard of 2016: Can Americans Access Electronic Disclosure Information?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig F. Berning

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The debate as to whether to require mandatory labeling of genetically modified organism (GMO foods was partially settled on 29 July 2016, when President Obama signed the National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard into public law. In contrast to precipitating legislation passed by the State of Vermont that required disclosure of GMO ingredients on food shelves or food packages, the superseding National Standard allows firms to disclose bioengineered ingredients to consumers via symbols, electronic or digital links, or phone numbers, and further requires a study assessing the ability of consumers to access disclosure information by these means. This communication analyzes survey responses from 525 adults to investigate whether U.S. consumers are able to obtain information as per the disclosure methods allowed in the Federal legislation. The survey probes deeper to investigate consumer perceptions of genetically modified organisms and whether consumers would use the tools available to access disclosure about bioengineered ingredients. Findings from the survey show that 93.8% of respondents have the ability to access information via the disclosure methods permitted. Those in the lowest income group, and from the oldest age group are least likely to have such access. This provides the United State Department of Agriculture with information relevant to how they can implement the law and highlights particular demographic segments that may require additional attention to ensure the disclosed information is universally accessible.

  15. 76 FR 20233 - Revocation of Class E Airspace; Kutztown, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ...-0869; Airspace Docket No. 10-AEA-21] Revocation of Class E Airspace; Kutztown, PA AGENCY: Federal... Kutztown, PA. The Kutztown Airport has been abandoned and therefore controlled airspace associated with the..., PA, has been listed as abandoned as per NFDD09-240 (12/16/2009). After evaluation it was decided the...

  16. 75 FR 67911 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Jeannette, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    ...-0052; Airspace Docket No. 10-AEA-19] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Jeannette, PA AGENCY: Federal... Jeannette, PA. Jeannette District Hospital will no longer be using the heliport therefore reference to the... E airspace area for Jeannette, PA serves both the Monsour Medical Center Heliport and the Jeannette...

  17. 76 FR 59503 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Lebanon, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ...-0558; Airspace Docket No. 11-AEA-13] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Lebanon, PA AGENCY: Federal... at Lebanon, PA, to accommodate new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures that have been developed... amend Class E airspace 700 feet above the surface, at Lebanon, PA (76 FR 39038). Subsequent to...

  18. 77 FR 45240 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Quakertown, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ...-0386; Airspace Docket No. 12-AEA-6] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Quakertown, PA AGENCY: Federal... at Quakertown, PA, to accommodate the new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS... Class E airspace at Quakertown, PA (77 FR 30438) Docket No. FAA-2012-0386. Interested parties were...

  19. 76 FR 64234 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Palmyra, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ...-0707; Airspace Docket No. 11-AEA-17] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Palmyra, PA AGENCY: Federal... at Palmyra, PA, to accommodate new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard... (NPRM) to amend Class E airspace 700 feet above the surface, at Palmyra, PA (76 FR 49390). Interested...

  20. 77 FR 29875 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Houston, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ...-0903; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-20] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Houston, MO AGENCY: Federal... at Houston, MO. Controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Area Navigation (RNAV) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures at Houston Memorial Airport. The FAA is taking this action to enhance the...

  1. 76 FR 52230 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Forest, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ...-0378; Airspace Docket No. 11-AEA-11] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Forest, VA AGENCY: Federal... at Forest, VA, to accommodate the new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard... published in the Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to establish Class E airspace at Forest...

  2. 77 FR 4458 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Rugby, ND

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ...-0433; Airspace Docket No. 11-AGL-12] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Rugby, ND AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class E airspace for Rugby, ND. Decommissioning of the Rugby non-directional beacon (NDB) at Rugby Municipal Airport has made this action...

  3. 76 FR 45180 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Alturas, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ...-0403; Airspace Docket No. 11-AWP-3] Modification of Class E Airspace; Alturas, CA AGENCY: Federal... Alturas Municipal Airport, Alturas, CA. Controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate aircraft using... Alturas Municipal Airport. This improves the safety and management of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR...

  4. 77 FR 42427 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Grinnell, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ...-1430; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-23] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Grinnell, IA AGENCY: Federal... Class E airspace at Grinnell Regional Airport, Grinnell, IA, by removing reference to the Grinnell NDB... Regional Airport, Grinnell, IA, and amends the geographic coordinates of the airport to coincide with the...

  5. 78 FR 18800 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Decorah, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ...-1433; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-26] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Decorah, IA AGENCY: Federal... Decorah, IA. Decommissioning of the Decorah non-directional beacon (NDB) at Decorah Municipal Airport has... Register a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend Class E airspace for the Decorah, IA, area...

  6. 77 FR 68682 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Guthrie, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ...-1436; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-29] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Guthrie, IA AGENCY: Federal... Guthrie, IA. Decommissioning of the Guthrie Center non-directional radio beacon (NDB) at Guthrie County... proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend Class E airspace for the Guthrie, IA, area, creating additional...

  7. 76 FR 75449 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Stuart, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ...-0831; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-17] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Stuart, IA AGENCY: Federal... for Stuart, IA, to accommodate new COPTER area navigation (RNAV) Standard Instrument Approach... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to establish Class E airspace for Stuart, IA, creating...

  8. 75 FR 23580 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mapleton, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ...-1155; Airspace Docket No. 09-ACE-14] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mapleton, IA AGENCY: Federal... Mapleton, IA, adding additional controlled airspace to accommodate Area Navigation (RNAV) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) at James G. Whiting Memorial Field Airport, Mapleton, IA. The FAA is...

  9. 78 FR 76053 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Chariton, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ...-0255; Airspace Docket No. 13-ACE-4] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Chariton, IA AGENCY: Federal... Chariton, IA. Decommissioning of the Chariton non-directional beacon (NDB) at Chariton Municipal Airport... Register a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend Class E airspace for the Chariton, IA, area...

  10. 75 FR 23581 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Emmetsburg, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ...-1153; Airspace Docket No. 09-ACE-13] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Emmetsburg, IA AGENCY: Federal... Emmetsburg, IA, adding additional controlled airspace to accommodate Area Navigation (RNAV) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) at Emmetsburg Municipal Airport, Emmetsburg, IA. The FAA is taking...

  11. 76 FR 75447 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Centerville, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ...-0830; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-16] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Centerville, IA AGENCY: Federal... Centerville, IA. Decommissioning of the Centerville non-directional beacon (NDB) and cancellation of the NDB... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to amend Class E airspace for the Centerville, IA, area...

  12. 75 FR 4269 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Clayton, GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ... September 14, 2009 that establishes Class E Airspace at Heaven's Landing Airport, Clayton, GA. DATES... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 [Docket No. FAA-2009-0605; Airspace Docket No. 09-ASO-19] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Clayton, GA AGENCY: Federal...

  13. 76 FR 14802 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Lancaster, NH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ...-1009; Airspace Docket No. 10-ANE-111] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Lancaster, NH AGENCY: Federal... at Lancaster, NH, to accommodate a new Area Navigation Global Positioning System RNAV special... establish Class E airspace at Lancaster, NH (75 FR 81517). Interested parties were invited to participate in...

  14. 76 FR 35966 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cocoa, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ...-0070; Airspace Docket No. 10-ASO-43] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cocoa, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class E Airspace at Cocoa, FL, as the... Island Airport, Cocoa, FL (75 FR 21266) Docket No. FAA-2011-0070. Interested parties were invited to...

  15. 75 FR 17852 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Altus, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Altus, OK AGENCY: Federal... rule published in the Federal Register December 29, 2009, amending Class E airspace in the Altus, OK... published in the Federal Register a final rule amending Class E airspace in the Altus, OK area (74 FR 68666...

  16. The Influence of Traffic Structure on Airspace Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunil, E.; Hoekstra, J.M.; Ellerbroek, J.; Bussink, F; Vidosavljevic, A; Nieuwenhuisen, D

    2016-01-01

    Airspace structure can be used as a procedural mechanism for a priori separation and organization of en-route air traffic. Although many studies have explored novel structuring methods to increase en-route airspace capacity, the relationship between the level of structuring of traffic and airspace

  17. 76 FR 8624 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Barrow, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action revises Class E airspace at Wiley Post/Will... airspace coordinates for Wiley Post/Will Rogers Memorial Airport at Barrow, Alaska. This error has been... airspace at Wiley Post/Will Rogers Memorial Airport at Barrow, AK, to accommodate five amended RNAV SIAPs...

  18. Sectorization and Configuration Transition in Airspace Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current airspace is sectorized according to some predefined rules that are not flexible. To facilitate utilizing the airspace more efficiently, methods to design sectors need to be promoted. In this paper, we propose an undirected graph cut-based approach that employs a memetic local search-embedded constrained evolution algorithm, NSGA-II, to generate nondominated airspace configurations. We also propose a new concave hull-based method to automatically depict sector boundaries. In addition, we also study the configuration transition problem. We define the similarity of the two different configurations and calculate their similarity with a bisection diagram and a minimum cost flow algorithm. We build a forward network to represent configuration transitions across several consecutive time periods and use multiobjective dynamic programming to determine a series of nondominated configuration links from the first period to the end. We test our approaches by simulation in high-altitude airspace controlled by Beijing Area Control Center. The results show that our sectorization method outperforms the current configuration in practice, providing a lower sector number, lower intersector flow, more balanced workload distribution among the different sectors, and no constraint violations, so that the proposed approach shows its significant potential as practical applications for dynamic airspace configuration.

  19. Examination of Data Accession at the National Snow and Ice Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D. J.; Booker, L.

    2017-12-01

    The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) stewards nearly 750 publicly available snow and ice data sets that support research into our world's frozen realms. NSIDC data management is primarily supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and most of the data we archive and distribute is assigned to NSIDC through the funding agency programs. In addition to these mandates, NSIDC has historically offered data stewardship to researchers wanting to properly preserve and increase visibility of their research data under our primary programs (NASA, NSF, NOAA). With publishers now requiring researchers to deliver data to a repository prior to the publication of their data-related papers, we have seen an increase in researcher-initiated data accession requests. This increase is pushing us to reexamine our process to ensure timeliness in the acquisition and release of these data. In this presentation, we will discuss the support and value a researcher receives by submitting data to a trustworthy repository. We will examine NSIDC's data accession practices, and the challenges of a consistent process across NSIDC's multiple funding sponsors. Finally, we will share recent activities related to improving our process and ideas we have for enhancing the overall data accession experience.

  20. Child psychiatry in the Finnish health care reform: national criteria for treatment access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukonen, Pälvi; Salmelin, Raili K; Luoma, Ilona; Puura, Kaija; Rutanen, Mervi; Pukuri, Tarja; Tamminen, Tuula

    2010-06-01

    As a part of the Finnish National Health Care Project, to develop and validate nationwide standardised criteria for assessing the need for non-urgent child psychiatric specialised medical care (SMC). The Finnish criteria tool, a cutpoint measure indicating access to SMC, was developed on the basis of the Western Canada Waiting List Criteria Tool. The Finnish criteria were widely discussed at national level and finally confirmed by a national child psychiatric consensus meeting. The testing data included 949 new cases, aged 5-18 years, from SMC, family guidance clinics, primary health care and child protection. The Finnish Child Psychiatric Criteria Tool covers the entire case-mix of child psychiatric disorders. Danger to self or others and psychotic symptoms have been combined into a threshold item. This alone suffices to indicate access to SMC. Sensitivity of the tool was 82% and specificity 74% with cutoff point 16/75. Child psychiatric non-urgent SMC is provided in accordance with national criteria, publicly accessible in the Internet. The criteria development process evoked multisectoral discussion on organising child mental health services and, by determining the need of treatment requiring SMC, defined health policy. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2017-01-01

    This contribution is timely as it addresses accessibility in regards system hardware and software aligned with introduction of the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act (CVAA) and adjoined game industry waiver that comes into force January 2017. This is an act created...... by the USA Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to increase the access of persons with disabilities to modern communications, and for other purposes. The act impacts advanced communications services and products including text messaging; e-mail; instant messaging; video communications; browsers; game...... platforms; and games software. However, the CVAA has no legal status in the EU. This text succinctly introduces and questions implications, impact, and wider adoption. By presenting the full CVAA and game industry waiver the text targets to motivate discussions and further publications on the subject...

  2. 76 FR 53048 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Casper, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-25

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Casper, WY AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class D and Class E airspace at Casper, Natrona County International...

  3. 76 FR 64233 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Casper, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Casper, WY AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final... published in the Federal Register of August 25, 2011 that amends Class D and Class E airspace, and...

  4. 77 FR 9839 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace, and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bozeman, MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace, and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bozeman, MT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action modifies Class D and Class E airspace at Bozeman, Gallatin Field Airport...

  5. 77 FR 15297 - Proposed Establishment of Class D and E Airspace Amendment of Class E Airspace; East Hampton, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... E Airspace; East Hampton, NY AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... existing Class E airspace at East Hampton, NY, to accommodate the new air traffic control tower at East Hampton Airport. Controlled airspace is necessary for the safety and management of instrument flight rules...

  6. 77 FR 37569 - Establishment of Class D Airspace and Amendment of Class E Airspace; East Hampton, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ...; East Hampton, NY AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action establishes Class D airspace and amends existing Class E airspace at East Hampton, NY, to accommodate the new mobile airport traffic control tower (ATCT) at East Hampton Airport. Controlled airspace...

  7. 78 FR 72001 - Amendment of Class D and E Airspace, and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Salisbury, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ... Class E Airspace; Salisbury, MD AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class D and Class E airspace, and establishes Class E airspace at Salisbury-Ocean City Wicomico Regional Airport, Salisbury, MD, due to the decommissioning of the Salisbury VHF...

  8. Prioritization of Malus accessions for collection cryopreservation at the USDA-ARS National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System maintains a grafted collection of apple accessions representing 49 taxa in Geneva, NY. Dormant buds of many of these accessions have been routinely cryopreserved at the USDA-ARS National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation (NCGRP) in Fort Collins, C...

  9. 10 CFR 2.905 - Access to restricted data and national security information for parties; security clearances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... information for parties; security clearances. 2.905 Section 2.905 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES... to Adjudicatory Proceedings Involving Restricted Data and/or National Security Information § 2.905 Access to restricted data and national security information for parties; security clearances. (a) Access...

  10. Supplement analysis for Greenville Gate access to Kirschbaum Field at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Program proposes to provide additional access to the Kirschbaum Field construction laydown area. This additional access would alleviate traffic congestion at the East Gate entrance to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from Greenville Road during periods of heavy construction for the NIF. The new access would be located along the northeastern boundary of LLNL, about 305 m (1,000 ft) north of the East Gate entrance. The access road would extend from Greenville Road to the Kirschbaum Field construction laydown area and would traverse an existing storm water drainage channel. Two culverts, side by side, and a compacted road base would be installed across the channel. The security fence that runs parallel to Greenville Road would be modified to accommodate this new entrance and a vehicle gate would be installed at the entrance of Kirschbaum Field. The exiting shoulder along Greenville Road would be converted into a new turn lane for trucks entering the new gate. This analysis evaluates the impacts of constructing the Kirschbaum Field bridge and access gate at a different location than was analyzed in the NIF Project specific Analysis in the Final Programmatic environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SS and M PEIS) published in September 1996 (DOE/EIS-0236) and the Record of Decision published on December 19, 1996. Issues of concern addressed in this supplement analysis include potential impacts to wetlands downstream of the access bridge, potential impacts to the California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii) listed as threatened on the federal listing pursuant to the Endangered Species Act of 1974, and potential impacts on the 100-yr floodplain along the Arroyo Las Positas

  11. Sustainable access to safe drinking water: fundamental human right in the international and national scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Maran de Oliveira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Access to potable water is absolutely essential to the maintenance of life, as well as to provide regular exercise of other human rights. The lack of access to water in sufficient quantity or access to non-potable water may cause serious and irreparable damage to people. This paper investigates the evolution of international and national recognition of this fundamental human right, whether implicit or explicit. This was accomplished by the study of international human rights treaties, bibliographic information on water resources and their corresponding legal systems, national and international. The results suggest that sustainable access to drinking water is a fundamental human right in the context of international relations and the State. Further, even without explicitly stating this right in the Constitution of 1988, Brazil has incorporated the main international provisions on the subject, but this right must be acknowledged according to the principles of non-typical fundamental rights and the dignity of the human person. This right should be universally guaranteed by the Government in sufficient quantity and quality, regardless of the economic resources of individuals.

  12. Psychiatric comorbidity, suicidality, and in-home firearm access among a nationally representative sample of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Joseph A; Mackelprang, Jessica L; Rowhani-Rahbar, Ali; Zatzick, Douglas; Rivara, Frederick P

    2015-02-01

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death among US adolescents, and in-home firearm access is an independent risk factor for suicide. Given recommendations to limit firearm access by those with mental health risk factors for suicide, we hypothesized that adolescents with such risk factors would be less likely to report in-home firearm access. To estimate the prevalence of self-reported in-home firearm access among US adolescents, to quantify the lifetime prevalence of mental illness and suicidality (ie, suicidal ideation, planning, or attempt) among adolescents living with a firearm in the home, and to compare the prevalence of in-home firearm access between adolescents with and without specific mental health risk factors for suicide. Cross-sectional analysis of data from the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement, a nationally representative survey of 10,123 US adolescents (age range, 13-18 years) who were interviewed between February 2001 and January 2004 (response rate 82.9%). Risk factors for suicide, including a history of any mental health disorder, suicidality, or any combination of the 2. Self-reported access to a firearm in the home. One in three respondents (2778 [29.1%]) of the weighted survey sample reported living in a home with a firearm and responded to a question about firearm access; 1089 (40.9%) of those adolescents reported easy access to and the ability to shoot that firearm. Among adolescents with a firearm in home, those with access were significantly more likely to be older (15.6 vs 15.1 years), male (70.1% vs 50.9%), of non-Hispanic white race/ethnicity (86.6% vs 78.3%), and living in high-income households (40.0% vs 31.8%), and in rural areas (28.1% vs 22.6%) (P firearm access also had a higher lifetime prevalence of alcohol abuse (10.1% vs 3.8%, P firearm access. In multivariable analyses, adolescents with a history of mental illness without a history of suicidality (prevalence ratio [PR], 1.13; 95% CI, 0.98-1.29) and

  13. 36 CFR 294.2 - Navigation of aircraft within airspace reservation over the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Navigation of aircraft within airspace reservation over the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, Superior National Forest, Minnesota... Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, Superior National Forest, Minnesota. (a) Description of areas...

  14. 76 FR 38585 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Wilkes-Barre, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ...-0369; Airspace Docket No. 11-AEA-07] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Wilkes-Barre, PA...: This action proposes to establish Class E Airspace at Wilkes- Barre, PA, to accommodate new Standard... establish Class E airspace at Wilkes- Barre, PA providing the controlled airspace required to support the...

  15. 76 FR 54155 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Danville, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ...- 0766; Airspace Docket No. 11-AEA-19] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Danville, PA AGENCY... action proposes to establish Class E Airspace at Danville, PA, to accommodate new Area Navigation (RNAV... establish Class E airspace at Danville, PA, providing the controlled airspace required to support the new...

  16. 77 FR 42228 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Wilkes-Barre, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ...-0341; Airspace Docket No. 12-AEA-4] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Wilkes-Barre, PA AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E Airspace at Wilkes- Barre, PA, creating controlled airspace to... at Wilkes-Barre, PA providing the controlled airspace required to support the new RNAV GPS standard...

  17. 75 FR 51171 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Kaneohe, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ...; Airspace Docket No. 10-AWP-10] Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Kaneohe, HI AGENCY: Federal... Class D and Class E airspace at Kaneohe Bay Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS), Kaneohe, HI. The FAA is... airspace and Class E airspace upward from 700 feet above the surface at Kaneohe Bay MCAS, Kaneohe Bay, HI...

  18. 75 FR 31677 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Corpus Christi, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    ...-0089; Airspace Docket No. 10-ASW-1] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Corpus Christi, TX AGENCY: Federal... the Corpus Christi, TX area. Additional controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Standard... E airspace for the Corpus Christi, TX area, reconfiguring controlled airspace at Aransas County...

  19. 75 FR 13453 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Corpus Christi, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ...-0089; Airspace Docket No. 10-ASW-1] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Corpus Christi, TX AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace in the Corpus Christi, TX area. Additional controlled airspace... adding additional Class E airspace extending upward from 700 feet above the surface in the Corpus Christi...

  20. National Measures on Access to Genetic Resources and Benefit Sharing – The Case of the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aphrodite Smagadi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the Convention on Biological Diversity stipulated at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (Rio de Janeiro, 1992 was not merely to promote the conservation and sustainable use of biological resources, but to ensure the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from their utilisation. The Convention stresses the sovereignty that signatory states exert over the biological wealth within their jurisdiction and calls on them to enact national legislation that will contribute to fleshing out the provisions on access to genetic resources and benefit sharing. The Philippines was the first country to enact such legislation and has thus accrued a decade of experience in this field. The first and much-analysed access and benefit sharing instrument enacted by the Government of the Philippines, was Executive Order 247 of 1995. However, due to problems experienced during the implementation of the Order, draft guidelines based on the 2001 Implementing Rules to the Wildlife Act have been drafted and are expected to correct the failures of the previous law. This article takes the example of the Philippines to assess the extent to which laws regulating the access and benefit sharing of biological resources can be effective in any country.

  1. Barriers to accessing substance abuse treatment in Mexico: national comparative analysis by migration status

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background We examined Mexican migrants’ perceived barriers to entering substance abuse treatment and potential differences by gender. Methods This study analyzed a subset of household data collected in Mexico in 2011 via the Encuesta Nacional de Adicciones (National Survey of Addictions). A sample of 1,143 individuals who reported using illicit drugs was analyzed using multivariate negative binomial models to determine direct and moderated relationships of gender, migrant status, and drug dependence with perceived barriers to accessing treatment. Results Significant findings included disparities in drug dependence by migrant status. Compared with non-migrant men, women who have traveled to the United States was associated with fewer (1.3) barriers to access treatment. Fewer barriers to access care were associated with individuals residing in other regions of the country, compared to those living in Mexico City. Conclusions Drug dependence, gender, migration status and regional location are factors associated with access to needed treatment. Implications for health care policy to develop treatment services infrastructure and for future research are discussed in the context of ongoing drug policy reform in Mexico. PMID:25074067

  2. Population-based geographic access to parent and satellite National Cancer Institute Cancer Center Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Wang, Fahui

    2017-09-01

    Satellite facilities of National Cancer Institute (NCI) cancer centers have expanded their regional footprints. This study characterized geographic access to parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities nationally overall and by sociodemographics. Parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities, which were geocoded in ArcGIS, were ascertained. Travel times from every census tract in the continental United States and Hawaii to the nearest parent and satellite facilities were calculated. Census-based population attributes were used to characterize measures of geographic access for sociodemographic groups. From the 62 NCI cancer centers providing clinical care in 2014, 76 unique parent locations and 211 satellite locations were mapped. The overall proportion of the population within 60 minutes of a facility was 22% for parent facilities and 32.7% for satellite facilities. When satellites were included for potential access, the proportion of some racial groups for which a satellite was the closest NCI cancer center facility increased notably (Native Americans, 22.6% with parent facilities and 39.7% with satellite facilities; whites, 34.8% with parent facilities and 50.3% with satellite facilities; and Asians, 40.0% with parent facilities and 54.0% with satellite facilities), with less marked increases for Hispanic and black populations. Rural populations of all categories had dramatically low proportions living within 60 minutes of an NCI cancer center facility of any type (1.0%-6.6%). Approximately 14% of the population (n = 43,033,310) lived more than 180 minutes from a parent or satellite facility, and most of these individuals were Native Americans and/or rural residents (37% of Native Americans and 41.7% of isolated rural residents). Racial/ethnic and rural populations showed markedly improved geographic access to NCI cancer center care when satellite facilities were included. Cancer 2017;123:3305-11. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American

  3. 78 FR 14909 - Amendment of Class B Airspace Description; Houston, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ...-0079; Airspace Docket No. 13-AWA-1] RIN 2120-AA66 Amendment of Class B Airspace Description; Houston.... SUMMARY: This action amends the description of the Houston, TX, Class B airspace area by changing the... 14910

  4. Understanding the political economy and key drivers of energy access in addressing national energy access priorities and policies: African Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khennas, Smail

    2012-01-01

    This paper is focused on the key drivers of energy access in North and sub-Saharan Africa which are characterized by huge discrepancies in terms of energy access to modern forms of energy. The paper points out that long term development strategies and large programmes with significant financial resources are essential to achieving substantial results in terms of energy access. The paper argues that building up the energy infrastructure (power plants, grid interconnections and small-scale decentralized energy options in rural areas.) is a pre-condition for economic growth and ultimately for energy access. It underlines that historically there is a trend towards more efficient, convenient and cost effective forms of energy. Low carbon path and above all renewable will therefore play an increasing role in the energy mix in the next couple of decades. Manufacturing of capital goods for the renewable energy industry in Africa will be a key challenge to achieving energy security economic growth and energy access. - Highlights: ► Sharp differences of energy access situation and approaches between North and Sub Saharan Africa. ► Energy infrastructure is a pre-condition to economic growth and energy access. ► Interconnections and small-scale decentralized energy schemes are a good mechanism to increasing energy access. ► However interconnections will only contribute marginally to the urban-rural energy divide. ► Manufacturing of capital goods is a key challenge to economic development.

  5. Use and benefits of public access defibrillation in a nation-wide network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Møller; Folke, Fredrik; Lippert, Freddy Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) are known to increase survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The aim of this study was to examine the use and benefit of public-access defibrillation (PAD) in a nation-wide network. We primarily sought to assess survival at 1 month...... to exercise (42% vs. 0%), and with improved 30-day survival (69% vs. 15%, p=0.001). Among those presenting with a shockable rhythm, 20 (65%) had Return of Spontaneous Circulation upon arrival of EMS and 8 (26%) were conscious, which emphasizes the diagnostic value of ECG downloads from AEDs. Survival could...

  6. Internet access and use by COPD patients in the National Emphysema/COPD Association Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Technology offers opportunities to improve healthcare, but little is known about Internet use by COPD patients. We tested two hypotheses: Internet access is associated with socio-demographic disparities and frequency of use is related to perceived needs. Methods We analyzed data from a 2007–2008 national convenience sample survey of COPD patients to determine the relationship between Internet access and frequency of use with demographics, socio-economic status, COPD severity, and satisfaction with healthcare. Results Among survey respondents (response rate 7.2%; n = 914, 59.1% women, mean age 71.2 years), 34.2% reported lack of Internet access, and an additional 49% had access but used the Internet less than weekly. Multivariate models showed association between lack of access and older age (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.07, 1.13), lower income (income below $30,000 OR 2.47, 95% CI 1.63, 3.73), less education (high school highest attainment OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.54, 3.45), comorbid arthritis or mobility-related disease (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.05, 2.34). More frequent use (at least weekly) was associated with younger age (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.93, 0.98), absence of cardiovascular disease (OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.29, 0.78), but with perception of needs insufficiently met by the healthcare system, including diagnostic delay (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.06, 2.78), feeling treated poorly (OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.15, 5.24), insufficient physician time (OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.02, 5.13), and feeling their physician did not listen (OR 3.14, 95% CI 1.42, 6.95). Conclusions An analysis of the characteristics associated with Internet access and use among COPD patients identified two different patient populations. Lack of Internet access was a marker of socioeconomic disparity and mobility-associated diseases, while frequent Internet use was associated with less somatic disease but dissatisfaction with care. PMID:24755090

  7. Internet access and use by COPD patients in the National Emphysema/COPD Association Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Carlos H; St Jean, Beth L; Plauschinat, Craig A; Rogers, Barbara; Beresford, Julen; Martinez, Fernando J; Richardson, Caroline R; Han, Meilan K

    2014-04-22

    Technology offers opportunities to improve healthcare, but little is known about Internet use by COPD patients. We tested two hypotheses: Internet access is associated with socio-demographic disparities and frequency of use is related to perceived needs. We analyzed data from a 2007-2008 national convenience sample survey of COPD patients to determine the relationship between Internet access and frequency of use with demographics, socio-economic status, COPD severity, and satisfaction with healthcare. Among survey respondents (response rate 7.2%; n = 914, 59.1% women, mean age 71.2 years), 34.2% reported lack of Internet access, and an additional 49% had access but used the Internet less than weekly. Multivariate models showed association between lack of access and older age (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.07, 1.13), lower income (income below $30,000 OR 2.47, 95% CI 1.63, 3.73), less education (high school highest attainment OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.54, 3.45), comorbid arthritis or mobility-related disease (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.05, 2.34). More frequent use (at least weekly) was associated with younger age (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.93, 0.98), absence of cardiovascular disease (OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.29, 0.78), but with perception of needs insufficiently met by the healthcare system, including diagnostic delay (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.06, 2.78), feeling treated poorly (OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.15, 5.24), insufficient physician time (OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.02, 5.13), and feeling their physician did not listen (OR 3.14, 95% CI 1.42, 6.95). An analysis of the characteristics associated with Internet access and use among COPD patients identified two different patient populations. Lack of Internet access was a marker of socioeconomic disparity and mobility-associated diseases, while frequent Internet use was associated with less somatic disease but dissatisfaction with care.

  8. Understanding the political economy and key drivers of energy access in addressing national energy access priorities and policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, I.H.; Kar, Abhishek; Banerjee, Manjushree; Kumar, Preeth; Shardul, Martand; Mohanty, Jeevan; Hossain, Ijaz

    2012-01-01

    Globally, 1.5 billion people lack access to electricity and nearly 3 billion lack access to modern cooking energy options. Of the world’s “energy poor”, 95% are in Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. Within Asia, almost 80% of electricity-deprived and 86% of biomass-dependent populations are in the “Big 5” countries: Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, and Pakistan. In this paper, we discuss the broad contours of the political economy of energy access in these countries. The political economy is assessed through an examination of three sustainability objectives: accessibility of physical infrastructure; energy service delivery; and conformance to social goals. The key areas of concern include emphasis on supply-driven grid electricity; vested power dynamics favouring affluent and urban areas; unreliability of energy service provision; and misdirected and misappropriated subsidies. The above-mentioned issues are responsible for limiting accelerated achievement of universal energy access in the “Big 5” countries and need to be addressed through innovative approaches. The paper emphasizes the need for firm commitments, policy convergence, and the implementation of 'pro-poor' equitable energy policies through a broad-based energy framework of bench-marked, technology-neutral energy provisioning that ensures reliability and equity. It highlights the need for reorienting of the subsidy regime and incorporating energy service delivery indicators in monitoring and reporting mechanisms. - Highlights: ► Limited emphasis on improved cooking programmes relative to electrification schemes. ► Strong disparity between rural and urban electrification and LPG access. ► Grid extension and subsidy on cooking fuels has limited success. ► Electricity access does not indicate transition to better cooking options. ► Technology neutrality in choosing suitable alternatives may led to improved access. ► There is need to re-orient energy subsidies and incentives.

  9. The National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network Access to Parks Indicator: A National County-Level Measure of Park Proximity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussery, Emily Neusel; Yngve, Leah; Merriam, Dee; Whitfield, Geoffrey; Foster, Stephanie; Wendel, Arthur; Boehmer, Tegan

    2016-01-01

    Parks and recreation departments and public health organizations both work to improve the well-being of their communities. Measuring residential proximity to parks could be a specific area of shared interest, given that proximity to parks is needed for walking access, and the use of parks is, in turn, associated with many physical, social, and mental health benefits. The CDC's publicly available National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (NEPHTN) Access to Parks Indicator (API) focuses on one major component of access, residential proximity to parks. The API uses a commercial parks database and U.S. Census data to estimate the number and percentage of individuals in the U.S. that live within a half-mile of a park boundary, a measure commonly used to represent park proximity. The API is calculated at the state and county levels and is available for all states and counties in the U.S. Using estimates from the API, we examined the distribution of residential proximity to parks by geography and race/ethnicity. Additionally, we evaluated differences in park proximity by rural/urban status of counties. In 2010, 39% of the total U.S. population lived within a half-mile of a park. This percentage varied widely between states, ranging from 9% in West Virginia to 67% in Hawaii and 88% in the District of Columbia (DC). Park proximity was lowest among non-Hispanic whites (34.2%) and highest among individuals belonging to the non-Hispanic other race category (52.0%). Metropolitan counties had the highest percentage of residents living within a half-mile of a park (43.3%); the percentage was lower in non-metropolitan counties adjacent to a metropolitan county (15.0%) and non-metropolitan counties not adjacent to a metropolitan county (18.5%). Park proximity was higher in metropolitan counties with a larger population size and in non-metropolitan counties with a higher degree of urbanization. The NEPHTN Access to Parks Indicator provides an opportunity to understand

  10. 28 CFR 16.82 - Exemption of the National Drug Intelligence Center Data Base-limited access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Intelligence Center Data Base-limited access. 16.82 Section 16.82 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE....82 Exemption of the National Drug Intelligence Center Data Base—limited access. (a) The following... Intelligence Center Data Base (JUSTICE/NDIC-001). (2) [Reserved] (b) These exemptions apply only to the extent...

  11. The National Access to Antiretroviral Program for PHA (NAPHA) in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasombat, Sanchai; Lertpiriyasuwat, Cheewanan; Thanprasertsuk, Sombat; Suebsaeng, Laksami; Lo, Ying Ru

    2006-07-01

    To describe the development, components, initial results and lessons learned from Thailand's National Access to Antiretroviral Program for People living with HIV/AIDS (NAPHA), a historical review was conducted and program monitoring was analyzed. The national antiretroviral therapy program at different levels of the public health system was implemented with all major program components; ARV protocol development, health care professional training, drug supply chain management, laboratory network formation, monitoring and evaluation, and multi-sector and PHA involvement since 2001, which was based on elements of research, pilot projects, training, national guideline development, experiences and policy making. A national monitoring system was developed to monitor the progress of the program. From February 2001 to December 2004, the monitoring reports received from implementing hospitals showed that 58,133 cases had received antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 85% (49,477) of them were continuing to take ARV drugs. In conclusion, the NAPHA was implemented nationwide with comprehensive systems. The reports indicate achievement of expansion of the ART program. Lessons learned from the program initiation and scaling up show local leadership, comprehensive training, adherence, and coordination are essential to program effectiveness and sustainability.

  12. Remote access to information sources in National and university library: development of service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorazd Vodeb

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available National and University Library established remote access to information sources in september 2004. The article describes implementation and development of the service. Library wanted to offer information sources to users wherever and whenever they would need them. First main evaluation criteria for software selection were integration with existing authentication system and second no need for intervention user side. The EZproxy software from Useful Utilities was chosen. Key step to implementation was establishing communication between software applications EZproxy and COBISS library automation system. Library needed to obtain licence agreements from publishers. Promotion campaign aimed to notify large number of users. Only users of National & University Library were able to use the service. Other users and libraries of Ljubljana University requested to authenticate by credentials of their library. Remote access service was developed further in order to enable authentication for other libraries. We needed to establish authentication and authorisation system and also upgrade and install the communication command procedure on different servers. The data about service usage are presented.

  13. Airspace Analyzer for Assessing Airspace Directional Permeability, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We build a software tool which enables the user (airline or Air Traffic Service Provider (ATSP)) the ability to analyze the flight-level-by-flight-level permeability...

  14. Tactical Conflict Detection in Terminal Airspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Huabin; Robinson, John E.; Denery, Dallas G.

    2010-01-01

    Air traffic systems have long relied on automated short-term conflict prediction algorithms to warn controllers of impending conflicts (losses of separation). The complexity of terminal airspace has proven difficult for such systems as it often leads to excessive false alerts. Thus, the legacy system, called Conflict Alert, which provides short-term alerts in both en-route and terminal airspace currently, is often inhibited or degraded in areas where frequent false alerts occur, even though the alerts are provided only when an aircraft is in dangerous proximity of other aircraft. This research investigates how a minimal level of flight intent information may be used to improve short-term conflict detection in terminal airspace such that it can be used by the controller to maintain legal aircraft separation. The flight intent information includes a site-specific nominal arrival route and inferred altitude clearances in addition to the flight plan that includes the RNAV (Area Navigation) departure route. A new tactical conflict detection algorithm is proposed, which uses a single analytic trajectory, determined by the flight intent and the current state information of the aircraft, and includes a complex set of current, dynamic separation standards for terminal airspace to define losses of separation. The new algorithm is compared with an algorithm that imitates a known en-route algorithm and another that imitates Conflict Alert by analysis of false-alert rate and alert lead time with recent real-world data of arrival and departure operations and a large set of operational error cases from Dallas/Fort Worth TRACON (Terminal Radar Approach Control). The new algorithm yielded a false-alert rate of two per hour and an average alert lead time of 38 seconds.

  15. Configuring Airspace Sectors with Approximate Dynamic Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, Michael; Gupta, Pramod

    2010-01-01

    In response to changing traffic and staffing conditions, supervisors dynamically configure airspace sectors by assigning them to control positions. A finite horizon airspace sector configuration problem models this supervisor decision. The problem is to select an airspace configuration at each time step while considering a workload cost, a reconfiguration cost, and a constraint on the number of control positions at each time step. Three algorithms for this problem are proposed and evaluated: a myopic heuristic, an exact dynamic programming algorithm, and a rollouts approximate dynamic programming algorithm. On problem instances from current operations with only dozens of possible configurations, an exact dynamic programming solution gives the optimal cost value. The rollouts algorithm achieves costs within 2% of optimal for these instances, on average. For larger problem instances that are representative of future operations and have thousands of possible configurations, excessive computation time prohibits the use of exact dynamic programming. On such problem instances, the rollouts algorithm reduces the cost achieved by the heuristic by more than 15% on average with an acceptable computation time.

  16. National Geothermal Data System: an Exemplar of Open Access to Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, M. L.; Richard, S. M.; Blackman, H.; Anderson, A.

    2013-12-01

    The National Geothermal Data System's (NGDS - www.geothermaldata.org) formal launch in 2014 will provide open access to millions of datasets, sharing technical geothermal-relevant data across the geosciences to propel geothermal development and production. With information from all of the Department of Energy's sponsored development and research projects and geologic data from all 50 states, this free, interactive tool is opening new exploration opportunities and shortening project development by making data easily discoverable and accessible. We continue to populate our prototype functional data system with multiple data nodes and nationwide data online and available to the public. Data from state geological surveys and partners includes more than 5 million records online, including 1.48 million well headers (oil and gas, water, geothermal), 732,000 well logs, and 314,000 borehole temperatures and is growing rapidly. There are over 250 Web services and another 138 WMS (Web Map Services) registered in the system as of August, 2013. Companion projects run by Boise State University, Southern Methodist University, and USGS are adding millions of additional data records. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is managing the Geothermal Data Repository which will serve as a system node and clearinghouse for data from hundreds of DOE-funded geothermal projects. NGDS is built on the US Geoscience Information Network data integration framework, which is a joint undertaking of the USGS and the Association of American State Geologists (AASG). NGDS is fully compliant with the White House Executive Order of May 2013, requiring all federal agencies to make their data holdings publicly accessible online in open source, interoperable formats with common core and extensible metadata. The National Geothermal Data System is being designed, built, deployed, and populated primarily with grants from the US Department of Energy, Geothermal Technologies Office. To keep this operational

  17. Web standards facilitating accessibility in a digitally inclusive South Africa – Perspectives from developing the South African National Accessibility Portal

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Coetzee, L

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Many factors impact on the ability to create a digitally inclusive society in a developing world context. These include lack of access to information and communication technology (ICT), infrastructure, low literacy levels as well as low ICT related...

  18. How does national culture affect citizens' rights of access to personal health information and informed consent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockcroft, Sophie; Sandhu, Neelam; Norris, Anthony

    2009-09-01

    Two widely discussed and debated aspects of health law literature are 'informed' consent to medical treatment and the right of access to personal health information. Both are tied to the larger subject of patients' rights, including the right to privacy. This article looks at the issue of informed consent internationally, and goes further to explain some of the inequalities across the world with respect to informed consent and patients' rights legislation via an analysis of the take-up of key legislative attributes in patient consent. Specifically, the effect that national culture, as defined by the GLOBE variables, has on the rate and pattern of adoption of these consent elements is analysed using binary logistic regression to provide evidence of the existence or otherwise of a cultural predicate of the legislative approach. The article concludes by outlining the challenges presented by these differences.

  19. Remote collaboration and data access at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.

    1998-09-01

    As the number of on-site and remote collaborators has increased, the demands on the DIII-D National Program's computational infrastructure has become more severe. The Director of the DIII-D Program recognized the increased importance of computers in carrying out the DIII-D mission and in late 1997 formed the Data Analysis Programming Group. Utilizing both software and hardware improvements, this new group has been charged with increasing the DIII-D data analysis throughput and data retrieval rate. Understanding the importance of the remote collaborators, this group has developed a long term plan that will allow for fast 24 hour data access (7x24) with complete documentation and a set of data viewing and analysis tools that can be run either on the collaborators' or DIII-D's computer systems. This paper presents the group's long term plan and progress to date

  20. The benefit of the European User Community from transnational access to national radiation facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrier, Elise; Manuel Braz Fernandes, Francisco; Bujan, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Transnational access (TNA) to national radiation sources is presently provided via programmes of the European Commission by BIOSTRUCT-X and CALIPSO with a major benefit for scientists from European countries. Entirely based on scientific merit, TNA allows all European scientists to realise synchr...... development of the research infrastructure of photon science. Taking into account the present programme structure of HORIZON2020, the European Synchrotron User Organization (ESUO) sees considerable dangers for the continuation of this successful collaboration in the future....... synchrotron radiation experiments for addressing the Societal Challenges promoted in HORIZON2020. In addition, by TNA all European users directly take part in the development of the research infrastructure of facilities. The mutual interconnection of users and facilities is a strong prerequisite for future...

  1. Asylum vs sovereignty in the 21st century: How nation-state's breach international law to block access to asylum.

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, John

    2015-01-01

    Asylum was created by the international community in the 20th century to provide legal protection to individuals fleeing persecution by nation states; but the ability to secure asylum has been fundamentally reshaped by sovereign national interests in the 21st century. This paper has two objectives. First it explores the various ways in which nation-states have adopted policies and pursued agendas which prevent asylum seekers from gaining access to countries of asylum, which criminalize many w...

  2. Student Assessment of Quality of Access at the National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet Obhajajie Inegbedion

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study conducted by Inegbedion, Adu and Ofulue from the National Open University of Nigeria. The study focused on the quality of access (admission and registration at NOUN from a student perspective. A survey design was used for the study while a multi-stage sampling technique was used to select the sample size. All the 78,555 registered students in all the 61 Study Centres of the University at the time of the study formed the population; out of which 3,060 students were sampled. The questionnaire instrument is the Institutional Internal QA Tools and Instrument developed by the African Council for Distance Education (ACDE as a regulatory mechanism. The data collected were analyzed using simple statistics. The result showed that 66% of the students confirmed that NOUN has published clear policies on the admission and registration of students. About 29.1% of the students were not satisfied with the transparency of the admission process. In conclusion, the study revealed high quality of access and some deficiencies in website and Internet connectivity.

  3. The National Emergency Access Target (NEAT) and the 4-hour rule: time to review the target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Clair; Staib, Andrew; Khanna, Sankalp; Good, Norm M; Boyle, Justin; Cattell, Rohan; Heiniger, Liam; Griffin, Bronwyn R; Bell, Anthony Jr; Lind, James; Scott, Ian A

    2016-05-16

    We explored the relationship between the National Emergency Access Target (NEAT) compliance rate, defined as the proportion of patients admitted or discharged from emergency departments (EDs) within 4 hours of presentation, and the risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality of patients admitted to hospital acutely from EDs. Retrospective observational study of all de-identified episodes of care involving patients who presented acutely to the EDs of 59 Australian hospitals between 1 July 2010 and 30 June 2014. The relationship between the risk-adjusted mortality of inpatients admitted acutely from EDs (the emergency hospital standardised mortality ratio [eHSMR]: the ratio of the numbers of observed to expected deaths) and NEAT compliance rates for all presenting patients (total NEAT) and admitted patients (admitted NEAT). ED and inpatient data were aggregated for 12.5 million ED episodes of care and 11.6 million inpatient episodes of care. A highly significant (P NEAT compliance rates was found; eHSMR declined to a nadir of 73 as total and admitted NEAT compliance rates rose to about 83% and 65% respectively. Sensitivity analyses found no confounding by the inclusion of palliative care and/or short-stay patients. As NEAT compliance rates increased, in-hospital mortality of emergency admissions declined, although this direct inverse relationship is lost once total and admitted NEAT compliance rates exceed certain levels. This inverse association between NEAT compliance rates and in-hospital mortality should be considered when formulating targets for access to emergency care.

  4. Public access and use of health research: an exploratory study of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Public Access Policy using interviews and surveys of health personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Jamie; Willinsky, John; Maggio, Lauren

    2011-11-21

    In 2008, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Public Access Policy mandated open access for publications resulting from NIH funding (following a 12-month embargo). The large increase in access to research that will take place in the years to come has potential implications for evidence-based practice (EBP) and lifelong learning for health personnel. This study assesses health personnel's current use of research to establish whether grounds exist for expecting, preparing for, and further measuring the impact of the NIH Public Access Policy on health care quality and outcomes in light of time constraints and existing information resources. In all, 14 interviews and 90 surveys of health personnel were conducted at a community-based clinic and an independent teaching hospital in 2010. Health personnel were asked about the research sources they consulted and the frequency with which they consulted these sources, as well as motivation and search strategies used to locate articles, perceived level of access to research, and knowledge of the NIH Public Access Policy. In terms of current access to health information, 65% (57/88) of the health personnel reported being satisfied, while 32% (28/88) reported feeling underserved. Among the sources health personnel reported that they relied upon and consulted weekly, 83% (73/88) reported turning to colleagues, 77% (67/87) reported using synthesized information resources (eg, UpToDate and Cochrane Systematic Reviews), while 32% (28/88) reported that they consulted primary research literature. The dominant resources health personnel consulted when actively searching for health information were Google and Wikipedia, while 27% (24/89) reported using PubMed weekly. The most prevalent reason given for accessing research on a weekly basis, reported by 35% (31/88) of survey respondents, was to help a specific patient, while 31% (26/84) were motivated by general interest in research. The results provide grounds for expecting the NIH

  5. National Geothermal Data System (USA): an Exemplar of Open Access to Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, M. Lee; Richard, Stephen; Blackman, Harold; Anderson, Arlene; Patten, Kim

    2014-05-01

    The National Geothermal Data System's (NGDS - www.geothermaldata.org) formal launch in April, 2014 will provide open access to millions of data records, sharing -relevant geoscience and longer term to land use data to propel geothermal development and production. NGDS serves information from all of the U.S. Department of Energy's sponsored development and research projects and geologic data from all 50 states, using free and open source software. This interactive online system is opening new exploration opportunities and potentially shortening project development by making data easily discoverable, accessible, and interoperable. We continue to populate our prototype functional data system with multiple data nodes and nationwide data online and available to the public. Data from state geological surveys and partners includes more than 6 million records online, including 1.72 million well headers (oil and gas, water, geothermal), 670,000 well logs, and 497,000 borehole temperatures and is growing rapidly. There are over 312 interoperable Web services and another 106 WMS (Web Map Services) registered in the system as of January, 2014. Companion projects run by Southern Methodist University and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are adding millions of additional data records. The DOE Geothermal Data Repository, currently hosted on OpenEI, is a system node and clearinghouse for data from hundreds of U.S. DOE-funded geothermal projects. NGDS is built on the US Geoscience Information Network (USGIN) data integration framework, which is a joint undertaking of the USGS and the Association of American State Geologists (AASG). NGDS complies with the White House Executive Order of May 2013, requiring all federal agencies to make their data holdings publicly accessible online in open source, interoperable formats with common core and extensible metadata. The National Geothermal Data System is being designed, built, deployed, and populated primarily with support from the US

  6. 77 FR 16669 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bellefonte, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ...-1337; Airspace Docket No. 11-AEA-23] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bellefonte, PA AGENCY: Federal... at Bellefonte, PA, to accommodate new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard... Bellefonte, PA (76 FR 79564). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by...

  7. 78 FR 48296 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Factoryville, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ...-0345; Airspace Docket No. 13-AEA-6] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Factoryville, PA AGENCY: Federal... Factoryville, PA, as the Lake Henry VORTAC has been decommissioned and new standard instrument approach..., Factoryville, PA, (78 FR, 32212). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by...

  8. 77 FR 34210 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Orlando, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ...-0503; Airspace Docket No. 11-ASO-19] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Orlando, FL AGENCY: Federal... Orlando, FL, as new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures have been developed at Orlando Executive... coordinates of Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando International Airport, and Kissimmee Municipal Airport...

  9. 75 FR 37292 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cherokee, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ...-0085; Airspace Docket No. 10-ACE-1] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cherokee, IA AGENCY: Federal... Cherokee, IA. Decommissioning of the Pilot Rock non-directional beacon (NDB) at Cherokee County Regional Airport, Cherokee, IA has made this action necessary to enhance the safety and management of Instrument...

  10. 76 FR 73501 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Carroll, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ...-0845; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-19] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Carroll, IA AGENCY: Federal... Carroll, IA. Decommissioning of the Carroll non-directional beacon (NDB) at Arthur N. Neu Airport, Carroll, IA, has made this action necessary to enhance the safety and management of Instrument Flight Rule...

  11. 78 FR 72009 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Star, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Star, NC AGENCY: Federal... at Star, NC, to accommodate a new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to establish Class E airspace at Star, NC (78 FR 54413...

  12. 78 FR 63861 - Modification of Class B Airspace; Minneapolis, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    .... The FAA is taking this action to ensure containment of aircraft being vectored to and conducting dual... conforming amendments. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Colby Abbott, Airspace Policy and ATC Procedures... lateral and vertical limits of the Class B airspace to ensure the containment of large turbine-powered...

  13. 75 FR 27637 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Claremore, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ..., OK AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class E airspace for Claremore, OK, adding additional controlled airspace to accommodate Area..., OK. The FAA is taking this action to enhance the safety and management of Instrument Flight Rule (IFR...

  14. 78 FR 50323 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Lexington, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Lexington, OK AGENCY... airspace at Muldrow Army Heliport, Lexington, OK. Changes to military mission requirements require..., Lexington, OK (78 FR 33017) Docket No. FAA-2013-0272. Interested parties were invited to participate in this...

  15. 76 FR 75446 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mercury, NV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ...-0894; Airspace Docket No. 11-AWP-14] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mercury, NV AGENCY: Federal... Mercury, Desert Rock Airport, Mercury, NV. Decommissioning of the Mercury Non-Directional Beacon (NDB) at Mercury, Desert Rock Airport has made this action necessary for the safety and management of Instrument...

  16. Influences of international airliner overflights on Japanese airspace efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-25

    overflights on Japanese airspace efficiency Tomoyuki Kozuka 1 and Miyazawa Yoshikazu 1 1 Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Graduate...from 2005 to 2027 [1] . If air traffic continues to grow at its current pace, new problems will arise and Japanese airspace efficiency will be...indicate international flights originating from Japanese airports. International departures regulate their passing time through ADNAP based on the

  17. Design, Development, and Testing of a UAV Hardware-in-the-Loop Testbed for Aviation and Airspace Prognostics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Chetan; Teubert, Chris; Gorospe, George; Burgett, Drew; Quach, Cuong C.; Hogge, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The airspace is becoming more and more complicated, and will continue to do so in the future with the integration of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), autonomy, spacecraft, other forms of aviation technology into the airspace. The new technology and complexity increases the importance and difficulty of safety assurance. Additionally, testing new technologies on complex aviation systems & systems of systems can be very difficult, expensive, and sometimes unsafe in real life scenarios. Prognostic methodology provides an estimate of the health and risks of a component, vehicle, or airspace and knowledge of how that will change over time. That measure is especially useful in safety determination, mission planning, and maintenance scheduling. The developed testbed will be used to validate prediction algorithms for the real-time safety monitoring of the National Airspace System (NAS) and the prediction of unsafe events. The framework injects flight related anomalies related to ground systems, routing, airport congestion, etc. to test and verify algorithms for NAS safety. In our research work, we develop a live, distributed, hardware-in-the-loop testbed for aviation and airspace prognostics along with exploring further research possibilities to verify and validate future algorithms for NAS safety. The testbed integrates virtual aircraft using the X-Plane simulator and X-PlaneConnect toolbox, UAVs using onboard sensors and cellular communications, and hardware in the loop components. In addition, the testbed includes an additional research framework to support and simplify future research activities. It enables safe, accurate, and inexpensive experimentation and research into airspace and vehicle prognosis that would not have been possible otherwise. This paper describes the design, development, and testing of this system. Software reliability, safety and latency are some of the critical design considerations in development of the testbed. Integration of HITL elements in

  18. Development and Application of an Integrated Approach toward NASA Airspace Systems Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhydt, Richard; Fong, Robert K.; Abramson, Paul D.; Koenke, Ed

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Airspace Systems Program is contributing air traffic management research in support of the 2025 Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). Contributions support research and development needs provided by the interagency Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO). These needs generally call for integrated technical solutions that improve system-level performance and work effectively across multiple domains and planning time horizons. In response, the Airspace Systems Program is pursuing an integrated research approach and has adapted systems engineering best practices for application in a research environment. Systems engineering methods aim to enable researchers to methodically compare different technical approaches, consider system-level performance, and develop compatible solutions. Systems engineering activities are performed iteratively as the research matures. Products of this approach include a demand and needs analysis, system-level descriptions focusing on NASA research contributions, system assessment and design studies, and common systemlevel metrics, scenarios, and assumptions. Results from the first systems engineering iteration include a preliminary demand and needs analysis; a functional modeling tool; and initial system-level metrics, scenario characteristics, and assumptions. Demand and needs analysis results suggest that several advanced concepts can mitigate demand/capacity imbalances for NextGen, but fall short of enabling three-times current-day capacity at the nation s busiest airports and airspace. Current activities are focusing on standardizing metrics, scenarios, and assumptions, conducting system-level performance assessments of integrated research solutions, and exploring key system design interfaces.

  19. 76 FR 39038 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Lebanon, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ...-0558; Airspace Docket No. 11-AEA-13] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Lebanon, PA AGENCY... action proposes to establish Class E Airspace at Lebanon, PA, to accommodate new Standard Instrument..., PA, providing the controlled airspace required to support the new RNAV GPS standard instrument...

  20. 76 FR 73505 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Danville Airport, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ...-0766; Airspace Docket No. 11-AEA-19] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Danville Airport, PA AGENCY... airspace at Danville, PA, to accommodate new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS... Class E airspace at Danville, PA (76 FR 54155). Interested parties were invited to participate in this...

  1. 77 FR 30438 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Quakertown, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ...-0386; Airspace Docket No. 12-AEA-6] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Quakertown, PA AGENCY... action proposes to establish Class E Airspace at Quakertown, PA, to accommodate new Area Navigation (RNAV... Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 71 to establish Class E airspace at Quakertown, PA, providing the...

  2. 78 FR 21044 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Reading, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-09

    ...-1270; Airspace Docket No. 12-AEA-16] Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Reading, PA AGENCY... Class E Airspace at Reading, PA, as the SHAPP OM navigation aid has been decommissioned, requiring the... D and Class E airspace at Reading, PA (78 FR 5754) Docket No. FAA-2012-1270. Interested parties were...

  3. 76 FR 44258 - Removal of Class D and E Airspace; Willow Grove, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    ...-0355; Airspace Docket No. 11-AEA-8] Removal of Class D and E Airspace; Willow Grove, PA AGENCY: Federal... E airspace areas at Willow Grove, PA. The Willow Grove Naval Air Station (NAS) has closed and... airspace at Willow Grove, PA. The closing of the Willow Grove NAS and cancellation of all standard...

  4. 76 FR 79564 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bellefonte, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ...-1337; Airspace Docket No. 11-AEA-23] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Bellefonte, PA AGENCY... action proposes to establish Class E Airspace at Bellefonte, PA, to accommodate the Area Navigation (RNAV... Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 71 to establish Class E airspace at Bellefonte, PA, providing the...

  5. 78 FR 32213 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bedford, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ...-0359; Airspace Docket No. 13-AEA-7] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bedford, PA AGENCY: Federal... proposes to amend Class E Airspace at Bedford, PA, as the St. Thomas VORTAC has been decommissioned..., Bedford, PA. Airspace reconfiguration to within a 12.5-mile radius of the airport is necessary due to the...

  6. 78 FR 48081 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; McConnellsburg, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ...-0558; Airspace Docket No. 13-AEA-10] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; McConnellsburg, PA...: This action proposes to establish Class E Airspace at McConnellsburg, PA, to accommodate a new Area... Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 71 to establish Class E airspace at McConnellsburg, PA, providing the...

  7. 78 FR 72007 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; McConnellsburg, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ...-0558; Airspace Docket No. 13-AEA-10] Establishment of Class E Airspace; McConnellsburg, PA AGENCY... Airspace at McConnellsburg, PA, to accommodate a new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS... rulemaking (NPRM) to establish Class E airspace at McConnellsburg, PA, (78 FR 48081) Docket No. FAA-2013-0558...

  8. 78 FR 5152 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Easton, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ...-0394; Airspace Docket No. 12-AEA-8] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Easton, PA AGENCY: Federal... proposes to amend Class E Airspace at Easton, PA, as the Allentown VORTAC has been decommissioned and new... Instrument Approach Procedures developed at Braden Airpark, Easton, PA. Airspace reconfiguration is necessary...

  9. 76 FR 49390 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Palmyra, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ...-0707; Airspace Docket No. 11-AEA-17] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Palmyra, PA AGENCY... action proposes to establish Class E Airspace at Palmyra, PA, to accommodate new Area Navigation (RNAV... Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 71 to establish Class E airspace at Palmyra, PA, providing the...

  10. 78 FR 32212 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Factoryville, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ...-0345; Airspace Docket No. 13-AEA-6] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Factoryville, PA AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E Airspace at Factoryville, PA, as the Lake Henry VORTAC has been... surface at Seamans Field Airport, Factoryville, PA. Airspace reconfiguration within an 8.2-mile radius of...

  11. 77 FR 27666 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bar Harbor, ME

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ...-1366; Airspace Docket No. 11-ANE-13] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bar Harbor, ME AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E Airspace at Bar Harbor, ME, as the Surry Non-Directional Radio Beacon... Hancock County-Bar Harbor Airport. This action would enhance the safety and airspace management of...

  12. 77 FR 4711 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Houston, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ...-0903; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-20] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Houston, MO AGENCY... action proposes to establish Class E airspace at Houston, MO. Controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAP) at Houston Memorial Airport. The FAA is taking...

  13. 77 FR 16783 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Orlando, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ...-0503; Airspace Docket No. 11-ASO-19] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Orlando, FL AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E Airspace at Orlando, FL, as new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures have been developed at Orlando Executive Airport. This action would enhance the safety and airspace...

  14. 76 FR 3571 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Kahului, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ...-1233; Airspace Docket No. 10-AWP-21] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Kahului, HI AGENCY... action proposes to establish Class E airspace at Kahului Airport, Kahului, HI. Controlled airspace is... procedures at Kahului Airport, Kahului, HI. The FAA is proposing this action to enhance the safety and...

  15. 75 FR 49868 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Kalaupapa, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ...-0650; Airspace Docket No. 10-AWP-9] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Kalaupapa, HI AGENCY... action proposes to establish Class E airspace at Kalaupapa, HI, to accommodate aircraft using a new Area... airspace extending upward from 700 feet above the surface at Kalaupapa Airport, Kalaupapa, HI. Controlled...

  16. 77 FR 4713 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Red Cloud, NE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ...-0426; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-7] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Red Cloud, NE AGENCY... action proposes to establish Class E airspace at Red Cloud, NE. Controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAP) at Red Cloud Municipal Airport. The FAA is...

  17. 76 FR 28915 - Proposed Modification of Class E Airspace; Alturas, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ...-0403; Airspace Docket No. 11-AWP-3] Proposed Modification of Class E Airspace; Alturas, CA AGENCY... action proposes to modify Class E airspace at Alturas Municipal Airport, Alturas, CA. Controlled airspace...) standard instrument approach procedures at Alturas Municipal Airport. The FAA is proposing this action to...

  18. 75 FR 6592 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Emmetsburg, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ...-1153; Airspace Docket No. 09-ACE-13] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Emmetsburg, IA AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Emmetsburg, IA. Additional controlled airspace is necessary..., Emmetsburg, IA. The FAA is taking this action to enhance the safety and management of Instrument Flight Rules...

  19. 77 FR 71361 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Union, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ...-1434; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-27] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Union, IA AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at West Union, IA. Decommissioning of the West Union non... instrument approach procedures at George L. Scott Municipal Airport, West Union, IA. Airspace reconfiguration...

  20. 77 FR 49399 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Forest City, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ...-0654; Airspace Docket No. 12-ACE-3] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Forest City, IA AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Forest City, IA. Additional controlled airspace is necessary... accommodate new standard instrument approach procedures at Forest City Municipal Airport, Forest City, IA. The...

  1. 77 FR 50650 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Boone, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ...-1432; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-25] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Boone, IA AGENCY: Federal... proposes to amend Class E airspace at Boone, IA. Decommissioning of the Boone non-directional beacon (NDB... instrument approach procedures at Boone Municipal Airport, Boone, IA. Airspace reconfiguration is necessary...

  2. 76 FR 53360 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Stuart, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-26

    ...-0831; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-17] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Stuart, IA AGENCY... action proposes to establish Class E airspace at Stuart, IA. Controlled airspace is necessary to... surface for new standard instrument approach procedures at the City of Stuart Helistop, Stuart, IA...

  3. 75 FR 6595 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mapleton, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-10

    ...-1155; Airspace Docket No. 09-ACE-14] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mapleton, IA AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Mapleton, IA. Additional controlled airspace is necessary to..., Mapleton, IA. The FAA is taking this action to enhance the safety and management of Instrument Flight Rules...

  4. 77 FR 71362 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Decorah, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ...-1433; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-26] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Decorah, IA AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Decorah, IA. Decommissioning of the Decorah non-directional... instrument approach procedures at Decorah Municipal Airport, Decorah, IA. Airspace reconfiguration is...

  5. 77 FR 68683 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Forest City, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ...-0654; Airspace Docket No. 12-ACE-3] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Forest City, IA AGENCY: Federal... Forest City, IA. Additional controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Area Navigation (RNAV... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend Class E airspace for the Forest City, IA...

  6. 78 FR 47237 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Chariton, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ...-0255; Airspace Docket No. 13-ACE-4] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Chariton, IA AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Chariton, IA. Decommissioning of the Chariton non... for standard instrument approach procedures at Chariton Municipal Airport, Chariton, IA. Airspace...

  7. 76 FR 44288 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; New Market, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    ...-380; Airspace Docket No. 11-AEA-12] Establishment of Class E Airspace; New Market, VA AGENCY: Federal... proposes to establish Class E Airspace at New Market, VA, to accommodate the additional airspace needed for the Standard Instrument Approach Procedures developed for New Market Airport. This action would...

  8. 77 FR 68716 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Hot Springs, SD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ...-0655; Airspace Docket No. 12-AGL-6] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Hot Springs, SD AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Hot Springs, SD. Additional controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) at Hot Springs Municipal Airport...

  9. 76 FR 22011 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Carizzo Springs, Glass Ranch Airport, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ...-0877; Airspace Docket No. 10-ASW-13] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Carizzo Springs, Glass Ranch... amends Class E airspace for the Carizzo Springs, Glass Ranch Airport, TX, airspace area, to accommodate... Springs, TX. The FAA is taking this action to enhance the safety and management of Instrument Flight Rule...

  10. 77 FR 9840 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ...-1191; Airspace Docket No. 11-ANM-21] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO AGENCY... airspace at City of Colorado Springs Municipal Airport, Colorado Springs, CO. Decommissioning of the Black... controlled airspace at Colorado Springs, CO (76 FR 70920). Interested parties were invited to participate in...

  11. 75 FR 68558 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; New Hampton, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-08

    ...-1035; Airspace Docket No. 10-ACE-12] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; New Hampton, IA AGENCY... action proposes to establish Class E airspace at New Hampton, IA, to accommodate new Standard Instrument... Mercy Medical Center Heliport, New Hampton, IA. Controlled airspace is needed for the safety and...

  12. 75 FR 42630 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Lancaster, NH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ...-0323; Airspace Docket No. 10-ANE-106] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Lancaster, NH AGENCY... action proposes to establish Class E Airspace at Lancaster, NH, to accommodate a new Area Navigation... Lancaster, NH to provide controlled airspace required to support the special SIAPs for Weeks Medical Center...

  13. 75 FR 81517 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Lancaster, NH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ...-1009; Airspace Docket No. 10-ANE-111] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Lancaster, NH AGENCY... action proposes to establish Class E Airspace at Lancaster, NH to accommodate a new Area Navigation (RNAV... Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 71 to establish Class E airspace at Lancaster, NH providing the...

  14. 78 FR 52422 - Amendment of Class D and E Airspace; Wrightstown, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ...-0565; Airspace Docket No. 13-AEA-11] Amendment of Class D and E Airspace; Wrightstown, NJ AGENCY... amends Class D and E Airspace at Wrightstown, NJ, by updating the geographic coordinates and changing the...) operations within the Wrightstown, NJ airspace area. DATES: Effective date 0901 UTC, October 17, 2013. The...

  15. 78 FR 21043 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Caldwell, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-09

    ...-0609; Airspace Docket No. 12-AEA-10] Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Caldwell, NJ AGENCY... Class E Airspace at Caldwell, NJ as the Paterson Non-Directional Radio Beacon (NDB) has been... D and Class E airspace at Caldwell, NJ (78 FR 5149) Docket No. FAA-2012-0609. Interested parties...

  16. 78 FR 54413 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Star, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Star, NC AGENCY... action proposes to establish Class E Airspace at Star, NC, to accommodate a new Area Navigation (RNAV... establish Class E airspace at Star, NC, providing the controlled airspace required to support the new RNAV...

  17. 77 FR 28243 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa Beach, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ...-0099; Airspace Docket No. 12-ASO-11] Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY: Federal... Federal Register on April 11, 2012 that amends Class D airspace at Cocoa Beach, FL. DATES: Effective 0901...), amends Class D airspace at Cape Canaveral Skid Strip, Cocoa Beach, FL. A typographical error was made in...

  18. 78 FR 33019 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Commerce, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ...-0269; Airspace Docket No. 13-ASW-3] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Commerce, TX AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Commerce, TX. Additional controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) at Commerce Municipal Airport (AAF). The FAA...

  19. 76 FR 31821 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Corpus Christi, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ...-1171; Airspace Docket No. 10-ASW-16] Amendment of Class D Airspace; Corpus Christi, TX AGENCY: Federal... Class D airspace within the Corpus Christi, TX, area by updating the geographic coordinates for Cabaniss... coordinates, within Class D airspace, of the Cabaniss NOLF, Corpus Christi, TX, to coincide with the FAAs...

  20. 75 FR 43886 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Corpus Christi, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ...-0404; Airspace Docket No. 10-ASW-7] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Corpus Christi, TX AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace in the Corpus Christi, TX area. Additional controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) at Corpus Christi...

  1. 78 FR 52109 - Proposed Amendment of Class D and E Airspace, and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Salisbury, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-22

    ... Establishment of Class E Airspace; Salisbury, MD AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION..., and establish Class E airspace at Salisbury-Ocean City Wicomico Regional Airport, Salisbury, MD, due to the decommissioning of the Salisbury VHF Omnidirectional Radio Range Tactical Air Navigation Aid...

  2. The role of the National Health insurance scheme in shaping equity of access to healthcare in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Alhassan, Yussif Nagumse

    2014-01-01

    In light of recent emphasis on achieving Universal Health Coverage through social health insurance in low income countries, this thesis examined how the National Health Insurance Scheme in Ghana impacts on equity of access to healthcare in Tamale District of northern Ghana. Using mainly a qualitative approach, the thesis specifically examined whether the NHIS promotes equity in health insurance coverage and whether insured members are able to access healthcare equitably. Against this backgrou...

  3. In-home firearm access among US adolescents and the role of religious subculture: Results from a nationally representative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroope, Samuel; Tom, Joshua C

    2017-09-01

    Religious participation is linked to numerous positive safety outcomes for adolescents. Scant attention, however, has been paid to associations between religious participation and safety risks among adolescents. Using data from Add Health (N = 18,449), a nationally representative school-based sample of US adolescents, this study examines the relationship between adolescents' religious affiliation and easy access to firearms at home. Regression analyses adjust for complex sampling design and compare easy firearm access at home among conservative Protestant adolescents to adolescent firearm access in other religious traditions. Conservative Protestant adolescents have a substantially greater likelihood of easy access to a gun at home compared to adolescents of all other major religious traditions in the United States. Recognizing differences in adolescent firearm access between subcultural groups can help public health interventions more effectively identify and address the needs of vulnerable populations. The paper's conclusion considers suggestions for effective policy and programmatic initiatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A national survey of teachers on antiretroviral therapy in Malawi: access, retention in therapy and survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon D Makombe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV/AIDS is having a devastating effect on the education sector in sub-Saharan Africa. A national survey was conducted in all public sector and private sector facilities in Malawi providing antiretroviral therapy (ART to determine the uptake of ART by teachers and their outcomes while on treatment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A retrospective cohort study was carried out based on patient follow-up records from ART Registers and treatment master cards in all 138 ART clinics in Malawi; observations were censored on September 30(th 2006. By this date, Malawi's 102 public sector and 36 private sector ART clinics had registered a total of 72,328 patients for treatment. Of these, 2,643 (3.7% were teachers. Adjusting for double-registration caused by clinic transfers, it is estimated that 2,380 individual teachers had ever accessed ART. There were 15% of teachers starting ART in WHO clinical stage 1 or 2 with a CD4-lymphocyte count of access life-prolonging treatment. There is evidence that this intervention can help to mitigate some of the shortages of teaching personnel in resource-poor countries affected by a generalised HIV epidemic.

  5. The National Geoelectromagnetic Facility - an open access resource for ultra wideband electromagnetic geophysics (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, A.; Urquhart, S.; Slater, M.

    2010-12-01

    At present, the US academic community has access to two national electromagnetic (EM) instrument pools that support long-period magnetotelluric (MT) equipment suitable for crust-mantle scale studies. The requirements of near surface geophysics, hydrology, glaciology, as well as the full range of crust and mantle investigations require development of new capabilities in data acquisition with broader frequency bandwidth than these existing units, increased instrument numbers, and concomitant developments in 3D/4D data interpretation. NSF Major Research Instrumentation support has been obtained to meet these requirements by developing an initial set of next-generation instruments as a National Geoelectromagnetic Facility (NGF), available to all PIs on a cost recovery basis, and operated by Oregon State University (OSU). In contrast to existing instruments with data acquisition systems specialized to operate within specific frequency bands and for specific electromagnetic methods, the NGF model "Zen/5" instruments being co-developed by OSU and Zonge Research and Engineering Organization are based on modular receivers with a flexible number of digital and analog input channels, designed to acquire EM data at dc, and from frequencies ranging from micro-Hz to MHz. These systems can be deployed in a compact, low power configuration for extended deployments (e.g. for crust-mantle scale experiments), or in a high frequency sampling mode for near surface work. The NGF is also acquiring controlled source EM transmitters, so that investigators may carry out magnetotelluric, audio-MT, radiofrequency-MT, as well as time-domain/transient EM and DC resistivity studies. The instruments are designed to simultaneously accommodate multiple electric field dipole sensors, magnetic fluxgates and induction coil sensors. Sample rates as high as 2.5 MHz with resolution between 24 and 32 bits, depending on sample rate, are specified to allow for high fidelity recording of waveforms. The NGF

  6. Study of Womens Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Data: Investigator Access

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The SWAN Coordinating Center provides SWAN data access to SWAN Investigators through the study website. The SWAN website provides access to longitudinal data...

  7. New National Cryo-EM Facility Provides Access to Cutting-Edge Technology for Cancer Research Community | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer researchers nationwide now have access to the latest technology in the field of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM)—the study of protein structures at atomic resolution—at the Frederick National Lab for Cancer Research. The emerging technol

  8. Website accessibility in the tourism industry: an analysis of official national tourism organization websites around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Vila, Trinidad; Alén González, Elisa; Darcy, Simon

    2017-08-09

    To analyze the accessibility of official national tourism organization websites of countries around the world, in order to establish possible common patterns and rankings of those with exemplary practice through to those with the highest number of issues. The purpose for undertaking such an analysis is to provide a quasi-indicator of inclusive organizational practice for online accessibility for both destination managers and their accessible tourism consumers - domestic and overseas people with disability visiting the websites. The official tourism websites of 210 countries included in the latest World Tourism Organization report were analyzed. A website accessibility evaluation tool (website accessible test) was used in the analysis, according to AA and AAA levels of conformance to Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 requirements. Different patterns compliance to Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 were established for the clusters, which were rather similar for both AA and AAA conformance levels. The main issues in the least accessible websites were also identified, mainly focused on the following guidelines: navigable, compatible, adaptability, text alternatives and also referred to other assistive technologies. Once the main issues were established several alternatives are suggested to address them, such as implementing more prescriptive laws and regulations, complying with mandatory benchmark standards and/or having external agencies audit website designs. However, in addition to using benchmark standards, efforts to improve this situation should also be made by programmers, who should also rely on preexistent experiences and develop more dynamic knowledge. This knowledge may include text alternatives for any nontext content; creation of content that can be presented in different ways without losing information; provide ways to help users navigate, find content, determine where they are and navigate websites to maximize compatibility with assistive

  9. Digital Library for Access to Rare Materials. From pilot projects to national digitisation programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolf Knoll

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available More than ten years ago, a first image digitisation product was published by the National Library of the Czech Republic in co-operation with an almost unknown small software company. It was a CD-ROM requested by UNESCO for its Memory of the World programme. After that there were many tests concerning digitisation devices and another two CD-ROM projects were completed to present two interesting manuscripts with rich description metadata related to all the structural levels of the book, including full text. In 1995 - 1996, our first digitisation centre was built to process manuscripts and old printed books. Later, it was upgraded several times with additional devices such as scanners, book cradles for careful document fixation, sophisticated camera stands, microclimate control units, etc. Simultaneously, many software tools were developed to assist the digitisation production. The co-operation with the company became crucial for further development of this activity and both the library and the company grew thanks to each other. In 1999, another project started to output digital data: it was based on the idea of safeguarding acid-paper library materials through preservation microfilming combined with digitisation of microfilm for access purposes. In order to be able to store large amounts of image data produced by this second programme, a mass storage facility was plugged into the digitisation production line. It was based on robotic library using magnetic tapes as storage medium. Successively, the digitisation programmes began to be used also by other Czech institutions holding rare collections of documents: other libraries, museums, archives, and even castle libraries and church institutions. Today, from all the digitised documents almost half of them are from other institutions than the National Library. This is an important success that has taken place thanks to support of the Ministry of Culture through specific grant programmes. Interested

  10. Flight planning and flexible use of airspace in Free route airspace area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kodera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes changes in the flight planning caused by the introduction of Free Route Airspace Project and suggests possible measures needed to be adopted across the whole system in order to ensure military and civilian aircraft remain segregated in a way that is today ensured by the system of conditional routes. The paper suggests a possible solution in flight planning using existing flight planning tools provided by the CFMU.

  11. Early Access to Investigational Agents through the National Cancer Institute's Treatment Referral Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tali M; Boron, Matthew J

    2012-12-01

    The National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD), as an investigational new drug sponsor, may provide early access to investigational agents for treatment use. Until recently, the NCI had 3 protocol mechanisms for distributing investigational agents through the Treatment Referral Center (TRC), a service provided by the Pharmaceutical Management Branch (PMB) within the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program of the NCI's DCTD. The first mechanism is the Group C protocol, the second mechanism is the TRC protocol, and the third, and most common, mechanism is the Special Exception protocol. The purpose of this article is to describe and report on the activities of the TRC at the PMB since 2000 through the end of 2011. Capital Technology Information Services performed PMB data mining for all treatment protocols from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2011. Requests to PMB were sorted in spreadsheet format by disposition, either as referred, approved, or denied, and were counted by type, either as Group C, TRC, or Special Exception. More than 60% of requests were either referred or approved between 2000 and 2011. The peak number of requests was 1664 between 2000 and 2011 and occurred in 2003. The peak was mostly a result of Special Exception requests; however, more than 400 TRC requests and 20 Group C requests were approved that year. The total number of requests dropped precipitously after 2003, and since 2008 have totaled fewer than 50 annually. All Group C and TRC protocols were completed by March 2006. The lowest number of treatment use requests occurred in 2011. Providing agents through the Special Exception mechanism is one way that promising investigational new drug agents can get to patients with life-threatening illnesses. In general, the PMB's TRC is a useful drug information resource for sites conducting clinical research in oncology, and it provides a valuable service to the oncology community.

  12. National Geothermal Data System: Transforming the Discovery, Access, and Analytics of Data for Geothermal Exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patten, Kim [Arizona Geological Survey

    2013-05-01

    Compendium of Papers from the 38th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California February 11-13, 2013 The National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) is a distributed, interoperable network of data collected from state geological surveys across all fifty states and the nation’s leading academic geothermal centers. The system serves as a platform for sharing consistent, reliable, geothermal-relevant technical data with users of all types, while supplying tools relevant for their work. As aggregated data supports new scientific findings, this content-rich linked data ultimately broadens the pool of knowledge available to promote discovery and development of commercial-scale geothermal energy production. Most of the up-front risks associated with geothermal development stem from exploration and characterization of subsurface resources. Wider access to distributed data will, therefore, result in lower costs for geothermal development. NGDS is on track to become fully operational by 2014 and will provide a platform for custom applications for accessing geothermal relevant data in the U.S. and abroad. It is being built on the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (USGIN) data integration framework to promote interoperability across the Earth sciences community. The basic structure of the NGDS employs state-of-the art informatics to advance geothermal knowledge. The following four papers comprising this Open-File Report are a compendium of presentations, from the 38th Annual Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, taking place February 11-13, 2013 at Stanford University, Stanford, California. “NGDS Geothermal Data Domain: Assessment of Geothermal Community Data Needs,” outlines the efforts of a set of nationwide data providers to supply data for the NGDS. In particular, data acquisition, delivery, and methodology are discussed. The paper addresses the various types of data and metadata required and why simple links to existing

  13. Combined simulation-analytical model of aerodrome airspace Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach to the problem of estimating an aerodrome airspace capacity based on the idea of airspace «quantization» and transition to discrete time while imposing restrictions on the filling of quantum states by aircrafts has been developed in this paper. It is shown that such a formalism can significantly reduce the complexity of aircrafts movement simulation in the airfield zone, to take into account the restrictions imposed on the aerodrome airspace capacity by intersections of arrival and departure routes. The paper presents the results of the simulation experiment, illustrating the dependence of the aerodrome airspace capacity upon the number of aircraft routes intersections, v.kuznetsov@mstuca.aero.

  14. 32 CFR 989.28 - Airspace and range proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... attachment to the proposal sent to HQ USAF/XOO. (b) Federal Aviation Administration. The DoD and the Federal... proposal per appropriate FAA handbooks and the FAA-DoD MOU. The preliminary airspace proposal is the basis...

  15. Small World: Access to Higher Education between Methodological Nationalism and International Organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goastellec, Gaele

    2010-01-01

    What do the shared norms emerging in the regulation of access reveal about the higher education internationalisation process? The history of access norms brings to light two characteristics of this process: the spreading of sociotechnic tools and the emergence of moral entrepreneurs. Based on case studies carried out in France, the US, South…

  16. The 2007 National Federation of the Blind Youth Slam: Making Astronomy Accessible to Students Who are Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grice, Noreen A.

    2008-05-01

    In the summer of 2007, nearly two hundred blind and visually impaired high school students participated in a weeklong enrichment program at Johns Hopkins University called the National Federation of the Blind Youth Slam. They spent four days participating in hands-on science and engineering classes and exploring careers previously thought inaccessible to those without sight. The students were separated into "tracks” with each group focusing on a different field. Want to know what happened in the astronomy track? Come by this paper and see examples of accessible astronomy activities, including accessible star parties, from the Youth Slam!

  17. Addressing geographic access barriers to emergency care services: a national ecologic study of hospitals in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Thiago Augusto Hernandes; da Silva, Núbia Cristina; Amaral, Pedro Vasconcelos; Barbosa, Allan Claudius Queiroz; Rocha, João Victor Muniz; Alvares, Viviane; de Almeida, Dante Grapiuna; Thumé, Elaine; Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; de Sousa Queiroz, Rejane Christine; de Souza, Marta Rovery; Lein, Adriana; Lopes, Daniel Paulino; Staton, Catherine A; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2017-08-22

    Unequal distribution of emergency care services is a critical barrier to be overcome to assure access to emergency and surgical care. Considering this context it was objective of the present work analyze geographic access barriers to emergency care services in Brazil. A secondary aim of the study is to define possible roles to be assumed by small hospitals in the Brazilian healthcare network to overcome geographic access challenges. The present work can be classified as a cross-sectional ecological study. To carry out the present study, data of all 5843 Brazilian hospitals were categorized among high complexity centers and small hospitals. The geographical access barriers were identified through the use of two-step floating catchment area method. Once concluded the previous step an evaluation using the Getis-Ord-Gi method was performed to identify spatial clusters of municipalities with limited access to high complexity centers but well covered by well-equipped small hospitals. The analysis of accessibility index of high complexity centers highlighted large portions of the country with nearly zero hospital beds by inhabitant. In contrast, it was possible observe a group of 1595 municipalities with high accessibility to small hospitals, simultaneously with a low coverage of high complexity centers. Among the 1595 municipalities with good accessibility to small hospitals, 74% (1183) were covered by small hospitals with at least 60% of minimum emergency service requirements. The spatial clusters analysis aggregated 589 municipalities with high values related to minimum emergency service requirements. Small hospitals in these 589 cities could promote the equity in access to emergency services benefiting more than eight million people. There is a spatial disequilibrium within the country with prominent gaps in the health care network for emergency services. Taking this challenge into consideration, small hospitals could be a possible solution and foster equity in access

  18. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - 2-Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of the Grand Canyon National Park, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the Grand Canyon National Park, AZ Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 50 Aeronautics and... No. 50-2—Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of the Grand Canyon National Park, AZ Section 1... airspace, designated as the Grand Canyon National Park Special Flight Rules Area: That airspace extending...

  19. Scleractinian Density for Florida Keys national Marine Sanctuary from 1999-2012 (NODC Accession 0123059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains records of scleractinian colony density, within the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, compiled from multiple sources. These are: SCREAM,...

  20. Health and Health Care Access of Rural Women Veterans: Findings From the National Survey of Women Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordasco, Kristina M; Mengeling, Michelle A; Yano, Elizabeth M; Washington, Donna L

    2016-09-01

    Disparities in health and health care access between rural and urban Americans are well documented. There is evidence that these disparities are mirrored within the US veteran population. However, there are few studies assessing this issue among women veterans (WVs). Using the 2008-2009 National Survey of Women Veterans, a population-based cross-sectional national telephone survey, we examined rural WVs' health and health care access compared to urban WVs. We measured health using the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form (SF-12); access using measures of regular source of care (RSOC), health care utilization, and unmet needs; and barriers to getting needed care. Rural WVs have significantly worse physical health functioning compared to urban WVs (mean physical component score of 43.6 for rural WVs versus 47.2 for urban WVs; P = .007). Rural WVs were more likely to have a VA RSOC (16.4% versus 10.6%; P = .009) and use VA health care (21.7% versus 12.9%; P health care visits compared with urban WVs (mean 4.2 versus 5.9; P = .021). They had similar overall numbers of health care visits (mean 5.8 versus 7.1; P = .11 ). Access barriers were affordability for rural WVs and work release time for urban WVs. Rural WVs additionally reported that transportation was a major factor affecting health care decisions. Our findings demonstrate VA's crucial role in addressing disparities in health and health care access for rural WVs. As VA continues to strive to optimally meet the needs of all WVs, innovative care models need to account for their high health care needs and persistent barriers to care. © 2016 National Rural Health Association.

  1. Use of and access to health services in Brazil, 2013 National Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopa, Sheila Rizzato; Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Monteiro, Camila Nascimento; Szwarcwald, Célia Landmann; Goldbaum, Moisés; Cesar, Chester Luiz Galvão

    2017-06-01

    To analyze the use of health services in the Brazilian population by sociodemographic factors, according to data from the 2013 Brazilian National Health Survey. The study analyzed data from 205,000 Brazilian citizens in all age groups who participated in the Brazilian National Health Survey, a cross-sectional study carried out in 2013. Prevalence and confidence intervals were estimated for indicators related to access to and use of health services according to age group, level of education of head of household, and Brazilian macroregions. Among individuals who sought health services in the two weeks prior to the survey, 95.3% (95%CI 94.9-95.8) received care in their first visit. Percentages were higher in the following groups: 60 years of age and over; head of household with complete tertiary education; living in the South and Southeast regions. In addition, 82.5% (95%CI 81.2-83.7) of individuals who received health care and prescriptions were able to obtain all the necessary medicines, 1/3 of them from SUS. Less than half the Brazilian population (44.4%; 95%CI 43.8-45.1) visited a dentist in the 12 months prior to the survey, with smaller percentages among the following groups: 60 years of age or older; head of household with no education or up to incomplete elementary; living in the North region of Brazil. People living in the South and Southeast regions still have greater access to health services, as do those whose head of household has a higher level of education. The (re)formulation of health policies to reduce disparities should consider differences encountered between regions and social levels. Descrever o uso de serviços de saúde na população brasileira segundo fatores sociodemográficos, de acordo com dados da Pesquisa Nacional de Saúde, 2013. Foram analisados dados referentes a 205 mil brasileiros, de todas as faixas etárias, que participaram da Pesquisa Nacional de Saúde, estudo transversal conduzido em 2013. Calcularam-se as prevalências e seus

  2. Airspace Technology Demonstration 2 (ATD-2) Technology Description Document (TDD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ging, Andrew; Engelland, Shawn; Capps, Al; Eshow, Michelle; Jung, Yoon; Sharma, Shivanjli; Talebi, Ehsan; Downs, Michael; Freedman, Cynthia; Ngo, Tyler; hide

    2018-01-01

    This Technology Description Document (TDD) provides an overview of the technology for the Phase 1 Baseline Integrated Arrival, Departure, and Surface (IADS) prototype system of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Airspace Technology Demonstration 2 (ATD-2) project, to be demonstrated beginning in 2017 at Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT). Development, integration, and field demonstration of relevant technologies of the IADS system directly address recommendations made by the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) Integration Working Group (NIWG) on Surface and Data Sharing and the Surface Collaborative Decision Making (Surface CDM) concept of operations developed jointly by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and aviation industry partners. NASA is developing the IADS traffic management system under the ATD-2 project in coordination with the FAA, flight operators, CLT airport, and the National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA). The primary goal of ATD-2 is to improve the predictability and operational efficiency of the air traffic system in metroplex environments, through the enhancement, development, and integration of the nation's most advanced and sophisticated arrival, departure, and surface prediction, scheduling, and management systems. The ATD-2 project is a 5-year research activity beginning in 2015 and extending through 2020. The Phase 1 Baseline IADS capability resulting from the ATD-2 research will be demonstrated at the CLT airport beginning in 2017. Phase 1 will provide the initial demonstration of the integrated system with strategic and tactical scheduling, tactical departure scheduling to an en route meter point, and an early implementation prototype of a Terminal Flight Data Manager (TFDM) Electronic Flight Data (EFD) system. The strategic surface scheduling element of the capability is consistent with the Surface CDM Concept of Operations published in 2014 by the FAA Surface

  3. Loss of controller-pilot voice communications in domestic en route airspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-10

    With the planned implementation of ControllerPilot Data Link Communications (CPDLC) in en route airspace, information on voice communication performance in this airspace can help to predict specific benefits associated with CPDLC, identify adjustm...

  4. Medicare immunosuppressant coverage and access to kidney transplantation: a retrospective national cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grubbs Vanessa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In December 2000, Medicare eliminated time limitations in immunosuppressant coverage after kidney transplant for beneficiaries age ≥65 and those who were disabled. This change did not apply to younger non-disabled beneficiaries who qualified for Medicare only because of their end-stage renal disease (ESRD. We sought to examine access to waitlisting for kidney transplantation in a cohort spanning this policy change. Methods This was a retrospective cohort analysis of 241,150 Medicare beneficiaries in the United States Renal Data System who initiated chronic dialysis between 1/1/96 and 11/30/03. We fit interrupted time series Cox proportional hazard models to compare access to kidney transplant waitlist within 12 months of initiating chronic dialysis by age/disability status, accounting for secular trends. Results Beneficiaries age Conclusions The most recent extension in Medicare immunosuppressant coverage appears to have had little impact on the already increasing access to waitlisting among ≥65/ disabled beneficiaries eligible for the benefit but may have decreased access for younger, non-disabled beneficiaries who were not. The potential ramifications of policies on candidacy appeal for access to kidney transplantation should be considered.

  5. Varying Levels of Automation on UAS Operator Responses to Traffic Resolution Advisories in Civil Airspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Caitlin; Fern, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Continuing demand for the use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) has put increasing pressure on operations in civil airspace. The need to fly UAS in the National Airspace System (NAS) in order to perform missions vital to national security and defense, emergency management, and science is increasing at a rapid pace. In order to ensure safe operations in the NAS, operators of unmanned aircraft, like those of manned aircraft, may be required to maintain separation assurance and avoid loss of separation with other aircraft while performing their mission tasks. This experiment investigated the effects of varying levels of automation on UAS operator performance and workload while responding to conflict resolution instructions provided by the Tactical Collision Avoidance System II (TCAS II) during a UAS mission in high-density airspace. The purpose of this study was not to investigate the safety of using TCAS II on UAS, but rather to examine the effect of automation on the ability of operators to respond to traffic collision alerts. Six licensed pilots were recruited to act as UAS operators for this study. Operators were instructed to follow a specified mission flight path, while maintaining radio contact with Air Traffic Control and responding to TCAS II resolution advisories. Operators flew four, 45 minute, experimental missions with four different levels of automation: Manual, Knobs, Management by Exception, and Fully Automated. All missions included TCAS II Resolution Advisories (RAs) that required operator attention and rerouting. Operator compliance and reaction time to RAs was measured, and post-run NASA-TLX ratings were collected to measure workload. Results showed significantly higher compliance rates, faster responses to TCAS II alerts, as well as less preemptive operator actions when higher levels of automation are implemented. Physical and Temporal ratings of workload were significantly higher in the Manual condition than in the Management by Exception and

  6. Ecological and environmental data as under-utilized national resources: results of the TIE/ACCESS program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armentano, T.V.; Loucks, O.L.

    1979-06-01

    The goal of The Institute of Energy (TIE) 1977 to 1979 ACCESS program was to define the national need for ecological and environmental data and the extent to which present data documentation and archiving are meeting this need. The principal steps focussed on current data documentation and research in government, private and academic sectors of the natural science technical community, particularly as they bear on the accessibility of environmental data to secondary users. The extent to which existing data services are satisfying the needs of data users also was emphasized. The results indicate that the potential contributions which existing data and models could make are not being achieved because of inconsistencies in data documentation, inadequate communication between data suppliers and data users, and a lack of overall coordination of the data bases in national research and monitoring programs. A nationally coordinated network is proposed which focuses on regional data centers and ties together the hierarchy of data bases (national, state, and local) with the broad spectrum of potential users. The network concept includes immediate development of a comprehensive catalog of data resources in each region, with later production of a data abstract journal as one of two methods for communicating between regional and local data centers and the user community.

  7. Lack of access and continuity of adult health care: a national population-based survey

    OpenAIRE

    Dilélio,Alitéia Santiago; Tomasi,Elaine; Thumé,Elaine; Silveira,Denise Silva da; Siqueira,Fernando Carlos Vinholes; Piccini,Roberto Xavier; Silva,Suele Manjourany; Nunes,Bruno Pereira; Facchini,Luiz Augusto

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the lack of access and continuity of health care in adults. METHODS A cross-sectional population-based study was performed on a sample of 12,402 adults aged 20 to 59 years in urban areas of 100 municipalities of 23 states in the five Brazilian geopolitical regions. Barriers to the access and continuity of health care and were investigated based on receiving, needing and seeking health care (hospitalization and accident/emergency care in the last 12 months; care provided ...

  8. Lack of access and continuity of adult health care: a national population-based survey

    OpenAIRE

    Dilélio, Alitéia Santiago; Tomasi, Elaine; Thumé, Elaine; Silveira, Denise Silva da; Siqueira, Fernando Carlos Vinholes; Piccini, Roberto Xavier; Silva, Suele Manjourany; Nunes, Bruno Pereira; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the lack of access and continuity of health care in adults.METHODS A cross-sectional population-based study was performed on a sample of 12,402 adults aged 20 to 59 years in urban areas of 100 municipalities of 23 states in the five Brazilian geopolitical regions. Barriers to the access and continuity of health care and were investigated based on receiving, needing and seeking health care (hospitalization and accident/emergency care in the last 12 months; care provided b...

  9. 77 FR 12760 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Wilkes-Barre, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ...-0369; Airspace Docket No. 11-AEA-07] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Wilkes-Barre, PA..., establishing Class E airspace at Wilkes- Barre/Wyoming Valley Airport, Wilkes-Barre, PA, is being withdrawn...-Barre, PA, to accommodate new standard instrument approach procedures for Wilkes-Barre/Wyoming Valley...

  10. 78 FR 5129 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Wilkes-Barre, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    ...-0341; Airspace Docket No. 12-AEA-4] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Wilkes-Barre, PA AGENCY: Federal... Wilkes-Barre, PA, creating controlled airspace to accommodate new area navigation (RNAV) Standard...-Barre, PA, area. This action also recognizes the name change of Hanover Township Fire Station 5 Heliport...

  11. 78 FR 6258 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL...: This action proposes to amend Class E Airspace in the West ] Palm Beach, FL area, as new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) have been developed at Palm Beach County Park Airport. Airspace...

  12. 76 FR 28888 - Revocation of Class E Airspace; Gruver Cluck Ranch Airport, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Revocation of Class E Airspace; Gruver Cluck Ranch Airport... removes Class E airspace at Gruver, Cluck Ranch Airport, TX. The airport has been abandoned, thereby eliminating the need for controlled airspace in the Gruver, Cluck Ranch Airport, TX, area. The FAA is taking...

  13. 75 FR 34393 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Port Clarence, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Regulations (14 CFR) part 71 by establishing Class E airspace at Port Clarence, AK, to accommodate a new.../FIR (PAZA) boundary. Issued in Anchorage, AK, on May 28, 2010. Michael A. Tarr, Manager, Alaska Flight...-0354; Airspace Docket No. 10-AAL-10] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Port Clarence, AK...

  14. 75 FR 20774 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Fort A.P. Hill, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 [Docket No. FAA-2009-0739; Airspace Docket No. 09-AEA-14] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Fort A.P. Hill, VA AGENCY... December 7, 2009 that establishes Class E airspace at Fort A.P. Hill, VA. DATES: Effective Date: 0901 UTC...

  15. 76 FR 54689 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Hawaiian Islands, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ...; Airspace Docket No. 11-AWP-12] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Hawaiian Islands, HI AGENCY: Federal Aviation... for the Hawaiian Islands, HI. The FAA is taking this action in response to a request from the Honolulu... E airspace extending upward from 1,200 feet above the surface for the Hawaiian Islands, HI. This...

  16. 77 FR 29871 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Red Cloud, NE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ...-0426; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-7] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Red Cloud, NE AGENCY: Federal... at Red Cloud, NE. Controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Area Navigation (RNAV) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures at Red Cloud Municipal Airport. The FAA is taking this action to enhance the...

  17. 77 FR 48476 - Proposed Amendment to Class B Airspace; Detroit, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... Wayne County Airport), Terminal Control Area (TCA) (39 FR 11085). The Detroit TCA airspace, renamed... after entry. In 1985, the Detroit TCA airspace was modified to accommodate SILS procedures as the... both directions. In 1987, the last modification to the Detroit TCA airspace was accomplished to contain...

  18. 76 FR 66870 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Rugby, ND

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ...-0433; Airspace Docket No. 11-AGL-12] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Rugby, ND AGENCY: Federal... proposes to amend Class E airspace at Rugby, ND. Decommissioning of the Rugby non-directional beacon (NDB) at Rugby Municipal Airport, Rugby, ND, has made this action necessary for the safety and management...

  19. 76 FR 53356 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Greenfield, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-26

    ...-0846; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-18] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Greenfield, IA AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Greenfield, IA. Decommissioning of the Greenfield non-directional beacon (NDB) at Greenfield Municipal Airport, Greenfield, IA, has made this action necessary for...

  20. 77 FR 50647 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Perry, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ...-1435; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-28] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Perry, IA AGENCY: Federal... proposes to amend Class E airspace at Perry, IA. Decommissioning of the Perry non-directional beacon (NDB) at Perry Municipal Airport, Perry, IA, has made reconfiguration necessary for standard instrument...

  1. 76 FR 53353 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Carroll, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-26

    ...-0845; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-19] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Carroll, IA AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Carroll, IA. Decommissioning of the Carroll non-directional beacon (NDB) at Arthur N. Neu Airport, Carroll, IA, has made this action necessary for the safety and...

  2. 75 FR 17637 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cherokee, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ...-0085; Airspace Docket No. 10-ACE-1] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cherokee, IA AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Cherokee, IA. Decommissioning of the Pilot Rock non... for standard instrument approach procedures at Cherokee County Regional Airport, Cherokee, IA...

  3. 76 FR 53358 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Centerville, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-26

    ...-0830; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-16] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Centerville, IA AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Centerville, IA. Decommissioning of the Centerville non... Centerville Municipal Airport, Centerville, IA. Decommissioning of the Centerville NDB and cancellation of the...

  4. 78 FR 18798 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Union, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ...-1434; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-27] Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Union, IA AGENCY: Federal... West Union, IA. Decommissioning of the West Union non-directional beacon (NDB) at George L. Scott... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend Class E airspace for the West Union, IA...

  5. 77 FR 45987 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Guthrie, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-02

    ...-1436; Airspace Docket No. 11-ACE-29] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Guthrie, IA AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Guthrie, IA. Decommissioning of the Guthrie Center non-directional radio beacon (NDB) at Guthrie County Regional Airport, Guthrie, IA, has made this action necessary...

  6. 76 FR 5303 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Carrizo Springs, Glass Ranch Airport, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ...-0877; Airspace Docket No. 10-ASW-13] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Carrizo Springs, Glass... rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: This action proposes to amend Class E airspace for the Carrizo Springs, Glass... Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAP) at Faith Ranch Airport, Carrizo Springs, TX. The FAA is...

  7. 76 FR 70920 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ...-1191; Airspace Docket No. 11-ANM-21] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO...: This action proposes to amend Class E airspace at City of Colorado Springs Municipal Airport, Colorado Springs, CO. Decommissioning of the Black Forest Tactical Air Navigation System (TACAN) has made this...

  8. 77 FR 11796 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Rock Springs, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ...-0131; Airspace Docket No. 12-ANM-2 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Rock Springs, WY AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Rock Springs-Sweetwater County Airport, Rock Springs, WY. Decommissioning of the Rock Springs Tactical Air Navigation System (TACAN) has made this action necessary for the...

  9. 78 FR 14911 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Hot Springs, SD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ...-0655; Airspace Docket No. 12-AGL-6] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Hot Springs, SD AGENCY: Federal... Springs, SD. Additional controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Area Navigation (RNAV) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures at Hot Springs Municipal Airport. The FAA is taking this action to...

  10. 77 FR 32393 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ...; Airspace Docket No. 11-ANM-21] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Colorado Springs, CO AGENCY: Federal Aviation... date for the amendment of Class E airspace at City of Colorado Springs Municipal Airport, Colorado Springs, CO, until September 20, 2012. The FAA is taking this action to allow additional time for...

  11. 78 FR 48840 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Hampton, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ...-0585; Airspace Docket No. 13-ACE-7] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Hampton, IA AGENCY: Federal... proposes to amend Class E airspace at Hampton, IA. Decommissioning of the Hampton non-directional beacon (NDB) at Hampton Municipal Airport has made reconfiguration necessary for standard instrument approach...

  12. 75 FR 65585 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Lancaster, NH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ...-0323; Airspace Docket No. 10-ANE-106] Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Lancaster, NH AGENCY... to establish Class E airspace at Weeks Medical Center Heliport, Lancaster, NH. The NPRM is being... Lancaster, NH to accommodate special standard instrument approach procedures for Weeks Medical Center...

  13. 77 FR 40488 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Lakehurst, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ...-0456; Airspace Docket No. 12-AEA-9] Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Lakehurst, NJ AGENCY... changes the name of the airport associated with the Class D and Class E airspace at Lakehurst, NJ. The..., at Lakehurst, NJ. The airport name is changed from Lakehurst Naval Air Experimental Center Airport...

  14. 75 FR 81442 - Revocation of Class E Airspace; Lone Star, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Revocation of Class E Airspace; Lone Star, TX AGENCY... airspace at Lone Star, TX. Abandonment of the former Lone Star Steel Company ] Airport and cancellation of... the Lone Star, TX, area. The FAA is taking this action to ensure the efficient use of airspace within...

  15. 75 FR 64972 - Proposed Revocation of Class E Airspace; Lone Star, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Revocation of Class E Airspace; Lone Star, TX...: This action proposes to remove Class E airspace at Lone Star, TX. Abandonment of the former Lone Star... eliminated the need for controlled airspace in the Lone Star, TX, area. The FAA is taking this action to...

  16. 77 FR 21662 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa Beach, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ...-0099; Airspace Docket No. 12-ASO-11] Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY: Federal... Class D airspace at Cape Canaveral Skid Strip, Cocoa Beach, FL, by correcting the geographic coordinates... of Cape Canaveral Skid Strip, Cocoa Beach, FL. Also, the geographic coordinates for the airport need...

  17. 76 FR 30298 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cocoa, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ...-0070; Airspace Docket No. 10-ASO-43] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cocoa, FL AGENCY: Federal... proposes to amend Class E Airspace at Cocoa, FL, as the Merritt Island Non-Directional Beacon (NDB) has... surface to support new standard instrument approach procedures developed at Merritt Island Airport, Cocoa...

  18. 78 FR 43772 - Modification of Class B Airspace; Las Vegas, NV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    ... Las Vegas, NV, Class B airspace area to ensure the containment of large turbine-powered aircraft... INFORMATION CONTACT: Paul Gallant, Airspace Policy and ATC Procedures Group, Office of Airspace Services... the impacts as much as possible. This policy was followed throughout the entire modernization process...

  19. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within the Territory and Airspace of Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the Territory and Airspace of Ethiopia Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 87 Aeronautics... Regulation No. 87—Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within the Territory and Airspace of Ethiopia 1... airspace of Ethiopia north of 12 degrees north latitude. 3. Permitted operations. This SFAR does not...

  20. 78 FR 33017 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Lexington, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Lexington, OK...: This action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Muldrow Army Heliport, Lexington, OK. Changes to... Federal Regulations (14 CFR), Part 71 by amending Class E airspace at Muldrow Army Heliport, Lexington, OK...

  1. 75 FR 5905 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Claremore, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Claremore, OK...). SUMMARY: This action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Claremore, OK. Additional controlled airspace... Airport, Claremore, OK. The FAA is taking this action to enhance the safety and management of Instrument...

  2. 75 FR 51176 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Pauls Valley, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Pauls Valley, OK AGENCY... airspace for Pauls Valley, OK to accommodate Area Navigation (RNAV) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures... Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to amend Class E airspace for Pauls Valley, OK, creating...

  3. 75 FR 27494 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Pauls Valley, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Pauls Valley, OK...: This action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Pauls Valley, OK. Additional controlled airspace is... Municipal Airport, Pauls Valley, OK. Adjustments to the geographic coordinates would be made in ] accordance...

  4. 76 FR 56127 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mercury, NV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    ...-0894; Airspace Docket No. 11-AWP-14] Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mercury, NV AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Mercury, Desert Rock Airport, Mercury, NV. Decommissioning of the Mercury Non- Directional Beacon (NDB) at Mercury, Desert Rock Airport has made this action...

  5. 76 FR 77669 - Amendment of Class D and E Airspace; North Philadelphia, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... Class E airspace at Northeast Philadelphia Airport, North Philadelphia, PA, due to the closing of Willow... typographic error in the regulatory text for the Class E airspace radius and ceiling level, and adjusts the..., the FAA found a typographic error in the regulatory text for the radius of the controlled airspace...

  6. 78 FR 25383 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    ...-0922; Airspace Docket No. 12-ASO-38] Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Federal... West Palm Beach, FL area, as new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) have been developed at Palm Beach County Park Airport. Airspace reconfiguration is necessary for the continued safety and...

  7. 75 FR 66301 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Corpus Christi, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    ...-0404; Airspace Docket No. 10-ASW-7] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Corpus Christi, TX AGENCY: Federal... the Corpus Christi, TX, area. Additional controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAP) at Corpus Christi International Airport, Corpus Christi, TX. The FAA is...

  8. Process for selecting NEAMS applications for access to Idaho National Laboratory high performance computing resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Pernice

    2010-09-01

    INL has agreed to provide participants in the Nuclear Energy Advanced Mod- eling and Simulation (NEAMS) program with access to its high performance computing (HPC) resources under sponsorship of the Enabling Computational Technologies (ECT) program element. This report documents the process used to select applications and the software stack in place at INL.

  9. DOE's nation-wide system for access control can solve problems for the federal government

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, S.; Tomes, D.; Davis, G.; Johnson, D.; Strait, S.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) ongoing efforts to improve its physical and personnel security systems while reducing its costs, provide a model for federal government visitor processing. Through the careful use of standardized badges, computer databases, and networks of automated access control systems, the DOE is increasing the security associated with travel throughout the DOE complex, and at the same time, eliminating paperwork, special badging, and visitor delays. The DOE is also improving badge accountability, personnel identification assurance, and access authorization timeliness and accuracy. Like the federal government, the DOE has dozens of geographically dispersed locations run by many different contractors operating a wide range of security systems. The DOE has overcome these obstacles by providing data format standards, a complex-wide virtual network for security, the adoption of a standard high security system, and an open-systems-compatible link for any automated access control system. If the location's level of security requires it, positive visitor identification is accomplished by personal identification number (PIN) and/or by biometrics. At sites with automated access control systems, this positive identification is integrated into the portals

  10. Lack of access and continuity of adult health care: a national population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilélio, Alitéia Santiago; Tomasi, Elaine; Thumé, Elaine; Silveira, Denise Silva da; Siqueira, Fernando Carlos Vinholes; Piccini, Roberto Xavier; Silva, Suele Manjourany; Nunes, Bruno Pereira; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the lack of access and continuity of health care in adults. METHODS A cross-sectional population-based study was performed on a sample of 12,402 adults aged 20 to 59 years in urban areas of 100 municipalities of 23 states in the five Brazilian geopolitical regions. Barriers to the access and continuity of health care and were investigated based on receiving, needing and seeking health care (hospitalization and accident/emergency care in the last 12 months; care provided by a doctor, by other health professional or home care in the last three months). Based on the results obtained by the description of the sample, a projection is provided for adults living in Brazilian urban areas. RESULTS The highest prevalence of lack of access to health services and to provision of care by health professionals was for hospitalization (3.0%), whilst the lowest prevalence was for care provided by a doctor (1.1%). The lack of access to care provided by other health professionals was 2.0%; to accident and emergency services, 2.1%; and to home care, 2.9%. As for prevalences, the greatest absolute lack of access occurred in emergency care (more than 360,000 adults). The main reasons were structural and organizational problems, such as unavailability of hospital beds, of health professionals, of appointments for the type of care needed and charges made for care. CONCLUSIONS The universal right to health care in Brazil has not yet been achieved. These projections can help health care management in scaling the efforts needed to overcome this problem, such as expanding the infrastructure of health services and the workforce.

  11. Dynamic airspace configuration method based on a weighted graph model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yangzhou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new method for dynamic airspace configuration based on a weighted graph model. The method begins with the construction of an undirected graph for the given airspace, where the vertices represent those key points such as airports, waypoints, and the edges represent those air routes. Those vertices are used as the sites of Voronoi diagram, which divides the airspace into units called as cells. Then, aircraft counts of both each cell and of each air-route are computed. Thus, by assigning both the vertices and the edges with those aircraft counts, a weighted graph model comes into being. Accordingly the airspace configuration problem is described as a weighted graph partitioning problem. Then, the problem is solved by a graph partitioning algorithm, which is a mixture of general weighted graph cuts algorithm, an optimal dynamic load balancing algorithm and a heuristic algorithm. After the cuts algorithm partitions the model into sub-graphs, the load balancing algorithm together with the heuristic algorithm transfers aircraft counts to balance workload among sub-graphs. Lastly, airspace configuration is completed by determining the sector boundaries. The simulation result shows that the designed sectors satisfy not only workload balancing condition, but also the constraints such as convexity, connectivity, as well as minimum distance constraint.

  12. National Program for Improving Access and Quality of Primary Care: Implications of its implementation in the Brazilian Northeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ianna Priscilla Dantas de Queiroz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Ministry of Health has been very interested in initiative to maintain and / or improve the quality of population health, among which the National Program for Improving Access and Quality of Basic Care (PMAQ stands out. Objective: To analyze the changes in the area of work management of the basic care teams after the implementation of the Program of Improvement of Access and Quality of Primary Care (PMAQ from the perspective of professionals inserted in Primary Care. Method: This is a descriptive study with a qualitative approach, carried out in the city of Santa Cruz, in the county of the PMAQ implementation in the Trairi region, in the state of Rio Grande do Norte, from September to November 2016. Two techniques were used for data collection: the semi-structured interview with the secretary of health and coordinator of basic care of the county, and the technique of focus group with the graduated professionals who work in the Basic Units that joined the PMAQ. Results: From this analysis emerged 3 categories: Implementation of the National Program for Improving Access and Quality of Primary Care, PMAQ encouraging changes in the health work process, and Evaluation on the PMAQ. Conclusion: The main change made by the PMAQ in the work process of Primary Care professionals was their organization.   KEY WORDS: primary health Care; Unified Health System; human resources.

  13. Octocoral Density for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary from 1999-2009. (NODC Accession 0123059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Using data collected from 1999 to 2009, the dataset includes species density of benthic octocorals collected from multiple habitat types across the south Florida...

  14. The Role of Access to Finance in Explaining Cross-National Variation in Entrepreneurial Activity: A Panel Data Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Gabriel Anton

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to investigate to what extent access to finance explains differences in entrepreneurial activity across European Union (EU member countries. We use a dataset containing information across countries and time to investigate the determinants of entrepreneurial activity in twenty-five EU members over the period between 2007 and 2013. Our sample comprises both periods of difficult access to finance and periods of excessive liquidities. Employing a panel data model with fixed effects, we found a positive relationship between access to finance and entrepreneurial activities. Furthermore, we showed that this positive relationship is more important for the individuals who believe they have the required skills and knowledge to start a business. The results proved to be robust when we employed different measures of entrepreneurial activity and several proxies for access to finance. Our findings provide empirical evidence for the need of policy initiatives at national and EU level to facilitate the creation of sustainable new ventures.

  15. Caribbean Equal Access Program: HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nancy Dancy, NLM, and Wilma Templin-Branner, ORISE

    2009-01-01

    As the treatment and management of HIV/AIDS continues to evolve with new scientific breakthroughs, treatment discoveries, and management challenges, it is difficult for people living with HIV/AIDS and those who care for them to keep up with the latest information on HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and research. The National Library of Medicine, of the National Institutes of Health, has a wealth of health information resources freely available on the Internet to address these needs.

  16. National Radiobiology Archives Distributed Access User`s Manual, Version 1.1. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.K.; Prather, J.C.; Ligotke, E.K.; Watson, C.R.

    1992-06-01

    This supplement to the NRA Distributed Access User`s manual (PNL-7877), November 1991, describes installation and use of Version 1.1 of the software package; this is not a replacement of the previous manual. Version 1.1 of the NRA Distributed Access Package is a maintenance release. It eliminates several bugs, and includes a few new features which are described in this manual. Although the appearance of some menu screens has changed, we are confident that the Version 1.0 User`s Manual will provide an adequate introduction to the system. Users who are unfamiliar with Version 1.0 may wish to experiment with that version before moving on to Version 1.1.

  17. National Radiobiology Archives Distributed Access User's Manual, Version 1. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.K.; Prather, J.C.; Ligotke, E.K.; Watson, C.R.

    1992-06-01

    This supplement to the NRA Distributed Access User's manual (PNL-7877), November 1991, describes installation and use of Version 1.1 of the software package; this is not a replacement of the previous manual. Version 1.1 of the NRA Distributed Access Package is a maintenance release. It eliminates several bugs, and includes a few new features which are described in this manual. Although the appearance of some menu screens has changed, we are confident that the Version 1.0 User's Manual will provide an adequate introduction to the system. Users who are unfamiliar with Version 1.0 may wish to experiment with that version before moving on to Version 1.1.

  18. Access to information on nuclear safety in some Western countries. Additional expertise commissioned by the Public Debate National Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marignac, Y.; Schneider, Th.; Drouet, F.

    2006-01-01

    The authors report the analysis of procedures implemented in different western countries (Switzerland, Finland, United Kingdom, Germany, Sweden and United States) about the access to information on nuclear safety in the broad sense, i.e. as far as population protection against accidental or malevolent situations is concerned. They aimed at analysing how these procedures conciliate pluralism and comprehensive debate while preserving national and industrial interests as well as population's confidence. For each country, they present the different pubic bodies or agencies in charge of nuclear installations and nuclear safety, the existing legal framework related to information on government and nuclear activities, and give examples of information related to nuclear safety (incident or accident concerning nuclear power station or radioactive wastes). The comparative analysis considers different issues: access to information, and pluralist expertise

  19. The significance of accession to the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods 1980 for Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH. M. Hum. TAUFIQURRAHMAN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods 1980 (The Convention is one of monumental products to respond the need practically of the business actors in international trade traffic. The Convention is not only containing substantive rules, but also containing procedures in determining the law applicable to disputes faced. The analytical result indicates that the legal concept can be developed in Indonesia for future governing choice of law in international sales of goods transactions is by accession to the Convention. In that accession, it is recommended that Indonesia puts aside the application of Article 1 (1 (b of the Convention does not reflect valued the appreciation of state sovereignty.

  20. [National pharmaceutical policy in Colombia and social security reform: access and rational use of medicines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia Restrepo, Samuel; Velez Arango, Alba Lucía; Buritica Arboleda, Olga Clemencia; Arango Mejia, María Cristina; Rio Gomez, Jaime Alberto del

    2002-01-01

    Based on the new social security system in Colombia (1993), which establishes equity and mandatory care as the basis for public health care provision, the authors analyze whether the formulation and implementation of pharmaceutical policy promote accessibility, availability, and rational use of medicines, thereby contributing to equity in health. Two approaches were used: a macro approach centered on the legal framework and various actors in the reform process and a micro approach related to the processes and results in the drug supply system. The authors studied the legal instruments backing the country's pharmaceutical policy and evaluated their application, using indicators and a specific disease (diabetes mellitus) as a marker. Although there is a legal framework providing the people's right to access health care services and essential medicines, the country lacks a comprehensive pharmaceuticals policy. Most of the institutions experience problems in distributing the medicines listed under the Mandatory Health Plan, a low percentage of medicines is dispensed at zero cost, and a major portion of patients purchase medicines through associations of diabetics or rely on alternative medicine. The study unveiled several obstacles to equity in health care coverage and access to essential medicines.

  1. A Science Information Infrastructure for Access to Earth and Space Science Data through the Nation's Science Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S.

    1999-01-01

    In this project, we worked with the University of California at Berkeley/Center for Extreme Ultraviolet Astrophysics and five science museums (the National Air and Space Museum, the Science Museum of Virginia, the Lawrence Hall of Science, the Exploratorium., and the New York Hall of Science) to formulate plans for computer-based laboratories located at these museums. These Science Learning Laboratories would be networked and provided with real Earth and space science observations, as well as appropriate lesson plans, that would allow the general public to directly access and manipulate the actual remote sensing data, much as a scientist would.

  2. Impact of Airspace Charges on Transatlantic Aircraft Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Banavar; Ng, Hok K.; Linke, Florian; Chen, Neil Y.

    2015-01-01

    Aircraft flying over the airspace of different countries are subject to over-flight charges. These charges vary from country to country. Airspace charges, while necessary to support the communication, navigation and surveillance services, may lead to aircraft flying routes longer than wind-optimal routes and produce additional carbon dioxide and other gaseous emissions. This paper develops an optimal route between city pairs by modifying the cost function to include an airspace cost whenever an aircraft flies through a controlled airspace without landing or departing from that airspace. It is assumed that the aircraft will fly the trajectory at a constant cruise altitude and constant speed. The computationally efficient optimal trajectory is derived by solving a non-linear optimal control problem. The operational strategies investigated in this study for minimizing aircraft fuel burn and emissions include flying fuel-optimal routes and flying cost-optimal routes that may completely or partially reduce airspace charges en route. The results in this paper use traffic data for transatlantic flights during July 2012. The mean daily savings in over-flight charges, fuel cost and total operation cost during the period are 17.6 percent, 1.6 percent, and 2.4 percent respectively, along the cost- optimal trajectories. The transatlantic flights can potentially save $600,000 in fuel cost plus $360,000 in over-flight charges daily by flying the cost-optimal trajectories. In addition, the aircraft emissions can be potentially reduced by 2,070 metric tons each day. The airport pairs and airspace regions that have the highest potential impacts due to airspace charges are identified for possible reduction of fuel burn and aircraft emissions for the transatlantic flights. The results in the paper show that the impact of the variation in fuel price on the optimal routes is to reduce the difference between wind-optimal and cost-optimal routes as the fuel price increases. The

  3. The right of all nations to access science, new technologies and sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Mohammad Reza; Dehshiri, Mohammad Reza

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the need for reflection on the right of developing countries to science and technology in addition to explaining the place of the scientific rights of nations in human rights as a whole. The discussion was conducted in relation to sustainable development. Through the examination of the current situation and the challenges to sustainable development, and taking into account the imbalance in the distribution of the benefits of science and new technologies, the authors advocate a comprehensive approach to promote cooperation and capacity-building in this area. They argue that linkages should be adopted between micro-levels and macro-levels of analysis by elevating rights and related issues from individuals to the national level in the field of the right to science and technology, and from the national to the international level in the field of sustainable development in order to institutionalise and ensure individual and national rights to science, technology and sustainable development. The authors also believe in a multidimensional perspective based on the balanced flourishing of the material and immaterial aspects of humankind in order to realise these rights in the context of dialogue and cultural diversity and to promote the culture of sustainable and dynamic peace based on justice in knowledge societies.

  4. Improving Access to University Education: The Case of the National Open University of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnaka, Chibuogwu V.

    2014-01-01

    Higher education has proved to be a significant medium for the socio- economic, political, and technological development of any nation. It is absolutely necessary for equipping individuals with new knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Globally higher education, especially university education is faced with a lot of challenges and difficulties…

  5. Vascular access and infection prevention and control: a national survey of routine practices in Irish haemodialysis units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Margaret; Clarke, Michael; Mellotte, George; Plant, Liam; Fitzpatrick, Fidelma

    2013-04-01

    National and international guidelines recommend the use of effective vascular access (VA) and infection prevention and control practices within the haemodialysis environment. Establishing an arterio-venous fistula (AVF) and preventing central venous catheter (CVC)-related infections are ongoing challenges for all dialysis settings. We surveyed VA and routine infection prevention and control practices in dialysis units, to provide national data on these practices in Ireland. A descriptive survey was emailed to nurse managers at all adult (n = 19) and children (n = 1) outpatient haemodialysis units in the Republic of Ireland. Data collected included AVF formation, CVC insertion and maintenance practices, VA use and surveillance of infection and screening protocols. Nineteen of the 20 units responded to the survey. The AVF prevalence was 49% for 1370 patients in 17 units who provided these data [mean prevalence per unit: 45.7% (SD 16.2)]; the CVC mean prevalence per unit was 52.5% (SD 16.0). Fourteen dialysis units experienced inadequate access to vascular surgical procedures either due to a lack of dedicated theatre time or hospital beds. Six units administered intravenous prophylactic antimicrobials prior to CVC insertion with only two units using a CVC insertion checklist at the time of catheter insertion. In general, dialysis units in Ireland show a strong adherence to national guidelines. Compared with the 12 countries participating in the Dialysis Outcomes Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS 4), in 2010, AVF prevalence in Irish dialysis units is the second lowest. Recommendations include establishing an AVF national prevalence target rate, discontinuing the administration of intravenous prophylactic antimicrobials prior to CVC insertion and promoting the use of CVC insertion checklists.

  6. Map of Water Infrastructure and Homes Without Access to Safe Drinking Water and Basic Sanitation on the Navajo Nation - October 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document presents the results of completed work using existing geographic information system (GIS) data to map existing water and sewer infrastructure and homes without access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation on the Navajo Nation.

  7. Problems of preservation and accessibility of cartographic publications in the National Libraries of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmilla Kildushevskaya

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The preservation of cartographic publications are considered in the context of the National Program of Preservation of the Library Collections of the Russian Federation approved by the government of the Russian Federation in 2000. This Program is the first goal_oriented national library programme in the history of the country. The Program is planned for ten years and includes a number of subprogrammes: 1. Collection conservation. 2. Creation of the insurance stock of library documents and information preservation. 3. Book Monuments of the Russian Federation. 4. Library collection safety. 5. Collection preservation through specifying usage conditions. 6. Registration of library stocks. 7. Personnel ensuring the collection preservation processes. It is impossible to describe in one report all the ranges of work reflected in this extensive programme. Therefore, I will dwell on the special measures carried out by the divisions of cartography within the first three subprogrammes and the fifth one.

  8. Barriers to access to opioid medicines: a review of national legislation and regulations of 11 central and eastern European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranken, Marjolein J M; Lisman, John A; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K; Jünger, Saskia; Scholten, Willem; Radbruch, Lukas; Payne, Sheila; Schutjens, Marie-Hélène D B

    2016-01-01

    Control measures designed to prevent the misuse of opioid medicines can often unintentionally restrict legitimate medical use, leaving patients with cancer in pain. This study aimed to develop and validate an assessment instrument based on WHO policy guidelines to systematically identify legal and regulatory barriers to opioid access in 11 European countries (Bulgaria, Cyprus, Estonia, Greece, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Turkey) as part of the Access to Opioid Medication in Europe project. Relevant legislation and regulations were independently assessed by three reviewers and potential barriers were identified within nine categories including prescribing, penalties, and others. Potential barriers were identified in all countries, ranging from 22 potential barriers (Cyprus) to 128 potential barriers (Lithuania). The total number of barriers in a single category varied from one (Slovenia, usage category) to 49 (Greece, prescribing category). Differences, such as prescription validity, varied within one category, ranging from 5 days (Hungary) to 13 weeks (Cyprus). The results of this Review should give rise to a national review and revision of provisions that impede access to opioids, disproportionate to their (intended) benefit in preventing misuse, in these 11 European countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The national education plan as articulator of the democratization of access to university and empowerment of the working class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hildegard Susana Jung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this essay, theoretical and documental, is to reflect on the concept(s of empowerment of the working class, in which it invests itself in power, but with an important caveat: this process cannot be individual but collective, through the cooperative dialogue, in which education – especially higher education – is the great protagonist, as articulator of the process. On this track, shows a comparison between the National Education Plan (PNE 2001-2010 and the PNE 2014-2024 regarding the goals aimed to the democratization of the access to university, finding that, in this moment, what can be affirmed in fact is that there were not many advances in Higher Education. Still, the PNE is an important legal instrument for the democratization of access to university, which may serve as an articulator of the empowerment of the working class. Rethinking education means rethinking the entire State, since education policy suffers injunctions of political, economic and social spheres. Enhancing the Brazilian State, means moving towards a broader concept, which will translate a correlation of forces between civil society and politics, which means a greater social participation, increased democratization of access to university and consequently, greater empowerment of the working class through (why not? Higher Education. Therefore, it lies the important role of the academy to prepare educators who disseminate the reflexive practice, which will lead to autonomy and emancipation.

  10. Preliminary Uncorrelated Encounter Model of the National Airspace System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kochenderfer, M. J; Kuchar, J. K; Espindle, L. P; Gertz, J. L

    2008-01-01

    ...) and which may not be in contact with air traffic control. In response to the need to develop a model of these types of encounters, Lincoln Laboratory undertook an extensive radar data collection and modeling effort...

  11. Integrating the Unmanned Aircraft System into the National Airspace System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-18

    potential hostile takeover .58 It is extremely important to protect communications links to UAS to ensure the safety of other aircraft and avoid potential... Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the Twenty-First Century. New York: Penguin Press, 2009. "Spectrum Management for the 21st Century, The

  12. Cross-National User Priorities for Housing Provision and Accessibility — Findings from the European innovAge Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Haak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available To develop an innovative information and communication technology (ICT tool intended to help older people in their search for optimal housing solutions, a first step in the development process is to gain knowledge from the intended users. Thus the aim of this study was to deepen the knowledge about needs and expectations about housing options as expressed and prioritized by older people, people ageing with disabilities and professionals. A participatory design focus was adopted; 26 people with a range of functional limitations representing the user perspective and 15 professionals with a variety of backgrounds, participated in research circles that were conducted in four European countries. An additional 20 experts were invited as guests to the different research circle meetings. Three themes illustrating cross-national user priorities for housing provision and accessibility were identified: “Information barrier: accessible housing”, “Information barrier: housing adaptation benefits”, and “Cost barrier: housing adaptations”. In conclusion, early user involvement and identification of cross-national differences in priorities and housing options will strengthen the development of a user-friendly ICT tool that can empower older people and people with disabilities to be more active consumers regarding housing provision.

  13. Disability, caregiver's dependency and patterns of access to rehabilitation care: results from a national representative study in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Vásquez, Alberto; Miranda, J Jaime

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of disability in Peru, explore dependency on caregiver's assistance and assess access to rehabilitation care. Data from Disability National Survey (ENEDIS), including urban and rural areas, were analyzed. Disability was defined as a permanent limitation on movement, vision, communication, hearing, learning/remembering or social relationships. Dependency was defined as the self-reported need for a caregiver to help with daily activities; and access to rehabilitation care was defined as the self-report of any therapy for disabilities. Estimates and projections were calculated using sample strata, primary sampling units and population weights, and prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95%CI were reported. From 798,308 people screened, 37,524 (5.1%; 95%CI 4.9--5.2%) had at least one disability. A total of 37,117 were included in further analysis, mean age 57.8 (SD ± 24.1) years, 52.1% women. Dependency was self-reported by 14,980 (40.5%; 95%CI: 39.2-41.9%) individuals with disabilities. A family member, usually female, was identified as a caregiver in 94.3% (95%CI: 93.3-95.3%) of dependent participants. Only 2881 (10.7%; 95%CI: 9.7-11.9%) of people with disabilities reported access to rehabilitation care. Major inequality patterns of disability burden versus access to rehabilitation care were observed by age and education level. Older age groups had higher disability burden yet lower chances of access to rehabilitation care. Conversely, the higher the education level, the lesser the overall disability burden but also the higher chances of reporting receiving care. Private healthcare insurance doubled the probability of having access to rehabilitation compared with those without insurance. Approximately 1.6 million Peruvians have at least one disability, and 40% of them require assistance with daily activities. Informal caregiving, likely female and relative-provided, is highly common. Rehabilitation care access is low and inequitable. Our results

  14. Access to scientific information. A national survey of the Italian Society of Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine (SIBioC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Ciaccio, Marcello; Giavarina, Davide

    2016-09-01

    Digital libraries are typically used for retrieving and accessing articles in academic journals and repositories. Previous studies have been published about the performance of various biomedical research platforms, but no information is available about access preferences. A six-question survey was designed by the Italian Society of Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine (SIBioC) using the platform Google Drive, and made available for 1 month to the members of the society. The information about the survey was published on the website of SIBioC and also disseminated by two sequential newsletters. Overall, 165 replies were collected throughout the 1-month survey availability. The largest number of replies were provided by laboratory professionals working in the national healthcare system (44.2%), followed by those working in private facilities (13.9%), university professors (12.7%) and specialization training staff (12.7%). The majority of responders published zero to one articles per year (55.2%), followed by two to five articles per year (37.6%), whereas only 7.3% published more than five articles per year. A total of 34.5% of the responders consulted biomedical research platforms on weekly basis, followed by 33.9% who did so on daily basis. PubMed/Medline was the most accessed scientific database, followed by Scopus, ISI Web of Science and Google Scholar. The impact factor was the leading reason when selecting which journal to publish in. The most consulted journals in the field of laboratory medicine were Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine and Biochimica Clinica. This survey provides useful indications about the personal inclination towards access to scientific information in our country.

  15. National Scale Marine Geophysical Data Portal for the Israel EEZ with Public Access Web-GIS Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketter, T.; Kanari, M.; Tibor, G.

    2017-12-01

    Recent offshore discoveries and regulation in the Israel Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) are the driving forces behind increasing marine research and development initiatives such as infrastructure development, environmental protection and decision making among many others. All marine operations rely on existing seabed information, while some also generate new data. We aim to create a single platform knowledge-base to enable access to existing information, in a comprehensive, publicly accessible web-based interface. The Israel EEZ covers approx. 26,000 sqkm and has been surveyed continuously with various geophysical instruments over the past decades, including 10,000 km of multibeam survey lines, 8,000 km of sub-bottom seismic lines, and hundreds of sediment sampling stations. Our database consists of vector and raster datasets from multiple sources compiled into a repository of geophysical data and metadata, acquired nation-wide by several research institutes and universities. The repository will enable public access via a web portal based on a GIS platform, including datasets from multibeam, sub-bottom profiling, single- and multi-channel seismic surveys and sediment sampling analysis. Respective data products will also be available e.g. bathymetry, substrate type, granulometry, geological structure etc. Operating a web-GIS based repository allows retrieval of pre-existing data for potential users to facilitate planning of future activities e.g. conducting marine surveys, construction of marine infrastructure and other private or public projects. User interface is based on map oriented spatial selection, which will reveal any relevant data for designated areas of interest. Querying the database will allow the user to obtain information about the data owner and to address them for data retrieval as required. Wide and free public access to existing data and metadata can save time and funds for academia, government and commercial sectors, while aiding in cooperation

  16. Three-year experience with access to nationally funded growth hormone (GH) replacement for GH-deficient adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdaway, I M; Hunt, P; Manning, P; Cutfield, W; Gamble, G; Ninow, N; Staples-Moon, D; Moodie, P; Metcalfe, S

    2015-07-01

    Treatment of growth hormone (GH)-deficient adults with GH has been shown to improve a range of metabolic abnormalities and enhance quality of life. However, the results of access to nationally funded treatment have not been reported. Retrospective case series auditing nationally funded treatment of defined GH-deficient adults in New Zealand, with carefully designed entry and exit criteria overseen by a panel of endocrinologists. Applications for 201 patients were assessed and 191 approved for funded treatment over the initial 3 years since inception. The majority had GH deficiency following treatment of pituitary adenomas or tumours adjacent to the pituitary. After an initial 9-month treatment period using serum IGF-I measurements to adjust GH dosing, all patients reported a significant improvement in quality of life (QoL) score on the QoL-AGHDA(®) instrument (baseline (95%CI) 19 (18-21), 9 months 6 (5-7.5)), and mean serum IGF-I SD scores rose from -3 to zero. Mean waist circumference decreased significantly by 2.8 ± 0.6 cm. The mean maintenance GH dose after 9 months of treatment was 0.39 mg/day. After 3 years, 17% of patients had stopped treatment, and all of the remaining patients maintained the improvements seen at 9 months of treatment. Carefully designed access to nationally funded GH replacement in GH-deficient adults was associated with a significant improvement in quality of life over a 3-year period with mean daily GH doses lower than in the majority of previously reported studies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. 78 FR 18801 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Beeville, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ...) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures at Chase Field Industrial Airport. The FAA is taking this action to...; telephone 817-321- 7716. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: History On November 30, 2012, the FAA published in the Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to establish Class E airspace at Chase Industrial...

  18. Toward n-Ship Computation of Trajectories for Shared Airspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerder, Daniel D.; Rothhaar, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers an approach for modelling transport aircraft trajectories that can facilitate their rapid evaluation and modification, either en route or in terminal control areas, with the goal of efficiently making use of airspace and runways by a large population of vehicles without pairwise violation of separation criteria.

  19. 77 FR 46282 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Sweetwater, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    ...) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures at Avenger Field Airport. The airport's geographic coordinates are..., creating additional controlled airspace at Avenger Field Airport (77 FR 29917) Docket No. FAA-2011-0829... accommodate new standard instrument approach procedures at Avenger Field Airport (formerly Avenger Field...

  20. A Sector Capacity Assessment Method Based on Airspace Utilization Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianping; Zhang, Ping; Li, Zhen; Zou, Xiang

    2018-02-01

    Sector capacity is one of the core factors affecting the safety and the efficiency of the air traffic system. Most of previous sector capacity assessment methods only considered the air traffic controller’s (ATCO’s) workload. These methods are not only limited which only concern about the safety, but also not accurate enough. In this paper, we employ the integrated quantitative index system proposed in one of our previous literatures. We use the principal component analysis (PCA) to find out the principal indicators among the indicators so as to calculate the airspace utilization efficiency. In addition, we use a series of fitting functions to test and define the correlation between the dense of air traffic flow and the airspace utilization efficiency. The sector capacity is then decided as the value of the dense of air traffic flow corresponding to the maximum airspace utilization efficiency. We also use the same series of fitting functions to test the correlation between the dese of air traffic flow and the ATCOs’ workload. We examine our method with a large amount of empirical operating data of Chengdu Controlling Center and obtain a reliable sector capacity value. Experiment results also show superiority of our method against those only consider the ATCO’s workload in terms of better correlation between the airspace utilization efficiency and the dense of air traffic flow.

  1. 78 FR 61179 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Comanche, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... safety and management of instrument flight rules (IFR) operations at the airport. As a result, a Notice... costs when diverting to alternate airports during poor weather conditions, and recreational and tourist... approach procedures at the airport. Controlled airspace enhances the safety and management of IFR...

  2. 77 FR 40489 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Memphis, TN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ... geographic coordinates of General DeWitt Spain Airport and makes a minor correction to the regulatory text... adjusts the geographic coordinates of General DeWitt Spain Airport to be in concert with the FAAs... that section, the FAA is charged with prescribing regulations to assign the use of airspace necessary...

  3. 75 FR 39145 - Amendment of Class C Airspace; Flint, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... construction, airport runway configuration made it possible for aircraft to mistake the 3,900 foot Runway 23... aircraft operating in the Flint, MI, airspace area. DATES: Effective date 0901 UTC, September 23, 2010. The...-8783. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: History In the autumn of 2009, a major construction project at Bishop...

  4. 75 FR 57375 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Toledo, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... Positioning System (GPS) Standard Instrument Approach Procedure (SIAP) at Ed Carlson Memorial Field-South... extending upward from 700 feet above the surface, at Ed Carlson Memorial Field-South Lewis County Airport... authority as it establishes additional controlled airspace at Ed Carlson Memorial Field-South Lewis County...

  5. 76 FR 73502 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Ardmore, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Ardmore, OK AGENCY: Federal... Ardmore, OK. Decommissioning of the Arbuckle non-directional beacon (NDB) and cancellation of the NDB Standard Instrument Approach Procedure (SIAP) at Ardmore Municipal Airport, Ardmore, OK, as well as the...

  6. The Relationship Between Traffic Stability and Capacity for Decentralized Airspace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunil, E.; Maas, J.B.; Ellerbroek, J.; Hoekstra, J.M.; Tra, M.A.P.

    2016-01-01

    The work that is presented in this paper is part of an ongoing study on the relationship between structure and capacity of decentralized airspace concepts. In this paper, the effect of traffic stability, which considers the occurrence of conflict chain reactions as a result of conflict resolution

  7. Mitigation of airspace congestion impact on airline networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaaben, Bo Valdemar; Larsen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    In recent years European airspace has become increasingly congested and airlines can now observe that en-route capacity constraints are the fastest growing source of flight delays. In 2010 this source of delay accounted for 19% of all flight delays in Europe and has been increasing with an average...

  8. 75 FR 69864 - Modification of Class B Airspace; Charlotte, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... west when Charlotte/Douglas International Airport (CLT) is on a north operation. In addition, the FAA... containing aircraft inbound to CLT within Class B airspace. The FAA does not agree with the suggestion for a... north of the Charlotte Airport from the current 11 NM arc of the Charlotte VOR/DME (CLT) outward to the...

  9. 75 FR 57376 - Modification of Class B Airspace; Chicago, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ...). The FAA proposed this action to ensure containment of turbo-jet IFR aircraft conducting instrument... entered it. Today, turbo-jet aircraft flying simultaneous triple instrument approach procedures to ORD... in IFR turbo-jet air carrier arrivals flying in the very airspace that non-participating VFR general...

  10. 78 FR 1742 - Amendment to Class B Airspace; Atlanta, GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    ... airspace. The FAA finds that the new 6,000-floor still provides sufficient space for safe operations in... rarely uses the published MAP, and instead controllers offer vectors or alternate instructions; the... that serves general aviation satellite airport departures and arrivals at 5,000 and 6,000 feet. One...

  11. The surgical management of male breast cancer: Time for an easy access national reporting database?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M.T. Staruch

    2016-08-01

    Discussion: We report a series of seven cases of male breast cancer encountered over three years, evaluating patient demographics as well as treatment and outcomes. In our series patients were managed with mastectomy. New evidence is questioning the role of mastectomy against breast conserving surgery in male patients. Furthermore there is a lack of reporting infrastructure for national data capture of the benefits of surgical modalities. Literature review highlights the varied clinical experience between units that remains reported as podium presentation but not published. The establishment of an online international reporting registry would allow for efficient analysis of surgical outcomes to improve patient care from smaller single centres. This would facilitate large scale meta analysis by larger academic surgical centres.

  12. Enhancing access, fidelity, and outcomes in the national dissemination of evidence-based psychotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Bradley E; Cross, Gerald

    2014-10-01

    Replies to comments by H. Holt and L. E. Beutler (see record 2014-40532-003), M. M. Steenkamp and B. Litz (see record 2014-40532-004), and L. R. Greene (see record 2014-40532-006) on the original article by B. E. Karlin and G. Cross (see record 2013-31043-001) on the national dissemination and implementation of evidence-based psychotherapies in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs health care system. Karlin and Cross comment on and clarify key issues raised in the commentaries and related aspects of the dissemination and implementation model. At the same time, several of the issues raised in the commentaries are beyond the scope of the original article, including issues related to specific research or the relative effectiveness of psychotherapies, on which there is rich discussion and debate in other contexts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Impact of a national specialty e-consultation implementation project on access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsh, Susan; Carey, Evan; Aron, Dacid C; Cardenas, Omar; Graham, Glenn; Jain, Rajiv; Au, David H; Tseng, Chin-Lin; Franklin, Heather; Ho, P Michael

    2015-12-01

    To assess the early impact of implementation of the electronic consults (e-consults) initiative by the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), designed to improve specialty care access. Observational cohort study exploiting a natural experiment begun in May 2011 at 12 VHA medical centers and expanded to 122 medical centers by December 2013. The following were assessed: 1) growth of e-consults by VHA regional networks, medical centers, and specialty; 2) location of patient's primary care provider (medical center vs community-based outpatient clinic [CBOC]); 3) potential patient miles needed to travel for a specialty care face-to-face consult in place of the observed e-consults using estimated geodesic distance; 4) use of specialty care subsequent to the e-consult. Of 11,270,638 consults completed in 13 clinics of interest, 217,014 were e-consults (adjusted rate, 1.93 e-consults per 100 consults). The e-consult rate was highest in endocrinology (5.0 per 100), hematology (3.0 per 100), and gastroenterology (3.0 per 100). The percentage of e-consult patients with CBOC-based primary care grew from 28.5% to 44.4% in the first year of implementation and to 45.6% at year 3. Of those e-consult patients from community clinics, the average potential miles needed to travel was 72.1 miles per patient (SD = 72.6; median = 54.6; interquartile range = 17.1-108), translating to a potential savings of 6,875,631 total miles and travel reimbursement costs of $2,853,387. E-consult volume increased significantly since inception within many medical and surgical specialties. For patients receiving primary care at one of more than 800 CBOCs, e-consults may decrease travel burden and direct travel costs for patients.

  14. Access to primary energy sources - the basis of national energy security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlązak, Jan; Szlązak, Rafał A.

    2017-11-01

    National energy security is of fundamental importance for economic development of a country. To ensure such safety energy raw material, also called primary energy sources, are necessary. Currently in Poland primary energy sources include mainly fossil fuels, such as hard coal, brown coal, natural gas and crude oil. Other sources, e.g. renewable energy sources account for c. 15% in the energy mix. Primary energy sources are used to produce mainly electricity, which is considered as the cleanest form of energy. Poland does not have, unfortunately, sufficient energy sources and is forced to import some of them, mainly natural gas and crude oil. The article presents an insightful analysis of energy raw material reserves possessed by Poland and their structure taking account of the requirements applicable in the European Union, in particular, those related to environmental protection. The article also describes demand for electricity now and in the perspective of 2030. Primary energy sources necessary for its production have also been given. The article also includes the possibilities for the use of renewable energy sources in Poland, however, climatic conditions there are not are not particularly favourable to it. All the issues addressed in the article are summed up and ended with conclusions.

  15. Biomaterials use in Mulago National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda: Access and affordability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakwatanisa, Bosco; Enywaku, Alfred; Kiwanuka, Martin; Lamunu, Claire; Mbowa, Nicholas; Mukiibi, Denis; Namayega, Catherine; Ngabirano, Beryl; Ntambi, Henry; Reichert, William

    2016-01-01

    Students in Biomaterials BBE3102 at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda were assigned semester long group projects in the first semester of the 2014-15 academic year to determine the biomaterials type and usage in Mulago National Referral Hospital, which is emblematic of large public hospitals across East Africa. Information gathering was conducted through student interviews with Mulago physicians because there were no archival records. The students divided themselves into seven project groups covering biomaterials use in the areas of wound closure, dental and oral surgery, cardiology, burn care, bone repair, ophthalmology and total joint replacement. As in the developed world, the majority of biomaterials used in Mulago are basic wound closure materials, dental materials, and bone fixation materials, all of which are comparatively inexpensive, easy to store, and readily available from either the government or local suppliers; however, there were significant issues with the implant supply chain, affordability, and patient compliance and follow-up in cases where specialty expertise and expensive implants were employed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The National Programme for Improvement of Access and Quality of Basic Health Care and the work process organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Auxiliadora Almeida LOPES

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study analises the National Programme for Improvement of Access and Quality of the Basic Health Care focusing on the reorganization of work processes: self-evaluation, continuous education, institutional support and monitoring. Based on document analysis, direct observations and interviews with workers in the Federal District. The results point to lack of training of team members for the adherence to the programme; parcial/distorted view about its proposal; weakenesses in the monitoring; incipient self-evaluations processes; lack of institutional support; inadequate permanent education; unsatisfactory working conditions; and deficits in the support diagnosys network. It should be considered that changes in work processes require time to be implemented and that improvement in the quality of services goes beyound prescriptions and fullfilment of standards and norms.

  17. Legal barriers in accessing opioid medicines: results of the ATOME quick scan of national legislation of eastern European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranken, Marjolein J M; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K; Jünger, Saskia; Radbruch, Lukas; Lisman, John; Scholten, Willem; Payne, Sheila; Lynch, Tom; Schutjens, Marie-Hélène D B

    2014-12-01

    Overregulation of controlled medicines is one of the factors contributing to limited access to opioid medicines. The purpose of this study was to identify legal barriers to access to opioid medicines in 12 Eastern European countries participating in the Access to Opioid Medication in Europa project, using a quick scan method. A quick scan method to identify legal barriers was developed focusing on eight different categories of barriers. Key experts in 12 European countries were requested to send relevant legislation. Legislation was quick scanned using World Health Organization guidelines. Overly restrictive provisions and provisions that contain stigmatizing language and incorrect definitions were identified. The selected provisions were scored into two categories: 1) barrier and 2) uncertain, and reviewed by two authors. A barrier was recorded if both authors agreed the selected provision to be a barrier (Category 1). National legislation was obtained from 11 of 12 countries. All 11 countries showed legal barriers in the areas of prescribing (most frequently observed barrier). Ten countries showed barriers in the areas of dispensing and showed stigmatizing language and incorrect use of definitions in their legislation. Most barriers were identified in the legislation of Bulgaria, Greece, Lithuania, Serbia, and Slovenia. The Cypriot legislation showed the fewest total number of barriers. The selected countries have in common as main barriers prescribing and dispensing restrictions, the use of stigmatizing language, and incorrect use of definitions. The practical impact of these barriers identified using a quick scan method needs to be validated by other means. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Equitable access to health insurance for socially excluded children? The case of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gemma A; Parmar, Divya; Dkhimi, Fahdi; Asante, Felix; Arhinful, Daniel; Mladovsky, Philipa

    2017-08-01

    To help reduce child mortality and reach universal health coverage, Ghana extended free membership of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) to children (under-18s) in 2008. However, despite the introduction of premium waivers, a substantial proportion of children remain uninsured. Thus far, few studies have explored why enrolment of children in NHIS may remain low, despite the absence of significant financial barriers to membership. In this paper we therefore look beyond economic explanations of access to health insurance to explore additional wider determinants of enrolment in the NHIS. In particular, we investigate whether social exclusion, as measured through a sociocultural, political and economic lens, can explain poor enrolment rates of children. Data were collected from a cross-sectional survey of 4050 representative households conducted in Ghana in 2012. Household indices were created to measure sociocultural, political and economic exclusion, and logistic regressions were conducted to study determinants of enrolment at the individual and household levels. Our results indicate that socioculturally, economically and politically excluded children are less likely to enrol in the NHIS. Furthermore, households excluded in all dimensions were more likely to be non-enrolled or partially-enrolled (i.e. not all children enrolled within the household) than fully-enrolled. These results suggest that equity in access for socially excluded children has not yet been achieved. Efforts should be taken to improve coverage by removing the remaining small, annually renewable registration fee, implementing and publicising the new clause that de-links premium waivers from parental membership, establishing additional scheme administrative offices in remote areas, holding regular registration sessions in schools and conducting outreach sessions and providing registration support to female guardians of children. Ensuring equitable access to NHIS will contribute substantially

  19. National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines (PNAUM: household survey component methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotero Serrate Mengue

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe methodological aspects of the household survey National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines (PNAUM related to sampling design and implementation, the actual obtained sample, instruments and fieldwork. METHODS A cross-sectional, population-based study with probability sampling in three stages of the population living in households located in Brazilian urban areas. Fieldwork was carried out between September 2013 and February 2014. The data collection instrument included questions related to: information about households, residents and respondents; chronic diseases and medicines used; use of health services; acute diseases and events treated with drugs; use of contraceptives; use of pharmacy services; behaviors that may affect drug use; package inserts and packaging; lifestyle and health insurance. RESULTS In total, 41,433 interviews were carried out in 20,404 households and 576 urban clusters corresponding to 586 census tracts distributed in the five Brazilian regions, according to eight domains defined by age and gender. CONCLUSIONS The results of the survey may be used as a baseline for future studies aiming to assess the impact of government action on drug access and use. For local studies using a compatible method, PNAUM may serve as a reference point to evaluate variations in space and population. With a comprehensive evaluation of drug-related aspects, PNAUM is a major source of data for a variety of analyses to be carried out both at academic and government level.

  20. A national survey of health service infrastructure and policy impacts on access to computerised CBT in Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenicer David

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NICE recommends computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (cCBT for the treatment of several mental health problems such as anxiety and depression. cCBT may be one way that services can reduce waiting lists and improve capacity and efficiency. However, there is some doubt about the extent to which the National Health Service (NHS in the UK is embracing this new health technology in practice. This study aimed to investigate Scottish health service infrastructure and policies that promote or impede the implementation of cCBT in the NHS. Methods A telephone survey of lead IT staff at all health board areas across Scotland to systematically enquire about the ability of local IT infrastructure and IT policies to support delivery of cCBT. Results Overall, most of the health boards possess the required software to use cCBT programmes. However, the majority of NHS health boards reported that they lack dedicated computers for patient use, hence access to cCBT at NHS sites is limited. Additionally, local policy in the majority of boards prevent staff from routinely contacting patients via email, skype or instant messenger, making the delivery of short, efficient support sessions difficult. Conclusions Conclusions: Overall most of the infrastructure is in place but is not utilised in ways that allow effective delivery. For cCBT to be successfully delivered within a guided support model, as recommended by national guidelines, dedicated patient computers should be provided to allow access to online interventions. Additionally, policy should allow staff to support patients in convenient ways such as via email or live chat. These measures would increase the likelihood of achieving Scottish health service targets to reduce waiting time for psychological therapies to 18 weeks.

  1. Evaluation of 19,460 Wheat Accessions Conserved in the Indian National Genebank to Identify New Sources of Resistance to Rust and Spot Blotch Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Sherry R.; Srinivasan, Kalyani; Radhamani, J.; Parimalan, R.; Sivaswamy, M.; Tyagi, Sandhya; Yadav, Mamata; Kumari, Jyotisna; Deepali; Sharma, Sandeep; Bhagat, Indoo; Meeta, Madhu; Bains, N. S.; Chowdhury, A. K.; Saha, B. C.; Bhattacharya, P. M.; Kumari, Jyoti; Singh, M. C.; Gangwar, O. P.; Prasad, P.; Bharadwaj, S. C.; Gogoi, Robin; Sharma, J. B.; GM, Sandeep Kumar; Saharan, M. S.; Bag, Manas; Roy, Anirban; Prasad, T. V.; Sharma, R. K.; Dutta, M.; Sharma, Indu; Bansal, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive germplasm evaluation study of wheat accessions conserved in the Indian National Genebank was conducted to identify sources of rust and spot blotch resistance. Genebank accessions comprising three species of wheat–Triticum aestivum, T. durum and T. dicoccum were screened sequentially at multiple disease hotspots, during the 2011–14 crop seasons, carrying only resistant accessions to the next step of evaluation. Wheat accessions which were found to be resistant in the field were then assayed for seedling resistance and profiled using molecular markers. In the primary evaluation, 19,460 accessions were screened at Wellington (Tamil Nadu), a hotspot for wheat rusts. We identified 4925 accessions to be resistant and these were further evaluated at Gurdaspur (Punjab), a hotspot for stripe rust and at Cooch Behar (West Bengal), a hotspot for spot blotch. The second round evaluation identified 498 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts and 868 accessions potentially resistant to spot blotch. Evaluation of rust resistant accessions for seedling resistance against seven virulent pathotypes of three rusts under artificial epiphytotic conditions identified 137 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts. Molecular analysis to identify different combinations of genetic loci imparting resistance to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and spot blotch using linked molecular markers, identified 45 wheat accessions containing known resistance genes against all three rusts as well as a QTL for spot blotch resistance. The resistant germplasm accessions, particularly against stripe rust, identified in this study can be excellent potential candidates to be employed for breeding resistance into the background of high yielding wheat cultivars through conventional or molecular breeding approaches, and are expected to contribute toward food security at national and global levels. PMID:27942031

  2. Evaluation of 19,460 Wheat Accessions Conserved in the Indian National Genebank to Identify New Sources of Resistance to Rust and Spot Blotch Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep Kumar

    Full Text Available A comprehensive germplasm evaluation study of wheat accessions conserved in the Indian National Genebank was conducted to identify sources of rust and spot blotch resistance. Genebank accessions comprising three species of wheat-Triticum aestivum, T. durum and T. dicoccum were screened sequentially at multiple disease hotspots, during the 2011-14 crop seasons, carrying only resistant accessions to the next step of evaluation. Wheat accessions which were found to be resistant in the field were then assayed for seedling resistance and profiled using molecular markers. In the primary evaluation, 19,460 accessions were screened at Wellington (Tamil Nadu, a hotspot for wheat rusts. We identified 4925 accessions to be resistant and these were further evaluated at Gurdaspur (Punjab, a hotspot for stripe rust and at Cooch Behar (West Bengal, a hotspot for spot blotch. The second round evaluation identified 498 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts and 868 accessions potentially resistant to spot blotch. Evaluation of rust resistant accessions for seedling resistance against seven virulent pathotypes of three rusts under artificial epiphytotic conditions identified 137 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts. Molecular analysis to identify different combinations of genetic loci imparting resistance to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and spot blotch using linked molecular markers, identified 45 wheat accessions containing known resistance genes against all three rusts as well as a QTL for spot blotch resistance. The resistant germplasm accessions, particularly against stripe rust, identified in this study can be excellent potential candidates to be employed for breeding resistance into the background of high yielding wheat cultivars through conventional or molecular breeding approaches, and are expected to contribute toward food security at national and global levels.

  3. Evaluation of 19,460 Wheat Accessions Conserved in the Indian National Genebank to Identify New Sources of Resistance to Rust and Spot Blotch Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sundeep; Archak, Sunil; Tyagi, R K; Kumar, Jagdish; Vk, Vikas; Jacob, Sherry R; Srinivasan, Kalyani; Radhamani, J; Parimalan, R; Sivaswamy, M; Tyagi, Sandhya; Yadav, Mamata; Kumari, Jyotisna; Deepali; Sharma, Sandeep; Bhagat, Indoo; Meeta, Madhu; Bains, N S; Chowdhury, A K; Saha, B C; Bhattacharya, P M; Kumari, Jyoti; Singh, M C; Gangwar, O P; Prasad, P; Bharadwaj, S C; Gogoi, Robin; Sharma, J B; Gm, Sandeep Kumar; Saharan, M S; Bag, Manas; Roy, Anirban; Prasad, T V; Sharma, R K; Dutta, M; Sharma, Indu; Bansal, K C

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive germplasm evaluation study of wheat accessions conserved in the Indian National Genebank was conducted to identify sources of rust and spot blotch resistance. Genebank accessions comprising three species of wheat-Triticum aestivum, T. durum and T. dicoccum were screened sequentially at multiple disease hotspots, during the 2011-14 crop seasons, carrying only resistant accessions to the next step of evaluation. Wheat accessions which were found to be resistant in the field were then assayed for seedling resistance and profiled using molecular markers. In the primary evaluation, 19,460 accessions were screened at Wellington (Tamil Nadu), a hotspot for wheat rusts. We identified 4925 accessions to be resistant and these were further evaluated at Gurdaspur (Punjab), a hotspot for stripe rust and at Cooch Behar (West Bengal), a hotspot for spot blotch. The second round evaluation identified 498 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts and 868 accessions potentially resistant to spot blotch. Evaluation of rust resistant accessions for seedling resistance against seven virulent pathotypes of three rusts under artificial epiphytotic conditions identified 137 accessions potentially resistant to multiple rusts. Molecular analysis to identify different combinations of genetic loci imparting resistance to leaf rust, stem rust, stripe rust and spot blotch using linked molecular markers, identified 45 wheat accessions containing known resistance genes against all three rusts as well as a QTL for spot blotch resistance. The resistant germplasm accessions, particularly against stripe rust, identified in this study can be excellent potential candidates to be employed for breeding resistance into the background of high yielding wheat cultivars through conventional or molecular breeding approaches, and are expected to contribute toward food security at national and global levels.

  4. Beyond access to transformations: A cross-national analysis of women in science and engineering education, 1970--2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wotipka, Christine Min

    2001-12-01

    Over the years, attention to the issue of women in science has tended to focus on individual and organizational efforts to encourage women's greater participation in science and engineering fields of study and occupations. With more intense globalization processes that increasingly shape and are shaped by science, national- and global-level understandings of the situation of women in science and engineering as well as methods to boost their greater and more equal participation in these fields are necessary. This study is a cross-national and longitudinal study of women's participation in science and engineering fields of study at the higher education level. In order to explain the growth in women's participation in these fields of study between 1972--1992, I use a world society theoretical perspective to argue that national linkages to global models regarding women's educational equality and women in science may positively influence their participation in these fields. In multivariate statistical analyses, women's participation in higher education, measured as female enrollment in non-science and non-engineering fields of study, exerted a positive effect on women in science and engineering as did male enrollment in science and engineering higher education. The fact that linkage variables and those measuring women's status and other national-level factors were not found to be influential suggests that world-level factors may be contributing to women's greater participation in these fields. To better understand processes at this level, I use feminist critiques of science to examine the efforts made by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), and the World Bank to address women in science and engineering education over a thirty year time period. My examination of their publications as well as conference declarations and platforms of action from ten international conferences finds a

  5. Report on the 4-h rule and National Emergency Access Target (NEAT) in Australia: time to review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staib, Andrew; Sullivan, Clair; Griffin, Bronwyn; Bell, Anthony; Scott, Ian

    2016-06-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to provide a summary of a systematic review of literature reporting benefits and limitations of implementing National Emergency Access Target (NEAT), a target stipulating that a certain proportion of patients presenting to hospital emergency departments are admitted or discharged within 4h of presentation. Methods A systematic review of published literature using specific search terms, snowballing techniques applied to retrieved references and Google searches was performed. Results are presented as a narrative synthesis given the heterogeneity of included studies. Results Benefits of a time-based target for emergency care are improved timeliness of emergency care and reduced in-hospital mortality for emergency admissions to hospital. Limitations centre on using a process measure (time) alone devoid of any monitoring of patient outcomes, the threshold nature of a time target and the fact that currently NEAT combines the measurement of clinical management of two very different patient cohorts seeking emergency care: less acute patients discharged home and more acute patients admitted to hospital. Conclusions Time-based access targets for emergency presentations are associated with significant improvements in in-hospital mortality for emergency admissions. However, other patient-important outcomes are deserving of attention, choice of targets needs to be validated by empirical evidence of patient benefit and single targets need to be partitioned into separate targets pertaining to admitted and discharged patients. What is known about the topic? Time targets for emergency care originated in the UK. The introduction of NEAT in Australia has been controversial. NEAT directs that a certain proportion of patients will be admitted or discharged from an emergency department (ED) within 4h. Recent dissolution of the Australian National Partnership Agreement (which provided hospitals with financial incentives for achieving NEAT

  6. Application of Epidemiology Model on Complex Networks in Propagation Dynamics of Airspace Congestion

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Xiaoxu; Hu, Minghua; Tian, Wen; Xie, Daoyi; Hu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a propagation dynamics model for congestion propagation in complex networks of airspace. It investigates the application of an epidemiology model to complex networks by comparing the similarities and differences between congestion propagation and epidemic transmission. The model developed satisfies the constraints of actual motion in airspace, based on the epidemiology model. Exploiting the constraint that the evolution of congestion cluster in the airspace is always dynam...

  7. Access to means of suicide, occupation and the risk of suicide: a national study over 12 years of coronial data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, A; Witt, K; Maheen, H; LaMontagne, A D

    2017-04-04

    Availability of lethal means is a significant risk factor for suicide. This study investigated whether occupations with greater access to lethal means had higher suicide rates than those without access, and further, whether this relationship differed for females versus males. A retrospective mortality study was conducted across the Australian population over the period 2001 to 2012. Data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, which collects Census information on occupation for the Australian population, and the National Coroners Information System, which records information on suicide deaths, were combined. Employed suicide records were coded by occupation and work-related access to lethal means. Descriptive analysis and negative binomial regression were used to assess the relationship between access to means and suicide. Persons in occupations with access to firearms, medicines or drugs, and carbon monoxide more frequently used these methods to end their lives than those without access to means. Females employed in occupations with access to means had suicide rates that were 3.02 times greater (95% CI 2.60 to 3.50, p suicide rates that were 1.24 times greater than those without access (95% CI 1.16 to 1.33, p suicide in the employed population, but is associated with a greater risk for females than males. The findings of this study suggest the importance of controlling access to lethal methods in occupations where these are readily available.

  8. Examining the Impact of the National Institutes of Health Public Access Policy on the Citation Rates of Journal Articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, Sandra L; Shultz, Mary; Smalheiser, Neil R

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded articles that were archived in PubMed Central (PMC) after the release of the 2008 NIH Public Access Policy show greater scholarly impact than comparable articles not archived in PMC. A list of journals across several subject areas was developed from which to collect article citation data. Citation information and cited reference counts of the articles published in 2006 and 2009 from 122 journals were obtained from the Scopus database. The articles were separated into categories of NIH funded, non-NIH funded and whether they were deposited in PubMed Central. An analysis of citation data across a five-year timespan was performed on this set of articles. A total of 45,716 articles were examined, including 7,960 with NIH-funding. An analysis of the number of times these articles were cited found that NIH-funded 2006 articles in PMC were not cited significantly more than NIH-funded non-PMC articles. However, 2009 NIH funded articles in PMC were cited 26% more than 2009 NIH funded articles not in PMC, 5 years after publication. This result is highly significant even after controlling for journal (as a proxy of article quality and topic). Our analysis suggests that factors occurring between 2006 and 2009 produced a subsequent boost in scholarly impact of PubMed Central. The 2008 Public Access Policy is likely to be one such factor, but others may have contributed as well (e.g., growing size and visibility of PMC, increasing availability of full-text linkouts from PubMed, and indexing of PMC articles by Google Scholar).

  9. Vaccinations Administered During Off-Clinic Hours at a National Community Pharmacy: Implications for Increasing Patient Access and Convenience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goad, Jeffery A.; Taitel, Michael S.; Fensterheim, Leonard E.; Cannon, Adam E.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Approximately 50,000 adults die annually from vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States. Most traditional vaccine providers (eg, physician offices) administer vaccinations during standard clinic hours, but community pharmacies offer expanded hours that allow patients to be vaccinated at convenient times. We analyzed the types of vaccines administered and patient populations vaccinated during off-clinic hours in a national community pharmacy, and their implications for vaccination access and convenience. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed data for all vaccinations given at the Walgreens pharmacy chain between August 2011 and July 2012. The time of vaccination was categorized as occurring during traditional hours (9:00 am–6:00 pm weekdays) or off-clinic hours, consisting of weekday evenings, weekends, and federal holidays. We compared demographic characteristics and types of vaccine. We used a logistic regression model to identify predictors of being vaccinated during off-clinic hours. RESULTS During the study period, pharmacists administered 6,250,402 vaccinations, of which 30.5% were provided during off-clinic hours: 17.4% were provided on weekends, 10.2% on evenings, and 2.9% on holidays. Patients had significantly higher odds of off-clinic vaccination if they were younger than 65 years of age, were male, resided in an urban area, and did not have any chronic conditions. CONCLUSIONS A large proportion of adults being vaccinated receive their vaccines during evening, weekend, and holiday hours at the pharmacy, when traditional vaccine providers are likely unavailable. Younger, working-aged, healthy adults, in particular, a variety of immunizations during off-clinic hours. With the low rates of adult and adolescent vaccination in the United States, community pharmacies are creating new opportunities for vaccination that expand access and convenience. PMID:24019274

  10. Vaccinations administered during off-clinic hours at a national community pharmacy: implications for increasing patient access and convenience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goad, Jeffery A; Taitel, Michael S; Fensterheim, Leonard E; Cannon, Adam E

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 50,000 adults die annually from vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States. Most traditional vaccine providers (eg, physician offices) administer vaccinations during standard clinic hours, but community pharmacies offer expanded hours that allow patients to be vaccinated at convenient times. We analyzed the types of vaccines administered and patient populations vaccinated during off-clinic hours in a national community pharmacy, and their implications for vaccination access and convenience. We retrospectively reviewed data for all vaccinations given at the Walgreens pharmacy chain between August 2011 and July 2012. The time of vaccination was categorized as occurring during traditional hours (9:00 am-6:00 pm weekdays) or off-clinic hours, consisting of weekday evenings, weekends, and federal holidays. We compared demographic characteristics and types of vaccine. We used a logistic regression model to identify predictors of being vaccinated during off-clinic hours. During the study period, pharmacists administered 6,250,402 vaccinations, of which 30.5% were provided during off-clinic hours: 17.4% were provided on weekends, 10.2% on evenings, and 2.9% on holidays. Patients had significantly higher odds of off-clinic vaccination if they were younger than 65 years of age, were male, resided in an urban area, and did not have any chronic conditions. A large proportion of adults being vaccinated receive their vaccines during evening, weekend, and holiday hours at the pharmacy, when traditional vaccine providers are likely unavailable. Younger, working-aged, healthy adults, in particular, a variety of immunizations during off-clinic hours. With the low rates of adult and adolescent vaccination in the United States, community pharmacies are creating new opportunities for vaccination that expand access and convenience.

  11. Enabling Airspace Integration for High Density Urban Air Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Eric Richard

    2017-01-01

    Aviation technologies and concepts have reached a level of maturity that may soon enable an era of on-demand mobility (ODM) fueled by quiet, efficient, and largely automated air taxis. However, successfully bringing such a system to fruition will require introducing orders of magnitude more aircraft to a given airspace volume than can be accommodated by the traditional air traffic control system, among other important technical challenges. The airspace integration problem is further compounded by requirements to set aside appropriate ground infrastructure for take-off and landing areas and ensuring these new aircraft types and their operations do not burden traditional airspace users and air traffic control. These challenge for ODM may be significantly reduced by extending the concepts and technologies developed to manage small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) at low altitude the UAS traffic management (UTM) system to higher altitudes and aircraft with humans onboard in controlled airspace, or by equipping ODM aircraft with advanced sensors, algorithms, and interfaces. The precedent of operational freedom inherent in visual flight rules and the technologies developed for large UAS and commercial aircraft automation will contribute to the evolution of an ODM system enabled by UTM. This paper describes the set of air traffic services, normally provided by the traditional air traffic system, that an ODM system would implement to achieve the high densities needed for ODMs economic viability. Finally, the paper proposes a framework for integrating, evaluating, and deploying low-, medium-, and high-density ODM concepts that build on each other to ensure operational and economic feasibility at every step.

  12. Flight safety measurements of UAVs in congested airspace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Jinwu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Describing spatial safety status is crucial for high-density air traffic involving multiple unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs in a complex environment. A probabilistic approach is proposed to measure safety situation in congested airspace. The occupancy distribution of the airspace is represented with conflict probability between spatial positions and UAV. The concept of a safety envelope related to flight performance and response time is presented first instead of the conventional fixed-size protected zones around aircraft. Consequently, the conflict probability is performance-dependent, and effects of various UAVs on safety can be distinguished. The uncertainty of a UAV future position is explicitly accounted for as Brownian motion. An analytic approximate algorithm for the conflict probability is developed to decrease the computational consumption. The relationship between safety and flight performance are discussed for different response times and prediction intervals. To illustrate the applications of the approach, an experiment of three UAVs in formation flight is performed. In addition, an example of trajectory planning is simulated for one UAV flying over airspace where five UAVs exist. The validation of the approach shows its potential in guaranteeing flight safety in highly dynamic environment.

  13. Using the Right to Health to Promote Universal Health Coverage: A Better Tool for Protecting Non-Nationals' Access to Affordable Health Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lougarre, Claire

    2016-12-01

    Five years ago, the World Health Assembly adopted a resolution on universal health coverage, followed a year later by a resolution from the United Nations General Assembly. In these resolutions, states promised to deliver affordable health care for everyone, referring to notions of equity and human rights law, particularly a human right to health. However, the explosion of migration coupled with the post-2008 bleak economic climate have led societies worldwide to restrict, or at least challenge, the affordability of access to national health systems for non-nationals. It is in this light that the claims of universality made by universal health coverage should be challenged. This article, therefore, will question the effectiveness of this global health policy in guaranteeing access to affordable health care for non-nationals and will ask whether and how legal avenues such as the right to health should be used to address potential weaknesses.

  14. Integration of Weather Data into Airspace and Traffic Operations Simulation (ATOS) for Trajectory- Based Operations Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Mark; Boisvert, Ben; Escala, Diego

    2009-01-01

    Explicit integration of aviation weather forecasts with the National Airspace System (NAS) structure is needed to improve the development and execution of operationally effective weather impact mitigation plans and has become increasingly important due to NAS congestion and associated increases in delay. This article considers several contemporary weather-air traffic management (ATM) integration applications: the use of probabilistic forecasts of visibility at San Francisco, the Route Availability Planning Tool to facilitate departures from the New York airports during thunderstorms, the estimation of en route capacity in convective weather, and the application of mixed-integer optimization techniques to air traffic management when the en route and terminal capacities are varying with time because of convective weather impacts. Our operational experience at San Francisco and New York coupled with very promising initial results of traffic flow optimizations suggests that weather-ATM integrated systems warrant significant research and development investment. However, they will need to be refined through rapid prototyping at facilities with supportive operational users We have discussed key elements of an emerging aviation weather research area: the explicit integration of aviation weather forecasts with NAS structure to improve the effectiveness and timeliness of weather impact mitigation plans. Our insights are based on operational experiences with Lincoln Laboratory-developed integrated weather sensing and processing systems, and derivative early prototypes of explicit ATM decision support tools such as the RAPT in New York City. The technical components of this effort involve improving meteorological forecast skill, tailoring the forecast outputs to the problem of estimating airspace impacts, developing models to quantify airspace impacts, and prototyping automated tools that assist in the development of objective broad-area ATM strategies, given probabilistic

  15. Long-term Survival with Ipilimumab: Experience from a National Expanded Access Program for Patients with Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajsová, Ivana; Arenberger, Petr; Lakomý, Radek; Kubala, Eugen; Březinová, Ivana; Poprach, Alexandr; Šťastný, Marek; Mužík, Jan; Melichar, Bohuslav

    2015-11-01

    Evaluation of efficacy and safety of ipilimumab in patients with advanced, refractory melanoma enrolled into a national ipilimumab Expanded Access Program. Adult patients with advanced/metastatic refractory melanoma were eligible for study inclusion. Ipilimumab was administered up to a total of four doses. One hundred and ninety-six patients were analyzed. Full ipilimumab induction was administered to 66.8% of patients. Median overall survival (OS) in the entire cohort was 7.5 months. Median OS for patients after four doses of ipilimumab was significantly longer than for patients with fewer doses (12.3 months vs. 2.0 months respectively; p<0.001). Median OS for patients with objective tumor response was 42.3 months. Normal baseline serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and the number of affected organs correlated with improved OS. The number of affected organs and combination of baseline LDH and CRP levels could potentially serve as predictors for both treatment response and OS. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. The narrow entrance door of Brazil's national health system (SUS: an evaluation of accessibility in the family health strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucia Martins de Azevedo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has the purpose of analyzing users' perception of the accessibility to Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF - Family Health Strategy in its geographical, organizational, socio-cultural and economic dimensions. Process evaluation with qualitative approach through open interview, direct observation and documental analysis was performed in the city of Recife, northeastern Brazil. The main problems were: the deficient referral and counter-referral system; delayed return of laboratory test results; excessive number of families per team; difficulties in scheduling medical consultations; expenditures on medicines. Facilities were observed in the professional-user relationship, as well as in the geographical proximity of the health unit. ESF proved to be a narrow entrance door to Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS - Brazil's National Health System. Therefore, it deserves to be evaluated with a more critical look that takes into account, as a starting point, the needs of individuals who request its actions, as well as the reasoning which guides the actions of the subjects involved in care.

  17. Legal Barriers in Accessing Opioid Medicines : Results of the ATOME Quick Scan of National Legislation of Eastern European Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, Marjolein J M; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K; Jünger, Saskia; Radbruch, Lukas; Lisman, John; Scholten, Willem; Payne, Sheila; Lynch, Tom; Schutjens, Marie-Hélène D B

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Overregulation of controlled medicines is one of the factors contributing to limited access to opioid medicines. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to identify legal barriers to access to opioid medicines in 12 Eastern European countries participating in the Access to Opioid

  18. Overview: Routes to Open Access

    OpenAIRE

    Tullney, Marco; van Wezenbeek, Wilma

    2017-01-01

    Slides of an overview presentation given at a CESAER workshop on Open Access, February 2nd, 2017, in Brussels Cover major routes to more open access as discussed in the Task Force Open Science of CESAER: (national) open access strategies open access mandates open access incentives open access awareness open access publishing open access infrastructure

  19. Medication errors with the use of allopurinol and colchicine : A retrospective study of a national, anonymous Internet-accessible error reporting system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikuls, TR; Curtis, [No Value; Allison, JJ; Hicks, RW; Saag, KG

    Objectives. To more closely assess medication errors in gout care, we examined data from a national, Internet-accessible error reporting program over a 5-year reporting period. Methods. We examined data from the MEDMARX (TM) database, covering the period from January 1, 1999 through December 31,

  20. Widening Access through Openness in Higher Education in the Developing World: A Bourdieusian Field Analysis of Experiences from the National Open University of Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakulehin, Felix Kayode; Singh, Gurmit

    2013-01-01

    Bourdieu has argued that higher education is a field that reproduces social inequality, thus complicating how openness widens access to higher education in the developing world. Drawing on the experiences of the National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN), this paper critically analyses and evaluates the rationale, approach, difficulties,…

  1. 78 FR 27872 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Salt Lake City, UT...: This action proposes to modify Class E airspace at Salt Lake City International Airport, Salt Lake City... operations at Salt Lake City International Airport. This action also would adjust the geographic coordinates...

  2. 78 FR 45848 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Salt Lake City, UT AGENCY... airspace at Salt Lake City, UT, to accommodate aircraft using Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning... procedures at Salt Lake City International Airport. This improves the safety and management of Instrument...

  3. 75 FR 79293 - Amendment and Revocation of Class E Airspace; Vero Beach, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment and Revocation of Class E Airspace; Vero Beach... removes Class E airspace designated as an extension to Class D surface area at Vero Beach Municipal Airport, Vero Beach, FL. The Vero Beach Non-Directional Beacon (NDB) has been decommissioned and new...

  4. Air-space pattern in lung metastasis from adenocarcinoma of the GI tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaeta, M.; Volta, S.; Scribano, E. [Univ. of Messina (Italy)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    We retrospectively reviewed a series of proven lung metastasis to evaluate the frequency and CT features of metastases showing an air-space (lepidic) pattern of growth. CT examinations of 65 patients with proven lung metastasis from GI carcinomas were reviewed by three observers. Four CT features were used to classify lesions as air-space metastases: (a) air-space nodules; (b) parenchymal consolidation containing air bronchogram and/or showing angiogram sign; (c) focal or extensive ground-glass opacities; and (d) nodule(s) with a {open_quotes}halo{close_quotes} sign. Six of 65 patients showed air-space metastases: three from pancreatic carcinoma. two from colonic carcinoma, and one from jejunal carcinoma. In one case, metastasis appeared as extensive parenchymal consolidation associated with ground-glass opacities; in one as an area of ground-glass opacity; in one as an extensive parenchymal consolidation with air bronchogram; in one as parenchymal consolidations with angiogram sign and multiple nodules, some of these with halo sign; in one as air-space nodules and patchy air-space consolidations; and in one as a solitary nodule with halo sign. Our study shows that air-space lung metastasis from GI carcinomas is uncommon but not rare. On CT as well as microscopically, differential diagnosis between air-space metastasis and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma may be impossible. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. 77 FR 45239 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bar Harbor, ME

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ...-1366; Airspace Docket No. 11-ANE-13] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bar Harbor, ME AGENCY: Federal... area at Bar Harbor, ME, as the Surry Non-Directional Radio Beacon (NDB) has been decommissioned and new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures have been developed at Hancock County-Bar Harbor Airport. This...

  6. 76 FR 5306 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Indianapolis Executive Airport, IN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... Executive Airport, IN AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Airport, Indianapolis, IN airspace area. Controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Standard... safety and management of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) operations at the airport. DATES: 0901 UTC...

  7. 78 FR 48291 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Columbus, Rickenbacker International Airport, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ..., Rickenbacker International Airport, OH AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class D airspace at Rickenbacker International Airport, Columbus, OH. Changes to the airspace description are necessary due to the closure of South Columbus Airport. The FAA is...

  8. 75 FR 29466 - Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within the Territory and Airspace of Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-26

    ...-0289; SFAR No. 110] RIN 2120-AJ69 Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within the Territory and Airspace... Requirements Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within the Territory and Airspace of Afghanistan Unless... with this proposal to the Office of Management and Budget for its review. Title: Prohibition Against...

  9. 75 FR 42015 - Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within the Territory and Airspace of Afghanistan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    ...-0289; SFAR No. 110] RIN 2120-AJ69 Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within the Territory and Airspace... Analysis for the previously published proposed rule entitled, Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within... Prohibition Against Certain Flights Within the Territory and Airspace of Afghanistan.\\1\\ The comment period...

  10. 78 FR 65241 - Proposed Modification of Class D and Class E Airspace; Kailua-Kona, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ...- Kona, HI AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... Keahole, Kailua-Kona, HI. Controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate the Area Navigation (RNAV... surface, at Kona International Airport at Keahole, Kailua-Kona, HI. The segment of controlled airspace...

  11. 76 FR 64295 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Huntington, WV

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... Tri-State/Milton J Ferguson Field Airport. This action would enhance the safety and airspace... through the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John Fornito... at Tri-State/Milton J Ferguson Field Airport, Huntington, WV. Airspace reconfiguration is necessary...

  12. 76 FR 5300 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cable Union, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cable Union, WI...: This action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Cable Union, WI. Decommissioning of the Seely non-directional beacon (NDB) at Cable Union Airport, Cable Union, WI, has made this action necessary for the...

  13. 76 FR 22014 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cable Union, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cable Union, WI AGENCY... airspace for Cable Union, WI. Decommissioning of the Seely non-directional beacon (NDB) at Cable Union Airport, Cable Union, WI, has made this action necessary to enhance the safety and management of...

  14. 75 FR 13668 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cedar Rapids, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-23

    ...-0916; Airspace Docket No. 09-ACE-12] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cedar Rapids, IA AGENCY: Federal... Cedar Rapids, IA, to accommodate Area Navigation (RNAV) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) at The Eastern Iowa Airport, Cedar Rapids, IA. The FAA is taking this action to enhance the safety...

  15. 77 FR 49712 - Amendment to Class B Airspace; Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    ... operational and safety benefit of raising the ceiling based on no actual mid-air collision or conflict resolution data having been provided to support taking this action. ] This Class B airspace area modification... B airspace ceiling as noted above, there are alternatives to installing a supplemental oxygen system...

  16. 77 FR 39651 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Circle Town, MT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... County Airport, Circle Town, MT, to accommodate aircraft using new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global... airspace at Circle Town County Airport, Circle Town, MT. Controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate aircraft using new RNAV (GPS) standard instrument approach procedures at Circle Town County Airport. This...

  17. 77 FR 30187 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Rock Springs, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ...-0131; Airspace Docket No. 12-ANM-2] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Rock Springs, WY AGENCY: Federal... Rock Springs-Sweetwater County Airport, Rock Springs, WY. Decommissioning of the Rock Springs Tactical... Rock Springs, WY (77 FR 11796). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking...

  18. 77 FR 17360 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Memphis, TN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ... regulations to assign the use of airspace necessary to ensure the safety of aircraft and the efficient use of... Branch, MS, Olive Branch Airport (Lat. 34[deg]58'44'' N., long. 89[deg]47'13'' W.) General DeWitt Spain... radius of General DeWitt Spain Airport; excluding that airspace within the Millington, TN, Class E...

  19. 75 FR 33559 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Toledo, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    ... (SIAP) at Ed Carlson Memorial Field-South Lewis County Airport. The FAA is proposing this action to... Ed Carlson Memorial Field- South Lewis County Airport, Toledo, WA. Controlled airspace is necessary... that authority as it establishes additional controlled airspace at Ed Carlson Memorial Field-South...

  20. 76 FR 5472 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; New Hampton, IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ...-1035; Airspace Docket No. 10-ACE-12] Establishment of Class E Airspace; New Hampton, IA AGENCY: Federal... at New Hampton, IA, to accommodate new Area Navigation (RNAV) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAP) at Mercy Medical Center Heliport, New Hampton, IA. The FAA is taking this action to enhance the...

  1. 76 FR 21266 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cocoa, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cocoa, FL AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E Airspace at Cocoa, FL, as ] the Merritt Island Non-Directional Beacon... surface to support new standard instrument approach procedures developed at Merritt Island Airport, Cocoa...

  2. 78 FR 10564 - Proposed Modification of Class B Airspace; Minneapolis, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... International Airport (MSP), MN, within Class B airspace. The FAA is proposing this action to ensure containment...://www.regulations.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Colby Abbott, Airspace Policy and ATC... subarea by 0.8 NM laterally, but still provide containment of large turbine-powered aircraft within Class...

  3. 77 FR 4457 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Altus AFB, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class D Airspace; Altus AFB, OK AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class D airspace for Altus AFB, OK... Mountain Regional Airport, Altus, OK, has made this action necessary for the safety and management of...

  4. 76 FR 53355 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Ardmore, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Ardmore, OK AGENCY... action proposes to amend Class E airspace at Ardmore, OK, to accommodate new Standard Instrument Approach... Airport, Ardmore, OK. Decommissioning of the Arbuckle NDB and cancellation of the NDB approach at Ardmore...

  5. 76 FR 66866 - Proposed Amendment of Class D Airspace; Altus AFB, OK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class D Airspace; Altus AFB, OK...: This action proposes to amend Class D airspace at Altus Air Force Base (AFB), OK. Procedural changes..., Altus, OK, has made this action necessary for the safety and management of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR...

  6. 76 FR 12558 - Amendment to Special Use Airspace Restricted Areas R-2203, and R-2205; Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ...-0055; Airspace Docket No. 11-AAL-2] Amendment to Special Use Airspace Restricted Areas R-2203, and R... amendment. SUMMARY: This action amends the using agency of Restricted Areas R-2203 A, B, & C; Eagle River, AK, and R-2205, Stuart Creek, AK. These changes reflect the U.S. Army's current organization in...

  7. 78 FR 5754 - Proposed Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Reading, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... Class E Airspace; Reading, PA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: This action proposes to amend Class D and Class E Airspace at Reading... Approach Procedures (SIAPs) at Reading Regional/Carl A. Spaatz Field. This action would enhance the safety...

  8. Widening access through openness in higher education in the developing world: A Bourdieusian field analysis of experiences from the National Open University of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Kayode Olakulehin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bourdieu has argued that higher education is a field that reproduces social inequality, thus complicating how openness widens access to higher education in the developing world. Drawing on the experiences of the National Open University of Nigeria (NOUN, this paper critically analyses and evaluates the rationale, approach, difficulties, opportunities, outcomes and benefits of NOUN’s experience in widening access to higher education in Nigeria using Bourdieu’s field theory. We argue that the success of efforts for openness in higher education in a developing world context involves steering the contradictory tensions of openness and access across competing policy and practice fields. We offer this theorisation as a future social theoretical agenda for reflexive research for improving the effectiveness of praxis to widen access through openness in higher education in the developing world.

  9. VIIRS Data and Data Access at the NASA National Snow and Ice Data Center Distributed Active Archive Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moth, P.; Johnston, T.; Fowler, D. K.

    2017-12-01

    Working collaboratively, NASA and NOAA are producing data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS). The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), a NASA Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC), is distributing VIIRS snow cover, ice surface temperature, and sea ice cover products. Data is available in .nc and HDF5 formats with a temporal coverage of 1 January 2012 and onward. VIIRS, NOAA's latest radiometer, was launched aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite on October 28, 2011. The instrument comprises 22 bands; five for high-resolution imagery, 16 at moderate resolution, and one panchromatic day/night band. VIIRS is a whiskbroom scanning radiometer that covers the spectrum between 0.412 μm and 12.01 μm and acquires spatial resolutions at nadir of 750 m, 375 m, and 750 m, respectively. One distinct advantage of VIIRS is to ensure continuity that will lead to the development of snow and sea ice climate data records with data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments on the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua and Terra satellites. Combined with the Advanced Very-High-resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), the AVHRR-MODIS-VIIRS timeline will start in the early 1980s and span at least four decades-and perhaps beyond-enabling researchers to produce and gain valuable insight from long, high-quality Earth System Data Records (ESDRs). Several options are available to view and download VIIRS data: Direct download from NSIDC via HTTPS. Using NASA Earthdata Search, users can explore and download VIIRS data with temporal and/or spatial filters, re-format, re-project, and subset by spatial extent and parameter. API access is also available for all these options; Using NASA Worldview, users can view Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) from VIIRS data; Users can join a VIIRS subscription list to have new VIIRS data automatically ftp'd or staged on a local server as it is archived at NSIDC.

  10. Understanding conflict-resolution taskload: Implementing advisory conflict-detection and resolution algorithms in an airspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Adan Ernesto

    2011-12-01

    From 2010 to 2030, the number of instrument flight rules aircraft operations handled by Federal Aviation Administration en route traffic centers is predicted to increase from approximately 39 million flights to 64 million flights. The projected growth in air transportation demand is likely to result in traffic levels that exceed the abilities of the unaided air traffic controller in managing, separating, and providing services to aircraft. Consequently, the Federal Aviation Administration, and other air navigation service providers around the world, are making several efforts to improve the capacity and throughput of existing airspaces. Ultimately, the stated goal of the Federal Aviation Administration is to triple the available capacity of the National Airspace System by 2025. In an effort to satisfy air traffic demand through the increase of airspace capacity, air navigation service providers are considering the inclusion of advisory conflict-detection and resolution systems. In a human-in-the-loop framework, advisory conflict-detection and resolution decision-support tools identify potential conflicts and propose resolution commands for the air traffic controller to verify and issue to aircraft. A number of researchers and air navigation service providers hypothesize that the inclusion of combined conflict-detection and resolution tools into air traffic control systems will reduce or transform controller workload and enable the required increases in airspace capacity. In an effort to understand the potential workload implications of introducing advisory conflict-detection and resolution tools, this thesis provides a detailed study of the conflict event process and the implementation of conflict-detection and resolution algorithms. Specifically, the research presented here examines a metric of controller taskload: how many resolution commands an air traffic controller issues under the guidance of a conflict-detection and resolution decision-support tool. The goal

  11. Does Household Gun Access Increase the Risk of Attempted Suicide?: Evidence from a National Sample of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Adam M.; Lizotte, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to assess if home firearm access increases the risk of nonfatal suicidal attempts among adolescents. Such a gun focus has largely been limited to case-control studies on completed suicides. This line of research has found that household gun access increases the risk of suicide due to features of available firearms…

  12. Determining Satisfaction with Access and Financial Aspects of Care for Persons Exposed to Libby Amphibole Asbestos: Rural and National Environmental Policy Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, Ch.A.; Kuntz, S.W.; Hill, W.; Weinert, C.; Rowse, K.

    2011-01-01

    Libby, Montana is a Superfund site and epicenter of one of the worst environmental disasters in the USA history in terms of asbestos-related mortality and morbidity. Perceptions of access and financial aspects of care were explored among a national cohort of persons post asbestos exposure and prior to a 2009 Public Health Emergency Declaration. Our findings indicated the Libby cohort was significantly less satisfied with access and financial aspects of care as measured by two PSQ-III scales when compared to an adult, chronically ill patient sample. Participants with higher levels of respiratory morbidity and depression had significantly lower satisfaction scores

  13. A cross-sectional analysis of the relationship between diabetes and health access barriers in an urban First Nations population in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Michael; Firestone, Michelle A; McKnight, Constance D; Smylie, Janet; Rotondi, Michael A

    2018-01-21

    This study explores the relationship between health access barriers and diabetes in an urban First Nations population in Canada. Data from a self-identified urban First Nations population were collected using respondent-driven sampling (RDS). As no clear approach for regression modelling of RDS data is available, two logistic regression modelling approaches, including survey-based logistic and generalised linear mixed models, were used to explore the relationship between diabetes and health barriers of interest, including access to healthcare, food, housing and socioeconomic factors. Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. This cross-sectional study used data collected from the Our Health Counts study, in partnership with the De dwa da dehs nye>s Aboriginal Health Centre, which recruited 554 First Nations adults living in Hamilton using RDS. After adjusting for covariates, multivariable regression techniques showed a statistically significant relationship between a self-reported diagnosis of diabetes and a lack of culturally appropriate care among urban First Nations peoples (OR: 12.70, 95% CI 2.52 to 57.91). There was also a trend towards a relationship between diabetes and not having a doctor available in the area, feeling that healthcare provided was inadequate and a lack of available healthcare services in the area. Urban First Nations peoples who felt the health service they received was not culturally appropriate were more likely to have diabetes, compared with those who did not feel the service they received was culturally inappropriate. Establishing more healthcare services that integrate First Nations cultures and traditions could improve access to care and the course of treatment for urban First Nations peoples living with diabetes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Sea-change or change challenge? Health information access in developing countries: The U.S. National Library of Medicine experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royall, J; Lyon, B

    2011-09-01

    Health professionals in developing countries want access to information to help them make changes in health care and contribute to medical research. However, they face challenges of technology limitations, lack of training, and, on the village level, culture and language. This report focuses on the U.S. National Library of Medicine experience with access: for the international medical/scientific community to health information which has been published by researchers in developing countries; for scientists and clinicians in developing countries to their own literature and to that of their colleagues around the world; for medical librarians who are a critical conduit for students, faculty, researchers, and, increasingly, the general public; and for the front line workers at the health center in the village at the end of the line. The fundamental question of whether or not information communication technology can make a difference in access and subsequently in health is illustrated by an anecdote regarding an early intervention in Africa in 1992. From that point, we examine programs to improve access involving malaria researchers, medical journal editors, librarians, and medical students working with local health center staff in the village. Although access is a reality, the positive change in health that the information technology intervention might produce often remains a mirage. Information and technology are not static elements in the equation for better access. They must function together, creating a dialectic in which they transform and inform one another and those whom their combination touches.

  15. National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines (PNAUM): household survey component methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengue, Sotero Serrate; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Boing, Alexandra Crispim; Tavares, Noemia Urruth Leão; Pizzol, Tatiane da Silva Dal; Oliveira, Maria Auxiliadora; Arrais, Paulo Sérgio Dourado; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Farias, Mareni Rocha; Luiza, Vera Lucia; Bernal, Regina Tomie Ivata; Barros, Aluísio Jardim Dornellas de

    2016-12-01

    To describe methodological aspects of the household survey National Survey on Access, Use and Promotion of Rational Use of Medicines (PNAUM) related to sampling design and implementation, the actual obtained sample, instruments and fieldwork. A cross-sectional, population-based study with probability sampling in three stages of the population living in households located in Brazilian urban areas. Fieldwork was carried out between September 2013 and February 2014. The data collection instrument included questions related to: information about households, residents and respondents; chronic diseases and medicines used; use of health services; acute diseases and events treated with drugs; use of contraceptives; use of pharmacy services; behaviors that may affect drug use; package inserts and packaging; lifestyle and health insurance. In total, 41,433 interviews were carried out in 20,404 households and 576 urban clusters corresponding to 586 census tracts distributed in the five Brazilian regions, according to eight domains defined by age and gender. The results of the survey may be used as a baseline for future studies aiming to assess the impact of government action on drug access and use. For local studies using a compatible method, PNAUM may serve as a reference point to evaluate variations in space and population. With a comprehensive evaluation of drug-related aspects, PNAUM is a major source of data for a variety of analyses to be carried out both at academic and government level. Descrever aspectos metodológicos do inquérito domiciliar da Pesquisa Nacional sobre Acesso, Utilização e Promoção do Uso Racional de Medicamentos (PNAUM) quanto ao desenho e implementação da amostragem e da amostra efetivamente obtida, seus instrumentos e implementação do campo. Estudo transversal de base populacional com amostra probabilística em três estágios da população residente nos domicílios localizados na zona urbana do Brasil. O trabalho de campo foi

  16. US Environmental Protection Agency National Coastal Assessment for Hawaii 2002: Water Quality, Fish Taxon, Sediment Chemistry Data (NODC Accession 0061250)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 2002, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) National Coastal Assessment (NCA), in conjunction with...

  17. U.S. Virgin Islands National Park Coral Transplant Study, St. John, 1999-2009 (NODC Accession 0112724)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In a pilot project in the Caribbean (Virgin Islands National Park, St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands), storm-produced fragments of Acropora palmata, Acropora...

  18. Coral reef fish species survey data GIS from the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (NODC Accession 0001394)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of an ArcView shapefile set that contains locations of sampled coral reef fish species at the National Marine Sanctuary along the Florida...

  19. Biogeographic Characterization of Fish Communities within the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (2006 - 2007) (NODC Accession 0118358)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The overarching goal of this collaboration was to provide the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS) staff with information on biogeographic patterns...

  20. Acropora Spatial Survey Data of the Upper Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary 2005 -2007 (NODC Accession 0046934)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Presence or absence of acroporid corals marked by handheld GPS during snorkel or tow surveys of shallow water (5m) reef habitats in the Upper Florida Keys National...

  1. The rise and fall of dental therapy in Canada: a policy analysis and assessment of equity of access to oral health care for Inuit and First Nations communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leck, Victoria; Randall, Glen E

    2017-07-20

    Inequality between most Canadians and those from Inuit and First Nations communities, in terms of both access to oral health care services and related health outcomes, has been a long-standing problem. Efforts to close this equity gap led to the creation of dental therapy training programs. These programs were designed to produce graduates who would provide services in rural and northern communities. The closure of the last dental therapy program in late 2011 has ended the supply of dental therapists and governments do not appear to have any alternative solutions to the growing gap in access to oral health care services between most Canadians and those from Inuit and First Nations communities. A policy analysis of the rise and fall of the dental therapy profession in Canada was conducted using historical and policy documents. The analysis is framed within Kingdon's agenda-setting framework and considers why dental therapy was originally pursued as an option to ensure equitable access to oral health care for Inuit and First Nations communities and why this policy has now been abandoned with the closure of Canada's last dental therapy training school. The closure of the last dental therapy program in Canada has the potential to further reduce access to dental care in some Inuit and First Nations communities. Overlaps between federal and provincial jurisdiction have contributed to the absence of a coordinated policy approach to address the equity gap in access to dental care which will exacerbate the inequalities in comparison to the general population. The analysis suggests that while a technically feasible policy solution is available there continues to be no politically acceptable solution and thus it remains unlikely that a window of opportunity for policy change will open any time soon. In the absence of federal government leadership, the most viable option forward may be incremental policy change. Provincial governments could expand the scope of practice for

  2. The development and implementation of the national evaluation strategy of Access to Care, a multi-site linkage to care initiative in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeeyon Janet; Maulsby, Cathy; Kinsky, Suzanne; Riordan, Maura; Charles, Vignetta; Jain, Kriti; Holtgrave, David R

    2014-10-01

    The Access to Care (A2C) is a multi-site initiative that seeks to increase the access to and retention in effective HIV healthcare and support services by people living with HIV across the United States. As the initiative implemented evidence-based programs in new settings with diverse populations, it was important to document these innovative efforts to contribute to the evidence base for best practices. In a partnership between Johns Hopkins University, AIDS United, and the A2C sites, a national evaluation strategy was developed and implemented to build knowledge about how linkage to care interventions could be most effectively implemented within the context of local, real-world settings. This article provides an overview of the efforts to develop and implement a national monitoring and evaluation strategy for a multi-site initiative. The findings may be of utility for other HIV interventions that are seeking to incorporate a monitoring and evaluation component into their efforts.

  3. Effects and Unforeseen Consequences of Accessing References on a Maintenance of Certification Examination: Findings From a National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Richard A; Jurich, Daniel; Foster, Lauren M

    2017-10-12

    Increasing criticism of maintenance of certification (MOC) examinations has prompted certifying boards to explore alternative assessment formats. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of allowing test takers to access reference material while completing their MOC Part III standardized examination. Item response data were obtained from 546 physicians who completed a medical subspecialty MOC examination between 2013 and 2016. To investigate if accessing references was related to better performance, an analysis of covariance was conducted on the MOC examination scores with references (access or no access) as the between-groups factor and scores from the physicians' initial certification examination as a covariate. Descriptive analyses were conducted to investigate how the new feature of accessing references influenced time management within the test day. Physicians scored significantly higher when references were allowed (mean = 534.44, standard error = 6.83) compared to when they were not (mean = 472.75, standard error = 4.87), F(1, 543) = 60.18, P references affected pacing behavior; physicians were 13.47 times more likely to finish with less than a minute of test time remaining per section when reference material was accessible. Permitting references caused an increase in performance, but also a decrease in the perception that the test has sufficient time limits. Implications for allowing references are discussed, including physician time management, impact on the construct assessed by the test, and the importance of providing validity evidence for all test design decisions.

  4. BioPortal: enhanced functionality via new Web services from the National Center for Biomedical Ontology to access and use ontologies in software applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whetzel, Patricia L; Noy, Natalya F; Shah, Nigam H; Alexander, Paul R; Nyulas, Csongor; Tudorache, Tania; Musen, Mark A

    2011-07-01

    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology (NCBO) is one of the National Centers for Biomedical Computing funded under the NIH Roadmap Initiative. Contributing to the national computing infrastructure, NCBO has developed BioPortal, a web portal that provides access to a library of biomedical ontologies and terminologies (http://bioportal.bioontology.org) via the NCBO Web services. BioPortal enables community participation in the evaluation and evolution of ontology content by providing features to add mappings between terms, to add comments linked to specific ontology terms and to provide ontology reviews. The NCBO Web services (http://www.bioontology.org/wiki/index.php/NCBO_REST_services) enable this functionality and provide a uniform mechanism to access ontologies from a variety of knowledge representation formats, such as Web Ontology Language (OWL) and Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) format. The Web services provide multi-layered access to the ontology content, from getting all terms in an ontology to retrieving metadata about a term. Users can easily incorporate the NCBO Web services into software applications to generate semantically aware applications and to facilitate structured data collection.

  5. Using the Internet to access health-related information: results from a nationally representative sample of New Zealand secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, Jennifer; Lucassen, Mathijs; Denny, Simon; Fleming, Terry; Peiris-John, Roshini; Clark, Terryann

    2017-11-23

    Objective To determine if secondary school students in New Zealand who report greater health concerns (e.g. significant depressive symptoms) are more likely to use the Internet to access health-related information. Methods A nationally representative health and wellbeing survey was undertaken in 2012 (n = 8500). Multiple regression models were used to examine the associations between students' use of the Internet to access health-related information and selected outcomes or indicators. Results Over 90% of students used the Internet on a daily basis, with 15.4% of students reporting that they had used the Internet to access health-related information. Students experiencing household poverty were more likely to report not using the Internet daily (17.4% compared to 4.2%). Odds ratios (ORs) for accessing the Internet for this sort of information were highest for students who reported self-harm [OR 2.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.3-3.3], disordered eating (OR 2.7, 95% CI 2.4-3.2), or a suicide attempt (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.9-3.3). Conclusion Our findings suggest that Internet-based health interventions may be a viable way to reach young people with high health needs, but consideration needs to be given to those with limited Internet access.

  6. Global Trends in Space Access and Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shamim A.; Keim, Nicholas S.; Zeender, Peter E.

    2010-01-01

    In the not-so-distant past, space access and air/space technology superiority were within the purview of the U.S. and former Soviet Union's respective space agencies, both vying for global leadership in space exploitation. In more recent years, with the emergence of the European Space Agency (ESA) member countries and Asian countries joining the family of space-faring nations, it is truer now more than ever that space access and utilization has become a truly global enterprise. In fact, according to the Space Report 2007, this enterprise is a $251-billion economy. It is possible to gauge the vitality of worldwide efforts from open sources in today's transparent, media-based society. In particular, print and web broadcasters regularly report and catalog global space activities for defense and civil purposes. For the purposes of this paper, a representative catalog of missions is used to illustrate the nature of the emerging "globalization." This paper highlights global trends in terms of not only the providers of space access, but also the end-users for the various recently accomplished missions. With well over 50 launches per year, in recent years, the launch-log reveals a surprising percentage of "cooperative or co-dependent missions" where different agencies, countries, and/or commercial entities are so engaged presumably to the benefit of all who participate. Statistics are cited and used to show that recently over d0% of the 50-plus missions involved multiple nations working collectively to deliver payloads to orbit. Observers, space policy professionals, and space agency leaders have eloquently proposed that it might require the combined resources and talents of multiple nations to advance human exploration goals beyond low earth orbit. This paper does not intend to offer new information with respect to whether international collaboration is necessary but to observe that, in continuing to monitor global trends, the results seem to support the thesis that a

  7. Safety Analysis of TCAS on Global Hawk Using Airspace Encounter Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Billingsley, Thomas B

    2006-01-01

    .... Because of the potential for close proximity to manned aircraft in civil airspace, collision avoidance is a major concern, and the Air Force is seeking to equip Global Hawk with the Traffic Alert...

  8. Speech systems for autonomous unmanned aircraft: enabling autonomous unmanned aircraft to communicate in civil airspace

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burger, CR

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Airspace control is currently based largely on the exchange of speech between aircraft and Air Traffic Service Units, or between aircraft themselves. ICAO regulatory guidelines make no distinction between unmanned and manned aircraft, implying...

  9. 75 FR 30689 - Modification of Class C Airspace; Beale Air Force Base, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... Base, CA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action modifies the legal description of the Beale Air Force Base (AFB), CA, Class C airspace area by allowing the...

  10. 78 FR 48862 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Gulf Regional Airspace Strategic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-12

    ... Airspace Strategic Initiative (GRASI) Landscape Initiative (GLI) is a U.S Air Force-led partnership with.... Scoping: In order to effectively define the full range of issues to be evaluated in the EIS, the Air Force...

  11. Progress in Reversing the HIV Epidemic through Intensified Access to Antiretroviral Therapy: Results from a Nationally Representative Population-Based Survey in Kenya, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Andrea A.; Mukui, Irene; N’gan’ga, Lucy; Katana, Abraham; Koros, Dan; Wamicwe, Joyce; De Cock, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2014, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) called for 90% of persons living with HIV (PLHIV) to know their status, 90% of these to be on antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 90% of these to be virally suppressed by 2020 (90-90-90). It is not clear whether planned ART scale-up in countries whose eligibility criteria for ART initiation are based on recommendations from the 2013 World Health Organization treatment guidelines will be sufficient to meet UNAIDS' new global targets. Materials and Methods Using data from a nationally representative population-based household survey of persons in Kenya we compared coverage and unmet need associated with HIV diagnosis, ART, and viral suppression among PLHIV aged 15–64 years in 2012 based on criteria outlined in the 2014 national ART guidelines and UNAIDS’ 90-90-90 goals. Estimates were weighted to account for sampling probability and nonresponse. Results Eight in ten PLHIV aged 15–64 years needed ART based on treatment eligibility. Need for treatment based on the national treatment policy was 97.4% of treatment need based on UNAIDS’ 90-90-90 goals, requiring an excess of 24,000 PLHIV to access treatment beyond those eligible for ART to achieve UNAIDS’ 90-90-90 treatment target. The gap in treatment coverage was high, ranging from 43.1% nationally to 52.3% in Nyanza among treatment-eligible PLHIV and 44.6% nationally to 52.4% in Nyanza among all PLHIV. Conclusion Maintaining the current pace of ART scale-up in Kenya will result in thousands of PLHIV unreached, many with high viral load and at-risk of transmitting infection to others. Careful strategies for reaching 90-90-90 will be instrumental in determining whether intensified access to treatment can be achieved to reach all who require ART. PMID:26930291

  12. 75 FR 33611 - Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers and the Smart Grid: Data Access...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    ... information from smart meters, historical consumption data, and pricing and billing information. DOE will hold... electronic form--including real-time information from smart meters, historical consumption data, and pricing... Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of...

  13. 75 FR 26203 - Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers and the Smart Grid: Data Access...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... information in electronic form--including real-time information from smart meters, historical consumption data... disclosed in ways that are both lawful and adequately transparent to consumers.\\3\\ \\2\\ A smart meter is a... extract value from two-way communications and real-time access to usage data. Smart meters play an...

  14. Limited Access to AP Courses for Students in Smaller and More Isolated Rural School Districts. National Issue Brief Number 80

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Douglas J.; Mattingly, Marybeth J.

    2015-01-01

    This brief assesses trends in access to, enrollment in, and success in Advanced Placement (AP) coursework in relation to school district poverty, racial composition, and urbanicity. It uses data merged from the 2011-2012 Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC), the 2012 Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE), and the 2010 Decennial U.S.…

  15. Evaluating multiple dimensions of visitors' tradeoffs between access and crowding at Arches National Park using indifference curve analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven R. Lawson; Robert E. Manning

    2001-01-01

    Tradeoffs are an inherent part of many of the decisions faced by outdoor recreation managers. For example, decisions concerning the social carrying capacity of popular attraction sites involve tradeoffs between limiting visitor use to ensure a high quality experience and allowing high levels of visitor use to ensure that large numbers of visitors retain access to park...

  16. Accessible Knowledge - Knowledge on Accessibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Inge Mette

    2015-01-01

    Although serious efforts are made internationally and nationally, it is a slow process to make our physical environment accessible. In the actual design process, architects play a major role. But what kinds of knowledge, including research-based knowledge, do practicing architects make use of when...... designing accessible environments? The answer to the question is crucially important since it affects how knowledge is distributed and how accessibility can be ensured. In order to get first-hand knowledge about the design process and the sources from which they gain knowledge, 11 qualitative interviews...... were conducted with architects with experience of designing for accessibility. The analysis draws on two theoretical distinctions. The first is research-based knowledge versus knowledge used by architects. The second is context-independent knowledge versus context-dependent knowledge. The practitioners...

  17. Access to healthcare and financial risk protection for older adults in Mexico: secondary data analysis of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubova, Svetlana V; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo; Canning, David; Reich, Michael R

    2015-07-21

    While the benefits of Seguro Popular health insurance in Mexico relative to no insurance have been widely documented, little has been reported on its effects relative to the pre-existing Social Security health insurance. We analyse the effects of Social Security and Seguro Popular health insurances in Mexico on access to healthcare of older adults, and on financial risk protection to their households, compared with older adults without health insurance. Secondary data analysis was performed using the 2012 Mexican Survey of Health and Nutrition (ENSANUT). The study population comprised 18,847 older adults and 13,180 households that have an elderly member. The dependent variables were access to healthcare given the reported need, the financial burden imposed by health expenditures measured through catastrophic health-related expenditures, and using savings for health-related expenditures. Separate propensity score matching analyses were conducted for each comparison. The analysis for access was performed at the individual level, and the analysis for financial burden at the household level. In each case, matching on a wide set of relevant characteristics was achieved. Seguro Popular showed a protective effect against lack of access to healthcare for older adults compared with those with no insurance. The average treatment effect on the treated (ATET) was ascertained through using the nearest-neighbour matching (-8.1%, t-stat -2.305) analysis. However, Seguro Popular did not show a protective effect against catastrophic expenditures in a household where an older adult lived. Social Security showed increased access to healthcare (ATET -11.3%, t-stat -3.138), and protective effect against catastrophic expenditures for households with an elderly member (ATET -1.9%, t-stat -2.178). Seguro Popular increased access to healthcare for Mexican older adults. Social Security showed a significant protective effect against lack of access and catastrophic expenditures compared with

  18. PPARγ deficiency results in reduced lung elastic recoil and abnormalities in airspace distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Starcher Barry C; Ingenito Edward P; Tsai Larry W; Simon Dawn M; Mariani Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ is a nuclear hormone receptor that regulates gene expression, cell proliferation and differentiation. We previously described airway epithelial cell PPARγ deficient mice that develop airspace enlargement with decreased tissue resistance and increased lung volumes. We sought to understand the impact of airspace enlargement in conditionally targeted mice upon the physio-mechanical properties of the lung. Methods We measured...

  19. IMPLEMENTATION OF LOCAL AND SUB-REGIONAL AIRSPACE MANAGEMENT SUPPORTING SYSTEM IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandr Luppo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available 1024x768 The article is devoted to the analysis of possible LARA (local and sub-regional airspace management supporting system implementation in Ukraine. We tried to define the problems which might occur during the integration of the new system into the flexible use of Ukrainian airspace and what it may result in. Probable allocation of responsibilities among the state aviation bodies was made Normal 0 false false false

  20. Patterns in diurnal airspace use by migratory landbirds along an ecological barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Anna C.; Niemi, Gerald J.; Johnson, Douglas H.

    2015-01-01

    Migratory bird populations and survival are affected by conditions experienced during migration. While many studies and conservation and management efforts focus on terrestrial stoppage and staging areas, the aerial environment through which migrants move also is subjected to anthropogenic impacts with potential consequences to migratory movement and survival. During autumn migration, the northern coastline of Lake Superior acts as an ecological barrier for many landbirds migrating out of the boreal forests of North America. From 24 observation points, we assessed the diurnal movements of birds throughout autumn migration, 2008-2010, within a 210 km by 10 km coastal region along the northern coast of Lake Superior. Several raptor species showed patterns in airspace associated with topographic features such as proximity to the coastline and presence of ridgelines. Funneling movement, commonly used to describe the concentration of raptors along a migratory diversion line that either prevents or enhances migration progress, occurred only for Bald and Golden Eagles. This suggests a "leaky" migration funnel for most migratory raptors (e.g., migrating birds exiting the purported migration corridor). Passerines migrating during the late season showed more spatial and temporal structure in airspace distribution than raptors, including funneling and an association with airspace near the coast. We conclude that a) the diurnal use of airspace by many migratory landbirds is patterned in space and time, b) autumn count sites situated along ecological barriers substantially underestimate the number of raptors due to 'leakage' out of these concentration areas, and c) the magnitude and structure of diurnal passerine movements in airspace have been overlooked. The heavy and structured use of airspace by migratory landbirds, especially the airspace associated with anthropogenic development (e.g., buildings, towers, turbines) necessitates a shift in focus to airspace management and

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from NOAA Ship DAVID STARR JORDAN in the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary and others from 2007-07-25 to 2007-10-28 (NCEI Accession 0144352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144352 includes Surface underway data collected from NOAA Ship DAVID STARR JORDAN in the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, Cordell Bank...

  2. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from WECOMA in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary and others from 2011-08-12 to 2011-08-30 (NCEI Accession 0157458)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157458 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from WECOMA in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine...

  3. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Barometric pressure sensor, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from WECOMA in the Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary, Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary and others from 2011-08-12 to 2011-08-30 (NCEI Accession 0157448)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157448 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from WECOMA in the Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary,...

  4. Automation for Accommodating Fuel-Efficient Descents in Constrained Airspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopenbarger, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous descents at low engine power are desired to reduce fuel consumption, emissions and noise during arrival operations. The challenge is to allow airplanes to fly these types of efficient descents without interruption during busy traffic conditions. During busy conditions today, airplanes are commonly forced to fly inefficient, step-down descents as airtraffic controllers work to ensure separation and maximize throughput. NASA in collaboration with government and industry partners is developing new automation to help controllers accommodate continuous descents in the presence of complex traffic and airspace constraints. This automation relies on accurate trajectory predictions to compute strategic maneuver advisories. The talk will describe the concept behind this new automation and provide an overview of the simulations and flight testing used to develop and refine its underlying technology.

  5. Sediment toxicity data from the NOAA National Status and Trends Program, March 1991 to July 1996 (NODC Accession 9800146)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As part of its bioeffects assessment program. NOAA has begun a series of surveys of the toxicity and other biological effects of toxicants in selected bays and...

  6. Octocoral Species Richness for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary from 1999-2009 (NODC Accession 0123059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset includes species richness of benthic branching and encrusting gorgonians collected from multiple habitat types across the south Florida shelf, inside and...

  7. National Coral Reef Monitoring Program: Benthic Images Collected from Climate Stations across the Mariana Archipelago in 2014 (NCEI Accession 0157759)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Photoquadrat benthic images were collected at NCRMP climate stations and permanent sites identified by the Ocean and Climate Change team across the Mariana...

  8. Health Care Access and Use by Urban American Indians and Alaska Natives: Findings from the National Health Interview Survey (2006-09).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutman, Shira; Phillips, Leslie; Sparck, Aren

    2016-01-01

    Health disparities between American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) and non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs) may be partially explained in terms of health care access and utilization. We examined access to and utilization of health care for urban AI/ANs and NHWs in National Health Interview Survey data (2006-09). Significant disparities exist for urban AI/ANs compared with urban NHWs. More AI/ANs are uninsured than NHWs, and more cited cost as the reason. More AI/ANs cannot afford needed medical care and more AI/ANs had not talked with a health care professional in the past year plus. Urban AI/ANs have decreased health care utilization and greater barriers to access compared with NHWs. Study data on the magnitude of disparity between urban AI/ANs and NHWs provides needed information to improve health care access and use in this population and can serve as a baseline for understanding the impact of health care reform.

  9. Three-dimensional trajectory optimization in constrained airspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ran

    This dissertation deals with the generation of three-dimensional optimized trajectory in constrained airspace. It expands the previously used two-dimensional aircraft model to a three-dimensional model and includes the consideration of complex airspace constraints not included in previous trajectory optimization studies. Two major branches of optimization methods, indirect and direct methods, are introduced and compared. Both of the methods are applied to solve a two-dimensional minimum-time-to-climb (MTTC) problem. The solution procedure is described in detail. Two traditional problems, the Brachistochrone problem and Zermelo's problem, are solved using the direct collocation and nonlinear programming method. Because analytical solutions to these problems are known. These solutions provide verification of the numerical methods. Three discretization methods, trapezoidal, Hermite-Simpson and Chebyshev Pseudospectral (CP) are introduced and applied to solve the Brachistochrone problem. The solutions obtained using these discretization methods are compared with the analytical results. An 3-D aircraft model with six state variables and two control variables are presented. Two primary trajectory optimization problems are considered using this model in the dissertation. One is to assume that the aircraft climbs up from sea level to a desired altitude in a square cross section cylinder of arbitrary height. Another is to intercept a constant velocity, constant altitude target in minimum time starting from sea level. Results of the optimal trajectories are compared with the results from the proportional navigation guidance law. Field of View constraint is finally considered in this interception problem. The CP discretization and nonlinear programming method is shown to have advantages over indirect methods in solving three-dimensional (3-D) trajectory optimization problems with multiple controls and complex constraints. Conclusions from both problems are presented and

  10. Access to healthcare and financial risk protection for older adults in Mexico: secondary data analysis of a national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Doubova, Svetlana V; P?rez-Cuevas, Ricardo; Canning, David; Reich, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: While the benefits of Seguro Popular health insurance in Mexico relative to no insurance have been widely documented, little has been reported on its effects relative to the pre-existing Social Security health insurance. We analyse the effects of Social Security and Seguro Popular health insurances in Mexico on access to healthcare of older adults, and on financial risk protection to their households, compared with older adults without health insurance. Setting: Secondary data ana...

  11. Access to curriculum for students with disabilities at higher education institutions: How does the National University of Lesotho fare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosia, Paseka A; Phasha, Nareadi

    2017-01-01

    Creating access to curricula at institutions of higher education for students with disabilities requires a concerted effort from management and other key stakeholders to identify students' needs and create opportunities for success. This paper presents the findings of a study which examined students with disabilities' access to curricula at a higher education institution in Lesotho. Data for this qualitative study were collected using three methods: in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and document analysis. Eleven students with various types of impairments and 15 academic and non-academic staff members currently working in close proximity to students with disabilities participated in this study. The findings reveal inconsistencies between the institution's admission policy of non-discrimination according to disability status and its practices. These inconsistencies are discussed under the following themes: (1) access at admission level, (2) management of disability data, (3) support by the special education unit, (4) teaching strategies, (5) support by lecturers, (6) availability of assistive technology, (7) special concessions and (8) students' coping mechanisms. We recommend that a clear policy concerning the support of students with disabilities be developed with the following aims: guide decisions on how disability data should be used, define roles that different university departments must play in facilitating access to curricula for all students, influence suitable development of teaching and learning resources, stimulate research on success and completion rates of students with disabilities and mandate restructuring of programmes that are currently inaccessible to students with disabilities. Key stakeholders, including students with disabilities, disabled persons' organisations, disability rights activists, and staff should be involved in such policy design.

  12. Access to curriculum for students with disabilities at higher education institutions: How does the National University of Lesotho fare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Creating access to curricula at institutions of higher education for students with disabilities requires a concerted effort from management and other key stakeholders to identify students’ needs and create opportunities for success. Objectives This paper presents the findings of a study which examined students with disabilities’ access to curricula at a higher education institution in Lesotho. Method Data for this qualitative study were collected using three methods: in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and document analysis. Eleven students with various types of impairments and 15 academic and non-academic staff members currently working in close proximity to students with disabilities participated in this study. Results The findings reveal inconsistencies between the institution’s admission policy of non-discrimination according to disability status and its practices. These inconsistencies are discussed under the following themes: (1) access at admission level, (2) management of disability data, (3) support by the special education unit, (4) teaching strategies, (5) support by lecturers, (6) availability of assistive technology, (7) special concessions and (8) students’ coping mechanisms. Conclusion We recommend that a clear policy concerning the support of students with disabilities be developed with the following aims: guide decisions on how disability data should be used, define roles that different university departments must play in facilitating access to curricula for all students, influence suitable development of teaching and learning resources, stimulate research on success and completion rates of students with disabilities and mandate restructuring of programmes that are currently inaccessible to students with disabilities. Key stakeholders, including students with disabilities, disabled persons’ organisations, disability rights activists, and staff should be involved in such policy design. PMID:28730064

  13. New types of and access to grey literature databases generated by the Russian National Public Library for Science and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Shraiberg, Yakov (Russian National Public Library for Science and Technology); GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents new types of databases as part of services provided by the Library and the sources which may be regarded as "grey literature": patents, reports, unpublished translations, industrial catalogs. The paper describes services with these and other databases based on grey literature processing, local and remote access, interaction with Union Catalog and pilot CD-ROM projects. The paper provides sample records of the database on "grey" literature and explains the differences in dat...

  14. THE NURSE IN THE CONTEXT OF NATIONAL PROGRAM TO IMPROVE ACCESS AND QUALITY OF PRIMARY CARE (PMAQ: REPORT EXERIÊNCIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Souza de Jesus

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This is an experience report of a nurse from the Family Health Strategy (FHS, which occurred between February and October 2012, in a city in the interior of Bahia. The aim was to reflect on the experience of nurses in their work process from the perspective of the National Programme for Improving Access and Quality of Primary Care (PMAQ. Phases of Accession, Development and external evaluation of the program were reported, getting compromised the account of other phases due to interruption of the process of nursing work in the team. The experience was significant, demonstrating that PMAQ is a new program, but with goals and targets already recommended above, but without the specific financial incentive. Other factors identified were workload of nurses in the face of new demands on health and the interference of precarious employment relations in the continuity of actions.

  15. A National Long-term Outcomes Evaluation of U.S. Premedical Postbaccalaureate Programs Designed to Promote Health care Access and Workforce Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougle, Leon; Way, David P; Lee, Winona K; Morfin, Jose A; Mavis, Brian E; Matthews, De'Andrea; Latham-Sadler, Brenda A; Clinchot, Daniel M

    2015-08-01

    The National Postbaccalaureate Collaborative (NPBC) is a partnership of Postbaccalaureate Programs (PBPs) dedicated to helping promising college graduates from disadvantaged and underrepresented backgrounds get into and succeed in medical school. This study aims to determine long-term program outcomes by looking at PBP graduates, who are now practicing physicians, in terms of health care service to the poor and underserved and contribution to health care workforce diversity. We surveyed the PBP graduates and a randomly drawn sample of non-PBP graduates from the affiliated 10 medical schools stratified by the year of medical school graduation (1996-2002). The PBP graduates were more likely to be providing care in federally designated underserved areas and practicing in institutional settings that enable access to care for vulnerable populations. The NPBC graduates serve a critical role in providing access to care for underserved populations and serve as a source for health care workforce diversity.

  16. A requirement for Australian research: access to 'big science' facilities, a report by the Australian National Committee for crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    Two types of 'Big Science' research facility - synchrotron radiation sources and intense neutron beams - are now recognised as essential resources for a wide range of research activities in chemistry, physics and biology. The cost of such facilities and the lack of a sufficiently large user base will probably preclude their construction in Australia in the foreseeable future. The needs of Australian crystallographers for access to such facilities are assessed. In relation to synchrotron radiation sources, the Committee considered only the question of access to such facilities overseas. In relation to neutron beam sources, the Committee's inquiries included not only the question of access to powerful facilities overseas but also the special problems which confront Australian crystallographers as a result of the obsolescence of the HIFAR reactor. The arguments about, and options for, funding Australian use of facilities overseas are presented. The Committee concluded there is a strong case for the purchase of a beam-line at an overseas synchrotron radiation facility and a strong, though less urgent, case for substantial Australian involvement in an overseas neutron beam facility. The Committee recommended that the Australian HIFAR reactor be refurbished in its present shell, retaining the present flux and power levels, and that in the upgrading of the neutron scattering instrumentation at HIFAR special consideration be given to including items which are sufficiently specialised to attract the international neutron scattering community

  17. OGIS Access System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — The OGIS Access System (OAS) provides case management, stakeholder collaboration, and public communications activities including a web presence via a web portal.

  18. Web Accessibility Issues for Higher & Further Education. EDNER (Formative Evaluation of the Distributed National Electronic Resource) Project. Issues Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester Metropolitan Univ. (England).

    This issues paper, sixth in a series of eight, is intended to distill formative evaluation questions on topics that are central to the development of the higher and further education information environment in the United Kingdom. In undertaking formative evaluation studies, the Formative Evaluation of the Distributed National Electronic Resource…

  19. Access to Education in Africa: Responding to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chataika, Tsitsi; Mckenzie, Judith Anne; Swart, Estelle; Lyner-Cleophas, Marcia

    2012-01-01

    Article 24 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities mandates that disabled people should have full rights to education in inclusive settings. However, to ensure that educational polices and settings are designed to meet this criterion seems challenging to African countries that have ratified this Convention. This…

  20. 77 FR 36394 - Safety Zone for Fireworks Display, Potomac River, National Harbor Access Channel; Oxon Hill, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... to coordinate protest activities so that your message can be received without jeopardizing the safety or security of people, places or vessels. 7. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act The Unfunded Mandates..., adjacent to the Gaylord National Resort Hotel, at Oxon Hill in Prince Georges County, Maryland scheduled on...

  1. Access to care and use of the Internet to search for health information: results from the US National Health Interview Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amante, Daniel J; Hogan, Timothy P; Pagoto, Sherry L; English, Thomas M; Lapane, Kate L

    2015-04-29

    The insurance mandate of the Affordable Care Act has increased the number of people with health coverage in the United States. There is speculation that this increase in the number of insured could make accessing health care services more difficult. Those who are unable to access care in a timely manner may use the Internet to search for information needed to answer their health questions. The aim was to determine whether difficulty accessing health care services for reasons unrelated to insurance coverage is associated with increased use of the Internet to obtain health information. Survey data from 32,139 adults in the 2011 National Health Interview Study (NHIS) were used in this study. The exposure for this analysis was reporting difficulty accessing health care services or delaying getting care for a reason unrelated to insurance status. To define this exposure, we examined 8 questions that asked whether different access problems occurred during the previous 12 months. The outcome for this analysis, health information technology (HIT) use, was captured by examining 2 questions that asked survey respondents if they used an online health chat room or searched the Internet to obtain health information in the previous 12 months. Several multinomial logistic regressions estimating the odds of using HIT for each reported access difficulty were conducted to accomplish the study objective. Of a survey population of 32,139 adults, more than 15.90% (n=5109) reported experiencing at least one access to care barrier, whereas 3.63% (1168/32,139) reported using online health chat rooms and 43.55% (13,997/32,139) reported searching the Internet for health information. Adults who reported difficulty accessing health care services for reasons unrelated to their health insurance coverage had greater odds of using the Internet to obtain health information. Those who reported delaying getting care because they could not get an appointment soon enough (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.9-2.5), were

  2. Access to and Satisfaction with Prenatal Care Among Pregnant Women with Physical Disabilities: Findings from a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Monika; Akobirshoev, Ilhom; Moring, Nechama Sammet; Long-Bellil, Linda; Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Smith, Lauren D; Iezzoni, Lisa I

    2017-12-01

    Previous qualitative studies suggest that women with physical disabilities face disability-specific barriers and challenges related to prenatal care accessibility and quality. This study aims to examine the pregnancy and prenatal care experiences and needs of U.S. mothers with physical disabilities and their perceptions of their interactions with their maternity care clinicians. We conducted the first survey of maternity care access and experiences of women with physical disabilities from 37 states. The survey was disseminated in partnership with disability community agencies and via social media and targeted U.S. women with a range of physical disabilities who had given birth in the past 10 years. The survey included questions regarding prenatal care quality and childbirth and labor experiences. A total of 126 women with various physical disability types from 37 states completed the survey. Almost half of the respondents (53.2%) reported that their physical disability was a big factor in their selection of a maternity care provider and 40.3% of women reported that their prenatal care provider knew little or nothing about the impact of their physical disability on their pregnancy. Controlling for maternal demographic characteristics and use of mobility equipment, women who reported that their prenatal care provider lacked knowledge of disability and those who felt they were not given adequate information were more likely to report unmet needs for prenatal care. The findings from this study suggest the need for training and education for clinicians regarding the prenatal care needs of women with physical disabilities.

  3. Long-term outcomes of a national expanded access program to antiretroviral therapy: the Chilean AIDS cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Marcelo J; Cortés, Claudia P; Shepherd, Bryan E; Beltrán, Carlos J

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate impact of the program after up to 6 years of follow-up in survival, virologic, and immunologic response. Prospective follow-up of patients initiating first highly active antiretroviral therapy from 2001 to 2007. Chile began in 2001 an expanded access program to antiretroviral therapy. The Chilean AIDS Cohort has enrolled >85% of patients from this program in the public health system. χ², Fisher tests, survival, univariate and multivariate analysis. Five thousand one hundred fifteen adults (16% women); median follow-up: 3.64 years (18,159 patient-years). At baseline: median age, 35.8 years; 45.6% had clinical AIDS; median CD4 cell count, 102 cells per cubic millimeter. Global mortality, 9.0%; loss to follow-up, 6.8%. Probability of survival at 1 and 5 years were 0.95 and 0.89, respectively. First regimen was maintained in 72% of those alive and in control at 1 year and 48% at end of study. Main reason for therapy change/discontinuation was drug toxicity (44.9%). At last visit, 74% of active patients had viral suppression, and median CD4 cell count had reached 301 cells per cubic millimeter. In this middle-income country, wide access highly active antiretroviral therapy has been successfully implemented and evaluated. Despite advanced disease at initiation, survival, clinical, virologic, and immunologic outcomes have been comparable with that of industrialized countries.

  4. Most U.S. School Districts Have Low Access to School Counselors: Poor, Diverse, and City School Districts Exhibit Particularly High Student-to-Counselor Ratios. National Issue Brief Number 108

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Douglas J.; Mattingly, Marybeth J.

    2016-01-01

    In this brief, the authors examine the level of access to school counselors, and how this access is mediated by district demographic and location characteristics. Using a large nationally representative data source compiled from the 2013-2104 Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC), the 2014 Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE), and 2007…

  5. Structural factors for public dental health services in Regional Health Care Network 13: an analysis of the Brazilian National Program for Improving Access and Quality of Primary Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucila Brandão HIROOKA

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The Brazilian National Program for Improving Access and Quality of Primary Care aims to induce the institution of processes that expand the capacity of federal, state and municipal administrations and Primary Care teams to offer services that ensure greater access and quality. Objective To identify the characteristics of infrastructure for the dental health care of the health units from the Regional Health Care Network 13, from the perspective of a health evaluation. Material and method This is a descriptive and cross-sectional study in which is used the Module V database of the External Evaluation instrument of 156 health units of this region that participated of the 2nd cycle of the referred program, which discuss the modality of the health teams, structure and environment of the dental office, the hours of operation, equipment, instruments and dental supplies. Result In general, the oral health units of this study have dental offices with good structural conditions and sufficient equipment and supplies to carry out clinical activities, except those for dental prostheses, possibly due to the permanence of this service in secondary care. However, they point out that advances in access and coverage by oral health services are still necessary. Conclusion Although the theme includes other studies and reflections, the present work may contribute to discussions about the present condition, and it is recommended the active participation of all the actors involved in the care, in the search for the qualification of oral health services in this region.

  6. Equity of access under Korean national long-term care insurance: implications for long-term care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ju Moon

    2015-09-15

    The national long-term care insurance was implemented in July 2008. Few studies have been conducted with representative national survey data since the long-term care insurance was introduced. Therefore, this study examines the extent to which equity in the use of long-term care has been achieved in Korea. The Aday-Andersen model was used as a conceptual model, based on the Korean Health Panel Study which was conducted in 2011. Descriptive and logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the relationship between the dependent and independent variables and the relative importance of factors as predictors of utilization. The results of this study indicated that those who rated his or her health to be fair, good, and very good, had no limited activities, were disabled, and had insurance coverage were more likely to use long-term care services, respectively. Their decision to use long-term care was primarily affected by need (health status, limited activity, disability) and enabling (insurance coverage) factors. The findings also indicated that the introduction of a national long-term care insurance program did not yield a fully equitable distribution of services. Long-term care reforms in Korea should continue to concentrate on expanding insurance coverage and reducing the inequities reflected in disparities in consumer cost-sharing and associated patterns of utilization across plans. The subsequent impact on managed care and expenditures need to be more fully understood.

  7. 77 FR 59573 - Proposed Amendment of Class D and E Airspace; Tri-Cities, TN; Revocation of Class E Airspace; Tri...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... at Hawkins County Airport, Rogersville, TN, and Virginia Highlands Airport, Abington, VA. The Tri... separation of existing Class E airspace surrounding Virginia Highlands Airport, Abingdon, VA, and Hawkins... publication, the FAA reassessed the proposal to show the separation of Hawkins County Airport, and Virginia...

  8. Variation in Arterial Access for Invasive Coronary Procedures in New Zealand: A National Analysis (ANZACS-QI 5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, P; Smyth, D; Harding, S A; El-Jack, S; Williams, M J A; Devlin, G; Stewart, J; Flynn, C; Lee, M; Kerr, A J

    2016-05-01

    Radial arterial access (RA) and femoral arterial access (FA) rates for invasive coronary angiography (ICA) vary widely internationally. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) suggests default RA is feasible. We aim to investigate the variation in RA rates across all New Zealand public hospitals. Patient characteristics, procedural details, and inpatient outcome data were collected in the All New Zealand Acute Coronary Syndrome - Quality Improvement (ANZACS-QI) registry on consecutive patients undergoing ICA over five months. Of the 5894 ICAs 81% were via RA. Hospitals averaged 25 - 176 procedures/month (46.5% - 96.4% via RA). Operators averaged 17 procedures/month. Those performing more than 20 ICAs/month had RA rates between 61% - 99%. Of the 75 operators, 69% met the ESC recommendation. After multivariable adjustment higher operator (RR 1.12, CI 1.09 - 1.30) and hospital (RR 1.21, CI 1.15 - 1.28) volume were independent predictors of RA. Those with prior CABG (RR 0.51, CI 0.45 - 0.57), STEMI <12h (RR 0.91, CI 0.87 - 0.96), and female sex (RR 0.96, CI 0.94 - 0.99) were less likely to receive RA. New Zealand has a high RA rate for ICAs. Rates vary substantially between both operators and centres. Radial arterial was highest amongst the highest volume operators and centres. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Parents' experiences in registering with and accessing funding under the National Disability Insurance Scheme for early intervention services for children with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Tharangi; Jeyaseelan, Deepa; White, Deirdre; Russo, Ray

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate parents' feedback regarding their experience in registering and accessing funding with the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) and communicating with the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA). Parents of children less than 7 years of age, who were assessed through the Child Development Unit (CDU) at the Women's and Children's Health Network from July 2013 to June 2014 and referred to the NDIS, were invited to complete a study questionnaire regarding their experience with the NDIS. The questionnaire was initially mailed to the parents. If no response was returned, families were telephoned to complete the questionnaire by phone or to be sent another copy of the questionnaire to complete. Of 121 children eligible for the study, 42 (34.7%) parents completed the questionnaire. Thirty-six (85.7%) parents reported having no difficulty with the NDIS registration process, while six parents (14.3%) had difficulty. With regards to accessing funding, 27 (64.3%) reported having no difficulty, 11 (26.2%) stated that it was difficult and 4 parents did not comment. Twenty-six parents (61.9%) reported that it was easy to communicate with the NDIA, while 12 (28.6%) found it difficult. Overall, 26 (61.9%) parents were satisfied with the NDIS and NDIA, 6 (14.8%) were unsatisfied and 9 (21.4%) were neutral. The majority of parents were satisfied with both the processes required to register and access funding through the NDIS for early intervention services for their children with developmental disabilities, and their ability to communicate with the NDIA. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  10. Change in health status and access to care in young adults with special health care needs: results from the 2007 national survey of adult transition and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Megumi J; Hersh, Aimee O; Hilton, Joan F; Lotstein, Debra S

    2013-04-01

    Despite over 500,000 adolescents with special health care needs transitioning to adulthood each year, limited information is available on their health status or their access to care after transition. To describe the change in health status and access to care of a nationally sampled, longitudinal cohort of young adults with special health care needs (ASHCN). We analyzed follow-up data collected in the 2007 Survey of Adult Transition and Health on young adults who were 14-17 years of age when their parents participated in the 2001 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs. We describe changes in access to care and health status over time, and used logistic regression to identify characteristics that were associated with declining health status in this cohort. 1,865 participants, aged 19-23 years, completed the Survey of Adult Transition and Health. Between 2001 and 2007, there was a 3.6 fold increase in the proportion experiencing delayed or forgone care; 10% reported a decline in health status. There was a 7.7-fold increase in the proportion reporting no insurance. In regression analysis, factors associated with declining health status between 2001 and 2007 included underlying disease severity and delayed or forgone care in young adulthood. We found significant deterioration in insurance coverage, usual source of care and receiving timely health care as ASHCN aged into adulthood, and that this was associated with decline in health status. Our findings suggest that further population-based analyses of health outcomes are needed to plan for interventions to assist this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Inequity in access to dental care services explains current socioeconomic disparities in oral health: the Swedish National Surveys of Public Health 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamala, Sarah; Merlo, Juan; Boström, Gunnel

    2006-12-01

    To analyse the effects of socioeconomic disadvantage on access to dental care services and on oral health. Design, setting and outcomes: Cross-sectional data from the Swedish National Surveys of Public Health 2004 and 2005. Outcomes were poor oral health (self-rated oral health and symptoms of periodontal disease) and lack of access to dental care services. A socioeconomic disadvantage index (SDI) was developed, consisting of social welfare beneficiary, being unemployed, financial crisis and lack of cash reserves. Swedish population-based sample of 17 362 men and 20 037 women. Every instance of increasing levels of socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with worsened oral health but, simultaneously, with decreased utilisation of dental care services. After adjusting for age, men with a mild SDI compared with those with no SDI had 2.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.5 to 3.0) times the odds for self-rated poor oral health, whereas odds related to severe SDI were 6.8 (95% CI 6.2 to 7.5). The corresponding values among women were 2.3 (95% CI 2.1 to 2.5) and 6.8 (95% CI 6.3 to 7.5). Nevertheless, people with severe socioeconomic disparities were 7-9 times as likely to refrain from seeking the required dental treatment. These associations persisted even after controlling for living alone, education, occupational status and lifestyle factors. Lifestyle factors explained only 29% of the socioeconomic differences in poor oral health among men and women, whereas lack of access to dental care services explained about 60%. The results of the multilevel regression analysis indicated no additional effect of the administrative boundaries of counties or of municipalities in Sweden. Results call for urgent public health interventions to increase equitable access to dental care services.

  12. Open Access @ DTU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrøm, Jeannette

    Open Access is high on the agenda in Denmark and internationally. Denmark has announced a national strategy for Open Access that aims to achieve Open Access to 80% in 2017 and 100% in 2022 to peer review research articles. All public Danish funders as well as H2020 requires that all peer review a...

  13. Oral health need and access to dental services: evidence from the National Survey of Children's Health, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Janice F; Huebner, Colleen E; Reed, Sarah C

    2012-04-01

    This study examines associations between parents' report of their children's oral health and receipt of a dental visit for preventive care. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of oral health status and receipt of a preventive dental visit among US children and youth, ages 1-17 years, using data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health (n = 86,764). Survey-weighted logistic regression was used to estimate associations between perceived oral health status and receipt of a preventive dental health visit in the prior 12 months. Overall, 78 % of children and youth received at least one preventive dental health visit in the prior year. Among the youngest children, lower oral health status was associated with higher odds of receiving a preventive dental visit; among older children, lower oral health status was associated with lower odds of receiving a dental visit for preventive care. Use of preventive dental health care is below national target goals. Younger children in worse oral health are more likely, and older youth less likely, to receive preventive dental care. Public health efforts to educate parents to seek early and ongoing preventive oral health care, rather than services in response to problems, may yield oral health benefits later in childhood and over the life course.

  14. A consensus plan for action to improve access to cancer care in the association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In many countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), cancer is an increasing problem due to ageing and a transition to Western lifestyles. Governments have been slow to react to the health consequences of these socioeconomic changes, leading to the risk of a cancer epidemic overwhelming the region. A major limitation to motivating change is the paucity of high-quality data on cancer, and its socioeconomic repercussions, in ASEAN. Two initiatives have been launched to address these issues. First, a study of over 9000 new cancer patients in ASEAN - the ACTION study - which records information on financial difficulties, as well as clinical outcomes, subsequent to the diagnosis. Second, a series of roundtable meetings of key stakeholders and experts, with the broad aim of producing advice for governments in ASEAN to take appropriate account of issues relating to cancer, as well as to generate knowledge and interest through engagement with the media. An important product of these roundtables has been the Jakarta Call to Action on Cancer Control. The growth and ageing of populations is a global challenge for cancer services. In the less developed parts of Asia, and elsewhere, these problems are compounded by the epidemiological transition to Western lifestyles and lack of awareness of cancer at the government level. For many years, health services in less developed countries have concentrated on infectious diseases and mother-and-child health; despite a recent wake-up call (United Nations, 2010), these health services have so far failed to allow for the huge increase in cancer cases to come. It has been estimated that, in Asia, the number of new cancer cases per year will grow from 6.1 million in 2008 to 10.6 million in 2030 (Sankaranarayanan et al., 2014). In the countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), corresponding figures are 770 thousand in 2012 (Figure 1), rising to 1.3 million in 2030 (Ferlay et al., 2012). ASEAN

  15. An Evaluation of Operational Airspace Sectorization Integrated System (OASIS) Advisory Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul U.; Mogford, Richard H.; Bridges, Wayne; Buckley, Nathan; Evans, Mark; Gujral, Vimmy; Lee, Hwasoo; Peknik, Daniel; Preston, William

    2013-01-01

    In January 2013, a human-in-the-loop evaluation of the Operational Airspace Sectorization Integrated System (OASIS) was conducted in the Airspace Operations Laboratory of the Human Systems Integration Division (Code TH) in conjunction with the Aviation Systems Division (Code AF). The development of OASIS is a major activity of the Dynamic Airspace Configuration (DAC) research focus area within the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) Airspace Systems Program. OASIS is an advisory tool to assist Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) En Route Area Supervisors in their planning of sector combinedecombine operations as well as opening closing of Data-side (D-side) control positions. These advisory solutions are tailored to the predicted traffic demand over the next few hours. During the experiment, eight retired FAA personnel served as participants for a part-task evaluation of OASIS functionality, covering the user interface as well as the underlying algorithm. Participants gave positive feedback on both the user interface and the algorithm solutions for airspace configuration, including an excellent average rating of 94 on the tool usability scales. They also suggested various enhancements to the OASIS tool, which will be incorporated into the next tool development cycle for the full-scale human-in-the-loop evaluation to be conducted later this year.

  16. Hepatocyte growth factor, a determinant of airspace homeostasis in the murine lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Calvi

    Full Text Available The alveolar compartment, the fundamental gas exchange unit in the lung, is critical for tissue oxygenation and viability. We explored hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, a pleiotrophic cytokine that promotes epithelial proliferation, morphogenesis, migration, and resistance to apoptosis, as a candidate mediator of alveolar formation and regeneration. Mice deficient in the expression of the HGF receptor Met in lung epithelial cells demonstrated impaired airspace formation marked by a reduction in alveolar epithelial cell abundance and survival, truncation of the pulmonary vascular bed, and enhanced oxidative stress. Administration of recombinant HGF to tight-skin mice, an established genetic emphysema model, attenuated airspace enlargement and reduced oxidative stress. Repair in the TSK/+ mouse was punctuated by enhanced akt and stat3 activation. HGF treatment of an alveolar epithelial cell line not only induced proliferation and scattering of the cells but also conferred protection against staurosporine-induced apoptosis, properties critical for alveolar septation. HGF promoted cell survival was attenuated by akt inhibition. Primary alveolar epithelial cells treated with HGF showed improved survival and enhanced antioxidant production. In conclusion, using both loss-of-function and gain-of-function maneuvers, we show that HGF signaling is necessary for alveolar homeostasis in the developing lung and that augmentation of HGF signaling can improve airspace morphology in murine emphysema. Our studies converge on prosurvival signaling and antioxidant protection as critical pathways in HGF-mediated airspace maintenance or repair. These findings support the exploration of HGF signaling enhancement for diseases of the airspace.

  17. 75 FR 73983 - Proposed Modification of the Salt Lake City, UT, Class B Airspace Area; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... of the Salt Lake City, UT, Class B Airspace Area; Public Meetings AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Class B airspace area at Salt Lake City, UT. The purpose of these meetings is to provide interested... Road, Ogden, UT, 84405. (2) The meeting on Tuesday, February 1, 2011, will be held in the Conference...

  18. 78 FR 51176 - Record of Decision for the Modernization and Enhancement of Ranges, Airspace, and Training Areas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    ... Enhancement of Ranges, Airspace, and Training Areas in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex in Alaska ACTION... Enhancement of Ranges, Airspace, and Training Areas in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex (JPARC) in... the EIS, including technical considerations, public review and Tribal and agency input. The Final EIS...

  19. Cartographic Mapping and Travel Burden to Assess and Develop Strategies to Improve Minority Access to National Cancer Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruner, Deborah Watkins, E-mail: deborah.w.bruner@emory.edu [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Pugh, Stephanie L. [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Yeager, Katherine A.; Bruner, Jesse; Curran, Walter [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: To assess how accrual to clinical trials is related to US minority population density relative to clinical trial site location and distance traveled to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trial sites. Methods and Materials: Data included member site address and ZIP codes, patient accrual, and patient race or ethnicity and ZIP code. Geographic Information System maps were developed for overall, Latino, and African American accrual to trials by population density. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to assess differences in distance traveled by site, type of trial, and race or ethnicity. Results: From 2006 to 2009, 6168 patients enrolled on RTOG trials. The RTOG US site distribution is generally concordant with overall population density. Sites with highest accrual are located throughout the United States and parts of Canada and do not cluster, nor does highest minority accrual cluster in areas of highest US minority population density. Of the 4913 US patients with complete data, patients traveled a median of 11.6 miles to participate in clinical trials. Whites traveled statistically longer distances (12.9 miles; P<.0001) to participate, followed by Latinos (8.22 miles) and African Americans (5.85 miles). Patients were willing to drive longer distances to academic sites than community sites, and there was a trend toward significantly longer median travel for therapeutic versus cancer control or metastatic trials. Conclusions: Location matters, but only to a degree, for minority compared with nonminority participation in clinical trials. Geographic Information System tools help identify gaps in geographic access and travel burden for clinical trials participation. Strategies that emerged using these tools are discussed.

  20. Early childhood development: impact of national human development, family poverty, parenting practices and access to early childhood education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, T D; Luchters, S; Fisher, J

    2017-05-01

    This study was to describe and quantify the relationships among family poverty, parents' caregiving practices, access to education and the development of children living in low- and middle-income countries (LAMIC). We conducted a secondary analysis of data collected in UNICEF's Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS). Early childhood development was assessed in four domains: language-cognitive, physical, socio-emotional and approaches to learning. Countries were classified into three groups on the basis of the Human Development Index (HDI). Overall, data from 97 731 children aged 36 to 59 months from 35 LAMIC were included in the after analyses. The mean child development scale score was 4.93 out of a maximum score of 10 (95%CI 4.90 to 4.97) in low-HDI countries and 7.08 (95%CI 7.05 to 7.12) in high-HDI countries. Family poverty was associated with lower child development scores in all countries. The total indirect effect of family poverty on child development score via attending early childhood education, care for the child at home and use of harsh punishments at home was -0.13 SD (77.8% of the total effect) in low-HDI countries, -0.09 SD (23.8% of the total effect) in medium-HDI countries and -0.02 SD (6.9% of the total effect) in high-HDI countries. Children in the most disadvantaged position in their societies and children living in low-HDI countries are at the greatest risk of failing to reach their developmental potential. Optimizing care for child development at home is essential to reduce the adverse effects of poverty on children's early development and subsequent life. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Cartographic Mapping and Travel Burden to Assess and Develop Strategies to Improve Minority Access to National Cancer Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Pugh, Stephanie L.; Yeager, Katherine A.; Bruner, Jesse; Curran, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess how accrual to clinical trials is related to US minority population density relative to clinical trial site location and distance traveled to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trial sites. Methods and Materials: Data included member site address and ZIP codes, patient accrual, and patient race or ethnicity and ZIP code. Geographic Information System maps were developed for overall, Latino, and African American accrual to trials by population density. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to assess differences in distance traveled by site, type of trial, and race or ethnicity. Results: From 2006 to 2009, 6168 patients enrolled on RTOG trials. The RTOG US site distribution is generally concordant with overall population density. Sites with highest accrual are located throughout the United States and parts of Canada and do not cluster, nor does highest minority accrual cluster in areas of highest US minority population density. Of the 4913 US patients with complete data, patients traveled a median of 11.6 miles to participate in clinical trials. Whites traveled statistically longer distances (12.9 miles; P<.0001) to participate, followed by Latinos (8.22 miles) and African Americans (5.85 miles). Patients were willing to drive longer distances to academic sites than community sites, and there was a trend toward significantly longer median travel for therapeutic versus cancer control or metastatic trials. Conclusions: Location matters, but only to a degree, for minority compared with nonminority participation in clinical trials. Geographic Information System tools help identify gaps in geographic access and travel burden for clinical trials participation. Strategies that emerged using these tools are discussed.

  2. A National Study of the Relationship between Home Access to a Computer and Academic Performance Scores of Grade 12 U.S. Science Students: An Analysis of the 2009 NAEP Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Mitchell Ward

    The purpose of this dissertation was to examine the relationship between student access to a computer at home and academic achievement. The 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) dataset was probed using the National Data Explorer (NDE) to investigate correlations in the subsets of SES, Parental Education, Race, and Gender as it relates to access of a home computer and improved performance scores for U.S. public school grade 12 science students. A causal-comparative approach was employed seeking clarity on the relationship between home access and performance scores. The influence of home access cannot overcome the challenges students of lower SES face. The achievement gap, or a second digital divide, for underprivileged classes of students, including minorities does not appear to contract via student access to a home computer. Nonetheless, in tests for significance, statistically significant improvement in science performance scores was reported for those having access to a computer at home compared to those not having access. Additionally, regression models reported evidence of correlations between and among subsets of controls for the demographic factors gender, race, and socioeconomic status. Variability in these correlations was high; suggesting influence from unobserved factors may have more impact upon the dependent variable. Having access to a computer at home increases performance scores for grade 12 general science students of all races, genders and socioeconomic levels. However, the performance gap is roughly equivalent to the existing performance gap of the national average for science scores, suggesting little influence from access to a computer on academic achievement. The variability of scores reported in the regression analysis models reflects a moderate to low effect, suggesting an absence of causation. These statistical results are accurate and confirm the literature review, whereby having access to a computer at home and the

  3. A national analysis of dental waiting lists and point-in-time geographic access to subsidised dental care: can geographic access be improved by offering public dental care through private dental clinics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudko, Yevgeni; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Australia is one of the least densely populated countries in the world, with a population concentrated on or around coastal areas. Up to 33% of the Australian population are likely to have untreated dental decay, while people with inadequate dentition (fewer than 21 teeth) account for up to 34% of Australian adults. Historically, inadequate access to public dental care has resulted in long waiting lists, received much media coverage and been the subject of a new federal and state initiative. The objective of this research was to gauge the potential for reducing the national dental waiting list through geographical advantage, which could arise from subcontracting the delivery of subsidised dental care to the existing network of private dental clinics across Australia. Eligible population data were collected from the Australian Bureau of Statistics website. Waiting list data from across Australia were collected from publicly available sources and confirmed through direct communication with each individual state or territory dental health body. Quantum geographic information system software was used to map distribution of the eligible population across Australia by statistical area, and to plot locations of government and private dental clinics. Catchment areas of 5 km for metropolitan clinics and 5 km and 50 km for rural clinics were defined. The number of people on the waiting list and those eligible for subsidised dental care covered by each of the catchment areas was calculated. Percentage of the eligible population and those on the waiting list that could benefit from the potential improvement in geographic access was ascertained for metropolitan and rural residents. Fifty three percent of people on the waiting list resided within metropolitan areas. Rural and remote residents made up 47% of the population waiting to receive care. The utilisation of both government and private dental clinics for the delivery of subsidised dental care to the eligible population

  4. Rural residence and adoption of a novel HIV therapy in a national, equal-access healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Michael; Lund, Brian; Belperio, Pamela S; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Rimland, David; Richardson, Kelly; Justice, Amy; Perencevich, Eli; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Rural persons with HIV face barriers to care that may influence adoption of advances in therapy. We performed a retrospective cohort study to determine rural-urban variation in adoption of raltegravir-the first HIV integrase inhibitor-in national Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare. There were 1,222 veterans with clinical indication for raltegravir therapy at time of its FDA approval in October 2007, of whom 223 (19.1%) resided in rural areas. Urban persons were more likely than rural to initiate raltegravir within 180 days (17.3% vs. 11.2%, P = 0.02) and 360 days (27.5% vs. 19.7%, P = 0.02), but this gap narrowed slightly at 720 days (36.3% vs. 31.8%, P = 0.19). In multivariable analysis adjusting for patient characteristics, urban residence predicted raltegravir adoption within 180 days (odds ratio 1.72, 95% CI 1.09-2.70) and 360 days (OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.13-2.34), but not 720 days (OR 1.26, 95% CI 0.84-1.87). Efforts are needed to reduce geographic variation in adoption of advances in HIV therapy.

  5. Information needs of young Italians accessing the AIDS/STI Helpline at the Italian National Institute of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taglieri, Filippo Maria; Fanales-Belasio, Emanuele; Santi, Flavia; Gallo, Pietro; Colucci, Anna; Luzi, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted infections (STI) have a relevant impact on health and sexual behavior of adolescents and young adults (range of age between 13 and 19 years). The AIDS and sexual transmitted infections (STI) Helpline of the Italian Istituto Superiore di Sanità (National Institute of Health), and also funded by the Italian Ministry of Health, has been active since 1987 providing personalized counselling interventions on HIV/AIDS and STI. The present study gathered data and questions issues from calls at AIDS/STI Helpline in the period 1987-2014, with the specific aim of assessing the level of awareness and information needs on HIV/AIDS and STI among people aged under 25 years, in relation to potential risky behavior. Data show that young subjects who called the helpline in the period considered are about the 26% of the total users, with a decreasing trend over the years. The 28% of young users reported a "risky behavior" for STI, with a chance statistically higher in the age range 15-19 years and in the MSM (men who have sex with men)/bisexuals users, which tended to decrease in the last years. Of note, a marked increase of the amount of young users not displaying behaviors at risk for HIV or STI has been observed in the years.

  6. Estimating Access to Drinking Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene Facilities in Wolaita Sodo Town, Southern Ethiopia, in Reference to National Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debebe, Ashenafi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The coverage of sanitation and access to safe drinking water in Ethiopia especially in Wolaita Sodo town are not well studied. Therefore, the main objective of this study was estimating access to drinking water supply, sanitation, and hygiene facilities in Wolaita Sodo town, southern Ethiopia, in reference to national coverage. Methods. A community based cross-sectional study design method was employed in the study in 588 households of Wolaita Sodo town inhabitants. Face-to-face interview to household owners, in-depth interview to key informants, reviewing secondary data, and observational check lists were used to collect data. Districts were selected using simple random sampling techniques, while systematic random sampling technique was applied to select households. Data was analyzed using Epi Info version 3.5.4 and SPSS version 16 statistical software. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis were carried out. Results. The community has access to improved water supply which was estimated to be 67.9%. The main water sources of the town were tap water within the yard, which was estimated to be 44.7%, and tap water in the community was 40.0% followed by private protected well which was 14.5%. Ninety-one percent of the households had at least one type of latrine in their homes. The most common type of latrine available to households was pit latrine with superstructure which was estimated to be 75.9% followed by a pit without superstructure, 21.3%, and more than half of the respondents had hand washing facilities in their compound. Occupational status, educational status, and training on water, sanitation, and hygiene related topics were significantly associated with use of improved water source, improved sanitation, and hygiene facilities. Conclusion. In order to address the demand of the town, additional water, sanitation, and hygiene programs are required. PMID:28025598

  7. Development of a Portfolio Management Approach with Case Study of the NASA Airspace Systems Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitzke, Kurt W.; Hartman, Christopher L.

    2012-01-01

    A portfolio management approach was developed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA s) Airspace Systems Program (ASP). The purpose was to help inform ASP leadership regarding future investment decisions related to its existing portfolio of advanced technology concepts and capabilities (C/Cs) currently under development and to potentially identify new opportunities. The portfolio management approach is general in form and is extensible to other advanced technology development programs. It focuses on individual C/Cs and consists of three parts: 1) concept of operations (con-ops) development, 2) safety impact assessment, and 3) benefit-cost-risk (B-C-R) assessment. The first two parts are recommendations to ASP leaders and will be discussed only briefly, while the B-C-R part relates to the development of an assessment capability and will be discussed in greater detail. The B-C-R assessment capability enables estimation of the relative value of each C/C as compared with all other C/Cs in the ASP portfolio. Value is expressed in terms of a composite weighted utility function (WUF) rating, based on estimated benefits, costs, and risks. Benefit utility is estimated relative to achieving key NAS performance objectives, which are outlined in the ASP Strategic Plan.1 Risk utility focuses on C/C development and implementation risk, while cost utility focuses on the development and implementation portions of overall C/C life-cycle costs. Initial composite ratings of the ASP C/Cs were successfully generated; however, the limited availability of B-C-R information, which is used as inputs to the WUF model, reduced the meaningfulness of these initial investment ratings. Development of this approach, however, defined specific information-generation requirements for ASP C/C developers that will increase the meaningfulness of future B-C-R ratings.

  8. Optimizing integrated airport surface and terminal airspace operations under uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosson, Christabelle S.

    In airports and surrounding terminal airspaces, the integration of surface, arrival and departure scheduling and routing have the potential to improve the operations efficiency. Moreover, because both the airport surface and the terminal airspace are often altered by random perturbations, the consideration of uncertainty in flight schedules is crucial to improve the design of robust flight schedules. Previous research mainly focused on independently solving arrival scheduling problems, departure scheduling problems and surface management scheduling problems and most of the developed models are deterministic. This dissertation presents an alternate method to model the integrated operations by using a machine job-shop scheduling formulation. A multistage stochastic programming approach is chosen to formulate the problem in the presence of uncertainty and candidate solutions are obtained by solving sample average approximation problems with finite sample size. The developed mixed-integer-linear-programming algorithm-based scheduler is capable of computing optimal aircraft schedules and routings that reflect the integration of air and ground operations. The assembled methodology is applied to a Los Angeles case study. To show the benefits of integrated operations over First-Come-First-Served, a preliminary proof-of-concept is conducted for a set of fourteen aircraft evolving under deterministic conditions in a model of the Los Angeles International Airport surface and surrounding terminal areas. Using historical data, a representative 30-minute traffic schedule and aircraft mix scenario is constructed. The results of the Los Angeles application show that the integration of air and ground operations and the use of a time-based separation strategy enable both significant surface and air time savings. The solution computed by the optimization provides a more efficient routing and scheduling than the First-Come-First-Served solution. Additionally, a data driven analysis is

  9. Acrolein induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and causes airspace enlargement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaguchi, Yoshiaki; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laimute; Hanaoka, Masayuki; Natarajan, Ramesh; Kraskauskas, Donatas; Voelkel, Norbert F

    2012-01-01

    Given the relative abundance and toxic potential of acrolein in inhaled cigarette smoke, it is surprising how little is known about the pulmonary and systemic effects of acrolein. Here we test the hypothesis whether systemic administration of acrolein could cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lung cell apoptosis, leading to the enlargement of the alveolar air spaces in rats. Acute and chronic effects of intraperitoneally administered acrolein were tested. Mean alveolar airspace area was measured by using light microscopy and imaging system software. TUNEL staining and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for active caspase 3 and Western blot analysis for active caspase 3, and caspase 12 were performed to detect apoptosis. The ER-stress related gene expression in the lungs was determined by Quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Acrolein-protein adducts in the lung tissue were detected by IHC. Acute administration of acrolein caused a significant elevation of activated caspase 3, upregulation of VEGF expression and induced ER stress proteins in the lung tissue. The chronic administration of acrolein in rats led to emphysematous lung tissue remodeling. TUNEL staining and IHC for cleaved caspase 3 showed a large number of apoptotic septal cells in the acrolein-treated rat lungs. Chronic acrolein administration cause the endoplasmic reticulum stress response manifested by significant upregulation of ATF4, CHOP and GADd34 expression. In smokers with COPD there was a considerable accumulation of acrolein-protein adducts in the inflammatory, airway and vascular cells. Systemic administration of acrolein causes endoplasmic reticulum stress response, lung cell apoptosis, and chronic administration leads to the enlargement of the alveolar air spaces and emphysema in rats. The substantial accumulation of acrolein-protein adducts in the lungs of COPD patients suggest a role of acrolein in the pathogenesis of emphysema.

  10. Acrolein induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and causes airspace enlargement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Kitaguchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given the relative abundance and toxic potential of acrolein in inhaled cigarette smoke, it is surprising how little is known about the pulmonary and systemic effects of acrolein. Here we test the hypothesis whether systemic administration of acrolein could cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, and lung cell apoptosis, leading to the enlargement of the alveolar air spaces in rats. METHODS: Acute and chronic effects of intraperitoneally administered acrolein were tested. Mean alveolar airspace area was measured by using light microscopy and imaging system software. TUNEL staining and immunohistochemistry (IHC for active caspase 3 and Western blot analysis for active caspase 3, and caspase 12 were performed to detect apoptosis. The ER-stress related gene expression in the lungs was determined by Quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Acrolein-protein adducts in the lung tissue were detected by IHC. RESULTS: Acute administration of acrolein caused a significant elevation of activated caspase 3, upregulation of VEGF expression and induced ER stress proteins in the lung tissue. The chronic administration of acrolein in rats led to emphysematous lung tissue remodeling. TUNEL staining and IHC for cleaved caspase 3 showed a large number of apoptotic septal cells in the acrolein-treated rat lungs. Chronic acrolein administration cause the endoplasmic reticulum stress response manifested by significant upregulation of ATF4, CHOP and GADd34 expression. In smokers with COPD there was a considerable accumulation of acrolein-protein adducts in the inflammatory, airway and vascular cells. CONCLUSIONS: Systemic administration of acrolein causes endoplasmic reticulum stress response, lung cell apoptosis, and chronic administration leads to the enlargement of the alveolar air spaces and emphysema in rats. The substantial accumulation of acrolein-protein adducts in the lungs of COPD patients suggest a role of acrolein in the pathogenesis of emphysema.

  11. Acrolein Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Causes Airspace Enlargement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Masayuki; Natarajan, Ramesh; Kraskauskas, Donatas; Voelkel, Norbert F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Given the relative abundance and toxic potential of acrolein in inhaled cigarette smoke, it is surprising how little is known about the pulmonary and systemic effects of acrolein. Here we test the hypothesis whether systemic administration of acrolein could cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lung cell apoptosis, leading to the enlargement of the alveolar air spaces in rats. Methods Acute and chronic effects of intraperitoneally administered acrolein were tested. Mean alveolar airspace area was measured by using light microscopy and imaging system software. TUNEL staining and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for active caspase 3 and Western blot analysis for active caspase 3, and caspase 12 were performed to detect apoptosis. The ER-stress related gene expression in the lungs was determined by Quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Acrolein-protein adducts in the lung tissue were detected by IHC. Results Acute administration of acrolein caused a significant elevation of activated caspase 3, upregulation of VEGF expression and induced ER stress proteins in the lung tissue. The chronic administration of acrolein in rats led to emphysematous lung tissue remodeling. TUNEL staining and IHC for cleaved caspase 3 showed a large number of apoptotic septal cells in the acrolein-treated rat lungs. Chronic acrolein administration cause the endoplasmic reticulum stress response manifested by significant upregulation of ATF4, CHOP and GADd34 expression. In smokers with COPD there was a considerable accumulation of acrolein-protein adducts in the inflammatory, airway and vascular cells. Conclusions Systemic administration of acrolein causes endoplasmic reticulum stress response, lung cell apoptosis, and chronic administration leads to the enlargement of the alveolar air spaces and emphysema in rats. The substantial accumulation of acrolein-protein adducts in the lungs of COPD patients suggest a role of acrolein in the pathogenesis of emphysema. PMID:22675432

  12. Permanent Access to the Records of Science - The International Role of the e-Depot at the Koninklijke Bibliotheek, National Library of the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard van Trier

    2006-10-01

    safeguards the access that licensees have paid for. Primarily, long-term preservation is a way of managing risk and a kind of insurance against loss or disrupted access. The KB expects that worldwide permanent archiving of STM literature will be taken care of by a limited number of institutions dedicated to this task (Safe Places Model. Libraries should invest in a qualified archiving solution and should effectively demand archival deposit by publishers as a condition of licensing electronic journals. The KB’s e-Depot strategy for the coming years includes: Further developing the technical and organisational infrastructure, which is now put to an external audit. Continuing the Research & Development effort concentrating on the full range of available preservation techniques. The KB has developed its own R&D-programme and is an initiating partner in the European project PLANETS. Concluding archiving agreements with more of the major international scientific publishers. The KB would like to reach 80% coverage of the total world production of STM literature. Promoting the creation of a European infrastructure for long-term preservation and access to the records of science, including large scientific organisations like ESA, CERN and the British CCLRC, but also JISC, the European Science Foundation, the International Association of STM Publishers, and national libraries like The British Library and the KB. Discussing the feasibility of new business models to cover the costs of storage space, the processing and management of the material, and R&D efforts.

  13. 77 FR 45290 - Proposed Modification of Class B Airspace Area; Philadelphia, PA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ...; Philadelphia, PA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: This action proposes to modify the Philadelphia, PA, Class B airspace area to ensure... rule that established the Philadelphia, PA, Terminal Control Area (TCA) with an effective date of March...

  14. 76 FR 52905 - Proposed Amendment to Class B Airspace; Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... (NPRM). SUMMARY: This action proposes to modify Salt Lake City, UT, Class B airspace to contain aircraft conducting Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) instrument approach procedures to Salt Lake City International Airport (SCL), Salt Lake City, UT. The FAA is taking this action to improve the flow of air traffic...

  15. 78 FR 63860 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands, RMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Island, Marshall Islands, RMI AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule... amending the geographic coordinates for Bucholz Army Airfield (AAF), Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands... geographic coordinates for Bucholz AAF in the Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands, RMI, Class D airspace legal...

  16. 76 FR 2572 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands, RMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... Island, Marshall Islands, RMI AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule... part 71 by amending Class E airspace; Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands, RMI (75 FR 61993... Kwajalein Island, Marshall Islands, RMI, as published in the Federal ] Register on October 7, 2010, FR Doc...

  17. 76 FR 28641 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Indianapolis Executive Airport, IN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Indianapolis Executive Airport, IN Correction In rule document 2011-9404 appearing on pages 22013-22014 in the issue of...

  18. 78 FR 57545 - Proposed Amendment of Class D Airspace; Dallas, Addison Airport, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... Airport, TX AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... Class D airspace ceiling at Addison Airport, Dallas, TX, is being withdrawn. Upon review, the FAA... 6, 2013, a NPRM was published in the Federal Register proposing to amend the Addison Airport Class D...

  19. 76 FR 2000 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Show Low, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ...This action will amend Class E airspace at Show Low, AZ, to accommodate aircraft using a new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures at Show Low Regional Airport. This will improve the safety and management of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) operations at the airport.

  20. 75 FR 77572 - Proposed Revision of Class E Airspace; Platinum AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... proposes to revise Class E airspace at Platinum AK. The creation of a new Standard Instrument Approach... Platinum Airport, in Platinum, AK, to accommodate the creation of a new SIAP at the Platinum Airport. This... the Platinum Airport. Issued in Anchorage, AK, on November 17, 2010. Michael A. Tarr, Alaska Flight...