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Sample records for naratriptan rizatriptan sumatriptan

  1. Published and not fully published double-blind, randomised, controlled trials with oral naratriptan in the treatment of migraine

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Naratriptan 2.5 mg is now an over-the-counter drug in Germany. This should increase the interest in drug. The GSK Trial Register was searched for published and unpublished double-blind, randomised, controlled trials (RCTs) concerning the use of naratriptan in migraine. Only 7 of 17 RCTs are publi......Naratriptan 2.5 mg is now an over-the-counter drug in Germany. This should increase the interest in drug. The GSK Trial Register was searched for published and unpublished double-blind, randomised, controlled trials (RCTs) concerning the use of naratriptan in migraine. Only 7 of 17 RCTs...... are published in full. Naratriptan 2.5 mg is superior to placebo for acute migraine treatment in 6 RCTs, but inferior to sumatriptan 100 mg and rizatriptan 10 mg in one RCT each. This dose of naratriptan has no more adverse events than placebo. Naratriptan 1 mg b.i.d. has some effect in the short...

  2. Isolated naratriptan-associated ischemic colitis

    Nissan, George; Chaudhry, Priyanka; Rangasamy, Priya; Mudrovich, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We report a 41-year-old woman who developed histology- and colonoscopy-proven ischemic colitis with the use of naratriptan not exceeding the maximum 2 doses a day and 3 days per week and without a known medical or cardiovascular history. By exclusion of other causes of colonic ischemia, naratriptan was considered the sole causal agent. Discontinuation of naratriptan resulted in a complete clinical recovery. To date, our patient is the youngest known patient to develop ischemic colitis on isolated naratriptan in the setting of no known medical risk factors or predisposing medical condition. Even though triptans are commonly used for the abortive treatment of migraine headaches, such a reported side effect is rare; however, careful assessment and individual patient-based treatment is advised. PMID:27695179

  3. Rizatriptan

    ... signals from being sent to the brain, and blocking the release of certain natural substances that cause ... feet difficulty breathing or swallowing swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, lips, eyes, hands, feet, ankles, ...

  4. Oral transmucosal delivery of naratriptan.

    Sattar, Mohammed; Lane, Majella E

    2016-11-30

    Naratriptan (NAR) is currently used as the hydrochloride salt (NAR.HCl) for the treatment of migraine and is available in tablet dosage forms for oral administration. Buccal drug delivery offers a number of advantages compared with conventional oral delivery including rapid absorption, avoidance of first pass metabolism and improved patient compliance. We have previously prepared and characterised the base form of NAR and shown that it has more favourable properties for buccal delivery compared with NAR.HCl. This study describes the design and evaluation of a range of formulations for oral transmucosal delivery of NAR base. Permeation studies were conducted using excised porcine buccal tissue mounted in Franz cells. Of the neat solvents examined, Transcutol ® P (TC) showed the greatest enhancement effects and was the vehicle in which NAR was most soluble. The mechanisms by which TC might promote permeation were further probed using binary systems containing TC with either buffer or Miglyol 812 ® (MG). Mass balance studies were also conducted for these systems. The permeation of TC as well as NAR was also monitored for TC:MG formulations. Overall, TC appears to promote enhanced membrane permeation of NAR because of its rapid uptake into the buccal tissue. Synergistic enhancement of buccal permeation was observed when TC was combined with MG and this is attributed to the increased thermodynamic activity of NAR in these formulations. Significantly enhanced permeation of NAR was achieved for TC:MG and this was also associated with less TC remaining on the tissue or in the tissue at the end of the experiment. To our knowledge this is the first report where both enhancer and active have been monitored in buccal permeation studies. The findings underline the importance of understanding the fate of vehicle components for rational formulation design of buccal delivery systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Naratriptan hydrochloride in extemporaneosly compounded oral suspensions.

    Zhang, Y P; Trissel, L A; Fox, J L

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmaceutical acceptability and chemical stability of naratriptan hydrochloride in three extemporaneously compounded suspension formulations. The naratriptan-hydrochloride oral suspensions were prepared from 2.5-mg commercial tablets yielding a nominal naratriptan concentration of 0.5 mg/mL. The suspension vehicles selected for testing were Syrpalta, an equal-parts mixture of Ora-Plus and Ora-Sweet, and an equal-parts mixture of Ora-Plus and Ora-Sweet SF. The tablets were crushed and thoroughly triturated to a fine powder using a porcelain mortar and pestle. The powder was incorporated into a portion of the Syrpalta or Ora-Plus suspension vehicle and mixed until homogeneous. The mixtures were then brought to volume with Syrpalta, Ora-Sweet or Ora-Sweet SF, as appropriate. The suspensions were packaged in amber, plastic, screw-cap prescription bottles and stored at 23 deg C for seven days and 4 deg C for 90 days. An adequate suspension was never achieved in Syrpalta. The crushed-tablet powder did not produce a uniformly dispersed mixture and exhibited clumping and a high rate of sedimentation. A distinct layer of the solid tablet material settled immediately after shaking. Over the next four hours, a densely packed, yellow, caked layer formed at the bottom of the containers, making resuspension difficult. During storage, the caking became worse. Chemical analysis was not performed. The Ora-Plus and Ora-Sweet or Ora-Sweet SF suspensions had a slight greenish cast and were resuspended without difficulty by shaking for approximately ten seconds, yielding easily poured and homogeneous mixtures throughout the study. Visible settling and layering did not begin for four hours with the Ora-Sweet suspension and 24 hours for the Ora-Sweet SF suspension. High pressure liquid chromatographic analysis found that the naratriptan concentration in both suspension-vehicle combinations exhibited little or no loss for seven days at 23

  6. Naratriptan in the Prophylactic Treatment of Cluster Headache.

    Ito, Yasuo; Mitsufuji, Takashi; Asano, Yoshio; Shimazu, Tomokazu; Kato, Yuji; Tanahashi, Norio; Maruki, Yuichi; Sakai, Fumihiko; Yamamoto, Toshimasa; Araki, Nobuo

    2017-10-01

    Objective Naratriptan has been reported to reduce the frequency of cluster headache. The purpose of this study was to determine whether naratriptan is effective as a prophylactic treatment for cluster headache in Japan. Methods We retrospectively reviewed all 43 patients with cluster headache who received preventive treatment with naratriptan from April 2009 to April 2015. The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd Edition (beta version) (ICHD-3 beta) was used to diagnose cluster headache. This study was conducted at 3 centers (Department of Neurology, Saitama Medical University; Saitama Neuropsychiatric Institute; Saitama Medical University International Medical Center). Patients were recruited from these specialized headache outpatient centers. Naratriptan was taken before the patient went to bed. Results The study population included 30 men (69.8%) and 13 women (30.2%). Twenty-two cases received other preventive treatments (51.2%), while 21 cases only received naratriptan (48.8%). Among the 43 cases, 37 patients (86.0%) achieved an improvement of cluster headache on naratriptan. Conclusion Naratriptan has been suggested as a preventive medicine for cluster headache because of the longer the biological half-life in comparison to other triptans. The internal use of naratriptan 2 hours before attacks appears to achieve a good response in patients with cluster headache.

  7. Angina pectoris efter sumatriptan (Imigran)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Christiansen, B D

    1992-01-01

    Developed for the treatment of migraine, sumatriptan is an agonist of 5-hydroxytryptamine-1-receptors. Though a pressure sensation is a common complaint, significant ECG changes have not been reported after subcutaneous administration of sumatriptan. A case history is given where angina pectoris...... after sumatriptan self-administration was experienced on two occasions by a 61-year old man with a history of minor myocardial infarction--without post-infarction angina--two years previously. The angina after sumatriptan was accompanied on both occasions by significant ST-segment depression on ECG...

  8. Sumatriptan

    ... the brain, and blocking the release of certain natural substances that cause pain, nausea, and other symptoms ... arm or leg sudden or severe stomach pain fast, pounding, or irregular ... the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting ...

  9. Stability indicating method development and validation of assay method for the estimation of rizatriptan benzoate in tablet

    Chandrashekhar K. Gadewar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A simple, sensitive, precise and specific high performance liquid chromatography method was developed and validated for the determination of rizatriptan in rizatriptan benzoate tablet. The separation was carried out by using a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile: pH 3.4 phosphate buffer in ratio of 20:80. The column used was Zorbax SB CN 250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μ with a flow rate of 1 ml/min using UV detection at 225 nm. The retention time of rizatriptan and benzoic acid was found to be 4.751 and 8.348 min respectively. A forced degradation study of rizatriptan benzoate in its tablet form was conducted under the condition of hydrolysis, oxidation, thermal and photolysis. Rizatriptan was found to be stable in basic buffer while in acidic buffer was found to be degraded (water bath at 60 °C for 15 min. The detector response of rizatriptan is directly proportional to concentration ranging from 30% to 160% of test concentration i.e. 15.032 to 80.172 mcg/ml. Results of analysis were validated statistically and by recovery studies (mean recovery = 99.44. The result of the study showed that the proposed method is simple, rapid, precise and accurate, which is useful for the routine determination of rizatriptan in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  10. Effect of Microneedle Type on Transdermal Permeation of Rizatriptan.

    Uppuluri, Chandrateja; Shaik, Ashraf Sultana; Han, Tao; Nayak, Atul; Nair, Karthik J; Whiteside, Benjamin R; Nalluri, Buchi N; Das, Diganta B

    2017-07-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of salient microneedle (MN) geometry parameters like length, density, shape and type on transdermal permeation of rizatriptan (RIZ). Studies were carried out using two types of MN devices viz. AdminPatch® arrays (ADM) (0.6, 0.9, 1.2 and 1.5 mm lengths) and laboratory-fabricated polymeric MNs (PMs) of 0.6 mm length. In the case of the PMs, arrays were applied three times at different places within a 1.77-cm 2 skin area (PM-3) to maintain the MN density closer to 0.6 mm ADM. Histological studies revealed that PM, owing to their geometry/design, formed wider and deeper microconduits when compared to ADM of similar length. Approximately 4.9- and 4.2-fold increases in the RIZ steady-state flux values were observed with 1.5 mm ADM and PM-3 applications when compared to the passive studies. A good correlation between different dimensionless parameters like the amount of RIZ permeated (C t /C s ), thickness (h/L) and surface area (S a /L 2 ) of the skin was observed with scaling analyses. Numerical simulations provided further information regarding the distribution of RIZ in MN-treated skin after application of different MNs. Overall, the study suggests that MN application enhances the RIZ transdermal permeation and the geometrical parameters of MNs play an important role in the degree enhancement.

  11. Does sumatriptan cross the blood-brain barrier in animals and man?

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2010-01-01

    Sumatriptan, a relatively hydrophilic triptan, based on several animal studies has been regarded to be unable to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In more recent animal studies there are strong indications that sumatriptan to some extent can cross the BBB. The CNS adverse events of sumatriptan...

  12. Evaluation of electrochemical, UV/VIS and Raman spectroelectrochemical detection of Naratriptan with screen-printed electrodes.

    Hernández, Carla Navarro; Martín-Yerga, Daniel; González-García, María Begoña; Hernández-Santos, David; Fanjul-Bolado, Pablo

    2018-02-01

    Naratriptan, active pharmaceutical ingredient with antimigraine activity was electrochemically detected in untreated screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs). Cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry were used to carry out quantitative analysis of this molecule (in a Britton-Robinson buffer solution at pH 3.0) through its irreversible oxidation (diffusion controlled) at a potential of +0.75V (vs. Ag pseudoreference electrode). Naratriptan oxidation product is an indole based dimer with a yellowish colour (maximum absorption at 320nm) so UV-VIS spectroelectrochemistry technique was used for the very first time as an in situ characterization and quantification technique for this molecule. A reflection configuration approach allowed its measurement over the untreated carbon based electrode. Finally, time resolved Raman Spectroelectrochemistry is used as a powerful technique to carry out qualitative and quantitative analysis of Naratriptan. Electrochemically treated silver screen-printed electrodes are shown as easy to use and cost-effective SERS substrates for the analysis of Naratriptan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cilostazol induced migraine does not respond to sumatriptan in a double blind trial

    Falkenberg, Katrine; Dunga, Bára Óladóttir Á; Guo, Song

    2018-01-01

    participants were asked to subsequently treat their spontaneous attacks with sumatriptan (50 mg) or placebo in a double-blind cross-over design and 15 participants did so. RESULTS: Cilostazol induced headache with some migraine characteristics in all participants; 18 patients on the sumatriptan day and 19...

  14. Protective Roles of N-acetyl Cysteine and/or Taurine against Sumatriptan-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    Javad Khalili Fard

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Triptans are the drug category mostly prescribed for abortive treatment of migraine. Most recent cases of liver toxicity induced by triptans have been described, but the mechanisms of liver toxicity of these medications have not been clear. Methods: In the present study, we obtained LC50 using dose-response curve and investigated cell viability, free radical generation, lipid peroxide production, mitochondrial injury, lysosomal membrane damage and the cellular glutathione level as toxicity markers as well as the beneficial effects of taurine and/or N-acetyl cysteine in the sumatriptan-treated rat parenchymal hepatocytes using accelerated method of cytotoxicity mechanism screening. Results: It was revealed that liver toxicity induced by sumatriptan in in freshly isolated parenchymal hepatocytes is dose-dependent. Sumatriptan caused significant free radical generation followed by lipid peroxide formation, mitochondrial injury as well as lysosomal damage. Moreover, sumatriptan reduced cellular glutathione content. Taurine and N-acetyl cysteine were able to protect hepatocytes against sumatriptan-induced harmful effects. Conclusion: It is concluded that sumatriptan causes oxidative stress in hepatocytes and the decreased hepatocytes glutathione has a key role in the sumatriptan-induced harmful effects. Also, N-acetyl cysteine and/or taurine could be used as treatments in sumatriptan-induced side effects.

  15. Sumatriptan (subcutaneous route of administration) for acute migraine attacks in adults

    Derry, Christopher J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a highly disabling condition for the individual and also has wide-reaching implications for society, healthcare services, and the economy. Sumatriptan is an abortive medication for migraine attacks, belonging to the triptan family. Subcutaneous administration may be preferable to oral for individuals experiencing nausea and/or vomiting Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of subcutaneous sumatriptan compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine attacks in adults. Search methods We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, online databases, and reference lists for studies through 13 October 2011. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- and/or active-controlled studies using subcutaneous sumatriptan to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used numbers of participants achieving each outcome to calculate relative risk (or ‘risk ratio’) and numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or a different active treatment. Main results Thirty-five studies (9365 participants) compared subcutaneous sumatriptan with placebo or an active comparator. Most of the data were for the 6 mg dose. Sumatriptan surpassed placebo for all efficacy outcomes. For sumatriptan 6 mg versus placebo the NNTs were 2.9, 2.3, 2.2, and 2.1 for pain-free at one and two hours, and headache relief at one and two hours, respectively, and 6.1 for sustained pain-free at 24 hours. Results for the 4 mg and 8 mg doses were similar to the 6 mg dose, with 6 mg significantly better than 4 mg only for pain-free at one hour, and 8 mg significantly better than 6 mg only for headache relief at one hour. There was no evidence of increased migraine relief if a second dose of sumatriptan 6

  16. Formulation, preparation, and evaluation of novel orally disintegrating tablets containing taste-masked naproxen sodium granules and naratriptan hydrochloride.

    Stange, Ulrike; Führling, Christian; Gieseler, Henning

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and manufacture novel freeze-dried orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs) for migraine therapy containing taste-masked naproxen sodium and naratriptan hydrochloride. The formulation was optimized based on freeze-drying of sucrose solutions with different binders (hydroxyethylstarch, sodium alginate, methylcellulose, and gelatin) and varying amounts of Eudragit® E-coated naproxen sodium granules. Excellent product performance of the ODTs in terms of hardness and disintegration time (hydrochloride, and taste-masked naproxen sodium granules corresponding to 200 mg of naproxen were then added, and the final batches of ODTs for migraine therapy were produced. The ODTs were fully characterized, and subsequently stored for 1 month at room temperature and at 40°C. The amount of free naproxen sodium after freeze-drying and storage was below the threshold bitterness value, and the coating remained intact. Additionally, the particle size distribution of taste-masked granules was preserved, and more than 90 % naproxen sodium was released after 30 min. Naratriptan hydrochloride was dissolved immediately after disintegration, hence facilitating buccal absorption of the active pharmaceutical ingredient. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  17. The natural diatomite from caldiran-van (Turkey): electroanalytical application to antimigraine compound naratriptan at modified carbon paste electrode.

    Calışkan, Necla; Sögüt, Eda; Saka, Cafer; Yardım, Yavuz; Sentürk, Zuhre

    2010-09-01

    This paper is the first report describing the characterization of local diatomite of Caldiran-Van region (Eastern Anatolia, Turkey). Special attention was paid to the ability of its electroanalytical performance at modified electrodes and to the potential application of diatomite-modified electrode. For this purpose, the determination of Naratriptan which is a novel oral triptan (5-hydroxytryptamine receptor agonist) in migraine treatment, by means of a carbon paste electrode modified with 10% (w/w) of diatomite was studied using cyclic and square-wave voltammetry. The experimental conditions that affect the electrode reaction process were studied in terms of pH of the supporting electrolyte, scan rate, accumulation variables, modifier composition and square-wave parameters. Using square-wave stripping mode, the drug yielded a well-defined voltammetric response in Britton-Robinson buffer, pH 4.0 at 0.84 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) (a pre-concentration step being carried out with an open circuit at 120 s). The process could be used to determine Naratriptan concentrations in the range 5x10(-7)-9x10(-7) M, with a detection limit of 1.25x10(-7) M (46.5 mug L(-1)). The applicability of the method to spiked human urine samples was illustrated.

  18. Comparison between the efficacy of ginger and sumatriptan in the ablative treatment of the common migraine.

    Maghbooli, Mehdi; Golipour, Farhad; Moghimi Esfandabadi, Alireza; Yousefi, Mehran

    2014-03-01

    Frequency and torment caused by migraines direct patients toward a variety of remedies. Few studies to date have proposed ginger derivates for migraine relief. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of ginger in the ablation of common migraine attack in comparison to sumatriptan therapy. In this double-blinded randomized clinical trial, 100 patients who had acute migraine without aura were randomly allocated to receive either ginger powder or sumatriptan. Time of headache onset, its severity, time interval from headache beginning to taking drug and patient self-estimation about response for five subsequent migraine attacks were recorded by patients. Patients(,) satisfaction from treatment efficacy and their willingness to continue it was also evaluated after 1 month following intervention. Two hours after using either drug, mean headaches severity decreased significantly. Efficacy of ginger powder and sumatriptan was similar. Clinical adverse effects of ginger powder were less than sumatriptan. Patients' satisfaction and willingness to continue did not differ. The effectiveness of ginger powder in the treatment of common migraine attacks is statistically comparable to sumatriptan. Ginger also poses a better side effect profile than sumatriptan. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Sumatriptan (oral route of administration) for acute migraine attacks in adults

    Derry, Christopher J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a highly disabling condition for the individual and also has wide-reaching implications for society, healthcare services, and the economy. Sumatriptan is an abortive medication for migraine attacks, belonging to the triptan family. Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of oral sumatriptan compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine attacks in adults. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, online databases, and reference lists for studies through 13 October 2011. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- and/or active-controlled studies using oral sumatriptan to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used numbers of participants achieving each outcome to calculate relative risk (or ‘risk ratio’) and numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or a different active treatment. Main results Sixty-one studies (37,250 participants) compared oral sumatriptan with placebo or an active comparator. Most of the data were for the 50 mg and 100 mg doses. Sumatriptan surpassed placebo for all efficacy outcomes. For sumatriptan 50 mg versus placebo the NNTs were 6.1, 7.5, and 4.0 for pain-free at two hours and headache relief at one and two hours, respectively. NNTs for sustained pain-free and sustained headache relief during the 24 hours postdose were 9.5 and 6.0, respectively. For sumatriptan 100 mg versus placebo the NNTs were 4.7, 6.8, 3.5, 6.5, and 5.2, respectively, for the same outcomes. Results for the 25 mg dose were similar to the 50 mg dose, while sumatriptan 100 mg was significantly better than 50 mg for pain-free and headache relief at two hours, and for sustained pain-free during 24 hours. Treating early, during

  20. Delayed absorption of many (paracetamol, aspirin, other NSAIDs and zolmitriptan) but not all (sumatriptan, rizatriptan) drugs during migraine attacks and most likely normal gastric emptying outside attacks. A review

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Background In most pharmacokinetic studies, the oral absorption of drugs is impaired during migraine attacks but exceptions occur. A study on gastric emptying using gastric scintigraphy indicated that gastric stasis also occurs interictally in migraine. These studies were reviewed critically. Res...

  1. In Vitro Skin Permeation Enhancement of Sumatriptan by Microneedle Application.

    Nalluri, Buchi N; Anusha, Sai Sri V; Bramhini, Sri R; Amulya, J; Sultana, Ashraf S K; Teja, Chandra U; Das, Diganta B

    2015-01-01

    Different dimensions of commercially available microneedle devices, namely, Admin- Patch(®) microneedle arrays (MN) (0.6, 0.9, 1.2 and 1.5 mm lengths) and Dermaroller(®) microneedle rollers (DR) (0.5 and 1mm lengths) were evaluated for their relative efficiency in enhancement of transdermal permeation of Sumatriptan (SMT). Solubility assessment of SMT was carried out using propylene glycol (PG), polyethylene glycol (PEG) in combination with saline (S) at different ratios and the order of solubility was found to be 70:30 > 80:20 > 90:10 %v/v in both PG:S and PEG:S. In vitro skin permeation studies were performed using PG:S (70:30 %v/v) as donor vehicle. A significant increase in cumulative amount of SMT permeated, steady state flux, permeability coefficient and diffusion coefficient values were observed after microneedle treatment, and the values were in the order of 1.5mm MN >1.2mm MN >0.9mm MN >1mm DR >0.6mm MN >0.5mm DR > passive permeation. Lag times were significantly shorter after longer microneedle application (0.24h for 1.5mm MN). Arrays were found to be superior to rollers with similar microneedle lengths in enhancing SMT permeation and may be attributed to higher density of microneedles and force of application onto skin. The in vitro flux values revealed that 2.5cm(2) area patch is sufficient for effective therapy after treatment of skin with 1.5mm MN. It may be inferred that microneedle application significantly enhances the transdermal penetration of SMT and that it may be feasible to deliver clinically relevant therapeutic levels of SMT using microneedle assisted transdermal delivery systems.

  2. Sumatriptan nasal spray in the acute treatment of migraine in adolescents and children

    Callenbach, Petra M. C.; Pels, Lise P. M.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; Linssen, Wirn H. J. P.; Gooskens, Rob H. J. M.; van der Zwan, Jan L.; Brouwer, Oebele F.

    2007-01-01

    About 4-10% of children and adolescents suffer from migraine. in the last few years, several studies have been performed to assess the efficacy and safety of triptans for the acute treatment of migraine in children and adolescents. Only sumatriptan nasal spray has been approved for the treatment of

  3. Effect of CGRP and sumatriptan on the BOLD response in visual cortex

    Asghar, Mohammed Sohail; Hansen, Adam E; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) modulates brain activity, we investigated the effect of intravenous CGRP on brain activity in response to a visual stimulus. In addition, we examined if possible alteration in brain activity was reversed by the anti-migraine drug......% of the participants reported headache after CGRP. We found no changes in brain activity after CGRP (P = 0.12) or after placebo (P = 0.41). Sumatriptan did not affect brain activity after CGRP (P = 0.71) or after placebo (P = 0.98). Systemic CGRP or sumatriptan has no direct effects on the BOLD activity in visual...... sumatriptan. Eighteen healthy volunteers were randomly allocated to receive CGRP infusion (1.5 µg/min for 20 min) or placebo. In vivo activity in the visual cortex was recorded before, during and after infusion and after 6 mg subcutaneous sumatriptan by functional magnetic resonance imaging (3 T). 77...

  4. Application of quality by design approach to optimize process and formulation parameters of rizatriptan loaded chitosan nanoparticles

    Ajinath Eknath Shirsat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of present study was to optimize rizatriptan (RZT chitosan (CS nanoparticles using ionic gelation method by application of quality by design (QbD approach. Based on risk assessment, effect of three variables, that is CS %, tripolyphosphate % and stirring speed were studied on critical quality attributes (CQAs; particle size and entrapment efficiency. Central composite design (CCD was implemented for design of experimentation with 20 runs. RZT CS nanoparticles were characterized for particle size, polydispersity index, entrapment efficiency, in-vitro release study, differential scanning calorimetric, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Based on QbD approach, design space (DS was optimized with a combination of selected variables with entrapment efficiency > 50% w/w and a particle size between 400 and 600 nm. Validation of model was performed with 3 representative formulations from DS for which standard error of − 0.70-3.29 was observed between experimental and predicted values. In-vitro drug release followed initial burst release 20.26 ± 2.34% in 3-4 h with sustained drug release of 98.43 ± 2.45% in 60 h. Lower magnitude of standard error for CQAs confirms the validation of selected CCD model for optimization of RZT CS nanoparticles. In-vitro drug release followed dual mechanism via, diffusion and polymer erosion. RZT CS nanoparticles were prepared successfully using QbD approach with the understanding of the high risk process and formulation parameters involved and optimized DS with a multifactorial combination of critical parameters to obtain predetermined RZT loaded CS nanoparticle specifications.

  5. Effect of sumatriptan on cerebral blood flow during migraine headache. Measurement by sequential SPECT used 99mTc-ECD background subtraction method

    Ueda, Takashi; Torihara, Yoshito; Tsuneyoshi, Noritaka; Ikeda, Yoshitomo

    2001-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the effect of sumatriptan on regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) during migraine headache. Nine cases were examined by 99m Tc-ECD background subtraction method for the absolute value measurement of regional CBF before and after sumatriptan injection. rCBF except for occipital and perioccipital lobes, were increased 10-20% during migraine headache and significant decreases were observed by sumatriptan injection. Two cases of nine had transiently increased systemic blood pressure and cardiac pulse rate, however, all cases improved migraine headache after injection of sumatriptan. (author)

  6. Effect of sumatriptan on cerebral blood flow during migraine headache. Measurement by sequential SPECT used {sup 99m}Tc-ECD background subtraction method

    Ueda, Takashi; Torihara, Yoshito; Tsuneyoshi, Noritaka; Ikeda, Yoshitomo [Miyazaki Social Insurance Hospital (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The present study was designed to examine the effect of sumatriptan on regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) during migraine headache. Nine cases were examined by {sup 99m}Tc-ECD background subtraction method for the absolute value measurement of regional CBF before and after sumatriptan injection. rCBF except for occipital and perioccipital lobes, were increased 10-20% during migraine headache and significant decreases were observed by sumatriptan injection. Two cases of nine had transiently increased systemic blood pressure and cardiac pulse rate, however, all cases improved migraine headache after injection of sumatriptan. (author)

  7. Oral sumatriptan for migraine in children and adolescents: a randomized, multicenter, placebo-controlled, parallel group study.

    Fujita, Mitsue; Sato, Katsuaki; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Sakai, Fumihiko

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this article is to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of two doses of oral sumatriptan vs placebo in the acute treatment of migraine in children and adolescents. Currently, there is no approved prescription medication in Japan for the treatment of migraine in children and adolescents. This was a multicenter, outpatient, single-attack, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study. Eligible patients were children and adolescents aged 10 to 17 years diagnosed with migraine with or without aura (ICHD-II criteria 1.1 or 1.2) from 17 centers. They were randomized to receive sumatriptan 25 mg, 50 mg or placebo (1:1:2). The primary efficacy endpoint was headache relief by two grades on a five-grade scale at two hours post-dose. A total of 178 patients from 17 centers in Japan were enrolled and randomized to an investigational product in double-blind fashion. Of these, 144 patients self-treated a single migraine attack, and all provided a post-dose efficacy assessment and completed the study. The percentage of patients in the full analysis set (FAS) population who report pain relief at two hours post-treatment for the primary endpoint was higher in the placebo group than in the pooled sumatriptan group (38.6% vs 31.1%, 95% CI: -23.02 to 8.04, P  = 0.345). The percentage of patients in the FAS population who reported pain relief at four hours post-dose was higher in the pooled sumatriptan group (63.5%) than in the placebo group (51.4%) but failed to achieve statistical significance ( P  = 0.142). At four hours post-dose, percentages of patients who were pain free or had complete relief of photophobia or phonophobia were numerically higher in the sumatriptan pooled group compared to placebo. Both doses of oral sumatriptan were well tolerated. No adverse events (AEs) were serious or led to study withdrawal. The most common AEs were somnolence in 6% (two patients) in the sumatriptan 25 mg treatment group and chest

  8. Dilation by CGRP of middle meningeal artery and reversal by sumatriptan in normal volunteers

    Asghar, M S; Hansen, A E; Kapijimpanga, T

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of neurovascular headaches. CGRP infusion causes headache and dilation of cranial vessels. However, it is unknown to what extent CGRP-induced vasodilation contributes to immediate head pain...... and whether the migraine-specific abortive drug sumatriptan, a 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B/1D agonist, inhibits CGRP-induced immediate vasodilation and headache. METHODS: We performed a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study in 18 healthy volunteers. We recorded circumference changes.......0001) and on the placebo day (p = 0.007). CONCLUSION: These data suggest that exogenous CGRP dilates extracranial vessels and not intracranial, and that sumatriptan exerts part of its antinociceptive action by constricting MMA and not MCA. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class I evidence that IV GCRP...

  9. Dissolving polyvinylpyrrolidone-based microneedle systems for in-vitro delivery of sumatriptan succinate.

    Ronnander, P; Simon, L; Spilgies, H; Koch, A; Scherr, S

    2018-03-01

    In-vitro permeation studies were conducted to assess the feasibility of fabricating dissolving-microneedle-array systems to release sumatriptan succinate. The formulations consisted mainly of the encapsulated active ingredient and a water-soluble biologically compatible polymer, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Tests with Franz-type diffusion cells and Göttingen minipig skins showed an increase of the transdermal flux compared to passive diffusion. A preparation, containing 30% by mass of PVP and 8.7mg sumatriptan, produced a delivery rate of 395±31μg/cm 2 h over a 7-hour period after a negligible lag time of approximately 39min. Theoretically, a 10.7cm 2 microneedle-array patch loaded with 118.8mg of the drug would provide the required plasma concentration, 72ng/mL, for nearly 7h. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel intranasal breath-powered delivery system for sumatriptan: a review of technology and clinical application of the investigational product AVP-825 in the treatment of migraine.

    Cady, Roger

    2015-01-01

    AVP-825, formerly 'OptiNose Sumatriptan,' is an investigational Breath-Powered(TM) Bi-Directional(TM) intranasal delivery system containing low-dose sumatriptan (22 mg intranasal powder) that avoids limitations of other types of intranasal administration by taking advantage of unique features of nasal anatomy and physiology. This review summarizes intranasal drug delivery for migraine, how the breath-powered technology works, and AVP-825 pharmacokinetic, efficacy and safety/tolerability findings. To identify AVP-825 clinical studies, a PubMed/MEDLINE database search was conducted with the terms AVP-825, OptiNose, OptiNose Sumatriptan, Breath-Powered Nasal Delivery or sumatriptan powder. Of 20 articles, 5 clinical studies were identified, including the head-to-head comparative COMPASS trial (AVP-825 vs oral sumatriptan) and two placebo-controlled studies. AVP-825 has faster sumatriptan absorption versus oral tablets or traditional liquid nasal spray. In Phase II/III randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, AVP-825 produced early and sustained efficacy with minimal triptan-related adverse effects. In COMPASS, AVP-825 produced earlier reduction of migraine pain intensity and migraine-associated symptoms than 100 mg oral sumatriptan, and higher early rates of pain relief and pain freedom, similar sustained efficacy, and fewer atypical sensations. AVP-825 has the potential to provide migraine patients with improved intranasal administration of sumatriptan that may enhance efficacy and tolerability.

  11. Randomized, double-blind, crossover study comparing DFN-11 injection (3 mg subcutaneous sumatriptan) with 6 mg subcutaneous sumatriptan for the treatment of rapidly-escalating attacks of episodic migraine.

    Cady, Roger K; Munjal, Sagar; Cady, Ryan J; Manley, Heather R; Brand-Schieber, Elimor

    2017-12-01

    A 6-mg dose of SC sumatriptan is the most efficacious and fast-acting acute treatment for migraine, but a 3-mg dose of SC sumatriptan may improve tolerability while maintaining efficacy. This randomized, double-blind, crossover study compared the efficacy and tolerability of 3 mg subcutaneous (SC) sumatriptan (DFN-11) with 6 mg SC sumatriptan in 20 adults with rapidly-escalating migraine attacks. Eligible subjects were randomized (1:1) to treat 1 attack with DFN-11 and matching placebo autoinjector consecutively or 2 DFN-11 autoinjectors consecutively and a second attack similarly but with the alternative dose (3 mg or 6 mg). The proportions of subjects who were pain-free at 60 min postdose, the primary endpoint, were similar following treatment with 3 mg SC sumatriptan and 6 mg SC sumatriptan (50% vs 52.6%, P  =  .87). The proportions of subjects experiencing pain relief (P  ≥  .48); reductions in migraine pain intensity (P  ≥  .78); and relief from nausea, photophobia, or phonophobia (P  ≥  .88) with 3 mg SC sumatriptan and 6 mg SC sumatriptan were similar, as were the mean scores for satisfaction with treatment (M  =  2.6 vs M  =  2.4, P  =  .81) and the mean number of rescue medications used (M  =  .11 vs M  =  .26, P  =  .32). The most common adverse events with the 3- and 6-mg doses were triptan sensations - paresthesia, neck pain, flushing, and involuntary muscle contractions of the neck - and the incidence of adverse events with both doses was similar (32 events total: 3 mg, n  =  14 [44%]; 6 mg, n  =  18 [56%], P  =  .60). Triptan sensations affected 4 subjects with the 6-mg dose only, 1 subject with the 3-mg dose only, and 7 subjects with both sumatriptan doses. Chest pain affected 2 subjects (10%) treated with the 6-mg dose and no subjects (0%) treated with the 3-mg dose of DFN-11. There were no serious adverse events. The 3-mg SC dose

  12. Sumatriptan increases the proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-infected individuals and healthy blood donors in vitro

    Afzelius, P; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    2000-01-01

    responsible for regulation of the intracellular levels of cAMP. In a preliminary study sumatriptan increased the proliferative responses of PBMC to a polyclonal activator in vitro in 9 of 10 HIV-seropositive individuals (p=0.007), and in 7 of 9 healthy blood donors (p=0.05). This was probably due...... of the intracellular second messenger adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) has been shown to cause impaired proliferative capacity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from HIV-infected individuals in vitro. Sumatriptan, a 5HT1d receptor agonist, inhibits the activity of adenylyl cyclases, the enzymes...

  13. Nitroglycerin enhances the propagation of cortical spreading depression: comparative studies with sumatriptan and novel kynurenic acid analogues

    Knapp L

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Levente Knapp,1 Bence Szita,1 Kitti Kocsis,1,2 László Vécsei,2,3 József Toldi1,2 1Department of Physiology, Anatomy, and Neuroscience, University of Szeged, 2MTA-SZTE Neuroscience Research Group, 3Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Albert Szent-Györgyi Clinical Centre, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary Background: The complex pathophysiology of migraine is not yet clearly understood; therefore, experimental models are essential for the investigation of the processes related to migraine headache, which include cortical spreading depression (CSD and NO donor-induced neurovascular changes. Data on the assessment of drug efficacy in these models are often limited, which prompted us to investigate a novel combined migraine model in which an effective pharmacon could be more easily identified. Materials and methods: In vivo electrophysiological experiments were performed to investigate the effect of nitroglycerin (NTG on CSD induced by KCl application. In addition, sumatriptan and newly synthesized neuroactive substances (analogues of the neuromodulator kynurenic acid [KYNA] were also tested. Results: The basic parameters of CSDs were unchanged following NTG administration; however, propagation failure was decreased compared to the controls. Sumatriptan decreased the number of CSDs, whereas propagation failure was as minimal as in the NTG group. On the other hand, both of the KYNA analogues restored the ratio of propagation to the control level. Discussion: The ratio of propagation appeared to be the indicator of the effect of NTG. This is the first study providing direct evidence that NTG influences CSD; furthermore, we observed different effects of sumatriptan and KYNA analogues. Sumatriptan changed the generation of CSDs, whereas the analogues acted on the propagation of the waves. Our experimental design overlaps with a large spectrum of processes present in migraine pathophysiology, and it can be a useful experimental model

  14. An electrochemical sensor for rizatriptan benzoate determination using Fe3O4 nanoparticle/multiwall carbon nanotube-modified glassy carbon electrode in real samples.

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Maleki, Somayeh; Heidari, Mozhgan; Afkhami, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a sensitive and selective electrochemical sensor for determination of rizatriptan benzoate (RZB) was proposed. A glassy carbon electrode was modified with nanocomposite of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4/MWCNTs/GCE). The results obtained clearly show that the combination of MWCNTs and Fe3O4 nanoparticles definitely improves the sensitivity of modified electrode to RZB determination. The morphology and electroanalytical performance of the fabricated sensor were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), square wave voltammetry (SWV) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Also, the effect of experimental and instrumental parameters on the sensor response was evaluated. The square wave voltammetric response of the electrode to RZB was linear in the range 0.5-100.0 μmol L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.09 μmol L(-1) under the optimum conditions. The investigated method showed good stability, reproducibility and repeatability. The proposed sensor was successfully applied for real life samples of blood serum and RZB determination in pharmaceutical. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of weight, body mass index, age, sex , and race on plasma concentrations of subcutaneous sumatriptan: a pooled analysis

    Munjal S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sagar Munjal,1 Anirudh Gautam,2 Alan M Rapoport,3 Dennis M Fisher4 1Department of Neurology Clinical Development and Medical Affairs, Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories Ltd, Princeton, NJ, USA; 2Pharmacokinetics, Modeling and Simulation & Bioanalysis, Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories Ltd, Hyderabad, India; 3Department of Neurology, The David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, 4P Less Than, San Francisco, CA, USA Objective/background: Factors such as body size (weight and body mass index [BMI], age, sex, and race might influence the clinical response to sumatriptan. We evaluated the impact of these covariates on the plasma concentration (Cp profile of sumatriptan administered subcutaneously. Methods: We conducted three pharmacokinetic studies of subcutaneous sumatriptan in 98 healthy adults. Sumatriptan was administered subcutaneously (236 administrations as either DFN-11 3 mg, a novel 0.5 mL autoinjector being developed by Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories; Imitrex® (Sumatriptan injection 3 mg or 6 mg (6 mg/0.5 mL; or Imitrex STATdose 4 mg or 6 mg (0.5 mL. Blood was sampled for 12 hours to determine sumatriptan Cp. Maximum Cp (Cmax, area under the curve during the first 2 hours (AUC0–2, and total area under the curve (AUC0–∞ were determined using noncompartmental methods. Post hoc analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between these exposure metrics and each of body weight, BMI, age, sex, and race (categorized as white, black, or others. Results: Both weight and BMI correlated negatively with each exposure metric for each treatment group. Across all treatment groups, AUC0–2 for subjects with BMI less than or equal to median value was 1.03–1.12 times the value for subjects with BMI more than median value. For subjects with BMI less than or equal to median value receiving DFN-11, median AUC0–2 was slightly less than that for subjects with BMI more than median value receiving Imitrex

  16. An electrochemical sensor for rizatriptan benzoate determination using Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticle/multiwall carbon nanotube-modified glassy carbon electrode in real samples

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh, E-mail: madrakian@basu.ac.ir; Maleki, Somayeh; Heidari, Mozhgan; Afkhami, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    In this paper a sensitive and selective electrochemical sensor for determination of rizatriptan benzoate (RZB) was proposed. A glassy carbon electrode was modified with nanocomposite of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MWCNTs/GCE). The results obtained clearly show that the combination of MWCNTs and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles definitely improves the sensitivity of modified electrode to RZB determination. The morphology and electroanalytical performance of the fabricated sensor were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), square wave voltammetry (SWV) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Also, the effect of experimental and instrumental parameters on the sensor response was evaluated. The square wave voltammetric response of the electrode to RZB was linear in the range 0.5–100.0 μmol L{sup −1} with a detection limit of 0.09 μmol L{sup −1} under the optimum conditions. The investigated method showed good stability, reproducibility and repeatability. The proposed sensor was successfully applied for real life samples of blood serum and RZB determination in pharmaceutical. - Highlights: • Simple and sensitive Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MWCNTs/GCE for rizatriptan benzoate determination • The surface morphology of nanocomposite was characterized by SEM and EDS. • Rizatriptan benzoate was measured at 0.09 μmol L{sup −1} with good sensitivity and selectivity. • The electrode has been successfully applied in serum and pharmaceutical samples. • The nanocomposite had excellent electrocatalytic activity and biocompatibility.

  17. Method development and validation for naratriptan determination in human plasma by HPLC with tandem mass spectrometry detection, and its application to bioequivalence study

    Balasekhara Reddy Challa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors developed a simple, sensitive and specific liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS method for the quantification of naratriptan (NP in human plasma using naratriptan-d3 (NPD3 as an internal standard (IS. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Zorbax SB-C18, 75 x 4.6 mm, 3.5 µm column with an isocratic mobile phase composed of 0.1% formic acid : acetonitrile (50:50 v/v, at a flow-rate of 0.6 mL/min. NP and NPD3 were detected with proton adducts at m/z 336.5→98.0 and 339.4→101.0 in selected reaction monitoring (SRM positive mode, respectively. The liquid-liquid extraction method was used to extract the NP and NPD3. This method was validated over a linear concentration range of 0.1-25.0 ng/mL with a correlation coefficient of (r2 > 0.9998. The Intra-day and Interday precision was found to be 1.8 to 3.6%, and 2.3 to 2.6%, and accuracy to be 101.7- 104.2% and 101.8 to 102.9%, respectively. NP was found to be stable throughout freeze-thaw (three cycles, bench top and auto sampler stability studies. This method was successfully applied for the analysis of plasma samples following oral administration of NP (2.5 mg in 31 healthy Indian male human volunteers under fasting conditions.Os autores desenvolveram um método simples, sensível e específico de cromatografia líquida-espectrometria de massa-tandem (LC-MS/MS para a quantificação de naratriptan (NP em plasma humano empregando naratriptan-d3 (NPD3 como padrão interno de referência (IS. A separação cromatográfica foi realizada em coluna Zorbax SB-C18, 75 x 4,6 mm, 3,5 μm com fase móvel isocrática composta por 0,1% ácido fórmico : acetronitrila (50:50 v/v e taxa de fluxo de 0,6 mL/min. NP e NPD3 foram detectados com adutos de prótons a m/z 336.5→98.0 e 339.4→101.0 in em modo positivo do tipo monitoramento de reação selecionada (SRM, respectivamente. Extração líquido-líquido foi empregada para extrair NP e NPD3, sendo o método validado

  18. Comparative pharmacokinetics between a microdose and therapeutic dose for clarithromycin, sumatriptan, propafenone, paracetamol (acetaminophen), and phenobarbital in human volunteers.

    Lappin, Graham; Shishikura, Yoko; Jochemsen, Roeline; Weaver, Richard John; Gesson, Charlotte; Brian Houston, J; Oosterhuis, Berend; Bjerrum, Ole J; Grynkiewicz, Grzegorz; Alder, Jane; Rowland, Malcolm; Garner, Colin

    2011-06-14

    A clinical study was conducted to assess the ability of a microdose (100 μg) to predict the human pharmacokinetics (PK) following a therapeutic dose of clarithromycin, sumatriptan, propafenone, paracetamol (acetaminophen) and phenobarbital, both within the study and by reference to the existing literature on these compounds and to explore the source of any nonlinearity if seen. For each drug, 6 healthy male volunteers were dosed with 100 μg (14)C-labelled compound. For clarithromycin, sumatriptan, and propafenone this labelled dose was administered alone, i.e. as a microdose, orally and intravenously (iv) and as an iv tracer dose concomitantly with an oral non-labelled therapeutic dose, in a 3-way cross over design. The oral therapeutic doses were 250, 50, and 150 mg, respectively. Paracetamol was given as the labelled microdose orally and iv using a 2-way cross over design, whereas phenobarbital was given only as the microdose orally. Plasma concentrations of total (14)C and parent drug were measured using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) or HPLC followed by AMS. Plasma concentrations following non-(14)C-labelled oral therapeutic doses were measured using either HPLC-electrochemical detection (clarithromycin) or HPLC-UV (sumatriptan, propafenone). For all five drugs an oral microdose predicted reasonably well the PK, including the shape of the plasma profile, following an oral therapeutic dose. For clarithromycin, sumatriptan, and propafenone, one parameter, oral bioavailability, was marginally outside of the normally acceptable 2-fold prediction interval around the mean therapeutic dose value. For clarithromycin, sumatriptan and propafenone, data obtained from an oral and iv microdose were compared within the same cohort of subjects used in the study, as well as those reported in the literature. For paracetamol (oral and iv) and phenobarbital (oral), microdose data were compared with those reported in the literature only. Where 100 μg iv (14)C-doses were

  19. Intranasal Pharmacokinetic Data for Triptans Such as Sumatriptan and Zolmitriptan Can Render Area Under the Curve (AUC) Predictions for the Oral Route: Strategy Development and Application.

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R; Syed, Muzeeb

    2016-01-01

    Limited pharmacokinetic sampling strategy may be useful for predicting the area under the curve (AUC) for triptans and may have clinical utility as a prospective tool for prediction. Using appropriate intranasal pharmacokinetic data, a Cmax vs. AUC relationship was established by linear regression models for sumatriptan and zolmitriptan. The predictions of the AUC values were performed using published mean/median Cmax data and appropriate regression lines. The quotient of observed and predicted values rendered fold-difference calculation. The mean absolute error (MAE), mean positive error (MPE), mean negative error (MNE), root mean square error (RMSE), correlation coefficient (r), and the goodness of the AUC fold prediction were used to evaluate the two triptans. Also, data from the mean concentration profiles at time points of 1 hour (sumatriptan) and 3 hours (zolmitriptan) were used for the AUC prediction. The Cmax vs. AUC models displayed excellent correlation for both sumatriptan (r = .9997; P AUCs (83%-85%) were within 0.76-1.25-fold difference using the regression model. The prediction of AUC values for sumatriptan or zolmitriptan using the concentration data that reflected the Tmax occurrence were in the proximity of the reported values. In summary, the Cmax vs. AUC models exhibited strong correlations for sumatriptan and zolmitriptan. The usefulness of the prediction of the AUC values was established by a rigorous statistical approach.

  20. Formation of NDMA from ranitidine and sumatriptan: the role of pH.

    Shen, Ruqiao; Andrews, Susan A

    2013-02-01

    N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is an emerging disinfection by-product (DBP) which can be formed via the chloramination of amine-based precursors. The formation of NDMA is mainly determined by the speciation of chloramines and the precursor amine groups, both of which are highly dependent on pH. The impact of pH on NDMA formation has been studied for the model precursor dimethylamine (DMA) and natural organic matter (NOM), but little is known for amine-based pharmaceuticals which have been newly identified as a group of potential NDMA precursors, especially in waters impacted by treated wastewater effluents. This study investigates the role of pH in the formation of NDMA from two amine-based pharmaceuticals, ranitidine and sumatriptan, under drinking water relevant conditions. The results indicate that pH affects both the ultimate NDMA formation as well as the reaction kinetics. The maximum NDMA formation typically occurs in the pH range of 7-8. At lower pH, the reaction is limited due to the lack of non-protonated amines. At higher pH, although the initial reaction is enhanced by the increasing amount of non-protonated amines, the ultimate NDMA formation is limited because of the lack of dichloramine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Phase 1, randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effects of erenumab (AMG 334) and concomitant sumatriptan on blood pressure in healthy volunteers.

    de Hoon, Jan; Van Hecken, Anne; Vandermeulen, Corinne; Herbots, Marissa; Kubo, Yumi; Lee, Ed; Eisele, Osa; Vargas, Gabriel; Gabriel, Kristin

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the effects of concomitant administration of erenumab and sumatriptan on resting blood pressure, pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability in healthy subjects. Methods In this phase 1, parallel-group, one-way crossover, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, healthy adult subjects were randomized (1:2) to receive either intravenous placebo and subcutaneous sumatriptan 12 mg (i.e. two 6-mg injections separated by 1 hour) or intravenous erenumab 140 mg and subcutaneous sumatriptan 12 mg. Blood pressure was measured pre-dose and at prespecified times post-dose. The primary endpoint was individual time-weighted averages of mean arterial pressure, measured from 0 hours to 2.5 hours after the first dose of sumatriptan. Pharmacokinetic parameters for sumatriptan were evaluated by calculating geometric mean ratios (erenumab and sumatriptan/placebo and sumatriptan). Adverse events and anti-erenumab antibodies were also evaluated. Results A total of 34 subjects were randomized and included in the analysis. Least squares mean (standard error) time-weighted averages of mean arterial pressure were 87.4 (1.0) mmHg for the placebo and sumatriptan group and 87.4 (1.2) mmHg for the erenumab and sumatriptan group. Mean difference in mean arterial pressure between groups was -0.04 mmHg (90% confidence interval: -2.2, 2.1). Geometric mean ratio estimates for maximum plasma concentration of sumatriptan was 0.95 (90% confidence interval: 0.82, 1.09), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from time 0 to 6 hours was 0.98 (90% confidence interval: 0.93, 1.03), and AUC from time 0 to infinity was 1.00 (90% confidence interval: 0.96, 1.05). No clinically relevant safety findings for co-administration of sumatriptan and erenumab were identified. Conclusion Co-administration of erenumab and sumatriptan had no additional effect on resting blood pressure or on pharmacokinetics of sumatriptan. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT

  2. Clinical aspects of perimenstrual headaches.

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2009-02-01

    Menstrual migraine (MM) is either pure, if attacks are limited solely during the perimenstrual window (PMW), or menstrually related (MRM), if two of three PMWs are associated with attacks with additional migraine events outside the PMW. Acute migraine specific therapy is equally effective in MM and non-MM. Although the International Classification of Headache Disorders-II classifies MM without aura, data suggest this needs revision. The studies on extended-cycle oral contraceptives suggest benefits for headache-prone individuals. Triptan mini-prophylaxis outcomes are positive, but a conclusion of "minimal net benefit compared to placebo" is not entirely unwarranted. In a 2008 evidence-based review, grade B recommendations exist for sumatriptan (50 and 100 mg), mefenamic acid (500 mg), and riza-triptan (10 mg) for the acute treatment of MRM. For the preventive mini-prophylactic treatment of MRM, grade B recommendations are provided for transcutaneous estrogen (1.5 mg), frovatriptan (2.5 mg twice daily), and naratriptan (1 mg twice daily).

  3. Intranasal Pharmacokinetic Data for Triptans Such as Sumatriptan and Zolmitriptan Can Render Area Under the Curve (AUC) Predictions for the Oral Route: Strategy Development and Application

    Srinivas, Nuggehally R.; Syed, Muzeeb

    2016-01-01

    Limited pharmacokinetic sampling strategy may be useful for predicting the area under the curve (AUC) for triptans and may have clinical utility as a prospective tool for prediction. Using appropriate intranasal pharmacokinetic data, a Cmax vs. AUC relationship was established by linear regression...... models for sumatriptan and zolmitriptan. The predictions of the AUC values were performed using published mean/median Cmax data and appropriate regression lines. The quotient of observed and predicted values rendered fold-difference calculation. The mean absolute error (MAE), mean positive error (MPE......), mean negative error (MNE), root mean square error (RMSE), correlation coefficient (r), and the goodness of the AUC fold prediction were used to evaluate the two triptans. Also, data from the mean concentration profiles at time points of 1 hour (sumatriptan) and 3 hours (zolmitriptan) were used...

  4. Permeation of sumatriptan succinate across human skin using multiple types of self-dissolving microneedle arrays fabricated from sodium hyaluronate.

    Wu, Dan; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Quan, Ying-Shu; Kamiyama, Fumio; Kusamori, Kosuke; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2016-09-01

    Available formulations of sumatriptan succinate (SS) have low bioavailability or are associated with site reactions. We developed various types of self-dissolving microneedle arrays (MNs) fabricated from sodium hyaluronate as a new delivery system for SS and evaluated their skin permeation and irritation in terms of clinical application. In vitro permeation studies with human skin, physicochemical properties (needle length, thickness and density), and penetration enhancers (glycerin, sodium dodecyl sulfate and lauric acid diethanolamide) were investigated. SS-loaded high-density MNs of 800 µm in length were the optimal formulation and met clinical therapeutic requirements. Penetration enhancers did not significantly affect permeation of SS from MNs. Optical coherence tomography images demonstrated that SS-loaded high-density MNs (800 µm) uniformly created drug permeation pathways for the delivery of SS into the skin. SS-loaded high-density MNs induced moderate primary skin irritations in rats, but the skin recovered within 72 h of removal of the MNs. These findings suggest that high-density MNs of 800 µm in length are an effective and promising formulation for transdermal delivery of SS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of SS permeation across human skin using self-dissolving MNs.

  5. Comparative Study Between Different Ready-Made Orally Disintegrating Platforms for the Formulation of Sumatriptan Succinate Sublingual Tablets.

    Tayel, Saadya A; El Nabarawi, Mohamed A; Amin, Maha M; AbouGhaly, Mohamed H H

    2017-02-01

    Sumatriptan succinate (SS) is a selective serotonin receptor agonist used for the treatment of migraine attacks, suffering from extensive first-pass metabolism and low oral bioavailability (∼14%). The aim of this work is to compare the performance of different ready-made co-processed platforms (Pharmaburst®, Prosolv ODT®, Starlac®, Pearlitol Flash®, or Ludiflash®) in the formulation of SS sublingual orodispersible tablets (ODTs) using direct compression technique. The prepared SS ODT formulae were evaluated regarding hardness, friability, simulated wetting time, and in vitro disintegration and dissolution tests. Different mucoadhesive polymers-HPMC K4M, Carbopol®, chitosan, or Polyox®-were tested aiming to increase the residence time in the sublingual area. A pharmacokinetic study on healthy human volunteers was performed, using LC/MS/MS assay, to compare the optimum sublingual formula (Ph25/HPMC) with the conventional oral tablet Imitrex®. Results showed that tablets prepared using Pharmaburst® had significantly (p disintegration times of 17.17 and 23.50 s, respectively, with Q 5 min of 83.62%. HPMC showed a significant (p tablet Imitrex®. In conclusion, Pharmaburst® was chosen as the optimum ready-made co-processed platform that can be successfully used in the preparation of SS sublingual tablets for the rapid relief of migraine attacks.

  6. Optimal balance of efficacy and tolerability of oral triptans and telcagepant

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2011-01-01

    Dose-response curves for headaches relief and adverse events (AEs) are presented for five triptans: sumatriptan, zolmitriptan, naratriptan, almotriptan, and frovatriptan, and the CGRP antagonist telcagepant. The upper part of the efficacy curve of the triptans is generally flat, the so-called cei......Dose-response curves for headaches relief and adverse events (AEs) are presented for five triptans: sumatriptan, zolmitriptan, naratriptan, almotriptan, and frovatriptan, and the CGRP antagonist telcagepant. The upper part of the efficacy curve of the triptans is generally flat, the so...

  7. Sumatriptan Nasal Spray

    ... signals from being sent to the brain, and blocking the release of certain natural substances that cause ... toes shortness of breath swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, or throat difficulty breathing or swallowing ...

  8. A multicenter, open-label, long-term safety and tolerability study of DFN-02, an intranasal spray of sumatriptan 10 mg plus permeation enhancer DDM, for the acute treatment of episodic migraine.

    Munjal, Sagar; Brand-Schieber, Elimor; Allenby, Kent; Spierings, Egilius L H; Cady, Roger K; Rapoport, Alan M

    2017-12-01

    DFN-02 is a novel intranasal spray formulation composed of sumatriptan 10 mg and a permeation-enhancing excipient comprised of 0.2% 1-O-n-Dodecyl-β-D-Maltopyranoside (DDM). This composition of DFN-02 allows sumatriptan to be rapidly absorbed into the systemic circulation and exhibit pharmacokinetics comparable to subcutaneously administered sumatriptan. Rapid rate of absorption is suggested to be important for optimal efficacy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and tolerability of DFN-02 (10 mg) in the acute treatment of episodic migraine with and without aura over a 6-month period based on the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events and the evaluation of results of clinical laboratory tests, vital signs, physical examination, and electrocardiograms. This was a multi-center, open-label, repeat-dose safety study in adults with episodic migraine with and without aura. Subjects diagnosed with migraine with or without aura according to the criteria set forth in the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition, who experienced 2 to 6 attacks per month with fewer than 15 headache days per month and at least 48 headache-free hours between attacks, used DFN-02 to treat their migraine attacks acutely over the course of 6 months. A total of 173 subjects was enrolled, 167 (96.5%) subjects used at least 1 dose of study medication and were evaluable for safety, and 134 (77.5%) subjects completed the 6-month study. A total of 2211 migraine attacks was reported, and 3292 doses of DFN-02 were administered; mean per subject monthly use of DFN-02 was 3.6 doses. Adverse events were those expected for triptans, as well as for nasally administered compounds. No new safety signals emerged. Dysgeusia and application site pain were the most commonly reported treatment-emergent adverse events over 6 months (21% and 30.5%, respectively). Most of the treatment-emergent adverse events were mild. There were 5 serious adverse events, all

  9. Endothelium-dependent relaxant responses to selective 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonists in the isolated middle cerebral artery of the rat

    Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob; Løvland Hoel, Natalie; Nilsson, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    perfused. Luminally added 5- hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), sumatriptan and rizatriptan induced maximal dilatations of 22 +/- 4, 10 +/- 2 and 13 +/- 5%, respectively, compared to the resting diameter. The relaxant effect of sumatriptan was blocked by the 5- HT(1B/1D) receptor selective antagonist GR 55562 (10......The vasomotor effects of triptans in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) of rats were studied using the pressurised arteriography method and in vitro vessel baths. Using the arteriograph, MCAs from Sprague-Dawley rats were mounted on two glass micropipettes, pressurised to 85 mm Hg and luminally...... response to 5-HT and triptans. Using the vessel bath technique, MCA segments were mounted on two metal wires. The relaxant responses to sumatriptan could not be reproduced using this model; instead, weak contractile responses (6 +/- 3% of submaximal contractile capacity) were observed. The difference...

  10. Reduced efficacy of sumatriptan in migraine with aura vs without aura

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Goadsby, Peter J; Charles, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    treated attacks with aura (24%) (p freedom 2 hours postdose for attacks without aura was 1.33 (95% confidence interval: 1.16-1.54). The number needed to treat for 2 hours of pain freedom was 4.4 for attacks without aura and 6.2 for attacks with aura. For the clinical...... trial of DHE, the 2-hour pain-free rates did not differ between patients treating attacks without aura (29.4%) compared with those who treated attacks with aura (27.2%; p = 0.65). The relative risk for pain freedom 2 hours postdose for attacks without aura vs with aura was 1.08 (95% confidence interval...

  11. Comparative tolerability of treatments for acute migraine: A network meta-analysis.

    Thorlund, Kristian; Toor, Kabirraaj; Wu, Ping; Chan, Keith; Druyts, Eric; Ramos, Elodie; Bhambri, Rahul; Donnet, Anne; Stark, Richard; Goadsby, Peter J

    2017-09-01

    Introduction Migraine headache is a neurological disorder whose attacks are associated with nausea, vomiting, photophobia and phonophobia. Treatments for migraine aim to either prevent attacks before they have started or relieve attacks (abort) after onset of symptoms and range from complementary therapies to pharmacological interventions. A number of treatment-related adverse events such as somnolence, fatigue, and chest discomfort have previously been reported in association with triptans. The comparative tolerability of available agents for the abortive treatment of migraine attacks has not yet been systematically reviewed and quantified. Methods We performed a systematic literature review and Bayesian network meta-analysis for comparative tolerability of treatments for migraine. The literature search targeted all randomized controlled trials evaluating oral abortive treatments for acute migraine over a range of available doses in adults. The primary outcomes of interest were any adverse event, treatment-related adverse events, and serious adverse events. Secondary outcomes were fatigue, dizziness, chest discomfort, somnolence, nausea, and vomiting. Results Our search yielded 141 trials covering 15 distinct treatments. Of the triptans, sumatriptan, eletriptan, rizatriptan, zolmitriptan, and the combination treatment of sumatriptan and naproxen were associated with a statistically significant increase in odds of any adverse event or a treatment-related adverse event occurring compared with placebo. Of the non-triptans, only acetaminophen was associated with a statistically significant increase in odds of an adverse event occurring when compared with placebo. Overall, triptans were not associated with increased odds of serious adverse events occurring and the same was the case for non-triptans. For the secondary outcomes, with the exception of vomiting, all triptans except for almotriptan and frovatriptan were significantly associated with increased risk for all

  12. Assessment of bitter taste of pharmaceuticals with multisensor system employing 3 way PLS regression

    Rudnitskaya, Alisa; Kirsanov, Dmitry; Blinova, Yulia; Legin, Evgeny; Seleznev, Boris; Clapham, David; Ives, Robert S.; Saunders, Kenneth A.; Legin, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Chemically diverse APIs are studied with potentiometric “electronic tongue”. ► Bitter taste of APIs can be predicted with 3wayPLS regression from ET data. ► High correlation of ET assessment with human panel and rat in vivo model. -- Abstract: The application of the potentiometric multisensor system (electronic tongue, ET) for quantification of the bitter taste of structurally diverse active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) is reported. The measurements were performed using a set of bitter substances that had been assessed by a professional human sensory panel and the in vivo rat brief access taste aversion (BATA) model to produce bitterness intensity scores for each substance at different concentrations. The set consisted of eight substances, both inorganic and organic – azelastine, caffeine, chlorhexidine, potassium nitrate, naratriptan, paracetamol, quinine, and sumatriptan. With the aim of enhancing the response of the sensors to the studied APIs, measurements were carried out at different pH levels ranging from 2 to 10, thus promoting ionization of the compounds. This experiment yielded a 3 way data array (samples × sensors × pH levels) from which 3wayPLS regression models were constructed with both human panel and rat model reference data. These models revealed that artificial assessment of bitter taste with ET in the chosen set of API's is possible with average relative errors of 16% in terms of human panel bitterness score and 25% in terms of inhibition values from in vivo rat model data. Furthermore, these 3wayPLS models were applied for prediction of the bitterness in blind test samples of a further set of API's. The results of the prediction were compared with the inhibition values obtained from the in vivo rat model

  13. Assessment of bitter taste of pharmaceuticals with multisensor system employing 3 way PLS regression

    Rudnitskaya, Alisa [CESAM and Chemistry Department, University of Aveiro, Aveiro (Portugal); Kirsanov, Dmitry, E-mail: d.kirsanov@gmail.com [Chemistry Department, St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Blinova, Yulia [Chemistry Department, St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Legin, Evgeny [Sensor Systems LLC, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Seleznev, Boris [Chemistry Department, St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Clapham, David; Ives, Robert S.; Saunders, Kenneth A. [GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, Gunnels Wood Road, Stevenage (United Kingdom); Legin, Andrey [Chemistry Department, St. Petersburg University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-03

    Highlights: ► Chemically diverse APIs are studied with potentiometric “electronic tongue”. ► Bitter taste of APIs can be predicted with 3wayPLS regression from ET data. ► High correlation of ET assessment with human panel and rat in vivo model. -- Abstract: The application of the potentiometric multisensor system (electronic tongue, ET) for quantification of the bitter taste of structurally diverse active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) is reported. The measurements were performed using a set of bitter substances that had been assessed by a professional human sensory panel and the in vivo rat brief access taste aversion (BATA) model to produce bitterness intensity scores for each substance at different concentrations. The set consisted of eight substances, both inorganic and organic – azelastine, caffeine, chlorhexidine, potassium nitrate, naratriptan, paracetamol, quinine, and sumatriptan. With the aim of enhancing the response of the sensors to the studied APIs, measurements were carried out at different pH levels ranging from 2 to 10, thus promoting ionization of the compounds. This experiment yielded a 3 way data array (samples × sensors × pH levels) from which 3wayPLS regression models were constructed with both human panel and rat model reference data. These models revealed that artificial assessment of bitter taste with ET in the chosen set of API's is possible with average relative errors of 16% in terms of human panel bitterness score and 25% in terms of inhibition values from in vivo rat model data. Furthermore, these 3wayPLS models were applied for prediction of the bitterness in blind test samples of a further set of API's. The results of the prediction were compared with the inhibition values obtained from the in vivo rat model.

  14. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in the circulation after sumatriptan

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Petersen, Jesper Troensegaard

    2013-01-01

    The origin of migraine pain is still elusive, but increasingly researchers focus on the neuropeptides in the perivascular space of cranial vessels as important mediators of nociceptive input during migraine attacks. The parasympathetic neurotransmitters, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating...... peptide-38 (PACAP38) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) may be released from parasympathetic fibres and activate sensory nerve fibres during migraine attacks. Triptans are effective and well tolerated in acute migraine management but the exact mechanism of action is still debated. Triptans might...

  15. A Prospective, Randomized Trial of Intravenous Prochlorperazine Versus Subcutaneous Sumatriptan in Acute Migraine Therapy in the Emergency Department(Preprint)

    2009-01-01

    Acute Migraine Therapy in the Emergency Department Mark A. Kostic, MD Francisco J. Gutierrez, MD Thomas S. Rieg, PhD Tammy S. Moore, MD Richard T...1995;25:154-155. 17. Goldstein J, Camargo CA Jr, Pelletier J, et al. Headache in United States emergency departments: demography, work up and

  16. 78 FR 20925 - Draft and Revised Draft Guidances for Industry Describing Product-Specific Bioequivalence...

    2013-04-08

    ... hydrochloride Desvenlafaxine Dutasteride; tamsulosin hydrochloride E Estramustine phosphate sodium Ethinyl... tromethamine L Loratadine M Miconazole Minocycline hydrochloride Mitotane N Nevirapine P Phentermine hydrochloride; topiramate R Rimexolone Rizatriptan benzoate [[Page 20926

  17. Ventana a la farmacología

    Facultad de Medicina Revista

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuevos antibióticos / efectos carcinogen os del minoxidil /  efectos cardiopáticos del sumatriptan / instituto Nacional de Vigilancia de medicamentos y alimentos, Invima / efectos convulsivos de las quinolonas

  18. Towards a pragmatic human migraine model for drug testing

    Hansen, Emma Katrine; Olesen, Jes

    2017-01-01

    Background A model for the testing of novel anti-migraine drugs should preferably use healthy volunteers for ease of recruiting. Isosorbide-5-mononitrate (5-ISMN) provokes headache in healthy volunteers with some migraine features such as pulsating pain quality and aggravation by physical activity.......003). Difference in area under the headache score curve (AUC) 0-4 hours between sumatriptan and placebo was not significant ( p = 0.30). Conclusion 5-ISMN is a very powerful inducer of migraine-like headache in healthy individuals but the headache does not respond to sumatriptan. The model is not useful for future...

  19. One hundred years of migraine research

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Koehler, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    ); oligemia in the wake of CSD in rats (1982); neurogenic inflammation theory of migraine (1987); a new headache classification (1988); the discovery of sumatriptan (1988); migraine and calcitonin gene-related peptide (1990); the brainstem "migraine generator" and PET studies (1995); migraine...

  20. Drugs targeting 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors in acute treatments of migraine attacks. A review of new drugs and new administration forms of established drugs

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Pihl, Thomas Peter Boye; Hougaard, Anders

    2014-01-01

    of migraines. Areas covered: This evaluation reviews the recent advances in acute migraine therapy targeting the 5-HT receptor. Specifically, the authors review the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical efficacy and safety of 5-HT1F receptor agonists and new formulations of sumatriptan...

  1. Role of Ser102 and Ser104 as Regulators of cGMP Hydrolysis by PDE5A

    Carøe Nordgaard, Julie; Kruse, Lars Schack; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2014-01-01

    -N-AS neuroblastoma cells as C-terminal fusions with green fluorescent protein. Transfected cells were treated with sildenafil, cilostazol, glyceryl trinitrate, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or sumatriptan. PDE5A-GFP fusion proteins were localized in fixed cells by immunofluorescence and PDE activity...

  2. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variability as possible causes for different drug responses in migraine. A comment

    Tfelt-Hansen, P; Edvinsson, L

    2007-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of antimigraine drugs zolmitriptan and sumatriptan varied considerably with a fourfold to 10-fold variation in plasma levels. In addition, the pharmacodynamics of triptans as investigated in vitro also varied considerably. In theory, there should probably be a 10-fold variation...

  3. Prevention of stress- or nitric oxide donor-induced medication overuse headache by a calcitonin gene-related peptide antibody in rodents.

    Kopruszinski, Caroline Machado; Xie, Jennifer Yanhua; Eyde, Nathan Mackenzie; Remeniuk, Bethany; Walter, Sarah; Stratton, Jennifer; Bigal, Marcelo; Chichorro, Juliana Geremias; Dodick, David; Porreca, Frank

    2017-05-01

    Objective The objective of this study was the determination of the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the induction of medication overuse headache (MOH)-related migraine in an injury-free preclinical model. Methods Rats were primed by a 7-day period of exposure to acute migraine therapies including sumatriptan and morphine. After an additional 14-day drug-free period, rats were exposed to putative migraine triggers including bright light stress (BLS) or nitric oxide (NO) donor in the presence or absence of TEV48125, a fully humanized CGRP antibody. Cutaneous allodynia (CA) was used as an outcome measure and CGRP blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels were measured. Results BLS and NO donor challenge evoked delayed, long-lasting CA selectively in rats that were previously treated with sumatriptan or morphine. BLS produced a significant increase in CGRP in the plasma, but not CSF, in animals that were previously exposed to sumatriptan compared to saline controls. TEV48125 did not modify baseline tactile thresholds or produce behavioral side effects, but significantly inhibited both BLS- and NO donor-induced CA in animals that were previously primed with sumatriptan or morphine; an isotype control protein that does not bind CGRP had no effect. Interpretation These data suggest that acute migraine medications may promote MOH in susceptible individuals through CGRP-dependent mechanisms and that anti-CGRP antibodies may be a useful clinical strategy for the treatment of MOH.

  4. Nitric oxide synthase, calcitonin gene-related peptide and NK-1 receptor mechanisms are involved in GTN-induced neuronal activation

    Ramachandran, Roshni; Bhatt, Deepak Kumar; Ploug, Kenneth Beri

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Infusion of glyceryltrinitrate (GTN), a nitric oxide (NO) donor, in awake, freely moving rats closely mimics a universally accepted human model of migraine and responds to sumatriptan treatment. Here we analyse the effect of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and calcitonin gene-rela...

  5. Pharmacological synergy: the next frontier on therapeutic advancement for migraine.

    Blumenfeld, Andrew; Gennings, Chris; Cady, Roger

    2012-04-01

    The burden of migraine significantly impacts the individual sufferer, their families, the workplace, and society. The World Health Organization has identified migraine as an urgent public health priority and has initiated a global initiative to reduce the burden of migraine. Underlying the World Health Organization initiative is the need to discover means of optimizing migraine treatments and make them accessible to the broader portion of the world population. Development of acute migraine medications over the past several decades has largely centered on engineering highly specific receptor molecules that alter migraine pathophysiological mechanisms to abort or reverse the acute attack of migraine. The first product of this line of discovery was sumatriptan and heralded as a landmark therapeutic breakthrough. Sumatriptan is a 5-HT-1B/D receptor agonist considered to activate receptors involved in the pathophysiology specific to migraine. Large-scale regulatory/clinical studies demonstrated statistical superiority for sumatriptan over placebo in reduction or elimination of headache, nausea, photophobia, and phonophobia. Since the introduction of sumatriptan, 6 other triptan products have been released in the United States as acute treatments for migraine, all having the same mechanism of action and similar efficacy. Despite their utility as migraine abortive medications, the triptans do not successfully treat all attacks of migraine or necessarily treat all migraine associated symptoms. In fact, in less than 25% of attacks do subjects obtain and maintain a migraine-free response to treatment for at least beyond 24 hours. A wide range of non-triptan medications also have demonstrated efficacy in acute migraine. These include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids, phenothiazines, and valproic acid to name a few. Given the distinctly different mechanisms of actions of these various medications, it is likely that several unique pathophysiological

  6. Reinforced spatial alternation as an animal model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD): investigation of 5-HT2C and 5-HT1D receptor involvement in OCD pathophysiology.

    Tsaltas, Eleftheria; Kontis, Dimitris; Chrysikakou, Sofia; Giannou, Haralambos; Biba, Angeliki; Pallidi, Stella; Christodoulou, Angeliki; Maillis, Antonis; Rabavilas, Andreas

    2005-05-15

    This study introduces a laboratory model of compulsive behavior based on persistence in the context of rewarded spatial alternation. Rats were screened for spontaneous persistence during T-maze reinforced alternation. Experiment 1: One high and one low spontaneous persistence group (n = 8) received 20 injections of fluoxetine, a matched pair saline, both followed by 4 days of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) challenge. Experiment 2: Five matched groups of rats (n = 9) received pretreatment (20 injections) with fluoxetine, mCPP, desipramine, diazepam or saline, followed by 4 days of mCPP challenge (fluoxetine in mCPP group). After washout, animals received 2 days of naratriptan, followed by another 2-day mCPP challenge. In both experiments mCPP significantly increased persistence in saline controls. Fluoxetine also acutely increased persistence scores: after a gradual return to baseline, these scores showed tolerance to mCPP. Experiment 1: This pattern was significant in high but not low initial persistence groups. Experiment 2: Fluoxetine and mCPP showed cross-tolerance. Neither desipramine nor diazepam protected against mCPP challenge. Persistence scores returned to baseline during washout and naratriptan and were thereafter increased by another mCPP challenge in all but the fluoxetine and mCPP groups, suggesting 5-HT2C receptor mediation. This model is based on spontaneous persistence behavior showing pharmacological responses concordant with those of compulsive symptomatology.

  7. CILOSTAZOL INDUCES C-FOS EXPRESSION IN THE TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS CAUDALIS AND BEHAVIOURAL CHANGES SUGGESTIVE OF HEADACHE WITH MIGRAINE-LIKE MANIFESTATIONS IN RATS

    Christensen, S. L. T.; Petersen, S.; Sorensen, D. B.

    2016-01-01

    in rats. Also, we tested the response to sumatriptan in order to evaluate the predictive properties of the model. Methods: The effect of cilostazol (125 mg/kg p.o.) was evaluated on a range of spontaneous behavioural parameters, light sensitivity and mechanical sensitivity thresholds. To assess headache...... specificity we evaluated the c-fos expression in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. All experiments were done in female Sprague Dawley rats and the oestrous cycle was included in the analyses. Results: We found that cilostazol increased the light sensitivity and grooming behaviour of the rats and decreased......: The altered behaviours are suggestive of headache with migraine features, but not specific. The c-fos response in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis implies that the rats had pain originating from the head. The lack of response to sumatriptan disqualifies the model as predictive, but confirms the translation...

  8. Cilostazol induces C-fos expression in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis and behavioural changes suggestive of headache with the migraine-like feature photophobia in female rats

    Christensen, S L; Petersen, Steffen; Sørensen, Dorte B

    2018-01-01

    -like behaviours and c-fos expression in rats. In order to evaluate the predictive validity of the model, we examined the response to the migraine specific drug sumatriptan. Methods The effect of cilostazol (125 mg/kg p.o.) in female Sprague Dawley rats was evaluated on a range of spontaneous behavioural...... parameters, light sensitivity and mechanical sensitivity thresholds. We also measured c-fos expression in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Results Cilostazol increased light sensitivity and grooming behaviour. These manifestations were not inhibited by sumatriptan. Cilostazol also induced c-fos expression...... in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Furthermore, trigeminal - but not hind paw hyperalgesia was observed. Conclusion The altered behaviours are suggestive of cilostazol induced headache with migraine-like features, but not specific. The presence of head specific hyperalgesia and the c-fos response in the trigeminal...

  9. Calcitonin gene-related peptide modulates heat nociception in the human brain - An fMRI study in healthy volunteers

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Becerra, Lino; Larsson, Henrik B.W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intravenous infusion of calcitonin-gene-related-peptide (CGRP) provokes headache and migraine in humans. Mechanisms underlying CGRP-induced headache are not fully clarified and it is unknown to what extent CGRP modulates nociceptive processing in the brain. To elucidate this we recorded...... cortex. Sumatriptan injection reversed these changes. Conclusion: The changes in BOLD-signals in the brain after CGRP infusion suggests that systemic CGRP modulates nociceptive transmission in the trigeminal pain pathways in response to noxious heat stimuli....

  10. Depression of home cage wheel running: a reliable and clinically relevant method to assess migraine pain in rats.

    Kandasamy, Ram; Lee, Andrea T; Morgan, Michael M

    2017-12-01

    The development of new anti-migraine treatments is limited by the difficulty inassessing migraine pain in laboratory animals. Depression of activity is one of the few diagnostic criteria formigraine that can be mimicked in rats. The goal of the present study was to test the hypothesis thatdepression of home cage wheel running is a reliable and clinically relevant method to assess migraine painin rats. Adult female rats were implanted with a cannula to inject allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) onto the dura to induce migraine pain, as has been shown before. Rats recovered from implantation surgery for 8 days in cages containing a running wheel. Home cage wheel running was recorded 23 h a day. AITC and the migraine medication sumatriptan were administered in the hour prior to onset of the dark phase. Administration of AITC caused a concentration-dependent decrease in wheel running that lasted 3 h. The duration and magnitude of AITC-induced depression of wheel running was consistent following three repeated injections spaced 48 h apart. Administration of sumatriptan attenuated AITC-induced depressionof wheel running when a large dose (1 mg/kg) was administered immediately following AITC administration. Wheel running patterns did not change when sumatriptan was given to naïve rats. These data indicate that home cage wheel running is a sensitive, reliable, and clinically relevant method to assess migraine pain in the rat.

  11. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults.

    Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2013-04-30

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 11, 2010 (Derry 2010). Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers choose not to, or are unable to, seek professional help and rely on over-the-counter analgesics. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce nausea and vomiting, which are commonly associated with migraine. To determine the efficacy and tolerability of paracetamol (acetaminophen), alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared with placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine in adults. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Oxford Pain Relief Database for studies through 4 October 2010 for the original review, and to 13 February 2013 for the update. Two clinical trials registers (ClinicalTrials.gov and gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com) were also searched on both occasions. We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- or active-controlled studies using self-administered paracetamol to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Numbers of participants achieving each outcome were used to calculate relative risk and numbers needed to treat (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared with placebo or other active treatment. Searches for the update identified one additional study for inclusion. Eleven studies (2942 participants, 5109 attacks) compared paracetamol 1000 mg, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, with placebo or other active comparators, mainly sumatriptan 100 mg. For all efficacy outcomes paracetamol was superior to placebo, with NNTs of 12 (19% response with paracetamol, 10% with placebo), 5.0 (56% response with paracetamol, 36% with placebo) and 5.2 (39% response with paracetamol, 20% with placebo) for 2-hour pain-free and 2- and 1

  12. Predictive validity of endpoints used in electrophysiological modelling of migraine in the trigeminovascular system.

    Farkas, Bence; Kardos, Péter; Orosz, Szabolcs; Tarnawa, István; Csekő, Csongor; Lévay, György; Farkas, Sándor; Lendvai, Balázs; Kovács, Péter

    2015-11-02

    The trigeminovascular system has a pivotal role in the pathomechanism of migraine. The aim of the present study was to further develop existing models of migraine making them more suitable for testing the effects of compounds with presumed antimigraine activity in anaesthetised rats. Simultaneous recording of ongoing activity of spontaneously active neurons in the trigeminocervical complex as well as their discharges evoked by electrical stimulation of the dura mater via activation of A- and C-sensory fibres were carried out. Effects of sumatriptan, propranolol and topiramate were evaluated prior to and after application of a mixture containing inflammatory mediators on the dura. Propranolol (10 mg/kg s.c) and topiramate (30 mg/kg s.c.) resulted in a tendency to decrease the level of both spontaneous and evoked activity, while sumatriptan (1 mg/kg s.c.) did not exhibit any effect on recorded parameters. Application of an inflammatory soup to the dura mater boosted up spontaneous activity, which could be significantly attenuated by propranolol and topiramate but not by sumatriptan. In addition, all compounds prevented the delayed increase of spontaneous firing. In contrast to the ongoing activity, evoked responses were not augmented by inflammatory mediators. Nevertheless, inhibitory effect of propranolol and topiramate was evident when considering A- or C-fibre responses. Findings do not support the view that electrically evoked responses are useful for the measurement of trigeminal sensitization. It is proposed however, that inhibition of enhanced firing (immediate and/or delayed) evoked by inflammatory mediators as an endpoint have higher predictive validity regarding the clinical effectiveness of compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Targeting to 5-HT1F Receptor Subtype for Migraine Treatment

    Mitsikostas, Dimos D; Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    attacks with efficacy in the same range as oral sumatriptan 100mg, the gold standard for triptans. The LY334370 project withdrew because of toxicity in animals, while lasmiditan is still testing. In this review we present all the available preclinical and clinical data on the 5-HT1F agonists...... inhibited markers associated with electrical stimulation of the TG. Thus 5-HT1F receptor represents an ideal target for anti-migraine drugs. So far two selective 5-HT1F agonists have been tested in human trials for migraine: LY334370 and lasmiditan. Both molecules were efficient in attenuating migraine...

  14. Treatment of post-electroconvulsive therapy headache with topical methyl salicylate.

    Logan, Christopher J; Stewart, Jonathan T

    2012-06-01

    Headache after administration of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is common, affecting approximately half of patients treated. Post-ECT headache is typically treated with acetaminophen or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs but occasionally requires agents such as sumatriptan, opioids, or β-blockers. We report on a patient whose severe post-ECT headaches responded completely to methyl salicylate ointment, applied to the area of his temporalis and masseter muscles. Topical methyl salicylate is generally well tolerated and may be a viable option for some patients with post-ECT headache.

  15. The usual treatment of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias.

    Pareja, Juan A; Álvarez, Mónica

    2013-10-01

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection, tearing, and rhinorrhea (SUNCT). Conventional pharmacological therapy can be successful in the majority of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias patients. Most cluster headache attacks respond to 100% oxygen inhalation, or 6 mg subcutaneous sumatriptan. Nasal spray of sumatriptan (20 mg) or zolmitriptan (5 mg) are recommended as second choice. The bouts can be brought under control by a short course of corticosteroids (oral prednisone: 60-100 mg/day, or intravenous methylprednisolone: 250-500 mg/day, for 5 days, followed by tapering off the dosage), or by long-term prophylaxis with verapamil (at least 240 mg/day). Alternative long-term preventive medications include lithium carbonate (800-1600 mg/day), methylergonovine (0.4-1.2 mg/day), and topiramate (100-200 mg/day). As a rule, paroxysmal hemicrania responds to preventive treatment with indomethacin (75-150 mg/day). A short course of intravenous lidocaine (1-4 mg/kg/hour) can reduce the flow of attacks during exacerbations of SUNCT. Lamotrigine (100-300 mg/day) is the preventive drug of choice for SUNCT. Gabapentin (800-2700 mg/day), topiramate (50-300 mg/day), and carbamazepine (200-1600 mg/day) may be of help. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  16. The pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of AVP-825: a potential advancement for acute treatment of migraine.

    Cady, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Oral triptans have dominated the prescription market for acute treatment of migraine for nearly 25 years. Today, patients often express dissatisfaction with prescribed acute treatment in part because they do not have confidence that the therapy will provide consistent efficacy over time. Major limitations to sustained successful use of oral triptans are their relatively slow onset of meaningful clinical benefit and variable absorption/efficacy due to impaired gastrointestinal function during migraine. AVP-825, a new intranasal delivery system for sumatriptan , may be an effective alternative to oral triptans. This article reviews AVP-825, which deposits low-dose sumatriptan powder deep into the vascular mucosa of the posterior nose, allowing rapid absorption of drug into the systemic circulation. Studies suggest that AVP-825 is a highly effective, well-tolerated acute treatment for episodic migraine. Oral triptans are limited in providing effective patient-centered outcomes to migraine patients. Failed or suboptimal abortive treatment of migraine is a major driver of migraine chronification and increases in healthcare costs. AVP-825 is an easy to use, novel, breath-powered intranasal delivery system that provides early onset of efficacy with low systemic drug exposure and few triptan-associated adverse events. AVP-825 will be a welcomed therapeutic tool for the acute treatment of migraine.

  17. A role for the hippocampal serotonergic system in the pathology of schizophrenia?

    Scarr, E.; Pavey, G.M.; Copolov, D.L.; Dean, B.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Theories of a role for serotonin in the pathology of schizophrenia predate the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia. More recently, interest in the involvement of serotonin in the disorder is primarily due to the fact that the 'atypical' neuroleptic drugs target the serotonergic system, amongst others. We have previously reported decreases in the 5-HT 2A receptors in hippocampi obtained postmortem from subjects with schizophrenia. In the same cohort of subjects we now report decreases (p 3 H]citalopram binding in the CA1 region (17.5 ± 1.4 vs. 21.7 ± 1.3 fmole/mg ETE) and methiothepin-insensitive [3H]sumatriptan binding in the CA1 (2.85 ± 0.25 vs. 3.90 ± 0.33 fmole/mg ETE), the stratum radiatum/lacunosum moleculare (4.11 ± 0.32 vs. 5.35 ± 0.46 fmole/mg ETE) and subiculum (3.87 ± 0.26 vs. 5.08 ± 0.39 fmole/mg ETE) from subjects with schizophrenia. No changes were found in [ 3 H]8-OHDPAT or methiothepin-sensitive [ 3 H]sumatriptan binding. These data indicate that there are regionally specific decreases in the densities of hippocampal serotonin transporter and 5-HT 1F receptors which may be involved in the pathology of schizophrenia. Copyright (2002) Australian Neuroscience Society

  18. Triptans and migraine: advances in use, administration, formulation, and development.

    Macone, Amanda E; Perloff, Michael D

    2017-03-01

    Recent triptan development has focused on new administration methods and formulations, triptan combination therapies, treatment in menstrually related migraines, and novel serotonin receptor subtype agonists (5HTf). Areas covered: Clinical triptan research related to migraine was reviewed, analyzing EMBASE and PUBMED data bases from 01/01/2011 to 06/29/2016, with a focus on clinical trials of class 1 or 2 level of evidence. There have been advances in drug combination therapies, as well as administration devices that aid in ease of use, increase efficacy, and decrease adverse reactions. Some new agents and devices have similar or less efficacy compared to previous generic triptan formulations. New agents have action at the 5HTf receptor subtype, and avoid vascular side effects of classic 5Ht1b/d agonists, however adverse reactions may limit their clinic use. Long half-life triptans, frovatriptan and naratriptan, do appear to have good benefit in menstral related migraine. Expert opinion: Recent advances in triptan development can offer some advantages to migraine therapy and patient preferences, but have a much higher cost compared to individual generic triptan agents. In the coming years, triptan advances with high efficacy, limiting ADRs and cost are welcomed, in this regard the 5HT1b/d triptans are already well established.

  19. Optimized method for the determination of itopride in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorimetric detection.

    Ptácek, Pavel; Klíma, Josef; Macek, Jan

    2009-03-15

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method with fluorescence detection for the determination of itopride in human plasma is reported. The sample preparation was based on liquid-liquid extraction of itopride from plasma with t-butylmethylether and dichloromethane (70:30, v/v) mixture followed by a back extraction of the analyte to the phosphate buffer (pH 3.2). Liquid chromatography was performed on an octadecylsilica column (55 mm x 4 mm, 3 microm particles), the mobile phase consisted of acetonitrile-triethylamine-15 mM dihydrogenpotassium phosphate (14.5:0.5:85, v/v/v), pH of the mobile phase was adjusted to 4.8. The run time was 3 min. The fluorimetric detector was operated at 250/342 nm (excitation/emission wavelength). Naratriptan was used as the internal standard. The limit of quantitation was 9.5 ng/ml using 0.5 ml of plasma. The method precision and inaccuracy were less than 8%. The assay was applied to the analysis of samples from a bioequivalence study.

  20. Development and gamma-scintigraphy study of Hibiscus rosasinensis polysaccharide-based microspheres for nasal drug delivery.

    Sharma, Nitin; Tyagi, Shanu; Gupta, Satish Kumar; Kulkarni, Giriraj Thirupathirao; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Kumar, Neeraj

    2016-11-01

    This work describes the application of natural plant polysaccharide as pharmaceutical mucoadhesive excipients in delivery systems to reduce the clearance rate through nasal cavity. Novel natural polysaccharide (Hibiscus rosasinensis)-based mucoadhesive microspheres were prepared by using emulsion crosslinking method for the delivery of rizatriptan benzoate (RB) through nasal route. Mucoadhesive microspheres were characterized for different parameters and nasal clearance of technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-radiolabeled microspheres was determined by using gamma-scintigraphy. Their Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies showed that the drug was stable during preparation of microspheres. Aerodynamic diameter of microspheres was in the range 13.23 ± 1.83-33.57 ± 3.69 µm. Change in drug and polysaccharide ratio influenced the mucoadhesion, encapsulation efficiency and in-vitro release property. Scintigraphs taken at regular interval indicate that control solution was cleared rapidly from nasal cavity, whereas microspheres showed slower clearance (p < 0.005) with half-life of 160 min. Natural polysaccharide-based microspheres achieved extended residence by minimizing effect of mucociliary clearance with opportunity of sustained delivery for longer duration.

  1. Use of a structured migraine diary improves patient and physician communication about migraine disability and treatment outcomes.

    Baos, V; Ester, F; Castellanos, A; Nocea, G; Caloto, M T; Gerth, W C

    2005-03-01

    Migraine is frequently undertreated, perhaps because impaired communication between patients and physicians underestimate the disability associated with migraine attacks. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the benefits of a structured migraine diary used during a prospective open-label study of triptan-naive patients in Spain for recording information on response to therapy for a pre-study migraine attack and three consecutive migraine attacks, the first and third treated with rizatriptan 10-mg wafer and the second with usual non-triptan therapy. Of 97 patients (83% women; mean age, 39 years) who completed the study, all reported moderate to severe pain, and two-thirds reported severe to total impairment during migraine attacks. At study end, 72% of patients reported that the migraine diary helped communication with their doctor about migraine, and 70% were more or much more satisfied than before the study with level of overall medical care provided by their doctor. Patients who reported the diary to be useful also reported higher overall satisfaction with medical care (p better communicate with their patients about migraine, and all reported that it enabled them to assess differences in pain intensity and disability across patients. We conclude that a structured migraine diary can be a valuable aid for improving communication between physicians and patients regarding migraine disability and treatment outcomes.

  2. Emerging migraine treatments and drug targets

    Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    Migraine has a 1-year prevalence of 10% and high socioeconomic costs. Despite recent drug developments, there is a huge unmet need for better pharmacotherapy. In this review we discuss promising anti-migraine strategies such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists and 5......-hydroxytrypamine (5-HT)(1F) receptor agonists, which are in late-stage development. Nitric oxide antagonists are also in development. New forms of administration of sumatriptan might improve efficacy and reduce side effects. Botulinum toxin A has recently been approved for the prophylaxis of chronic migraine....... Tonabersat, a cortical spreading depression inhibitor, has shown efficacy in the prophylaxis of migraine with aura. Several new drug targets such as nitric oxide synthase, the 5-HT(1D) receptor, the prostanoid receptors EP(2) and EP(4), and the pituitary adenylate cyclase receptor PAC1 await development...

  3. 5-HT receptor subtypes as key targets in mediating pigment dispersion within melanophores of teleost, Oreochromis mossambicus.

    Salim, Saima; Ali, Ayesha S; Ali, Sharique A

    2013-02-01

    The presence of distinct class of 5-HT receptors in the melanophores of tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) is reported. The cellular responses to 5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine), 5-HT(1), and 5-HT(2), agonists on isolated scale melanophores were observed with regard to pigment translocation within the cells. It was found that 5-HT exerted rapid and strong concentration dependent pigment granule dispersion within the melanophores. The threshold pharmacological dose of 5-HT that could elicit a measurable response was as low as 4.7×10(-12) M/L. Selective 5-HT(1) and 5-HT(2) agonists, sumatriptan and myristicin were investigated and resulted in dose-dependent pigment dispersion. The dispersing effects were effectively antagonized by receptor specific antagonists. It is suggested that 5-HT-induced physiological effects are mediated via distinct classes of receptors that possibly participate in modulation of pigmentary responses of the fish. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Recent advances in the management of migraine [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Mark Obermann

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Migraine remains one of the most disabling disorders worldwide. The high prevalence in the general population and the often-delicate treatment of patients account for that. Therapeutic management of migraine relies mainly on non-specific medical treatment and is affected by low patient adherence to the treatment regimens applied. The introduction of specific anti-migraine treatment occurred over 20 years ago when the first triptan was approved by regulatory authorities (sumatriptan, 28 December 1992. Triptan use is limited by side effects, time- and frequency-restricted application, and the risk of developing medication overuse headache. Within the past few years, new and promising drugs such as more specific 5-HT 1F receptor agonists (that is, lasmiditan and monoclonal calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP receptor antibodies entered advanced development phases while non-invasive neuromodulatory approaches were suggested to be potentially effective as non-pharmaceutical interventions for migraine.

  5. The qualitative problem of major quotation errors, as illustrated by 10 different examples in the headache literature

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2015-01-01

    There are two types of errors when references are used in the scientific literature: citation errors and quotation errors, and these errors have in reviews mainly been evaluated quantitatively. Quotation errors are the major problem, and 1 review reported 6% major quotation errors. The objective...... of this listing of quotation errors is to illustrate by qualitative analysis of different types of 10 major quotation errors how and possibly why authors misquote references. The author selected for review the first 10 different consecutive major quotation errors encountered from his reading of the headache...... literature. The characteristics of the 10 quotation errors ranged considerably. Thus, in a review of migraine therapy in a very prestigious medical journal, the superiority of a new treatment (sumatriptan) vs an old treatment (aspirin plus metoclopramide) was claimed despite no significant difference...

  6. 5-HT receptors as novel targets for optimizing pigmentary responses in dorsal skin melanophores of frog, Hoplobatrachus tigerinus

    Ali, Sharique A; Salim, Saima; Sahni, Tarandeep; Peter, Jaya; Ali, Ayesha S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Biochemical identification of 5-HT has revealed similar projection patterns across vertebrates. In CNS, 5-HT regulates major physiological functions but its peripheral functions are still emerging. The pharmacology of 5-HT is mediated by a diverse range of receptors that trigger different responses. Interestingly, 5-HT receptors have been detected in pigment cells indicating their role in skin pigmentation. Hence, we investigated the role of this monoaminergic system in amphibian pigment cells, melanophores, to further our understanding of its role in pigmentation biology together with its evolutionary significance. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Pharmacological profiling of 5-HT receptors was achieved using potent/selective agonists and antagonists. In vitro responses of melanophores were examined by Mean Melanophores Size Index assay. The melanophores of lower vertebrates are highly sensitive to external stimuli. The immediate cellular responses to drugs were defined in terms of pigment translocation within the cells. KEY RESULTS 5-HT exerted strong concentration-dependent pigment dispersion at threshold dose of 1 × 10−6 g·mL−1. Specific 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptor agonists, sumatriptan and myristicin. also induced dose-dependent dispersion. Yohimbine and metergoline synergistically antagonized sumatriptan-mediated dispersion, whereas trazodone partially blocked myristicin-induced dispersion. Conversely, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptor agonists, 1 (3 chlorophenyl) biguanide (1,3 CPB) and 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MT), caused a dose-dependent pigment aggregation. The aggregatory effect of 1,3 CPB was completely blocked by ondansetron, whereas L-lysine partially blocked the effect of 5-MT. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The results suggest that 5-HT-induced physiological effects are mediated via distinct classes of receptors, which possibly participate in the modulation of pigmentary responses in amphibian. PMID:21880033

  7. Spotlight on frovatriptan: a review of its efficacy in the treatment of migraine

    Allais, Gianni; Benedetto, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is a common neurovascular disorder, affecting millions of people worldwide. Current guidelines recommend triptans as first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe migraine attacks. Frovatriptan is a second-generation triptan with a longer terminal elimination half-life in blood than other triptans (~26 hours). Three double-blind, randomized crossover preference studies have been recently conducted, assessing efficacy and safety of frovatriptan versus rizatriptan, zolmitriptan, and almotriptan, respectively. Frovatriptan showed favorable tolerability and sustained effect, with a significantly lower rate of relapse over 48 hours versus the other triptans. These findings were confirmed in a series of analyses of patient subsets from the three studies, including patients with menstrually related and oral contraceptive-induced migraine, hypertension, obesity, weekend migraine, as well as patients with migraine with aura. In all patient subsets analyzed, lower headache recurrence rates were observed versus the comparator triptans, indicating a more sustained pain-relieving effect on migraine symptoms. A further randomized, double-blind study demonstrated that frovatriptan given in combination with the fast-acting cyclooxygenase inhibitor dexketoprofen provided improved migraine pain-free activity at 2 hours, and gave more sustained pain-free activity at 24 hours, versus frovatriptan alone. These benefits were observed both when the combination was administered early (1 hour after onset). Different pharmacokinetic, but synergistic, properties between frovatriptan and dexketoprofen may make the combination of these agents particularly effective in migraine treatment, with rapid onset of action and sustained effect over 48 hours. These benefits, together with potential cost-effectiveness advantages versus other triptans could drive selection of the most appropriate treatment for acute migraine attacks. PMID:27757013

  8. Spotlight on frovatriptan: a review of its efficacy in the treatment of migraine

    Allais G

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gianni Allais, Chiara Benedetto Department of Surgical Sciences, Women’s Headache Center, University of Turin, Turin, Italy Abstract: Migraine is a common neurovascular disorder, affecting millions of people worldwide. Current guidelines recommend triptans as first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe migraine attacks. Frovatriptan is a second-generation triptan with a longer terminal elimination half-life in blood than other triptans (~26 hours. Three double-blind, randomized crossover preference studies have been recently conducted, assessing efficacy and safety of frovatriptan versus rizatriptan, zolmitriptan, and almotriptan, respectively. Frovatriptan showed favorable tolerability and sustained effect, with a significantly lower rate of relapse over 48 hours versus the other triptans. These findings were confirmed in a series of analyses of patient subsets from the three studies, including patients with menstrually related and oral contraceptive-induced migraine, hypertension, obesity, weekend migraine, as well as patients with migraine with aura. In all patient subsets analyzed, lower headache recurrence rates were observed versus the comparator triptans, indicating a more sustained pain-relieving effect on migraine symptoms. A further randomized, double-blind study demonstrated that frovatriptan given in combination with the fast-acting cyclooxygenase inhibitor dexketoprofen provided improved migraine pain-free activity at 2 hours, and gave more sustained pain-free activity at 24 hours, versus frovatriptan alone. These benefits were observed both when the combination was administered early (<1 hour after symptom onset or late (>1 hour after onset. Different pharmacokinetic, but synergistic, properties between frovatriptan and dexketoprofen may make the combination of these agents particularly effective in migraine treatment, with rapid onset of action and sustained effect over 48 hours. These benefits, together with potential cost

  9. How large are the differences between originator and generic prices? Analysis of five molecules in 16 European countries

    Sabine Vogler

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To survey the price differences between originators and generics for a selected basket of molecules and to analyze similarities and differences with regard to the countries included and their generic policies. METHODS: Ex-factory prices as of November 2011 of five molecules provided from the Pharma Price Information (PPI service of the Austrian Health Institute were analyzed for 16 European countries (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden, UK. The selected molecules were gemcitabine, mycophenolate mofetil, olanzapine, risperidone and sumatriptan. For a specific presentation (same pack size, dosage and pharmaceutical form of each molecule, the prices of the original product and the “most common generic” as defined by PPI were compared. RESULTS: Considerable variations among the extent of price differences between originator and generic were identified (gemicitabine: lowest price difference of 1.4% between originator and generic in Belgium and highest difference of 73.4% in Portugal; mycophenolate mofetil: 3.4% Norway – 71.7% Netherlands; olanzapine: 0.1% Spain – 97.1% Sweden; risperidone: 0.9% Netherlands – 97.3% UK; sumatriptan: 5.8% Greece – 95.0% Denmark. Further, no difference at all between originator and generic prices was found for some molecules in a few countries (Norway: for 4 of the 5 molecules analyzed; Spain: 3; Belgium: 2; in Austria, France and Greece for one molecule respectively. For the five molecules of the sample, Greece, Spain, Ireland and Norway consistently displayed lower price differences whereas Denmark, Finland and Sweden tended to show higher differences between originator and generic prices. CONCLUSION: Even if this research is illustrative and not representative due to the small sample size, results suggest confirming large differences across Europe. It appears that countries (e.g. Denmark

  10. Nose-to-Brain delivery of insulin for Alzheimer’s disease

    Martina Stützle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The transport of small molecules, peptides and proteins via the olfactory epithelium and along olfactory and trigeminal nerve pathways from the nasal cavity to the brain is very well known and clinically established for central nervous system (CNS active drugs like oxytocin, sumatriptan or insulin. Insulin is a clinically well-established biopharmaceutical with a validated function in cognition. Central supply with insulin via intranasal administration improves cognition in animal models and in human, making insulin a so-called cognitive enhancer. Furthermore, dysregulation of insulin is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, which is associated with lower levels of insulin in the cerebrospinal fluid and is involved in amyloid-beta (Ab regulation. Clinical trials with intranasal insulin implicate positive effects on learning and memory, but a massive lack of pharmacokinetic and efficacy data hamper a pharmacokinetic – pharmcodynamic relation and a possible clinical development as cognition enhancer. A lack of such data also prevents resolving the mechanisms involved in directing insulin to the central or to the peripheral compartment. Here we discuss the basic mechanism of Nose-to-Brain delivery, evidences for intranasal insulin as cognition enhancer, medical devices for intranasal delivery and safety aspects.

  11. NDMA formation from amine-based pharmaceuticals--impact from prechlorination and water matrix.

    Shen, Ruqiao; Andrews, Susan A

    2013-05-01

    The presence of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in drinking water is most commonly associated with the chloramination of amine-based precursors. One option to control the NDMA formation is to remove the precursors via pre-oxidation, and prechlorination is among the most effective options in reducing NDMA formation. However, most of the findings to-date are based on single-precursor scenarios using the model precursor dimethylamine (DMA) and natural organic matter (NOM), while few studies have considered the potential interactions between water matrix components and the target precursors when investigating the prechlorination impact. Specifically, little is known for the behaviour of amine-based pharmaceuticals which have recently been reported to contribute to NDMA formation upon chloramination. This work demonstrates that prechlorination can affect both the ultimate NDMA conversion and the reaction kinetics from selected pharmaceuticals, and the nature and extent of the impact was compound-specific and matrix-specific. In the absence of NOM, the NDMA formation from most pharmaceuticals was reduced upon prechlorination, except for sumatriptan which showed a consistent increase in NDMA formation with increasing free chlorine contact time. In the presence of NOM, prechlorination was shown to enhance initial reactions by reducing the binding between NOM and pharmaceuticals, but prolonged prechlorination broke down NOM into smaller products which could then form new bonds with pharmaceuticals and thus inhibit their further conversion into NDMA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Medical image of the week: sleep bruxism

    Bartell J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 42 year-old man with a past medical history of insomnia, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and both migraine and tension headaches was referred for an overnight sleep study. He had presented to the sleep clinic with symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea. Medications included sumatriptan, amitryptiline, sertraline, and trazodone. His sleep study showed: sleep efficiency of 58.2%, apnea-hypopnea index of 33 events per hour, and arousal index of 14.5/hr. Periodic limb movement index was 29.2/hr. The time spent in the sleep stages included N1 (3.6%, N2 (72.5%, N3 (12.9%, and REM (10.9%. Figure 1 is representative of the several brief waveforms seen on his EEG and chin EMG. Sleep bruxism (SB is a type of sleep-related movement disorder that is characterized by involuntary masticatory muscle contraction resulting in grinding and clenching of the teeth and typically associated with arousals from sleep (1,2. The American academy of sleep medicine (AASM criteria for ...

  13. Extractive spectrophotometric determination of five selected drugs by ion-pair complex formation with bromothymol blue in pure form and pharmaceutical preparations

    Sneha G. Nair

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Simple, precise, selective, and expeditious spectrophotometric methods have been developed for the determination of itopride (ITO, midodrine (MID, diclofenac (DIC, mesalamine (MES, and sumatriptan (SUM in their pure form as well as in pharmaceutical preparations. The method was based on ion-pair complex formation between the drugs and anionic dye, bromothymol blue in an acidic medium (pH 2.0–4.0. The yellow colored complexes formed were quantitatively extracted into chloroform and measured at 411, 410, 413, 412, and 414 nm wavelength for ITO, MID, DIC, MES, and SUM, respectively. Beer’s law was obeyed in the concentration range of 3.0–30 µg/mL for ITO, 1.0–20 µg/mL for MID, 1.5–40 µg/mL for DIC, 1.2–12 µg/mL for MES, and 0.5–15 µg/mL for SUM. The stoichiometry of the complexes formed between the drugs and the dye was 1:1 as determined by Job’s method of continuous variation. The association constant (KIP of the ion-pair complexes formed was evaluated using Benesi–Hildebrand equation. Limit of detection, limit of quantification, and Sandell’s sensitivity of the methods were also estimated. The proposed methods were successfully employed for the determination of these drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  14. The use of illicit drugs as self-medication in the treatment of cluster headache: Results from an Italian online survey.

    Di Lorenzo, C; Coppola, G; Di Lorenzo, G; Bracaglia, M; Rossi, P; Pierelli, F

    2016-02-01

    Cluster headache (CH) patients often receive unsatisfactory treatment and may explore illicit substances as alternatives. We aimed to explore this use of illicit drugs for CH treatment. We invited CH patients from an Internet-based self-help group to complete a questionnaire regarding their therapeutic use of illicit substances. Of the 54 respondents, 29 were classified as chronic and 39 were drug-resistant cases. Fifty patients had previously tried subcutaneous sumatriptan, 40 had tried O2, and 48 had tried at least one prophylactic treatment. All 54 patients specified that they were dissatisfied with conventional treatments. Thirty-four patients had used cannabinoids, 13 cocaine, 8 heroin, 18 psilocybin, 12 lysergic acid amide (LSA), and 4 lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). Some patients with intractable CH decided to try illicit drugs concomitantly with cessation of medical care. Most of these patients found suggestions for illicit drug use on the Internet. Many patients seemed to underestimate the judicial consequences of, and had an overestimated confidence in the safety of, such illicit treatments. Physicians are often not informed by patients of their choice to use illicit drugs. This leads to questions regarding the true nature of the physician-patient relationship among dissatisfied CH patients. © International Headache Society 2015.

  15. Evidence-based treatments for cluster headache

    Gooriah R

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rubesh Gooriah, Alina Buture, Fayyaz Ahmed Department of Neurology, Hull Royal Infirmary, Kingston upon Hull, UK Abstract: Cluster headache (CH, one of the most painful syndromes known to man, is managed with acute and preventive medications. The brief duration and severity of the attacks command the use of rapid-acting pain relievers. Inhalation of oxygen and subcutaneous sumatriptan are the two most effective acute therapeutic options for sufferers of CH. Several preventive medications are available, the most effective of which is verapamil. However, most of these agents are not backed by strong clinical evidence. In some patients, these options can be ineffective, especially in those who develop chronic CH. Surgical procedures for the chronic refractory form of the disorder should then be contemplated, the most promising of which is hypothalamic deep brain stimulation. We hereby review the pathogenesis of CH and the evidence behind the treatment options for this debilitating condition. Keywords: cluster headache, pathogenesis, vasoactive intestinal peptide, suprachiasmatic nucleus

  16. Implementation of effective, self-sustaining headache services in the Republic of Georgia: Evaluation of their impact on headache-related disability and quality of life of people with headache.

    Giorgadze, Gvantsa; Mania, Maka; Kukava, Maka; Dzagnidze, Ana; Mirvelashvili, Ekaterine; Steiner, Timothy J; Katsarava, Zaza

    2018-04-01

    Background Headache disorders are widespread and disabling. They are common in Georgia, especially headache on ≥15 days/month (HA ≥ 15), but there are no headache services. Objective We established headache services meeting local needs, investigating feasibility, consumer uptake and satisfaction, and cost, with an exit strategy bequeathing effective, self-sustaining services that could be rolled out nationwide. Methods We created headache centres in Tbilisi and Gori offering free expert care for three visits over three months, and affordable medication thereafter. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of patients using the service beyond the free period - a measure of both satisfaction and sustainability. Results Of 1,445 patients (age 43.7 ± 12.4 years; 10.5% male), 49.8% had episodic migraine, 22.5% episodic tension-type headache, 25.7% HA ≥ 15 (24.5% overusing medication) and 2.0% trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. Only 454 (31.4%) and 51 (3.5%) returned for second and third visits; in these, headache improved and treatment costs decreased. As information about the service spread, five other headache clinics opened in Tbilisi and Kutaisi (western Georgia). Pharmaceutical companies reduced prices (sumatriptan 100 mg from US$7 to US$1). Conclusion The study failed to achieve its primary outcome, but sustainable headache services operating to international standards were successfully implemented nonetheless, with demand increasing.

  17. Diclofenac with or without an antiemetic for acute migraine headaches in adults

    Derry, Sheena; Rabbie, Roy; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Migraine is a common, disabling condition and a burden for the individual, health services and society. Many sufferers choose not to, or are unable to, seek professional help and rely on over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics. Diclofenac is an established analgesic, and new formulations using the potassium or epolamine salts, which can be dissolved in water, have been developed for rapid absorption, which may be beneficial in acute migraine. Co-therapy with an antiemetic should help to reduce the nausea and vomiting commonly associated with migraine. Objectives To determine the efficacy and tolerability of diclofenac, alone or in combination with an antiemetic, compared to placebo and other active interventions in the treatment of acute migraine headaches in adults. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Oxford Pain Relief Database, ClinicalTrials.gov, and reference lists for studies through 27 September 2011. Selection criteria We included randomised, double-blind, placebo- and/or active-controlled studies using self administered diclofenac to treat a migraine headache episode, with at least 10 participants per treatment arm. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used numbers of participants achieving each outcome to calculate relative risk (or ‘risk ratio’) and numbers needed to treat to benefit (NNT) or harm (NNH) compared to placebo or a different active treatment. Main results Five studies (1356 participants) compared oral diclofenac with placebo, and one also compared it with sumatriptan; none combined diclofenac with a self administered antiemetic. Four studies treated attacks with single doses of medication, and two allowed an optional second dose for inadequate response. Only two studies, with three active treatment arms, provided data for pooled analysis of primary outcomes. For single doses of diclofenac

  18. Canadian Headache Society systematic review and recommendations on the treatment of migraine pain in emergency settings.

    Orr, Serena L; Aubé, Michel; Becker, Werner J; Davenport, W Jeptha; Dilli, Esma; Dodick, David; Giammarco, Rose; Gladstone, Jonathan; Leroux, Elizabeth; Pim, Heather; Dickinson, Garth; Christie, Suzanne N

    2015-03-01

    There is a considerable amount of practice variation in managing migraines in emergency settings, and evidence-based therapies are often not used first line. A peer-reviewed search of databases (MEDLINE, Embase, CENTRAL) was carried out to identify randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of interventions for acute pain relief in adults presenting with migraine to emergency settings. Where possible, data were pooled into meta-analyses. Two independent reviewers screened 831 titles and abstracts for eligibility. Three independent reviewers subsequently evaluated 120 full text articles for inclusion, of which 44 were included. Individual studies were then assigned a US Preventive Services Task Force quality rating. The GRADE scheme was used to assign a level of evidence and recommendation strength for each intervention. We strongly recommend the use of prochlorperazine based on a high level of evidence, lysine acetylsalicylic acid, metoclopramide and sumatriptan, based on a moderate level of evidence, and ketorolac, based on a low level of evidence. We weakly recommend the use of chlorpromazine based on a moderate level of evidence, and ergotamine, dihydroergotamine, lidocaine intranasal and meperidine, based on a low level of evidence. We found evidence to recommend strongly against the use of dexamethasone, based on a moderate level of evidence, and granisetron, haloperidol and trimethobenzamide based on a low level of evidence. Based on moderate-quality evidence, we recommend weakly against the use of acetaminophen and magnesium sulfate. Based on low-quality evidence, we recommend weakly against the use of diclofenac, droperidol, lidocaine intravenous, lysine clonixinate, morphine, propofol, sodium valproate and tramadol. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. Sphenopalatine ganglion block for postdural puncture headache in ambulatory setting

    José Miguel Cardoso

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Postdural puncture headache (PDPH is a common complication following subarachnoid blockade and its incidence varies with the size of the needle used and the needle design. Suportive therapy is the usual initial approach. Epidural blood patch (EBP is the gold-standard when supportive therapy fails but has significant risks associated. Sphenopalatine ganglion block (SPGB may be a safer alternative. Case report: We observed a 41 year-old female patient presenting with PDPH after a subarachnoid blockade a week before. We administrated 1 l of crystalloids, Dexamethasone 4 mg, parecoxib 40 mg, acetaminophen 1 g and caffeine 500 mg without significant relief after 2 hours. We performed a bilateral SPGB with a cotton-tipped applicator saturated with 0.5% Levobupivacaine under standard ASA monitoring. Symptoms relief was reported 5 minutes after the block. The patient was monitored for an hour after which she was discharged and prescribed acetaminophen 1 g and ibuprofen 400 mg every 8 hours for the following 2 days. She was contacted on the next day and again after a week reporting no pain in both situation. Conclusions: SPGB may attenuate cerebral vasodilation induced by parasympathetic stimulation transmitted through neurons that have synapses in the sphenopalatine ganglion. This would be in agreement with the Monro-Kellie concept and would explain why caffeine and sumatriptan can have some effect in the treatment of PDPH. Apparently, SPGB has a faster onset than EBP with better safety profile. We suggest that patients presenting with PDPH should be considered primarily for SPGB. Patients may have a rescue EBP if needed.

  20. Synthesis of a smart pH-responsive magnetic nanocomposite as high loading carrier of pharmaceutical agents.

    Berah, Razieh; Ghorbani, Mohsen; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar

    2017-06-01

    To create facile external controlled drug delivery system, a magnetic porous carrier based on Tin oxide nanoparticles was synthesized by an inexpensive and versatile hydrothermal strategy and used for in-vitro process. Magnetic nanocomposites were qualified by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Vibrational Sample Magnetometer (VSM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Results showed that nanoparticles were synthesized successfully with good dispersion of magnetic nanoparticles in cavity, uniform particle size distribution with average size of 65nm and high magnetization of 33.75 emu/mg. Furthermore, the nano-porosity and magnetism allowed high efficiency and remote controlled drug release. In this study, anti-migraine Sumatriptan was used as drug sample and the effect of drug concentration, Fe/Sn ratio and loading time on drug absorption were investigated. The best result was checked for stability at body temperature and different body pH. The sample with drug concentration of 0.25(mg/ml), Fe/Sn=0.22 and loading time of 1.5h had the highest drug efficiency (70%). Finally, in order to simulate the in vivo process for in-vitro step, Amnion was used and drug diffusion rate was measured in different intervals and different pH values. The result illustrated that after 25h, diffusion reached 65% at pH=2 and 56% at pH=7, and then became constant. Based on the above mentioned results, the carrier has an acceptable in vitro yield and therefore could be chosen for future in vivo researches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Triptan safety during pregnancy: a Norwegian population registry study

    Nezvalová-Henriksen, Kateřina; Spigset, Olav; Nordeng, Hedvig

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge on triptan safety during pregnancy remains limited to their class effect or studies on sumatriptan. Our aim was to evaluate the individual effect of four most frequently used triptans on several pregnancy outcomes. We used the Norwegian prescription database to access information on triptans redeemed by pregnant women living in Norway between 2004 and 2007. This database was linked to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway covering every institutional delivery in Norway and providing information on pregnancy, delivery, maternal and neonatal health. Estimates of associations with pregnancy outcomes were obtained by Generalised Estimation Equations analysis. Of the 181,125 women in our study, 1,465 (0.8 %) redeemed triptans during pregnancy, and 1,095 (0.6 %) redeemed triptans before pregnancy only (disease comparison group). The population comparison group comprised the remaining 178,565 women. Using this group as reference, we found no associations between triptan redemption during pregnancy and congenital malformations. Second trimester redemption was associated with postpartum haemorrhage (adjusted OR 1.57; 95 % CI 1.19–2.07). The disease comparison group had an increased risk of major congenital malformations (adjusted OR 1.48; 95 % CI 1.11–1.97), low birth weight (adjusted OR 1.39; 95 % CI 1.08–1.81), and preterm birth (adjusted OR 1.30; 95 % CI 1.06–1.60). The association of triptans with postpartum hemorrhage could be attributable to decreased platelet agreeability occurring in severe migraine. Likewise, the increased risk of major congenital malformations and other adverse pregnancy outcomes in the disease comparison group might be attributable to migraine severity

  2. Selective labelling of 5-HT{sub 7} receptor recognition sites in rat brain using [{sup 3}H]5-carboxamidotryptamine

    Stowe, R.L.; Barnes, N.M. [Department of Pharmacology, The Medical School, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish a radioligand binding assay to selectively label the native 5-HT{sub 7} receptor expressed in rat brain. In rat whole brain (minus cerebellum and striatum) homogenate, ({+-})-pindolol (10 {mu}M)-insensitive [{sup 3}H]5-CT ([{sup 3}H]5-carboxamidotryptamine; 0.5 nM) specific binding (defined by 5-HT, 10 {mu}M) displayed a pharmacological profile similar to the recombinant 5-HT{sub 7} receptor, although the Hill coefficients for competition curves generated by methiothepin, ritanserin, sumatriptan, clozapine and pimozide were significantly less than unity. In homogenates of rat hypothalamus, ({+-})-pindolol (10 {mu}M)-insensitive [{sup 3}H]5-CT recognition sites also resembled, pharmacologically, the 5-HT{sub 7} receptor, although pimozide still generated Hill coefficients significantly less than unity. Subsequent studies were performed in the additional presence of WAY100635 (100 nM) to prevent [{sup 3}H]5-CT binding to residual, possibly, 5-HT{sub 1A} sites. Competition for this [{sup 3}H]5-CT binding indicated the labelling in whole rat brain homogenate of a homogenous population of sites with the pharmacological profile of the 5-HT{sub 7} receptor. Saturation studies also indicated that ({+-})-pindolol (10 {mu}M)/WAY 100635 (100 nM)-insensitive [{sup 3}H]5-CT binding to homogenates of whole rat brain was saturable and to an apparently homogenous population of sites which were labelled with nanomolar affinity (B{sub max}=33.2{+-}0.7 fmol mg{sup -1} protein, pK{sub d}=8.78{+-}0.05, mean{+-}S.E.M., n=3). The development of this 5-HT{sub 7} receptor binding assay will aid investigation of the rat native 5-HT{sub 7} receptor. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  3. Selective labelling of 5-HT7 receptor recognition sites in rat brain using [3H]5-carboxamidotryptamine

    Stowe, R.L.; Barnes, N.M.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish a radioligand binding assay to selectively label the native 5-HT 7 receptor expressed in rat brain. In rat whole brain (minus cerebellum and striatum) homogenate, (±)-pindolol (10 μM)-insensitive [ 3 H]5-CT ([ 3 H]5-carboxamidotryptamine; 0.5 nM) specific binding (defined by 5-HT, 10 μM) displayed a pharmacological profile similar to the recombinant 5-HT 7 receptor, although the Hill coefficients for competition curves generated by methiothepin, ritanserin, sumatriptan, clozapine and pimozide were significantly less than unity. In homogenates of rat hypothalamus, (±)-pindolol (10 μM)-insensitive [ 3 H]5-CT recognition sites also resembled, pharmacologically, the 5-HT 7 receptor, although pimozide still generated Hill coefficients significantly less than unity. Subsequent studies were performed in the additional presence of WAY100635 (100 nM) to prevent [ 3 H]5-CT binding to residual, possibly, 5-HT 1A sites. Competition for this [ 3 H]5-CT binding indicated the labelling in whole rat brain homogenate of a homogenous population of sites with the pharmacological profile of the 5-HT 7 receptor. Saturation studies also indicated that (±)-pindolol (10 μM)/WAY 100635 (100 nM)-insensitive [ 3 H]5-CT binding to homogenates of whole rat brain was saturable and to an apparently homogenous population of sites which were labelled with nanomolar affinity (B max =33.2±0.7 fmol mg -1 protein, pK d =8.78±0.05, mean±S.E.M., n=3). The development of this 5-HT 7 receptor binding assay will aid investigation of the rat native 5-HT 7 receptor. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. The qualitative problem of major quotation errors, as illustrated by 10 different examples in the headache literature.

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2015-03-01

    There are two types of errors when references are used in the scientific literature: citation errors and quotation errors, and these errors have in reviews mainly been evaluated quantitatively. Quotation errors are the major problem, and 1 review reported 6% major quotation errors. The objective of this listing of quotation errors is to illustrate by qualitative analysis of different types of 10 major quotation errors how and possibly why authors misquote references. The author selected for review the first 10 different consecutive major quotation errors encountered from his reading of the headache literature. The characteristics of the 10 quotation errors ranged considerably. Thus, in a review of migraine therapy in a very prestigious medical journal, the superiority of a new treatment (sumatriptan) vs an old treatment (aspirin plus metoclopramide) was claimed despite no significant difference for the primary efficacy measure in the trial. One author, in a scientific debate, referred to the lack of dilation of the middle meningeal artery in spontaneous migraine despite the fact that only 1 migraine attack was studied. The possibility for creative major quotation errors in the medical literature is most likely infinite. Qualitative evaluations, as the present, of major quotation errors will hopefully result in more general awareness of quotation problems in the medical literature. Even if the final responsibility for correct use of quotations is with the authors, the referees, the experts with the knowledge needed to spot quotation errors, should be more involved in ensuring correct and fair use of references. Finally, this paper suggests that major misleading quotations, if pointed out by readers of the journal, should, as a rule, be corrected by way of an erratum statement. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  5. Palatal myoclonus: report of two cases Mioclonia palatal: relato de dois casos

    GIORGIO FABIANI

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe two cases of palatal myoclonus (PM, one essential and another secondary to a stroke. Case 1: a 64 years old female who developed clicking sounds in both ears after a stroke and three years later on noticed a progressive involuntary movement of the throat associated with rhythmic contractions of the soft palate, muscles of tongue and throat. MRI showed an ischemic area in brainstem. The patient had a partial response to the use of sumatriptan 6 mg subcutaneously. Case 2: a 66 years old female who began with ear clicking at left ear that worsed slowly associated with tinnitus and arrhythmic movements of soft palate and an audible click at left ear. Brain MRI was normal; audiometry showed bilateral neurosensory loss. She was prescribed clonazepan 1 mg daily with complete recovery. Primary and secondary palatal myoclonus share the same clinical features but probably have different pathophysiological underlying mechanisms.Descrevemos dois casos de mioclonia palatal (MP, um essencial e o outro secundário a acidente vascular cerebral (AVC. Caso1: mulher de 64 anos que desenvolveu cliques audíveis em ambos os ouvidos após um AVC e que três anos depois começou a apresentar movimentos involuntários do pálato, músculos do língua e garganta. A ressonância magnética (RNM mostrou áreas de isquemia no tronco cerebral. A paciente apresentou resposta parcial e não duradoura ao uso subcutâneo de 6 mg de sumatriptano. Caso 2: mulher de 66 anos, com cliques audíveis no ouvido esquerdo que pioraram progressiva e lentamente associados com tinitus e movimentos mais ou menos rítmicos do pálato mole. A RNM encefálica era normal. A audiometria mostrou perda neurossensorial bilateral. Foi medicada com 1,0 mg de clonazepan diariamente com completa recuperação. MP primária e secundária compartilham das mesmas características clínicas, mas evidências sugerem que se devam a diferentes mecanismos fisiopatológicos.

  6. Headache in the parturient: Pathophysiology and management of post-dural puncture headache

    Gita Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Headache in the postpartum period is common and multifactorial in origin. Apart from primary causes such as tension headaches and migraine, secondary headaches such as post-dural puncture headache (PDPH are increasingly common because of increasing use of regional anaesthesia and analgesia during childbirth. Preventive measures for PDPH include the use of smaller gauge pencil-point needles for spinal blocks; epidural needles of 18 G or less; using saline rather than air for epidural space identification and the use of ultrasound guidance, especially for difficult cases such as morbid obesity and spinal deformities. In case of accidental dural puncture (ADP, the choice is between inserting the catheter in an adjacent space or intrathecal catheterization. Current evidence seems to be in favour of inserting the epidural catheter into the subarachnoid space and using the intrathecal catheter for analgesia/anaesthesia after prominently labelling it as intrathecal, to prevent misuse. It should be removed after at least 24 hours and a 10 ml bolus of saline injected before removal of catheter may be helpful. Either way, having written protocols for the management of accidental dural puncture helps to reduce the incidence of PDPH. PDPH can be disabling in severity and can mar the whole experience of childbirth. In addition, severe untreated PDPH can cause complications such as nerve palsies, subdural hematoma and cerebral venous thrombosis. Conservative methods of treatment should be tried first such as adequate hydration, paracetamol, caffeine, sumatriptan or ACTH/hydrocortisone. Epidural blood patching is the most effective treatment for PDPH. It is more effective if done 24-48 hours after dural puncture. It is an invasive procedure with its own complications as well as a failure rate of up to 30%, so that a second or even third patch may be necessary. Both these facts should be intimated to the patient beforehand. Meticulous follow-up and evaluation

  7. Orofacial pain

    Marjolijn Oomens

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the primary care sector, diagnosis and initial management of orofacial pain are often performed by familydoctors and dentists. Knowledge of the different types of orofacial pain and headache disorders is therefor of great importance. The International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 provides an overview of the different types of orofacial pain and will be discussed in this lecture. The main focus will be on trigeminal neuralgia and cluster headache and the current research in this field. Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN is defined as a disorder characterized by recurrent, unilateral, brief, electricshock-like pains, abrupt in onset and termination, limited to the distribution of one or more divisions of thetrigeminal nerve and triggered by innocuous stimuli. Unfortunately, most TN is idiopathic, and the aetiology isnot clear. The guidelines on pharmaceutical TN management published by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN and the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS recommend carbamazepine (CBZ; 200–1200 mg/day or oxcarbazepine (OXC; 600–1800 mg/day as first-line therapy. Both are antiepileptics with well known interactions with other drugs and safety problems. An overview of the currently available literature on the pharmaceutical management of TN patients is discussed. Cluster headache (CH is one of the most painful primary headache disorders. It is characterized by daily or almost daily attacks of unilateral excruciating periorbital pain associated with ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms, typically lasting between 15 and 180 minutes if untreated. Cluster headache is caused by the relaesement of neurotransmitters and vasodilators from the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPH. The SPG is a large extracranial parasympathetic ganglion located in the pterygopalatine fossa (PPF. The current treatments for CH attacks are injectable sumatriptan and oxygen inhalation. Both treatments have well known side effects and

  8. Functional Characterization of 5-HT1B Receptor Drugs in Nonhuman Primates Using Simultaneous PET-MR.

    Hansen, Hanne D; Mandeville, Joseph B; Sander, Christin Y; Hooker, Jacob M; Catana, Ciprian; Rosen, Bruce R; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, we used a simultaneous PET-MR experimental design to investigate the effects of functionally different compounds (agonist, partial agonist, and antagonist) on 5-HT 1B receptor (5-HT 1B R) occupancy and the associated hemodynamic responses. In anesthetized male nonhuman primates ( n = 3), we used positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with the radioligand [ 11 C]AZ10419369 administered as a bolus followed by constant infusion to measure changes in 5-HT 1B R occupancy. Simultaneously, we measured changes in cerebral blood volume (CBV) as a proxy of drug effects on neuronal activity. The 5-HT 1B R partial agonist AZ10419369 elicited a dose-dependent biphasic hemodynamic response that was related to the 5-HT 1B R occupancy. The magnitude of the response was spatially overlapping with high cerebral 5-HT 1B R densities. High doses of AZ10419369 exerted an extracranial tissue vasoconstriction that was comparable to the less blood-brain barrier-permeable 5-HT 1B R agonist sumatriptan. By contrast, injection of the antagonist GR127935 did not elicit significant hemodynamic responses, even at a 5-HT 1B R cerebral occupancy similar to the one obtained with a high dose of AZ10419369. Given the knowledge we have of the 5-HT 1B R and its function and distribution in the brain, the hemodynamic response informs us about the functionality of the given drug: changes in CBV are only produced when the receptor is stimulated by the partial agonist AZ10419369 and not by the antagonist GR127935, consistent with low basal occupancy by endogenous serotonin. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We here show that combined simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging uniquely enables the assessment of CNS active compounds. We conducted a series of pharmacological interventions to interrogate 5-HT 1B receptor binding and function and determined blood-brain barrier passage of drugs and demonstrate target involvement. Importantly, we show how the spatial

  9. Parenteral treatment of episodic tension-type headache: a systematic review.

    Weinman, Danielle; Nicastro, Olivia; Akala, Olabiyi; Friedman, Benjamin W

    2014-02-01

    continuous outcomes otherwise. Our search returned 640 results. One hundred eighty-seven abstracts were reviewed, and 8 studies involving 486 patients were included in our analysis. The most common reasons for exclusion of abstracts were no assessment of acute pain relief, use of nonparenteral medications only, and no differentiation of headache type. Risk of bias ranged from low to high. The following medications were more effective than placebo for acute pain (NNT, 95%CI): metamizole (4, 2-26), chlorpromazine (4, 2-26), and metoclopramide (2, 1-3). The combination of metoclopramide + diphenhydramine was superior to ketorolac (4, 2-8) The following medications were not more effective than placebo: mepivacaine, meperidine + promethazine, and sumatriptan. Various parenteral medications other than salicylates or nonsteroidals provide acute relief of tension-type headache. Comparative efficacy studies are needed. © 2014 American Headache Society.

  10. Cluster headache

    Ducros Anne

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cluster headache (CH is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye. It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name in bouts that can occur during specific months of the year. Alcohol is the only dietary trigger of CH, strong odors (mainly solvents and cigarette smoke and napping may also trigger CH attacks. During bouts, attacks may happen at precise hours, especially during the night. During the attacks, patients tend to be restless. CH may be episodic or chronic, depending on the presence of remission periods. CH is associated with trigeminovascular activation and neuroendocrine and vegetative disturbances, however, the precise cautive mechanisms remain unknown. Involvement of the hypothalamus (a structure regulating endocrine function and sleep-wake rhythms has been confirmed, explaining, at least in part, the cyclic aspects of CH. The disease is familial in about 10% of cases. Genetic factors play a role in CH susceptibility, and a causative role has been suggested for the hypocretin receptor gene. Diagnosis is clinical. Differential diagnoses include other primary headache diseases such as migraine, paroxysmal hemicrania and SUNCT syndrome. At present, there is no curative treatment. There are efficient treatments to shorten the painful attacks (acute treatments and to reduce the number of daily attacks (prophylactic treatments. Acute treatment is based on subcutaneous administration of sumatriptan and high-flow oxygen. Verapamil, lithium, methysergide, prednisone, greater occipital nerve blocks and topiramate may be used for prophylaxis. In refractory cases, deep-brain stimulation of the

  11. Induction of Migraine-Like Photophobic Behavior in Mice by Both Peripheral and Central CGRP Mechanisms

    Mason, Bianca N.; Kaiser, Eric A.; Kuburas, Adisa; Loomis, Maria-Cristina M.; Latham, John A.; Garcia-Martinez, Leon F.

    2017-01-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key player in migraine. Although migraine can be treated using CGRP antagonists that act peripherally, the relevant sites of CGRP action remain unknown. To address the role of CGRP both within and outside the CNS, we used CGRP-induced light-aversive behavior in mice as a measure of migraine-associated photophobia. Peripheral (intraperitoneal) injection of CGRP resulted in light-aversive behavior in wild-type CD1 mice similar to aversion seen previously after central (intracerebroventricular) injection. The phenotype was also observed in C57BL/6J mice, although to a lesser degree and with more variability. After intraperitoneal CGRP, motility was decreased in the dark only, similar to motility changes after intracerebroventricular CGRP. In addition, as with intracerebroventricular CGRP, there was no general increase in anxiety as measured in an open-field assay after intraperitoneal CGRP. Importantly, two clinically effective migraine drugs, the 5-HT1B/D agonist sumatriptan and a CGRP-blocking monoclonal antibody, attenuated the peripheral CGRP-induced light aversion and motility behaviors. To begin to address the mechanism of peripheral CGRP action, we used transgenic CGRP-sensitized mice that have elevated levels of the CGRP receptor hRAMP1 subunit in nervous tissue (nestin/hRAMP1). Surprisingly, sensitivity to low light was not seen after intraperitoneal CGRP injection, but was seen after intracerebroventricular CGRP injection. These results suggest that CGRP can act in both the periphery and the brain by distinct mechanisms and that CGRP actions may be transmitted to the CNS via indirect sensitization of peripheral nerves. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a central player in migraine pathogenesis, yet its site(s) of action remains unknown. Some preclinical studies have pointed to central sites in the brain and brainstem. However, a peripheral site of

  12. Regulation of Hippocampal 5-HT Release by P2X7 Receptors in Response to Optogenetic Stimulation of Median Raphe Terminals of Mice

    Flóra Gölöncsér

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Serotonergic and glutamatergic neurons of median raphe region (MRR play a pivotal role in the modulation of affective and cognitive functions. These neurons synapse both onto themselves and remote cortical areas. P2X7 receptors (P2rx7 are ligand gated ion channels expressed by central presynaptic excitatory nerve terminals and involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release. P2rx7s are implicated in various neuropsychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and depression. Here we investigated whether 5-HT release released from the hippocampal terminals of MRR is subject to modulation by P2rx7s. To achieve this goal, an optogenetic approach was used to selectively activate subpopulation of serotonergic terminals derived from the MRR locally, and one of its target area, the hippocampus. Optogenetic activation of neurons in the MRR with 20 Hz was correlated with freezing and enhanced locomotor activity of freely moving mice and elevated extracellular levels of 5-HT, glutamate but not GABA in vivo. Similar optical stimulation (OS significantly increased [3H]5-HT and [3H]glutamate release in acute MRR and hippocampal slices. We examined spatial and temporal patterns of [3H]5-HT release and the interaction between the serotonin and glutamate systems. Whilst [3H]5-HT release from MRR neurons was [Ca2+]o-dependent and sensitive to TTX, CNQX and DL-AP-5, release from hippocampal terminals was not affected by the latter drugs. Hippocampal [3H]5-HT released by electrical but not OS was subject to modulation by 5- HT1B/D receptors agonist sumatriptan (1 μM, whereas the selective 5-HT1A agonist buspirone (0.1 μM was without effect. [3H]5-HT released by electrical and optical stimulation was decreased in mice genetically deficient in P2rx7s, and after perfusion with selective P2rx7 antagonists, JNJ-47965567 (0.1 μM, and AZ-10606120 (0.1 μM. Optical and electrical stimulation elevated the extracellular level of ATP. Our results demonstrate for the

  13. The triptan formulations: a critical evaluation Formulações dos triptanos: avaliacão crítica

    Marcelo E. Bigal

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The migraine-specific triptans have revolutionized the treatment of migraine and are usually the drugs of choice to treat a migraine attack in progress. Different triptans are available in different strengths and formulations including oral tablets, orally disintegrating tablets, nasal sprays and subcutaneous injections. In Europe, sumatriptan is also available as a suppository. Specific differences among the triptans exist as evidenced by different pharmacological profiles includingT½, Tmax, Cmax, AUC, metabolism, drug-drug interaction profiles, amongst other parameters. How or whether these differences translate to clinical efficacy and tolerability differences is not well differentiated. Clinical distinctions among these agents are subtle and proper choice of triptan requires attention to the specific characteristics of each individual patient, knowledge of patient preference, accurate history of the efficacy of previous acute care medications as well as individual features of the drug being considered. Delivery systems may play an important role in the onset of action of triptans. The selection of an acute antimigraine drug for a patient depends upon the stratification of the patient's migraine attack by peak intensity, time to peak intensity, level of associated symptoms such as nausea and vomiting, time to associated symptoms, comorbid diseases, and concomitant treatments that might cause drug-drug interactions. The clinician has in his armamentarium an ever-expanding variety of medications, available in multiple formulations and dosages, with good safety and tolerability profiles. Continued clinical use will yield familiarity with the various triptans, and it should become possible for the interested physician to match individual patient needs with the specific characteristics of a triptan to optimize therapeutic benefit.Os triptanos, drogas anti-migranosas específicas, revolucionaram o tratamento da migrânea e são considerados as

  14. Cluster Headache Clinical Phenotypes: Tobacco Nonexposed (Never Smoker and No Parental Secondary Smoke Exposure as a Child) versus Tobacco-Exposed: Results from the United States Cluster Headache Survey.

    Rozen, Todd D

    2018-05-01

    statistically significant higher frequency of a migraine family history. The exposed population is statistically significantly more likely to have a history of head trauma 19% vs the nonexposed population 10% (P = .02). Tobacco exposed are significantly more likely to transition from episodic to chronic cluster headache (23% vs 14%, P = .02). Cranial autonomic symptoms as well as agitation are more common in tobacco exposed. Nonexposed are less likely to have specific cluster headache triggers. Exposed are significantly more likely to be triggered by alcohol. Tobacco exposed are significantly heavier caffeine users than nonexposed. Nonexposed are significantly more likely to have cluster headache cycles that vary throughout the year than exposed (52% vs 40%, P = .02). Exposed are much more likely to develop cluster headache from 12 am to 6 am than non exposed. Exposed experience significantly more frequent attacks per day and longer duration cycles than nonexposed. A significantly larger percent of the exposed population (57%) has suicidal ideations with their syndrome than nonexposed (43%) (P = .003). In regard to disability, both subtypes are disabled by their headaches, but exposed have more work related disability and lost home-days from headache. Both subgroups have a poor overall response to preventive and abortive medication outside of inhaled oxygen and injectable sumatriptan. Cluster headache sufferers who were never exposed to tobacco (personal or secondary as a child) appear to present uniquely compared to the tobacco exposed subgroup. The tobacco exposed clinical phenotype appears to have a more severe syndrome based on attack frequency, cycle duration, and headache related disability. Tobacco exposure is associated with cluster headache chronification. The nonexposed subtype appears to have an earlier age of onset, higher rate of familial migraine, and less circadian periodicity and daytime entrainment, suggesting a possible different underlying

  15. Female cluster headache in the United States of America: what are the gender differences? Results from the United States Cluster Headache Survey.

    Rozen, Todd D; Fishman, Royce S

    2012-06-15

    location: cluster headache pain is typically retro-orbital in location in both sexes but women are significantly more likely to experience cluster headache pain in the jaw, cheek and ear than men. f. Associated symptoms: women with cluster headache develop more “migrainous” associated symptoms than men, especially nausea and they are also more likely to have self-injurious behavior than men. g. Triggers: women with cluster headache are much less likely to have alcohol trigger a headache, but are significantly more likely to have “migrainous” triggers for their cluster headaches than men. h. Smoking issues: women are much less likely to have a smoking history than male cluster headache sufferers, more likely to have never smoked prior to cluster headache onset. i. Cycle issues: spring and fall are the most common time to start a cluster headache cycle in both sexes. Women are statistically significantly less likely to start a cluster headache cycle in the months of October–December than men. Women have more attacks per day and higher pain intensity nighttime attacks than men. j. in regard to acute treatment women statistically were less response to sumatriptan injectable and nasal spray than men, but statistically more likely to respond to inhaled lidocaine. There was equal efficacy in the sexes to inhaled oxygen but slower response in women. For preventive treatment no significant gender differences were noted, but overall women were less responsive to almost all preventives than men. k. Diagnostic delay: there remains a significant diagnostic delay for cluster headache patients in both sexes but women were more likely to be diagnosed after 10 years of symptom onset than males and significantly fewer women were diagnosed correctly at an initial physician visit than men. l. Female specific issues: cluster headache does not appear to be influenced by menses or menopause but 50% of the survey responders stated their headaches improved with pregnancy. Cluster

  16. Specific labelling of serotonin 5-HT(1B) receptors in rat frontal cortex with the novel, phenylpiperazine derivative, [3H]GR125,743. A pharmacological characterization.

    Millan, M J; Newman-Tancredi, A; Lochon, S; Touzard, M; Aubry, S; Audinot, V

    2002-04-01

    Although several tritiated agonists have been used for radiolabelling serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)(1B) receptors in rats, data with a selective, radiolabelled antagonist have not been presented. Inasmuch as [3H]GR125,743 specifically labels cloned, human and native guinea pig 5-HT(1B) receptors and has been employed for characterization of cerebral 5-HT(1B) receptor in the latter species [Eur. J. Pharmacol. 327 (1997) 247.], the present study evaluated its utility for characterization of native, cerebral 5-HT(1B) sites in the rat. In homogenates of frontal cortex, [3H]GR125,743 (0.8 nM) showed rapid association (t(1/2)=3.4 min), >90% specific binding and high affinity (K(d)=0.6 nM) for a homogeneous population of receptors with a density (B(max)) of 160 fmol/mg protein. In competition binding studies, affinities were determined for 15 chemically diverse 5-HT(1B) agonists, including 2-[5-[3-(4-methylsulphonylamino)benzyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]-1H-indole-3-yl]ethylamine (L694,247; pK(i), 10.4), 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT; 9.7), 3-[3-(2-dimethylamino-ethyl)-1H-indol-6-yl]-N-(4-methoxybenzyl)acrylamide (GR46,611; 9.6), 5-methoxy-3-(1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridinyl)-1H-indole (RU24,969; 9.5), dihydroergotamine (DHE; 8.6), 5-H-pyrrolo[3,2-b]pyridin-5-one,1,4-dihydro-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridinyl (CP93,129; 8.4), anpirtoline (7.9), sumatriptan (7.4), 1-[2-(3-fluorophenyl)ethyl]-4-[3-[5-(1,2,4-triazol-4-yl)-1H-indol-3-yl]propyl]piperazine (L775,606; 6.4) and (minus sign)-1(S)-[2-[4-(4-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl]-N-methyl-3,4-dihydro-1H-2-benzopyran-6-carboxamide (PNU109,291; <5.0). Similarly, affinities were established for 13 chemically diverse antagonists, including N-[4-methoxy-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)phenyl]-3-methyl-4-(4-pyridyl)benzamide (GR125,743; pK(i), 9.1), (-)cyanopindolol (9.0), (-)-tertatolol (8.2), N-(4-methoxy-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)phenyl]-2'-methyl-4'-(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiozol-3-yl)biphenyl-4-carboxamide (GR127,935; 8.2), N-[3