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Sample records for naphthenic acid solvent

  1. Salinity and solvent effects on the characterization of naphthenic acids from Athabasca oil sands using electrospray ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Headley, J.; Peru, K.; Barrow, M.; Derrick, P.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the salinity and solvent effects on the characterization of naphthenic acids (NA) in oil sands. The mass spectra of NA were obtained using an electrospray ionization method combined with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. The study showed that while monocarboxylic compounds (C n H 2n+z O 2 ) in the z=-4, -6, and -12 of the 2,3 and 6-ring NA in the carbon number range of 13 to 19 were prevalent in the dichloromethane and acetonitrile co-solvent systems, the addition of salt resulted in a reduction of the observed species, the complete elimination of dicarboxylic acids, and an 80 per cent reduction in O 3 species with similar carbon number range and z values. The dicarboxylic acids were also less toxic than monocarboxylic acids. Results of the study will be used to refine methods of remediating oil sands and process water contaminated soils.

  2. Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang; Yongchun Tang; William A. Goddard

    2005-12-09

    In the past three years, we followed the work plan as we suggested in the proposal and made every efforts to fulfill the project objectives. Based on our large amount of creative and productive work, including both of experimental and theoretic aspects, we received important technical breakthrough on naphthenic acid removal process and obtained deep insight on catalytic decarboxylation chemistry. In detail, we established an integrated methodology to serve for all of the experimental and theoretical work. Our experimental investigation results in discovery of four type effective catalysts to the reaction of decarboxylation of model carboxylic acid compounds. The adsorption experiment revealed the effectiveness of several solid materials to naphthenic acid adsorption and acidity reduction of crude oil, which can be either natural minerals or synthesized materials. The test with crude oil also received promising results, which can be potentially developed into a practical process for oil industry. The theoretical work predicted several possible catalytic decarboxylation mechanisms that would govern the decarboxylation pathways depending on the type of catalysts being used. The calculation for reaction activation energy was in good agreement with our experimental measurements.

  3. Interfacial (o/w) properties of naphthetic acids and metal naphthenates, naphtenic acid characterization and metal naphthenate inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandal, Oeystein

    2005-07-01

    Deposition of metal naphthenates in process facilities is becoming a huge problem for petroleum companies producing highly acidic crudes. In this thesis, the main focus has been towards the oil-water (o/w) interfacial properties of naphthenic acids and their ability to react with different divalent cations across the interface to form metal naphthenates. The pendant drop technique was utilized to determine dynamic interfacial tensions (IFT) between model oil containing naphthenic acid, synthetic as well as indigenous acid mixtures, and pH adjusted water upon addition of different divalent cations. Changes in IFT caused by the divalent cations were correlated to reaction mechanisms by considering two reaction steps with subsequent binding of acid monomers to the divalent cation. The results were discussed in light of degree of cation hydration and naphthenic acid conformation, which affect the interfacial conditions and thus the rate of formation of 2:1 complexes of acid and cations. Moreover, addition of non-ionic oil-soluble surfactants used as basis compounds in naphthenate inhibitors was found to hinder a completion of the reaction through interfacial dilution of the acid monomers. Formation and stability of metal naphthenate films at o/w interfaces were studied by means of Langmuir technique with a trough designed for liquid-liquid systems. The effects of different naphthenic acids, divalent cations, and pH of the subphase were investigated. The results were correlated to acid structure, cation hydration, and degree of dissociation, which all affect the film stability against compression. Naphthenic acids acquired from a metal naphthenate deposit were characterized by different spectroscopic techniques. The sample was found to consist of a narrow family of 4-protic naphthenic acids with molecular weights around 1230 g/mol. These acids were found to be very o/w interfacially active compared to normal crude acids, and to form Langmuir monolayers with stability

  4. Modelling the ecotoxicity of naphthenic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redman, A.; McGrath, J.; Parkerton, T.; Frank, R.; Di Toro, D.

    2010-01-01

    Oil sand-derived process water is comprised of mixtures of many different toxic compounds. Recent modelling studies have been developed to assess oil sand ecotoxicity caused by naphthenic acids (NA). The hydrocarbon block method was used to described the ecotoxicity of NA mixtures using a database of physico-chemical properties for individual hydrocarbons. Chemical speciation and biota partitioning models are used to characterize the toxicity of ionizable compounds. An analysis of model predictions has suggested that high MW and compounds from the higher Z families contribute significantly to the ecotoxicity of oil sand-derived process water. However, the current modelling method overpredicts the toxicity of the highest residual fractions, which suggests that the bioavailability of the highest MW compounds is limited. Further model refinement is needed to evaluate NA compounds across a wide range of MW and Z families.

  5. Naphthenic acid removal from HVGO by alkaline earth metal catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, L.; Rahimi, P.; Hawkins, R.; Bhatt, S.; Shi, Y. [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Devon, AB (Canada); Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada). CanmetENERGY

    2009-07-01

    This poster highlighted a study that investigated naphthenic acid removal from bitumen-derived heavy vacuum gas oil (HVGO) by thermal cracking and catalytic decarboxylation over alkaline earth-metal oxides and ZnO catalysts in a batch reactor and a continuous fixed-bed reactor. X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}-TPD), and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the fresh and spent catalysts. With MgO and ZnO, naphthenic acid removal proceeded via catalytic decarboxylation. No crystalline phase changes were observed after reaction. With CaO, multiple pathways such as catalytic decarboxylation, neutralization, and thermal cracking were responsible for naphthenic acid conversion. The spent catalysts contained Ca(OH){sub 2} and CaCO{sub 3}. With BaO, naphthenic acid conversion occurred through neutralization. All BaO was converted to Ba(OH){sub 2} during the reaction. tabs., figs.

  6. Mitigation of naphthenate related production upsets in high TAN (Total Acid Number) crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostojic, Nik [Maersk Oil, Copenhagen (Denmark); Vijn, Pieter; Reiners, Robert [Champion Technologies Europe BV, Delden (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes a strategy for prediction, evaluation and mitigation of calcium naphthenate related production problems. Developing fields with acidic crude in the North Sea, West Africa, Bohai Bay (China) and Brazil is becoming more common in recent years. The high acid crude contains a considerable amount of naphthenic acids, typically having a Total Acid Number (TAN) higher than 0.5 mg KOH/g. Formation of either hard type 'calcium naphthenate precipitates' or soft type 'sodium carboxylate/emulsions' during crude oil production can lead to severe flow assurance and separation problems. In severe cases this may lead to production shutdowns to clean-up the equipment. A number of different naphthenate mitigation approaches have been published but no one particular approach is considered to be the most efficient as it depends significantly on the particular field conditions. Initially, this problem was addressed by deploying large volumes of (usually organic) acid, but more recently high efficiency low dose naphthenate inhibitors have been introduced. For predicting naphthenate scaling potential, methods were developed to determine the concentration of 1230 Dalton naphthenic tetra acid (ARN acids) in either deposit or crude oil and this information can be used to locate and potentially isolate the problem to a certain reservoir. Also, methods were developed to design suitable low dose naphthenate inhibitors. As these inhibitors are field tested, monitoring is required to ensure the product is performing most efficiently. In cases of tight emulsions however, this is less difficult as the oil dehydration and water quality is affected instantly. Methods were developed to allow monitoring of the calcium naphthenate deposition in field trails, thus allow trending and evaluation of the chemicals performance. After detailed analyses and discussions of the developed methods, a North Sea case history is presented reviewing several years of treating

  7. Mechanism of magnetite formation in high temperature corrosion by model naphthenic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Peng; Robbins, Winston; Bota, Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Magnetite scales were found in naphthenic acid (NAP) corrosion. • Magnetite scales were formed due to thermal decomposition of iron naphthenates. • Formation and protectiveness of magnetite scales depended on structure of NAP. • Carboxylic acids confirm corrosion observations for commercial NAP. - Abstract: Naphthenic acid (NAP) corrosion is a major concern for refineries. The complexity of NAP in crude oil and the sulfidation process hinder a fundamental knowledge of their corrosive behavior. Studies with model acids were performed to explore the corrosion mechanism and magnetite scales were found on carbon steel. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction methods detected differences in the quantity and quality of magnetite formed by model acids. These scales exhibited different resistance to higher severity NAP corrosion in a flow through apparatus. Magnetite is proposed to be formed by thermal decomposition of iron naphthenates.

  8. Synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion in crude oil distillation unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B. S.; Yin, W. F.; Sang, D. H.; Jiang, Z. Y.

    2012-10-01

    The synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion at high temperature in crude oil distillation unit was studied using Q235 carbon-manganese steel and 316 stainless steel. The corrosion of Q235 and 316 in corrosion media containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acid at 280 °C was investigated by weight loss, scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The results showed that in corrosion media containing only sulfur, the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316 first increased and then decreased with the increase of sulfur content. In corrosion media containing naphthenic acid and sulfur, with the variations of acid value or sulfur content, the synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion has a great influence on the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316. It was indicated that the sulfur accelerated naphthenic acid corrosion below a certain sulfur content but prevented naphthenic acid corrosion above that. The corrosion products on two steels after exposure to corrosion media were investigated. The stable Cr5S8 phases detected in the corrosion products film of 316 were considered as the reason why 316 has greater corrosion resistance to that of Q235.

  9. Synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion in crude oil distillation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B.S., E-mail: yinwenfeng2010@163.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China); Yin, W.F. [College of Mechatronic Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China); Sang, D.H. [Sheng Li Construction Group International Engineering Department, Shandong, Dongying, 257000 (China); Jiang, Z.Y. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion of a carbon-manganese steel and a stainless steel in sulfur and/or naphthenic acid media was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion rate of the carbon-manganese steel increased with the increase of the acid value and sulfur content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The critical values of the concentration of sulfur and acid for corrosion rate of the stainless steel were ascertained respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The stainless steel is superior to the carbon-manganese steel in corrosion resistance because of the presence of stable Cr{sub 5}S{sub 8} phases. - Abstract: The synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion at high temperature in crude oil distillation unit was studied using Q235 carbon-manganese steel and 316 stainless steel. The corrosion of Q235 and 316 in corrosion media containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acid at 280 Degree-Sign C was investigated by weight loss, scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The results showed that in corrosion media containing only sulfur, the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316 first increased and then decreased with the increase of sulfur content. In corrosion media containing naphthenic acid and sulfur, with the variations of acid value or sulfur content, the synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion has a great influence on the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316. It was indicated that the sulfur accelerated naphthenic acid corrosion below a certain sulfur content but prevented naphthenic acid corrosion above that. The corrosion products on two steels after exposure to corrosion media were investigated. The stable Cr{sub 5}S{sub 8} phases detected in the corrosion products film of 316 were considered as the reason why 316 has greater corrosion resistance to that of Q235.

  10. Immunotoxic effects of oil sands-derived naphthenic acids to rainbow trout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, Gillian Z.; Hogan, Natacha S.; Köllner, Bernd; Thorpe, Karen L.; Phalen, Laura J.; Wagner, Brian D.; Heuvel, Michael R. van den

    2013-01-01

    Naphthenic acids are the major organic constituents in waters impacted by oil sands. To investigate their immunotoxicity, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were injected with naphthenic acids extracted from aged oil sands tailings water. In two experiments, rainbow trout were injected intraperitoneally with 0, 10, or 100 mg/kg of naphthenic acids, and sampled after 5 or 21 d. Half of the fish from the 21 d exposure were co-exposed to inactivated Aeromonas salmonicida (A.s.) to induce an immune response. A positive control experiment was conducted using an intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg/kg of benzo[a]pyrene, a known immune suppressing compound. T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, thrombocytes, and myeloid cells were counted in blood and lymphatic tissue using flow cytometry. In the 5 d exposure, there was a reduction in blood leucocytes and spleen thrombocytes at the 100 mg/kg dose. However, at 21 d, leucocyte populations showed no effects of exposure with the exception that spleen thrombocyte populations increase at the 100 mg/kg dose. In the 21 d exposure, B- and T-lymphocytes in blood showed a significant Dose × A.s. interaction, indicating stimulated blood cell proliferation due to naphthenic acids alone as well as due to A.s. Naphthenic acid injections did not result in elevated bile fluorescent metabolites or elevated hepatic EROD activity. In contrast to naphthenic acids exposures, as similar dose of benzo[a]pyrene caused a significant decrease in B- and T-lymphocyte absolute counts in blood and relative B-lymphocyte counts in spleen. Results suggest that the naphthenic acids may act via a generally toxic mechanism rather than by specific toxic effects on immune cells.

  11. Immunotoxic effects of oil sands-derived naphthenic acids to rainbow trout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, Gillian Z.; Hogan, Natacha S. [Canadian Rivers Institute, Department of Biology, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PEI (Canada); Koellner, Bernd [Friedrich Loeffler Institute, Federal Research Institute of Animal Health, Institute of Immunology, Greifswald (Germany); Thorpe, Karen L.; Phalen, Laura J. [Canadian Rivers Institute, Department of Biology, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PEI (Canada); Wagner, Brian D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown (Canada); Heuvel, Michael R. van den, E-mail: mheuvel@upei.ca [Canadian Rivers Institute, Department of Biology, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PEI (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    Naphthenic acids are the major organic constituents in waters impacted by oil sands. To investigate their immunotoxicity, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were injected with naphthenic acids extracted from aged oil sands tailings water. In two experiments, rainbow trout were injected intraperitoneally with 0, 10, or 100 mg/kg of naphthenic acids, and sampled after 5 or 21 d. Half of the fish from the 21 d exposure were co-exposed to inactivated Aeromonas salmonicida (A.s.) to induce an immune response. A positive control experiment was conducted using an intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg/kg of benzo[a]pyrene, a known immune suppressing compound. T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, thrombocytes, and myeloid cells were counted in blood and lymphatic tissue using flow cytometry. In the 5 d exposure, there was a reduction in blood leucocytes and spleen thrombocytes at the 100 mg/kg dose. However, at 21 d, leucocyte populations showed no effects of exposure with the exception that spleen thrombocyte populations increase at the 100 mg/kg dose. In the 21 d exposure, B- and T-lymphocytes in blood showed a significant Dose Multiplication-Sign A.s. interaction, indicating stimulated blood cell proliferation due to naphthenic acids alone as well as due to A.s. Naphthenic acid injections did not result in elevated bile fluorescent metabolites or elevated hepatic EROD activity. In contrast to naphthenic acids exposures, as similar dose of benzo[a]pyrene caused a significant decrease in B- and T-lymphocyte absolute counts in blood and relative B-lymphocyte counts in spleen. Results suggest that the naphthenic acids may act via a generally toxic mechanism rather than by specific toxic effects on immune cells.

  12. Response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to naphthenic acid exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, K.; Wilson, K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Headley, J. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using a model organism for the algal bioremediation of oil sands process water (OSPW), a highly toxic mixture of sediments, bitumen, ions, and organic and inorganic compounds. Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a contaminant class of particular concern. Bioremediation techniques may mitigate toxicity of OSPW in general, and NAs in particular. Although most studies on the biodegradation of NAs focus on the role of bacteria, fungi, and emergent macrophytes, studies have indicated that algae may also play a key role through direct degradation, biosequestration, or photosynthetic aeration of waters to promote other biological reactions. Chlamydomonas frigida is of particular interest, but no cultures are currently available. Therefore, this study used C. reinhardtii, a well-characterized model organism, to begin analysis of potential algal bioremediation of OSPW. Cultures of C. reinhardtii were grown heterotrophically in nutrient media spiked with a dilution series of NAs. Culture densities were measured to compile growth curves over time, changes in rate of growth, and survivability. Negative ion electrospray mass spectrometry was used to determine the concentration of NAs in solution in relation to growth rate and culture density. The study determined the tolerance of C. reinhardtii to NAs. A mechanism for this tolerance was then proposed.

  13. Mass spectrometry of oil sands naphthenic acids : degradation in OSPW and wetland plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Headley, J. [Environment Canada, Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Water Science and Technology Directorate

    2009-07-01

    This presentation discussed mass spectrometry of oil sands naphthenic acids and the degradation in OSPW and wetland plants. It presented background information on the Athabasca oil sands and naphthenic acids which involve a mixture of alkanes and cycloalkane carboxylic acids with aliphatic side chains. The presentation also discussed mass spectrometry with electrospray operating in negative ion modes. Loop injection, external standard methods and solid phase extraction were reviewed along with improved analysis by removing background ions. Other topics that were presented included hydroponic test systems and wetland plant toxicity, growth and transpiration. It was concluded that dissipation included species containing oxygen, ozone, O{sub 4}, and O{sub 5}. tabs., figs.

  14. Biodegradation of a surrogate naphthenic acid under denitrifying conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Yetty; Nemati, Mehdi; Dalai, Ajay

    2014-03-15

    Extraction of bitumen from the shallow oil sands generates extremely large volumes of waters contaminated by naphthenic acid which pose severe environmental and ecological risks. Aerobic biodegradation of NA in properly designed bioreactors has been investigated in our earlier works. In the present work, anoxic biodegradation of trans-4-methyl-1-cyclohexane carboxylic acid (trans-4MCHCA) coupled to denitrification was investigated as a potential ex situ approach for the treatment of oil sand process waters in bioreactors whereby excessive aeration cost could be eliminated, or as an in situ alternative for the treatment of these waters in anoxic stabilization ponds amended with nitrate. Using batch and continuous reactors (CSTR and biofilm), effects of NA concentration (100-750mgL(-1)), NA loading rate (up to 2607.9mgL(-1)h(-1)) and temperature (10-35°C) on biodegradation and denitrification processes were evaluated. In the batch system biodegradation of trans-4MCHCA coupled to denitrification occurred even at the highest concentration of 750mgL(-1). Consistent with the patterns reported for aerobic biodegradation, increase in initial concentration of NA led to higher biodegradation and denitrification rates and the optimum temperature was determined as 23-24°C. In the CSTR, NA removal and nitrate reduction rates passed through a maximum due to increases in NA loading rate. NA loading rate of 157.8mgL(-1)h(-1) at which maximum anoxic NA and nitrate removal rates (105.3mgL(-1)h(-1) and 144.5mgL(-1)h(-1), respectively) occurred was much higher than those reported for the aerobic alternative (NA loading and removal rates: 14.2 and 9.6mgL(-1)h(-1), respectively). In the anoxic biofilm reactor removal rates of NA and nitrate were dependent on NA loading rate in a linear fashion for the entire range of applied loading rates. The highest loading and removal rates for NA were 2607.9 and 2028.1mgL(-1)h(-1), respectively which were at least twofold higher than the values

  15. Coupling of subcritical methanol with acidic ionic liquids for the acidity reduction of naphthenic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar Faisal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of naphthenic acids (NAs in crude oil is the major cause of corrosion in the refineries and its processing equipment. The goal of this study is to reduce the total acid number (TAN of NAs by treating them with subcritical methanol in the presence of acidic ionic liquid (AIL catalysts. Experiments were carried out in an autoclave batch reactor and the effect of different reaction parameters was investigated. It was observed that TAN reduction was positively dependent on the temperature and concentration of the AIL whereas excess of methanol has a negative effect. Approximately 90% TAN reduction was achieved under the optimized reaction conditions using [BMIM]HSO4 as catalyst. It was also perceived from the experimental results that the AILs with longer alkyl chain exhibited higher catalytic activity. The activity and stability of AIL showed that they can be promising catalyst to esterify NAs under subcritical methanol.

  16. Naphthenic acid characterization and distribution in crude oils; Caracterizacao e distribuicao de acidos naftenicos em petroleos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Regina C.L.; Gomes, Alexandre de O. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Naphthenic acid corrosion was observed for the first time during the distillation process of some kind of crude oils in 1920. Recent reports about naphthenic acid corrosion have been found in China, India, Venezuela, Eastern Europe, Russia and the USA. In Brazil, heavy and acid crude oil processing is rising. Some brazilian crude oils have TAN around 3,0 mg KOH/g. The presence of relatively high levels of naphthenic acids in crude oils is a bane of petroleum refiners; and more recently, of producers as well, who have reported problems during production with calcium and sodium naphthenate . Essentially, these acids which are found to greater or lesser extent in virtually all crude oils are corrosive and tend to cause equipment failures, lead to high maintenance costs and may pose environmental disposal problems. In order to give these information to PETROBRAS, The Research and Development Center of PETROBRAS (CENPES) has been working in house and with brazilian universities developing analytical technicians to know better molecular structures and distribution of these acids compounds in crude oils. This work presents the actual methods and some results from these developments. (author)

  17. Mechanism of Corrosion by Naphthenic Acids and Organosulfur Compounds at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng

    Due to the law of supply and demand, the last decade has witnessed a skyrocketing in the price of light sweet crude oil. Therefore, refineries are increasingly interested in "opportunity crudes", characterized by their discounted price and relative ease of procurement. However, the attractive economics of opportunity crudes come with the disadvantage of high acid/organosulfur compound content, which could lead to corrosion and even failure of facilities in refineries. However, it is generally accepted that organosulfur compounds may form protective iron sulfide layers on the metal surface and decrease the corrosion rate. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the corrosive property of crudes at high temperatures, the mechanism of corrosion by acids (naphthenic acids) in the presence of organosulfur compounds, and methods to mitigate its corrosive effect. In 2004, an industrial project was initiated at the Institute for Corrosion and Multiphase Technology to investigate the corrosion by naphthenic acids and organosulfur compounds. In this project, for each experiment there were two experimentation phases: pretreatment and challenge. In the first pretreatment phase, a stirred autoclave was filled with a real crude oil fraction or model oil of different acidity and organosulfur compound concentration. Then, the stirred autoclave was heated to high temperatures to examine the corrosivity of the oil to different materials (specimens made from CS and 5% Cr containing steel were used). During the pretreatment, corrosion product layers were formed on the metal surface. In the second challenge phase, the steel specimens pretreated in the first phase were inserted into a rotating cylinder autoclave, called High Velocity Rig (HVR). The HVR was fed with a high-temperature oil solution of naphthenic acids to attack the iron sulfide layers. Based on the difference of specimen weight loss between the two steps, the net corrosion rate could be calculated and the protectiveness

  18. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Wang

    Full Text Available Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals.

  19. Simple Method to Determine the Partition Coefficient of Naphthenic Acid in Oil/Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitsch-Larsen, Anders; Andersen, Simon Ivar

    2008-01-01

    The partition coefficient for technical grade naphthenic acid in water/n-decane at 295 K has been determined (K-wo = 2.1 center dot 10(-4)) using a simple experimental technique with large extraction volumes (0.09 m(3) of water). Furthermore, nonequilibrium values at different pH values...

  20. [Determination of naphthenic acids in distillates of crude oil by gas chromatography/chemical ionization-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Zhenbo; Tian, Songbai; Zhai, Yuchun; Sun, Yanwei; Zhuang, Lihong

    2004-05-01

    The petroleum carboxylic acids in 200-420 degrees C distillate of crude oil were separated by the extraction with column chromatography on an anion exchange resin. The effect of the composition and structure of naphthenic acids on separation were studied by the infra-red (IR) spectroscopic techniques. Naphthenic acids and iso-butane reagent gas were introduced into the ion source for chemical ionization, in which the ions represented by [M + C4H9]+ were used to calculate the relative molecular mass for each acid. Based on the mass spectra of pure fatty and naphthenic acids, in combination with the z-series formula CnH(2n + z)O2, the naphthenic acids can be classified into fatty, mono-, bi- ... hexa-cyclic types. The results indicated that the relative molecular mass range of naphthenic acids in this distillates was 170-510, and the carbon number range was C10-C35. The contents of bi-cyclic and tri-cyclic naphthenic acids were higher than others.

  1. Influence of containing of asphaltenes and naphthenic acids over organic deposition inhibitor performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Geiza E.; Mansur, Claudia R.E.; Pires, Renata V.; Passos, Leonardo B.; Lucas, Elizabete F. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas; Alvares, Dellyo R.S.; Gonzalez, Gaspar [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    Organic deposition is a serious problem confronted by the petroleum industry in Brazil and worldwide. Among the main petroleum components that may cause deposition problems are waxes and asphaltenes. This work aims at evaluating the influence of petroleum fractions (asphaltenes and naphthenic acids) on the organic deposition phenomenon as well as on organic deposition inhibitors performance. The influence of the organic fractions was evaluated by their ability to change wax crystals, to lower the pour point and to alter the initial wax appearance temperature. The efficiency of the additives was tested by pour point measurements. The results show that asphaltenes seem to act as organic deposition inhibitors, while naphthenic acids do not significantly change the system. Moreover, employing both of them produces no synergic effect. Among polymeric inhibitors, all of the chemically modified EVA copolymer presented better results than the non-modified commercial EVA copolymer. The best result was observed for EVA28C{sub 16}. (author)

  2. Could naphthenic acids be responsible for severe emulsion tightness for a low TAN value oil?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauchard, V.; Muller, H.; Al-Hajji, A. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Research and Development Center; Sjoblom, J. [Norwegian Univ. of Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Ugelstad Laboratory; Kokal, S. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). EXPEC Advanced Research Center; Bouriat, P.; Dicharry, C. [Univ. de Pau, Pau Cedex (France). Laboratoire des Fluides Complexes, UMR CNRS; Rogers, R. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This study re-analyzed the emulsion stabilizing properties of a low Total Acid Number (TAN) of a high asphaltene crude oil with respect to the role of naphthenic acids. The emulsion stability depended on the pressure/pH. The high interfacial activity of indigenous acids extracted from the crude oil was determined by means of Ion Exchange Resins and by the high organic acid content in the interfacial material extracted from a sludge emulsion. The physical origin of these phenomenological observations was identified using the Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) and pendant droplet experiments. The interfacial material was composed of a mixture of asphaltenes and organic acids having a wide range of structures (monoprotic, diprotic, fatty, naphthenic and perhaps aromatic) and molecular weights. The interfacial rheology was a 2D gel with an assumed glass transition temperature of approximately 40 degrees C. It was concluded that a synergistic effect of asphaltenes and organic acids promoted the build up of a very structured interface. This interface is more resistant to droplets coalescence than less structured interfaces. Therefore, the disruption of the interfacial layer requires the drainage of individual molecules as well as a collective yield of the gel.

  3. Characterization of commercial ceramic adsorbents and its application on naphthenic acids removal of petroleum distillates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Pereira Silva

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The mixture of carboxylic acids present in petroleum oil and directly responsible for its acidity and corrosiveness in liquid phase during the refine process is denominated "naphthenic acids". These acids are also present in distilled fraction of petroleum, causing several problems in final products quality. A possible way to remove the carboxilic acids from petroleum distilled fractions is the adsorption in porous materials. However, the results obtained until now indicate that ion exchange resins would be the best adsorbents for this process, which would probably increase its cost. In this work, two commercial adsorbents (clay and activated alumina were characterized by a set of physical-chemistry techniques and evaluated concerning their capacity of removing naphthenic acids from a light petroleum fraction. It was verified the influence of a thermal treatment previous to the adsorption in its physical-chemistry characteristics and its properties. A high reduction of the TAN values was verified in the residual oils from both adsorbent, although there was a competition among all the compounds present in the light oil fraction for the adsorption sites, which can be probably related to the thermal pre-treatment. These results were related to corrosion yield experiments, and it was observed that the adsorbent pretreatment also affected the reduction in corrosion yields for both alumina and clay.

  4. Determination of naphthenic acid profile in Ghana's Jubilee Oil using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osuteye, I.

    2015-01-01

    Crude oil is the life-blood of the global economy. Its importance stems from the fact that it is a base product for a wide variety of goods [Drugs, Plastics, Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)]. The oil discovery (over 3 billion barrel reserves in hydrocarbon and gas), about 60 km offshore between the Deepwater Tano and Cape Three Points Block in South western Ghana is a valuable natural asset and it has the potential of boosting the Ghanaian economy. During petroleum processing, various waste products are generated. One of such products is Naphthenic acids (NA). Naphthenic acids are organic acids naturally occurring in crude oil and a constituent of waste associated with oil refinery. Naphthenic acids serve as biomarkers for identification of the source of crude oil. The presence of Naphthenic acid in the aquatic environment causes toxic effects due to their weak biodegradable nature; the toxicity of Naphthenic acids depends on the class of Naphthenic acids present in the crude oil. The study assessed the profile of Naphthenic acids in Ghana’s Jubilee crude oil using Low Resolution Electron Impact – Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (LREI-GCMS) after isolation of Naphthenic acids in the Jubilee oil by a modified Kupchan’s Partitioning Process. The Mass Spectrometric (MS) Work Station Software was used for the identification of the Naphthenic acids present in the Jubilee crude oil. The quality of the Jubilee oil was also evaluated through the use of some key physico-chemical parameters [Total Acid Number (TAN), Sulphur Content, Viscosity, Pour Point, Flashpoint, Water Content and Densities] based on the American Standards for Testing and Materials (ASTM, 2007). The Total Acid Number was determined by Colorimetric Titration (ASTM D974); Sulphur Content by X-ray Fluorescent Spectrometry (ASTM D4294); Pour Point by the use of the SETA cloud and Pour Point Refrigerator Technique (ASTM D97); Viscosity by Gravity Timed Method (ASTM D445); Density by the Hydrometer

  5. Influence of commercial (Fluka) naphthenic acids on acid volatile sulfide (AVS) production and divalent metal precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Andrew D; Kinley, Ciera M; Rodgers, John H; Friesen, Vanessa; Bergsveinson, Jordyn; Haakensen, Monique C

    2016-12-01

    Energy-derived waters containing naphthenic acids (NAs) are complex mixtures often comprising a suite of potentially problematic constituents (e.g. organics, metals, and metalloids) that need treatment prior to beneficial use, including release to receiving aquatic systems. It has previously been suggested that NAs can have biostatic or biocidal properties that could inhibit microbially driven processes (e.g. dissimilatory sulfate reduction) used to transfer or transform metals in passive treatment systems (i.e. constructed wetlands). The overall objective of this study was to measure the effects of a commercially available (Fluka) NA on sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), production of sulfides (as acid-volatile sulfides [AVS]), and precipitation of divalent metals (i.e. Cu, Ni, Zn). These endpoints were assessed following 21-d aqueous exposures of NAs using bench-scale reactors. After 21-days, AVS molar concentrations were not statistically different (pAVS production was sufficient in all NA treatments to achieve ∑SEM:AVS AVS) could be used to treat metals occurring in NAs affected waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The influence of naphthenic acids and their fractions onto cell membrane permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović Ksenija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of naphthenic acids (NAs mixture and their narrow fractions (called NA pH 4, pH 8 and pH 10 onto permeability of beetroot cell membrane is examined. The results showed that the effect depends on treatment duration, concentration and NAs structure. Longer treatment of plant cell membranes with sodium naphthenate (Na-naph resulted in the increase of membrane permeability (e.g. 4-hour treatment with Na-naph (C=100 μmol L-1 increased membrane permeability about 3 times, while prolongation of treatment to 24 hour resulted in the 18 times increasing of the effect. NAs in the concentration range from 0.1 to 10 μmol L-1 does not change membrane permeability, while membrane permeability is increasing linearly with concentration increasing from 10-100 μmol L-1. The strongest effect expressed fraction pH 8, where bi- and tricyclic carboxylic acids are the most abundant. These structures are predominant in the total NAs mixture as well. Thereby could be explained their closest, but a little bit weaker effect, comparing to NAs present in fraction pH 8. The effect of NAs onto beetroot cell membrane is between the effects of anionic (SDS and LS and non-ionic surfactants (Triton X-100. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172006. i br. TR31036

  7. Effect of alkyl side chain location and cyclicity on the aerobic biotransformation of naphthenic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiti, Teresa M; Tezel, Ulas; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2014-07-15

    Aerobic biodegradation of naphthenic acids is of importance to the oil industry for the long-term management and environmental impact of process water and wastewater. The effect of structure, particularly the location of the alkyl side chain as well as cyclicity, on the aerobic biotransformation of 10 model naphthenic acids (NAs) was investigated. Using an aerobic, mixed culture, enriched with a commercial NA mixture (NA sodium salt; TCI Chemicals), batch biotransformation assays were conducted with individual model NAs, including eight 8-carbon isomers. It was shown that NAs with a quaternary carbon at the α- or β-position or a tertiary carbon at the β- and/or β'-position are recalcitrant or have limited biodegradability. In addition, branched NAs exhibited lag periods and lower degradation rates than nonbranched or simple cyclic NAs. Two NA isomers used in a closed bottle, aerobic biodegradation assay were mineralized, while 21 and 35% of the parent compound carbon was incorporated into the biomass. The NA biodegradation probability estimated by two widely used models (BIOWIN 2 and 6) and a recently developed model (OCHEM) was compared to the biodegradability of the 10 model NAs tested in this study as well as other related NAs. The biodegradation probability estimated by the OCHEM model agreed best with the experimental data and was best correlated with the measured NA biodegradation rate.

  8. Analysis of naphthenic acid mixtures as pentafluorobenzyl derivatives by gas chromatography-electron impact mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Villagomez, Juan Manuel; Vázquez-Martínez, Juan; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Trudeau, Vance L

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we report for the first time the efficiency of pentafluorobenzyl bromide (PFBBr) for naphthenic acid (NA) mixtures derivatization, and the comparison in the optimal conditions to the most common NAs derivatization reagents, BF 3 /MeOH and N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Naphthenic acids are carboxylic acid mixtures of petrochemical origin. These compounds are important for the oil industry because of their corrosive properties, which can damage oil distillation infrastructure. Moreover, NAs are commercially used in a wide range of products such as paint and ink driers, wood and fabric preservatives, fuel additives, emulsifiers, and surfactants. Naphthenic acids have also been found in sediments after major oils spills in the United States and South Korea. Furthermore, the toxicity of the oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), product of the oil sands extraction activities in Canada's oil sands, has largely been attributed to NAs. One of the main challenges for the chromatographic analysis of these mixtures is the resolution of the components. The derivatization optimization was achieved using surface response analysis with molar ratio and time as factors for derivatization signal yield. After gas chromatography-electron impact mass spectrometry (GC/EIMS) analysis of a mixture of NA standards, it was found that the signal produced by PFB-derivatives was 2.3 and 1.4 times higher than the signal produced by methylated and MTBS-derivatives, respectively. The pentafluorobenzyl derivatives have a characteristic fragment ion at 181m/z that is diagnostic for the differentiation of carboxylic and non-carboxylic acid components within mixtures. In the analysis of a Sigma and a Merichem derivatized oil extract NA mixtures, it was found that some peaks lack the characteristic fragment ion; therefore they are not carboxylic acids. Open column chromatography was used to obtain a hexane and a methanol fraction of the Sigma and

  9. Environmental fate and quantitative analysis of oilsands naphthenic acids : a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMartin, D. [Regina Univ., SK (Canada). Faculty of Engineering; Peru, K.M.; Headley, J. [Environment Canada, Saskatoon, SK (Canada). National Water Research Inst.

    2006-07-01

    Naphthenic acids (NA) are toxic to aquatic species and mammals. Significant concentrations of NA are found in oil sands tailings ponds. This presentation reviewed some of the analytical tools used by industry and environmentalists to remediate NA. Environmental persistence results were presented, as well as detailed information regarding the origin of NA in tailings ponds. Chemistry and toxicological considerations were examined, and current analytical methods for aquatic sampling were reviewed. Issues concerning photodegradation and phytoremediation were discussed. Details of the environmental effects of NA exposure were presented. Studies investigating the microbial populations required to degrade NA in water were discussed, as well as recent research investigating the phytoremediation of wetlands exposed to NA. It was noted that research is currently being conducted to optimize algae culture for use in phytoremediation methods. However, many of the components of NA are resistant to the biodegradation, photodegradation and phytoremediation methods currently used. It was concluded that further research is needed to complete mass balance studies in riverine systems and to evaluate the cellular level toxicity of NA in plants. refs., tabs., figs.

  10. Effects of naphthenic acid exposure on development and liver metabolic processes in anuran tadpoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melvin, Steven D.; Lanctôt, Chantal M.; Craig, Paul M.; Moon, Thomas W.; Peru, Kerry M.; Headley, John V.; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2013-01-01

    Naphthenic acids (NA) are used in a variety of commercial and industrial applications, and are primary toxic components of oil sands wastewater. We investigated developmental and metabolic responses of tadpoles exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of a commercial NA blend throughout development. We exposed Lithobates pipiens tadpoles to 1 and 2 mg/L NA for 75 days and monitored growth and development, condition factor, gonad and liver sizes, and levels of liver glucose, glycogen, lipids and cholesterol following exposure. NA decreased growth and development, significantly reduced glycogen stores and increased triglycerides, indicating disruption to processes associated with energy metabolism and hepatic glycolysis. Effects on liver function may explain reduced growth and delayed development observed in this and previous studies. Our data highlight the need for greater understanding of the mechanisms leading to hepatotoxicity in NA-exposed organisms, and indicate that strict guidelines may be needed for the release of NA into aquatic environments. -- Highlights: ► We exposed Lithobates pipiens tadpoles to 1–2 mg/L NA in the laboratory. ► We monitored survival, growth and development for 75 days. ► We measured liver glycogen, glucose, triglycerides, and cholesterol levels. ► NA significantly reduced growth and development compared to controls. ► NA significantly reduced glycogen levels and increased triglycerides. -- Leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens) tadpoles chronically exposed to sub-lethal NA concentrations (1–2 mg/L) suffered decreased growth and development and disruption to liver metabolic processes

  11. Oil sands naphthenic acids: a review of properties, measurement, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lisa D; Ulrich, Ania C

    2015-05-01

    The Alberta oil sands contain one of the world's largest reserves of oil - over 169 billion barrels of bitumen are economically recoverable with current extraction technologies. Surface mining and subsequent hot water extraction of bitumen from the ore generates about nine cubic meters of raw tailings per cubic meter of oil. Oil sands facilities are required to operate under a policy of zero water discharge, resulting in ponds containing more than one billion cubic meters of tailings, a mixture of sand, fines and process-affected water. Process-affected water contains numerous organic compounds, including naphthenic acids (NAs), which have been identified as the primary source of acute toxicity of process-affected water. Developments in analytical techniques, aerobic biodegradability, and treatment via chemical oxidation (ozone) of NAs are reviewed. The field continues to be challenged by the lack of a cost-effective, accurate analytical technique for NAs or an understanding of all the organic constituents in process-affected water that may be contributing to observed toxicity and thus requiring treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Trace analysis of total naphthenic acids in aqueous environmental matrices by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry direct injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunswick, Pamela; Shang, Dayue; van Aggelen, Graham; Hindle, Ralph; Hewitt, L Mark; Frank, Richard A; Haberl, Maxine; Kim, Marcus

    2015-07-31

    A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography quadrupole time of flight method has been established for the determination of total naphthenic acid concentrations in aqueous samples. This is the first methodology that has been adopted for routine, high resolution, high throughput analysis of total naphthenic acids at trace levels in unprocessed samples. A calibration range from 0.02 to 1.0μgmL(-1) total Merichem naphthenic acids was validated and demonstrated excellent accuracy (97-111% recovery) and precision (1.9% RSD at 0.02μgmL(-1)). Quantitative validation was also demonstrated in a non-commercial oil sands process water (OSPW) acid extractable organics (AEOs) fraction containing a higher percentage of polycarboxylic acid isomers than the Merichem technical mix. The chromatographic method showed good calibration linearity of ≥0.999 RSQ to 0.005μgmL(-1) total naphthenic acids with a precision <3.1% RSD and a calculated detection limit of 0.0004μgmL(-1) employing Merichem technical mix reference material. The method is well suited to monitoring naturally occurring and industrially derived naphthenic acids (and other AEOs) present in surface and ground waters in the vicinity of mining developments. The advantage of the current method is its direct application to unprocessed environmental samples and to examine natural naphthenic acid isomer profiles. It is noted that where the isomer profile of samples differs from that of the reference material, results should be considered semi-quantitative due to the lack of matching isomer content. The fingerprint profile of naphthenic acids is known to be transitory during aging and the present method has the ability to adapt to monitoring of these changes in naphthenic acid content. The method's total ion scan approach allows for data previously collected to be examined retrospectively for specific analyte mass ions of interest. A list of potential naphthenic acid isomers that decrease in response with aging is proposed

  13. Use of a (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationship [(Q)SAR] model to predict the toxicity of naphthenic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, Richard; Sanderson, Hans; Kavanagh, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a complex mixture of carboxylic acids that are natural constituents of oil sand found in north-eastern Alberta, Canada.  NAs are released and concentrated in the alkaline water used in the extraction of bitumen from oil sand sediment.  NAs have been identified...... as the principal toxic components of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), and microbial degradation of lower molecular weight (MW) NAs decreases the toxicity of NA mixtures in OSPW.  Analysis by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy indicated that larger, more cyclic NAs contain greater carboxylic...

  14. Differences in phytotoxicity and dissipation between ionized and nonionized oil sands naphthenic acids in wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Sarah A; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M; Germida, James J

    2009-10-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are composed of alkyl-substituted acyclic and cycloaliphatic carboxylic acids and, because they are acutely toxic to fish, are of toxicological concern. During the caustic hot-water extraction of oil from the bitumen in oil sands deposits, NAs become concentrated in the resulting tailings pond water. The present study investigated if dissipation of NAs occurs in the presence of hydroponically grown emergent macrophytes (Typha latifolia, Phragmites australis, and Scirpus acutus) to determine the potential for phytoremediation of these compounds. Plants were grown with oil sands NAs (pKa approximately 5-6) in medium at pH 7.8 (predominantly ionized NAs) and pH 5.0 (predominantly nonionized NAs) to determine if, by altering their chemical form, NAs may be more accessible to plants and, thus, undergo increased dissipation. Whereas the oil sands NA mixture in its nonionized form was more toxic to wetland plants than its ionized form, neither form appeared to be sequestered by wetland plants. The present study demonstrated that plants may selectively enhance the dissipation of individual nonionized NA compounds, which contributes to toxicity reduction but does not translate into detectable total NA dissipation within experimental error and natural variation. Plants were able to reduce the toxicity of a NA system over 30 d, increasing the median lethal concentration (LC50; % of hydroponic solution) of the medium for Daphnia magna by 23.3% +/- 8.1% (mean +/- standard error; nonionized NAs) and 37.0% +/- 2.7% (ionized NAs) as determined by acute toxicity bioassays. This reduction in toxicity was 7.3% +/- 2.6% (nonionized NAs) and 45.0% +/- 6.8% (ionized NAs) greater than that in unplanted systems.

  15. Bio-physicochemical effects of gamma irradiation treatment for naphthenic acids in oil sands fluid fine tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudens, Ryan; Reid, Thomas; VanMensel, Danielle; Sabari Prakasanm, M.R. [Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON (Canada); Ciborowski, Jan J.H. [Biological Sciences, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON (Canada); Weisener, Christopher G., E-mail: weisener@uwindsor.ca [Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON (Canada)

    2016-01-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are persistent compounds that are components of most petroleum, including those found in the Athabasca oil sands. Their presence in freshly processed tailings is of significant environmental concern due to their toxicity to aquatic organisms. Gamma irradiation (GI) was used to reduce the toxicity and concentration of NAs in oil sands process water (OSPW) and fluid fine tailings (FFT). This investigation systematically studied the impact of GI on the biogeochemical development and progressive reduction of toxicity using laboratory incubations of fresh and aged tailings under anoxic and oxic conditions. GI reduced NA concentrations in OSPW by up to 97% in OSPW and in FFT by 85%. The GI-treated FFT exhibited increased rates of biogeochemical change, dependent on the age of the tailings source. Dissolved oxygen (DO) flux was enhanced in GI-treated FFT from fresh and aged source materials, whereas hydrogen sulfide (HS{sup −}) flux was stimulated only in the fresh FFT. Acute toxicity to Vibrio fischeri was immediately reduced following GI treatment of fresh OSPW. GI treatment followed by 4-week incubation reduced toxicity of aged OSPW to V. fischeri. - Highlights: • Gamma irradiation substantially reduced concentrations of ecotoxic naphthenic acids • Acute toxicity was reduced in gamma irradiated process water • Gamma irradiated tailings exhibited increased rates of microbial respiration.

  16. Impact of temperature, pH, and salinity changes on the physico-chemical properties of model naphthenic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celsie, Alena; Parnis, J Mark; Mackay, Donald

    2016-03-01

    The effects of temperature, pH, and salinity change on naphthenic acids (NAs) present in oil-sands process wastewater were modeled for 55 representative NAs. COSMO-RS was used to estimate octanol-water (KOW) and octanol-air (KOA) partition ratios and Henry's law constants (H). Validation with experimental carboxylic acid data yielded log KOW and log H RMS errors of 0.45 and 0.55 respectively. Calculations of log KOW, (or log D, for pH-dependence), log KOA and log H (or log HD, for pH-dependence) were made for model NAs between -20 °C and 40 °C, pH between 0 and 14, and salinity between 0 and 3 g NaCl L(-1). Temperature increase by 60 °C resulted in 3-5 log unit increase in H and a similar magnitude decrease in KOA. pH increase above the NA pKa resulted in a dramatic decrease in both log D and log HD. Salinity increase over the 0-3 g NaCl L(-1) range resulted in a 0.3 log unit increase on average for KOW and H values. Log KOW values of the sodium salt and anion of the conjugate base were also estimated to examine their potential for contribution to the overall partitioning of NAs. Sodium salts and anions of naphthenic acids are predicted to have on average 4 log units and 6 log units lower log KOW values, respectively, with respect to the corresponding neutral NA. Partitioning properties are profoundly influenced by the by the relative prevailing pH and the substance's pKa at the relevant temperature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Minimal health impacts but detectable tissue residues after exposure of northern leopard frogs (Lithobates pipiens) to commercial naphthenic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hersikorn, B.; Young, R.; Fedorak, P.; Smits, J.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reported on a study that examined whether naphthenic acids (NAs) are a toxic component in oil sands process-affected materials (OSPM). The study investigated the toxicity of commercial (Refined Merichem) NAs to native amphibians (northern leopard frogs) exposed to saline conditions comparable to those of reclaimed wetlands on oil sand leases. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis showed that the exposure of frogs to NAs solutions for 28 days resulted in proportional NA concentrations in extracts of frog muscle tissue. Biological assays were performed to determine if the increasing exposure to NAs caused a proportional compromise in the health of test animals. The innate immune function, thyroid hormones, and hepatic detoxification enzyme induction did not differ in response to increased tissue concentrations of NAs. The commercial NAs were absorbed and deposited in muscle tissue. It was concluded that NAs play only a small, if any, role in the toxicity of OSPM to frogs.

  18. In vitro evaluation of the toxic effects and endocrine disrupting potential of oil sands processed water and naphthenic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.; Wiseman, S.; Higley, E.; Jones, P.D.; Hecker, M.; Giesy, J.P. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Gamel El Din, M.; Martin, J.W. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are the primary toxic constituents of oil sands process-affected waters (OSPW). This presentation reported on a series of in vitro studies that were initiated to evaluate potential endocrine modulating effects of OSPW and their constituent NAs. The H295R steroidogenesis bioassay was used to examine the impact of OSPW and NA on 52 steroidogenesis. In particular, dose-response and time course studies were conducted to evaluate the impact of OSPW and NAs on testosterone and estradiol production. Aromatase activity and transcript abundance of the key 11 steroidogenic enzymes were also quantified to complement analysis of hormone levels. The MVLN trans-activation assay was used to test the estrogenicity/anti-estrogenicity of OSPW and NAs. In vitro cell viability and apoptosis (live-dead) caused by OSPW and NAs was quantified by the MTS reduction and caspase-3/7 activity in H295R and MVLN cells.

  19. Investigating salt and naphthenic acids interactions in the toxicity of oil sands process water to freshwater invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, D.; Kautzman, M.; Wojnarowicz, P.; Cutter, J.; Bird, E.; Liber, K.

    2010-01-01

    The hot water extraction process used to produce bitumens from oil sands produces a large volume of oil sands process water (OSPW) that contain elevated concentrations of naphthenic acids (NA) and salts. Many oil sands reclamation projects are proposing the use of OSPW as part of reconstructed wetlands projects. This study investigated the toxicity of OSPW to freshwater invertebrates. The toxic interactions between NA and salinity on freshwater invertebrates were assessed. Bioassays with laboratory-cultured Ceriodaphnia dubia were conducted to determine the toxicity of OSPW from selected water bodies. The study showed that while the concentrations of NAs and salinity were elevated in OSPW waters that caused toxic responses, the concentrations of salinity ions varied greatly among the OSPW samples. Results of the study suggested that ion composition may be a factor in toxicity. Interactions between NAs and salinity were then assessed by performing bioassays with mixtures representing major ion combinations in OSPW.

  20. A review of the nature of naphthenic acid occurrence, toxicity, and fate in refinery and oil sands extraction wastewaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eickhoff [Maxxam, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation evaluated the occurrence, toxicity and fate of naphthenic acids (NA) in refinery and oil sands extraction waste waters. The chemistry of NA was reviewed. Factors affecting the aquatic toxicity of NA were discussed, and modes of toxicity were outlined. NA residues in fish were evaluated. Issues concerning the biodegradation, photolysis, and phytodegradation of NA were reviewed. Various phytoremediation techniques were presented. Results of the study indicated that acute toxicity to aquatic organisms was caused by narcosis. Sublethal impacts of NA included changes to growth, fertilization, reproduction, development, and hormone modifications. Varying rates of toxicity were observed in different NA, based on their size and molecular structure. While biodegradation can reduce the toxicity of NA, higher molecular weight NA can resist degradation and cause toxicity. tabs., figs.

  1. Remotion of naphthenic acidity through adsorption with transition metal-perovskita; Remocao de acidez naftenica por adsorcao utilizando perovsquita com metais de transicao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Andressa Mendes [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos, Jean Heliton Lopes dos [Companhia Brasileira de Petroleo Ipiranga, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, Aleksandros El Aurens Meira de; Barbosa, Celmy Maria Bezerra de Menezes [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2008-07-01

    Some existent oxygenated compounds in the petroleum are main responsible for the acidity and corrodibility of petroleum derivates. Naphthenic acids are most present molecules, and there already are some quantity of phenols and fat acids. The aim of this work was to evaluate the kinetic behavior of naphthenic acid removal, using a new adsorbent material based on perovskite forms (LaZnO{sub 3}). Two model mixtures were used to carry out the research: the first one was 4-tertbuthylbenzoic acid soluble in n-dodecane and the other one was dodecanoic acid also in n dodecane. For the 4-tertbuthylbenzoic analysis, the adsorption reached the equilibrium at 180 min, with the adsorption capacity of q{sub ads} = 0,25 g{sub acid}/g{sub adsorbent}, and a q{sub ads,max} = 0,55 g{sub acid}/g{sub adsorbent} at equilibrium. For the analysis of the dodecanoic acid removal, the adsorption occurred at first minutes, reaching the equilibrium at 250 min, with the adsorption capacity of q{sub ads} = 0,87 g{sub acid}/g{sub adsorbent}, and a q{sub ads,max} = 0,62 g{sub acid}/g{sub adsorbent} at equilibrium. (author)

  2. Dynamics of two methanogenic microbiomes incubated in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, naphthenic acids, and oil field produced water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oko, Bonahis J; Tao, Yu; Stuckey, David C

    2017-01-01

    Oil field produced water (OFPW) is widely produced in large volumes around the world. Transforming the organic matter in OFPW into bioenergy, such as biomethane, is one promising way to sustainability. However, OFPW is difficult to biologically degrade because it contains complex compounds such as naphthenic acids (NAs), or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although active microbial communities have been found in many oil reservoirs, little is known about how an exotic microbiome, e.g. the one which originates from municipal wastewater treatment plants, would evolve when incubated with OFPW. In this study, we harvested methanogenic biomass from two sources: a full-scale anaerobic digester (AD) treating oil and gas processing wastewater (named O&G sludge), and from a full-scale AD reactor treating multiple fractions of municipal solid wastes (named MS, short for mixed sludge). Both were incubated in replicate microcosms fed with PAHs, NAs, or OFPW. The results showed that the PAHs, NAs, and OFPW feeds could rapidly alter the methanogenic microbiomes, even after 14 days, while the O&G sludge adapted faster than the mixed sludge in all the incubations. Two rarely reported microorganisms, a hydrogenotrophic methanogen Candidatus methanoregula and a saccharolytic fermenter Kosmotoga , were found to be prevalent in the PAHs and OFPW microcosms, and are likely to play an important role in the syntrophic degradation of PAHs and OFPW, cooperating with methanogens such as Methanoregula, Methanosarcina, or Methanobacterium . The dominant phyla varied in certain patterns during the incubations, depending on the biomass source, feed type, and variation in nutrients. The sludge that originated from the oil and gas processing wastewater treatment (O&G) reactor adapted faster than the one from municipal solid waste reactors, almost certainly because the O&G biomass had been "pre-selected" by the environment. This study reveals the importance of biomass selection for other

  3. Fate and behavior of oil sands naphthenic acids in a pilot-scale treatment wetland as characterized by negative-ion electrospray ionization Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajaero, Chukwuemeka; Peru, Kerry M; Simair, Monique; Friesen, Vanessa; O'Sullivan, Gwen; Hughes, Sarah A; McMartin, Dena W; Headley, John V

    2018-08-01

    Large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) are generated during the extraction of bitumen from oil sands in the Athabasca region of northeastern Alberta, Canada. As part of the development of treatment technologies, molecular characterization of naphthenic acids (NAs) and naphthenic acid fraction compounds (NAFC) in wetlands is a topic of research to better understand their fate and behavior in aquatic environments. Reported here is the application of high-resolution negative-ion electrospray Orbitrap-mass spectrometry for molecular characterization of NAs and NAFCs in a non-aerated constructed treatment wetland. The effectiveness of the wetlands to remove OSPW-NAs and NAFCs was evaluated by monitoring the changes in distributions of NAFC compounds in the untreated sample and non-aerated treatment system. After correction for measured evapotranspiration, the removal rate of the classical NAs followed approximately first-order kinetics, with higher rates observed for structures with relatively higher number of carbon atoms. These findings indicate that constructed wetland treatment is a viable method for removal of classical NAs in OSPW. Work is underway to evaluate the effects of wetland design on water quality improvement, preferential removal of different NAFC species, and reduction in toxicity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Acids and bases solvent effects on acid-base strenght

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Brian G

    2013-01-01

    Acids and bases are ubiquitous in chemistry. Our understanding of them, however, is dominated by their behaviour in water. Transfer to non-aqueous solvents leads to profound changes in acid-base strengths and to the rates and equilibria of many processes: for example, synthetic reactions involving acids, bases and nucleophiles; isolation of pharmaceutical actives through salt formation; formation of zwitter- ions in amino acids; and chromatographic separation of substrates. This book seeks to enhance our understanding of acids and bases by reviewing and analysing their behaviour in non-aqueous solvents. The behaviour is related where possible to that in water, but correlations and contrasts between solvents are also presented.

  5. Copper naphthenate: an update and status report on an effective wood pole and crossarm preservative for Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, M.

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this PowerPoint presentation was three-fold: (1) tp provide information on copper naphthenate and treated wood, (2) to demonstrate that copper naphthenate is an excellent choice for wood poles, and (3) to provide an evaluation of copper naphthenate-treated poles in service. The author proceeded by describing the nature of naphthenic acid and copper naphthenate. Only those petroleum-based alicyclic carboxylic acids with acid numbers between 180-250 milligram KOH/gram. The author specified that two samples produced in Europe and Australia contain either naphthenic acid blends or 100 per cent synthetic acids, which could result in reduced preservatives performance. As for copper naphthenate, it is produced by the reaction of naphthenic acid and copper compounds. A drawing of the molecule was displayed. The toxicity for humans is low, minimal to avian, and moderate to high aquatic toxicity. Discovered in the late 1800s, copper naphthenate is used for pressure and non-pressure treatment, and the anticipated annual growth rate is 5 per cent. The regulatory status of copper naphthenate was described in both the United States and Canada. Results from field skate decay measurements were presented. The author concluded by stating that copper naphthenate is an excellent choice, recognized for its performance and efficacy. It is considered as an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) unrestricted use pesticide, imposes minimal regulatory requirements on treaters and users, and there are no federal disposal restrictions. Copper naphthenate is a safe and effective wood preservative. refs., figs.

  6. Characterization of commercial ceramic adsorbents and their application on naphthenic acids removal of petroleum distillates; Caracterizacao de adsorventes ceramicos comerciais e sua aplicacao na remocao de acidos naftenicos de destilados de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, J.P.; Senna, L.F. de; Lago, D.C.B. do; Silva Junior, P.F. da; Figueiredo, M.A.G. de; Dias, E.G. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: julia_psi@yahoo.com.br; Chiaro, S.S.X. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2006-07-01

    One denominates 'naphthenic acids' to the mixture of carboxylic acids that is present in petroleum oil, and is directly responsible for its acidity and corrosiveness in liquid phase during the refine process. These acids are also presents in distilled fraction of petroleum, causing several problems in final products quality. A possible way to remove them from petroleum distilled fractions is the adsorption in porous materials. However, the published results indicate that ion exchange resins would be the best adsorbents for this process, which would probably increase its cost. In this work, two commercial adsorbents (clay and activated alumina) were characterized by a set of physical-chemistry techniques and evaluated concerning their capacity of removing naphthenic acids from a light petroleum fraction. It was also verified the influence of a previous thermal treatment to the adsorption in their physical-chemistry characteristics and its properties. (author)

  7. Preparation of activated petroleum coke for removal of naphthenic acids model compounds: Box-Behnken design optimization of KOH activation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niasar, Hojatallah Seyedy; Li, Hanning; Das, Sreejon; Kasanneni, Tirumala Venkateswara Rao; Ray, Madhumita B; Xu, Chunbao Charles

    2018-04-01

    This study employed Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology to optimize activation parameters for the production of activated petroleum coke (APC) adsorbent from petroleum coke (PC) to achieve highest adsorption capacity for three model naphthenic acids. Activated petroleum coke (APC) adsorbent with a BET surface area of 1726 m 2 /g and total pore volume of 0.85 cc/g was produced at the optimum activation conditions (KOH/coke mass ratio) of 3.0, activation temperature 790 °C, and activation time 3.47 h). Effects of the activation parameters on the adsorption pefromances (adsortion capaciy and kinetics) were investigated. With the APC obtained at the optimum activation condition, the maximum adsorption capacity of 451, 362, and 320 (mg/g) was achieved for 2-naphthoic acid, diphenylacetic acid and cyclohexanepentanoic acid (CP), respectively. Although, generally APC adsorbents with a higher specific surface area and pore volume provide better adsorption capacity, the textural properties (surface areas and pore volume) are not the only parameters determining the APC adsorbents' adsorption capacity. Other parameters such as surface functionalities play effective roles on the adsorption capacity of the produced APC adsorbents for NAs. The KOH activation process, in particular the acid washing step, distinctly reduced the sulfur and metals contents in the raw PC, decreasing the leaching potential of metals from APC adsorbents during adsorption. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Beyond Naphthenic Acids: Environmental Screening of Water from Natural Sources and the Athabasca Oil Sands Industry Using Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Mark P; Peru, Kerry M; Fahlman, Brian; Hewitt, L Mark; Frank, Richard A; Headley, John V

    2015-09-01

    There is a growing need for environmental screening of natural waters in the Athabasca region of Alberta, Canada, particularly in the differentiation between anthropogenic and naturally-derived organic compounds associated with weathered bitumen deposits. Previous research has focused primarily upon characterization of naphthenic acids in water samples by negative-ion electrospray ionization methods. Atmospheric pressure photoionization is a much less widely used ionization method, but one that affords the possibility of observing low polarity compounds that cannot be readily observed by electrospray ionization. This study describes the first usage of atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (in both positive-ion and negative-ion modes) to characterize and compare extracts of oil sands process water, river water, and groundwater samples from areas associated with oil sands mining activities. When comparing mass spectra previously obtained by electrospray ionization and data acquired by atmospheric pressure photoionization, there can be a doubling of the number of components detected. In addition to polar compounds that have previously been observed, low-polarity, sulfur-containing compounds and hydrocarbons that do not incorporate a heteroatom were detected. These latter components, which are not amenable to electrospray ionization, have potential for screening efforts within monitoring programs of the oil sands.

  9. The effect of oil sands process-affected water and model naphthenic acids on photosynthesis and growth in Emiliania huxleyi and Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddow, Jessica; Johnson, Richard J; Lawson, Tracy; Breckels, Mark N; Webster, Richard J; Smith, Ben E; Rowland, Steven J; Whitby, Corinne

    2016-02-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are among the most toxic organic pollutants present in oil sands process waters (OSPW) and enter marine and freshwater environments through natural and anthropogenic sources. We investigated the effects of the acid extractable organic (AEO) fraction of OSPW and individual surrogate NAs, on maximum photosynthetic efficiency of photosystem II (PSII) (FV/FM) and cell growth in Emiliania huxleyi and Chlorella vulgaris as representative marine and freshwater phytoplankton. Whilst FV/FM in E. huxleyi and C. vulgaris was not inhibited by AEO, exposure to two surrogate NAs: (4'-n-butylphenyl)-4-butanoic acid (n-BPBA) and (4'-tert-butylphenyl)-4-butanoic acid (tert-BPBA), caused complete inhibition of FV/FM in E. huxleyi (≥10 mg L(-1)n-BPBA; ≥50 mg L(-1)tert-BPBA) but not in C. vulgaris. Growth rates and cell abundances in E. huxleyi were also reduced when exposed to ≥10 mg L(-1)n- and tert-BPBA; however, higher concentrations of n- and tert-BPBA (100 mg L(-1)) were required to reduce cell growth in C. vulgaris. AEO at ≥10 mg L(-1) stimulated E. huxleyi growth rate (p ≤ 0.002), yet had no apparent effect on C. vulgaris. In conclusion, E. huxleyi was generally more sensitive to NAs than C. vulgaris. This report provides a better understanding of the physiological responses of phytoplankton to NAs which will enable improved monitoring of NA pollution in aquatic ecosystems in the future. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Method of purifying phosphoric acid after solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouloheris, A.P.; Lefever, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    A method of purifying phosphoric acid after solvent extraction is described. The phosphoric acid is contacted with a sorbent which sorbs or takes up the residual amount of organic carrier and the phosphoric acid separated from the organic carrier-laden sorbent. The method is especially suitable for removing residual organic carrier from phosphoric acid after solvent extraction uranium recovery. (author)

  11. Selective solvent extraction of oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1938-04-09

    In the selective solvent extraction of naphthenic base oils, the solvent used consists of the extract obtained by treating a paraffinic base oil with a selective solvent. The extract, or partially spent solvent is less selective than the solvent itself. Selective solvents specified for the extraction of the paraffinic base oil are phenol, sulphur dioxide, cresylic acid, nitrobenzene, B:B/sup 1/-dichlorethyl ether, furfural, nitroaniline and benzaldehyde. Oils treated are Coastal lubricating oils, or naphthenic oils from the cracking, or destructive hydrogenation of coal, tar, lignite, peat, shale, bitumen, or petroleum. The extraction may be effected by a batch or counter-current method, and in the presence of (1) liquefied propane, or butane, or naphtha, or (2) agents which modify the solvent power such as, water, ammonia, acetonitrile, glycerine, glycol, caustic soda or potash. Treatment (2) may form a post-treatment effected on the extract phase. In counter-current treatment in a tower some pure selective solvent may be introduced near the raffinate outlet to wash out any extract therefrom.

  12. Naphthenic acids hydrates of gases: influence of the water/oil interface on the dispersing properties of an acidic crude oil; Acides naphteniques hydrates de gaz de l'interface eau/huile sur les proprietes dispersantes d'un brut acide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arla, D.

    2006-01-15

    Nowadays, the development of offshore oil production under increasing water depths (high pressures and low temperatures) has led oil companies to focus on gas hydrates risks. Hydrates are crystals containing gas and water molecules which can plug offshore pipelines. It has been shown that some asphaltenic crude oils stabilize water-in-oil emulsions (W/O) during several months and exhibit very good anti-agglomerant properties avoiding hydrate plugs formation. In this work, we have studied the 'anti-hydrate' properties of a West African acidic crude oil called crude AH. This oil contains naphthenic acids, RCOOH hydrocarbons which are sensitive to both the pH and the salinity of the water phase.The emulsifying properties of the crude AH have firstly been explored. It has been shown that heavy resins and asphaltenes are the main compounds of the crude AH responsible for the long term stability of the W/O emulsions whereas the napthenates RCOO{sup -} lead to less stable W/O emulsions. Dealing with hydrates, the crude AH exhibits moderate anti-agglomerant properties due to the presence of heavy resins and asphaltenes. However, the naphthenates RCOO{sup -} drastically increase the formation of hydrate plugs. Moreover, it has been pointed out that hydrate particles agglomeration accelerates the kinetics of hydrate formation and enhances the water/oil separation. In order to explain these behaviours, a mechanism of agglomeration by 'sticking' between a hydrate particle and a water droplet has been proposed. Finally, we have developed a model which describes the physico-chemical equilibria of the naphthenic acids in the binary system water/crude AH, in order to transpose the results obtained in the laboratory to the real oil field conditions. (author)

  13. Recovery of acid-degraded tributyl phosphate by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, G.C.; Holladay, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    During nuclear fuel reprocessing the organic solvent becomes loaded with various acidic degradation products, which can be effectively removed through solvent extraction. Studies have been made with a small bench-scale solvent extraction system to optimize such parameters as pH of aqueous phase, phase ratio, residence time, flow rates, and temperature. The necessary decontamination factors have been obtained for various degradation products during continuous solvent extraction in one stage, with the aqueous phase being recycled. The aqueous phase contains compounds that can be degraded to gases to minimize waste disposal problems

  14. On the solubility of nicotinic acid and isonicotinic acid in water and organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, Michael H.; Acree, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Solubilities of nicotinic acid and isonicotinic acids in organicsolvents have been determined. ► Solubilities are used to calculate Abraham descriptors for the two acids. ► These descriptors then yield water-solvent and gas-solvent partitions into numerous solvents. ► The solubility of the neutral acids in water is obtained. ► The method is straightforward and can be applied to any set of compound solubilities. -- Abstract: We have determined the solubility of nicotinic acid in four solvents and the solubility of isonicotinic acid in another four solvents. These results, together with literature data on the solubility of nicotinic acid in five other organic solvents and isonicotinic acid in four other organic solvents, have been analyzed through two linear Gibbs energy relationships in order to extract compound properties, or descriptors, that encode various solute–solvent interactions. The descriptors for nicotinic acid and isonicotinic acid can then be used in known equations for partition of solutes between water and organic solvents to predict partition coefficients and then further solubility in a host of organic solvents, as well as to predict a number of other physicochemical properties

  15. Application of UV-irradiated Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (UV-Fe(III)NTA) and UV-NTA-Fenton systems to degrade model and natural occurring naphthenic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; Klamerth, Nikolaus; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a highly complex mixture of organic compounds naturally present in bitumen and identified as the primary toxic constituent of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). This work investigated the degradation of cyclohexanoic acid (CHA), a model NA compound, and natural occurring NAs during the UV photolysis of Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (UV-Fe(III)NTA) and UV-NTA-Fenton processes. The results indicated that in the UV-Fe(III)NTA process at pH 8, the CHA removal increased with increasing NTA dose (0.18, 0.36 and 0.72 mM), while it was independent of the Fe(III) dose (0.09, 0.18 and 0.36 mM). Moreover, the three Fe concentrations had no influence on the photolysis of the Fe(III)NTA complex. The main responsible species for the CHA degradation was hydroxyl radical (OH), and the role of dissolved O 2 in the OH generation was found to be negligible. Real OSPW was treated with the UV-Fe(III)NTA and UV-NTA-Fenton advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The removals of classical NAs (O 2 -NAs), oxidized NAs with one additional oxygen atom (O 3 -NAs) and with two additional oxygen atoms (O 4 -NAs) were 44.5%, 21.3%, and 25.2% in the UV-Fe(III)NTA process, respectively, and 98.4%, 86.0%, and 81.0% in the UV-NTA-Fenton process, respectively. There was no influence of O 2 on the NA removal in these two processes. The results also confirmed the high reactivity of the O 2 -NA species with more carbons and increasing number of rings or double bond equivalents. This work opens a new window for the possible treatment of OSPW at natural pH using these AOPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of corrosion products formed by sulfidation as inhibitors of the naphthenic corrosion of AISI-316 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria-Cala, J. A.; Montañez, N. D.; Laverde Cataño, D.; Y Peña Ballesteros, D.; Mejía, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Naphthenic acids present in oil from most regions worldwide currently stand as the main responsible for the naphthenic corrosion problems, affecting the oil-refining industry. The phenomenon of sulfidation, accompanying corrosion processes brought about by naphthenic acids in high-temperature refining plant applications, takes place when the combination of sulfidic acid (H2S) with Fe forms layers of iron sulphide (FeS) on the material surface, layers with the potential to protect the material from attack by other corrosive species like naphthenic acids. This work assessed corrosion products formed by sulfidation as inhibitors of naphthenic corrosion rate in AISI-316 steel exposed to processing conditions of simulated crude oil in a dynamic autoclave. Calculation of the sulfidation and naphthenic corrosion rates were determined by gravimetry. The surfaces of the AISI-316 gravimetric coupons exposed to acid systems; were characterized morphologically by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and X-ray Fluorescence by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) combined with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). One of the results obtained was the determination of an inhibiting effect of corrosion products at 250 and 300°C, where lower corrosion rate levels were detected. For the temperature of 350°C, naphthenic corrosion rates increased due to deposition of naphthenic acids on the areas where corrosion products formed by sulfidation have lower homogeneity and stability on the surface, thus accelerating the destruction of AISI-316 steel. The above provides an initial contribution to oil industry in search of new alternatives to corrosion control by the attack of naphthenic acids, from the formation of FeS layers on exposed materials in the processing of heavy crude oils with high sulphur content.

  17. 21 CFR 173.280 - Solvent extraction process for citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Solvent extraction process for citric acid. 173.280... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Solvents, Lubricants, Release Agents and Related Substances § 173.280 Solvent extraction process for citric acid. A solvent extraction process for recovery of citric acid from...

  18. Effects of solvent and structure on the reactivity of 6-substituted nicotinic acids with diazodiphenylmethane in aprotic solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRATISLAV Ž. JOVANOVIĆ

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The rate constants for the reactions of diazodiphenylmethane (DDM with 6-substituted nicotinic acids in aprotic solvents at 30 °C were determined. The obtained second order rate constants in aprotic solvents, together with literature data for benzoic and nicotinic acids in protic solvents, were used for the calculation of solvent effects, employing the Kamlet-Taft solvatochromic equation (linear solvation energy relationship – LSER in the form: log k = log k0 + s* + a + b. The correlations of the kinetic data were performed by means of multiple linear regression analysis taking appropriate solvent parameters. The sign of the equation coefficients (s, a and b were in agreement with the postulated reaction mechanism, and the mode of the solvent influences on the reaction rate is discussed based on the correlation results. A similar contribution of the non-specific solvent effect and electrophilic solvation was observed for all acids, while the highest contribution of nucleophilic solvation was influenced by their high acidity. Correlation analysis of the rate data with substituent p parameters in an appropriate solvent using the Hammett equation was also performed. The substituent effect on the acid reactivity was higher in aprotic solvents of higher dipolarity/polarizability. The mode of the transmission of the substituent effect is discussed in light of the contribution of solute–solvent interaction on the acid reactivity.

  19. Third generation capture system: precipitating amino acid solvent systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Fernandez, E.; Misiak, K.; Ham, L. van der; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2013-01-01

    This work summarises the results of the design of novel separation processes for CO2 removal from flue gas based on precipitating amino acid solvents. The processes here described (DECAB, DECAB Plus and pH-swing) use a combination of enhanced CO2 absorption (based on the Le Chatelier’s principle)

  20. Solvent extraction of uranium from high acid leach solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadevi, G.; Sreenivas, T.; Navale, A.S.; Padmanabhan, N.P.H.

    2010-01-01

    A significant part of the total uranium reserves all over the world is contributed by refractory uranium minerals. The refractory oxides are highly stable and inert to attack by most of the commonly used acids under normal conditions of acid strength, pressure and temperature. Quantitative dissolution of uranium from such ores containing refractory uranium minerals requires drastic operating conditions during chemical leaching like high acid strength, elevated pressures and temperatures. The leach liquors produced under these conditions normally have high free acidity, which affects the downstream operations like ion exchange and solvent extraction

  1. Solubility of cefoxitin acid in different solvent systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Fuhong; Wang, Yongli; Xiao, Liping; Huang, Qiaoyin; Xu, Jinchao; Jiang, Chen; Hao, Hongxun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The solubility of cefoxitin acid in different solvent systems was measured. • Three models were used to correlate the solubility data. • The dissolution enthalpy of the dissolution process was calculated. - Abstract: Cefoxitin acid is one kind of important pharmaceutical intermediate. Its solubility is crucial for designing and optimizing the crystallization processes. In this work, the solubility of cefoxitin acid in organic solvents (methanol, acetonitrile, ethanol, isopropanol, n-propanol and ethyl acetate), water and water-methanol mixtures was measured spectrophotometrically using a shake-flask method within the temperature range 278.15–303.15 K. PXRD data and the Karl Fischer method were used to verify the crystal form stability of cefoxitin acid in the solubility measuring process. The melting points, the enthalpy and entropy of fusion were estimated. Results showed that the solubility of cefoxitin acid increases with the increasing temperature in all tested solvents in this work, and the solubility of cefoxitin acid increases with the increasing methanol concentration in water-methanol mixtures. The experimental solubility values were well correlated using the modified Apelblat equation, NRTL model and CNIBS/R-K model. An equation proposed by Williamson was adopted to calculate the molar enthalpy during the dissolution process.

  2. A unique laboratory test rig reduces the need for offshore tests to combat calcium naphthenate deposition in oilfield process equipment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mediaas, Heidi; Grande, Knut; Hustad, Britt-Marie; Hoevik, Kim Reidar; Kummernes, Hege; Nergaard, Bjoern; Vindstad, Jens Emil

    2006-03-15

    Producing and refining high-TAN crude oils introduces a number of challenges, among which calcium naphthenate deposition in process facilities is the most serious production issue. Until recently, the only option for studying chemicals and process parameters in order to prevent naphthenate deposition has been field tests. Statoil has now developed a small scale pilot plant where these experiments can be performed in the laboratory at Statoil's Research and Technology Center in Trondheim, Norway. The results from the pilot plant are in full agreement with the extensive naphthenate experience obtained from almost 9 years operation of the Heidrun oilfield. The design and operational procedures for this test facility are based on the recent discovery by Statoil and ConocoPhillips of the ARN acid. The ARN acid is a prerequisite for calcium naphthenate deposition. The new continuous flow pilot plant, the Naphthenate Rig, is used to develop new environmental friendly naphthenate inhibitors and to optimize process operating conditions. Since it operates on real crudes the need for field tests in qualifying new naphthenate inhibitors is reduced. To the best of our knowledge, the rig is the first of its kind in the world. (Author)

  3. Biochemical changes in cuttings of Robinia pseudoacacia after treatment with naphthenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SLAVKO KEVRESAN

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Naphthenic acids were isolated from gas oil fractions (distillation interval 168–290 °C of Vojvodina crude oil “Velebit”, characterized and their biological ac­tivity evaluated by the biochemical changes in cuttings of Robinia pseudoacacia after treatment with naphthenate. The activities of IAA peroxidase, total peroxi­da­ses and amylase, as well as the contents of reducing sugars and total proteins, were determined in the basal parts of soft wood cuttings of black locust after treat­ment with sodium naphthenate or the sodium salt of 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA, con­­centration 10-7 mol dm-3 for 3 or 6 h. High activities of IAA oxidase and amy­lase, together with a low activity of peroxidase (which is known as being stimula­tory for the initiation and activation of primordia were obtained after the three-hour treatment with sodium naphthenate. Six-hour treatment had an inhibitory effect on the examined biochemical markers. The effects of three- and six-hour treatments with NAA were between those of the corresponding treatment with naphthenic acids.

  4. Solvent extraction of thorium(IV) with dibutyldithiophosphoric acid in various organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtui, M.; Haiduc, I.

    1994-01-01

    The extraction of thorium(IV) from perchlorate solutions with di-n-butyldithiophosphoric acid (HBudtp) in various organic solvents occurs through an ion exchange mechanism. The extracted species in the organic phase is an eight-coordinate complex Th(Budtp) 4 . The higher values of the distribution ratio obtained in HBudtp-benzene-water system than in HBudtp-n-butanol-water system are explained by higher solubility of the complex species in nonpolar solvents. The position of the extraction curves in the pH-range lower than 0.7 reduces the complexation of thorium(IV) with Budtp - in the aqueous phase and also the hydrolysis process. (author) 8 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  5. Effects of temperature and solvent concentration on the solvent crystallization of palm-based dihydroxystearic acid with isopropyl alcohol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gregory F.L.Koay; Teong-Guan Chuah; Sumaiya Zainal-Abidin; Salmiah Ahmad; Thomas S.Y.Choong

    2012-01-01

    Palm-based dihydroxystearic acid of 69.55% purity was produced in a 500-kg-per-batch operation pilot plant and purified through solvent crystallization in a custom fabricated simultaneous batch crystallizer unit.The effects of temperature and solvent concentration on yield,particle size distribution and purity were studied.The purity was higher,while the yield and particle size were lower and smaller,respectively,at higher temperature and solvent concentration.The solvent crystallization process efficiency was rated at 66-69% when carried out with 70-80% isopropyl alcohol at 20 ℃.

  6. A knowledge based advisory system for acid/base titrations in non-aqueous solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.; van der Linden, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    A computer program was developed that could advice on the choice of solvent and titrant for acid/base titrations in nonaqueous media. It is shown that the feasibility of a titration in a given solvent can be calculated from solvent properties and intrinsic acid/base properties of the sample

  7. THERMAL AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT CONTACTED WITH 16 MOLAR AND 8 MOLAR NITRIC ACID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fondeur, F; David Hobbs, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-01-01

    Thermal and spectroscopic analyses were performed on multiple layers formed from contacting Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent with 1 M or 3 M nitric acid. A slow chemical reaction occurs (i.e., over several weeks) between the solvent and 1 M or 3 M nitric acid as evidenced by color changes and the detection of nitro groups in the infrared spectrum of the aged samples. Thermal analysis revealed that decomposition of the resulting mixture does not meet the definition of explosive or deflagrating material

  8. Reactivity of cyclohex-1-enylcarboxylic and 2-methylcyclohex-1-enylcarboxylic acids with diazodiphenylmethane in aprotic solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VERA V. KRSTIC

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Rate constants for the reaction of diazodiphenylmethane with cyclohex-1-enylcarboxylic acid and 2-methylcyclohex-1-enylcarboxylic acid were determined in nine aprotic solvents, as well as in seven protic solvents, at 30°C using the appropriate UV-spectroscopic method. In protic solvents the unsubsituted acid displayed higher reaction rates than the methyl-substituted one. The results in aprotic solvents showed quite the opposite, and the reaction rates were considerably lower. In order to explain the obtained results through solvent effects, reaction rate constants (k of the examined acids were correlated using the total solvatochromic equation of the form: log k=logk0+sp*+aa+bb, where p* is the measure of the solvent polarity, a represents the scale of the solvent hydrogen bond donor acidities (HBD and b represents the scale of the solvent hydrogen bond acceptor basicities (HBA. The correlation of the kinetic data were carried out by means of multiple linear regression analysis and the opposite effects of aprotic solvents, as well as the difference in the influence of protic and aprotic solvents on the reaction of the two examined acids with DDM were discussed. The results presented in this paper for cyclohex-1-enylcarboxylic and 2-methylcyclohex-1-enylcarboxylic acids were compared with the kinetic data for benzoic acid obtained in the same chemical reaction, under the same experimental conditions.

  9. Acid-base titrations in solvents of relatively low dielectric constant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.; Dahmen, E.A.M.F.

    1973-01-01

    From a comparison of the pKa values of various compounds in the solvent 1,2-dichloroethane, m-cresol, acetic acid and pyridine, the differences in basicity of these solvents could be determined. If the basicity of 1,2-dichloroethane is taken as 0 pK units, the basicities of m-cresol, acetic acid and

  10. Investigations of the reactivity of pyridine carboxylic acids with diazodiphenylmethane in protic and aprotic solvents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEKSANDAR D. MARINKOVIC

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Rate constants for the reaction of diazodiphenylmethane with isomeric pyridine carboxylic acids were determined in chosen protic and aprotic solvents at 30 °C, using the well known UV spectrophotometric method. The values of the rate constants of the investigated acids in protic solvents were higher than those in aprotic solvents. The second order rate constants were correlated with solvent parameters using the Kamlet-Taft solvatochromic equation in the form: log k = log k0 + sp* + aa + bb . The correlation of the obtained kinetic data were performed by means of multiple linear regression analysis taking appropriate solvent parameters. The signs of the equation coefficients were in agreement with the postulated reaction mechanism. The mode of the influence of the solvent on the reaction rate in all the investigated acids are discussed on the basis of the correlation results.

  11. Thermodynamic equilibrium of hydroxyacetic acid in pure and binary solvent systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Qiaoyin; Xie, Chuang; Li, Yang; Su, Nannan; Lou, Yajing; Hu, Xiaoxue; Wang, Yongli; Bao, Ying; Hou, Baohong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubility of hydroxyacetic acid in mono-solvents and binary solvent mixtures was measured. • Modified Apelblat, NRTL and Wilson model were used to correlate the solubility data in pure solvents. • CNIBS/R-K and Jouyban-Acree model were used to correlate the solubility in binary solvent mixtures. • The mixing properties were calculated based on the NRTL model. - Abstract: The solubility of hydroxyacetic acid in five pure organic solvents and two binary solvent mixtures were experimentally measured from 273.15 K to 313.15 K at atmospheric pressure (p = 0.1 MPa) by using a dynamic method. The order of solubility in pure organic solvents is ethanol > isopropanol > n-butanol > acetonitrile > ethyl acetate within the investigated temperature range, except for temperature lower than 278 K where the solubility of HA in ethyl acetate is slightly larger than that in acetonitrile. Furthermore, the solubility data in pure solvents were correlated with the modified Apelblat model, NRTL model, and Wilson model and that in the binary solvents mixtures were fitted to the CNIBS/R-K model and Jouyban-Acree model. Finally, the mixing thermodynamic properties of hydroxyacetic acid in pure and binary solvent systems were calculated and discussed.

  12. Effects of solvation on partition and dimerization of benzoic acid in mixed solvent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, H; Yajima, K; Wada, H; Nakagawa, G

    1995-06-01

    The partition of benzoic acid between 0.1M perchloric acid solution and two kinds of mixed solvents has been carried out at 25 degrees C. The partition and dimerization constants of benzoic acid have been determined in the 1-octanol-benzene and 2-octanone-benzene systems. In both the mixed solvent systems, with increasing content of 1-octanol and 2-octanone in each mixed solvent, the partition constant of benzoic acid has been found to increase, and the dimerization constant of benzoic acid in each organic phase to decrease. These phenomena are attributable to solvation of monomeric benzoic acid by 1-octanol and 2-octanone molecules in each mixed solvent.

  13. Exploring orange peel treatment with deep eutectic solvents and diluted organic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bruinhorst, A.; Kouris, P.; Timmer, J.M.K.; de Croon, M.H.J.M.; Kroon, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    The disintegration of orange peel waste in deep eutectic solvents and diluted organic acids is presented in this work. The albedo and flavedo layers of the peel were studied separately, showing faster disintegration of the latter. Addition of water to the deep eutectic solvents lowered the amount of

  14. Molecular microenvironments: Solvent interactions with nucleic acid bases and ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Pohorille, A.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of reconstructing plausible sequences of events in prebiotic molecular evolution is limited by the lack of fossil remains. However, with hindsight, one goal of molecular evolution was obvious: the development of molecular systems that became constituents of living systems. By understanding the interactions among molecules that are likely to have been present in the prebiotic environment, and that could have served as components in protobiotic molecular systems, plausible evolutionary sequences can be suggested. When stable aggregations of molecules form, a net decrease in free energy is observed in the system. Such changes occur when solvent molecules interact among themselves, as well as when they interact with organic species. A significant decrease in free energy, in systems of solvent and organic molecules, is due to entropy changes in the solvent. Entropy-driven interactioins played a major role in the organization of prebiotic systems, and understanding the energetics of them is essential to understanding molecular evolution.

  15. Behaviour of solvent extraction of niobium in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Cansheng; Huang Meixin; Zhang Xianzi; Zhang Chonghai

    1988-01-01

    The behaviour of solvent extraction of niobium is discussed. The expractants, includding TBP, HDBP, H 2 MBP, TBP irradiated, HDEHP, TTA and Aliquat-7402, are used. The special influence of molybdenum and zirconium on solvent extraction of niobium and the extraction behaviur of niobium with TBP irradiated are described. The effect of fluorine and uranium in aqueous phase on extraction of niobium is mentioned. It is observed that the interfacial crud has not relevance to D Nb , but niobium-95 can be absorbed on it. The species of extractable niobium, extraction mechanism, and the reason brought niobum into organic phase are discussed. Finally, the idea of increasing decontamination factor for niobium is suggested

  16. Validation of a UV Spectrometric Method for the Assay of Tolfenamic Acid in Organic Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study has been carried out to validate a UV spectrometric method for the assay of tolfenamic acid (TA in organic solvents. TA is insoluble in water; therefore, a total of thirteen commonly used organic solvents have been selected in which the drug is soluble. Fresh stock solutions of TA in each solvent in a concentration of 1 × 10−4 M (2.62 mg% were prepared for the assay. The method has been validated according to the guideline of International Conference on Harmonization and parameters like linearity, range, accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and robustness have been studied. Although the method was found to be efficient for the determination of TA in all solvents on the basis of statistical data 1-octanol, followed by ethanol and methanol, was found to be comparatively better than the other studied solvents. No change in the stock solution stability of TA has been observed in each solvent for 24 hours stored either at room (25±1°C or at refrigerated temperature (2–8°C. A shift in the absorption maxima has been observed for TA in various solvents indicating drug-solvent interactions. The studied method is simple, rapid, economical, accurate, and precise for the assay of TA in different organic solvents.

  17. Anhydrous formic acid and acetic anhydride as solvent or additive in nonaqueous titrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buvári-Barcza, A; Tóth, I; Barcza, L

    2005-09-01

    The use and importance of formic acid and acetic anhydride (Ac2O) is increasing in nonaqueous acid-base titrations, but their interaction with the solutes is poorly understood. This paper attempts to clarify the effect of the solvents; NMR and spectrophotometric investigations were done to reveal the interactions between some bases and the mentioned solvents. Anhydrous formic acid is a typical protogenic solvent but both the relative permittivity and acidity are higher than those of acetic acid (mostly used in assays of bases). These differences originate from the different chemical structures: liquid acetic acid contains basically cyclic dimers while formic acid forms linear associates. Ac2O is obviously not an acidic but an aprotic (very slightly protophilic) solvent, which supposedly dissociates slightly into acetyl (CH3CO+) and acetate (AcO-) ions. In fact, some bases react with Ac2O forming an associate: the Ac+ group is bound to the delta- charged atom of the reactant while AcO- is associated with the delta+ group at appropriate distance.

  18. Conceptual design of a novel CO2 capture process based on precipitating amino acid solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez Fernandez, E.; Heffernan, K.; Ham, L.V. van der; Linders, M.J.G.; Eggink, E.; Schrama, F.N.H.; Brilman, D.W.F.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Vlugt, T.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Amino acid salt based solvents can be used for CO2 removal from flue gas in a conventional absorption-thermal desorption process. Recently, new process concepts have been developed based on the precipitation of the amino acid zwitterion species during the absorption of CO2. In this work, a new

  19. Tunable polymeric sorbent materials for fractionation of model naphthenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mohamed H; Wilson, Lee D; Headley, John V

    2013-04-04

    The sorption properties are reported for several examples of single-component carboxylic acids representing naphthenic acids (NAs) with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) based polyurethane sorbents. Seven single-component examples of NAs were chosen with variable z values, carbon number, and chemical structure as follows: 2-hexyldecanoic acid (z = 0 and C = 16; S1), n-caprylic acid (z = 0 and C = 8; S2), trans-4-pentylcyclohexanecarboxylic acid (z = -2 and C = 12; S3), 4-methylcyclohexanecarboxylic acid (z = -2 and C = 8; S4), dicyclohexylacetic acid (z = -4; C = 14; S5), 4-pentylbicyclo[2.2.2]octane-1-carboxylic acid (z = -4; C = 14; S6), and lithocholic acid (z = -6; C = 24; S7). The copolymer sorbents were synthesized at three relative β-CD:diisocyanate mole ratios (i.e., 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3) using 4,4'-dicyclohexylmethane diisocyanate (CDI) and 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI). The sorption properties of the copolymer sorbents were characterized using equilibrium sorption isotherms in aqueous solution at pH 9.00 with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The equilibrium fraction of the unbound carboxylate anions was monitored in the aqueous phase. The sorption properties of the copolymer sorbents (i.e., Qm) were obtained from the Sips isotherm model. The Qm values generally decrease as the number of accessible β-CD inclusion sites in the copolymer framework decreases. The chemical structure of the adsorbates played an important role in their relative uptake, as evidenced by the adsorbate lipophilic surface area (LSA) and the involvement of hydrophobic effects. The copolymers exhibit molecular selective sorption of the single-component carboxylates in mixtures which suggests their application as sorbents for fractionation of mixtures of NAs. By comparison, granular activated carbon (GAC) and chitosan sorbents did not exhibit any significant molecular selective sorption relative to the copolymer materials; however, evidence of variable sorption capacity was

  20. Solubility of 3-Caffeoylquinic Acid in Different Solvents at 291-340 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. T.; Zhang, C. L.; Cheng, X. L.; Zhao, J. H.; Wang, L. C.

    2017-12-01

    Using a laser monitoring observation technique the solubilities of 3-caffeoylquinic acid in pure solvents, water, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, and two mixed solvents, methanol + water, ethanol + water have been determined at temperature range from 291-340 K. The experimental data were correlated by the modified Apelblat equation, λ h equation, and ideal model. The calculated solubilities were turned out very consistent with the experimental results, and the modified Apelblat equation shows the best agreement.

  1. Effects of organic solvents on hyaluronic acid nanoparticles obtained by precipitation and chemical crosslinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicudo, Rafaela Costa Souza; Santana, Maria Helena Andrade

    2012-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a hydrophilic mucopolysaccharide composed of alternating units of D-glucuronic acid and N-acetylglucosamine. It is used in many medical, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic applications, as sponges, films, or particle formulations. Hyaluronic acid nanoparticles can be synthesized free of oil and surfactants by nanoprecipitation in organic solvents, followed by chemical crosslinking. The organic solvent plays an important role in particles size and structure. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the influence of acetone, ethanol, and isopropyl alcohol on the synthesis and physico-chemical properties of hyaluronic acid nanoparticles. Particles were crosslinked with adipic hydrazide and chloride carbodiimide under controlled conditions. The nanoparticles obtained with all three studied solvents were moderately electrostatically stable. Experiments with acetone produced the smallest particle size (120.44 nm) and polydispersity (0.27). The size and polydispersity of hyaluronic acid nanoparticles correlated with the surface tension between water and the organic solvents, not with the thermodynamic affinity of water for the organic solvents.

  2. Thermal decomposition of organic solvent with nitric acid in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Tadao; Nishio, Gunji; Takada, Junichi; Tukamoto, Michio; Watanabe, Kouji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Miyata, Sadaichirou

    1995-02-01

    Since a thermal decomposition of organic solvent containing TBP (tributyl phosphate) with nitric acid and heavy metal nitrates is an exothermic reaction, it is possible to cause an explosive decomposition of TBP-complex materials formed by a nitration between the solvent and nitric acid, if the solvent involving TBP-complex is heated upto a thermal limit in an evaporator to concentrate a fuel liquid solution from the extraction process in the reprocessing plant. In JAERI, the demonstration test for explosive decomposition of TBP-complex by the nitration was performed to elucidate the safety margin of the evaporator in the event of hypothetical explosion under auspices of the Science and Technology Agency. The demonstration test was carried out by heating TBP/n-dodecane solvent mixed with nitric acid and uranium nitrate. In the test, the thermal decomposition behavior of the solvent was examined, and also a kinematic reaction constant and a heat formation of the TBP-complex decomposition were measured by the test. In the paper, a safety analysis of a model evaporator was conducted during accidental conditions under the explosive decomposition of the solvent. (author).

  3. Conformational analysis of glutamic acid: a density functional approach using implicit continuum solvent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Başak; Selçuki, Cenk

    2014-09-01

    Amino acids are constituents of proteins and enzymes which take part almost in all metabolic reactions. Glutamic acid, with an ability to form a negatively charged side chain, plays a major role in intra and intermolecular interactions of proteins, peptides, and enzymes. An exhaustive conformational analysis has been performed for all eight possible forms at B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level. All possible neutral, zwitterionic, protonated, and deprotonated forms of glutamic acid structures have been investigated in solution by using polarizable continuum model mimicking water as the solvent. Nine families based on the dihedral angles have been classified for eight glutamic acid forms. The electrostatic effects included in the solvent model usually stabilize the charged forms more. However, the stability of the zwitterionic form has been underestimated due to the lack of hydrogen bonding between the solute and solvent; therefore, it is observed that compact neutral glutamic acid structures are more stable in solution than they are in vacuum. Our calculations have shown that among all eight possible forms, some are not stable in solution and are immediately converted to other more stable forms. Comparison of isoelectronic glutamic acid forms indicated that one of the structures among possible zwitterionic and anionic forms may dominate over the other possible forms. Additional investigations using explicit solvent models are necessary to determine the stability of charged forms of glutamic acid in solution as our results clearly indicate that hydrogen bonding and its type have a major role in the structure and energy of conformers.

  4. Copper naphthenate: a proven solution for new wood preservative problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNair, W.S. [Merichem Chemicals and Refinery Services LLC, Houston, TX (United States); Loecner, P. [Pacific Gas and Electric, Davis, CA (United States)

    2002-08-01

    Today's engineers have the responsibility of considering cost, availability and climbability, as well as the environmental alternatives available to the traditional wood preservatives used in the production of utility poles: creosote, pentachlorophenol (PCP) and chromated copper arsenate (CCA). The leading alternative now emerging for utilities in this field is copper naphthenate. The authors present a case study that clearly demonstrates copper naphthenate as one of the most environmentally sensitive and effective wood preservative. When first introduced, copper naphthenate seemed to frequently result in early failure of the poles treated with this preservative. It was discovered that it was a phenomenon that had been largely exaggerated, and the failure rate was less than one per cent. A recent review has concluded that premature failures have basically disappeared. Several reasons can explain premature failures, such as pretreatment decay, improper sterilization/conditioning/drying, inadequate copper penetration and retention, and others. The long term effectiveness and performance of copper naphthenate has been documented in a number of field trials. The ultimate disposal of the product must be considered by the specifying engineer, and it is possible to dispose of copper naphthenate poles in a sanitary landfill. Due in part to recent manufacturing economies, the cost of copper naphthenate is similar to other oil-borne treatments. The case study of Pacific Gas and Electric was discussed. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Gels with exceptional thermal stability formed by bis(amino acid) oxalamide gelators and solvents of low polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarević, Janja; Jokić, Milan; Frkanec, Leo; Katalenić, Darinka; Zinić, Mladen

    2002-10-07

    Some bis (amino acid) oxalamide gelators form common thermo-reversible gels with various organic solvents but also gels of exceptional thermal stability with some solvents of medium and low polarity; the latter gels can be heated up to 50 degrees C higher temperatures than the bp of the solvent without apparent gel-to-sol transition.

  6. Amino acid salt solutions as solvents in CO2 capture from flue gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai; Thomsen, Kaj; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    New solvents based on the salts of amino acids have emerged as an alternative to the alkanolamine solutions, for the chemical absorption of CO2 from flue gas. But only few studies on amino acids as CO2 capturing agents have been performed so far. One of the interesting features of amino acid salt...... solutions is their ability to form solid precipitates upon the absorption of CO2. The occurrence of crystallization offers the possibility of increasing the CO2 loading capacity of the solvent. However, precipitation can also have negative effect on the CO2 capture process. The chemical nature of the solid...... of glycine, taurine, and lysine, while in the case of proline, and glutamic acid, the precipitate was found to be bicarbonate. These results give an important contribution to further understanding the potential of amino acid salt solutions in CO2 capture from flue gas....

  7. Solubilities of benzoic acid in binary (benzyl alcohol + benzaldehyde) solvent mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Qinbo; Xiong, Zhenhua; Chen, Chuxiong; Shen, Binwei

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubilities of benzoic acid in (benzyl alcohol + benzaldehyde) mixtures were measured at 1 atm. • The experimental temperature ranges at (298.35 to 355.65) K. • Effects of benzyl alcohol mass concentration at (0.00 to 1.00) on the solubilities of benzoic acid were studied. • The experimental data were correlated with NRTL model. • Thermodynamic functions of dissolution of benzoic acid in (benzyl alcohol + benzaldehyde) mixtures were discussed. - Abstract: The solubility of benzoic acid in binary (benzyl alcohol + benzaldehyde) solvent mixtures was measured at temperature from (298.35 to 355.65) K and atmospheric pressure. The measured solubility increases with the increasing temperature at constant solvent composition. The effects of mass fraction benzaldehyde in the solvent mixtures at (0.0 to 1.00) on the solubility were studied. The measured solubility decreases with the increasing mass fraction of benzaldehyde. The experimental results were correlated with the non-random two-liquid (NRTL) equations, and good agreement between the correlated and the experimental values was obtained. Thermodynamic functions for the solution of benzoic acid in binary (benzyl alcohol + benzaldehyde) solvent mixtures were calculated with the van’t Hoff plot. The apparent dissolution Gibbs free energy change was also calculated

  8. POLY(AMINOMETHYLENEPHOSPHONIC ACID FOR SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF METAL IONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M’hamed Kaid

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Diaminododecyltetramethylenetetraphosphonic acid (DADTMTPA has been investigated in liquid - liquid extraction of Zn (II and Cu (II in acetate media. The extraction of both cations was carried out in different media with the addition of CH3COONa, CH3COOH, HCl and H2SO4 at different pH values. The maximum extraction yield for copper is 70% after addition of 10 mg of sodium acetate and for zinc is 30% after addition of acetic acid at pHi = 5.5, in one step.

  9. Solvent extraction of uranium from lean grade acidic sulfate leach liquor with alamine 336 reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadevi, G.; Sreenivas, T.; Navale, A.S.; Padmanabhan, N.P.H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the solvent extraction studies carried out on an acidic low assay uranium bearing leach liquor generated during sulfuric acid leaching of a refractory uranium ore using alamine 336-isodecenol-kerosene reagent combine. The leach liquor has a U 3 O 8 content of about 270 mg/L, free acidity 2.4 N H 2 SO 4 and total dissolved solids concentration of 260 g/L. Process parameteric variation studies indicated strong influence of free acidity of the leach liquor, alamine 336 concentration and aqueous to organic phase ratio on the extraction efficiency of uranium. An extraction efficiency of about 95% was achieved when the free acidity of leach liquor was 1 N H 2 SO 4 or lower, using 2% (v/v) alamine 336 at ambient temperature with an aqueous to organic phase ratio of 1:1. The loading capacity under these conditions was 1.2 g/L of U 3 O 8 . About 98% of the uranium values could be stripped from the loaded organic using 1 N NaCl in 0.2 N H 2 SO 4 . The solvent extraction studies aided in developing a suitable process flowsheet for treating refractory uranium ores which need high acidity during leaching and relatively lower acidity for purification by solvent extraction. (author)

  10. Dimethylurea/citric acid as a highly efficient deep eutectic solvent

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dimethylurea/citric acid deep eutectic solvent was used as a dual catalyst and a green reaction medium for the efficient synthesis of bis(indolyl)methanes, quinolines and aryl-4, 5-diphenyl-1H-imidazoles. Ease of recovery and reusability of DES with high activity makes this method efficient and eco-friendly.

  11. Anodization of Zr-Nb-Cu alloy in mandelic acid - effect of solvent and anionic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavanya, A.; Raghunath Reddy, G.; Ch Anjaneyulu

    2004-01-01

    Anodization of zirconium-niobium-copper (ZNC) alloy in 0.1 M mandelic acid has been carried out. The effect of solvent (ethylene glycol) and added anionic impurities (sulphates, phosphates and carbonates) showed better kinetic results (formation rate, current efficiency and differential field of formation). (author)

  12. Extraction of bitter acids from hops and hop products using pressurized solvent extraction (PSE)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čulík, J.; Jurková, M.; Horák, T.; Čejka, P.; Kellner, V.; Dvořák, J.; Karásek, Pavel; Roth, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 3 (2009), s. 220-225 ISSN 0046-9750 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/1536; GA MŠk 1M0570 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : hops * bitter acids * pressurized solvent extraction Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2009

  13. Aggregation behavior of cholic acid derivatives in organic solvents and in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemen, H.M.

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis various cholic acid derivatives are reported that display aggregation in water or in organic solvents. Spontaneous aggregation of single molecules into larger, ordered structures occurs at the borderline of solubility. Amphiphilic compounds, or surfactants, which possess a

  14. Effect of organic solvents on dissolution process of mechano-chemically activated molybdenum by inorganic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevtsova, I.Ya.; Chernyak, A.S.; Khal'zov, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    The process of chemical dissolution of mechanochemically activated and nonactivated molybdenite by inorganic acid solutions in certain organic solvents of different nature was considered. It is shown that the highest extraction of molybdenum in solution is achieved in the presence of nitric acid. The dissociation constant of the acid used in the given organic solvent does not affect molybdenite solubility. When dissolving molybdenite by solutions of nitric acid in carbonic acids, alcohols and esters, the solubility of the concentrate depends on the length of hydrocarbon chain of the organic solvent and dispersion degree of mineral source material

  15. Influence of the solvents on the γ-ray polymerization of acrylic acid. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laborie, F.

    1977-01-01

    The presence of plurimolecular H-bonded aggregates in the acrylic acid allows the polymer to involve some stereoregular sequences. This effect is made easier when some polymer is already formed in the reacting medium: the aggregates are stabilized by hydrogen bonds with the polymer which gives rise to a matrix effect. Two groups of solvents have been characterized by examination of the monomer's association forms in solution. In a first group of solvents (methanol--dioxan--water), the aggregates are maintained and reinforced; in the second one, acrylic acid exists only as cyclic dimers (hydrocarbons--chlorinated solvents). The difference between the association forms of the monomer involves some important modifications on the kinetics of polymerization and the structure of the obtained polymers. In the solvents of the first group, the obtained polymers are crystallizable and may involve syndiotactic sequences, while in the presence of the solvents of the second group no crystallization or stereoregularity of the polymer can occur. A very close correlation is thus found between the aggregated structure of the monomer, the polymerization kinetics, and the structure of the polymers

  16. Microbial process for the preparation of acetic acid as well as solvent for its extraction from the fermentation broth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, James L.; Clausen, Edgar C.; Ko, Ching-Whan; Wade, Leslie E.; Wikstrom, Carl V.

    2002-01-01

    A modified water-immiscible solvent useful in the extraction of acetic acid from aqueous streams is a substantially pure mixture of isomers of highly branched di-alkyl amines. This solvent is substantially devoid of mono-alkyl amines and alcohols. Solvent mixtures formed of such a modified solvent with a desired cosolvent, preferably a low boiling hydrocarbon which forms an azeotrope with water are useful in the extraction of acetic acid from aqueous gaseous streams. An anaerobic microbial fermentation process for the production of acetic acid employs such solvents, under conditions which limit amide formation by the solvent and thus increase the efficiency of acetic acid recovery. Methods for the direct extraction of acetic acid and the extractive fermentation of acetic acid also employ the modified solvents and increase efficiency of acetic acid production. Such increases in efficiency are also obtained where the energy source for the microbial fermentation contains carbon dioxide and the method includes a carbon dioxide stripping step prior to extraction of acetic acid in solvent.

  17. Solvent extraction of rare earth nitrates by Versatic Acid 911

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazuoka, K; Tanabe, T; Kondo, Y [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1975-07-01

    The extraction equilibria of cerous, terbium and yttrium nitrates into Versatic Acid 911 were studied. The organic phase was diluted with benzene, and the ionic strength of the aqueous solutions was maintained at unity by adding NaNO/sub 3/. Radioactive isotopes of these elements were used as the tracer. The compositions of the extracted species were CeR/sub 3/.4RH.H/sub 2/O, TbR/sub 3/.4RH.H/sub 2/O and YR/sub 3/.4RH.H/sub 2/o, and the apparent equilibrium constants of extraction were 9.14x10/sup -15/, 3.90x10/sup -14/ and 1.70x10/sup -14/, respectively.

  18. The substituent and solvent effects on the antioxidant activity of the ferulic acid derivations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najafi, M.; Bukhari, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    The antioxidant activity of ortho and meta substituted ferulic acid derivatives have been investigated in the gas phase and water. The reaction enthalpies of antioxidant activity of studied derivatives have been calculated and compared with corresponding values of ferulic acid. Results show that EWG substituents increase the BDE, IP, while EDG ones cause a rise in the PA. The ferulic acid derivatives with lowest BDE, IP and PA values were identified as the compounds with high antioxidant activity. Results show that the substituents at ortho position have high potential for synthesis of novel ferulic acid derivatives. Results show that ferulic acid derivatives can process their protective role via HAT and SPLET mechanism in gas phase and solvent, respectively. The calculated reaction enthalpies of the substituted ferulic acids have linear dependences with Hammett constants and EHOMO that can be utilized in the selection of suitable substituents for the synthesis of novel antioxidants based on ferulic acid. (author)

  19. Effects of Extraction Solvents on the Quantification of Free Amino Acids in Lyophilised Brewer’s Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea STĂNILĂ

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to test some solvents in order to improve the free amino acids extraction from lyophilised brewer’s yeast. The brewer’ yeast was treated with four types of extraction solvents: Solvent I – acetonitrile 25%/HCl 0.01M (ACN; Solvent II – ethanol 80%; solvent III – HCl 0.05M/deionized water (1/1 volume; Solvent IV – HCl 0.05M/ethanol 80% (1/1 volume. The supernatants were analysed by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS method. Acetonitrile provided the less quantities and number of amino acids extracted due to its weaker polarity. Solvent II and IV (ethanol, respectively acidified ethanol, which have an increased polarity, extracted 15 amino acids due to the addition of HCl in solvent IV. Solvent III (acidified water proved to be the best extraction solvent for the amino acids from brewer’s yeast providing the separation of 17 compounds: GLN, ASN, SER, GLY, ALA, ORN, PRO, HIS, LYS, GLU, TRP, LEU, PHE, ILE, AAA, HPHE, TYR.

  20. Characteristics and mechanism of explosive reactions of Purex solvents with Nitric Acid at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Teijiro [Radiation Application Development Association, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Takada, Junichi; Koike, Tadao; Tsukamoto, Michio; Watanabe, Koji [Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Ida, Masaaki [JGC PLANTECH CO., LTD (Japan); Nakagiri, Naotaka [JGC Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Nishio, Gunji [Research Organization for Information Science and Technology, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    This investigation was undertaken to make clear the energetic properties and mechanism of explosive decomposition of Purex solvent systems (TBP/n-Dodecane/HNO{sub 3}) by Nitric Acid at elevated temperatures using a calorimetric technique (DSC, ARC) and a chromatographic technique (GC, GC/MS). The measurement of exothermic events of solvent-HNO{sub 3} reactions using DSC with a stainless steel sealed cell showed distinct two peaks with maxima at around 170 and 320degC, respectively. The peak at around 170degC was mainly attributed to the reactions of dealkylation products (n-butyl nitrate) of TBP and the solvent with nitric acid, and the peak at around 320degC was attributed to the exothermic decomposition of nitrated dodecanes formed in the foregoing exothermic reaction of dodecane with nitric acid. By using the data obtained in ARC experiments, activation energies of 123.2 and 152.5 kJ/mol were determined for the exothermic reaction of TBP with nitric acid and for the exothermic pyrolysis of n-butyl nitrate, respectively. Some possible pathways were considered for the explosive decomposition of TBP by nitric acid at elevated temperatures. (author)

  1. The effects of solvents and structure on the electronic absorption spectra of the isomeric pyridine carboxylic acid N-oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drmanić Saša Ž.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultraviolet absorption spectra of the carboxyl group of three isomeric pyridine carboxylic acids N-oxides (picolinic acid N-oxide, nicotinic acid N-oxide and isonicotinic acid N-oxide were determined in fourteen solvents in the wavelength range from 200 to 400 nm. The position of the absorption maxima (λmax of the examined acids showed that the ultraviolet absorption maximum wavelengths of picolinic acid N-oxide are the shortest, and those of isonicotinic acid N-oxide acid are the longest. In order to analyze the solvent effect on the obtained absorption spectra, the ultraviolet absorption frequencies of the electronic transitions in the carboxylic group of the examined acids were correlated using a total solvatochromic equation of the form max = v0 + sπ + aα+ bβ, where υmax is the absorption frequency (1/λmax, p is a measure of the solvent polarity, β represents the scale of solvent hydrogen bond acceptor basicities and α represent the scale of solvent hydrogen bond donor acidities. The correlation of the spectroscopic data was carried out by means of multiple linear regression analysis. The solvent effects on the ultraviolet absorption maximums of the examined acids were discussed.

  2. Acidic resin-catalysed conversion of fructose into furan derivatives in low boiling point solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Cao, Quan; Li, Chunhu; Mu, Xindong

    2011-09-27

    Conversion of fructose into furan derivatives 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and 5-methoxymethylfurfural (MMF) is performed in tetrahydrofuran (THF) and methanol-organic solvent systems, catalysed by an acidic resin Amberlyst-15. The melted fructose can be converted into HMF on the surface of the solid resin catalyst in the presence of THF as an extracting phase, which is a good solvent for HMF and other by-products. The solid resin catalyst can be reused eleven times without losing its catalytic ability, with an average HMF yield of approximately 50%. Upon the addition of methanol, the generated HMF can further react with methanol to form MMF, and the total yield of HMF and MMF could be promoted to 65%. GC-MS analysis confirms the formation of a small amount of methyl levulinate in methanolorganic solvent system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Solvent extraction in the treatment of acidic high-level liquid waste : where do we stand?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, E. P.; Schulz, W. W.

    1998-01-01

    During the last 15 years, a number of solvent extraction/recovery processes have been developed for the removal of the transuranic elements, 90 Sr and 137 Cs from acidic high-level liquid waste. These processes are based on the use of a variety of both acidic and neutral extractants. This chapter will present an overview and analysis of the various extractants and flowsheets developed to treat acidic high-level liquid waste streams. The advantages and disadvantages of each extractant along with comparisons of the individual systems are discussed

  4. Innovative method of direct determination of the content of paraffins, naphthenes, aromatics and sulfur compounds by capillary high-resolution gas chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Baizhumanova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on determination of individual Hydrocarbon (paraffins, naphthenes, aromatics and Sulphur components of fuels and their mixture on the thin bonded of absorber (the stationary phase is a 100-metre silica capillary column, containing 0.5μm film thickness of bonded dimethylpolysiloxane phase by means of the selective solvents (mobile phase combined with technique of ionization of separated compounds by Flame Ionization Detector (FID and Sulphur Chemiluminescence Detector (SCD.

  5. Evaluation of protective effect of deposits formed by naphthenic corrosion and sulfidation on carbon steel and steel 5Cr-0.5Mo exposed in atmospheric distillation fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Duarte

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Refining of so-called opportunity crude oils with a high level of naphthenic acids and sulfur compounds has been increasing interest due to limited availability of light crude oils, however, considerable corrosive effects in the processing to high temperature on pipes and distillation towers mainly by the attack of naphthenic acids and sulfur compounds; sulfur compounds could be corrosive or can reduce the attack of naphthenic acids due to the formation of sulfides layers on the metal surface. In this work was evaluated the performance of deposits formed on the surface of carbon steel AISI SAE 1020 and 5% Cr-0.5% Mo steel exposed in crude oil fractions obtained from atmospheric distillation tower. For this, gravimetric tests were performed in dynamic autoclave using metal samples pre-treated in a crude oil fraction obtained from the atmospheric distillation tower of the Crude Distillation Unit (CDU # 1 in order to form layers of sulfides on the surface of the two materials and subsequently to expose pre-treated and non-pretreated samples in two different crude oil fractions obtained from atmospheric distillation tower of Crude Distillation Unit (CDU # 2. The evaluation showed that the samples pretreated decreased tendency to corrosion by naphthenic acids and sulfidation compared to untreated samples.

  6. An odd–even effect on solubility of dicarboxylic acids in organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hui; Yin, Qiuxiang; Liu, Zengkun; Gong, Junbo; Bao, Ying; Zhang, Meijing; Hao, Hongxun; Hou, Baohong; Xie, Chuang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The solubilities of the homologous series of C2–C10 dicarboxylic acids were determined in four selected solvents. • The experimental data were well correlated with the modified Apelblat equation. • The odd–even effect of solubility was found and explained. • The enthalpy, entropy and the molar Gibbs free energy of solution were predicted. - Abstract: The solubility of the homologous series of dicarboxylic acids, HOOC-(CH 2 ) n−2 -COOH (n = 2 to 10), in ethanol, acetic acid, acetone and ethyl acetate was measured at temperatures ranging from (278.15 to 323.15) K by a static analytic method at atmospheric pressure. Dicarboxylic acids with even number of carbon atoms exhibit lower values of solubility than adjacent homologues with odd carbon numbers. This odd–even effect of solubility is attributed to the twist of molecules and interlayer packing in solid state as explained in our previous work. The alternation varies in different solvents, which is believed to be associated with the properties of solvents. Finally, the dissolution enthalpy, dissolution entropy and the molar Gibbs free energy were calculated using the fitting parameters of the modified Apelblat equation. The molar Gibbs free energy also showed apparent odd–even alternation in keeping with the alternation of solubility

  7. Choice of solvent extraction technique affects fatty acid composition of pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolshahi, Anna; Majd, Mojtaba Heydari; Rad, Javad Sharifi; Taheri, Mehrdad; Shabani, Aliakbar; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A

    2015-04-01

    Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) oil has important nutritional and therapeutic properties because of its high concentration of essential fatty acids. The extraction method used to obtain natural compounds from raw material is critical for product quality, in particular to protect nutritional value. This study compared the fatty acid composition of pistachio oil extracted by two conventional procedures, Soxhlet extraction and maceration, analyzed by a gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Four solvents with different polarities were tested: n-hexane (Hx), dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EtAc) and ethanol (EtOH). The highest unsaturated fatty acid content (88.493 %) was obtained by Soxhlet extraction with EtAc. The Soxhlet method extracted the most oleic and linolenic acids (51.99 % and 0.385 %, respectively) although a higher concentration (36.32 %) of linoleic acid was extracted by maceration.

  8. Development of a universal solvent for the decontamination of acidic liquid radioactive wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, T. A.; Brewer, K. N.; Law, J. D.; Wood, D. J.; Herbest, R. S.; Romanovskiy, V. N.; Esimantovskiy, V. M.; Smirnov, I. V.; Babain, V. A.

    1999-01-01

    A teritiary solvent containing chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, polyethylene glycol and diphenylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide was evaluated in different non-nitroaromatic diluents for the separation of cesium, strontium, actinides and rare earth elements from acidic liquid radioactive waste. Decontamination factors of >95% for Cs, 99.7% for Sr, and 99.99% for actinides were achieved in four successive batch contacts using actual radioactive waste. Pilot plant testing in centrifugal contactors using simulated wastes, has demonstrated removal of >99% of all targeted ions.

  9. Dispersion of carbon nanotubes and polymer nanocomposite fabrication using trifluoroacetic acid as a co-solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Hui; Muthuraman, Harish; Stokes, Paul; Zou Jianhua; Liu Xiong; Wang, Jinhai; Huo Qun; Khondaker, Saiful I; Zhai Lei

    2007-01-01

    We herein report the dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) as a co-solvent. TFA is a strong but volatile acid which is miscible with many commonly used organic solvents. Our study demonstrates that MWCNTs can be effectively purified and readily dispersed in a range of organic solvents including dimethyl formamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and dichloromethane when mixed with 10 vol.% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis revealed that the chemical structure of the TFA-treated MWCNTs remained intact without oxidation. The dispersed carbon nanotubes in TFA/THF solution were mixed with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to fabricate polymer nanocomposites. A good dispersion of nanotubes in solution and in polymer matrices was observed and confirmed by SEM, optical microscopy, and light transmittance study. Low percolation thresholds of electrical conductivity were observed from the fabricated MWCNT/PMMA composite films. Further enhancement in the dispersion of MWCNTs was achieved by adding a conjugated conducting polymer, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), to the dispersion, wherein TFA also serves as a doping agent to the conducting polymer. The ternary nanocomposite MWCNT/P3HT/PMMA exhibited an extremely low percolation threshold of less than 0.006 wt% of MWCNT content. This low percolation threshold is attributed to a good dispersion of MWCNTs and enhanced conductivity of the nanocomposites by conjugated conducting polymer

  10. Potentiometric titration of selenic and telluric acids with titanium(III) chloride in nonaqueous solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Chozo; Miyamoto, Kiyoshige

    1985-01-01

    Selenic and Telluric acids were titrated potentiometrically with titanium(III) chloride solution by using Pt-Cu · Hg bimetallic electrodes in nonaqueous solvents such as N, N-dimethyl-formamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and the mixtures of these solvents. It was found that selenic and telluric acids were titrated directly at room temperature in DMF solution without hydrochloric acid. The molar ratios of selenic and telluric acids to titanium(III) chloride was 1 : 6. However, the corresponding reactions to SeO 4 2- → SeO 3 2- or TeO 4 2- → TeO 3 2- were not confirmed in the titration curve in DMF. In the titration of selenic acid in mixed solvents of DMF and IPA in 1 : 1 or 1 : 2 ratio, two steps were observed. The first and the second steps were appeared on the titration curve at molar ratios of 1 : 2 and 1 : 6, respectively. It was interpreted that the first step corresponded to the intermediate reaction of SeO 4 2- → SeO 3 2- . Mixed solution of selenic and telluric acids were determined by the proposed method. Three steps were observed on the titration curve. It was interpreted that the first, second and third steps corresponded to the reaction of SeO 4 2- → SeO 3 2- , SeO 3 2- → Se(0), and TeO 4 2- → Te(0), respectively. Less than 5 % of water gave no influence on the titration. (author)

  11. The distribution of n-caprylic acid between organic solvents and aqueous sodium sulfate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloe, K.; Muehl, P.; Kholkin, A.I.; Gindin, L.M.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of 14 C-labelled n-caprylic acid between n-decane, benzene, isoamyl acetate, diisopropyl ketone, isoamyl alcohol and an aqueous 0.6 molar sodium sulfate solution was studied. The distribution constants and the dimerisation constants were determined for the reactions HRsub((w)) reversible HRsub((org)) and 2 HRsub((org)) reversible (HR)sub(2(org)), respectively. Both the effect of the solvent on the acid distribution and the importance of such studies for the interpretation of liquid-liquid extraction equilibria are discussed. (author)

  12. Competitive solvent extraction of alkaline-earth cations into chloroform by lipophilic acyclic polyether dicarboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S.I.; Czech, A.; Czech, B.P.; Stewart, L.E.; Bartsch, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Competitive solvent extraction of alkaline-earth cations from aqueous solutions into chloroform by a series of lipophilic acyclic polyether dicarboxylic acids is reported. The influence of polyether chain length and of terminal carboxylic acid group variation upon extraction selectivity and efficiency is assessed. In the competitive extraction of concentrated magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium chloride solutions, one complexing agent exhibits pronounced selectivity for barium with Ba 2+ /S 2+ = 50, Ba 2+ /Ca 2+ = 250, and no detectable Mg 2+ extraction. 20 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  13. Selective recovery of a pyridine derivative from an aqueous waste stream containing acetic acid and succinonitrile with solvent impregnated resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, J.; Visser, T.J.; Schuur, Boelo; de Haan, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Solvent impregnated resins (SIRs) were evaluated for the recovery of pyridine derivatives from an aqueous waste-stream containing also acetic acid and succinonitrile. For this purpose, a new solvent was developed, synthesized and impregnated in Amberlite XAD4. Sorption studies were used to determine

  14. Solvent Extraction of Rare Earths by Di-2 Ethylhexyl Phosphoric Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinuttrakul, Wannee; Kranlert, Kannika; Kraikaew, Jarunee; Pongpansook, Surasak; Chayavadhanangkur, Chavalek; Kranlert, Kannika

    2004-10-01

    Solvent extraction has been widely applied for individual rare earth separation because the separation time is rapid and a large quantity of products is obtained. In this work, this technique was utilized to extract mixed rare earths, obtained from monazite digestion process. Di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) was used as an extractant. The factors affected the extraction including HNO 3 concentration in mixed rare earth nitrate solution and the amount of D2EHPA were studied. The appropriate concentrations of HNO 3 and D2EHPA were found to be 0.01 and 1.5 M, respectively. From the result of equilibrium curve study, it was observed that heavy rare earths were extracted more efficient than light rare earths. A 6-stage continuous countercurrent solvent extraction was simulated for rare earth extraction. The optimum ratio of solvent to feed solution (S/F) was 2. Because of the high cost of D2EHPA, 1.0 M of D2EHPA was suitable for the rare earth extraction by the continuous countercurrent solvent extraction

  15. Solid–liquid equilibrium and thermodynamic research of 3-Thiophenecarboxylic acid in (water + acetic acid) binary solvent mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiang; Liang, Mengmeng; Hu, Yonghong; Yang, Wenge; Shi, Ying; Yin, Jingjing; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The solubility was measured in (water + acetic acid) from 283.15 to 338.15 K. • The solubility increased with increasing temperature and water contents. • The modified Apelblat equation was more accurate than the λh equation. - Abstract: In this study, the solubility of 3-thiophenecarboxylic acid was measured in (water + acetic acid) binary solvent mixtures in the temperature ranging from 283.15 to 338.15 K by the analytical stirred-flask method under atmospheric pressure. The experimental data were well-correlated with the modified Apelblat equation and the λh equation. In addition, the calculated solubilities showed good agreement with the experimental results. It was found that the modified Apelblat equation could obtain the better correlation results than the λh equation. The experiment results indicated that the solubility of 3-thiophenecarboxylic acid in the binary solvents increased with increasing temperature, increases with increasing water contents, but the increments with temperature differed from different water contents. In addition, the thermodynamic properties of the solution process, including the Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy were calculated by the van’t Hoff analysis. The experimental data and model parameters would be useful for optimizing the process of purification of 3-thiophenecarboxylic acid in industry

  16. Solvent extraction of hafnium(IV) by dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid from mixed aqueous-organic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hala, J.; Piperkovova, H.

    1979-01-01

    The extraction of hafnium(IV) by heptane and toluene solutions of dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid (HD) from mixed aqueous-organic solutions has been studied. Alcohols, ketones, carboxylic acids, cyclic ethers, dimethylsulfoxide and dimethylformamide were used as the organic component of the mixed phase. Methanol, ethanol, formic acid and dioxane increased the extractability of Hf(IV) whereas other solvents showed only an antagonistic effect. The results were discussed from the point of view of the changes in micellar structure of HD, and compared with the uptake of Hf(IV) by resinous cation exchangers. The solubilization by HD of alcohols, carboxylic acids and dimethylsulfoxide was demonstrated by using the corresponding 14 C and 35 S labelled compounds. (author)

  17. Application of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of dispersed organic solvent in developing new microencapsulation process technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Honghwa; Lee, Sunhwa; Bhattacharjee, Himanshu; Sah, Hongkee

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a new microencapsulation technology employing an acid-catalyzed solvent extraction method in conjunction to an emulsion-based microencapsulation process. Its process consisted of emulsifying a dispersed phase of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) and isopropyl formate in an aqueous phase. This step was followed by adding hydrochloric acid to the resulting oil-in-water emulsion, in order to initiate the hydrolysis of isopropyl formate dissolved in the aqueous phase. Its hydrolysis caused the liberation of water-soluble species, that is, isopropanol and formic acid. This event triggered continual solvent leaching out of emulsion droplets, thereby initiating microsphere solidification. This new processing worked well for encapsulation of progesterone and ketoprofen that were chosen as a nonionizable model drug and a weakly acidic one, respectively. Furthermore, the structural integrity of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) was retained during microencapsulation. The new microencapsulation technology, being conceptually different from previous approaches, might be useful in preparing various polymeric particles.

  18. Fabrication of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microcontainers using solvent evaporation with polydimethylsiloxane stencil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chul Min; Byul Lee, Han; Kim, Jong Uk; Kim, Gyu Man

    2017-12-01

    We present a fabrication method using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stencils and solvent evaporation to prepare microcontainers with a desired shape made from a biodegradable polymer. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) was used for preparing microcontainers, but most polymers are applicable in the proposed method in which solvent evaporation is used to construct microstructures in confined spaces in the stencil. Microcontainers with various shapes were fabricated by controlling the stencil geometry. Furthermore, a porous structure could be prepared in a micromembrane using water porogen. The porous structure was observed using a field emission scanning electron microscope and mass transfer across the porous membrane was examined using a fluorescent dye. The flexibility of the PDMS stencil allowed the fabrication of microcontainers on a curved surface. Finally, it was demonstrated that microcontainers can be used to contain a localized cell culture. The viability and morphology of cultured cells were observed using confocal microscopy over a period of 3 weeks.

  19. Solvent extraction of organic acids from stillage for its re-use in ethanol production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, G A; Caicedo, L A; Alméciga-Díaz, C J; Sanchez, O F

    2010-06-01

    Stillage re-use in the fermentation stage in ethanol production is a technique used for the reduction of water and fermentation nutrients consumption. However, the inhibitory effect on yeast growth of the by-products and feed components that remains in stillage increases with re-use and reduces the number of possible recycles. Several methods such as ultrafiltration, electrodialysis and advanced oxidation processes have been used in stillage treatment prior its re-use in the fermentation stage. Nevertheless, few studies evaluating the effect of solvent extraction as a stillage treatment option have been performed. In this work, the inhibitory effect of serial stillage recycling over ethanol and biomass production was determined, using acetic acid as a monitoring compound during the fermentation and solvent extraction process. Raw palm oil methyl ester showed the highest acetic acid extraction from the aqueous phase, presenting a distribution coefficient of 3.10 for a 1:1 aqueous phase mixture:solvent ratio. Re-using stillage without treatment allowed up to three recycles with an ethanol production of 53.7 +/- 2.0 g L(-1), which was reduced 25% in the fifth recycle. Alternatively, treated stillage allowed up to five recycles with an ethanol final concentration of 54.7 +/- 1.3 g L(- 1). These results show that reduction of acetic acid concentration by an extraction process with raw palm oil methyl ester before re-using stillage improves the number of recycles without a major effect on ethanol production. The proposed process generates a palm oil methyl ester that contains organic acids, among other by-products, that could be used for product recovery and as an alternative fuel.

  20. Colloidal 3-Mercaptopropionic Acid Capped Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots in a Low Boiling Point Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Chase C; Johansson, Erik

    2017-04-26

    Colloidal 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MPA) capped lead sulfide quantum dots were prepared in a variety of organic solvents stabilized with a quaternary ammonium halide salt. The stabilized colloids' optical properties were studied through optical absorption and emission spectroscopy and found to be dependent on both the concentration of a new ligand and stabilizer, and sample age. Nanocrystal ligand chemistry was studied through a combination of 1 H NMR and two-dimensional Nuclear Overhauser Effect Spectroscopy (NOESY) which revealed full displacement of the original oleate ligand to form a dynamically exchanging ligand shell. The colloids were studied optically and via NMR as they aged and revealed a quantitative conversion of monomeric 3-mercaptopropionic acid to its dimer, dithiodipropionic acid (dTdPA).

  1. Solvent Extraction of Tungsten(VI) from Moderate Hydrochloric Acid Solutions with LIX 63

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Hoai Thanh; Lee, Man Seung [Mokpo National University, Jeollanamdo (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Hwan [Incheon Technology Service Centre, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The solvent extraction of tungsten(VI) from hydrochloric acid solutions using 5,8-diethyl-7-hydroxydodecan-6-one oxime (LIX 63) was analyzed in solutions having an initial pH range from 2 to 5, by varying the concentration of metal and extractant. In our experimental range, the cationic exchange reaction as well as the solvation reaction occurred simultaneously. The cation exchange reaction was identified by applying a slope analysis method to the extraction data. The existence of cationic tungsten(VI) species was confirmed by ion exchange experiments with Diphonix resin at pH 3. Further study is needed to identify the nature of this tungsten cationic species.

  2. Selection of optimum ionic liquid solvents for flavonoid and phenolic acids extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, N. R. A.; Yunus, N. A.; Mustaffa, A. A.

    2017-06-01

    Phytochemicals are important in improving human health with their functions as antioxidants, antimicrobials and anticancer agents. However, the quality of phytochemicals extract relies on the efficiency of extraction process. Ionic liquids (ILs) have become a research phenomenal as extraction solvent due to their unique properties such as unlimited range of ILs, non-volatile, strongly solvating and may become either polarity. In phytochemical extraction, the determination of the best solvent that can extract highest yield of solute (phytochemical) is very important. Therefore, this study is conducted to determine the best IL solvent to extract flavonoids and phenolic acids through a property prediction modeling approach. ILs were selected from the imidazolium-based anion for alkyl chains ranging from ethyl > octyl and cations consisting of Br, Cl, [PF6], BF4], [H2PO4], [SO4], [CF3SO3], [TF2N] and [HSO4]. This work are divided into several stages. In Stage 1, a Microsoft Excel-based database containing available solubility parameter values of phytochemicals and ILs including its prediction models and their parameters has been established. The database also includes available solubility data of phytochemicals in IL, and activity coefficient models, for solid-liquid phase equilibrium (SLE) calculations. In Stage 2, the solubility parameter values of the flavonoids (e.g. kaempferol, quercetin and myricetin) and phenolic acids (e.g. gallic acid and caffeic acid) are determined either directly from database or predicted using Stefanis and Marrero-Gani group contribution model for the phytochemicals. A cation-anion contribution model is used for IL. In Stage 3, the amount of phytochemicals extracted can be determined by using SLE relationship involving UNIFAC-IL model. For missing parameters (UNIFAC-IL), they are regressed using available solubility data. Finally, in Stage 4, the solvent candidates are ranked and five ILs, ([OMIM] [TF2N], [HeMIM] [TF2N], [HMIM] [TF2N

  3. Acid, silver, and solvent-free gold-catalyzed hydrophenoxylation of internal alkynes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia E. Richard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A range of arylgold compounds have been synthesized and investigated as single-component catalysts for the hydrophenoxylation of unactivated internal alkynes. Both carbene and phosphine-ligated compounds were screened as part of this work, and the most efficient catalysts contained either JohnPhos or IPr/SIPr. Phenols bearing either electron-withdrawing or electron-donating groups were efficiently added using these catalysts. No silver salts, acids, or solvents were needed for the catalysis, and either microwave or conventional heating afforded moderate to excellent yields of the vinyl ethers.

  4. Solvent free one pot synthesis of amidoalkyl naphthols over phosphotungstic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya P. Narayanan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Montmorillonite KSF clay was effectively modified by the encapsulation of phosphotungstic acid into the clay layers via sonication followed by incipient wet impregnation method. The prepared catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. The catalytic activities of the prepared systems were investigated in the solvent free synthesis of amidoalkyl naphthols by the multicomponent one-pot condensation of an aldehyde, β-naphthol and an amide or urea. Excellent yield, shorter reaction time, easy work-up, and reusability of the catalyst are the main attractions of this green procedure.

  5. Solvent polarity controls the helical conformation of short peptides rich in Calpha-tetrasubstituted amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellanda, Massimo; Mammi, Stefano; Geremia, Silvano; Demitri, Nicola; Randaccio, Lucio; Broxterman, Quirinus B; Kaptein, Bernard; Pengo, Paolo; Pasquato, Lucia; Scrimin, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    The two peptides, rich in C(alpha)-tetrasubstituted amino acids, Ac-[Aib-L-(alphaMe)Val-Aib](2)-L-His-NH(2) (1) and Ac-[Aib-L-(alphaMe)Val-Aib](2)-O-tBu (2 a) are prevalently helical. They present the unique property of changing their conformation from the alpha- to the 3(10)-helix as a function of the polarity of the solvent: alpha in more polar solvents, 3(10) in less polar ones. Conclusive evidence of this reversible change of conformation is reported on the basis of the circular dichroism (CD) spectra and a detailed two-dimensional NMR analysis in two solvents (trifluoroethanol and methanol) refined with molecular dynamics calculations. The X-ray diffractometric analysis of the crystals of both peptides reveals that they assume a prevalent 3(10)-helix conformation in the solid state. This conformation is practically superimposable on that obtained from the NMR analysis of 1 in methanol. The NMR results further validate the reported CD signature of the 3(10)-helix and the use of the CD technique for its assessment.

  6. Separation of trivalent actinide from lanthanide by a solvent extraction technique using imidazoledithiocarboxylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, S.; Yanaga, M.; Okuno, K.; Suganuma, H.; Satoh, I.

    2006-01-01

    The extraction behavior of 241 Am and 152,154 Eu by a solvent extraction technique using imidazoledithiocarboxylic acid (IMD) were investigated. Although the solubility of IMD into organic solvent is very poor, it was improved by the formation of ion pair with hydrophobic cation, such as tetrabutylammonium ion (TBA + ) or tetraoctylammonium ion (TOA + ). The obtained tetrabutylammonium imidazole-dithiocarboxylate (TBA + IMD - ) and tetraoctylammonium imidazoledithiocarboxylate (TOA + TMD - ) are able to solve into various organic solvents, for example cyclohexanone, chloroform and nitrobenzene, but not to solve into nonpolar alkane. The radionuclides of Am(III) and Eu(III) are able to be extracted in the region of 2 eq + IMD - /cyclohexanone and TOA + IMD - /cyclohexanone. The distribution ratio of Am(III) is higher than that of Eu(III) when the organic phase is 0.1 M TBA + IMD - /cyclohexanone and the aqueous phase is 1.0 M (H,Na)NO 3 . The separation factor (Am(III)/Eu(III)) at pH eq =5.5 is ca. 30. In the region of pH>6, the distribution ratios of Am(III) and Eu(III) in the system described above showed constant values, respectively. (author)

  7. A study of solvent extraction of uranium and thorium with a crown either carboxylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Hongshan

    1995-03-01

    The solvent extraction of uranium and thorium with a new type of extractant sym-dibenzo-16-crown-5-oxyacetic acid in chloroform has been studied. The extraction efficiencies for both elements depend strongly on pH. At pH 3.5, UO 2 2+ is not extractable, whereas Th 4+ is extracted with greater than 98% efficiency. The dependence of the distribution ratios of UO 2 2+ and Th 4+ on the concentration of sym-dibenzo-16-crown-5-oxyacetic acid are linear and the slopes are 1 and 2 respectively. The results suggest that uranium and thorium appear to form a 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 extraction complex with ligand. A new method for separating U and Th is established, and U and Th with high purity can be obtained. This method have important application to analytical chemistry and nuclear industry. (8 refs., 3 figs.)

  8. Solvent effects in the acid-catalysed rearrangements of 1,2-oxazines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagoub, A.K.; Ogur, J.A.; Wanekaya, A.K.

    2005-12-01

    The rates of acid-catalyzed rearrangements of 6-ethoxy-5,6-dihydro-3-phenyl-4H-1,2-oxazines have been investigated in H 2 SO 4 /methanol, MeCN and Me 2 SO by means of spectrophotometric methods. Pseudo first order rate constants were obtained in each case. Results in methanol supported an A1 type mechanism. Also investigated were the correlation of reaction rates with Hammet acidity function (H 0 ) by application of the Bunnet criterion where a slope of -0.67 was obtained. Further, the solvent effect was considered from two points of mechanistic views: the thermodynamic transfer functions of MeOH to MeCN and Me 2 SO where the rate was found fast in MeCN and slow in Me 2 SO and the Kirkwood-Buff preferential solvation with aqueous MeOH, MeCN and Me 2 SO. The techniques supported the proposed transition state structure. (author)

  9. The ultrasound-assisted oxidative scission of monoenic fatty acids by ruthenium tetroxide catalysis: influence of the mixture of solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rup, Sandrine; Zimmermann, François; Meux, Eric; Schneider, Michel; Sindt, Michele; Oget, Nicolas

    2009-02-01

    Carboxylic acids and diacids were synthesized from monoenic fatty acids by using RuO4 catalysis, under ultrasonic irradiation, in various mixtures of solvents. Ultrasound associated with Aliquat 336 have promoted in water, the quantitative oxidative cleavage of the CH=CH bond of oleic acid. A design of experiment (DOE) shows that the optimal mixture of solvents (H2O/MeCN, ratio 1/1, 2.2% RuCl3/4.1 eq. NaIO4) gives 81% azelaic acid and 97% pelargonic acid. With the binary heterogeneous mixture H2O/AcOEt, the oxidation of the oleic acid leads to a third product, the alpha-dione 9,10-dioxostearic acid.

  10. Solvent extraction of indium and gallium complexes with bromopyrogallol red by mixed extractants containing chloroform, a polar organic solvent and monocarboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatnitskij, I.V.; Lysenko, O.V.; Kolomiets, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent extraction of indium and gallium complexes with bromopyragallol red (BPR) has been studied using mixed extractants containing chloroform, capronic acid (HL) and 1-pentanol (S) (extractant 1), and chloroform, HL, S and propionic acid (extractant 2). The latter is more selectie and extracts only the indium complex. Optimal conditions have been found for the extraction of In-BRP complex (pH 6.3-6.5; C BPR 1.5x10 -4 M) its composition has been estimated and discussed

  11. Efficient production of fatty acid methyl ester from waste activated bleaching earth using diesel oil as organic solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Seiji; Du, Dongning; Sato, Masayasu; Park, Enoch Y

    2004-01-01

    Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) production from waste activated bleaching earth (ABE) discarded by the crude oil refining industry was investigated using fossil fuel as a solvent in the esterification of triglycerides. Lipase from Candida cylindracea showed the highest stability in diesel oil. Using diesel oil as a solvent, 3 h was sufficient to obtain a yield of approximately 100% of FAME in the presence of 10% lipase from waste ABE. Kerosene was also a good solvent in the esterification of triglycerides embedded in the waste ABE. Fuel analysis showed that the FAME produced using diesel oil as a solvent complied with the Japanese diesel standard and the 10% residual carbon amount was lower than that of FAME produced using other solvents. Use of diesel oil as solvent in the FAME production from the waste ABE simplified the process, because there was no need to separate the organic solvent from the FAME-solvent mixture. These results demonstrate a promising reutilization method for the production of FAME, for use as a biodiesel, from industrial waste resources containing waste vegetable oils.

  12. Potentiometric investigations of (acid+base) equilibria in (n-butylamine+acetic acid) systems in binary (acetone+cyclohexane) solvent mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czaja, MaIgorzata; Kozak, Anna; Makowski, Mariusz; Chmurzynski, Lech

    2005-01-01

    By using the potentiometric titration method, standard equilibrium constants have been determined of acid dissociation of molecular acid, K a (HA), cationic acid, K a (BH + ), of anionic and cationic homoconjugation, K AHA - andK BHB + , respectively, and of molecular heteroconjugation, K AHB (K BHA ), in (acid+base) systems without proton transfer consisting of n-butylamine and acetic acid in binary (acetone+cyclohexane) solvent mixtures. The results have shown that both the pK a (HA) and pK a (BH + ), as well as lgK AHA - values change non-linearly as a function of composition of the solvent mixture. On the other hand, standard molecular heteroconjugation constants without proton transfer do not depend on the cyclohexane content in the mixture, i.e. on solvent polarity

  13. Potentiometric investigations of (acid+base) equilibria in (n-butylamine+acetic acid) systems in binary (acetone+cyclohexane) solvent mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czaja, MaIgorzata [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Kozak, Anna [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Makowski, Mariusz [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Chmurzynski, Lech [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)]. E-mail: lech@chem.univ.gda.pl

    2005-08-15

    By using the potentiometric titration method, standard equilibrium constants have been determined of acid dissociation of molecular acid, K{sub a}(HA), cationic acid, K{sub a}(BH{sup +}), of anionic and cationic homoconjugation, K{sub AHA{sup -}}andK{sub BHB{sup +}}, respectively, and of molecular heteroconjugation, K{sub AHB} (K{sub BHA}), in (acid+base) systems without proton transfer consisting of n-butylamine and acetic acid in binary (acetone+cyclohexane) solvent mixtures. The results have shown that both the pK{sub a}(HA) and pK{sub a}(BH{sup +}), as well as lgK{sub AHA{sup -}} values change non-linearly as a function of composition of the solvent mixture. On the other hand, standard molecular heteroconjugation constants without proton transfer do not depend on the cyclohexane content in the mixture, i.e. on solvent polarity.

  14. Modelling of nitric and nitrous acid chemistry for solvent extraction purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, H.; McLachlan, F. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Building D5, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); MacDonald-Taylor, J. [National Nuclear Laboratory, 5th Floor, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park, Warrington, WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Orr, R.; Woodhead, D. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-01

    Nitric acid plays an integral role in the reprocessing of irradiated fuel. It is well known that nitric acid degrades; its often yellow hue signifies the presence of decomposition products. The decomposition of nitric acid is accelerated by temperature and radiolysis; therefore it is an important consideration in the reprocessing of nuclear fuels. Thermal and radiolytic reactions of nitric acid result in the formation of redox active nitrogen species, of which nitrous acid is of particular concern, largely due to its redox reactions with plutonium and neptunium. Such reactions are important to understand as plutonium and neptunium can exist in a number of oxidation states; the oxidation state has a direct effect on the species extractability. The effect of nitrous acid is exacerbated as it catalyzes its own production and its reactions with actinides are typically autocatalytic; thus even micromolar quantities can have a large effect. A full understanding of solvent extraction requires us to understand actinide valence states which in turn require us to understand what nitrogen species are present and their concentrations. As a first step in the overall objective of enhancing process models, the kinetic data for nitric acid decomposition reactions has been investigated in order to produce an initial dynamic model of decomposition under aqueous conditions. The identification of a set of kinetic reactions suitable for modelling has been the primary focus of this work. A model of nitric acid thermal decomposition will help develop a better understanding of nitric acid decomposition chemistry and enable better prediction of the oxidation states of species in solution. It is intended to later extend the model to include radiolytic reactions and then further to incorporate an organic phase in order to have a model which covers all decomposition routes for nitric acid within a nuclear fuel reprocessing scheme. The model will be used as a sub model for process models

  15. Staining of proteins in gels with Coomassie G-250 without organic solvent and acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Ann-Marie; Besir, H Uuml Seyin

    2009-08-14

    In classical protein staining protocols using Coomassie Brilliant Blue (CBB), solutions with high contents of toxic and flammable organic solvents (Methanol, Ethanol or 2-Propanol) and acetic acid are used for fixation, staining and destaining of proteins in a gel after SDS-PAGE. To speed up the procedure, heating the staining solution in the microwave oven for a short time is frequently used. This usually results in evaporation of toxic or hazardous Methanol, Ethanol or 2-Propanol and a strong smell of acetic acid in the lab which should be avoided due to safety considerations. In a protocol originally published in two patent applications by E.M. Wondrak (US2001046709 (A1), US6319720 (B1)), an alternative composition of the staining solution is described in which no organic solvent or acid is used. The CBB is dissolved in bidistilled water (60-80 mg of CBB G-250 per liter) and 35 mM HCl is added as the only other compound in the staining solution. The CBB staining of the gel is done after SDS-PAGE and thorough washing of the gel in bidistilled water. By heating the gel during the washing and staining steps, the process can be finished faster and no toxic or hazardous compounds are evaporating. The staining of proteins occurs already within 1 minute after heating the gel in staining solution and is fully developed after 15-30 min with a slightly blue background that is destained completely by prolonged washing of the stained gel in bidistilled water, without affecting the stained protein bands.

  16. Online analytical investigations on solvent-, temperature- and water vapour-induced phase transformations of citric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmdach, L.; Ulrich, J. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Zentrum fuer Ingenieurwissenschaft, Verfahrenstechnik/TVT, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Feth, M.P. [Sanofi-Aventis Deutschland GmbH, Chemical and Process Development Frankfurt Chemistry, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    It was demonstrated exemplarily for the crystallization of citric acid that the usage of an ultrasound device as well as Raman spectroscopy enables the inline measurement and the control of phase transitions. The influence of different solvent compositions (water and ethanol-water) on the crystallization of citric acid was investigated. By increasing the ethanol content the transformation point was shifted towards higher temperatures. In addition, a strong impact on the nucleation point as well as on the crystal habit was detected in ethanol-water mixtures. The results lead to the assumption that a citric acid solvate exists, which is, however, highly unstable upon isolation from mother liquor and converts fast into the known anhydrate or monohydrate forms of citric acid. The presence of such a solvate, however, could not be proven during this study. Furthermore, factors such as temperature and humidity which might influence the phase transition of the solid product were analyzed by Hotstage-Raman Spectroscopy and Water Vapor Sorption Gravimetry-Dispersive Raman Spectroscopy. Both, temperature as well as humidity show a strong influence on the behaviour of CAM. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Solvent Composition is Critical for Carbodiimide Cross-Linking of Hyaluronic Acid as an Ophthalmic Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Yang Lai

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA is one of the most important ophthalmic biomaterials, while also being used for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Although chemical cross-linking is an effective way to improve the material performance, it may as a consequence be detrimental to the living cells/tissues. Given that the cross-linking efficiency is mediated by the solvent composition during the chemical modification, this study aims to explore the stability and biocompatibility of carbodiimide cross-linked HA in relation to material processing conditions by varying the acetone/water volume ratio (from 70:30 to 95:5 at a constant 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl carbodiimide (EDC concentration of 100 mM. Our results indicated that after the EDC treatment in the presence of an acetone/water mixture (85:15, v/v, the HA hydrogel membranes have the lowest equilibrium water content, the highest stress at break and the greatest resistance to hyaluronidase digestion. Live/Dead assays and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression analyses showed that the cross-linked HA hydrogel membranes, irrespective of the solvent composition, are compatible with human RPE cell lines without causing toxicity and inflammation. However, it should be noted that the test samples prepared by the cross-linking in the presence of acetone/water mixtures containing 70, 75, and 95 vol % of acetone slightly inhibit the metabolic activity of viable ARPE-19 cultures, probably due to the alteration in the ionic interaction between the medium nutrients and polysaccharide biomaterials. In summary, the water content, mechanical strength and RPE cell proliferative capacity strongly depends on the solvent composition for carbodiimide cross-linking of HA materials.

  18. Identification of Flavonoids (Quercetin, Gallic acid and Rutin from Catharanthus roseus Plant Parts using Deep Eutectic Solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Nisar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Green technology is the most important topic in the pharmaceutical field because it reduces the cost of medicines and minimizes the environmental impact of the field and is better for human health and safety. Green chemistry emphasizes that the solvent should be nontoxic, safe, cheap, green, readily available, recyclable, and biodegradable. Deep eutectic solvents, a new type of green solvent, have some renowned properties—for instance, high thermal stability, low vapor pressure, low cost, biodegradability, and high viscosity. In this study, deep eutectic solvents made up of choline chloride-glycerol (1:2 were used for the extraction and isolation of flavonoid (rutin, gallic acid, and quercetin from Catharanthus roseus plant parts, flower petal, leaves, stem, and root. The amounts of rutin and quercetin in flower petal are 29.46 and 6.51%, respectively, whereas, rutin, gallic acid, and quercetin amounts in leaves are 25.16, 8.57, and 10.47%, respectively. In stem the amounts of rutin, gallic acid, and quercetin are 13.02, 5.89, and 7.47%, respectively. In root, only quercetin has been obtained that is 13.49%. The HPLC is an analytical method, which was found to be an excellent technique for determination of rutin, gallic acid, and quercetin using deep eutectic solvent extraction from plant parts of Catharanthus roseus.

  19. [Determination of residual solvents in 7-amino-3-chloro cephalosporanic acid by gas chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Yao, Tong-wei

    2011-01-01

    To develop a gas chromatography method for determination of residual solvents in 7-amino-3-chloro cephalosporanic acid (7-ACCA). The residual levels of acetone, methanol, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, isobutanol, pyridine and toluene in 7-ACCA were measured by gas chromatography using Agilent INNOWAX capillary column (30 m × 0.32 mm,0.5 μm). The initial column temperature was 70° maintained for 6 min and then raised (10°C/min) to 160°C for 1 min. Nitrogen gas was used as carrier and FID as detector. The flow of carrier was 1.0 ml/min, the temperature of injection port and detector was 200°C and 250°C, respectively. The limits of detection for acetone, methanol, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, isobutanol, pyridine, toluene in 7-ACCA were 2.5 μg/ml, 1.5 μg/ml, 15 μg/ml, 2.5 μg/ml, 2.5 μg/ml, 2.5 μg/ml and 11 μg/ml, respectively. Only acetone was detected in the sample, and was less than the limits of Ch.P. The method can effectively detect the residual solvents in 7-ACCA.

  20. Recovery of Acetic Acid from An Ethanol Fermentation Broth by Liquid-Liquid Extraction (LLE) Using Various Solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Thi Thu Huong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Um, Byung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) using various solvents was studied for recovery of acetic acid from a synthetic ethanol fermentation broth. The microbial fermentation of sugars presented in hydrolyzate gives rise to acetic acid as a byproduct. In order to obtain pure ethanol for use as a biofuel, fermentation broth should be subjected to acetic acid removal step and the recovered acetic acid can be put to industrial use. Herein, batch LLE experiments were carried out at 25°C using a synthetic fermentation broth comprising 20.0 g l -1 acetic acid and 5.0 g l -1 ethanol. Ethyl acetate (EtOAc), tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO), tri-n-octylamine (TOA), and tri-n-alkylphosphine oxide (TAPO) were utilized as solvents, and the extraction potential of each solvent was evaluated by varying the organic phase-to-aqueous phase ratios as 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0. The highest acetic acid extraction yield was achieved with TAPO; however, the lowest ethanol-to-acetic acid extraction ratio was obtained using TOPO. In a single-stage batch extraction, 97.0 % and 92.4 % of acetic acid could be extracted using TAPO and TOPO when the ratio of organic-to-aqueous phases is 4:1 respectively. A higher solvent-to-feed ratio resulted in an increase in the ethanol-to-acetic acid ratio, which decreased both acetic acid purity and acetic acid extraction yield.

  1. Effect of solvent on anodization of Zr-4 in L-ascorbic acid - SEM studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeevana Jyothi, V.; Ch Anjaneyulu

    2013-01-01

    Anodization of Zircaloy-4 in 0.1 M L-ascorbic acid has been carried out. Kinetics of anodic oxidation of Zircaloy-4 has been studied at a constant current density of 8 mA.cm -2 and at room temperature. The plots of formation voltage vs time, reciprocal capacitance vs time and reciprocal capacitance vs formation voltage were drawn. From these plots, formation rate, current efficiency and differential field were calculated. The addition of solvent (ethylene glycol) showed better kinetic results for 20, 40, 60 and 80% aquo-glycolic media, the dielectric constant values are low leading to the marked improvement in the kinetics. The surface morphology of the anodic films was also studied by Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM). (author)

  2. Evaluation of a novel and efficient solvent system containing chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide for radio-cesium recovery from acidic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandwal, Pankaj; Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry Div.

    2014-11-01

    A novel solvent system containing chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (CCD) in a diluent mixture containing 2-nitrophenyloctyl ether (NPOE) and n-dodecane was found to be highly efficient for the extraction of radio-cesium from acidic feed conditions. When PEG-400 (polyethylene glycol with average molecular weight of 400) was added to the solvent system, it was found to extract radio-strontium as well similar to that reported with the UNEX (Universal Extractant) solvent. The solvent system was found to be superior as compared to analogous solvent systems reported previously using CCD in either nitrobenzene or PTMS (phenyltrifluoromethyl sulphone, a fluorinated diluent). The present work deals with less toxic solvent formulation which can be used as an alternative to these hazardous/toxic chemicals for simultaneous recovery of Cs(I) and Sr(II) from acidic solutions. Batch co-current extraction data are also presented for the simultaneous recovery of Cs and Sr which indicated near quantitative extraction (>99.5%) of the metal ions in 4 and 3 stages, respectively. The reusability and radiolytic stability studies were also carried out which suggested highly encouraging results.

  3. Effect of Solvent Additives on the Solution Aggregation of Phenyl-C61-Butyl Acid Methyl Ester (PCBM)

    KAUST Repository

    Tummala, Naga Rajesh

    2015-11-24

    High-boiling-point solvent additives, employed during the solution processing of active-layer formulations, impact the efficiency of bulk hetero-junction (BHJ) organic solar cells by influencing the morphological / topological features of the multicomponent thin film. Here, we aim at a better understanding of how these additives change the aggregation landscape in the casting solution prior to film deposition via a multi-scale computational study of the aggregation phenomena of phenyl-C61-butyric-acid methyl ester (PCBM) in various solutions. The energetic landscape of PCBM-solvent / solvent-additive intermolecular interactions is evaluated at the electronic-structure level through symmetry-adapted perturbation theory to determine the nature and strength of non-covalent forces important to aggregation. Molecular dynamics simulations highlight how the choice of solvent and solvent additives control the formation of molecular aggregates. Our results indicate that high-boiling-point solvent additives change the effective interactions among the PCBM and casting-solvent molecules and alter the equilibrium PCBM aggregate sizes in solution.

  4. NMR determination of solvent dependent behavior and XRD structural properties of 4-carboxy phenylboronic acid: A DFT supported study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmen, Gökhan; Alver, Özgür; Parlak, Cemal

    2018-04-01

    Solvent dependent structural properties of 4-carboxy phenylboronic acid (4-cpba) were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods. The molecular structure and geometric parameters were determined by some computational methods such as B3LYP/6-31 + G(3df,p), HF/aug-cc-pvtz and MP2/6-31G(d). Detailed elucidation of the structural and spectroscopic properties of 4-cpba was carried out with 1H, HETCOR and DOSY NMR experiments. Solvent effects on the structural properties were monitored on the changes of 1H NMR spectra by using various solvents and it was observed that 4-cpba shows serious structural preferences depending on the solvent used.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of poly(L-lactic acid) gels induced by fibrous complex crystallization with solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Yasuhiro [ORNL; Fukatsu, Akinobu [Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu, Japan; Wang, Yangyang [ORNL; Miyamoto, Kazuaki [Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu, Japan; Mays, Jimmy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Tasaka, Shigeru [Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu, Japan

    2014-01-01

    Complex crystal induced gelation of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) solutions was studied for a series of solvents, including N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). By cooling the solutions prepared at elevated temperatures, PLLA gels were produced in solvents that induced complex crystals ( -crystals) with PLLA. Fibrous structure of PLLA in the gel with DMF was observed by polarizing optical microscopy, field emission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Upon heating, the crystal form of PLLA in the DMF gel changed from -crystal to a-crystal, the major crystal form in common untreated PLLA films, but the morphology and high elastic modulus of the gel remained until the a-crystal dissolved at higher temperature. In addition, a solvent exchanging method was developed, which allowed PLLA gels to be prepared in other useful solvents that do not induce -crystals without losing the morphology and mechanical properties.

  6. Biogeochemical anomaly above oil-containing structures in an arid zone. [Growth stimulation of plants by sodium naphthenate used for prospecting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishchenko, O.M.

    1983-01-01

    Visual biological anomalies above the oil-containing structures are characterized by bright green coloring of the vegetation cover, gigantism of the plants, extended vegetation period of the plants, deformity of the plants, etc. Biological anomalies are associated with geological features and are observed only above the zone of fault disorders of the earth's crust, above deep faults. A conclusion is drawn about the presence above the oil-bearing structures in the arid zone of a biogeochemical anomaly whose origin is explained by the biological activity of oil and its derivatives. The petroleum growth matter is the sodium salt of naphthene acid, a growth stimulator of plants and animals. The oils of the USSR contain 0.8-4.8% naphthene acids, which effuse through the faults into the root area levels of the soil. As a result of stimulation of growth and development by the petroleum growth matter, the vegetation period of the plants is prolonged. Under the influence of natural petroleum growth substances, the height and productivity of the anomalous plants increases 2-3-fold. Formation and manifestation of signs of biogeochemical anomalies above the oil-bearing structures in the arid zone predetermine the following conditions: presence of fault disorders of the earth's crust; salinity of the root area of the soil layer necessary for neutralization of the naphthene acids with subsequent formation of the biologically active naphthenates; aridity of the desert landscape; plain relief excluding color diversity in vegetation cover because of nonuniform wetting, etc. The established biogeochemical anomaly can be used in prospecting and exploration of oil, gas and bitumen, and also in determining the fault disorders of the earth's crust.

  7. SOLVENT EFFECTS IN THE LIQUID-PHASE HYDRATION OF CYCLOHEXENE CATALYZED BY A MACROPOROUS STRONG ACID ION-EXCHANGE RESIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    1992-01-01

    The liquid-phase hydration of cyclohexene, a pseudo first order reversible reaction catalyzed by a strong acid ion exchange resin, macroporous Amberlite XE 307, was investigated in solvent mixtures of water and sulfolane. A decrease by a factor of 3 and 6 is observed in the experimentally measured

  8. Choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents as additives for optimizing chromatographic behavior of caffeic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guizhen; Zhu, Tao; Lei, Yingjie

    2015-01-01

    A series of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were prepared using glycerol and choline chloride (ChCl), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) was used to analyze the spectra of glycerol, choline chloride and DESs based on glycerol and choline chloride. Then DESs were used as the additives of mobile phase to optimize chromatographic behavior of caffeic acid in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A 17-run Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed to evaluate effect of DESs as additives by analyzing the maximum theoretical plate number. Three factors, reaction temperature (60 .deg. C, 80 .deg. C, 100 .deg. C), molar ratio of glycerol and choline chloride (2 : 1, 3 : 1, 4 : 1, n/n), and volume percent of additives (0.05%, 0.10%, 0.15%, v/v), were investigated in BBD. The optimum experiment condition was that of reaction temperature (80 .deg. C), molar ratio of glycerol and ChCl (3 : 1, n/n), and volume percent of additive (0.10%, v/v). The mean chromatographic theoretical plate number of the caffeic acid this condition was 1567.5, and DESs as additives shorten the retention time and modify the chromatogram shape, proving DESs as additives for effective theoretical plate number and column efficiency in HPLC.

  9. Choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents as additives for optimizing chromatographic behavior of caffeic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guizhen; Zhu, Tao; Lei, Yingjie [Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin (China)

    2015-10-15

    A series of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were prepared using glycerol and choline chloride (ChCl), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) was used to analyze the spectra of glycerol, choline chloride and DESs based on glycerol and choline chloride. Then DESs were used as the additives of mobile phase to optimize chromatographic behavior of caffeic acid in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A 17-run Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed to evaluate effect of DESs as additives by analyzing the maximum theoretical plate number. Three factors, reaction temperature (60 .deg. C, 80 .deg. C, 100 .deg. C), molar ratio of glycerol and choline chloride (2 : 1, 3 : 1, 4 : 1, n/n), and volume percent of additives (0.05%, 0.10%, 0.15%, v/v), were investigated in BBD. The optimum experiment condition was that of reaction temperature (80 .deg. C), molar ratio of glycerol and ChCl (3 : 1, n/n), and volume percent of additive (0.10%, v/v). The mean chromatographic theoretical plate number of the caffeic acid this condition was 1567.5, and DESs as additives shorten the retention time and modify the chromatogram shape, proving DESs as additives for effective theoretical plate number and column efficiency in HPLC.

  10. Molecular modeling study of agglomeration of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester in solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortuza, S M; Banerjee, Soumik

    2012-12-28

    The molecular interactions between solvent and nanoparticles during photoactive layer formation in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells influence the morphology of the photoactive layer and hence determine the power conversion efficiency. Prediction of optimal synthesis parameters in OPVs, such as choice of solvent, processing temperature, and nanoparticle concentration, requires fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern the agglomeration of nanoparticles in solvents. In this study, we used molecular dynamics simulations to simulate a commonly used organic nanoparticle, [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), in various solvents to correlate solvent-nanoparticle interactions with the size of the agglomerate structure of PCBM. We analyzed the effects of concentration of PCBM and operating temperature on the molecular rearrangement and agglomeration of PCBM in three solvents: (i) toluene, (ii) indane, and (iii) toluene-indane mixture. We evaluated the agglomeration behavior of PCBM by determining sizes of the largest clusters of PCBM and the corresponding size distributions. To obtain further insight into the agglomerate structure of PCBMs, we evaluated radial distribution functions (RDFs) and coordination numbers of the various moieties of PCBMs with respect to solvent atoms as well as with respect to that of other PCBMs. Our simulations demonstrate that PCBMs form larger clusters in toluene while they are relatively dispersed in indane, which indicates the greater solubility of PCBM in indane than in toluene. In toluene-indane mixture, PCBMs are clustered to a greater extent than in indane and less than that in toluene. To correlate agglomerate size to nanoparticle-solvent interactions, we also evaluated the potential of mean force (PMF) of the fullerene moiety of PCBM in toluene and indane. Our results also show that the cluster size of PCBM molecules increases with the increase of concentration of PCBM and the processing temperature. To

  11. Apparent formation constants of Pu(IV) and Th(IV) with humic acids determined by solvent extraction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, T.; Aoyama, S.; Yoshida, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Takagi, I. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Kulyako, Y.; Samsonov, M.; Miyasoedov, B. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). V. I. Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry (GEOKHI); Moriyama, H. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    2012-07-01

    Apparent formation constants of Pu(IV) and Th(IV) with two kinds of humic acids were determined in 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} at 25 C using a solvent extraction method with thenoyltrifluoroacetone in xylene. The acid dissociation constants of humic acids were also measured by potentiometric titration and used as the degree of dissociation for calculating the formation constants. The effect of solution conditions, such as the pH, the initial metal and humic acid concentrations, and the ionic strength, on the formation constants was examined. The obtained data were compared with the ones in the literature. (orig.)

  12. Enhancement in extraction rates by addition of organic acids to aqueous phase in solvent extraction of rare earth metals in presence of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Hideto; Azis, A.; Fujita, Mamoru; Teramoto, Masaaki.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that the selectivity of rare earth metals by solvent extraction is increased by the addition of a chelating agent such as diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) in the aqueous phase. One of the disadvantages of this method is the decrease in extraction rates due to complexation in the aqueous phase. In this paper, further addition of organic acids to the aqueous phase was examined for the purpose of enhancing the extraction rates in solvent extraction with DTPA. The addition of several kind of organic acids such as formic acid, acetic acid, malonic acid, lactic acid and citric acid was investigated for a Er/Y separation system. A remarkable enhancement in extraction rates was observed with a slight decrease in the selectivity by the addition of citric acid or lactic acid. Extraction rates in the presence of both DTPA and citric acid increased with the increase in citric acid concentration and with the increase in proton concentration. A 150 times enhancement in extraction rates was found in the low proton concentration condition. In order to analyze the extraction rates and selectivities obtained, mass transfer equations were presented by considering both the dissociation reaction of rare earth metal-DTPA complexes and the complex formation between rare earth metal and organic acid in the aqueous phase. The experimental data were analyzed by these equations. (author)

  13. Surface Patterning of Benzene Carboxylic Acids on Graphite: Influence of structure, solvent, and concentration on molecular self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, Gina; Stiso, Kimberly; Campanelli, Joseph; Dessources, Kimberly; Folkes, Trudi

    2012-02-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) was used to investigate the molecular self-assembly of four different benzene carboxylic acid derivatives at the liquid/graphite interface: pyromellitic acid (1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid), trimellitic acid (1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylic acid), trimesic acid (1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid), and 1,3,5-benzenetriacetic acid. A range of two dimensional networks are observed that depend sensitively on the number of carboxylic acids present, the nature of the solvent, and the solution concentration. We will describe our recent efforts to determine (a) the preferential two-dimensional structure(s) for each benzene carboxylic acid at the liquid/graphite interface, (b) the thermodynamic and kinetic factors influencing self-assembly (or lack thereof), (c) the role solvent plays in the assembly, (e) the effect of in situ versus ex situ dilution on surface packing density, and (f) the temporal evolution of the self-assembled monolayer. Results of computational analysis of analog molecules and model monolayer films will also be presented to aid assignment of network structures and to provide a qualitative picture of surface adsorption and network formation.

  14. Optimization Study for Butanol Extraction from Butanol-Water Using Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) as Solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurul Izzati Ab Rahim; Mohd Irfan Hatim Mohamed Dzahir; Wan Nurul Hidayah Wan Othman

    2015-01-01

    The oil crisis, warned the humanity's depends on oil was not sustainable and recently, there are plenty of renewable resources had been developed. Much attention has been given to the solvent extraction process to separate butanol from butanol-water mixture using fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) as a solvent. In this respect, the use of FAME as a green solvent which are locally available has greater potential for butanol extraction process. Therefore, an experimental work has been carried out to study its feasibility as a potential solvent. A single stage extraction process as performed to evaluate the ability to achieve optimal extract butanol. The extraction process was carried out to evaluate the distribution coefficient of butanol with the effects of other parameters such as reaction temperature (50-70 degree Celsius) and butanol-water mixture to solvent ratio (1:1, 1:1.5, 1:2). The constant parameter is the stirring speed (300 rpm). Response Surface Methodology (RSM) in conjunction with the Central Composition Design (CCD) as employed to statistically evaluate and optimize the butanol extraction process. It was found that the distribution coefficient has achieved an optimum level of 1.92 % at the following conditions: (i) butanol-water mixtures to solvent ratio (1:1.48) and (ii) reaction temperature (62.75 degree Celsius). (author)

  15. Characterization of Polyamide 66 membranes prepared by phase inversion using formic acid and hydrochloric acid such as solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Poletto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The membranes properties prepared from water/formic acid (FA/ polyamide 66 (PA66 and water/hydrochloric acid (HCl/polyamide 66 (PA 66 systems has been studied. The different solvents interact distinctly with the polymer, affecting the membrane morphology. The asymmetric structure of the membranes showed a dense top layer and a porous sublayer. The membranes M-HCl prepared from HCl/PA 66 system showed a larger dense layer (around 23 μm in compared to those prepared from FA/PA 66 system (M-FA (around 10 μm. The membrane morphology was a determinant factor in results of water absorption, porosity and pure water flux. The lower thickness of dense layer in M-FA membranes resulted in a higher water absorption and, consequently, porosity, approximately 50%, compared with M-HCl membranes, approximately 15%. The same trend was observed to permeate flux, the lower thickness of dense layer higher pure water flux.

  16. Absorption and emission behaviour of trans- p-coumaric acid in aqueous solutions and some organic solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putschögl, M.; Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.

    2008-01-01

    The absorption and fluorescence behaviour of trans- p-coumaric acid ( trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) is investigated in buffered aqueous solution over a wide range from pH 1 to pH 12, in un-buffered water, and in some organic solvents. Absorption cross-section spectra, fluorescence quantum distributions, fluorescence quantum yields, and degrees of fluorescence polarisation are measured. p-Coumaric acid exists in different ionic forms in aqueous solution depending on the pH. There is an equilibrium between the neutral form ( p-CAH 2) and the single anionic form ( p-CAH -) at low pH (p Kna ≈ 4.9), and between the single anionic and the double anionic form ( p-CA 2-) at high pH (p Kaa ≈ 9.35). In the organic solvents studied trans- p-coumaric acid is dissolved in its neutral form. The fluorescence quantum yield of trans- p-coumaric acid in aqueous solution is ϕF ≈ 1.4 × 10 -4 for the neutral and the single anionic form, while it is ϕF ≈ 1.3 × 10 -3 for the double anionic form. For trans- p-coumaric acid in organic solvents fluorescence quantum yields in the range from 4.8 × 10 -5 (acetonitrile) to 1.5 × 10 -4 (glycerol) were measured. The fluorescence spectra are 7700-10,000 cm -1 Stokes shifted in aqueous solution, and 5400-8200 cm -1 Stokes shifted in the studied organic solvents. Decay paths responsible for the low fluorescence quantum yields are discussed (photo-isomerisation and internal conversion for p-CA 2-, solvent-assisted intra-molecular charge-transfer or ππ ∗ to nπ ∗ transfer and internal conversion for p-CAH 2 and p-CAH -). The solvent dependence of the first ππ ∗ electronic transition frequency and of the fluorescence Stokes shift of p-CAH 2 is discussed in terms of polar solute-solvent interaction effects. Thereby the ground-state and excite-state molecular dipole moments are extracted.

  17. Absorption and emission behaviour of trans-p-coumaric acid in aqueous solutions and some organic solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putschoegl, M.; Zirak, P. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Penzkofer, A. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)], E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de

    2008-01-22

    The absorption and fluorescence behaviour of trans-p-coumaric acid (trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) is investigated in buffered aqueous solution over a wide range from pH 1 to pH 12, in un-buffered water, and in some organic solvents. Absorption cross-section spectra, fluorescence quantum distributions, fluorescence quantum yields, and degrees of fluorescence polarisation are measured. p-Coumaric acid exists in different ionic forms in aqueous solution depending on the pH. There is an equilibrium between the neutral form (p-CAH{sub 2}) and the single anionic form (p-CAH{sup -}) at low pH (pK{sub na} {approx} 4.9), and between the single anionic and the double anionic form (p-CA{sup 2-}) at high pH (pK{sub aa} {approx} 9.35). In the organic solvents studied trans-p-coumaric acid is dissolved in its neutral form. The fluorescence quantum yield of trans-p-coumaric acid in aqueous solution is {phi}{sub F} {approx} 1.4 x 10{sup -4} for the neutral and the single anionic form, while it is {phi}{sub F} {approx} 1.3 x 10{sup -3} for the double anionic form. For trans-p-coumaric acid in organic solvents fluorescence quantum yields in the range from 4.8 x 10{sup -5} (acetonitrile) to 1.5 x 10{sup -4} (glycerol) were measured. The fluorescence spectra are 7700-10,000 cm{sup -1} Stokes shifted in aqueous solution, and 5400-8200 cm{sup -1} Stokes shifted in the studied organic solvents. Decay paths responsible for the low fluorescence quantum yields are discussed (photo-isomerisation and internal conversion for p-CA{sup 2-}, solvent-assisted intra-molecular charge-transfer or {pi}{pi}* to n{pi}* transfer and internal conversion for p-CAH{sub 2} and p-CAH{sup -}). The solvent dependence of the first {pi}{pi}* electronic transition frequency and of the fluorescence Stokes shift of p-CAH{sub 2} is discussed in terms of polar solute-solvent interaction effects. Thereby the ground-state and excite-state molecular dipole moments are extracted.

  18. Absorption and emission behaviour of trans-p-coumaric acid in aqueous solutions and some organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putschoegl, M.; Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.

    2008-01-01

    The absorption and fluorescence behaviour of trans-p-coumaric acid (trans-4-hydroxycinnamic acid) is investigated in buffered aqueous solution over a wide range from pH 1 to pH 12, in un-buffered water, and in some organic solvents. Absorption cross-section spectra, fluorescence quantum distributions, fluorescence quantum yields, and degrees of fluorescence polarisation are measured. p-Coumaric acid exists in different ionic forms in aqueous solution depending on the pH. There is an equilibrium between the neutral form (p-CAH 2 ) and the single anionic form (p-CAH - ) at low pH (pK na ∼ 4.9), and between the single anionic and the double anionic form (p-CA 2- ) at high pH (pK aa ∼ 9.35). In the organic solvents studied trans-p-coumaric acid is dissolved in its neutral form. The fluorescence quantum yield of trans-p-coumaric acid in aqueous solution is φ F ∼ 1.4 x 10 -4 for the neutral and the single anionic form, while it is φ F ∼ 1.3 x 10 -3 for the double anionic form. For trans-p-coumaric acid in organic solvents fluorescence quantum yields in the range from 4.8 x 10 -5 (acetonitrile) to 1.5 x 10 -4 (glycerol) were measured. The fluorescence spectra are 7700-10,000 cm -1 Stokes shifted in aqueous solution, and 5400-8200 cm -1 Stokes shifted in the studied organic solvents. Decay paths responsible for the low fluorescence quantum yields are discussed (photo-isomerisation and internal conversion for p-CA 2- , solvent-assisted intra-molecular charge-transfer or ππ* to nπ* transfer and internal conversion for p-CAH 2 and p-CAH - ). The solvent dependence of the first ππ* electronic transition frequency and of the fluorescence Stokes shift of p-CAH 2 is discussed in terms of polar solute-solvent interaction effects. Thereby the ground-state and excite-state molecular dipole moments are extracted

  19. Solvent-Free Synthesis of Aryl Iodide Using Nano SiO2/HIO4 as a Reusable Acid Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bamoniri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and environmentally benign   method for the synthesis of aryl iodides have been developed by diazotization of aromatic amines with NaNO2 and nanosilica periodic acid (nano-SPIA as a green catalyst via grinding followed by a sandmeyer iodination by KI under solvent-free conditions at room temperature. The ensuing aryl diazonium salts supported on nano-SPIA were sufficiently stable to be kept at room temperature in the dry state. This method is a novel, efficient, eco-friendly route for solvent-free synthesis of aryl iodides.

  20. Solvent-extraction and purification of uranium(VI) and molybdenum(VI) by tertiary amines from acid leach solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Gamma, Ana M.G.; Becquart, Elena T.; Chocron, Mauricio

    2008-01-01

    Considering international interest in the yellow-cake price, Argentina is seeking to exploit new uranium ore bodies and processing plants. A study of similar plants would suggest that solvent- extraction with Alamine 336 is considered the best method for the purification and concentration of uranium present in leaching solutions. In order to study the purification of these leach liquors, solvent-extraction tests under different conditions were performed with simulated solutions which containing molybdenum and molybdenum-uranium mixtures. Preliminary extraction tests carried out on mill acid-leaching liquors are also presented. (authors)

  1. The Synthesis of 58co-Naphthenate Complex Compound for Evaluation of Oil well Production Capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duyeh Setiawan; Marlina

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear technique using radioisotope as a tracer in oil industry has assisted to solve the degradation of oil production. Usually, the degradation of oil production in well caused by the formation changing of hydrostatic pressure of the oil layer in the well. This problem could be evaluated by injection of water to oil well, for recovering this hydrostatic pressure. The watcher of the water injection success is done by the way of nuclear technique radioactive tracer systems, applied radioisotope having short half life and low gamma radiation energy. Radioisotope cobalt-58 in the complex form with naphthenate ( 58 Co-naphthenate ) often used as the tracer in the water injection technique. The tracer 58 Co-naphthenate relatively easy to synthesis and radioisotope 58 Co has half life 70.86 days and gamma energy was 0.811 Me v. The synthesis method of 58 Co-naphthenate route has been carried out by mixing of 58 CoCl 2 radioisotope solution with sodium naphthenate (C 5 H 9 CH 2 COONa) in the optimum condition. The results shows that the optimal mole ratio of cobalt-58 and naphthenate was 1:6 which produced 87,38 % of ren dement and 82,5 % of efficiency labelling. This synthesis technique was made permanent procedure for making of 58 Co-naphthenate complex as radioactive tracer in service of radioisotope production especially industrial area. (author)

  2. Dual fluorescence of N-phenylanthranilic acid: Effect of solvents, pH and β-cyclodextrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendiran, N.; Balasubramanian, T.

    2007-11-01

    Spectral characteristics of N-phenylanthranilic acid (NPAA) have been studied in different solvents, pH and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and compared with anthranilic acid (2-aminobenzoic acid, 2ABA). In all solvents a dual fluorescence is observed in NPAA, whereas 2ABA gives single emission. Combining the results observed in the absorption, fluorescence emission and fluorescence excitation spectra, it is found that strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IHB) interactions present in NPAA molecule. The inclusion complex of NPAA with β-CD is analysed by UV-vis, fluorimetry, FT-IR, 1H NMR, scanning electron microscope and AM 1 method. The above spectral studies show that NPAA forms a 1:1 inclusion complex with β-CD and COOH group present in the β-CD cavity. A mechanism is proposed to explain the inclusion process.

  3. Dual fluorescence of N-phenylanthranilic acid: Effect of solvents, pH and beta-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendiran, N; Balasubramanian, T

    2007-11-01

    Spectral characteristics of N-phenylanthranilic acid (NPAA) have been studied in different solvents, pH and beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD) and compared with anthranilic acid (2-aminobenzoic acid, 2ABA). In all solvents a dual fluorescence is observed in NPAA, whereas 2ABA gives single emission. Combining the results observed in the absorption, fluorescence emission and fluorescence excitation spectra, it is found that strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding (IHB) interactions present in NPAA molecule. The inclusion complex of NPAA with beta-CD is analysed by UV-vis, fluorimetry, FT-IR, (1)H NMR, scanning electron microscope and AM 1 method. The above spectral studies show that NPAA forms a 1:1 inclusion complex with beta-CD and COOH group present in the beta-CD cavity. A mechanism is proposed to explain the inclusion process.

  4. (Liquid + liquid) equilibria for ternary mixtures of (water + propionic acid + organic solvent) at T = 303.2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanadzadeh, H.; Ghanadzadeh Gilani, A.; Bahrpaima, Kh.; Sariri, R.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental tie-line results and phase diagrams were obtained for the ternary systems of {water + propionic acid + organic solvent (cyclohexane, toluene, and methylcyclohexane)} at T = 303.2 K and atmospheric pressure. The organic solvents were two cycloaliphatic hydrocarbons (i.e., cyclohexane and methylcyclohexane) and an aromatic hydrocarbon (toluene). The experimental tie-lines values were also compared with those calculated by the UNIQUAC and NRTL models. The consistency of the values of the experimental tie-lines was determined through the Othmer-Tobias and Hands plots. Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated over the immiscibility regions and a comparison of the extracting capabilities of the solvents was made with respect to distribution coefficients and separation factors. The Kamlet LSER model was applied to correlate distribution coefficients and separation factors in these ternary systems. The LSER model values showed a good regression to the experimental results.

  5. Separation of Molybdenum from Acidic High-Phosphorus Tungsten Solution by Solvent Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongli; Zhao, Zhongwei

    2017-10-01

    A solvent-extraction process for deep separation of molybdenum from an acidic high-phosphate tungsten solution was developed using tributyl phosphate (TBP) as the extractant and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a complexing agent. The common aqueous complexes of tungsten and molybdenum (PMoxW12-xO40 3-, x = 0-12) are depolymerized to {PO4[Mo(O)2(O-O)]4}3- and {PO4[W(O)2(O-O)]4}3- by H2O2. The former can be preferentially extracted by TBP. The extractant concentration, phase contact time, H2O2 dosage, and H2SO4 concentration were optimized. By employing 80% by volume TBP, O:A = 1:1, 1.0 mol/L H2SO4, 1.0 mol/L H3PO4, a contact time of 2 min, and a molar ratio of H2O2/(W + Mo) equal to 1.5, 60.2% molybdenum was extracted in a single stage, while limiting tungsten co-extraction to 3.2%. An extraction isotherm indicated that the raffinate could be reduced to <0.1 g/L Mo in six stages of continuous counter-current extraction.

  6. Rirang uranium ore processing: continuous solvent extraction of uranium from Rirang ore acid digestion solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riza, F.; Nuri, H. L.; Waluya, S.; Subijanto, A.; Sarono, B.

    1998-01-01

    Separation of uranium from Rirang ore acid digestion solution by means of continuous solvent extraction using mixer-settlers has been studied and a mixture of 0.3 M D2EHPA and 0.075 M TOPO extracting agent and kerosene diluent is employed to recover and separate uranium from Th, RE, phosphate containing solution. The experiments have been conducted batch-wise and several parameters have been studied including the aqueous to organic phase ratio, A/O, the extraction and the stripping times, and the operation temperature. The optimum conditions for extraction have been found to be A/O = 2 ratio, five minute extraction time per stage at room temperature. The uranium recovery of 99.07% has been achieved at those conditions whilst U can be stripped from the organic phase by 85% H 3 PO 4 solution with an O/A = 1 for 5 minutes stripping time per stage, and in a there stage operation at room temperature yielding a 100% uranium recovery from the stripping process

  7. Study in the behavior of several heavy elements in solvents with hydrofluoric acid base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarnero, M.

    1988-01-01

    Initial goal was the study of two nonaqueous solvents with an HF base, one with an oxidizing character, N 2 O 4 -HF, the other with an acid character, SbF 5 -HF. For the N 2 O 4 -HF mixtures, nitric acid and NO 2 + ions exist in these media, nitric acid is dissociated for concentrations of N 2 O 4 2 + ions. Results for the dissolution of metals agree with those of Brookhaven. For uranium, the speed did not increase in clear fashion from 60-70/degree/C, but that it obeyed Arrhenius' law between 40 and 115/degree/C. UF 4 was more soluble than ZrF 4 . U(IV) passed to U(V) after dissolution. The compound obtained from UF 4 was the same as that obtained from the metal uranium, i.e., NOUF 6 . U(VI)appeared to be poorly soluble, the uranium passes into solution particularly at valence 5. For SbF 5 -HF mixtures, the corrosion speeds were much lower than in N 2 O 4 -HF mixtures. For Zr, rates of dissolution are very low, while they are very high with N 2 O 4 -HF. Th is practically not corroded at all. Al was not corroded at all up to 90/degree/C. Only U was dissolved at higher rates than Th and Zr; however, the corrosion speeds at 90/degree/C are equal to those with the N 2 O 4 -HF mixtures at 50/degree/C. This shows that U passed into solution in the trivalent state, and that the product was U(SbF 6 ) 3 . The trivalent uranium compounds were more soluble than the others. Addition of N 2 O 4 to SbF 5 -HF induces acid-base reactions between the NO + and NO 2 /sup /minus// on the one hand, and SbF 6 /sup /minus// on the other hand, reactions accompanying the formation of a precipitate, probably a NOSbF 6 and NO 2 SbF 6 mixture. 66 refs., 34 figs., 23 tabs

  8. Studies on the effect of solvents on self-assembly of thioctic acid and Mercaptohexanol on gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhiguo; Niu Tianxing [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry of China and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang Zhenjiang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry of China and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Feng Guiying [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry of China and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Bi Shuping, E-mail: bisp@nju.edu.c [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry of China and Key Laboratory of MOE for Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2011-04-29

    In this article we investigated the effect of solvents (CCl{sub 4}, CH{sub 3}CN, DMF, ethanol, ethanol-H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O) on self-assembly of Thioctic acid (TA) and Mercaptohexanol (MCH) on gold by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Electrochemical characteristics of TA and MCH self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed in different solvents were evaluated by inspecting the ions permeability (interfacial capacitance C and phase angle {phi}{sub 1Hz}) and electron transfer capability (current density difference {Delta}i and charge transfer resistance R{sub ct}). Experimental results indicated that the ability of solvents availing the ordering of SAMs was: for TA, CCl{sub 4} > ethanol > CH{sub 3}CN > ethanol-H{sub 2}O > DMF; for MCH, H{sub 2}O > ethanol-H{sub 2}O {approx} CCl{sub 4} > ethanol {approx} CH{sub 3}CN > DMF. Through relating the C, {phi}{sub 1Hz}, {Delta}i and R{sub ct} of SAMs (TA and MCH) with parameters of solvent (polarity E{sub T}{sup N}, solubility parameter {delta} and octanol/water partition coefficients logP{sub ow}), it was found that solvents with bigger logP{sub ow} (smaller E{sub T}{sup N} and {delta}) availed the ordering of TA-SAMs but the effect of solvents on MCH self-assembly was complex and MCH-SAMs formed in H{sub 2}O (the biggest E{sub T}{sup N}, {delta} and the smallest logP{sub ow}) and CCl{sub 4} (the smallest E{sub T}{sup N}, {delta} and the biggest logP{sub ow}) were more ordered than in other solvents.

  9. Effects of Different Solvents on the Surface Acidic Oxygen-containing Functional Groups on Xanthoceras sorbifolia Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linan Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the preparation of a novel biomaterial from a forestry residue - Xanthoceras sorbifolia shell (XSS - by solvent modification. The effects of acid and base (hydrochloric acerbic, acetic acid, sodium hydroxide, ammonia water and some organic solvents (ethanol, acetone, ethyl acetate, chloroform, petroleum ether, and n-hexane on the surface acidic functional groups (SAFGs on XSS were investigated. The amount of SAFGs was quantified using acid and alkali chemical titration methods, and the characteristics of virgin XSS were compared with treated ones by FT-IR spectroscopy. It was found that acid solutions can increase the concentration of SAFGs, while alkaline solutions reduce it. The XSS treated in 0.5 M HCl has the largest number of total acidic functional groups and phenolic hydroxyl groups. The shell extracted with 2 M acetic acid has the highest concentration of carboxyl. The SAFG contents were remarkably increased by treatments with ethanol and acetone, due to the outstanding enhancement of phenolic hydroxyl. These changes in the SAFGs of XSS brought about by treatments with various solutions could be a theoretical foundation for modifying this residue to create a new type of highly efficient absorbent material.

  10. Thermodynamically based solvent design for enzymatic saccharide acylation with hydroxycinnamic acids in non-conventional media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuner, Birgitte; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Riisager, Anders

    2012-01-01

    as well as other enzymatic hydroxycinnamate acylations in ionic liquid systems. The choice of solvent system is highly decisive for enzyme stability, selectivity, and reaction yields in these synthesis reactions. To increase the understanding of the reaction environment and to facilitate solvent screening......-free microemulsions of a hydrocarbon, a polar alcohol, and water are interesting solvent systems because they accommodate different substrate and product solubilities and maintain enzyme stability. Ionic liquids may provide advantages as solvents in terms of increased substrate and product solubility, higher...... of their amphiphilicity and antioxidative potential. Synthetic reactions using mono- or disaccharides as one of the substrates may moreover direct new routes for biomass upgrading in the biorefinery. The paper reviews the available data for enzymatic hydroxycinnamate saccharide ester synthesis in organic solvent systems...

  11. Solvent-Free Biginelli Condensation using Tungstate Sulfuric Acid: a Powerful and Reusable Catalyst for Selective Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezvan Rezaee Nasab

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tungstate sulfuric acid (TSA has been prepared and used as a recyclable catalyst for the Biginelli syn-thesis of some biologically active quinazolinones/thiones under solvent-free conditions. This method has advantages such as the avoidance of organic solvents, high yield of pure products, short reaction times, and operational simplicity.  © 2014 BCREC UNDIP. All rightsReceived: 28th April 2014; Revised: 15th May 2014; Accepted: 26th May 2014[ How to Cite: Nasab, R.R., Karami, B., Khodabakhshi, S. (2014. Selective Solvent‐free Biginelli Condensation using Tungstate Sulfuric Acid as Powerful and Reusable Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 9 (2: 142-154. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.9.2.6794.148-154][ Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.9.2.6794.148-154

  12. Structural evidence for solvent-stabilisation by aspartic acid as a mechanism for halophilic protein stability in high salt concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenton, Samuel; Walsh, Danielle L; Rhys, Natasha H; Soper, Alan K; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-21

    Halophilic organisms have adapted to survive in high salt environments, where mesophilic organisms would perish. One of the biggest challenges faced by halophilic proteins is the ability to maintain both the structure and function at molar concentrations of salt. A distinct adaptation of halophilic proteins, compared to mesophilic homologues, is the abundance of aspartic acid on the protein surface. Mutagenesis and crystallographic studies of halophilic proteins suggest an important role for solvent interactions with the surface aspartic acid residues. This interaction, between the regions of the acidic protein surface and the solvent, is thought to maintain a hydration layer around the protein at molar salt concentrations thereby allowing halophilic proteins to retain their functional state. Here we present neutron diffraction data of the monomeric zwitterionic form of aspartic acid solutions at physiological pH in 0.25 M and 2.5 M concentration of potassium chloride, to mimic mesophilic and halophilic-like environmental conditions. We have used isotopic substitution in combination with empirical potential structure refinement to extract atomic-scale information from the data. Our study provides structural insights that support the hypothesis that carboxyl groups on acidic residues bind water more tightly under high salt conditions, in support of the residue-ion interaction model of halophilic protein stabilisation. Furthermore our data show that in the presence of high salt the self-association between the zwitterionic form of aspartic acid molecules is reduced, suggesting a possible mechanism through which protein aggregation is prevented.

  13. Influence of Extractive Solvents on Lipid and Fatty Acids Content of Edible Freshwater Algal and Seaweed Products, the Green Microalga Chlorella kessleri and the Cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Vavra Ambrozova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Total lipid contents of green (Chlorella pyrenoidosa, C, red (Porphyra tenera, N; Palmaria palmata, D, and brown (Laminaria japonica, K; Eisenia bicyclis, A; Undaria pinnatifida, W, WI; Hizikia fusiformis, H commercial edible algal and cyanobacterial (Spirulina platensis, S products, and autotrophically cultivated samples of the green microalga Chlorella kessleri (CK and the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis (SP were determined using a solvent mixture of methanol/chloroform/water (1:2:1, v/v/v, solvent I and n-hexane (solvent II. Total lipid contents ranged from 0.64% (II to 18.02% (I by dry weight and the highest total lipid content was observed in the autotrophically cultivated cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis. Solvent mixture I was found to be more effective than solvent II. Fatty acids were determined by gas chromatography of their methyl esters (% of total FAMEs. Generally, the predominant fatty acids (all results for extractions with solvent mixture I were saturated palmitic acid (C16:0; 24.64%–65.49%, monounsaturated oleic acid (C18:1(n-9; 2.79%–26.45%, polyunsaturated linoleic acid (C18:2(n-6; 0.71%–36.38%, α-linolenic acid (C18:3(n-3; 0.00%–21.29%, γ-linolenic acid (C18:3(n-6; 1.94%–17.36%, and arachidonic acid (C20:4(n-6; 0.00%–15.37%. The highest content of ω-3 fatty acids (21.29% was determined in Chlorella pyrenoidosa using solvent I, while conversely, the highest content of ω-6 fatty acids (41.42% was observed in Chlorella kessleri using the same solvent.

  14. Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and solvent extraction of papaya seed oil: yield, fatty acid composition and triacylglycerol profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaram, Shadi; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Tan, Chin Ping; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd

    2013-10-10

    The main objective of the current work was to evaluate the suitability of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) for the recovery of oil from papaya seed as compared to conventional extraction techniques (i.e., Soxhlet extraction (SXE) and solvent extraction (SE)). In the present study, the recovery yield, fatty acid composition and triacylglycerol profile of papaya seed oil obtained from different extraction methods and conditions were compared. Results indicated that both solvent extraction (SE, 12 h/25 °C) and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) methods recovered relatively high yields (79.1% and 76.1% of total oil content, respectively). Analysis of fatty acid composition revealed that the predominant fatty acids in papaya seed oil were oleic (18:1, 70.5%-74.7%), palmitic (16:0, 14.9%-17.9%), stearic (18:0, 4.50%-5.25%), and linoleic acid (18:2, 3.63%-4.6%). Moreover, the most abundant triacylglycerols of papaya seed oil were triolein (OOO), palmitoyl diolein (POO) and stearoyl oleoyl linolein (SOL). In this study, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) significantly (p < 0.05) influenced the triacylglycerol profile of papaya seed oil, but no significant differences were observed in the fatty acid composition of papaya seed oil extracted by different extraction methods (SXE, SE and UAE) and conditions.

  15. Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction (UAE and Solvent Extraction of Papaya Seed Oil: Yield, Fatty Acid Composition and Triacylglycerol Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanah Mohd Ghazali

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the current work was to evaluate the suitability of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE for the recovery of oil from papaya seed as compared to conventional extraction techniques (i.e., Soxhlet extraction (SXE and solvent extraction (SE. In the present study, the recovery yield, fatty acid composition and triacylglycerol profile of papaya seed oil obtained from different extraction methods and conditions were compared. Results indicated that both solvent extraction (SE, 12 h/25 °C and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE methods recovered relatively high yields (79.1% and 76.1% of total oil content, respectively. Analysis of fatty acid composition revealed that the predominant fatty acids in papaya seed oil were oleic (18:1, 70.5%–74.7%, palmitic (16:0, 14.9%–17.9%, stearic (18:0, 4.50%–5.25%, and linoleic acid (18:2, 3.63%–4.6%. Moreover, the most abundant triacylglycerols of papaya seed oil were triolein (OOO, palmitoyl diolein (POO and stearoyl oleoyl linolein (SOL. In this study, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE significantly (p < 0.05 influenced the triacylglycerol profile of papaya seed oil, but no significant differences were observed in the fatty acid composition of papaya seed oil extracted by different extraction methods (SXE, SE and UAE and conditions.

  16. Recovery of Vanadium from H2SO4-HF Acidic Leaching Solution of Black Shale by Solvent Extraction and Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingbin Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The recovery of vanadium from sulfuric and hydrofluoric mixed acid solutions generated by the direct leaching of black shale was investigated using solvent extraction and precipitation methods. The process consisted of reduction, solvent extraction, and stripping, followed by precipitation and calcination to yield vanadium pentoxide. The influence of various operating parameters on the extraction and recovery of vanadium was studied. Vanadium (IV was selectively extracted using a mixture of 10% (v/v di(2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid and 5% (v/v tri-n-butylphosphate in sulfonated kerosene. Using six extraction and five stripping stages, the extraction efficiency for vanadium was 96.7% and the stripping efficiency was 99.7%. V2O5 with a purity of 99.52% was obtained by oxidation of the loaded strip solution and precipitation of ammonium polyvanadate at pH 1.8 to 2.2, followed by calcination of the dried precipitate at 550 °C for 2 h. It was concluded that the combination of solvent extraction and precipitation is an efficient method for the recovery of vanadium from a multi-element leach solution generated from black shale.

  17. Safety demonstration tests on thermal decomposition of nitrated solvent with nitric acid in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Contract research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Michio; Takada, Junichi; Koike, Tadao; Watanabe, Koji; Uchiyama, Gunzou; Nishio, Gunji; Murata, Mikio

    2001-03-01

    The demonstration tests were conducted to investigate the safety of the ventilation system and integrity of the HEPA filters under the design basis accident (DBA) of the evaporator in the reprocessing plants. The tests were carried out by heating organic solvent (TBP/n- dodecane) mixed with nitric acid in a sealed vessel. It was possible to cause an explosive decomposition of TBP-complex formed by nitration of the solvent with nitric acid. The following was obtained by the analysis of the experimental results of the tests. From derivation by the experimental method, data on the maximum mass release rate and the maximum energy release rate in the explosion, as the solvent of 1 [kg] spouted out by the thermal decomposition, were obtained. They were 0.59 [kg/s] and 3240.3 [kJ/kg·s] respectively. The influence given on the cell ventilation system by this explosion was small and it was demonstrated that the safety of the HEPA filters could be secured. (author)

  18. Extraction of Betulin, Trimyristin, Eugenol and Carnosic Acid Using Water-Organic Solvent Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulgentius N. Lugemwa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A solvent system consisting of ethyl acetate, ethyl alcohol and water, in the volume ratio of 4.5:4.5:1, was developed and used to extract, at room temperature, betulin from white birch bark and antioxidants from spices (rosemary, thyme, sage, and oregano and white oak chips. In addition, under reflux conditions, trimyristin was extracted from nutmeg using the same solvent system, and eugenol from olives was extracted using a mixture of salt water and ethyl acetate. The protocol demonstrates the use of water in organic solvents to extract natural products from plants. Measurement of the free-radical scavenging activity using by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH indicated that the extraction of plant material using ethyl acetate, ethyl alcohol and water (4.5:4.5:1, v/v/v was exhaustive when carried out at room temperature for 96 h.

  19. Empirical parameters for solvent acidity, basicity, dipolarity, and polarizability of the ionic liquids [BMIM][BF4] and [BMIM][PF6].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Valle, J C; García Blanco, F; Catalán, J

    2015-04-02

    The empirical solvent scales for polarizability (SP), dipolarity (SdP), acidity (SA), and basicity (SB) have been successfully used to interpret the solvatochromism of compounds dissolved in organic solvents and their solvent mixtures. Providing that the published solvatochromic parameters for the ionic liquids 1-(1-butyl)-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, [BMIM][BF4] and 1-(1-butyl)-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, [BMIM][PF6], are excessively widespread, their SP, SdP, SA, and SB values are measured herein at temperatures from 293 to 353 K. Four key points are emphasized herein: (i) the origin of the solvatochromic solvent scales--the gas phase, that is the absence of any medium perturbation--; (ii) the separation of the polarizability and dipolarity effects; (iii) the simplification of the probing process in order to obtain the solvatochromic parameters; and (iv) the SP, SdP, SA, and SB solvent scales can probe the polarizability, dipolarity, acidity, and basicity of ionic liquids as well as of organic solvents and water-organic solvent mixtures. From the multiparameter approach using the four pure solvent scales one can draw the conclusion that (a) the solvent influence of [BMIM][BF4] parallels that of formamide at 293 K, both of them miscible with water; (b) [BMIM][PF6] shows a set of solvatochromic parameters similar to that of chloroacetonitrile, both of them water insoluble; and (c) that the corresponding solvent acidity and basicity of the ionic liquids can be explained to a great extent from the cation species by comparing the empirical parameters of [BMIM](+) with those of the solvent 1-methylimidazole. The insolubility of [BMIM][PF6] in water as compared to [BMIM][BF4] is tentatively connected to some extent to the larger molar volume of the anion [PF6](-), and to the difference in basicity of [PF6](-) and [BF4](-).

  20. Carbon dioxide solubilities in decanoic acid-based hydrophobic deep eutectic solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zubeir, Lawien F.; Van Osch, Dannie J.G.P.; Rocha, Marisa A.A.; Banat, Fawzi; Kroon, Maaike C.

    2018-01-01

    The solubility of CO2 in hydrophobic deep eutectic solvents (DESs) has been measured for the first time. Six different hydrophobic DESs are studied in the temperature range from 298 to 323 K and at CO2 pressures up to 2 MPa. The results are evaluated by comparing the solubility data with existing

  1. β-Secondary and solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects and the mechanisms of base- and acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of penicillanic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deraniyagala, S.A.; Adediran, S.A.; Pratt, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    β-Secondary and solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects have been determined at 25 degrees C for the alkaline and acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of penicillanic acid. In order to determine the former isotope effect, [6,6- 2 H 2 ]dideuteriopenicillanic acid has been synthesized. In alkaline solution, the former isotope effect was found to be 0.95 ± 0.01. These values support the B AC 2 mechanism of hydrolysis with rate-determining formation of the tetrahedral intermediate that has been proposed for other β-lactams. The measured β-secondary kinetic isotope for the acid-catalyzed reaction was 1.00 ± 0.01. The data indicates that a likely pathway of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis would be that of an A AC 1 mechanism with an intermediate acylium ion. If this were so, the calculated β-secondary isotope effect per hydrogen coplanar with the breaking C-N bond and corrected for the inductive effect of deuterium would be 1.06 ± 0.01. This suggests an early A AC 1 transition state, which would be reasonable in this case because of destabilization of the N-protonated amide with respect to the acylium ion because of ring strain. The absence of specific participation by solvent in the transition state, as would be expected of an A AC 1 but not an associative mechanism, is supported by the strongly inverse solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effect of 0.25 ± 0.00 in 1 M HCl and 0.22 ± 0.01 in 33.3 wt % H 2 SO 4 . 1 fig., 3 tabs

  2. Direct catalytic conversion of brown seaweed-derived alginic acid to furfural using 12-tungstophosphoric acid catalyst in tetrahydrofuran/water co-solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Geonu; Jeon, Wonjin; Ban, Chunghyeon; Woo, Hee Chul; Kim, Do Heui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Furfural was produced by catalytic conversion of macroalgae-derived alginic acid. • 12-Tungstophosphoric acid (H_3PW_1_2O_4_0) showed remarkable catalytic performance. • Tetrahydrofuran (THF) as a reaction medium significantly enhanced production of furfural. - Abstract: Furfural, a biomass-derived platform chemical, was produced by acid-catalyzed reaction of alginic acid extracted from brown seaweed. Three acid catalysts, H_2SO_4, Amberlyst15 and 12-tungstophosphoric acid (H_3PW_1_2O_4_0), were compared to evaluate their catalytic performance for the alginic acid conversion. The H_3PW_1_2O_4_0 catalyst showed the highest catalytic activity, yielding the maximum furfural yield (33.8%) at 180 °C for 30 min in tetrahydrofuran/water co-solvent. Higher reaction temperature promoted the conversion of alginic acid to furfural, but the transformation of furfural to humin was also accelerated. To our knowledge, this is the highest furfural yield among studies about the direct catalytic conversion of alginic acid. Furthermore, products distribution with time-on-stream was investigated in detail, which led us to propose a reaction pathway.

  3. A potentiometric study of molecular heteroconjugation equilibria in (n-butylamine+acetic acid) systems in binary (acetonitrile +1,4-dioxane) solvent mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czaja, Malgorzata; Makowski, Mariusz; Chmurzynski, Lech

    2006-01-01

    By using the potentiometric method the following quantities have been determined: acidity constants of molecular acid, K a (HA), of cationic acid, K a (BH + ), anionic and cationic homoconjugation constants, K AHA - and K BHB + , respectively, as well as molecular heteroconjugation constants, K AHB , in (n-butylamine+acetic acid) systems without proton transfer in binary (acetonitrile+1,4-dioxane), AN+D, solvent mixtures. The results of these measurements have shown that the magnitudes of the molecular heteroconjugation constants do not depend on the 1,4-dioxane content in the mixed solvent, i.e., on solvent polarity. It has also been found that in the (acid+base) systems without proton transfer, the manner of carrying out the titration (direct B+HA vs. reverse HA+B) does not affect the magnitudes of the molecular heteroconjugation constants

  4. A potentiometric study of molecular heteroconjugation equilibria in (n-butylamine+acetic acid) systems in binary (acetonitrile +1,4-dioxane) solvent mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czaja, Malgorzata [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Makowski, Mariusz [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Chmurzynski, Lech [Department of General Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)]. E-mail: lech@chem.univ.gda.pl

    2006-05-15

    By using the potentiometric method the following quantities have been determined: acidity constants of molecular acid, K{sub a}(HA), of cationic acid, K{sub a}(BH{sup +}), anionic and cationic homoconjugation constants, K{sub AHA{sup -}} and K{sub BHB{sup +}}, respectively, as well as molecular heteroconjugation constants, K{sub AHB}, in (n-butylamine+acetic acid) systems without proton transfer in binary (acetonitrile+1,4-dioxane), AN+D, solvent mixtures. The results of these measurements have shown that the magnitudes of the molecular heteroconjugation constants do not depend on the 1,4-dioxane content in the mixed solvent, i.e., on solvent polarity. It has also been found that in the (acid+base) systems without proton transfer, the manner of carrying out the titration (direct B+HA vs. reverse HA+B) does not affect the magnitudes of the molecular heteroconjugation constants.

  5. A comparison of choline:urea and choline:oxalic acid deep eutectic solvents at 338 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Mark; Moura, Leila M.; Turner, Adam H.; Swadźba-Kwaśny, Małgorzata; Callear, Samantha K.; McCune, Jade A.; Scherman, Oren A.; Holbrey, John D.

    2018-05-01

    1:2 choline chloride:urea and 1:1 choline chloride:oxalic acid deep eutectic solvents are compared at 338 K using liquid-phase neutron diffraction with H/D isotopic substitution to obtain differential neutron scattering cross sections and fitting of models to the experimental data using Empirical Potential Structure Refinement. In comparison to the previously reported study of choline chloride:urea at 303 K, we observed significant weakening and lengthening of choline-OH⋯Cl- and choline-OH⋯hydrogen-bond acceptor correlations.

  6. Solvent effects on extraction of aluminum(III), gallium(III), and indium(III), with decanoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hiromichi; Hayashi, Hisao; Fujii, Yukio; Mizuta, Masateru

    1986-01-01

    Extraction of aluminum(III) and indium(III) with decanoic acid in 1-octanol was carried out at 25 deg C and at an aqueous ionic strength of 0.1 mol dm -3 (NaClO 4 ). Monomeric and tetrameric aluminum(III) decanoates and monomeric indium(III) decanoate are responsible for the extraction. From a comparison of the present results with those obtained from the previous works, the polymerization of the extracted species was found to be more extensive in benzene than in 1-octanol, and the metal decanoates were highly polymerized in the following order in both solvents: Al > Ga > In. (author)

  7. Some regularities in formation and solvent extraction of complexes in metal-salicylic acid or its derivative- organic base systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimarin, I.P.; Fadeeva, V.I.; Tikhomirova, T.I.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of concentrations of the reagents, pH and solvent on the conditions for the formation and extraction of Sc, Ti, Zr, Hf, Th complexes has been examined in salicylic acid (H 2 Sal)-heterocyclic amine systems. The extraction chemism and factors, which affect the reactions between the metal ions and the ligands, are discussed. It has been shown that Zr, Hf, Ti form species of ion associate type, Sc and Th form different-ligand complexes under conditions for interphase equilibrium in a Me-H 2 Sal-heterocyclic amine system

  8. Selective removal of chromium from sulphuric acid leach liquor of ilmenite ore by solvent extraction with trioctylamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.O. Olanipekun

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The selective removal of chromium, a trace impurity that degrades the whiteness of titanium(IV oxide pigments, from sulphuric acid leach liquor of ilmenite, was investigated by solvent extraction with xylene solutions of trioctylamine. Important factors of commercial significance affecting the extraction operation have been examined. More than 99% of the chromium was selectively removed in multiple batch extractions from the leach liquor and titanium losses were minimal (< 1%. The chromium content of extracted solutions was reduced to less than 1 ppm and thermal hydrolysis of these solutions yielded white titanium(IV oxide pigments that are suitable for use in the coatings pigment industry.

  9. An Efficient Solvent-Free Protocol for the Synthesis of 1-Amidoalkyl-2-naphthols using Silica-Supported Molybdatophosphoric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolkarim Zare

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly efficient, green and simple solvent-free method for the synthesis of 1-amidoalkyl-2-naphthols via one-pot multi-components condensation of 2-naphthol, aromatic aldehydes and amides in the presence of catalytic amount of silica-supported molybdatophosphoric acid (H3PMo12O40.xH2O/SiO2, 3.17 mol% is described. The reactions proceed rapidly and the title compounds are produced in high to excellent yields.

  10. Co-solvents transesterification of cotton seed oil into biodiesel: Effects of reaction conditions on quality of fatty acids methyl esters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhassan, Y.; Kumar, N.; Bugaje, I.M.; Pali, H.S.; Kathkar, P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Using co-solvent systems reduce reaction time by 60%. • Only small volume of co-solvent is required to improve the process. • Greater than 90% yields were obtained within the first 10 min. • Physico-chemical and fuel properties of FAMEs were within standard limits. • Acetone was found to be the best co-solvent for the transesterification. - Abstract: Solvent Technology, is gaining the interest of researchers in improving transesterification process recently. Transesterification of cotton seed oil into biodiesel using different mixtures of methanol with Diethyl Ether (DEE), Dichlorobenzene (CBN) or Acetone (ACT) co-solvent systems was conducted. Potassium hydroxide (KOH) was used as the catalyst all through. The reaction conditions optimized include; the molar ratio of co-solvent in methanol, reaction temperature and time. The catalyst concentration was also optimized. The optimization was based on the percentage yields of Fatty Acids Methyl Esters (FAMEs) produced. In addition, the effects of co-solvent systems on physico-chemical properties (Acid value and fatty acids composition) and fuel properties (viscosity, density and calorific value) were investigated as well. The result obtained, indicated 10% (v/v) addition of co-solvents CBN and ACT in methanol was the optimal volume. The optimal reaction temperature was 55 ° 0 C for 10 min when the catalyst concentration of 0.75% (w/w) weight of oil was used. Fuel properties were within the acceptable limit of ASTM and not significantly affected by the co-solvent systems except for the calorific value. It was concluded that the addition of co-solvent reduced the reaction time and improved some fuel properties of the biodiesel produced

  11. Systemic study of solvent-assisted active loading of gambogic acid into liposomes and its formulation optimization for improved delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei-Lun; Tang, Wei-Hsin; Szeitz, Andras; Kulkarni, Jayesh; Cullis, Pieter; Li, Shyh-Dar

    2018-06-01

    The solvent-assisted active loading technology (SALT) was developed for encapsulating a water insoluble weak base into the liposomal core in the presence of 5% DMSO. In this study, we further examined the effect of various water miscible solvents in promoting active loading of other types of drugs into liposomes. To achieve complete drug loading, the amount of solvent required must result in complete drug solubilization and membrane permeability enhancement, but must be below the threshold that induces liposomal aggregation or causes bilayer disruption. We then used the SALT to load gambogic acid (GA, an insoluble model drug that shows promising anticancer effect) into liposomes, and optimized the loading gradient and lipid composition to prepare a stable formulation (Lipo-GA) that displayed >95% drug retention after incubation with serum for 3 days. Lipo-GA contained a high drug-to-lipid ratio of 1/5 (w/w) with a mean particle size of ∼75 nm. It also displayed a prolonged circulation half-life (1.5 h vs. 18.6 h) and enhanced antitumor activity in two syngeneic mice models compared to free GA. Particularly, complete tumor regression was observed in the EMT6 tumor model for 14 d with significant inhibition of multiple oncogenes including HIF-1α, VEGF-A, STAT3, BCL-2, and NF-κB. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Acid catalyzed solvent free synthesis of new 1-acyl-4-benzhydryl substituted pyrazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sher, M.; Kausar, T.; Riaz, N.; Sharif, A.

    2016-01-01

    A convenient, cost effective and environmentally benign methodology has been developed, which delivered fourteen new 1-acyl-4-benzhyrdyl substituted pyrazole derivatives under solvent free conditions. Target compounds were synthesized in good to excellent yields simply by grinding reactants in a pestle and mortar with catalytic amount of conc. H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. All the newly formed compounds were fully characterized with the help of detailed spectroscopic techniques including FTIR, NMR and GC-MS. (author)

  13. Indium recovery from acidic aqueous solutions by solvent extraction with D2EHPA: a statistical approach to the experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortes M.C.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This experimental work presents the optimization results of obtaining a high indium concentration solution and minimum iron poisoning by solvent extraction with D2EHPA solubilized in isoparaffin and exxsol. The variables studied in the extraction step were D2EHPA concentration, acidity of the aqueous phase and time of contact between phases. Different hydrochloric and sulfuric acid concentrations were studied for the stripping step. The optimum experimental conditions resulted in a solution with 99% indium extraction and less than 4% iron. The construction of a McCabe-Thiele diagram indicated two theoretical countercurrent stages for indium extraction and at least six stages for indium stripping. Finally, the influence of associated metals found in typical sulfate leach liquors from zinc plants was studied. Under the experimental conditions for maximum indium extraction, 96% indium extraction was obtained, iron extraction was about 4% and no Ga, Cu and Zn were co-extracted.

  14. Interaction of Fe(II) with Polyacrylic Acid as a Simplification of Humic Acid: Comparison of Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budi Setiawan

    2007-01-01

    To estimate the safety assessment around the disposal facility, the interaction behavior of radionuclides/metal ions into organic material (such as humic acids) exist in natural water becomes an important study. To avoid the effect of heterogeneous composition of humic acid, polyacrylic acids (abbrev. APA) was used as are representative of homogeneous polymeric weak acid. The experiments have been carried out by solvent extraction and ion exchange methods to find out the suitable method for the study of complex formation of Fe(II) with humic acid(AH) and APA. The solvent extraction experiment has been done by using diphenylthiocarbazone (dithizone) in CCl 4 and C Fe(II) were 10 -8 M to 10 -5 M, pH around 5 and I=0.1M NaCI. In ionic exchange experiment, C Fe(II) were 10 -8 to 10 -4 M, pH from 4.8 to 5.5 in I=0.1M NaCl. The apparent complex formation constant is defined as β α = [ML]/([M][R]), where [M] and [ML] are concentration of free and bound of Fe(II) and [R] is the concentration of dissociated carboxylic group in macromolecules of PAA. The results shown that, for solvent extraction experiments, variable concentration of Fe(II) had no appreciable influence on the distribution ratio of Fe(II)-polyacrylate at the tracer concentration with the log D to be 1.32 ± 0.03 (pcH 5.25). At macro concentration, the distribution ratio of Fe(II) becomes smaller due to oxidation and obtained log D value to be 1.04 ± 0.07 (pcH 5.34). An interest kind was observed at higher PAA concentration, the distribution ratio curve becomes higher presumably due to the problem on redox sensitive characteristic of Fe(II) and/or coagulation of Fe(II)-polyacrylate at the interface of aqueous-organic phases. In case of ionic exchange method, the plot of I/Kd versus [R] gives a straight line result indicating this method is appropriate and more superior compare than solvent extraction method to determine the complex formation constant. (author)

  15. Study of acid-base properties in various water-salt and water-organic solvent mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, M.

    1969-01-01

    Acid-base reactions have been studied in water-salt mixtures and water organic solvent-mixtures. It has been possible to find some relations between the displacement of the equilibria and the numerical value of water activity in the mixture. First have been studied some equilibria H + + B ↔ HB + in salt-water mixtures and found a relation between the pK A value, the solubility of the base and water activity. The reaction HO - + H + ↔ H 2 O has been investigated and a relation been found between pK i values, water activity and the molar concentration of the salt in the mixture. This relation is the same for every mixture. Then the same reactions have been studied in organic solvent-water mixtures and a relation found in the first part of the work have been used with success. So it has been possible to explain easily some properties of organic water-mixture as the shape of the curves of the Hammett acidity function Ho. (authors) [fr

  16. System Development from Organic Solvents to Ionic Liquids for Synthesiz-ing Ascorbyl Esters with Conjugated Linoleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhiyong; Schultz, Lise; Guo, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    . Results show that only Novozym® 435 turned out to be a useful enzymatic preparation for the production of ascorbyl-CLA ester. The optimum reaction conditions in the or-ganic solvent system were 4 h at 55°C and at a molar ratio of 5 (CLA/ascorbic acid). The esterification reaction was trans......-ferred to an ionic liquid system for the purpose of improving solubility of the polar substrate and avoiding the application of organic solvents. From screening experiments, it was evident that only methyltrioctylammonium triflouroacetate (tO-MA·TFA) could provide a proper reaction environment for production...... of ascorbyl-CLA ester when using Novozym® 435 as biocatalyst. It was possible to significantly increase the productivity (150 g/l) through the increase of ascorbic acid sol-ubility in ionic liquids by super saturation together with the increase of reaction temperature to 70°C, far beyond than that in organic...

  17. THE EFFECT OF SULPHURIC ACID CONCENTRATION ON SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF ReO4 - BY THE LONG-CHAIN ALIPHATIC TERTIARY AMINES AND ALCOHOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander G. Kasikov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sulphuric acid concentration on solvent extraction of ReO4- by the long-chain aliphatic tertiary amines and alcohols in a wide range of H2SO4 concentrations in initial solutions is discussed. It has been established that the influence of the sulphuric acid concentration on rhenium solvent extraction is largely due to the extraction process mechanism. In the case of the anion-exchange mechanism, ReO4- is best extracted from weakly acidic solutions, whereas when the hydrate-solvate mechanism takes place – from solutions containing 4-7 mole/l H2SO4.

  18. Multicarboxylic acids as environment-friendly solvents and in situ crosslinkers for chitosan/PVA nanofibers with tunable physicochemical properties and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangon, Autchara; Saesoo, Somsak; Saengkrit, Nattika; Ruktanonchai, Uracha; Intasanta, Varol

    2016-03-15

    Monocarboxylic acids are common solvents for chitosan to fabricate nanofibers however the unpleasant odor and the additional step of fiber stabilization using crosslinkers, which might cause toxicity, are always the points to be aware of. The present work demonstrates the potential use of multicarboxylic acids as environment-friendly solvents and in situ crosslinking agents for chitosan electrospinning. The use of these solvents leads to the tunable physicochemical properties, cellular compatibility, and cost effective production. By changing di-, to tri-, and tetracarboxylic acids combining with the simple thermal treatment, the stability and mechanical properties of the nanofibrous mats, especially the elastic modulus and elongation at break, can be altered. The resulting nanofibers exhibit biocompatibility favorable for proliferation and adhesion of the osteoblast cells. The multicarboxylic acids allow us lab-scale reproducibility and possibility to semi-production of nanofibrous chitosan using Nanospider™. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Solvent extraction of Zn and metals in Zn ores by nonphosphorous solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchapt, J.M.; Tostain, Jacqueline.

    1975-07-01

    This bibliography follows a first work on Zn solvent extraction by organo-phosphorous compounds. The other solvents used in Zn extraction, are studied: oxygenated nonphosphorous solvents (ketones, alcohols, carboxylic acids, sulfonates), nitrogenous solvents and hydrocarbons [fr

  20. Novel Regenerated Solvent Extraction Processes for the Recovery of Carboxylic Acids or Ammonia from Aqueous Solutions Part I. Regeneration of Amine-Carboxylic Acid Extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poole, Loree Joanne [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); King, C. Judson [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1990-03-01

    Two novel regenerated solvent extraction processes are examined. The first process has the potential to reduce the energy costs inherent in the recovery of low-volatility carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solutions. The second process has the potential for reducing the energy costs required for separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases (e.g. CO2 and H2S) from industrial sour waters. The recovery of carboxylic acids from dilute aqueous solution can be achieved by extraction with tertiary amines. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back-extract the carboxylic acid with a water-soluble, volatile tertiary amine, such as trimethylamine. The resulting trimethylammonium carboxylate solution can be concentrated and thermally decomposed, yielding the product acid and the volatile amine for recycle. Experimental work was performed with lactic acid, succinic acid, and fumaric acid. Equilibrium data show near-stoichiometric recovery of the carboxylic acids from an organic solution of Alamine 336 into aqueous solutions of trimethylamine. For fumaric and succinic acids, partial evaporation of the aqueous back extract decomposes the carboxylate and yields the acid product in crystalline form. The decomposition of aqueous solutions of trimethylammonium lactates was not carried out to completion, due to the high water solubility of lactic acid and the tendency of the acid to self-associate. The separate recovery of ammonia and acid gases from sour waters can be achieved by combining steam-stripping of the acid gases with simultaneous removal of ammonia by extraction with a liquid cation exchanger. The use of di-2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic acid as the liquid cation exchanger is explored in this work. Batch extraction experiments were carried out to measure the equilibrium distribution ratio of ammonia between an aqueous buffer solution and an organic solution of the phosphinic acid (0.2N) in Norpar 12. The

  1. Recovery of salicylic acid from aqueous solution by solvent extraction and supported liquid membrane using TOMAC as carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouki, Noura; Tayeb, Rafik; Dhahbi, Mahmoud

    2009-01-01

    Conventional sewage treatment plants do not fully degrade residues of pharmaceuticals, so that they are introduced into the aquatic environment. On this basis, the demand for the development of efficient systems for removing these compounds from water has assumed a great research interest. Membrane operations are increasingly employed in many industrial sectors as important alternative technologies to the classical processes of separation. Among membrane-based separation processes, the use of supported liquid membranes (SLMs) has received growing attention during recent years. In our work we had tried to recover a pharmaceutical product, salicylic acid (S.A), from an aqueous solution by solvent extraction and supported liquid membrane using an ionic liquid: the tri octylmethylammonium chloride (TOMAC) as carrier. Ionic liquids has been revealed as interesting clean alternatives to classical solvents and their use as a liquid phase results in the stabilization of the SLMs duo to their negligible vapour pressure, the possibility of minimising their solubility in the surrounding phases by adequate selection of the cation and anion, and the greater capillary force associated with their high viscosity. For this reason we had studied the influence of different parameters which could affect the efficiency of the transport: pH of the feed phase, the nature of the strippant, the concentration of the strippant, the nature of the support and the initial concentration of the salicylic acid in the feed phase. We had noticed that the pH of the feed solution had no effect of the percentage extraction and after 24 hours we can extract completely our solute. TOMAC seemed to be a good extractant but we found difficult to strip salicylic acid from the TOMAC phase and this could be related to the formation of water micro environments in the ionic liquid membrane.

  2. A linear solvation energy relationship study for the reactivity of 2-substituted cyclohex-1-enecarboxylic and 2-substituted benzoic acids with diazodiphenylmethane in aprotic and protic solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JASMINA B. NIKOLIC

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The rate constants for the reaction of 2-substituted cyclohex-1-enylcarboxylic acids and the corresponding 2-substituted benzoic acids with diazodiphenyl methane were determined in various aprotic solvents at 30 ºC. In order to explain the kinetic results through solvent effects, the second order rate constants of the reaction of the examined acids were correlated using the Kamlet–Taft solvatechromic equation. The correlations of the kinetic data were carried out by means of multiple linear regression analysis and the solvent effects on the reaction rates were analyzed in terms of the contributions of the initial and transition state. The signs of the equation coefficients support the proposed reaction mechanism. The quantitative relationship between the molecular structure and the chemical reactivity is discussed, as well as the effect of geometry on the reactivity of the examined molecules.

  3. Study of uranium(VI) speciation in phosphoric acid solutions and of its recovery by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dartiguelongue, Adrien

    2014-01-01

    Because small amounts of uranium are present in phosphate rocks, wet phosphoric acids may contain up to 300 ppm of uranium(VI). Therefore, such acids are a cost-effective unconventional source of this metal. Its recovery is a challenge for metallurgical firms which must develop reliable and selective solvent extraction processes. Such processes need to know the chemical equilibria involved in the extraction process, the speciation of uranium and its thermodynamics in solution. These two last points have been investigated in this work. Firstly, the most probable species of uranium(VI) in phosphoric acid solutions have been selected thanks to a detailed review of the literature. Then, a thermodynamic model founded on an equation of state for electrolytes has been built according these hypotheses. It has been validated with speciation data coming from original ATR-IR spectroscopy measurements. Finally, the composition of the aqueous phosphoric acid solutions and the activity coefficients obtained have been combined with a chemical model of uranium(VI) extraction into an organic phase containing a synergistic mixture of bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in order to represent the variation of the distribution coefficient of uranium(VI) with H 3 PO 4 concentration. This model had been previously developed at Chimie ParisTech at a given concentration of H 3 PO 4 (i.e., 5,3 mol/L), but in the present study we have tested its validity in an extended range of phosphoric acid concentrations (i.e., 1-7 mol/L) and improved it. (author)

  4. (Liquid + liquid) equilibrium data of (water + phosphoric acid + solvents) systems at T = (308.2 and 318.2) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanadzadeh Gilani, H.; Ghanadzadeh Gilani, A.; Shekarsaraee, S.; Uslu, H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Phase equilibria of the (water + PA + solvents) systems were investigated. ► Experimental LLE data were correlated with NRTL and UNIQUAC models. ► Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated. - Abstract: Ternary equilibrium data for the mixtures of {water + phosphoric acid + organic solvent (cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, and toluene)} were determined at T = (308.2 and 318.2) K and atmospheric pressure. Solubility data were determined by the cloud-point titration method. In order to obtain the tie-line data, the concentration of each phase was determined by acidimetric titration, the Karl–Fischer technique, and refractive index measurements. The experimental tie-line data were correlated using the UNIQUAC and NRTL models. The reliability of the experimental data was determined through the Othmer–Tobias and Hand plots. Distribution coefficients and separation factors were evaluated over the immiscibility regions. The Katritzky LSER model was applied to correlate distribution coefficients and separation factors in these ternary systems.

  5. Studies on the solvent extraction behaviour of Pu(IV) from nitric acid, nitric-perchloric acid and hydrochloric acids, by di,2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (HDEHP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phal, D.G.; Kannan, S.K.; Ramakrishna, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Extraction of plutonium (IV) from aqueous nitric acid, nitric-perchloric acid and hydrochloric acids by di,2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid, the dimeric form of which is represented as H 2 Y 2 , in different diluents (dodecane, toluene and chloroform) was investigated. The composition of the extracted Pu(IV) species were found to be Pu(NO 3 ) 2 (HY) 2 , Pu(NO 3 )(ClO 4 )(HY 2 ) 2 , PuClY(HY 2 ) 2 and PuCl 2 (HY 2 ) 2 from nitric, nitric-perchloric and hydrochloric acids respectively, the last one being pre-dominant at high aqueous acidities (i.e. 5M HCl). Synergic enhancement in the extraction of Pu(IV) from different aqueous media, by the addition of thenoyltrifluoroacetone (HTTA) to HDEHP was also investigated and was attributed to the formation and extraction of the species PuX(TTA)(HY 2 ) 2 , and Pu(TTA) 2 (HY 2 ) 2 where X=Cl - or NO 3 - . The addition of the neutral extractant TOPO to H 2 Y 2 also resulted in synergism. The possible equilibria in these systems were inferred and the corresponding equilibrium constants determined. (author). 24 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs

  6. Characterization of particulate sol-gel synthesis of LiNi0.8Co0.2O2 via maleic acid assistance with different solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Y.D.; Zhao, X.B.; Cao, G.S.; Tu, J.P.; Zhu, T.J.

    2006-01-01

    Particulate sol-gel LiNi 0.8 Co 0.2 O 2 has been synthesized by a maleic-acid-assisted process using de-ionized water or ethanol as the solvent. A comparison of the effect on these two different solvents was made on the basis of thermal studies, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, chemical diffusion coefficients measurement, and electrochemical cyclability tests. An esterification reaction occurred on the xerogel prepared with ethanol as solvent, reducing Ni and Co from their nitrate salts. LiNi 0.8 Co 0.2 O 2 grew at the expense of Li 2 CO 3 , NiO, and CoO during calcination. Better results of capacity and cyclability were obtained in a DI-water-solvent sample associated with a larger interslab thickness between O-Li-O and lower Ni occupancy on the Li site. The activation energy for the calcinations of DI-water-solvent sample is one-half of that of the ethanol-solvent one, which could be the reason for its better properties. Chemical diffusion coefficients of Li + ion are of the same order 10 -10 cm 2 /s, is not affected by the solvents used and/or the temperature raise to 55 deg. C

  7. HTGR fuel development: loading of uranium on carboxylic acid cation-exchange resins using solvent extraction of nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.

    1975-09-01

    The reference fuel kernel for recycle of 233 U to HTGR's (High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors) is prepared by loading carboxylic acid cation-exchange resins with uranium and carbonizing at controlled conditions. The purified 233 UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 solution from a fuel reprocessing plant contains excess HNO 3 (NO 3 - /U ratio of approximately 2.2). The reference flowsheet for a 233 U recycle fuel facility at Oak Ridge uses solvent extraction of nitrate by a 0.3 M secondary amine in a hydrocarbon diluent to prepare acid-deficient uranyl nitrate. This nitrate extraction, along with resin loading and amine regeneration steps, was demonstrated in 14 runs. No significant operating difficulties were encountered. The process is controlled via in-line pH measurements for the acid-deficient uranyl nitrate solutions. Information was developed on pH values for uranyl nitrate solution vs NO 3 - /U mole ratios, resin loading kinetics, resin drying requirements, and other resin loading process parameters. Calculations made to estimate the capacities of equipment that is geometrically safe with respect to control of nuclear criticality indicate 100 kg/day or more of uranium for single nitrate extraction lines with one continuous resin loading contactor or four batch loading contactors. (auth)

  8. Solvent extraction of titanium (IV) from sulphuric acid media by cyanex 921 and tri-butylphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayl, A.A.; Aly, H.F.

    2009-01-01

    titanium and its compounds found different useful applications in the nuclear and radioactive waste treatment fields. extraction behavior of titanium (IV) from sulfuric acid by commercial tri-octylphosphine oxide (CYANEX 921) and tributylphosphate (TBP)has been investigated. effects of contact time, sulfuric acid concentration in the aqueous phase, the extractants concentration in the organic phase, and the temperature on the extraction of titanium by the two systems were studied. it is found that extraction equilibrium of titanium is reached after 10-15 min and 4 min for CYANEX 921 and TBP, respectively . the extraction of Ti(IV) by 0.15 M CYANEX 921 in kerosene increases with the increase in sulfuric acid concentration to reach a maximum extraction of 91% at 7.0 m acid concentration. for the TBP system, the maximum extraction of titanium was 79% using 1.0 M TBP in kerosene from 4.0 m H 2 SO 4 solution . the effect of temperature was also evaluated. Na 2 CO 3 was used as a good stripping agent compared with other reagents. the interaction of Ti(IV) in sulfate medium and different sulfate species in sulfuric acid are reviewed. within the literature survey together with analysis of the extraction results , it can be concluded that titanium extracted by CYANEX 921 as Ti O (HSO 4 ) 2 .2 CYANEX 921 whereby in case of TBP, the extracted species is TiOSO 4 .2 TBP

  9. Kinetics and Optimization of Lipophilic Kojic Acid Derivative Synthesis in Polar Aprotic Solvent Using Lipozyme RMIM and Its Rheological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurazwa Ishak

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of kojic acid derivative (KAD from kojic and palmitic acid (C16:0 in the presence of immobilized lipase from Rhizomucor miehei (commercially known as Lipozyme RMIM, was studied using a shake flask system. Kojic acid is a polyfunctional heterocycles that acts as a source of nucleophile in this reaction allowing the formation of a lipophilic KAD. In this study, the source of biocatalyst, Lipozyme RMIM, was derived from the lipase of Rhizomucor miehei immobilized on weak anion exchange macro-porous Duolite ES 562 by the adsorption technique. The effects of solvents, enzyme loading, reaction temperature, and substrate molar ratio on the reaction rate were investigated. In one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT experiments, a high reaction rate (30.6 × 10−3 M·min−1 of KAD synthesis was recorded using acetone, enzyme loading of 1.25% (w/v, reaction time of 12 h, temperature of 50 °C and substrate molar ratio of 5:1. Thereafter, a yield of KAD synthesis was optimized via the response surface methodology (RSM whereby the optimized molar ratio (fatty acid: kojic acid, enzyme loading, reaction temperature and reaction time were 6.74, 1.97% (w/v, 45.9 °C, and 20 h respectively, giving a high yield of KAD (64.47%. This condition was reevaluated in a 0.5 L stirred tank reactor (STR where the agitation effects of two impellers; Rushton turbine (RT and pitch-blade turbine (PBT, were investigated. In the STR, a very high yield of KAD synthesis (84.12% was achieved using RT at 250 rpm, which was higher than the shake flask, thus indicating better mixing quality in STR. In a rheological study, a pseudoplastic behavior of KAD mixture was proposed for potential application in lotion formulation.

  10. Kinetics and Optimization of Lipophilic Kojic Acid Derivative Synthesis in Polar Aprotic Solvent Using Lipozyme RMIM and Its Rheological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Nurazwa; Lajis, Ahmad Firdaus B; Mohamad, Rosfarizan; Ariff, Arbakariya B; Mohamed, Mohd Shamzi; Halim, Murni; Wasoh, Helmi

    2018-02-24

    The synthesis of kojic acid derivative (KAD) from kojic and palmitic acid (C16:0) in the presence of immobilized lipase from Rhizomucor miehei (commercially known as Lipozyme RMIM), was studied using a shake flask system. Kojic acid is a polyfunctional heterocycles that acts as a source of nucleophile in this reaction allowing the formation of a lipophilic KAD. In this study, the source of biocatalyst, Lipozyme RMIM, was derived from the lipase of Rhizomucor miehei immobilized on weak anion exchange macro-porous Duolite ES 562 by the adsorption technique. The effects of solvents, enzyme loading, reaction temperature, and substrate molar ratio on the reaction rate were investigated. In one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) experiments, a high reaction rate (30.6 × 10 -3 M·min -1 ) of KAD synthesis was recorded using acetone, enzyme loading of 1.25% ( w / v ), reaction time of 12 h, temperature of 50 °C and substrate molar ratio of 5:1. Thereafter, a yield of KAD synthesis was optimized via the response surface methodology (RSM) whereby the optimized molar ratio (fatty acid: kojic acid), enzyme loading, reaction temperature and reaction time were 6.74, 1.97% ( w / v ), 45.9 °C, and 20 h respectively, giving a high yield of KAD (64.47%). This condition was reevaluated in a 0.5 L stirred tank reactor (STR) where the agitation effects of two impellers; Rushton turbine (RT) and pitch-blade turbine (PBT), were investigated. In the STR, a very high yield of KAD synthesis (84.12%) was achieved using RT at 250 rpm, which was higher than the shake flask, thus indicating better mixing quality in STR. In a rheological study, a pseudoplastic behavior of KAD mixture was proposed for potential application in lotion formulation.

  11. Solvent extraction separations of trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions using an aqueous aminomethanediphosphonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    The possibility of separating the trivalent lanthanides, represented by EU 3+ , and actinides, represented by Cf 3+ , using HDEHP in toluene and an aqueous phase containing N-piperidinomethane-1,1-diphosphotic acid, PMDPA, has been investigated. This modified aqueous phase offers potential advantages over the diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid based TALSPEAK process because of the improved complexation properties of PMDPA in acidic solutions, and the ability to decompose PMDPA before disposal. Extraction experiments were conducted at 25 C in 2 M NaClO 4 between -log [H + ] 1 and 2. The studies enabled us to derive the aqueous phase speciation, the stability constants of the aqueous complexes, and the Cf/Eu separation factors. Despite the presence of an amino group in PMDPA that should favor the retention of the actinides in the aqueous phase, the Cf/Eu separation factors are near unity under the conditions studied

  12. Air formaldehyde and solvent concentrations during surface coating with acid-curing lacquers and paints in the woodworking and furniture industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorud, Syvert; Gjolstad, Merete; Ellingsen, Dag G; Molander, Paal

    2005-06-01

    An investigation of contemporary exposure to formaldehyde and organic solvents has been carried out during surface coating with acid-curing lacquers and paints in the Norwegian woodworking and furniture industry over a period of 3 years. The investigation covered 27 factories of different sizes and with different types of production, and totally 557 parallel formaldehyde and solvent samples were collected. The formaldehyde concentration (geometric mean) was 0.15 ppm (range 0.01-1.48 ppm) with about 10% of the samples exceeding the Norwegian occupational exposure limit of 0.5 ppm. The solvent concentration as additive effect (geometric mean) was 0.13 (range 0.0004-5.08) and about 5% of the samples exceeded the Norwegian occupational exposure limit. The most frequently occurring solvents from acid-curing lacquers were n-butyl acetate, ethanol, ethyl acetate and 1-butanol, which were found in 88-98% of the samples. Toluene, n-butyl acetate and 1-butanol were the only solvents with maximum concentrations exceeding their respective occupational exposure limits. Curtain painting machine operators were exposed to the highest concentrations of both formaldehyde (geometric mean 0.51 ppm, range 0.08-1.48 ppm) and organic solvents (additive effect, geometric mean 1.18, range 0.02-5.08). Other painting application work tasks such as automatic and manual spray-painting, manual painting and dip painting, showed on average considerably lower concentrations of both formaldehyde (geometric means 0.07-0.16 ppm) and organic solvents (additive effect, geometric mean 0.02-0.18). Non-painting work tasks also displayed moderate concentrations of formaldehyde (geometric means 0.11-0.17 ppm) and organic solvents (additive effect, geometric mean 0.04-0.07).

  13. Spectrophotometric investigation of the Acidity constants of fluorescein in various water-organic solvent media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niazi, A.; Yazdanipour, A.; Ghasemi, J.; Amini, A.; Bozorgzad, S.; Kubista, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 195, č. 10 (2008), s. 1257-1268 ISSN 0098-6445 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Acid ionization constant * acidy * fluorecein Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.585, year: 2008

  14. Influence of solvent on the poly (acrylic acid)-oligo-(ethylene glycol) polymer gel electrolyte and the performance of quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jihuai; Lan, Zhang; Lin, Jianming; Huang, Miaoliang; Hao, Shancun; Fang, Leqing

    2007-01-01

    The influence of solvents on the property of poly (acrylic acid)-oligo-(ethylene glycol) polymer gel electrolyte and photovoltaic performance of quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were investigated. Solvents or mixed solvents with large donor number enhance the liquid electrolyte absorbency, which further influences the ionic conductivity of polymer gel electrolyte. A polymer gel electrolyte with ionic conductivity of 4.45 mS cm -1 was obtained by using poly (acrylic acid)-oligo-(ethylene glycol) as polymer matrix, and absorbing 30 vol.% N-methyl pyrrolidone and 70 vol.% γ-butyrolactone with 0.5 M NaI and 0.05 M I 2 . By using this polymer gel electrolyte coupling with 0.4 M pyridine additive, a quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell with conversion efficiency of 4.74% was obtained under irradiation of 100 mW cm -2 (AM 1.5)

  15. Spectrophotometric determination of boron by solvent extraction with 2-hydroxy-2-methylbutyric acid and malachite green

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shigeya; Uchikawa, Sumio

    1984-01-01

    A very simple and sensitive method for the spectrophotometric determination of boron was developed. Boron was found to react with 2-hydroxy-2-methylbutyric acid in weak acidic aqueous solution at room temperature to form a complex anion which can be extracted into chlorobenzene with malachite green in a single extraction; boron is determined indirectly by measuring the absorbance of malachite green in the extract at 629 nm. The calibration graph is linear over the range (7.50 x 10 -7 - 2.00 x 10 -5 ) mol dm -3 boron; the apparent molar absorptivity is 6.50 x 10 4 dm 3 mol -1 cm -1 . The method is applied to the determination of micro amounts of boron in natural waters with satisfactory results. (author)

  16. Spectrophotometric determination of boron by solvent extraction with 2-hydroxy-2-methylbutyric acid and malachite green

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shigeya; Uchikawa, Sumio [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Education

    1984-03-01

    A very simple and sensitive method for the spectrophotometric determination of boron was developed. Boron was found to react with 2-hydroxy-2-methylbutyric acid in weak acidic aqueous solution at room temperature to form a complex anion which can be extracted into chlorobenzene with malachite green in a single extraction; boron is determined indirectly by measuring the absorbance of malachite green in the extract at 629 nm. The calibration graph is linear over the range (7.50 x 10/sup -7/ - 2.00 x 10/sup -5/) mol dm/sup -3/ boron; the apparent molar absorptivity is 6.50 x 10/sup 4/ dm/sup 3/ mol/sup -1/ cm/sup -1/. The method is applied to the determination of micro amounts of boron in natural waters with satisfactory results.

  17. Solvent extraction of uranium, thorium, and rare earths with dialkyldithiophosphoric acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haiduc, I.; Curtui, M.

    1986-01-01

    The separation conditions for throium (IV) in the presence of trivalent rare earths was investigated. The distribution ratios (D), extraction effectivity values (E%) and separation factor(S) were calculated for binary systems Th-La, Th-Ce, Th-Pr, Th-Sm. Di-(2-ethyl-hexyl)dithiophosphoric acid (HEhdtp) alone or mixtures of HEhdtp and trioctylphosphoshine oxide (TOPO) can be successfully used for separation of Thorium (IV) and rare earths

  18. The Role of Concentration and Solvent Character in the Molecular Organization of Humic Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Klučáková

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The molecular organization of humic acids in different aqueous solutions was studied over a wide concentration range (0.01–10 g·dm−3. Solutions of humic acids were prepared in three different media: NaOH, NaCl, and NaOH neutralized by HCl after dissolution of the humic sample. Potentiometry, conductometry, densitometry, and high resolution ultrasound spectrometry were used in order to investigate conformational changes in the humic systems. The molecular organization of humic acids in the studied systems could be divided into three concentration ranges. The rearrangements were observed at concentrations of ~0.02 g·dm−3 and ~1 g·dm−3. The first “switch-over point” was connected with changes in the hydration shells of humic particles resulting in changes in their elasticity. The compressibility of water in the hydration shells is less than the compressibility of bulk water. The transfer of hydration water into bulk water increased the total compressibility of the solution, reducing the ultrasonic velocity. The aggregation of humic particles and the formation of rigid structures in systems with concentrations higher than 1 g·dm−3 was detected.

  19. Aprotic solvent systems provide mechanistic windows for biomolecular reactions: nucleic acid proton exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, B.; Tan, A.

    1986-01-01

    Detection of general acid-base catalysis of proton transfer reactions in aqueous cytidine (or adenosine) is completely obscured by the highly reactive endocyclic protonated species of the nucleobase, whose amino proton lifetime is much shorter than that of the neutral form. In aqueous solution, protonation of the nucleobase always accompanies protonation of the buffer catalyzing exchange. However, in DMSO/water mixtures this is not the case; aqueous protonated acetate or chloroacetate can be added to cytidine in DMSO solutions without further dissociation of the buffer or significant protonation of cytidine N-3. Under these conditions general acid catalysis is observed, which involves an H-bonded complex between cytidine (N-3) and the buffer acid. Increased amino proton exchange in response to H-bond donation to C(N-3) is further suggested by increased 1 H NMR saturation-recovery rates with the formation of G-C base-pairs in DMSO and by the inverse dependence of amino proton exchange on nucleoside concentration

  20. SOLVENT EFFECTS ON THE HYDRATION OF CYCLOHEXENE CATALYZED BY A STRONG ACID ION-EXCHANGE RESIN .3. EFFECT OF SULFOLANE ON THE EQUILIBRIUM CONVERSION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    The liquid-phase hydration of cyclohexene, a pseudo-first-order reversible reaction catalyzed by a strong acid ion-exchange resin, was investigated in solvent mixtures of water and sulfolane. Macroporous Amberlite XE 307 was used because of its superior catalytic activity. Chemical equilibrium

  1. SOLVENT EFFECTS ON THE HYDRATION OF CYCLOHEXENE CATALYZED BY A STRONG ACID ION-EXCHANGE RESIN .2. EFFECT OF SULFOLANE ON THE REACTION-KINETICS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    The kinetics of the' hydration of cyclohexene, catalyzed by a strong acid ion-exchange resin, have been studied in a packed bed reactor at temperatures between 353 and 413 K and a pressure of 20 bar. The kinetic rate constants were measured as a function of temperature and solvent composition (0-90

  2. Synthesis of 1-amidoalkyl-2-naphthols based on a three-component reaction catalyzed by boric acid as a solid heterogeneous catalyst under solvent-free conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahed Karimi-Jaberi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An efficient method for the preparation of 1-amidoalkyl-2-naphthols has been described using a multi-component, one-pot condensation reaction of 2-naphthol, aldehydes and amides in the presence of boric acid under solvent-free conditions.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v26i3.18

  3. Radiation-induced controlled polymerization of acrylic acid by RAFT and RAFT-MADIX methods in protic solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sütekin, S. Duygu; Güven, Olgun

    2018-01-01

    The kinetic investigation of one-pot synthesis of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) prepared via gamma radiation induced controlled polymerization was reported. PAA homopolymers were prepared by Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerization in the presence of trithiocarbonate-based chain transfer agent (CTA) 2-(Dodecylthiocarbonothioylthio)-2-methylpropionic acid (DDMAT) and also by Reversible Addition-Fragmentation/Macromolecular Design by Inter-change of Xanthates (RAFT/MADIX) polymerization in the presence of a xanthate based CTA O-ethyl-S-(1-methoxycarbonyl) ethyl dithiocarbonate (RA1). The polymerizations were performed at room temperature by the virtue of ionizing radiation. Protic solvents were used for the RAFT polymerization of AA considering environmental profits. The linear first-order kinetic plot, close control of molecular weight by the monomer/CTA molar ratio supported that the polymerization proceeds in a living fashion. The linear increase in molecular weight with conversion monitored by Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC) is another proof of controlling of polymerization. [Monomer]/[RAFT] ratio and conversion was controlled to obtain PAA in the molecular weight range of 6900-35,800 with narrow molecular weight distributions. Reaction kinetics and effect of the amount of RAFT agent were investigated in detail. Between two different types of CTA, trithiocarbonate based DDMAT was found to be more efficient in terms of low dispersity (Đ) and linear first-order kinetic behavior for the radiation induced controlled synthesis of PAA homopolymers.

  4. Enzymatic Lipophilization of Phenolic Acids through Esterification with Fatty Alcohols in Organic Solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhiyong; Guo, Zheng; Xu, Xuebing

    2012-01-01

    and octadecenol respectively. However, the conversions of ferulic and caffeic acids under the same conditions were much lower than DHCA. The optimal mixture ratio of hexane to butanone was found to be 65:35. Using octanol and DHCA as model, the reaction parameters, such as temperature, enzyme load, reaction time...... and substrate molar ratio, were optimized with response surface modelling (RSM). The optimum conditions are finalized as: temperature 60 oC, reaction time 7 days, enzyme load 100 mg, and substrate molar ratio 4.34 (octanol/DHCA)....

  5. Chlorella sp : Extraction of fatty acid by using avocado oil as solvent and its application as an anti-aging cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, T. W.; Raya, I.; Natsir, H.; Mayasari, E.

    2018-03-01

    The study aimed to analyze the fatty acid content of Chlorella sp crude extract by using avocado oil solvent and determining the effectiveness of fatty acids Chlorella sp as the anti-aging cream The extraction of fatty acids from Chlorella sp using avocado oil as a solvent with three ratios were 1:10, 1:20 and 1:25 w/V. The highest lipid content was obtained at 1:20 w/V (gram microalgae: mL avocado oil) yielding 52.73%. Crude extracted were analysis by GC-MS and FTIR, and skin condition was determined by skin analyzer. The effectiveness test of Chlorella sp cream was applicated on the face of the panelists aged 20-60 years. From 10 panelists, the applied of Chlorella sp cream was 90% increased on the facial skin yielded moisture and oil content, 70% repair the skin structure. The composition of fatty acids Chlorella sp extract was palmitic acid, linoleic, oleic and stearate. Fatty acids crude extract of Chlorella sp can improve the effectiveness of anti-aging cream. The cream from Chlorella sp was more effective than the cream without containing microalgae. This is very promising because it is alternative to organic solvents i.e. green chemistry.

  6. SEPARATION OF SATURED AND UNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS FROM PALM FATTY ACIDS DISTILLATES IN CONTINUOUS MULTISTAGE COUNTERCURRENT COLUMNS WITH SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE AS SOLVENT: A PROCESS DESIGN METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nélio Teixeira MACHADO

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work the separation of multicomponent mixtures in counter-current columns with supercritical carbon dioxide has been investigated using a process design methodology. First the separation task must be defined, then phase equilibria experiments are carried out, and the data obtained are correlated with thermodynamic models or empirical functions. Mutual solubilities, Ki-values, and separation factors aij are determined. Based on this data possible operating conditions for further extraction experiments can be determined. Separation analysis using graphical methods are performed to optimize the process parameters. Hydrodynamic experiments are carried out to determine the flow capacity diagram. Extraction experiments in laboratory scale are planned and carried out in order to determine HETP values, to validate the simulation results, and to provide new materials for additional phase equilibria experiments, needed to determine the dependence of separation factors on concetration. Numerical simulation of the separation process and auxiliary systems is carried out to optimize the number of stages, solvent-to-feed ratio, product purity, yield, and energy consumption. Scale-up and cost analysis close the process design. The separation of palmitic acid and (oleic+linoleic acids from PFAD-Palm Fatty Acids Distillates was used as a case study.

  7. Speciation of mercury in soil and sediment by selective solvent and acid extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Y. [Metara Inc., 1225 East Arques Ave, Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Kingston, H.M.; Boylan, H.M.; Rahman, G.M.M.; Shah, S.; Richter, R.C.; Link, D.D.; Bhandari, S. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2003-02-01

    In order to characterize the mercury hazard in soil, a sequential extraction scheme has been developed to classify mercury species based on their environmental mobility and/or toxicity for either routine lab analysis or on-site screening purposes. The alkyl mercury species and soluble inorganic species that contribute to the major portion of potential mercury toxicity in the soil are extracted by an acidic ethanol solution (2% HCl+10% ethanol solution) from soil matrices as ''mobile and toxic'' species. A High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) system coupled with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection has been developed to further resolve the species information into soluble inorganic species (Hg{sup 2+}), methylmercury(II) (MeHg{sup +}) and ethylmercury(II) (EtHg{sup +}) species. Alternatively, these species can be separated into ''soluble inorganic mercury'' and ''alkyl mercury'' sub-categories by Solid-Phase Extraction (SPE). A custom Sulfydryl Cotton Fiber (SCF) material is used as the solid phase medium. Optimization of the SCF SPE technique is discussed. Combined with a direct mercury analyzer (DMA-80), the SCF SPE technique is a promising candidate for on-site screening purposes. Following the ethanol extraction, the inorganic mercury species remaining in soil are further divided into ''semi-mobile'' and ''non-mobile'' sub-categories by sequential acid extractions. The ''semi-mobile'' mercury species include mainly elemental mercury (Hg) and mercury-metal amalgams. The non-mobile mercury species mainly include mercuric sulfide (HgS) and mercurous chloride (Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}). (orig.)

  8. Traceable atomic force microscopy of high-quality solvent-free crystals of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester

    OpenAIRE

    Lazzerini, GM; Paterno, GM; Tregnago, G; Treat, N; Stingelin, N; Yacoot, A; Cacialli, F

    2016-01-01

    We report high-resolution, traceable atomic force microscopymeasurements of high-quality, solvent-free single crystals of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). These were grown by drop-casting PCBM solutions onto the spectrosil substrates and by removing the residual solvent in a vacuum. A home-built atomic force microscope featuring a plane mirror differential optical interferometer, fiber-fed from a frequency-stabilized laser (emitting at 632.8???nm), was used to measure the cr...

  9. Traceable atomic force microscopy of high-quality solvent-free crystals of [6,6]-phenyl-C-61-butyric acid methyl ester

    OpenAIRE

    Lazzerini, G. M.; Paterno, G. M.; Tregnago, G.; Treat, N.; Stingelin, N.; Yacoot, A.; Cacialli, F.

    2016-01-01

    We report high-resolution, traceable atomic force microscopymeasurements of high-quality, solvent-free single crystals of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). These were grown by drop-casting PCBM solutions onto the spectrosil substrates and by removing the residual solvent in a vacuum. A home-built atomic force microscope featuring a plane mirror differential optical interferometer, fiber-fed from a frequency-stabilized laser (emitting at 632.8 nm), was used to measure the crys...

  10. Solvent extraction of tricomponent complexes of zirconium and scandium with salicylic acid and collidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochetkova, S.K.; Fadeeva, V.I.; Kalistratova, V.P.

    1976-01-01

    Extraction of tricomponent compounds of zirconium and scandium with salicylic acid (Sal) and collidine (Col) has been studied. Addition of Col widens considerably the pH range of maximum extraction of zirconium salicylate and makes it possible to extract quantitatively both zirconium and scandium in the following pH range: scandium at pH 3.8-5.2; zirconium at pH 2-4. Optimum concentrations of salicylic acid and collidine are 0.05 mol/l and 0.375 mol/l, respectively. The composition of the complexes being extracted has been studied by the shift equilibrium method. Chloroform extracts complexes having the ratio Zr:Sal:Col=1:2:1(pH=3); Sc:Sal:Col=1:3:1(pH=4), and 1:2:1(pH=5). The composition of the complexes being formed is assumed to be [Zr(OH) 3 (HSal) 2 ] - [ColH + ] (pH=3); Sc(HSal) 3 xCol (pH=4.0); Sc(OH)(HSal) 2 xCol (pH=5.0). Extraction of collidine-salicylate complexes of Hf, Th, La, and Y under the conditions of optimum extraction of zirconium and scandium has been investigated when concentration of Zr and Sc in the solution is 3.0.10μ- 5 -1.37.10 -4 mol/l, respectively. It has been shown that hafnium is extracted quantitatively (95-100%) at pH 2.3-4.6; thorium at pH 3.0-6.4; 60% of yttrium is extracted at pH 4.0-4.8; 25% of lanthanum is extracted at pH 3.3-4.9. At pH 2.0 it is possible to separate Zr from Sc,Y, and La; at pH 1.4-1.5 from small amounts of Hf and Tn. Separation of zirconium, from small amounts of hafnium, 10-fold amounts of thorium, 100-fold amounts of scandium and lanthanum is also possible

  11. Solvent extraction of tricomponent complexes of zirconium and scandium with salicylic acid and collidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochetkova, S K; Fadeeva, V I; Kalistratova, V P [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR)

    1976-01-01

    Extraction of tricomponent compounds of zirconium and scandium with salicylic acid (Sal) and collidine (Col) has been studied. Addition of Col widens considerably the pH range of maximum extraction of zirconium salicylate and makes it possible to extract quantitatively both zirconium and scandium in the following pH range: scandium at pH 3.8-5.2; zirconium at pH 2-4. Optimum concentrations of salicylic acid and collidine are 0.05 mol/l and 0.375 mol/l, respectively. The composition of the complexes being extracted has been studied by the shift equilibrium method. Chloroform extracts complexes having the ratio Zr:Sal:Col=1:2:1(pH=3); Sc:Sal:Col=1:3:1(pH=4), and 1:2:1(pH=5). The composition of the complexes being formed is assumed to be (Zr(OH)/sub 3/(HSal)/sub 2/)/sup -/(ColH/sup +/) (pH=3); Sc(HSal)/sub 3/xCol (pH=4.0); Sc(OH)(HSal)/sub 2/xCol (pH=5.0). Extraction of collidine-salicylate complexes of Hf, Th, La, and Y under the conditions of optimum extraction of zirconium and scandium has been investigated when concentration of Zr and Sc in the solution is 3.0.10..mu..-/sup 5/-1.37.10/sup -4/ mol/l, respectively. It has been shown that hafnium is extracted quantitatively (95-100%) at pH 2.3-4.6; thorium at pH 3.0-6.4; 60% of yttrium is extracted at pH 4.0-4.8; 25% of lanthanum is extracted at pH 3.3-4.9. At pH 2.0 it is possible to separate Zr from Sc,Y, and La; at pH 1.4-1.5 from small amounts of Hf and Tn. Separation of zirconium, from small amounts of hafnium, 10-fold amounts of thorium, 100-fold amounts of scandium and lanthanum is also possible.

  12. Catalyst of a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on a non-metallic porous support and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Peden, Charles H. F. [West Richland, WA; Choi, Saemin [Richland, WA

    2002-10-29

    The present invention includes a catalyst having (a) a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores; (b) a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on the non-metallic support; wherein at least a portion of the metal heteropoly acid salt is dispersed within said plurality of pores. The present invention also includes a method of depositing a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent onto a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores. The method has the steps of: (a) obtaining a first solution containing a first precursor of a metal salt cation; (b) obtaining a second solution containing a second precursor of a heteropoly acid anion in a solvent having a limited dissolution potential for said first precursor; (c) impregnating the non-metallic support with the first precursor forming a first precursor deposit within the plurality of pores, forming a first precursor impregnated support; (d) heating said first precursor impregnated support forming a bonded first precursor impregnated support; (e) impregnating the second precursor that reacts with the precursor deposit and forms the metal heteropoly acid salt.

  13. Determination of cobalt-60 in seawater by solvent extraction with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, C.L.; Lo, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    Cobalt-60 was extracted from a large volume of seawater and concentrated in a small volume of organic solution of pyrrolidinedithiocarbamic acid (HPDC) in chloroform. All foreign nuclides in the organic phase were stripped completely with 12N HCl and 2N HNO 3 successively. By this procedure, a chemically pure Co-60 chelate, 60 Co(PDC) 3 , in chloroform was obtained. The recovery of Co-60 activity was found to average 99%. Cobalt-60 in seawater can thus be simply, rapidly and accurately determined by direct NaI(Tl) scintillation counting. The time for a single analysis, for example, exclusive of the counting operation, is about 40 min. The effects of various foreign nuclides on the extraction of Co-60 were examined by the use of 42 radiotracers and the results are tabulated. The nuclides Ag + , Mn 2+ , Ni 2+ , Cu 2+ , Zn 2+ , Cd 2+ , Pb 2+ , Hg 2+ , Fe 3+ , Ga 3+ , In 3+ , As 3+ , Sn 4+ , and Cr 6+ were extracted almost completely into chloroform with cobalt as the pyrrolidinedithiocarbamates. The extraction yield of Sb 3+ was close to 90%. Appreciable fractions of Cs + , Ba 2+ , Cr 3+ , Zr 4+ and Np 5+ were also found in the organic phase. (T.I.)

  14. Thermodynamics of the second-stage dissociation of 2-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-N-methylaminomethyl]-propenoic acid (HEMPA) in water at different ionic strength and different solvent mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taha, Mohamed [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Beni-Suef Branch, Beni-Suef (Egypt)]. E-mail: mtaha978@yahoo.com; Fazary, Ahmed E. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Beni-Suef Branch, Beni-Suef (Egypt)

    2005-01-01

    The second stage dissociation constant pK{sub 2} of 2-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-N-methylaminomethyl]-propenoic acid (HEMPA) has been determined in aqueous solution at different ionic strengths and different temperatures, using pH-metric technique. The thermodynamic quantities ({delta}G{sup 0}, {delta}H{sup 0}, and {delta}S{sup 0}) have been studied and discussed. Evaluation of the effect of organic solvent of the medium on the dissociation processes have also been reported and discussed. The organic solvents used were methanol, dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), acetone and dioxane. The pK{sub 2} for the ionization in water +10, +20, +30, +40 and +50 wt% dioxane has been determined at five different temperatures from T = (288.15 to 308.15) K at intervals of 5 K. The thermodynamic quantities were calculated. The implications of the results with regard to specific (solute + solvent) interactions (particularly stabilization of zwitterionic species) are also discussed.

  15. Thermodynamics of the second-stage dissociation of 2-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-N-methylaminomethyl]-propenoic acid (HEMPA) in water at different ionic strength and different solvent mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, Mohamed; Fazary, Ahmed E.

    2005-01-01

    The second stage dissociation constant pK 2 of 2-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-N-methylaminomethyl]-propenoic acid (HEMPA) has been determined in aqueous solution at different ionic strengths and different temperatures, using pH-metric technique. The thermodynamic quantities (ΔG 0 , ΔH 0 , and ΔS 0 ) have been studied and discussed. Evaluation of the effect of organic solvent of the medium on the dissociation processes have also been reported and discussed. The organic solvents used were methanol, dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), acetone and dioxane. The pK 2 for the ionization in water +10, +20, +30, +40 and +50 wt% dioxane has been determined at five different temperatures from T = (288.15 to 308.15) K at intervals of 5 K. The thermodynamic quantities were calculated. The implications of the results with regard to specific (solute + solvent) interactions (particularly stabilization of zwitterionic species) are also discussed

  16. Improved interfacial adhesion in carbon fiber/polyether sulfone composites through an organic solvent-free polyamic acid sizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Haojie; Zhang, Shouchun; Lu, Chunxiang; He, Shuqing; An, Feng

    2013-01-01

    An organic solvent-free polyamic acid (PAA) nanoemulsion was obtained by direct ionization of the solid PAA in deionized water, with the average particle size of 261 nm and Zeta potential of −55.1 mV, and used as a carbon fiber sizing to improve the interfacial adhesion between the carbon fiber and polyether sulfone (PES). The surface characteristics of PAA coated carbon fibers were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic contact angle measurement. The results demonstrated that a continuous and uniform PAA sizing layer was formed on the surface of carbon fibers, and the surface energy of carbon fibers increased from 42.91 to 54.55 mN/m after sizing treatment. The single fiber pull-out testing was also performed, which showed the increased interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of carbon fiber/PES composites from 33.6 to 49.7 MPa by 47.9%. The major reasons for the improved interfacial adhesion were the increased van der Waals forces between the PES matrix and sizing layer as well as the chemical bonding between the sizing layer and carbon fiber surface. Furthermore, the PAA sizing also presented a positive effect on the interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber/PES composites under hydrothermal condition.

  17. Improved interfacial adhesion in carbon fiber/polyether sulfone composites through an organic solvent-free polyamic acid sizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Haojie [National Engineering Laboratory for carbon fiber technology, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Shouchun, E-mail: zschun@sxicc.ac.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for carbon fiber technology, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Lu, Chunxiang, E-mail: chunxl@sxicc.ac.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for carbon fiber technology, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China); He, Shuqing [National Engineering Laboratory for carbon fiber technology, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); An, Feng [National Engineering Laboratory for carbon fiber technology, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China)

    2013-08-15

    An organic solvent-free polyamic acid (PAA) nanoemulsion was obtained by direct ionization of the solid PAA in deionized water, with the average particle size of 261 nm and Zeta potential of −55.1 mV, and used as a carbon fiber sizing to improve the interfacial adhesion between the carbon fiber and polyether sulfone (PES). The surface characteristics of PAA coated carbon fibers were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic contact angle measurement. The results demonstrated that a continuous and uniform PAA sizing layer was formed on the surface of carbon fibers, and the surface energy of carbon fibers increased from 42.91 to 54.55 mN/m after sizing treatment. The single fiber pull-out testing was also performed, which showed the increased interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of carbon fiber/PES composites from 33.6 to 49.7 MPa by 47.9%. The major reasons for the improved interfacial adhesion were the increased van der Waals forces between the PES matrix and sizing layer as well as the chemical bonding between the sizing layer and carbon fiber surface. Furthermore, the PAA sizing also presented a positive effect on the interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber/PES composites under hydrothermal condition.

  18. Solvent extraction of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) from nitrate media by carboxylic acid amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preston, J.S.; Preez, A.C. du

    1995-01-01

    A series of nineteen N-alkyl carboxylic acid amides (R.CO.NHR') has been prepared, in which the alkyl groups R and R' have been varied in order to introduce different degrees of steric complexity into the compounds. A smaller number of N,N-dialkyl amides (R.CO.NR 2 ') and non-substituted amides (R.CO.NH 2 ) has also been prepared for comparison purposes. These amides were characterized by measurement of their boiling points, melting points, refractive indices and densities. The solvent extraction of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) from sodium nitrate media by solutions of the amides in toluene was studied. Increasing steric bulk of the alkyl groups R and R' was found to cause a marked decrease in the extraction of thorium, with a much smaller effect on the extraction of uranium, thus considerably enhancing the separation between these metals. Vapour pressure osmometry studies indicate that the N-alkyl amides are self-associated in toluene solution, with aggregation numbers up to about 2.5 for 0.6 M solutions at 35 degree C. In contrast, the N,N-dialkyl amides behave as monomers under these conditions. The distribution ratios for the extraction of uranium and thorium show second- and third-order dependences, respectively, on the extractant concentration for both the N-alkyl and N,N-dialkyl amides. 15 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs

  19. Spectral characteristics of 2-(4'-amino-3-pyridyl)benzimidazole: Effects of solvent and acid or base concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogra, Sneh K.

    2006-01-01

    Spectral characteristics of 2-(4'-amino-3-pyridyl)benzimidazole (4-A3PyBI) have been studied in different solvents, as well as at different acid or base concentrations using absorption, fluorescence excitation and fluorescence spectroscopy. Excited singlet state (S 1 ) lifetimes for each species were measured using nanosecond time-dependent spectrofluorimeter. AM1 semi-empirical and density functional theoretical (DFT) calculations were performed on each species for the spectral assignment. From the above results it is concluded that 4-A3PyBI exists only in the amine form. First protonation occurs at pyridine=N- atom and second protonation at the benzimidazole (BI)=N- atom. When dication (DC) species is excited, two emission bands are observed, having the same fluorescence excitation spectra, suggesting the same ground state (S ) precursor. Short wavelength (SW) emission band is assigned to the π-π* transition and long wavelength (LW) emission to the charge transfer transition. First deprotonation in S state occurs from >N-H moiety, whereas in S 1 state it is from -NH 2 group. Monoanion (MA) so formed in S 1 state is non-fluorescent. Dianion (DA) is formed by further deprotonating >N-H moiety in S 1 state and it is fluorescent. pK a values were determined and discussed

  20. 4f-4f absorption spectral analysis of complexation of Pr(IlI) and Nd(IlI) with fumaric acid and maleic acid in different solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Th. David; Taru Taru, T.; Nimita, L.; Singh, N. Rajmuhon

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Dimensions to lanthanide co-ordination chemistry in solution become a new age with the increase use of lanthanides as PROBES in the exploration of the structural function of biomolecular reactions. Absorption difference and comparative absorption spectrophotometric studies involving 4f-4f transitions for the complexation of Pr(III)/Nd(lIl) with fumaric acid and maleic acid have been carried out in CH 3 OH,CH 3 CN, dioxane and DMF. The small chemical and structural differences due to the ligands and solvents are shown to produce significant red shift and variation in the intensities of observed 4f-4f absorption bands. The variation in the spectral energy parameters - Slater Condon (F K ), Lande spin orbit coupling constant (ζ 4f ), nephelauxetic ratio (β), bonding parameter (b 1/2 ) and percent covalency (δ) are calculated and correlated with binding of the ligands with Pr(III)/Nd(III). In addition to this experimentally calculated oscillator strengths (P) and calculated values of Judd-Ofelt electric dipole intensity parameters, T λ (λ=2,4,6) are discussed for different 4f-4f transitions in different experimental conditions to discuss the nature of bonding between Ln(lIl) and ligands. The participation of π-electron density of ligands with complexation is also discussed

  1. Modelling copper solvent extraction from acidic sulphate solutions using MOC 45

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alguacil, F. J.

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model to predict the extraction has been developed for the Cu-MOC 45 system. The model consists of sets of nonlinear mass action and mass balance equations where the dimerization of the oxime was also considered. The predictive model calculated the equilibrium concentrations from the total oxime concentration, total copper concentration, initial pH value and the O/A volume phase ratio. The model suggests that the extraction of copper can be defined by the existence of two species into the organic solution: CuR2 (kext = 4.2 and Cu(HR22 (kext = 10.000- The initial oxime concentration defines the predominancy in the organic solution of both species. The model can be used to predict copper extraction isotherm as well as copper stripping with sulphuric acid.

    Se desarrolla un modelo matemático para predecir el proceso de extracción en el sistema Cu-MOC 45. El modelo consiste en un conjunto de ecuaciones en el que se considera la dimerización de la oxima. El modelo permite predecir la extracción a partir de las concentraciones totales de la oxima y del cobre, del pH inicial y de la relación de fases O/A. La extracción de cobre responde a la existencia de dos especies en la fase orgánica: CuR2 (kext = 4,2 y Cu(HR22 (kext = 10.000. La predominancia de una u otra especie en esta fase depende de la concentración inicial de la oxima. El modelo también puede predecir las isotermas de extracción y la reextracción de cobre mediante ácido sulfúrico.

  2. Determination of As, Cr, Mo, Sb, Se and V in agricultural soil samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after simple and rapid solvent extraction using choline chloride-oxalic acid deep eutectic solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matong, Joseph M; Nyaba, Luthando; Nomngongo, Philiswa N

    2017-01-01

    A rapid, simple and green ultrasound-assisted extraction method using deep eutectic solvents (DES) for extraction of As, Cr, Mo, Sb, Se and V in soil samples, has been developed. Choline chloride-oxalic acid based DES was used as a solvent. The target analytes were subsequently quantified using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP OES). The parameters that affect the extraction of the target analytes was optimized using standard reference material of San Joaquin soil (SRM 2709a). In the optimization step, a two-level full factorial experimental design was used. The factors under investigation include extraction time, sample mass and acid concentration. Under optimized conditions, limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) ranged from 0.009 to 0.1 and 0.03-0.3µgg -1 , respectively. The repeatability (n=20) estimated in terms of relative standard deviation (%RSD) ranged from 0.9% to 3.7%. The accuracy of the proposed method was carried out using SRM 2709a. The obtained and certified/ indicative values were statistically in good agreement at 95% confidence level. The proposed method applied for quantification of As, Cr, Mo, Sb, Se and V in real soil samples. For comparison, the analytes of interest were also determined using a conventional acid digestion method. According to the paired t-test, the analytical results were not significant differences at 95% confidence level. The method was found to be accurate, precise and environmentally friendly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Excited-state inter- and intramolecular proton transfer in methyl 3-hydroxy-2-quinoxalinate: effects of solvent and acid or base concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogra, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    Absorption, fluorescence excitation and fluorescence spectroscopy, combined with time-dependent spectroscopy and semi-empirical (AM1) and density functional theory using Gaussian 98 program calculations have been used to study the effects of solvent and acid or base concentration on the spectral characteristics of methyl 3-hydroxy-2-quinoxalinate (M3HQ). M3HQ is present as enol in less polar solvents and as keto in polar media. In non-polar solvents, large Stokes shifted fluorescence band is assigned to the phototautomer, formed by the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer, whereas fluorescence is only observed from keto in the polar solvents. In aqueous and polar solvents the monocation (MC5/MC6) is formed by protonating the carbonyl oxygen atom in the ground (S 0 ) and the first excited singlet states (S 1 ). Dication is formed by protonating one of ?N- atom of MC5/MC6. Monoanion is formed by deprotonating the phenolic proton of enol in the basic solution. pK a values for different prototropic equilibriums were determined in S 0 and S 1 states and discussed

  4. Simultaneous Enhancement of Electrical Conductivity and Seebeck Coefficient of [6,6]-Phenyl-C71 Butyric Acid Methyl Ester (PC70BM by Adding Co-Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Rastegaralam

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical modification by co-solvents added to [6,6]-Phenyl-C71 butyric acid methyl ester, commonly known as an n-type semiconducting fullerene derivative PC70BM, is reported to change the electrical and thermoelectric properties of this system. Power factor of the casted PC70BM samples achieves values higher than that determined for a variety of organic compounds, including conducting polymers, such as PEDOT:PSS in the pristine form. After chemical functionalization by different solvents, namely N,N-Dimethylformamide (DMF, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP, acetonitrile (AC, and 1,2-Dichloroethane (DCE, the four-probe in-plane electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements indicate a simultaneous increase of the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient. The observed effect is more pronounced for solvents with a high boiling point, such as N,N-Dimethylformamide (DMF, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO, and N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP, than in acetonitrile (AC and 1,2-Dichloroethane (DCE. We identified the origin of these changes using Hall mobility measurements, which demonstrate enhancement of the PC70BM charge carrier mobility upon addition of the corresponding solvents due to the improved packaging of the fullerene compound and chemical interaction with entrapped solvent molecules within the layers.

  5. 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF Production from Hexoses: Limits of Heterogeneous Catalysis in Hydrothermal Conditions and Potential of Concentrated Aqueous Organic Acids as Reactive Solvent System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Essayem

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF is an important bio-sourced intermediate, formed from carbohydrates such as glucose or fructose. The treatment at 150–250 °C of glucose or fructose in pure water and batch conditions, with catalytic amounts of most of the usual acid-basic solid catalysts, gave limited yields in 5-HMF, due mainly to the fast formation of soluble oligomers. Niobic acid, which possesses both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites, gave the highest 5-HMF yield, 28%, when high catalyst/glucose ratio is used. By contrast, we disclose in this work that the reaction of fructose in concentrated aqueous solutions of carboxylic acids, formic, acetic or lactic acids, used as reactive solvent media, leads to the selective dehydration of fructose in 5-HMF with yields up to 64% after 2 hours at 150 °C. This shows the potential of such solvent systems for the clean and easy production of 5-HMF from carbohydrates. The influence of adding solid catalysts to the carboxylic acid media was also reported, starting from glucose.

  6. A novel akermanite/poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) porous composite scaffold fabricated via a solvent casting-particulate leaching method improved by solvent self-proliferating process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yao; Zhang, Mengjiao; Chen, Xianchun; Pu, Ximing; Liao, Xiaoming; Huang, Zhongbing; Yin, Guangfu

    2017-08-01

    Desirable scaffolds for tissue engineering should be biodegradable carriers to supply suitable microenvironments mimicked the extracellular matrices for desired cellular interactions and to provide supports for the formation of new tissues. In this work, a kind of slightly soluble bioactive ceramic akermanite (AKT) powders were aboratively selected and introduced in the PLGA matrix, a novel l-lactide modified AKT/poly (lactic- co -glycolic acid) (m-AKT/PLGA) composite scaffold was fabricated via a solvent casting-particulate leaching method improved by solvent self-proliferating process. The effects of m-AKT contents on properties of composite scaffolds and on MC3T3-E1 cellular behaviors in vitro have been primarily investigated. The fabricated scaffolds exhibited three-dimensional porous networks, in which homogenously distributed cavities in size of 300-400 μm were interconnected by some smaller holes in a size of 100-200 μm. Meanwhile, the mechanical structure of scaffolds was reinforced by the introduction of m-AKT. Moreover, alkaline ionic products released by m-AKT could neutralize the acidic degradation products of PLGA, and the apatite-mineralization ability of scaffolds could be largely improved. More valuably, significant promotions on adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 have been observed, which implied the calcium, magnesium and especially silidous ions released sustainably from composite scaffolds could regulate the behaviors of osteogenesis-related cells.

  7. Effect of pKa on the extraction behavior of Am(III) in organo phosphorus acid and diglycolamide solvent system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swami, K. Rama; Antony, M.P.; Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai; Kumaresan, R.; Nayak, P.K.; Venkatesan, K.A.

    2018-01-01

    A combination of neutral and acidic extractant has been proposed for the single-cycle separation of trivalent actinides from high-level liquid waste (HLLW). The nature of acidic extractant in the combined solvent formulation plays a profound role in deciding the extraction and stripping of trivalent actinides. Therefore, the extraction behavior of Am(III) in a solution of tetra-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-diglycolamide (TEHDGA) and acidic extractant (HA) was studied from nitric acid medium. The acidic extractants chosen were bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphonic acid (PC88A) and bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinic acid (CYANEX-272) whose pKa values were 3.24, 4.51 and 6.37, respectively. The distribution ratio of Am(III) was measured as a function of various parameters such as concentration of nitric acid, TEHDGA, HA etc. The data were compared with those obtained in individual solvent systems namely 0.1 M TEHDGA/n-DD and HA/n-DD. Slope analysis of the extraction data indicated the synergic participation of both TEHDGA and HDEHP in the extraction of Am(III) at all acidities. However, antagonistic effect was observed at lower acidity when TEHDGA was mixed to PC88A or CYANEX-272 present in n-DD. Accordingly, a suitable mechanism has been proposed for the extraction of Am(III) at all acidities using these combined solvent formulation. Studies with fast reactor simulated high level liquid waste indicated that extraction of Am(III) was accompanied by co-extraction of lanthanides and unwanted metal ions such as Zr(IV), Mo(VI), Y(III) and Pd(II). However, addition of trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N,N ' -tetraaceticacid (CyDTA) reduced the extraction of unwanted metal ions. Batch extraction and stripping studies indicated the possibility of using 0.1 M TEHDGA+0.25 M HDEHP in n-dodecane for the single cycle separation of Am(III) from FR-SHLLW.

  8. Effect of Solvent Additives on the Solution Aggregation of Phenyl-C61-Butyl Acid Methyl Ester (PCBM)

    KAUST Repository

    Tummala, Naga Rajesh; Sutton, Christopher; Aziz, Saadullah G.; Toney, Michael F.; Risko, Chad; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    High-boiling-point solvent additives, employed during the solution processing of active-layer formulations, impact the efficiency of bulk hetero-junction (BHJ) organic solar cells by influencing the morphological / topological features

  9. Mercury extraction by the TRUEX process solvent. II. Selective partitioning of mercury from co-extracted actinides in a simulated acidic ICPP waste stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

    1995-01-01

    The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) as a means to partition the actinides from acidic sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The mercury content of this waste averages 1 g/l. Because the chemistry of mercury has not been extensively evaluated in the TRUEX process, mercury was singled out as an element of interest. Radioactive mercury, 203 Hg, was spiked into a simulated solution of SBW containing 1 g/l mercury. Successive extraction batch contacts with the mercury spiked waste and successive scrubbing and stripping batch contacts of the mercury loaded TRUEX solvent (0.2 M CMPO-1.4 M TBP in dodecane) show that mercury will extract into and strip from the solvent. The extraction distribution coefficient for mercury, as HgCl 2 , from SBW having a nitric acid concentration of 1.4 M and a chloride concentration of 0.035 M was found to be 3. The stripping distribution coefficient was found to be 0.5 with 5 M HNO 3 and 0.077 with 0.25 M Na 2 CO 3 . Because experiments described here show that mercury can be extracted from SBW and stripped from the solvent, a process has been developed to partition mercury from the actinides in SBW. 10 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs

  10. Solvent extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coombs, D.M.; Latimer, E.G.

    1988-01-05

    It is an object of this invention to provide for the demetallization and general upgrading of heavy oil via a solvent extracton process, and to improve the efficiency of solvent extraction operations. The yield and demetallization of product oil form heavy high-metal content oil is maximized by solvent extractions which employ either or all of the following techniques: premixing of a minor amount of the solvent with feed and using countercurrent flow for the remaining solvent; use of certain solvent/free ratios; use of segmental baffle tray extraction column internals and the proper extraction column residence time. The solvent premix/countercurrent flow feature of the invention substantially improves extractions where temperatures and pressures above the critical point of the solvent are used. By using this technique, a greater yield of extract oil can be obtained at the same metals content or a lower metals-containing extract oil product can be obtained at the same yield. Furthermore, the premixing of part of the solvent with the feed before countercurrent extraction gives high extract oil yields and high quality demetallization. The solvent/feed ratio features of the invention substanially lower the captial and operating costs for such processes while not suffering a loss in selectivity for metals rejection. The column internals and rsidence time features of the invention further improve the extractor metals rejection at a constant yield or allow for an increase in extract oil yield at a constant extract oil metals content. 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Evaluation of food grade solvents for lipid extraction and impact of storage temperature on fatty acid composition of edible seaweeds Laminaria digitata (Phaeophyceae) and Palmaria palmata (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Matthias; Guihéneuf, Freddy; Stengel, Dagmar B

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the impact of different food- and non-food grade extraction solvents on yield and fatty acid composition of the lipid extracts of two seaweed species (Palmaria palmata and Laminaria digitata). The application of chloroform/methanol and three different food grade solvents (ethanol, hexane, ethanol/hexane) revealed significant differences in both, extraction yield and fatty acid composition. The extraction efficiency, in terms of yields of total fatty acids (TFA), was in the order: chloroform/methanol>ethanol>hexane>ethanol/hexane for both species. Highest levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were achieved by the extraction with ethanol. Additionally the effect of storage temperature on the stability of PUFA in ground and freeze-dried seaweed biomass was investigated. Seaweed samples were stored for a total duration of 22months at three different temperatures (-20°C, 4°C and 20°C). Levels of TFA and PUFA were only stable after storage at -20°C for the two seaweed species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Silica sulfuric acid: a reusable solid catalyst for one pot synthesis of densely substituted pyrrole-fused isocoumarins under solvent-free conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudipta Pathak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A convenient and efficient methodology for the synthesis of densely substituted pyrrole-fused isocoumarins, which employs solid-supported silica sulfuric acid (SSA as catalyst, has been developed. When the mixture of ninhydrin adducts of acetylacetone/ethyl acetoacetate and primary amines was heated on the solid surface of SSA under solvent-free conditions, the pyrrole-fused isocoumarins were formed in good yields. This synthetic method has several advantages such as the employment of solvent-free reaction conditions without the use of any toxic reagents and metal catalysts, the ease of product isolation, the use of a recyclable catalyst, the low cost, the easy availability of the starting materials, and the excellent yields of products.

  13. Solvent Extraction of Furfural From Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Solvent-extraction method reduces energy required to remove furfural produced during acid hydrolysis of biomass. Acid hydrolysis performed in vessel containing both solvents and reacting ingredients. With intimate contact between solvents and aqueous hydrolyis liqour, furfural removed form liquor almost as fast as it forms.

  14. Deasphalting solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo, J. A; Caceres, J; Vela, G; Bueno, H

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes how the deasphalted oil (DMO) or demetalized oil (DMO) quality (CCR, Ni, V end asphaltenes contents) changes with: DAO or DMO yield, solvent/feed ratio, type of vacuum reside (from paraffinic to blends with vis breaking bottoms), extraction temperature and extraction solvent (propane, propylene, n-butane and I butane)

  15. Solvent - solute interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanczyk, A.; Kalinowski, M.K.

    1983-01-01

    The electronic absorption spectrum of vanadyl acetylacetonate has been studied in 15 organic solvents. It has been found that wavenumbers and molar absorptivities of the long-wavelength bands (d-d transitions) can be well described by a complementary Lewis acid-base model including Gutmann's donor number [Gutmann V., Wychera E., Inorg. Nucl. Chem. Letters 2, 257 (1966)] and acceptor number [Mayer U., Gutmann V., Gerger W., Monatsh. Chem. 106, 1235 (1975)] of a solvent. This model describes also the solvent effect of the hyperfine splitting constant, Asub(iso)( 51 V), from e.s.r. spectra of VOacac 2 . These observations are discussed in terms of the donor-acceptor concept for solvent-solute interactions. (Author)

  16. Impregnation of 12-tungstophosphoric acid on silica - part II: effect of different solvents on the impregnation and catalytic activity in methyl esterification of stearic acid; Impregnacao do acido 12-tungstofosforico em silica - parte II: efeito de diferentes solventes na impregnacao e atividade catalitica na esterificacao metilica de acido estearico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scroccaro, Karine Isabel; Yamamoto, Carlos I., E-mail: karineisabel@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Centro Politecnico. Departamento de Engenharia Quimica; Tanobe, Valcineide O. de A.; Oliveira, Alan Antonio de [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia e Tecnologia Florestal; Wypych, Fernando [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica

    2014-04-15

    Materials obtained by the immobilization of 12-tungstophosphoric acid (PTA) on silica using the method of impregnation with excess solution in distinct solvents (aqueous HCl, methanol:H{sub 2}O, and acetonitrile) were evaluated for use as catalysts in the methyl esterification of stearic acid. Optimum conditions were established for the impregnation of 0.5 g (w/w) of PTA on amorphous silica, under stirring at 150 rpm for 24 h, using 20 mL of 0.1 mol L{sup -1} HCl as the solvent. After calcination at 200 deg C, high conversions were obtained under mild reaction conditions, resulting in high turnover numbers. The catalyst was evaluated in ten catalytic cycles of use, where the activity was reduced only slightly, attesting its stability and the possibility to apply it to industrial production of methylesters. (author)

  17. Solvent substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general ''Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated

  18. Solvent substitution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  19. Continuous Preparation of 1:1 Haloperidol-Maleic Acid Salt by a Novel Solvent-Free Method Using a Twin Screw Melt Extruder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hung Lin; Vasoya, Jaydip M; Cirqueira, Marilia de Lima; Yeh, Kuan Lin; Lee, Tu; Serajuddin, Abu T M

    2017-04-03

    Salts are generally prepared by acid-base reaction in relatively large volumes of organic solvents, followed by crystallization. In this study, the potential for preparing a pharmaceutical salt between haloperidol and maleic acid by a novel solvent-free method using a twin-screw melt extruder was investigated. The pH-solubility relationship between haloperidol and maleic acid in aqueous medium was first determined, which demonstrated that 1:1 salt formation between them was feasible (pH max 4.8; salt solubility 4.7 mg/mL). Extrusion of a 1:1 mixture of haloperidol and maleic acid at the extruder barrel temperature of 60 °C resulted in the formation of a highly crystalline salt. The effects of operating temperature and screw configuration on salt formation were also investigated, and those two were identified as key processing parameters. Salts were also prepared by solution crystallization from ethyl acetate, liquid-assisted grinding, and heat-assisted grinding and compared with those obtained by melt extrusion by using DSC, PXRD, TGA, and optical microscopy. While similar salts were obtained by all methods, both melt extrusion and solution crystallization yielded highly crystalline materials with identical enthalpies of melting. During the pH-solubility study, a salt hydrate form was also identified, which, upon heating, converted to anhydrate similar to that obtained by other methods. There were previous reports of the formation of cocrystals, but not salts, by melt extrusion. 1 H NMR and single-crystal X-ray diffraction confirmed that a salt was indeed formed in the present study. The haloperidol-maleic acid salt obtained was nonhygroscopic in the moisture sorption study and converted to the hydrate form only upon mixing with water. Thus, we are reporting for the first time a relatively simple and solvent-free twin-screw melt extrusion method for the preparation of a pharmaceutical salt that provides material comparable to that obtained by solution

  20. Volumetric studies and thermodynamics of viscous flow of hydroxamic acids in acetone + water solvent at temperatures 303.15 and 313.15 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Vaishali; Pande, Rama

    2006-01-01

    Densities ρ and viscosities η of two hydroxamic acids, N-phenyl-2-chlorobenzo- and N-o-tolyl-4-chlorobenzo-, have been determined as a function of their concentration in aqueous acetone solution at temperatures 303.15 and 313.15 K. Apparent molar volumes, standard-state partial molar volumes and relative viscosities have been calculated. The viscosity data have been analyzed using Jones-Dole equation. The activation thermodynamic parameters of viscous flow have been evaluated using Feakins equation. These were obtained to throw light on the mechanism of viscous flow. Thermodynamic interactions in solutions have been studied in terms of a number of excess functions calculated from the experimental data. The effect of hydroxamic acid concentration and temperature on these parameters has been discussed. The results were interpreted in the light of solute-solvent interactions in aquo-organic media

  1. Hydrolysis of N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid by the Haemophilus influenzae dapE-encoded desuccinylase: metal activation, solvent isotope effects, and kinetic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, T L; Zheng, R; Blanchard, J S

    1998-07-21

    Hydrolysis of N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid by the dapE-encoded desuccinylase is required for the bacterial synthesis of lysine and meso-diaminopimelic acid. We have investigated the catalytic mechanism of the recombinant enzyme from Haemophilus influenzae. The desuccinylase was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Steady-state kinetic experiments verified that the enzyme is metal-dependent, with a Km for N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid of 1.3 mM and a turnover number of 200 s-1 in the presence of zinc. The maximal velocity was independent of pH above 7 but decreased with a slope of 1 below pH 7. The pH dependence of V/K was bell-shaped with apparent pKs of 6.5 and 8.3. Both L,L- and D,L-diaminopimelic acid were competitive inhibitors of the substrate, but d,d-diaminopimelic acid was not. Solvent kinetic isotope effect studies yielded inverse isotope effects, with values for D2OV/K of 0.62 and D2OV of 0.78. Determination of metal stoichiometry by ICP-AES indicated one tightly bound metal ion, while sequence homologies suggest the presence of two metal binding sites. On the basis of these observations, we propose a chemical mechanism for this metalloenzyme, which has a number of important structurally defined homologues.

  2. Synthesis and Determination of Acid Dissociation Constants in Dimethyl Sulfoxide–Water Hydroorganic Solvent of 5,5-Diphenylpyrrolidine N-Aroylthiourea Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Nural

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Novel 5,5-diphenylpyrrolidineN-aroylthioureas, containing 4-methylbenzoyl, 2-chlorobenzoyl,2,4-dichlorobenzoyl, and2-naphthoyl, were synthesized and their structural analysis was performed using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, 13C NMR, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry (MS, and high-resolution MS (HRMS techniques. The acid dissociation constants of the 5,5-diphenylpyrrolidineN-aroylthiourea derivative compounds were determined using Hyperquad computer program for data obtained using potentiometric titration method in 25% (v/v dimethyl sulfoxide–water hydroorganic solvent in the presence of 0.1 mol×L-1 ionic strength of NaCl and in the acidic medium at 25±0.1°C, using sodium hydroxide base as a titrant. Two acid dissociation constants were obtained for 3a, 3b, and 3d, and it was suggested that they were related to N-H and enol groups. Furthermore, three acid dissociation constants obtained for 3a indicated that they were related to N-H, enthiol, and enol groups, and four acid dissociation constants obtained for 3c suggested that they were related to N-H, enthiol, enol, and carboxyl groups.

  3. Thermodynamic functions for solubility of 3-nitro-o-toluic acid in nine organic solvents from T = (283.15 to 318.15) K and apparent thermodynamic properties of solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xinbao; Wang, Mingju; Du, Cunbin; Cong, Yang; Zhao, Hongkun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Solubilities of 3-nitro-o-toluic acid in nine organic solvents were determined. • The solubilities were correlated by using four thermodynamic models. • The mixing properties of solution were computed based on Wilson model. - Abstract: Separation of 3-nitro-o-toluic acid from its isomeric mixtures has essential significance in industry. In this work, by using isothermal saturation method, the solid-liquid equilibrium for 3-nitro-o-toluic acid in nine organic solvents (acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, isopropanol, ethyl acetate, acetone, 1,4-dioxane and 2-butanone) were obtained experimentally within a temperature range from (283.15 to 318.15) K under atmosphere pressure of 101.2 kPa, and the solubility values of 3-nitro-o-toluic acid in these solvents were determined by a high-performance liquid chromatography. Within the studied temperature range, the mole fraction solubility of 3-nitro-o-toluic acid in selected organic solvents increased with increasing temperature. Except for ethyl acetate, the descending order of the mole fraction solubility values were as follow: 1,4-dioxane > acetone > 2-butanone > methanol > ethanol > isopropanol > n-propanol > acetonitrile. The solubility values determined for 3-nitro-o-toluic acid in the selected solvents were correlated and back calculated with the modified Apelblat equation, λh equation, Wilson model and NRTL model. The largest values of RAD and RMSD obtained with the four models were 0.67% and 4.02 × 10 −4 , respectively. In general, the four thermodynamic models were all acceptable for describing the solubility behaviour of 3-nitro-o-toluic acid in these solvents. In addition, the apparent mixing Gibbs energy, mixing enthalpy, mixing entropy, activity coefficient at infinitesimal concentration and reduced excess enthalpy were calculated. The acquired solubility data and thermodynamic studies would be very important in optimizing the separation process of 3-nitro-o-toluic acid from

  4. Influence of ionic liquids on actinides extraction by diphenyl(dibutyl)carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide in different solvents from nitric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pribylova, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Influence of ionic liquids (ILs) addition (1-50 wt%) on extraction efficiency of actinides by diphenyl(dibutyl)carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (Ph 2 Bu 2 ) from 3 M HNO 3 has been studied. Am(III) distribution ratios in two-phase systems 0.1 M Ph 2 Bu 2 in either DCE or CHCl 3 -3 M HNO 3 depending on the nature of additional ionic liquids: imidazolium-based ILs: [C 4 mim][PF 6 ], [C 4 mim][BF 4 ] and phosphonium-based ILs: PPF 6 , PBF 4 and PCl were determined. The highest value of Am(III) extraction ratio change (1040) was found on addition of PPF 6 to Ph 2 Bu 2 in CHCl 3 . Extraction of Pu(IV) and U(VI) by 0.001 M Ph 2 Bu 2 in the presence of [C 4 mim][PF 6 ] in DCE, CHCl 3 or meta-nitrobenzotrifluoride (NBTF) have been investigated. The greatest enhancement of extraction efficiency was observed using CHCl 3 , the least polar studied solvent. Using a mixture of conventional solvent and ionic liquid as a solvent for extractant enables one to increase distribution ratios and reduce viscosity of organic phase as compared with ionic liquid viscosity. The marked increase of Am(III), Pu(IV) and U(VI) extraction extent by Ph 2 Bu 2 on addition of ionic liquids to the extent of 10 wt% permit one essentially to diminish amounts considerably more expensive carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide(the general name is CMPO) used in TRUEX process. (author)

  5. An Efficient Synthesis of 3,4-Dihydropyrimidin-2(1H-Ones and Thiones Catalyzed by a Novel Brønsted Acidic Ionic Liquid under Solvent-Free Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghong Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report here an efficient and green method for Biginelli condensation reaction of aldehydes, β-ketoesters and urea or thiourea catalyzed by Brønsted acidic ionic liquid [Btto][p-TSA] under solvent-free conditions. Compared to the classical Biginelli reaction conditions, the present method has the advantages of giving good yields, short reaction times, near room temperature conditions and the avoidance of the use of organic solvents and metal catalyst.

  6. Fermentation products of solvent tolerant marine bacterium Moraxella spp. MB1 and its biotechnological applications in salicylic acid bioconversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solimabi Wahidullah

    Full Text Available As part of a proactive approach to environmental protection, emerging issues with potential impact on the environment is the subject of ongoing investigation. One emerging area of environmental research concerns pharmaceuticals like salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of various analgesics including aspirin. It is a common component of sewage effluent and also an intermediate in the degradation pathway of various aromatic compounds which are introduced in the marine environment as pollutants. In this study, biotransformation products of salicylic acid by seaweed, Bryopsis plumosa, associated marine bacterium, Moraxella spp. MB1, have been investigated. Phenol, conjugates of phenol and hydroxy cinnamic acid derivatives (coumaroyl, caffeoyl, feruloyl and trihydroxy cinnamyl with salicylic acid (3-8 were identified as the bioconversion products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. These results show that the microorganism do not degrade phenolic acid but catalyses oxygen dependent transformations without ring cleavage. The degradation of salicylic acid is known to proceed either via gentisic acid pathway or catechol pathway but this is the first report of biotransformation of salicylic acid into cinnamates, without ring cleavage. Besides cinnamic acid derivatives (9-12, metabolites produced by the bacterium include antimicrobial indole (13 and β-carbolines, norharman (14, harman (15 and methyl derivative (16, which are beneficial to the host and the environment.

  7. Solvent-Free Esterification of Carboxylic Acids Using Supported Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as an Efficient and Recoverable Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rajabi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Supported iron oxide nanoparticles on mesoporous materials (FeNP@SBA-15 have been successfully utilized in the esterification of a variety carboxylic acids including aromatic, aliphatic, and long-chain carboxylic acids under convenient reaction conditions. The supported catalyst could be easily recovered after reaction completion and reused several times without any loss in activity after up to 10 runs.

  8. Solvent substitutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evanoff, S.P.

    1995-01-01

    The environmental and industrial hygiene regulations promulgated since 1980, most notably the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments to the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, have brought about an increased emphasis on user exposure, hazardous waste generation, and air emissions. As a result, industry is performing a fundamental reassessment of cleaning solvents, processes, and procedures. The more progressive organizations have made their goal the elimination of solvents that may pose significant potential human health and environmental hazards. This chapter discusses solvent cleaning in metal-finishing, metal-manufacturing, and industrial maintenance applications; precision cleaning; and electronics manufacturing. Nonmetallic cleaning, adhesives, coatings, inks, and aerosols also will be addressed, but in a more cursory manner

  9. Traceable atomic force microscopy of high-quality solvent-free crystals of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzerini, Giovanni Mattia; Yacoot, Andrew; Paternò, Giuseppe Maria; Tregnago, Giulia; Cacialli, Franco; Treat, Neil; Stingelin, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    We report high-resolution, traceable atomic force microscopy measurements of high-quality, solvent-free single crystals of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). These were grown by drop-casting PCBM solutions onto the spectrosil substrates and by removing the residual solvent in a vacuum. A home-built atomic force microscope featuring a plane mirror differential optical interferometer, fiber-fed from a frequency-stabilized laser (emitting at 632.8 nm), was used to measure the crystals' height. The optical interferometer together with the stabilized laser provides traceability (via the laser wavelength) of the vertical measurements made with the atomic force microscope. We find that the crystals can conform to the surface topography, thanks to their height being significantly smaller compared to their lateral dimensions (namely, heights between about 50 nm and 140 nm, for the crystals analysed, vs. several tens of microns lateral dimensions). The vast majority of the crystals are flat, but an isolated, non-flat crystal provides insights into the growth mechanism and allows identification of “molecular terraces” whose height corresponds to one of the lattice constants of the single PCBM crystal (1.4 nm) as measured with X-ray diffraction

  10. Traceable atomic force microscopy of high-quality solvent-free crystals of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzerini, Giovanni Mattia; Paternò, Giuseppe Maria; Tregnago, Giulia; Treat, Neil; Stingelin, Natalie; Yacoot, Andrew; Cacialli, Franco

    2016-02-01

    We report high-resolution, traceable atomic force microscopy measurements of high-quality, solvent-free single crystals of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). These were grown by drop-casting PCBM solutions onto the spectrosil substrates and by removing the residual solvent in a vacuum. A home-built atomic force microscope featuring a plane mirror differential optical interferometer, fiber-fed from a frequency-stabilized laser (emitting at 632.8 nm), was used to measure the crystals' height. The optical interferometer together with the stabilized laser provides traceability (via the laser wavelength) of the vertical measurements made with the atomic force microscope. We find that the crystals can conform to the surface topography, thanks to their height being significantly smaller compared to their lateral dimensions (namely, heights between about 50 nm and 140 nm, for the crystals analysed, vs. several tens of microns lateral dimensions). The vast majority of the crystals are flat, but an isolated, non-flat crystal provides insights into the growth mechanism and allows identification of "molecular terraces" whose height corresponds to one of the lattice constants of the single PCBM crystal (1.4 nm) as measured with X-ray diffraction.

  11. Traceable atomic force microscopy of high-quality solvent-free crystals of [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzerini, Giovanni Mattia; Yacoot, Andrew [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Paternò, Giuseppe Maria; Tregnago, Giulia; Cacialli, Franco [Department of Physics and Astronomy and London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Treat, Neil; Stingelin, Natalie [Department of Materials Science, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-01

    We report high-resolution, traceable atomic force microscopy measurements of high-quality, solvent-free single crystals of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). These were grown by drop-casting PCBM solutions onto the spectrosil substrates and by removing the residual solvent in a vacuum. A home-built atomic force microscope featuring a plane mirror differential optical interferometer, fiber-fed from a frequency-stabilized laser (emitting at 632.8 nm), was used to measure the crystals' height. The optical interferometer together with the stabilized laser provides traceability (via the laser wavelength) of the vertical measurements made with the atomic force microscope. We find that the crystals can conform to the surface topography, thanks to their height being significantly smaller compared to their lateral dimensions (namely, heights between about 50 nm and 140 nm, for the crystals analysed, vs. several tens of microns lateral dimensions). The vast majority of the crystals are flat, but an isolated, non-flat crystal provides insights into the growth mechanism and allows identification of “molecular terraces” whose height corresponds to one of the lattice constants of the single PCBM crystal (1.4 nm) as measured with X-ray diffraction.

  12. The effect of re-dissolution solvents and HPLC columns on the analysis of mycosporine-like amino acids in the eulittoral macroalgae Prasiola crispa and Porphyra umbilicalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, Ulf; Escoubeyrou, Karine; Charles, François

    2009-09-01

    Many macroalgal species that are regularly exposed to high solar radiation such as the eulittoral green alga Prasiola crispa and the red alga Porphyra umbilicalis synthesize and accumulate high concentrations of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) as UV-sunscreen compounds. These substances are typically extracted with a widely used standard protocol following quantification by various high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) techniques. However, further preparation steps prior to HPLC analysis as well as different HPLC column types have not been systematically checked regarding separation quality and reproducibility. Therefore pure methanol, distilled water and HPLC eluent were evaluated as re-dissolution solvent for dried Prasiola and Porphyra extracts, which were subsequently analyzed on three reversed-phase C8 and C18 HPLC columns. The data indicate that distilled water and the HPLC eluent gave almost identical peak patterns and MAA contents on the C8 and C18 columns. In contrast, the application of the widely used methanol led to double peaks or even the loss of specific peaks as well as to a strong decline in total MAA amounts ranging from about 35% of the maximum in P. crispa to 80% of the maximum in P. umbilicalis. Consequently, methanol should be avoided as re-dissolution solvent for the HPLC sample preparation. An improved protocol for the MAA analysis in macroalgae in combination with a reliable C18 column is suggested.

  13. Preparation of porous carboxymethyl chitosan grafted poly (acrylic acid) superabsorbent by solvent precipitation and its application as a hemostatic wound dressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu, E-mail: cylsy@163.com [School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Yong [School of Life Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Wang, Fengju [School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Meng, Weiwei; Yang, Xinlin [School of Life Science, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Li, Peng [School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Jiang, Jianxin [State Key Laboratory of Trauma Burns and Combined Injury, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400042 (China); Tan, Huimin [School of Material Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zheng, Yongfa [Guangdong Fuyang Biotechnology Co., Ltd., Heyuan, Guangdong 517000 (China)

    2016-06-01

    The volume phase transition of a hydrogel initiated by shrinking may result in complex patterns on its surface. Based on this unique property of hydrogel, we have developed a novel solvent precipitation method to prepare a kind of novel superabsorbent polymers with excellent hemostatic properties. A porous carboxymethyl chitosan grafted poly (acrylic acid) (CMCTS-g-PAA) superabsorbent polymer was prepared by precipitating CMCTS-g-PAA hydrogel with ethanol. Its potential application in hemostatic wound dressing was investigated. The results indicate that the modified superabsorbent polymer is non-cytotoxic. It showed a high swelling capacity and better hemostatic performance in the treatments of hemorrhage model of ear artery, arteria cruralis and spleen of the New Zealand white rabbit than the unmodified polymer and other commonly used clinic wound dressings. The hemostatic mechanism of the porous CMCTS-g-PAA polymer was also discussed. - Highlights: • The novel solvent precipitation method was developed to prepare the porous superabsorbent polymer. • The swelling rate was promoted and the harmful residual monomer was leached after modification. • The modified polymer showed good biological safety. • It showed good hemostasis to arterial hemorrhage model of the animal. • The hemostatic mechanism of the modified superabsorbent polymer was discussed.

  14. Dependence of protein binding capacity of dimethylamino-γ-butyric-acid (DMGABA)-immobilized porous membrane on composition of solvent used for DMGABA immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanade, Akio; Umeno, Daisuke; Saito, Kyoichi; Sugo, Takanobu

    2013-01-01

    Dimethylamino-γ-butyric acid (DMGABA) as an ampholite was reacted with the epoxy group of the poly-glycidyl methacrylate chain grafted onto the pore surface of a porous hollow-fiber polyethylene membrane by radiation-induced graft polymerization. DMGABA was dissolved in a mixture of dioxane and water at various dioxane volume fractions, defined by dividing the dioxane volume by the total volume. The equilibrium binding capacity (EBC) of the DMGABA-immobilized porous hollow-fiber membrane for lysozyme was evaluated in the permeation mode. The EBC was varied from a 1/50-fold monolayer binding capacity to a 10-fold monolayer binding capacity by controlling the composition of the solvent used for DMGABA immobilization and the molar conversion of the epoxy group into the DMGABA group. - Highlights: ► A DMGABA membrane was immobilized by irradiation induced graft polymerization. ► The DMGABA was immobilized in a mixture of dioxane and water of various compositions. ► Lysozyme adsorptivity of DMGABA-immobilized membranes evaluated in the permeation mode. ► The composition of the DMGABA immobilized solvent can control adsorptivity

  15. Chemical Speciation and Bond Lengths of Organic Solutes by Core-Level Spectroscopy: pH and Solvent Influence on p-Aminobenzoic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Joanna S; Gainar, Adrian; Suljoti, Edlira; Xiao, Jie; Golnak, Ronny; Aziz, Emad F; Schroeder, Sven L M

    2015-05-04

    Through X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies, the chemical, electronic and structural properties of organic species in solution can be observed. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements at the nitrogen K-edge of para-aminobenzoic acid reveal both pH- and solvent-dependent variations in the ionisation potential (IP), 1s→π* resonances and HOMO-LUMO gap. These changes unequivocally identify the chemical species (neutral, cationic or anionic) present in solution. It is shown how this incisive chemical state sensitivity is further enhanced by the possibility of quantitative bond length determination, based on the analysis of chemical shifts in IPs and σ* shape resonances in the NEXAFS spectra. This provides experimental access to detecting even minor variations in the molecular structure of solutes in solution, thereby providing an avenue to examining computational predictions of solute properties and solute-solvent interactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Fermentation products of solvent tolerant marine bacterium Moraxella spp. MB1 and its biotechnological applications in salicylic acid bioconversion

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wahidullah, S.; Naik, D.N.; PrabhaDevi

    As part of a proactive approach to environmental protection, emerging issues with potential impact on the environment is the subject of ongoing investigation. One emerging area of environmental research concerns pharmaceuticals like salicylic acid...

  17. Stereochemistry of Complex Marine Natural Products by Quantum Mechanical Calculations of NMR Chemical Shifts: Solvent and Conformational Effects on Okadaic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto J. Domínguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine organisms are an increasingly important source of novel metabolites, some of which have already inspired or become new drugs. In addition, many of these molecules show a high degree of novelty from a structural and/or pharmacological point of view. Structure determination is generally achieved by the use of a variety of spectroscopic methods, among which NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance plays a major role and determination of the stereochemical relationships within every new molecule is generally the most challenging part in structural determination. In this communication, we have chosen okadaic acid as a model compound to perform a computational chemistry study to predict 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts. The effect of two different solvents and conformation on the ability of DFT (density functional theory calculations to predict the correct stereoisomer has been studied.

  18. Characterization of napthenic acids in oil sands process-affected waters using fluorescence technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.; Alostaz, M.; Ulrich, A.

    2009-01-01

    Process-affected water from oil sands production plants presents a major environmental challenge to oil sands operators due to its toxicity to different organisms as well as its corrosiveness in refinery units. This abstract investigated the use of fluorescence excitation-emission matrices to detect and characterize changes in naphthenic acid in oil sands process-affected waters. Samples from oil sands production plants and storage ponds were tested. The study showed that oil sands naphthenic acids show characteristic fluorescence signatures when excited by ultraviolet light in the range of 260 to 350 mm. The signal was a unique attribute of the naphthenic acid molecule. Changes in the fluorescence signature can be used to determine chemical changes such as degradation or aging. It was concluded that the technology can be used as a non-invasive continuous water quality monitoring tool to increase process control in oil sands processing plants

  19. Solvent induced synthesis, structure and properties of coordination polymers based on 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid as linker and 1,10-phenanthroline as auxiliary ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kariem, Mukaddus; Yawer, Mohd; Sheikh, Haq Nawaz

    2015-01-01

    Three new coordination polymers [Mn(hip)(phen) (H_2O)]_n (1), [Co(hip)(phen) (H_2O)]_n (2), and [Cd(hip) (phen) (H_2O)]_n (3) (H_2hip=5-hydroxyisophthalic acid; phen=1,10-phenanthroline) have been synthesized by solvo-hydrothermal method using diethyl formamide-water (DEF-H_2O) as solvent system. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that all three coordination polymers 1, 2 and 3 crystallize in monoclinic space group P2/n. Metal ions are inter-connected by hydroxyisophthalate anions forming zig-zag 1D chain. 1D chains are further inter-connected by hydrogen bonding and π–π stacking interactions leading to 3D supramolecular architecture. Hydrogen-bonding and π–π stacking provide thermal stability to polymers. Compounds 1 and 2 are paramagnetic at room temperature and variable temperature magnetic moment measurements revealed weak ferromagnetic interactions between metal ions at low temperature. Compound 3 exhibits excellent photoluminescence with large Stokes shift. - Graphical abstract: 1D helical chains of coordination polymers were synthesized by solvo-hydrothermal reaction of 5-hydroxyisopthalic acid and 1,10-phenanthroline with MnCl_2·4H_2O / CoCl_2·6H_2O / Cd(NO_3)_2·6H_2O. - Highlights: • Solvent induced synthesis of three coordination polymers with 1D zig-zag structure. • Crystal structures of coordination polymers are reported and discussed. • 1,10-Phenanthroline influences magnetic and luminescent properties of polymers. • Coordination polymer of Cd is luminescent exhibiting large Stokes shift.

  20. Solvent induced synthesis, structure and properties of coordination polymers based on 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid as linker and 1,10-phenanthroline as auxiliary ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kariem, Mukaddus; Yawer, Mohd; Sheikh, Haq Nawaz, E-mail: hnsheikh@rediffmail.com

    2015-11-15

    Three new coordination polymers [Mn(hip)(phen) (H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (1), [Co(hip)(phen) (H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (2), and [Cd(hip) (phen) (H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (3) (H{sub 2}hip=5-hydroxyisophthalic acid; phen=1,10-phenanthroline) have been synthesized by solvo-hydrothermal method using diethyl formamide-water (DEF-H{sub 2}O) as solvent system. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that all three coordination polymers 1, 2 and 3 crystallize in monoclinic space group P2/n. Metal ions are inter-connected by hydroxyisophthalate anions forming zig-zag 1D chain. 1D chains are further inter-connected by hydrogen bonding and π–π stacking interactions leading to 3D supramolecular architecture. Hydrogen-bonding and π–π stacking provide thermal stability to polymers. Compounds 1 and 2 are paramagnetic at room temperature and variable temperature magnetic moment measurements revealed weak ferromagnetic interactions between metal ions at low temperature. Compound 3 exhibits excellent photoluminescence with large Stokes shift. - Graphical abstract: 1D helical chains of coordination polymers were synthesized by solvo-hydrothermal reaction of 5-hydroxyisopthalic acid and 1,10-phenanthroline with MnCl{sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O / CoCl{sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O / Cd(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O. - Highlights: • Solvent induced synthesis of three coordination polymers with 1D zig-zag structure. • Crystal structures of coordination polymers are reported and discussed. • 1,10-Phenanthroline influences magnetic and luminescent properties of polymers. • Coordination polymer of Cd is luminescent exhibiting large Stokes shift.

  1. Photophysical properties and excited state intramolecular proton transfer in 2-hydroxy-5-[(E)-(4-methoxyphenyl)diazenyl]benzoic acid in homogeneous solvents and micro-heterogeneous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gashnga, Pynsakhiat Miki [Centre for Advanced Studies, Department of Chemistry, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793022, Meghalaya (India); Singh, T. Sanjoy [Department of Chemistry, Assam University, Silchar 788011, Assam (India); Baul, Tushar S. Basu [Centre for Advanced Studies, Department of Chemistry, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793022, Meghalaya (India); Mitra, Sivaprasad, E-mail: smitra@nehu.ac.in [Centre for Advanced Studies, Department of Chemistry, North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong 793022, Meghalaya (India)

    2014-04-15

    A systematic study on the photophysical properties and excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) behavior of 2-hydroxy-5-[(E)-(4-methoxyphenyl)diazenyl]benzoic acid, is reported using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in homogeneous solvents as well as in different micro-heterogeneous environments. Depending on the nature of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IHB), the salicylic acid derivative may exist in two different ground state conformers (I and II). Structure I having IHB between the carbonyl oxygen and phenolic hydrogen can undergo ESIPT upon excitation as evidenced by largely Stokes-shifted fluorescence at ∼455 nm; whereas, normal fluorescence in the blue side of the spectrum (∼410 nm) is due to the spontaneous emission from conformer II. The results in homogeneous solvents were compared with those in bio-mimicking environments of β-cyclodextrin (CD) and surfactants. The intensity of the ESIPT fluorescence increases substantially upon encapsulation of the probe into the cyclodextrin as well as micellar nano-cavities. Detailed analysis of the spectroscopic data indicates that the probe forms 1:1 complex with CD in aqueous medium. Binding constant of the probe with the micelles as well as critical micelle concentration was obtained from the variation of fluorescence intensity on increasing concentration of different surfactants in aqueous medium. -- Highlights: • Steady state and time resolved fluorescence study on ESIPT in HMBA. • Dual fluorescence corresponding to the pro- and non-ESIPT structures. • Modulation of ESIPT fluorescence in micro-heterogeneous environments. • 1:1 stoichiometry for interaction with cyclodextrin. • Calculation of binding constant and other physico-chemical properties from fluorescence titration data in surfactants.

  2. Photophysical properties and excited state intramolecular proton transfer in 2-hydroxy-5-[(E)-(4-methoxyphenyl)diazenyl]benzoic acid in homogeneous solvents and micro-heterogeneous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gashnga, Pynsakhiat Miki; Singh, T. Sanjoy; Baul, Tushar S. Basu; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2014-01-01

    A systematic study on the photophysical properties and excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) behavior of 2-hydroxy-5-[(E)-(4-methoxyphenyl)diazenyl]benzoic acid, is reported using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy in homogeneous solvents as well as in different micro-heterogeneous environments. Depending on the nature of intramolecular hydrogen bond (IHB), the salicylic acid derivative may exist in two different ground state conformers (I and II). Structure I having IHB between the carbonyl oxygen and phenolic hydrogen can undergo ESIPT upon excitation as evidenced by largely Stokes-shifted fluorescence at ∼455 nm; whereas, normal fluorescence in the blue side of the spectrum (∼410 nm) is due to the spontaneous emission from conformer II. The results in homogeneous solvents were compared with those in bio-mimicking environments of β-cyclodextrin (CD) and surfactants. The intensity of the ESIPT fluorescence increases substantially upon encapsulation of the probe into the cyclodextrin as well as micellar nano-cavities. Detailed analysis of the spectroscopic data indicates that the probe forms 1:1 complex with CD in aqueous medium. Binding constant of the probe with the micelles as well as critical micelle concentration was obtained from the variation of fluorescence intensity on increasing concentration of different surfactants in aqueous medium. -- Highlights: • Steady state and time resolved fluorescence study on ESIPT in HMBA. • Dual fluorescence corresponding to the pro- and non-ESIPT structures. • Modulation of ESIPT fluorescence in micro-heterogeneous environments. • 1:1 stoichiometry for interaction with cyclodextrin. • Calculation of binding constant and other physico-chemical properties from fluorescence titration data in surfactants

  3. The Increased Content of Micronutrients in Celery, Carrot, Parsnip and Parsley Plants after Treatment with Sodium Naphthenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grbović Ljubica

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Young plants of celery, parsley, parsnip and carrot, grown in nutrient solution, were treated with sodium naphthenate (10−7 mol dm−3, applying foliar and root treatments. Both treatments affected the root content of all investigated elements present in the nutrient solution, but in a different way, depending on the plant species. An average change (increase/decrease in the contents of investigated essential elements was about 35%. Our experiments with naphthenate showed that this treatment may enhance the efficiency of essential elements uptake and increase its content in plants without changing concentration of these elements in the nutrient solution. Especially interesting results were obtained in the case of carrot, as increased contents were observed in the elements that are usually deficient in nutrition (Fe, Zn, Mn, whereas the other remained unchanged.

  4. Obtention of Samarium and Gadolinium concentrates by solvent extraction using mono-2-ethylhexyl ester of 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda Junior, Pedro

    1996-01-01

    The rare earth chlorides solution employed in this study, which is constituted by medium and heavy fractions, is derived from monazite processing accomplished by NUCLEMON-Mineroquimica (SP). This solution shows an acidity about 1.18 M and 189 g/L of rare earth oxides, containing as main constituents: Sm(34.55%), Gd(23.85%), Dy (6.82%), and Y (24.45%). It was used, as organic phase, 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid, mono-2-ethylhexylester diluted to 1 M in isododecane. (author)

  5. Liquid-liquid extraction systems of benzoic acid in water, heptane, methylbenzene or trichloroethylene as co-solvent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, F.; Gaakeer, W.A.; Granados Mendoza, P.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Schaaf, van der J.; Schouten, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Equilibrium data at (293 ± 2) K are presented for benzoic acid in water and three different organic phases (heptane, methylbenzene, and trichloroethylene). The monomeric partition constant, KPMON, and the dimerization constant, KD, for the organic phase were determined at 293 K. For the

  6. Binary Solvent Extraction of Tocols, γ-Oryzanol, and Ferulic Acid from Rice Bran Using Alkaline Treatment Combined with Ultrasonication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Hoa Thi; Luu, Phuong Duc; Imamura, Kiyoshi; Matsubara, Takeo; Takahashi, Hideki; Takenaka, Norimichi; Boi, Luu Van; Maeda, Yasuaki

    2017-06-21

    Alkaline treatment (Alk) combined with ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) (Alk+UAE) was examined as a means of extracting tocols and γ-oryzanol from rice bran into an organic phase while simultaneously recovering ferulic acid into an aqueous phase. The tocols and γ-oryzanol/ferulic acid yields were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence and UV detection. The effects of extraction conditions were evaluated by varying the Alk treatment temperature and extraction duration. The maximum yields of tocols and γ-oryzanol were obtained at 25 °C over a time span of 30 min. When the temperature was increased to 80 °C, the yield of ferulic acid increased dramatically, whereas the recovery of γ-oryzanol slightly decreased. Employing the Alk+UAE procedure, the recovered concentrations of tocols, γ-oryzanol, and ferulic acid were in the ranges of 146-518, 1591-3629, and 352-970 μg/g, respectively. These results are in good agreement with those reported for rice bran samples from Thailand.

  7. Direct patterning of highly-conductive graphene@copper composites using copper naphthenate as a resist for graphene device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Kaixi; Xiang, Quan; Chen, Yiqin; Shi, Huimin; Li, Zhiqin; Lin, Jun; Zhang, Yongzhe; Wan, Qiang; Zhang, Guanhua; Qin, Shiqiao; Zhang, Xueao; Duan, Huigao

    2017-11-09

    We report an electron-beam lithography process to directly fabricate graphene@copper composite patterns without involving metal deposition, lift-off and etching processes using copper naphthenate as a high-resolution negative-tone resist. As a commonly used industrial painting product, copper naphthenate is extremely cheap with a long shelf time but demonstrates an unexpected patterning resolution better than 10 nm. With appropriate annealing under a hydrogen atmosphere, the produced graphene@copper composite patterns show high conductivity of ∼400 S cm -1 . X-ray diffraction, conformal Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to analyze the chemical composition of the final patterns. With the properties of high resolution and high conductivity, the patterned graphene@copper composites could be used as conductive pads and interconnects for graphene electronic devices with ohmic contacts. Compared to common fabrication processes involving metal evaporation and lift-off steps, this pattern-transfer-free fabrication process using copper naphthenate resist is direct and simple but allows comparable device performance in practical device applications.

  8. Transcriptional responses of earthworm (Eisenia fetida) exposed to naphthenic acids in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jie; Cao, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jinhua; Chai, Liwei; Huang, Yi; Tang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, earthworms (Eisenia fetida) were exposed to commercial NAs contaminated soil, and changes in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and gene expressions of their defense system were monitored. The effects on the gene expression involved in reproduction and carcinogenesis were also evaluated. Significant increases in ROS levels was observed in NAs exposure groups, and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) genes were both up-regulated at low and medium exposure doses, which implied NAs might exert toxicity by oxidative stress. The transcription of CRT and HSP70 coincided with oxidative stress, which implied both chaperones perform important functions in the protection against oxidative toxicity. The upregulation of TCTP gene indicated a potential adverse effect of NAs to terrestrial organisms through induction of carcinogenesis, and the downregulation of ANN gene indicated that NAs might potentially result in deleterious reproduction effects. - Highlights: • The first attempt to study gene ecotoxicity of NAs in terrestrial environment. • NAs exert toxicity by oxidative stress on earthworm. • NAs might cause carcinogenesis and reproductive disruption to earthworm. - NAs induced oxidative stress and altered transcriptions of genes involved in defense, reproduction, and carcinogenesis

  9. Magnetic Nanoparticle Immobilized N-Propylsulfamic Acid as a Recyclable and Efficient Nanocatalyst for the Synthesis of 2H-indazolo[2,1-b]phthalazine-triones in Solvent-Free Conditions: Comparison with Sulfamic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostami, Amin; Tahmasbi, Bahman; Yari, Ako [Univ. of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    N-Propylsulfamic acid supported onto magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (MNPs-PSA) was used as an efficient and magnetically recoverable catalyst for synthesis of 2H-Indazolo[2,1-b]phthalazine-1,6,11(13H)-trione derivatives from the three-component, one-pot condensation reaction of phthalhydrazide, aromatic aldehydes and cyclic 1,3-diones, in good to excellent yields at 100 .deg. C under solvent-free conditions. The catalyst was easily separated with the assistance of an external magnetic field from the reaction mixture and reused for several consecutive runs without significant loss of its catalytic efficiency. In order to compare, the synthesis of 2H-Indazolo[2,1-b]phthalazine-1,6,11(13H)-trione derivatives in the presence of catalytic amount of sulfamic acid (SA) under same reaction condition was also reported.

  10. Ultrasound-assisted catalytic synthesis of acyclic imides in the presence of p-toluenesulfonic acid under solvent free conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasr-Esfahani Masoud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid and convenient preparation of acyclic imides by the reaction of aliphatic and aromatic nitriles with acyclic carboxylic anhydride in the presence of catalytic amounts of p-toluenesulfonic acid under thermal or ultrasonic conditions is reported. The advantages of this procedure are moderate reaction times, good to excellent yields, use of inexpensive and ecofriendly catalyst. The reaction of nitriles with aliphatic anhydrides proceeds in thermal conditions, while by the use of ultrasound irradiations these reactions get accelerated.

  11. Empirical modeling of solvent extraction of uranium from sulphuric acid medium using PC-88A and TOPO as extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, S.; Roy, S.B.; Pathak, P.N.; Manchanda, V.K.; Singh, D.K.

    2011-01-01

    Extraction behavior of uranium (VI) from sulphuric acid medium using PC-88A (H 2 A 2 , dimer form) and a mixture of PC-88A + TOPO in n-dodecane has been investigated. The extraction data have been used to develop a mathematical model correlating percentage extraction (%E) with PC-88A and TOPO concentration. It can be used to predict the steady-state concentrations of metal ion under the conditions of the present work. (author)

  12. Enthalpy-entropy compensation for the solubility of drugs in solvent mixtures: paracetamol, acetanilide, and nalidixic acid in dioxane-water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, P; Romero, S; Pena, A; Escalera, B; Reillo, A

    1998-12-01

    In earlier work, a nonlinear enthalpy-entropy compensation was observed for the solubility of phenacetin in dioxane-water mixtures. This effect had not been earlier reported for the solubility of drugs in solvent mixtures. To gain insight into the compensation effect, the behavior of the apparent thermodynamic magnitudes for the solubility of paracetamol, acetanilide, and nalidixic acid is studied in this work. The solubility of these drugs was measured at several temperatures in dioxane-water mixtures. DSC analysis was performed on the original powders and on the solid phases after equilibration with the solvent mixture. The thermal properties of the solid phases did not show significant changes. The three drugs display a solubility maximum against the cosolvent ratio. The solubility peaks of acetanilide and nalidixic acid shift to a more polar region at the higher temperatures. Nonlinear van't Hoff plots were observed for nalidixic acid whereas acetanilide and paracetamol show linear behavior at the temperature range studied. The apparent enthalpies of solution are endothermic going through a maximum at 50% dioxane. Two different mechanisms, entropy and enthalpy, are suggested to be the driving forces that increase the solubility of the three drugs. Solubility is entropy controlled at the water-rich region (0-50% dioxane) and enthalpy controlled at the dioxane-rich region (50-100% dioxane). The enthalpy-entropy compensation analysis also suggests that two different mechanisms, dependent on cosolvent ratio, are involved in the solubility enhancement of the three drugs. The plots of deltaH versus deltaG are nonlinear, and the slope changes from positive to negative above 50% dioxane. The compensation effect for the thermodynamic magnitudes of transfer from water to the aqueous mixtures can be described by a common empirical nonlinear relationship, with the exception of paracetamol, which follows a separate linear relationship at dioxane ratios above 50%. The

  13. Lewis basicity of relevant monoanions in a non-protogenic organic solvent using a zinc(ii) Schiff-base complex as a reference Lewis acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveri, Ivan Pietro; Di Bella, Santo

    2017-09-12

    Anions are ubiquitous species playing a primary role in chemistry, whose reactivity is essentially dominated by their Lewis basicity. However, no Lewis basicity data, in terms of Gibbs energy, are reported in the literature. We report here the first Lewis basicity of relevant monoanions through the determination of binding constants for the formation of stable 1 : 1 adducts, using a Zn II Schiff-base complex, 1, as a reference Lewis acid. Binding constants for equilibrium reactions were achieved through a nonlinear regression analysis of the binding isotherms from spectrophotometric titration data. The Lewis acidic complex 1 is a proper reference species because it forms stable adducts with both neutral and charged Lewis bases, thus allowing ranking their Lewis basicity. Binding constants indicate generally a strong Lewis basicity for all involved anions, rivalling or exceeding that of the stronger neutral bases, such as primary amines or pyridine. The cyanide anion results to be the strongest Lewis base, while the nitrate is the weaker base within the present anion series. Moreover, even the weaker base anions behave as stronger bases than the most common non-protogenic coordinating solvents.

  14. Improved Purex solvent scrubbing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of hydrazine and hydroxylamine salts as solvent scrubbing agents that can be decomposed into gases are summarized. Results from testing of countercurrent scrubbers and solid sorber columns that produce lesser amounts of permanent salts are reported. The status of studies of the acid-degradation of paraffin diluent and the options for removal of long-chain organic acids is given

  15. Dielectric dispersion and thermodynamic behavior of stearic acid binary mixtures with alcohol as co-solvent using time domain reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maria Sylvester

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dielectric permittivity and relaxation dynamics of binary and ternary mixture of stearic acid on various concentration and their thermodynamic effects are studied. The static dielectric constant (ε0, dielectric permittivity (ε′ and dielectric loss (ε′′ are found by bilinear calibration. The relaxation time (τ, dielectric strength (Δε and the excess permittivity (εE are found. The thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy (ΔH, entropy (ΔS and Gibb’s free energy (ΔG are evolved. The significant changes in dielectric parameters are due to the intramolecular and intermolecular interactions in response to the applied frequency. The permittivity spectra of stearic acid–alcohol in the frequency range of 10MHz to 30GHz have been measured using picoseconds Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR. The dielectric parameters (ε0, ε′, ε′′ are found by bilinear calibration method. Influence of temperature in intermolecular interaction and the relaxation process are also studied. The FT-IR spectral analysis reveals that the conformation of functional groups and formation for hydrogen bonding are present in both binary and ternary mixtures of stearic acid.

  16. Penelitian pengaruh variasi china clay dan naphthenic oil terhadap perpanjangan tetap dan tegangan putus kompon karet untuk lis pintu almari es

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Buchori

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to know the influence of filer china clay naphthenic oil to the physical properties of permanent set and tensile strength rubber compound for refrigerator gasket. It makes from natural rubber ( pale crepe and synthetic rubber (SBR 1502 as raw material with addition of ingredients such as : softener, activator, filler, antioxidant, accelerator, coloring and vulcanizing agent. It should be carried out using base formula by varying china clay : 30; 40 ; and 50 parts and naphthenic oil : 5,0 ; 7,5 and 10 parts for 9 compound then should be tested their physical properties permanent set and tensile strength. The result of the test statistically prove that china clay and naphthenic oil influence the physical properties for permanent set by china clay 30 parts and naphthenic oil 5 parts, the value 1,24%, for tensile strength by china clay 50 parts and naphthenic oil 5 parts, the value 102,6081 Kg/Cm2.

  17. A novel digestion method based on a choline chloride–oxalic acid deep eutectic solvent for determining Cu, Fe, and Zn in fish samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habibi, Emadaldin [Department of Marine Chemistry, Faculty of Marine Science, Khorramshahr University of Marine Science and Technology, P.O. BOX 669, Khorramshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghanemi, Kamal, E-mail: Kamal.ghanemi@kmsu.ac.ir [Department of Marine Chemistry, Faculty of Marine Science, Khorramshahr University of Marine Science and Technology, P.O. BOX 669, Khorramshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Marine Science Research Institute, Khorramshahr University of Marine Science and Technology, Khorramshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fallah-Mehrjardi, Mehdi [Department of Marine Chemistry, Faculty of Marine Science, Khorramshahr University of Marine Science and Technology, P.O. BOX 669, Khorramshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Marine Science Research Institute, Khorramshahr University of Marine Science and Technology, Khorramshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dadolahi-Sohrab, Ali [Department of Marine Environment, Faculty of marine natural resources, Khorramshahr University of Marine Science and Technology, Khorramshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-31

    Highlights: ► A novel digestion method: lack of concentrated acids or oxidizing reagents. ► First report of using choline chloride–oxalic acid (ChCl–Ox) for digestion. ► Complete dissolution of biological samples in ChCl–Ox for solubilization metals. ► Extraction recoveries greater than 95%: validated by the fish protein CRM. ► Successfully applied in different fish tissues (Muscle, Liver, and Gills). -- Abstract: A novel and efficient digestion method based on choline chloride–oxalic acid (ChCl–Ox) deep eutectic solvent (DES) was developed for flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) determination of Cu, Zn, and Fe in biological fish samples. Key parameters that influence analyte recovery were investigated and optimized, using the fish protein certified reference material (CRM, DORM-3) throughout the procedure. In this method, 100 mg of the sample was dissolved in ChCl–Ox (1:2, molar ratio) at 100 °C for 45 min. Then, 5.0 mL HNO{sub 3} (1.0 M) was added. After centrifugation, the supernatant solution was filtered, diluted to a known volume, and analyzed by FAAS. Under optimized conditions, an excellent agreement between the obtained results and the certified values was observed, using Student's t-test (P = 0.05); the extraction recovery of the all elements was greater than 95.3%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of analytes in different tissues (muscle, liver, and gills) having a broad concentration range in a marine fish sample. The reproducibility of the method was validated by analyzing all samples by our method in a different laboratory, using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). For comparison, a conventional acid digestion (CAD) method was also used for the determination of analytes in all studied samples. The simplicity of the proposed experimental procedure, high extraction efficiency, short analysis time, lack of concentrated acids and oxidizing agents, and the

  18. A novel digestion method based on a choline chloride–oxalic acid deep eutectic solvent for determining Cu, Fe, and Zn in fish samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habibi, Emadaldin; Ghanemi, Kamal; Fallah-Mehrjardi, Mehdi; Dadolahi-Sohrab, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A novel digestion method: lack of concentrated acids or oxidizing reagents. ► First report of using choline chloride–oxalic acid (ChCl–Ox) for digestion. ► Complete dissolution of biological samples in ChCl–Ox for solubilization metals. ► Extraction recoveries greater than 95%: validated by the fish protein CRM. ► Successfully applied in different fish tissues (Muscle, Liver, and Gills). -- Abstract: A novel and efficient digestion method based on choline chloride–oxalic acid (ChCl–Ox) deep eutectic solvent (DES) was developed for flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) determination of Cu, Zn, and Fe in biological fish samples. Key parameters that influence analyte recovery were investigated and optimized, using the fish protein certified reference material (CRM, DORM-3) throughout the procedure. In this method, 100 mg of the sample was dissolved in ChCl–Ox (1:2, molar ratio) at 100 °C for 45 min. Then, 5.0 mL HNO 3 (1.0 M) was added. After centrifugation, the supernatant solution was filtered, diluted to a known volume, and analyzed by FAAS. Under optimized conditions, an excellent agreement between the obtained results and the certified values was observed, using Student's t-test (P = 0.05); the extraction recovery of the all elements was greater than 95.3%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of analytes in different tissues (muscle, liver, and gills) having a broad concentration range in a marine fish sample. The reproducibility of the method was validated by analyzing all samples by our method in a different laboratory, using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). For comparison, a conventional acid digestion (CAD) method was also used for the determination of analytes in all studied samples. The simplicity of the proposed experimental procedure, high extraction efficiency, short analysis time, lack of concentrated acids and oxidizing agents, and the use of

  19. Extreme Pressure Synergistic Mechanism of Bismuth Naphthenate and Sulfurized Isobutene Additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Hu, Jianqiang; Yang, Shizhao; Xie, Feng; Guo, Li

    A four-ball tester was used to evaluate the tribological performances of bismuth naphthenate (BiNap), sulfurized isobutene (VSB), and their combinations. The results show that the antiwear properties of BiNap and VSB are not very visible, but they possess good extreme pressure (EP) properties, particularly sulfur containing bismuth additives. Synergistic EP properties of BiNap with various sulfur-containing additives were investigated. The results indicate that BiNap exhibits good EP synergism with sulfur-containing additives. The surface analytical tools, such as X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), were used to investigate the topography, composition contents, and depth profile of some typical elements on the rubbing surface. Smooth topography of wear scar further confirms that the additive showed good EP capacities, and XPS and EDX analyzes indicate that tribochemical mixed protective films composed of bismuth, bismuth oxides, sulfides, and sulfates are formed on the rubbing surface, which improves the tribological properties of lubricants. In particular, a large number of bismuth atoms and bismuth sulfides play an important role in improving the EP properties of oils.

  20. Modeling of solvent extraction equilibrium of Cu(II from sulphuric Acid solution with MOC-55TD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alguacil, F. J.

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of Cu(II from acidic sulphate aqueous solutions using the commercial MOC-55TD extractant is studied. A predictive model, which consists in a set of non-linear mass action and mass balance equations is proposed. The model was solved using a tailor-made equation-solving program. The extraction of copper can be described by the formation of CuR2 species (log Kext= 0.717 ± 0.03 in the organic phase. The copper equilibrium isotherm was also obtained at 20°C.

    Se estudia la extracción de Cu(II de disoluciones acuosas acidas, en medio sulfato, mediante la oxima comercial MOC-55TD. Se propone un modelo para predecir la extracción del metal; este modelo consiste en una serie de ecuaciones no lineales de acción de masas y balance de masas. El modelo se resolvió empleando un programa de ordenador específicamente definido para este tipo de equilibrios. La extracción de cobre se describe por la formación de la especie CuR2 (log Kext= 0,717 ± 0,03 en la fase orgánica. Se ha obtenido la isoterma de extracción de cobre a 20 °C.

  1. Advanced Model Compounds for Understanding Acid-Catalyzed Lignin Depolymerization: Identification of Renewable Aromatics and a Lignin-Derived Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahive, Ciaran W; Deuss, Peter J; Lancefield, Christopher S; Sun, Zhuohua; Cordes, David B; Young, Claire M; Tran, Fanny; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; de Vries, Johannes G; Kamer, Paul C J; Westwood, Nicholas J; Barta, Katalin

    2016-07-20

    The development of fundamentally new approaches for lignin depolymerization is challenged by the complexity of this aromatic biopolymer. While overly simplified model compounds often lack relevance to the chemistry of lignin, the direct use of lignin streams poses significant analytical challenges to methodology development. Ideally, new methods should be tested on model compounds that are complex enough to mirror the structural diversity in lignin but still of sufficiently low molecular weight to enable facile analysis. In this contribution, we present a new class of advanced (β-O-4)-(β-5) dilinkage models that are highly realistic representations of a lignin fragment. Together with selected β-O-4, β-5, and β-β structures, these compounds provide a detailed understanding of the reactivity of various types of lignin linkages in acid catalysis in conjunction with stabilization of reactive intermediates using ethylene glycol. The use of these new models has allowed for identification of novel reaction pathways and intermediates and led to the characterization of new dimeric products in subsequent lignin depolymerization studies. The excellent correlation between model and lignin experiments highlights the relevance of this new class of model compounds for broader use in catalysis studies. Only by understanding the reactivity of the linkages in lignin at this level of detail can fully optimized lignin depolymerization strategies be developed.

  2. Solvent extraction of Zn(II) from aqueous sulphate media by di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid in kerosene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, D.A.; Alauddin, M.; Rahman, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    The extraction equilibrium studies of Zn(II) from sulphate medium by di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA, H/sub 2/A/sub 2/) in kerosene revealed that the distribution ratio (D) decreased with the increase of initial (Zn(A(II) in the aqueous phase and increased with the increase of equilibrium pH and extractant concentration. The equilibration is reached within 2 min. The species extracted into the organic phase is thought to be ZnA2, HA. The pH and extractant dependencies were about 2 and 1.67, respectively. The distribution ratio decreased with the increase in sulphate ion concentration in the aqueous phase. The extraction equilibrium reaction is suggested as Zn/sup 2+/ /sub aq/ +1.5 (H/sub 2/A/sub 2/)org - (ZnA/sub 2/, HA)org +2H/sup +/ /sub aq/. The extraction equilibrium constant (kex) for the above reaction was calculated to be 10-2.26. The extraction process was endothermic in nature having positive DH value of 16.27 kJ/mol. The loading of D2EHPA by Zn(II) is about 4.50 g of Zn(II) by 0.10 M D2EHPA. Possible reaction mechanism has been suggested based on distribution data, extractant concentration and equilibrium pH of the aqueous phase. (author)

  3. Solvent induced synthesis, structure and properties of coordination polymers based on 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid as linker and 1,10-phenanthroline as auxiliary ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariem, Mukaddus; Yawer, Mohd; Sheikh, Haq Nawaz

    2015-11-01

    Three new coordination polymers [Mn(hip)(phen) (H2O)]n (1), [Co(hip)(phen) (H2O)]n (2), and [Cd(hip) (phen) (H2O)]n (3) (H2hip=5-hydroxyisophthalic acid; phen=1,10-phenanthroline) have been synthesized by solvo-hydrothermal method using diethyl formamide-water (DEF-H2O) as solvent system. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that all three coordination polymers 1, 2 and 3 crystallize in monoclinic space group P2/n. Metal ions are inter-connected by hydroxyisophthalate anions forming zig-zag 1D chain. 1D chains are further inter-connected by hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions leading to 3D supramolecular architecture. Hydrogen-bonding and π-π stacking provide thermal stability to polymers. Compounds 1 and 2 are paramagnetic at room temperature and variable temperature magnetic moment measurements revealed weak ferromagnetic interactions between metal ions at low temperature. Compound 3 exhibits excellent photoluminescence with large Stokes shift.

  4. Effect of temperature and solvent composition on acid dissociation equilibria, I: Sequenced sspKa determination of compounds commonly used as buffers in high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padró, Juan M.; Acquaviva, Agustín; Tascon, Marcos; Gagliardi, Leonardo G.; Castells, Cecilia B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We developed a rapid potentiometric method for sequential pK a determinations. ► We measured pK a of buffers from 0 to 90% (v/v) acetonitrile/water and from 20 to 60 °C. ► Sequences of 42 pK a -data spanned over a wide solvent composition range needed 2 h. ► We measured pK a of formic acid and triethylamine/HCl in up to 90% (v/v) acetonitrile. ► The high-throughput method was applied to obtain pK a of two common buffers in LC/MS. - Abstract: A new automated and rapid potentiometric method for determining the effect of organic-solvent composition on pK a has been developed. It is based on the measurements of pH values of buffer solutions of variable solvent compositions using a combined glass electrode. Additions of small volumes of one precisely thermostated solution into another, both containing exactly the same analytical concentrations of the buffer components, can produce continuous changes in the solvent composition. Two sequences of potential measurements, one of increasing and the other of decreasing solvent content, are sufficient to obtain the pK a values of the acidic compound within the complete solvent-composition range in about 2 h. The experimental design, procedures, and calculations needed to convert the measured pH into the thermodynamic pK a values are thoroughly discussed. This rapid and automated method allows the systematic study of the effect of solvent compositions and temperatures on the pK a . It has been applied to study the dissociation constants of two monoprotic acids: formic acid and triethylamine:HCl in acetonitrile/water mixtures within the range from 0 to 90% (v/v) at temperatures between 20 °C and 60 °C. These volatile compounds are frequently used to control the pH of the mobile phase in HPLC, especially in methods coupled to mass-spectrometry detection. The obtained pK a values are in excellent agreement with those previously reported. The results were fitted to empirical functions between pK a and

  5. Effect of temperature and solvent composition on acid dissociation equilibria, I: Sequenced {sup s}{sub s}pK{sub a} determination of compounds commonly used as buffers in high performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padro, Juan M.; Acquaviva, Agustin; Tascon, Marcos [Laboratorio de Separaciones Analiticas, Division Quimica Analitica, Universidad Nacional de La Plata y CIDEPINT, 47 y 115, (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Gagliardi, Leonardo G., E-mail: leogagliardi@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Separaciones Analiticas, Division Quimica Analitica, Universidad Nacional de La Plata y CIDEPINT, 47 y 115, (1900) La Plata (Argentina); Castells, Cecilia B., E-mail: castells@isis.unlp.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Separaciones Analiticas, Division Quimica Analitica, Universidad Nacional de La Plata y CIDEPINT, 47 y 115, (1900) La Plata (Argentina)

    2012-05-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed a rapid potentiometric method for sequential pK{sub a} determinations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured pK{sub a} of buffers from 0 to 90% (v/v) acetonitrile/water and from 20 to 60 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequences of 42 pK{sub a}-data spanned over a wide solvent composition range needed 2 h. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured pK{sub a} of formic acid and triethylamine/HCl in up to 90% (v/v) acetonitrile. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The high-throughput method was applied to obtain pK{sub a} of two common buffers in LC/MS. - Abstract: A new automated and rapid potentiometric method for determining the effect of organic-solvent composition on pK{sub a} has been developed. It is based on the measurements of pH values of buffer solutions of variable solvent compositions using a combined glass electrode. Additions of small volumes of one precisely thermostated solution into another, both containing exactly the same analytical concentrations of the buffer components, can produce continuous changes in the solvent composition. Two sequences of potential measurements, one of increasing and the other of decreasing solvent content, are sufficient to obtain the pK{sub a} values of the acidic compound within the complete solvent-composition range in about 2 h. The experimental design, procedures, and calculations needed to convert the measured pH into the thermodynamic pK{sub a} values are thoroughly discussed. This rapid and automated method allows the systematic study of the effect of solvent compositions and temperatures on the pK{sub a}. It has been applied to study the dissociation constants of two monoprotic acids: formic acid and triethylamine:HCl in acetonitrile/water mixtures within the range from 0 to 90% (v/v) at temperatures between 20 Degree-Sign C and 60 Degree-Sign C. These volatile compounds are frequently used to control the pH of the mobile phase in HPLC, especially in

  6. Solvent extraction of zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.S.; Yoon, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The extraction of zirconium(VI) from an aqueous solution of constant ionic strength with versatic acid-10 dissolved in benzen was studied as a function of pH and the concentration of zirconium(VI) and organic acid. The effects of sulphate and chlorine ions on the extraction of the zirconium(VI) were briefly examined. It was revealed that (ZrOR 2 .2RH) is the predominant species of extracted zirconium(VI) in the versatic acid-10. The chemical equation and the apparent equilibrium constants thereof have been determined as follows. (ZrOsup(2+))aq+ 2(R 2 H 2 )sub(org) = (ZrOR 2 .2RH)sub(org)+2(H + )aq Ksub(Zr) = (ZrOR 2 .2RH)sub(org)(H + ) 2 /(ZrOsup(2+))sub(aq)(R 2 H 2 )sup(2)sub(org) = 3.3 x 10 -7 . The synergistic effects of TBP and D2EHPA were also studied. In the mixed solvent with 0.1M TBP, the synergistic effect was observed, while the mixed solvent with D2EHPA showed the antisynergistic effect. (Author)

  7. Microstructure and mechanical properties of biodegradable poly (D/L) lactic acid/polycaprolactone blends processed from the solvent-evaporation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Javad; Hesaraki, Saeed; Hadavi, Seyed Mohammad-Mehdi; Esfandeh, Masoud; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hosein

    2017-02-01

    In this study, polymer blends comprising poly(D/L) lactic acid (PDLLA) and 0-30wt% polycaprolactone (PCL) was prepared by a solvent-evaporation technique. The effect of PCL content on the dynamic-mechanical properties and tensile and flexural characteristics of the blends was evaluated. The creep and stress relaxation behaviors were also determined and using various known models such as power law, Burgers model and Weibull distribution equation. The results showed that by increasing the PCL content from 10 to 30wt%, the yield stress and flexural strength decreased from 47MPa to 26MPa and 72MPa to 29MPa respectively. In addition to tensile and flexural strength, the elastic modulus of neat PDLLA declined with increasing the PCL content, whereas the elongation or the strain percentage at the break point increased considerably. Biphasic regions were observed in the microstructures of the blends, indicating the immiscibility of PCL in PDLLA matrix. However, the PCL spherulites with an average particle diameter of 100nm to 5μm were homogeneously dispersed in PDLLA phase even at high PCL concentrations. Moreover, the microstructures of the fractured surfaces of the polymers confirmed that PDLLA with a brittle fracture behavior tends toward a soft fracture behavior when it is blended with PCL. The dynamic-mechanical tests indicated that the damping energy and dissipative ability of PDLLA improve by adding PCL. Moreover, T g of neat PDLLA by adding of 10, 20 and 30wt% decreases from 67.3 to 66.2, 65.1 and 63.5°C respectively. Increasing in the recovered viscoelastic strain due to the addition of PCL was also experienced which can be attributed to the presence of large volumetric backbone of PCL chains as well as easy movement of them in the matrix. The results of modeling studies showed a good correlation between the experimentally obtained data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Indium recovery by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortes, Marilia Camargos Botelho

    1999-04-01

    Indium has been recovered as a byproduct from residues generated from the sulfuric acid leaching circuits in mineral plants for zinc recovery. Once its recovery comes from the slags of other metals recovery, it is necessary to separate it from the other elements which usually are present in high concentrations. Many works have been approaching this separation and indicate the solvent extraction process as the main technique used. In Brazilian case, indium recovery depends on the knowledge of this technique and its development. This paper describes the solvent extraction knowledge for the indium recovery from aqueous solutions generated in mineral plants. The results for determination of the best experimental conditions to obtain a high indium concentration solution and minimum iron poisoning by solvent extraction with di (2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) solubilized in isoparafin and exxsol has been presented. (author)

  9. Method of decomposing radioactive organic solvent wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uki, Kazuo; Ichihashi, Toshio; Hasegawa, Akira; Sato, Tatsuaki

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To decompose radioactive organic solvent wastes or radioactive hydrocarbon solvents separated therefrom into organic materials under moderate conditions, as well as greatly decrease the amount of secondary wastes generated. Method: Radioactive organic solvent wastes comprising an organic phosphoric acid ester ingredient and a hydrocarbon ingredient as a diluent therefor, or radioactive hydrocarbon solvents separated therefrom are oxidatively decomposed by hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous phosphoric acid solution of phosphoric acid metal salts finally into organic materials to perform decomposing treatment for the radioactive organic solvent wastes. The decomposing reaction is carried out under relatively moderate conditions and cause less burden to facilities or the likes. Further, since the decomposed liquid after the treatment can be reused for the decomposing reaction as a catalyst solution secondary wastes can significantly be decreased. (Yoshihara, H.)

  10. The chemistry of nonaqueous solvents v.4 solution phenomena and aprotic solvents

    CERN Document Server

    Lagowski, J J

    1976-01-01

    The Chemistry of Nonaqueous Solvents, Volume IV: Solution Phenomena and Aprotic Solvents focuses on the chemistry of nonaqueous solvents, with emphasis on solution phenomena and aprotic solvents such as tetramethylurea, inorganic acid chlorides, cyclic carbonates, and sulfolane. This book is organized into seven chapters and begins with an overview of the theory of electrical conductivity and elementary experimental considerations, along with some of the interesting research on nonaqueous solvents. It then turns to a discussion on hydrogen bonding phenomena in nonaqueous systems as probed

  11. Carbonyl Activation by Borane Lewis Acid Complexation: Transition States of H2 Splitting at the Activated Carbonyl Carbon Atom in a Lewis Basic Solvent and the Proton-Transfer Dynamics of the Boroalkoxide Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshmat, Mojgan; Privalov, Timofei

    2017-07-06

    By using transition-state (TS) calculations, we examined how Lewis acid (LA) complexation activates carbonyl compounds in the context of hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds by H 2 in Lewis basic (ethereal) solvents containing borane LAs of the type (C 6 F 5 ) 3 B. According to our calculations, LA complexation does not activate a ketone sufficiently enough for the direct addition of H 2 to the O=C unsaturated bond; but, calculations indicate a possibly facile heterolytic cleavage of H 2 at the activated and thus sufficiently Lewis acidic carbonyl carbon atom with the assistance of the Lewis basic solvent (i.e., 1,4-dioxane or THF). For the solvent-assisted H 2 splitting at the carbonyl carbon atom of (C 6 F 5 ) 3 B adducts with different ketones, a number of TSs are computed and the obtained results are related to insights from experiment. By using the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the DFT for electronic structure calculations, the evolution of the (C 6 F 5 ) 3 B-alkoxide ionic intermediate and the proton transfer to the alkoxide oxygen atom were investigated. The results indicate a plausible hydrogenation mechanism with a LA, that is, (C 6 F 5 ) 3 B, as a catalyst, namely, 1) the step of H 2 cleavage that involves a Lewis basic solvent molecule plus the carbonyl carbon atom of thermodynamically stable and experimentally identifiable (C 6 F 5 ) 3 B-ketone adducts in which (C 6 F 5 ) 3 B is the "Lewis acid promoter", 2) the transfer of the solvent-bound proton to the oxygen atom of the (C 6 F 5 ) 3 B-alkoxide intermediate giving the (C 6 F 5 ) 3 B-alcohol adduct, and 3) the S N 2-style displacement of the alcohol by a ketone or a Lewis basic solvent molecule. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Study of acid-base properties in various water-salt and water-organic solvent mixtures; Etude de proprietes acides-bases dans divers melanges eau-sels et eau-solvants organiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-02-01

    Acid-base reactions have been studied in water-salt mixtures and water organic solvent-mixtures. It has been possible to find some relations between the displacement of the equilibria and the numerical value of water activity in the mixture. First have been studied some equilibria H{sup +} + B {r_reversible} HB{sup +} in salt-water mixtures and found a relation between the pK{sub A} value, the solubility of the base and water activity. The reaction HO{sup -} + H{sup +} {r_reversible} H{sub 2}O has been investigated and a relation been found between pK{sub i} values, water activity and the molar concentration of the salt in the mixture. This relation is the same for every mixture. Then the same reactions have been studied in organic solvent-water mixtures and a relation found in the first part of the work have been used with success. So it has been possible to explain easily some properties of organic water-mixture as the shape of the curves of the Hammett acidity function Ho. (authors) [French] Nous avons envisage l'etude des reactions acides-bases dans des melanges eau-sels MX et des melanges d'eau et de solvants organiques. Les uns et les autres ont ete choisis de facon a ce que la basicite du solvant ou celle de l'anion X{sup -} soit negligeable devant celle de l'eau dans les melanges consideres. Dans un premier temps nous avons etudie dans les melanges eau-sels MX les equilibres H{sup +} + B {r_reversible} HB{sup +} et HA {r_reversible} H{sup +} + A{sup -}. On montre que connaissant la valeur de la solubilite de la base B et de l'acide HA dans le melange eau-sel considere et dans l'eau pure et celle de l'activite de l'eau dans le melange, il est possible de prevoir la valeur de la constante de l'equilibre acide-base etudiee. Dans un deuxieme temps nous avons cherche a generaliser ces resultats, lorsque l'on remplace le sel MX dans le melange avec l'eau par un solvant organique. De meme que precedemment, nous avons compare les constantes d'equilibre du type HB

  13. Organic solvents from sugar cane molasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeser, H

    1970-01-01

    The production of organic solvents by fermentation of low priced cane molasses is discussed. Processes described and illustrated in detail include the production of acetone, butanol, ethanol, acetic acid, ethyl acetate and butyl acetate.

  14. STUDIES ON SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF FREE HYDROGEN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    synthesized through glucose degradation (glycolysis) to lactic acid. ... g sample into a well stoppered plastic bottle and mixed with 20 mL of distilled .... Recovery of used solvent is necessary because methylchloroform is toxic to the bacteria.

  15. Computational Elucidation of a Role That Brønsted Acidification of the Lewis Acid-Bound Water Might Play in the Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds with H2 in Lewis Basic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshmat, Mojgan; Privalov, Timofei

    2017-08-25

    Brønsted acidification of water by Lewis acid (LA) complexation is one of the fundamental principles in chemistry. Using transition-state calculations (TS), herein we investigate the role that Brønsted acidification of the LA-bound water might play in the mechanism of the hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds in Lewis basic solvents under non-anhydrous conditions. The potential energy scans and TS calculations were carried out with a series of eight borane LAs as well as the commonly known strong LA AlCl 3 in 1,4-dioxane or THF as Lewis basic solvents. Our molecular model consists of the dative LA-water adduct with hydrogen bonds to acetone and a solvent molecule plus one additional solvent molecule that participates is the TS structure describing the cleavage of H 2 at acetone's carbonyl carbon atom. In all the molecular models applied here, acetone (O=CMe 2 ) is the archetypical carbonyl substrate. We demonstrate that Brønsted acidification of the LA-bound water can indeed lower the barrier height of the solvent-involving H 2 -cleavage at the acetone's carbonyl carbon atom. This is significant because at present it is believed that the mechanism of the herein considered reaction is described by the same mechanism regardless of whether the reaction conditions are strictly anhydrous or non-anhydrous. Our results offer an alternative to this belief that warrants consideration and further study. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. TRUEX process solvent cleanup with solid sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tse, Pui-Kwan; Reichley-Yinger, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    Solid sorbents, alumina, silica gel, and Amberlyst A-26 have been tested for the cleanup of degraded TRUEX-NPH solvent. A sodium carbonate scrub alone does not completely remove acidic degradation products from highly degraded solvent and cannot restore the stripping performance of the solvent. By following the carbonate scrub with either neutral alumina or Amberlyst A-26 anion exchange resin, the performance of the TRUEX-NPH is substantially restored. The degraded TRUEX-NPH was characterized before and after treatment by supercritical fluid chromatography. Its performance was evaluated by americium distribution ratios, phase-separation times, and lauric acid distribution coefficients. 17 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  17. SOLVENT EFFECTS ON THE HYDRATION OF CYCLOHEXENE CATALYZED BY A STRONG ACID ION-EXCHANGE RESIN .1. SOLUBILITY OF CYCLOHEXENE IN AQUEOUS SULFOLANE MIXTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PANNEMAN, HJ; BEENACKERS, AACM

    The solubility of cyclohexene in different water-sulfolane mixtures was measured between 313 and 413 K. The results demonstrate a sharp increase of the solubility of cyclohexene with increasing percentages of sulfolane in the solvent mixture. Without sulfolane the increase of the solubility with

  18. Obtention of Samarium and Gadolinium concentrates by solvent extraction using mono-2-ethylhexyl ester of 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid; Obtencao de concentrados de samario e gadolinio via extracao por solventes com o ester mono-2-etilhexil do acido 2-etilhexilfosfonico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Junior, Pedro

    1996-07-01

    The rare earth chlorides solution employed in this study, which is constituted by medium and heavy fractions, is derived from monazite processing accomplished by NUCLEMON-Mineroquimica (SP). This solution shows an acidity about 1.18 M and 189 g/L of rare earth oxides, containing as main constituents: Sm(34.55%), Gd(23.85%), Dy (6.82%), and Y (24.45%). It was used, as organic phase, 2-ethylhexyl phosphonic acid, mono-2-ethylhexylester diluted to 1 M in isododecane. (author)

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of aquation and formation reactions of carbonato complexes. XII. Deuterium solvent isotope effect on the rate of acid-catalyzed decarboxylation of the carbonatobis (ethylenediamine) cobalt(III) complex ion. A mechanistic reappraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, G.M.; Hyde, K.E.

    1978-01-01

    A recent study of the acid-catalyzed decarboxylation of the carbonatotetrakis(pyridine)cobalt(III) complex ion showed there to be rate acceleration in D 2 O solvent, consistent with a proton-preequilibration mechanism. This observation directly contradicts the results of a similar study made some years ago of the analogous ion, carbonatobis(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III), for which there appeared to be deceleration in D 2 O solvent. A reinvestigation of the latter reaction over a much wider acidity range has now shown the earlier work to be in error. The previously proposed generalized mechanism for aquation of chelated carbonato complex ions of the form CoN 4 CO 3 + (N 4 identical with various tetramine ligand groupings of uni-, bi-, or quadridentate type) has thus been revised to include a proton equilibration step. An unexpected complication arises in the interpretation of the data for the bis(ethylenediamine) complex ion in the acidity range 0.1 + ] + ] term, overtakes and exceeds the true first-order rate constant for CO 2 release. The interesting implications of this unusual first-order successive reaction system are fully explored in the context of the present study

  20. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Stephen L.; Lee, Eric K. L.; Friesen, Dwayne T.; Kelly, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    There is disclosed a composite immobulized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation.

  1. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

    1989-04-25

    There is disclosed a composite immobilized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation. 3 figs.

  2. Solvents and solvent effects in organic chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reichardt, C; Welton, T

    2011-01-01

    .../guest complexation equilibria and reactions in biphasic solvent systems and neoteric solvents, respectively. More than 900 new references have been added, giving preference to review articles, and many older ones have been deleted. New references either replace older ones or are added to the end of the respective reference list of each chapter. Th...

  3. Organic Solvent Tropical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COWLEY, W.L.

    2000-01-01

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an unmitigated organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines

  4. Canyon solvent cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The HM Process at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) uses 7.5% tributylphosphate in n-paraffin as an extraction solvent. During use, the solvent is altered due to hydrolysis and radiolysis, forming materials that influence product losses, produce decontamination, and separation efficiencies. Laboratory studies to improve online solvent cleaning have shown the carbonate washing, although removing residual solvent activity does not remove binding ligands that hold fission products in the solvent. Treatment of solvent by an alumina adsorption process removes binding ligands and significantly improves recycle solvent performance. Both laboratory work defining a full-scale alumina adsorption process and the use of the process to clean HM Process first cycle solvent are presented

  5. Solvent wash solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neace, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution comprising an admixture of an organic extractant for uranium and plutonium and a non-polar organic liquid diluent, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. Comprising combining a wash solution consisting of: (a) water; and (b) a positive amount up to about, an including, 50 volume percent of at least one highly-polar water-miscible organic solvent, based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent, with the solvent extraction solution after uranium and plutonium values have been stripped from the solvent extraction solution, the diluent degradation products dissolving in the highly-polar organic solvent and the extractant and diluent of the extraction solution not dissolving in the highly-polar organic solvent, and separating the highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solution to obtain a purified extraction solution

  6. Comparison of ambient solvent extraction methods for the analysis of fatty acids in non-starch lipids of flour and starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Niloufar; Yonekura, Lina; Linforth, Robert; Carvalho da Silva, Margarida; Hill, Sandra; Penson, Simon; Chope, Gemma; Fisk, Ian Denis

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lipids are minor components of flours, but are major determinants of baking properties and end-product quality. To the best of our knowledge, there is no single solvent system currently known that efficiently extracts all non-starch lipids from all flours without the risk of chemical, mechanical or thermal damage. This paper compares nine ambient solvent systems (monophasic and biphasic) with varying polarities: Bligh and Dyer (BD); modified Bligh and Dyer using HCl (BDHCL); modified BD using NaCl (BDNaCl); methanol–chloroform–hexane (3:2:1, v/v); Hara and Radin (hexane–isopropanol, 3:2, v/v); water-saturated n-butanol; chloroform; methanol and hexane for their ability to extract total non-starch lipids (separated by lipid classes) from wheat flour (Triticum aestivum L.). Seven ambient extraction protocols were further compared for their ability to extract total non-starch lipids from three alternative samples: barley flour (Hordeum vulgare L.), maize starch (Zea mays L.) and tapioca starch (Manihot esculenta Crantz). RESULTS For wheat flour the original BD method and those containing HCl or NaCl tended to extract the maximum lipid and a significant correlation between lipid extraction yield (especially the glycolipids and phospholipids) and the polarity of the solvent was observed. For the wider range of samples BD and BD HCl repeatedly offered the maximum extraction yield and using pooled standardized (by sample) data from all flours, total non-starch lipid extraction yield was positively correlated with solvent polarity (r = 0.5682, P starches when compared to the flour samples, which is due to the differences in lipid profiles between the two sample types (flours and starches). PMID:24132804

  7. A Green and Efficient Method for the Preconcentration and Determination of Gallic Acid, Bergenin, Quercitrin, and Embelin from Ardisia japonica Using Nononic Surfactant Genapol X-080 as the Extraction Solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple cloud point preconcentration method was developed and validated for the determination of gallic acid, bergenin, quercitrin, and embelin in Ardisia japonica by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC using ultrasonic assisted micellar extraction. Nonionic surfactant Genapol X-080 was selected as the extraction solvent. The effects of various experimental conditions such as the type and concentration of surfactant and salt, temperature, and solution pH on the extraction of these components were studied to optimize the conditions of Ardisia japonica. The solution was incubated in a thermostatic water bath at 60°C for 10 min, and 35% NaH2PO4 (w/v was added to the solution to promote the phase separation and increase the preconcentration factor. The intraday and interday precision (RSD were both below 5.0% and the limits of detection (LOD for the analytes were between 10 and 20 ng·mL−1. The proposed method provides a simple, efficient, and organic solvent-free method to analyze gallic acid, bergenin, quercitrin, and embelin for the quality control of Ardisia japonica.

  8. A Green and Efficient Method for the Preconcentration and Determination of Gallic Acid, Bergenin, Quercitrin, and Embelin from Ardisia japonica Using Nononic Surfactant Genapol X-080 as the Extraction Solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Du, Kunze; Li, Jin; Bai, Yun; An, Mingrui; Tan, Zhijing

    2018-01-01

    A simple cloud point preconcentration method was developed and validated for the determination of gallic acid, bergenin, quercitrin, and embelin in Ardisia japonica by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using ultrasonic assisted micellar extraction. Nonionic surfactant Genapol X-080 was selected as the extraction solvent. The effects of various experimental conditions such as the type and concentration of surfactant and salt, temperature, and solution pH on the extraction of these components were studied to optimize the conditions of Ardisia japonica. The solution was incubated in a thermostatic water bath at 60°C for 10 min, and 35% NaH2PO4 (w/v) was added to the solution to promote the phase separation and increase the preconcentration factor. The intraday and interday precision (RSD) were both below 5.0% and the limits of detection (LOD) for the analytes were between 10 and 20 ng·mL−1. The proposed method provides a simple, efficient, and organic solvent-free method to analyze gallic acid, bergenin, quercitrin, and embelin for the quality control of Ardisia japonica. PMID:29487621

  9. Chemical reactions in solvents and melts

    CERN Document Server

    Charlot, G

    1969-01-01

    Chemical Reactions in Solvents and Melts discusses the use of organic and inorganic compounds as well as of melts as solvents. This book examines the applications in organic and inorganic chemistry as well as in electrochemistry. Organized into two parts encompassing 15 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the general properties and the different types of reactions, including acid-base reactions, complex formation reactions, and oxidation-reduction reactions. This text then describes the properties of inert and active solvents. Other chapters consider the proton transfer reactions in

  10. Computer-Aided Solvent Screening for Biocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens; Leeuwen, M.B. van; Boeriu, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    constrained properties related to chemical reaction equilibrium, substrate and product solubility, water solubility, boiling points, toxicity and others. Two examples are provided, covering the screening of solvents for lipase-catalyzed transesterification of octanol and inulin with vinyl laurate....... Esterification of acrylic acid with octanol is also addressed. Solvents are screened and candidates identified, confirming existing experimental results. Although the examples involve lipases, the method is quite general, so there seems to be no preclusion against application to other biocatalysts....

  11. Solvent-Free Polymerization of L-Aspartic Acid in the Presence of D-Sorbitol to Obtain Water Soluble or Network Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    L-aspartic acid was thermally polymerized in the presence of D-sorbitol with the goal of synthesizing new, higher molecular weight water soluble and absorbent copolymers. No reaction occurred when aspartic acid alone was heated at 170 or 200 degrees C. In contrast, heating sorbitol and aspartic ac...

  12. The influence of solvent processing on polyester bioabsorbable polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Joanne; Dixon, Dorian

    2012-01-01

    Solvent-based methods are commonly employed for the production of polyester-based samples and coatings in both medical device production and research. The influence of solvent casting and subsequent drying time was studied using thermal analysis, spectroscopy and weight measurement for four grades of 50 : 50 poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) produced by using chloroform, dichloromethane, and acetone. The results demonstrate that solvent choice and PLGA molecular weight are critical factors in terms of solvent removal rate and maintaining sample integrity, respectively. The protocols widely employed result in high levels of residual solvent and a new protocol is presented together with solutions to commonly encountered problems.

  13. Determination of Acid Dissociation Constants (pKa) of Bicyclic Thiohydantoin-Pyrrolidine Compounds in 20% Ethanol-Water Hydroorganic Solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nural, Yahya; Döndaş, H. Ali; Sarı, Hayati; Atabey, Hasan; Belveren, Samet; Gemili, Müge

    2014-01-01

    The acid dissociation constants of potential bioactive fused ring thiohydantoin-pyrrolidine compounds were determined by potentiometric titration in 20% (v/v) ethanol-water mixed at 25 ± 0.1°C, at an ionic background of 0.1 mol/L of NaCl using the HYPERQUAD computer program. Proton affinities of potential donor atoms of the ligands were calculated by AM1 and PM3 semiempiric methods. We found, potentiometrically, three different acid dissociation constants for 1a–f. We suggest that these acid dissociation constants are related to the carboxyl, enol, and amino groups. PMID:24799905

  14. LIQUID-LIQUID EQUILIBRIA OF THE TERNARY SYSTEMS PROPIONIC ACID - WATER - SOLVENT (n-AMYL ALCOHOL AND n-AMYL ACETATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek ÖZMEN

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The experimental liquid-liquid equilibrium (LLE data have been obtained at 25 oC for ternary systems propionic acid-water-n-amyl alcohol and propionic acid-water-n-amyl acetate. The reliability of the experimental tie line data are checked using the methods of Othmer-Tobias and Hand. The distribution coefficients and separation factors were obtained from experimental results and are also reported. The predicted tie line data obtained by UNIFAC method are compared with experimental data. It is concluded that n-amyl alcohol and n-amyl acetate are suitable separating agents for dilute aqueous propionic acid solutions.

  15. Influence of Solvent-Solvent and Solute-Solvent Interaction Properties on Solvent-Mediated Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shiqi

    2005-01-01

    A recently proposed universal calculational recipe for solvent-mediated potential is applied to calculate excess potential of mean force between two large Lennard-Jones (LJ) or hard core attractive Yukawa particles immersed in small LJ solvent bath at supercritical state. Comparison between the present prediction with a hypernetted chain approximation adopted for solute-solute correlation at infinitely dilute limit and existing simulation data shows high accuracy for the region with large separation, and qualitative reliability for the solute particle contact region. The calculational simplicity of the present recipe allows for a detailed investigation on the effect of the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interaction details on the excess potential of mean force. The resultant conclusion is that gathering of solvent particles near a solute particle leads to repulsive excess PMF, while depletion of solvent particles away from the solute particle leads to attractive excess PMF, and minor change of the solvent-solvent interaction range has large influence on the excess PMF.

  16. A Novel Aqueous Two Phase System Composed of a Thermo-Separating Polymer and an Organic Solvent for Purification of Thermo-Acidic Amylase Enzyme from Red Pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus Peel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnoush Amid

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purification of thermo-acidic amylase enzyme from red pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus peel for the first time was investigated using a novel aqueous two-phase system (ATPS consisting of a thermo-separating copolymer and an organic solvent. The effectiveness of different parameters such as molecular weight of the thermo-separating ethylene oxide-propylene oxide (EOPO copolymer and type and concentration of organic solvent on the partitioning behavior of amylase was investigated. In addition, the effects of phase components, volume ratio (VR, pH and crude load of purification factor and yield of amylase were evaluated to achieve the optimum partition conditions of the enzyme. In the novel ATPS method, the enzyme was satisfactorily partitioned into the polymer-rich top phase in the system composed of 30% (w/w EOPO 2500 and 15% (w/w 2-propanol, at a volume ratio of 1.94 and with a crude load scale of 25% (w/w at pH 5.0. Recovery and recycling of components was also measured in each successive step of the ATPS process. The enzyme was successfully recovered by the method with a high purification factor of 14.3 and yield of 96.6% and copolymer was also recovered and recycled at a rate above 97%, making the method was more economical than the traditional ATPS method.

  17. Solvent Extraction and Characterization of Neutral Lipids in Oocystis sp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony, Renil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States); Stuart, Ben, E-mail: stuart@ohio.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Ohio University, Athens, OH (United States)

    2015-01-20

    Microalgae are a favorable feedstock for bioproducts and biofuels due to their high oil content, fast growth rates, and low resource demands. Solvent lipid extraction efficiency from microalgae is dependent on algal strain and the extraction solvent. Four non-polar extraction solvents were evaluated for the recovery of neutral cellular lipids from microalgae Oocystis sp. (University of Texas at Austin LB2396). Methylene chloride, hexane, diethyl ether, and cyclohexane were selected as the extraction solvents. The lipid extracts were derivatized and analyzed using gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy. All solvent extracts contained hexadecanoic acid, linoleic acid, and linolenic acid; accounting for 70% of total lipid content with a proportional wt% composition of the three fatty acids, except for the hexane extracts that showed only hexadecanoic acid and linoleic acid. While not statistically differentiated, methylene chloride proved to be the most effective solvent for Oocystis sp. among the four solvents tested with a total average neutral lipid recovery of 0.25% of dry weight followed by diethyl ether (0.18%), cyclohexane (0.14%), and hexane (0.11%). This research presents a simple methodology to optimize the selection of lipid specific extraction solvents for the microalgal strain selected.

  18. Solvent Extraction and Characterization of Neutral Lipids in Oocystis sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renil eAnthony

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are a favorable feedstock for bioproducts and biofuels due to their high oil content, fast growth rates and low resource demands. Solvent lipid extraction efficiency from microalgae is dependent on algal strain and the extraction solvent. Four non-polar extraction solvents were evaluated for the recovery of neutral cellular lipids from microalgae Oocystis sp. (UTEX LB2396. Methylene chloride, hexane, diethyl ether, and cyclohexane were selected as the extraction solvents. All solvent extracts contained hexadecanoic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid; accounting for 70% of total lipid content with a proportional wt% composition of the three fatty acids, except for the hexane extracts that showed only hexadecanoic acid and linoleic acid. While not statistically differentiated, methylene chloride proved to be the most effective solvent for Oocystis sp. among the four solvents tested with a total average neutral lipid recovery of 0.25% of dry weight followed by diethyl ether (0.18%, cyclohexane (0.14% and hexane (0.11%. This research presents a simple methodology to optimize the selection of lipid specific extraction solvents for the microalgal strain selected.

  19. Solvent Extraction and Characterization of Neutral Lipids in Oocystis sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, Renil; Stuart, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are a favorable feedstock for bioproducts and biofuels due to their high oil content, fast growth rates, and low resource demands. Solvent lipid extraction efficiency from microalgae is dependent on algal strain and the extraction solvent. Four non-polar extraction solvents were evaluated for the recovery of neutral cellular lipids from microalgae Oocystis sp. (University of Texas at Austin LB2396). Methylene chloride, hexane, diethyl ether, and cyclohexane were selected as the extraction solvents. The lipid extracts were derivatized and analyzed using gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy. All solvent extracts contained hexadecanoic acid, linoleic acid, and linolenic acid; accounting for 70% of total lipid content with a proportional wt% composition of the three fatty acids, except for the hexane extracts that showed only hexadecanoic acid and linoleic acid. While not statistically differentiated, methylene chloride proved to be the most effective solvent for Oocystis sp. among the four solvents tested with a total average neutral lipid recovery of 0.25% of dry weight followed by diethyl ether (0.18%), cyclohexane (0.14%), and hexane (0.11%). This research presents a simple methodology to optimize the selection of lipid specific extraction solvents for the microalgal strain selected.

  20. Organic Solvent Tolerant Lipases and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivika Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipases are a group of enzymes naturally endowed with the property of performing reactions in aqueous as well as organic solvents. The esterification reactions using lipase(s could be performed in water-restricted organic media as organic solvent(s not only improve(s the solubility of substrate and reactant in reaction mixture but also permit(s the reaction in the reverse direction, and often it is easy to recover the product in organic phase in two-phase equilibrium systems. The use of organic solvent tolerant lipase in organic media has exhibited many advantages: increased activity and stability, regiospecificity and stereoselectivity, higher solubility of substrate, ease of products recovery, and ability to shift the reaction equilibrium toward synthetic direction. Therefore the search for organic solvent tolerant enzymes has been an extensive area of research. A variety of fatty acid esters are now being produced commercially using immobilized lipase in nonaqueous solvents. This review describes the organic tolerance and industrial application of lipases. The main emphasis is to study the nature of organic solvent tolerant lipases. Also, the potential industrial applications that make lipases the biocatalysts of choice for the present and future have been presented.

  1. Hazardous solvent substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    This article is an overview of efforts at INEL to reduce the generation of hazardous wastes through the elimination of hazardous solvents. To aid in their efforts, a number of databases have been developed and will become a part of an Integrated Solvent Substitution Data System. This latter data system will be accessible through Internet

  2. Solvent induced supramolecular anisotropy in molecular gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Michael A., E-mail: mroger09@uoguelph.ca [Department of Food Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N3C3X9 (Canada); Corradini, Maria G. [Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, 01003 (United States); Emge, Thomas [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 08901 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Herein is the first report of solvent induced anisotropy in 12-hydroxystearic acid self-assembled fibrillar networks. Increasing the chain length of polar solvent, such as nitriles and ketones, tailored the anisotropy of the fibrillar aggregates. 12HSA molecular gels, comprised of alkanes, exhibited an isotropic fibrillar network irrespective of the alkane chain length. In polar solvents, anisotropy, observed using 2D powder x-ray diffraction profiles, is correlated to a fibrillar supramolecular morphologies in long chain nitriles and ketones while sphereulitic crystals are correlated to x-ray diffraction patterns with an isotropic scatter intensity in short chain ketones and nitriles. These changes directly modify the final physical properties of the gels. - Highlights: • 12-HSA self-assembles into crystalline supramolecular morphologies depending on the solvent. • Alkanes, short chain nitriles and ketones led to 12-HSA displaying supramolecular isotropy. • In long chain nitriles and ketones, 12-HSA displays supramolecular anisotropy.

  3. Solvent induced supramolecular anisotropy in molecular gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, Michael A.; Corradini, Maria G.; Emge, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Herein is the first report of solvent induced anisotropy in 12-hydroxystearic acid self-assembled fibrillar networks. Increasing the chain length of polar solvent, such as nitriles and ketones, tailored the anisotropy of the fibrillar aggregates. 12HSA molecular gels, comprised of alkanes, exhibited an isotropic fibrillar network irrespective of the alkane chain length. In polar solvents, anisotropy, observed using 2D powder x-ray diffraction profiles, is correlated to a fibrillar supramolecular morphologies in long chain nitriles and ketones while sphereulitic crystals are correlated to x-ray diffraction patterns with an isotropic scatter intensity in short chain ketones and nitriles. These changes directly modify the final physical properties of the gels. - Highlights: • 12-HSA self-assembles into crystalline supramolecular morphologies depending on the solvent. • Alkanes, short chain nitriles and ketones led to 12-HSA displaying supramolecular isotropy. • In long chain nitriles and ketones, 12-HSA displays supramolecular anisotropy.

  4. 90Y and 90Sr separation from hydrochloric acid solutions using TODGA as the extractant by solvent extraction and SLM methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, S.; Raut, D.R.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2010-01-01

    Yttrium-90 is an important radionuclide known for its therapeutic application in nuclear medicine. It is a pure β-emitter with no associated gamma rays and decays to stable daughter 90 Zr. Suitability of this isotope is because of its short half-life (t 1/2 = 64.2 hrs) and high β emissions (E max = 2.28 MeV. An important source of 90 Y is through the decay of 90 Sr, which produces carrier free isotope. 90 Sr (t 1/2 28 yrs) attains secular equilibrium with 90 Y in a short period and can serve as a long term source for the latter isotope because of relatively long half-life of the parent isotope. Solvent extraction studies with N,N,N',N'-tetra-octyldiglycolamide (TODGA) has shown that Y(III) is well extracted in 6 M HCI while at the same time, extraction of Sr(II) is very low leading to a separation factor (D Y /D Sr = 60,000). This property of TODGA can be exploited for the separation of Y from Sr. In the present work, Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM) based separation of Y and Sr has been explored using TODGA as the carrier

  5. Thermodynamic modelling of the absorption of acid gas in mixed solvent (water-di-ethanolamine-methanol); Modelisation thermodynamique de l'absorption des gaz acides dans un solvant mixte (eau-diethanolamine-methanol)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habchi tounsi, K.N.

    2003-10-01

    This work is related to the development of new processes about gas sweetening with mixed solvent coupling a chemical one (aqueous solution of di-ethanolamine) and a physical one (Methanol). These systems are electrolyte solutions constituted by ions and molecular species related each others by chemical reactions. This work is also relevant to the problematic of solvent mixtures (water-methanol). In a first stage we focus our interest over the measurement of original data covering a large experimental interval: five compositions in condition of pressures and temperatures up to 30 and 120 deg C respectively. In a second stage the simultaneous representation of chemical and phase equilibrium was successfully realised. The non stoichiometric method is used for the determination of chemical equilibrium. The heterogeneous method (Peng Robinson + NRTL electrolyte) is used for the representation of vapour liquid equilibrium. (author)

  6. Third phase formation in organic solutions in the extraction of mono-acids by tertiary trialcoyl-amines diluted in very slightly polar organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robaglia, Michele

    1973-01-01

    The phenomena of third phase formation which can occur during the extraction of an acid with a tertiary amine diluted in a low polarity diluent are studied. In the first part a system including water (TnOA - C 6 H 12 - HCl - H 2 O) is compared with an anhydrous system (TnOA - C 6 H 12 - HCl - N 2 ). There are two kinds of gaps. One during amine salification, another one during the extraction of excess acid. The important part of the water content of the organic phase is demonstrated. The presence of water enhances the gaps. The polar water molecules are dissolved inside the tri-octylamine salt micelles. The heavy phase is formed by aggregates, the light phase represents the solubility of the non soluble species in the medium. In the second part are studied the influence of some parameters (like nature of diluent, acid, amine and temperature) on the gaps formation and on the extraction of excess acid and water. In every cases the part played by water remains the same. Finally some comparisons are made between tertiary systems and binary systems which formed them. The binary systems were studied by the mean of crystallization curves. (author) [fr

  7. Sensitive GC/MS determination of 15 isomers of chlorobenzoic acids in accelerated solvent extracts of soils historically contaminated with PCBs and validation of the entire method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křesinová, Zdena; Hostačná, Lucie; Medková, Jaroslava; Čvančarová, Monika; Stella, Tatiana; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 8 (2014), s. 822-836 ISSN 0306-7319 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) 13-28283S; GA TA ČR TE01020218 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : chlorobenzoic acid * GC/MS * separation * PCB * contamination Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.295, year: 2014

  8. Solvent degradation and cleanup: a survey and recent ORNL studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1984-01-01

    This paper surveys the mechanisms for degradation of the tributyl phosphate and diluent components of Purex solvent by acid and radiation, reviews the problems encountered in plant operations resulting from the presence of these degradation products, and discusses methods for minimizing the formation of degradation products and accomplishing their removal. Scrubbing solutions containing sodium carbonate or hydroxylamine salts and secondary cleanup of solvents using solid sorbents are evaluated. Finally, recommendations for improved solvent cleanup are presented. 50 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  9. Esterification of industrial-grade palm fatty acid distillate over modified ZrO{sub 2} (with WO{sub 3}-, SO{sub 4} -and TiO{sub 2}-): Effects of co-solvent adding and water removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mongkolbovornkij, P.; Laosiripojana, N. [The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi (Thailand); Champreda, V. [National Center for Genetic Enginnering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), Pathumthani (Thailand); Sutthisripok, W. [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla (Thailand)

    2010-11-15

    The esterification of palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD), a by-product from palm oil industry, in the presence of three modified zirconia-based catalysts i.e. SO{sub 4}-ZrO{sub 2}, WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} (with several sulfur- and tungsten-loading contents, Ti/Zr molar ratios, and calcination temperatures) was studied. It was found that, among all synthesized catalysts, the reaction in the presence of SO{sub 4}-ZrO{sub 2} and WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} (with 1.8%SO{sub 4} calcined at 500 C and/or 20%WO{sub 3} calcined at 800 C) enhances relatively high fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) yield (84.9-93.7%), which was proven to relate with the high acid site density and specific surface area as well as the formation of tetragonal phase over these catalysts. The greater benefit of WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} over SO{sub 4}-ZrO{sub 2} was its high stability after several reaction cycles, whereas significant deactivation was detected over SO{sub 4}-ZrO{sub 2} due to the leaching of sulfur from catalyst. For further improvement, the addition of toluene as co-solvent was found to increase the FAME yield along with reduce the requirement of methanol to PFAD molar ratio (while maintains the FAME yield above 90%). Furthermore, it was observed that the presence of water in the feed considerably lower the FAME yield due to the catalyst surface interfering by water and the further hydrolysis of FAME back to fatty acids. We proposed here that the negative effect can be considerably minimized by adding molecular sieve to remove water from the feed and/or during the reaction. (author)

  10. Reaction kinetics and reaction heat on thermal decomposition of solvent containing unstable reactive hydrocarbons with nitric acid at Tomsk-7 reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Gunji; Watanabe, Kouji; Koike, Tadao; Miyato, Teijiro.

    1996-12-01

    For analyzing a cause of the Tomsk-7 accident at Russian reprocessing plant, it is necessary to determine reaction-rate constant and reaction heat for a thermal decomposition of TBP/kerosine containing unstable reactive hydrocarbons with nitric acid. In JAERI, the rate constant and reaction heat were obtained from data measured with a differential thermal analyzer (DTA) for unstable hydrocarbons such as n-butanol, n-butyl nitrate, aromatic hydrocarbons, and cyclic compounds. The safety evaluation of Tomsk tank ruptured by the reaction was carried out by heat balance calculations between heat generation and heat loss in the tank using these rate constants and reaction heats. Consequently, it is clear that the cause of the tank rupture would be due to an exothermic reaction of aromatic hydrocarbons in kerosine made by petroleum with the concentrated nitric acid of 14.2N. (author)

  11. Use of stirred tanks for studying matrix effects caused by inorganic acids, easily ionized elements and organic solvents in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, Eduardo [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Maestre, Salvador E. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Todoli, Jose L. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, University of Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain)]. E-mail: jose.todoli@ua.es

    2006-03-15

    A stirred tank was used for the first time to elucidate the mechanism responsible for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) matrix effects caused by inorganic, acids and easily ionized elements (EIEs), as well as organic, ethanol and acetic acid, compounds. In order to gradually increase the matrix concentration, a matrix solution was introduced inside a stirred container (tank) initially filled with an aqueous multielement standard. PolyTetraFluoroEthylene (PTFE) tubing was used to deliver the resulting solution to the liquid sample introduction system. Matrix concentration ranged from 0 to 2 mol l{sup -1} in the case of inorganic acids (i.e., nitric, sulfuric, hydrochloric and a mixture of them), from 0 to about 2500 mg l{sup -1} for EIEs (i.e., sodium, calcium and mixtures of both) and from 0% to 15%, w/w for organic compounds. Up to 40-50 different solutions were prepared and measured in a period of time shorter than 6-7 min. This investigation was carried out in terms of emission intensity and tertiary aerosols characteristics. The experimental setup used in the present work allowed to thoroughly study the effect of matrix concentration on analytical signal. Generally speaking, the experiments concerning tertiary aerosol characterization revealed that, in the case of inorganic acids and EIEs, the mechanism responsible for changes in aerosol characteristics was the droplet fission. In contrast, for organic matrices it was found that the interference was caused by a change in both aerosol transport and plasma thermal characteristics. The extent of the interferences caused by organic as well as inorganic compounds was compared for a set of 14 emission lines through a wide range of matrix concentrations. With a stirred tank, it is possible to choose an efficient internal standard for any given matrix composition. The time required to complete this procedure was shorter than 7 min.

  12. Use of stirred tanks for studying matrix effects caused by inorganic acids, easily ionized elements and organic solvents in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes, Eduardo; Maestre, Salvador E.; Todoli, Jose L.

    2006-01-01

    A stirred tank was used for the first time to elucidate the mechanism responsible for inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) matrix effects caused by inorganic, acids and easily ionized elements (EIEs), as well as organic, ethanol and acetic acid, compounds. In order to gradually increase the matrix concentration, a matrix solution was introduced inside a stirred container (tank) initially filled with an aqueous multielement standard. PolyTetraFluoroEthylene (PTFE) tubing was used to deliver the resulting solution to the liquid sample introduction system. Matrix concentration ranged from 0 to 2 mol l -1 in the case of inorganic acids (i.e., nitric, sulfuric, hydrochloric and a mixture of them), from 0 to about 2500 mg l -1 for EIEs (i.e., sodium, calcium and mixtures of both) and from 0% to 15%, w/w for organic compounds. Up to 40-50 different solutions were prepared and measured in a period of time shorter than 6-7 min. This investigation was carried out in terms of emission intensity and tertiary aerosols characteristics. The experimental setup used in the present work allowed to thoroughly study the effect of matrix concentration on analytical signal. Generally speaking, the experiments concerning tertiary aerosol characterization revealed that, in the case of inorganic acids and EIEs, the mechanism responsible for changes in aerosol characteristics was the droplet fission. In contrast, for organic matrices it was found that the interference was caused by a change in both aerosol transport and plasma thermal characteristics. The extent of the interferences caused by organic as well as inorganic compounds was compared for a set of 14 emission lines through a wide range of matrix concentrations. With a stirred tank, it is possible to choose an efficient internal standard for any given matrix composition. The time required to complete this procedure was shorter than 7 min

  13. SHORT COMMUNICATION SOLVENT FREE PREPARATION OF N ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    KEYWORDS: Solvent free, Maleanilic acids, Maleic anhydride, Aniline derivatives ... associated with the carboxylic group between 3275-2877 cm-1, the weak –NH .... Chemical shifts (σ/ppm) relative to TMS*. O-H N-H Ha. Hb. Hc. Hd. He. Hf.

  14. Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Leonard, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Advanced integrated solvent extraction systems are a series of novel solvent extraction (SX) processes that will remove and recover all of the major radioisotopes from acidic-dissolved sludge or other acidic high-level wastes. The major focus of this effort during the last 2 years has been the development of a combined cesium-strontium extraction/recovery process, the Combined CSEX-SREX Process. The Combined CSEX-SREX Process relies on a mixture of a strontium-selective macrocyclic polyether and a novel cesium-selective extractant based on dibenzo 18-crown-6. The process offers several potential advantages over possible alternatives in a chemical processing scheme for high-level waste treatment. First, if the process is applied as the first step in chemical pretreatment, the radiation level for all subsequent processing steps (e.g., transuranic extraction/recovery, or TRUEX) will be significantly reduced. Thus, less costly shielding would be required. The second advantage of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process is that the recovered Cs-Sr fraction is non-transuranic, and therefore will decay to low-level waste after only a few hundred years. Finally, combining individual processes into a single process will reduce the amount of equipment required to pretreat the waste and therefore reduce the size and cost of the waste processing facility. In an ongoing collaboration with Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO), the authors have successfully tested various segments of the Advanced Integrated Solvent Extraction Systems. Eichrom Industries, Inc. (Darien, IL) synthesizes and markets the Sr extractant and can supply the Cs extractant on a limited basis. Plans are under way to perform a test of the Combined CSEX-SREX Process with real waste at LMITCO in the near future.

  15. X-ray crystallographic study of 3-Oxo-2-{[4-(thiazol-2-ylsulfamoyl)-phenyl]-hydrazono}-butyric acid ethyl ester and its application in the solvent assisted naked eye sensing of Hg(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, K. K.; Upadhyay, Shalini; Kumar, Kamlesh; Prasad, Rajendra

    2009-06-01

    The 3-Oxo-2-{[4-(thiazol-2-ylsulfamoyl)-phenyl]-hydrazono}-butyric acid ethyl ester (OSPBE) was studied through single crystal structure analysis revealing some interesting supramolecular architectural patterns. The N(3)-N(4) bond length of OSPBE was found to be 1.36 Å matching well with reported N-N bond length in the literature and hence clearly proved that it is the keto form of OSPBE which is stable. Full structural optimization of OSPBE using density functional theory (DFT) at the HCTH407/6-31G ∗∗ level also proved that the keto form of OSPBE is stable. The UV-Vis absorption peaks for OSPBE predicted by the time dependent DFT at B3LYP/6-311G ∗∗ level matched quite well with the experimentally observed UV-Vis bands for OSPBE. The OSPBE was successfully tested as the naked eye sensor for Hg(II) as its chloride salt at the millimolar level in dimethylsulfoxide. A color change from red orange to olive green was observed on addition of 1.0 equiv. of Hg(II) to the 1.0 × 10 -3 M DMSO solution of the chemosensor. The role of DMSO in the sensing process appears to be the crucial one because the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) band of OSPBE in DMSO observed at 489 nm did not appear in the UV-Vis spectrum of OSPBE in nujol. The UV-Vis and 1H NMR titrations revealed that formation of six membered 1:1 chelate between OSPBE and Hg(II) along with reversible supramolecular association of DMSO with NH at N-2 position in OSPBE may be responsible for its Hg(II) sensing. No sensing for other d 10 metal ions like Zn(II) and Cd(II) were observed with OSPBE under similar conditions. Besides DMSO, some other polar aprotic solvents like DMF and acetone having X dbnd O (where X = C) also produced similar type of color change on the addition of 1.0 equiv. of Hg(II) to their respective 1.0 × 10 -3 M OSPBE solutions. Nevertheless, polar aprotic solvent like acetonitrile not having X dbnd O or non-polar aprotic solvent like chloroform no color change was observed under

  16. Study of the behaviour of some heavy elements in solvents containing hydrogen fluoride; Etude du comportement de quelques elements lourds dans des solvants a base d'acide fluorhydrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarnero, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-01-01

    The anhydrous liquid mixtures: dinitrogen tetroxide-hydrogen fluoride and antimony pentafluoride-hydrogen fluoride were studied as solvents for heavy elements interesting nuclear energy: uranium, thorium, zirconium and for some of their compounds. For N{sub 2}O{sub 4}-HF mixtures, electric conductivity measurements and liquid phase infrared spectra were also obtained. Uranium and zirconium tetrafluoride are much more soluble in N{sub 2}O{sub 4}-HF mixtures than in pure hydrogen fluoride. Uranium dissolved in these mixtures is pentavalent. In SbF{sub 5}-HF mixtures, uranium dissolves with hydrogen evolution and becomes trivalent. The solid compound resulting from the dissolution is a fluoro-antimonate: U(SbF{sub 6}){sub 3}. (author) [French] On a etudie les melanges liquides anhydres: peroxyde d'azote-acide fluorhydrique et pentafluorure d'antimoine-acide fluorhydrique comme solvants d'elements lourds interessant l'energie nucleaire: uranium, thorium, zirconium et de quelques uns de leurs composes. Pour les melanges N{sub 2}O{sub 4}-HF on a egalement effectue des mesures de conductivite electrique, ainsi que des spectres d'absorption infrarouge en phase liquide. Le tetrafluorure d'uranium et le tetrafluorure de zirconium sont beaucoup plus solubles dans les melanges N{sub 2}O{sub 4}-HF que dans l'acide fluorhydrique. L'uranium dissous dans ces melanges est a l'etat pentavalent. Dans les melanges SbF{sub 5}-HF l'uranium se dissout avec degagement d'hydrogene et passe a l'etat trivalent. Le compose solide resultant de la dissolution est un fluoantimoniate: U(SbF{sub 6}){sub 3}. (auteur)

  17. Microwave assisted solvent extraction and coupled-column reversed-phase liquid chromatography with UV detection use of an analytical restricted-access-medium column for the efficient multi-residue analysis of acidic pesticides in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogendoom, E A; Huls, R; Dijkman, E; Hoogerbrugge, R

    2001-12-14

    A screening method has been developed for the determination of acidic pesticides in various types of soils. Methodology is based on the use of microwave assisted solvent extraction (MASE) for fast and efficient extraction of the analytes from the soils and coupled-column reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC-LC) with UV detection at 228 nm for the instrumental analysis of uncleaned extracts. Four types of soils, including sand, clay and peat, with a range in organic matter content of 0.3-13% and ten acidic pesticides of different chemical families (bentazone, bromoxynil, metsulfuron-methyl, 2,4-D, MCPA, MCPP, 2,4-DP, 2,4,5-T, 2,4-DB and MCPB) were selected as matrices and analytes, respectively. The method developed included the selection of suitable MASE and LC-LC conditions. The latter consisted of the selection of a 5-microm GFF-II internal surface reversed-phase (ISRP, Pinkerton) analytical column (50 x 4.6 mm, I.D.) as the first column in the RAM-C18 configuration in combination with an optimised linear gradient elution including on-line cleanup of sample extracts and reconditioning of the columns. The method was validated with the analysis of freshly spiked samples and samples with aged residues (120 days). The four types of soils were spiked with the ten acidic pesticides at levels between 20 and 200 microg/kg. Weighted regression of the recovery data showed for most analyte-matrix combinations, including freshly spiked samples and aged residues, that the method provides overall recoveries between 60 and 90% with relative standard deviations of the intra-laboratory reproducibility's between 5 and 25%; LODs were obtained between 5 and 50 microg/kg. Evaluation of the data set with principal component analysis revealed that the parameters (i) increase of organic matter content of the soil samples and (ii) aged residues negatively effect the recovery of the analytes.

  18. Compound forming extractants, solvating solvents and inert solvents IUPAC chemical data series

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y; Kertes, A S

    2013-01-01

    Equilibrium Constants of Liquid-Liquid Distribution Reactions, Part III: Compound Forming Extractants, Solvating Solvents, and Inert Solvents focuses on the compilation of equilibrium constants of various compounds, such as acids, ions, salts, and aqueous solutions. The manuscript presents tables that show the distribution reactions of carboxylic and sulfonic acid extractants and their dimerization and other reactions in the organic phase and extraction reactions of metal ions from aqueous solutions. The book also states that the inorganic anions in these solutions are irrelevant, since they d

  19. Purex process solvent: literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, R.G.

    1979-10-01

    This document summarizes the data on Purex process solvent presently published in a variety of sources. Extracts from these various sources are presented herein and contain the work done, the salient results obtained, and the original, unaltered conclusions of the author of each paper. Three major areas are addressed: solvent stability, solvent quality testing, and solvent treatment processes. 34 references, 44 tables.

  20. Purex process solvent: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, R.G.

    1979-10-01

    This document summarizes the data on Purex process solvent presently published in a variety of sources. Extracts from these various sources are presented herein and contain the work done, the salient results obtained, and the original, unaltered conclusions of the author of each paper. Three major areas are addressed: solvent stability, solvent quality testing, and solvent treatment processes. 34 references, 44 tables

  1. Double Solvent for Extracting Rare Earth Concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bintarti, AN; Bambang EHB

    2007-01-01

    An extraction process to rare earth concentrate which contain elements were yttrium (Y), lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), neodymium (Nd), samarium (Sm), gadolinium (Gd) and dysprosium (Dy) which were dissolved in to nitric acid has been done. The experiment of the extraction by double solvent in batch to mix 10 ml of the feed with 10 ml solvent contained the pair of solvent was TBP and TOA, D2EHPA and TOA, TBP and D2EHPA in cyclohexane as tinner. It was selected a right pairs of solvent for doing variation such as the acidity of the feed from 2 - 6 M and the time of stirring from 5 - 25 minutes gave the good relatively extraction condition to Dy element such as using 10 % volume of TOA in D2EHPA and cyclohexane, the acidity of the feed 3 M and the time stirring 15 minutes produced coefficient distribution to dysprosium = 0.586 and separation factor Dy-Ce = ∼ (unlimited); Dy-Nd = 4.651. (author)

  2. Solvent-free preparation of polylactic acid fibers by melt electrospinning using umbrella-like spray head and alleviation of problematic thermal degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Melt electrospinning is an even simpler and safer method compared with the solution electrospinning in the production of ultra-fine fibers. Polylactic acid (PLA is a biodegradable and resorbable aliphatic ester that has received significant attention in recent years. PLA is easily degradable at high temperature in the process of melt electrospinning. High efficient fibers were made using our designed umbrella-like spray head spinning facility in this work. To find how to alleviate the problematic degradation and what factors could be relevant to degradation, temperature, relative molecular mass, Differential Scanning Calorimeter and X-ray Diffraction patterns before and after spinning were investigated and compared with each other. Results showed that fibers were facile shorten and fractured when spun at 245°C while the relative molecular mass of PLA fibers decreased markedly as compared with that spun at 210°C. To hinder the degradation, couple of experimental efforts were implemented with adding antioxidants, raising spinning voltage, lowering temperature, and reducing residence time. After such efforts, it was observed that the relative molecular mass of the PLA fibers was higher than those without inputting any efforts. The effect of antioxidant 1010 was found the most promising on the alleviation of PLA problematic thermal degradation.

  3. Fluorometric determination of aluminium (III) and cadmium (II) by solvent extraction of the ternary complex composed of metal ion, 8-hydroxy-5-quinolinesulfonic acid, and methyltrioctylammonium ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, Yukihiro; Kataoka, Masamitsu; Kambara, Tomihito

    1982-01-01

    A fluorometric micro determination of aluminium (III) and cadmium (II) using the formation of metal-8-hydroxy-5-quinolinesulfonic acid-capriquat (methyltrioctylammonium) ternary complex is described. These complexes are easily extracted into chloroform phase and the extract emits a strong fluorescence. Spectra of aluminium (III) and cadmium (II) ternary complexes have the excitation maximum at 396 nm and 400 nm, and emission maximum at 501 nm and 524 nm, respectively. Fluorescence intensity of the aluminium (III) and cadmium (II) ternary complexes extracted into chloroform showed the constant and maximum values in the pH range of aqueous phase from 5.3 to 8.5 and 8.1 to 8.5, respectively. The calibration curves for aluminium (III) and cadmium (II) show good proportionality int the concentration range from 0.5 to 5.0 and 1.0 to 50.0 μg, respectively. The relative standard deviation observed with four measurements was found to be 1.8% for 0.5 μg of aluminium (III) and 1.1% for 10.0 μg of cadmium (II). The effect of diverse ions is studied and a 25-fold amount of Cu(II), Ni(II), Fe(II), Fe(III) in weight gave errors, however, the interferences were easily eliminated by the addition of appropriate masking agent. In the determination of cadmium (II), an equal amount of Co(II), Ni(II), Mn(II), Fe(III) and twice amount of Al(III) gave negative errors, however, the interference of Fe(III) and Al(III) were also eliminated as above. (author)

  4. Separation by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, C.H. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    In a process for separating fission product values from U and Pu values contained in an aqueous solution, an oxidizing agent is added to the solution to secure U and Pu in their hexavalent state. The aqueous solution is contacted with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent with agitation while the temperature is maintained at from -1 to -2 0 C until the major part of the water present is frozen. The solid ice phase is continuously separated as it is formed and a remaining aqueous liquid phase containing fission product values and a solvent phase containing Pu and U values are separated from each other. The last obtained part of the ice phase is melted and added to the separated liquid phase. The resulting liquid is treated with a new supply of solvent whereby it is practically depleted of U and Pu

  5. Cleaning of spent solvent and method of processing cleaning liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Masaki; Kawada, Tomio; Tamura, Nobuhiko.

    1993-01-01

    Spent solvents discharged from a solvent extracting step mainly comprise n-dodecane and TBP and contain nuclear fission products and solvent degradation products. The spent solvents are cleaned by using a sodium chloride free detergent comprising hydrazine oxalate and hydrazine carbonate in a solvent cleaning device. Nitric acid is added to the cleaning liquid wastes containing spent detergents extracted from the solvent cleaning device, to control an acid concentration. The detergent liquid wastes of controlled acid concentration are sent to an electrolysis oxidation bath as electrolytes and electrochemically decomposed in carbonic acid gas, nitrogen gas and hydrogen gas. The decomposed gases are processed as off gases. The decomposed liquid wastes are processed as a waste nitric acid solution. This can provide more effective cleaning. In addition, the spent detergent can be easily decomposed in a room temperature region. Accordingly, the amount of wastes can be decreased. (I.N.)

  6. Organic solvent topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  7. Organic solvent topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  8. Organic solvent topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-01-01

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed

  9. Organic solvent topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel

  10. DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computer-aided design of chemicals and chemical mixtures provides a powerful tool to help engineers identify cleaner process designs and more-benign alternatives to toxic industrial solvents. Three software programs are discussed: (1) PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replaceme...

  11. Uranium refining by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraikaew, J.; Srinuttrakul, W.

    2014-01-01

    The solvent extraction process to produce higher purity uranium from yellowcake was studied in laboratory scale. Yellowcake, which the uranium purity is around 70% and the main impurity is thorium, was obtained from monazite processing pilot plant of Rare Earth Research and Development Center in Thailand. For uranium re-extraction process, the extractant chosen was Tributylphosphate (TBP) in kerosene. It was found that the optimum concentration of TBP was 10% in kerosene and the optimum nitric acid concentration in uranyl nitrate feed solution was 4 N. An increase in concentrations of uranium and thorium in feed solution resulted in a decrease in the distribution of both components in the extractant. However, the distribution of uranium into the extractant was found to be more than that of thorium. The equilibration study of the extraction system, UO_2(NO_3)/4N HNO_3 – 10%TBP/Kerosene, was also investigated. Two extraction stages were calculated graphically from 100,000 ppm uranium concentration in feed solution input with 90% extraction efficiency and the flow ratio of aqueous phase to organic phase was adjusted to 1.0. For thorium impurity scrubbing process, 10% TBP in kerosene was loaded with uranium and minor thorium from uranyl nitrate solution prepared from yellowcake and was scrubbed with different low concentration nitric acid. The results showed that at nitric acid normality was lower than 1 N, uranium distributed well to aqueous phase. As conclusion, optimum nitric acid concentration for scrubbing process should not less than 1 N and diluted nitric acid or de-ionized water should be applied to strip uranium from organic phase in the final refining process. (author)

  12. Desulfurization of Diesel Fuel by Oxidation and Solvent Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadood Taher Mohammed

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This research presents a study in ultra-desulfurization of diesel fuel produced from conventional hydro desulfurization process, using oxidation and solvent extraction techniques. Dibenzothiophene (DBT was the organosulfur compound that had been detected in sulfur removal. The oxidation process used hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant and acetic acid as homogeneous catalyst . The solvent extraction process used acetonitrile (ACN and N-methyl – 2 - pyrrolidone (NMP as extractants . Also the effect of five parameters (stirring speed :150 , 250 , 350 , and 450 rpm, temperature (30 , 40 , 45 , and 50 oC, oxidant/simulated diesel fuel ratio (0.5 , 0.75 , 1 , and 1.5 , catalyst/oxidant ratio(0.125,0.25,0.5,and0.75 , and solvent/simulated diesel fuel ratio(0.5,0.6,0.75,and1 were examined as well as solvent type. The results exhibit that the highest removal of sulfur is 98.5% using NMP solvent while it is 95.8% for ACN solvent. The set of conditions that show the highest sulfur removal is: stirring speed of 350 rpm , temperature 50oC , oxidant/simulated diesel fuel ratio 1 , catalyst/oxidant ratio 0.5 , solvent/simulated diesel fuel ratio 1. These best conditions were applied upon real diesel fuel (produced from Al-Dora refinerywith 1000 ppm sulfur content . It was found that sulfur removal was 64.4% using ACN solvent and 75% using NMP solvent.

  13. Measuring solvent barrier properties of paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollström, Roger; Saarinen, Jarkko J; Toivakka, Martti; Räty, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    New methods for measuring barrier properties against solvents, acids and bases on dispersion coated paper were developed and investigated. Usability, reliability and repeatability were compared both between the new methods and with the standardized method for measuring barrier properties against water vapor. Barrier properties could be measured with all methods and the results obtained by the different methods were in correlation with each other. A qualitative method based on a trace color provided an indicative result, whereas further developed methods also took into account the durability. The effective barrier lifetime could be measured by measuring the conductivity through the substrate as a function of time, or by utilizing a glass prism where the change in refractive index caused by penetrated liquid was monitored, also as a function of time. Barrier properties against water and humidity were also measured and were found not to be predictors for barrier properties against either solvents, or acids or bases, which supports the need to develop new methods

  14. Solvent extraction studies on cadmium. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alian, A.; Badran, A.; El-Bassiouny, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    An extraction study was performed on tracer concentrations of cadmium, zinc and silver halides in absence and presence of phosphoric acid. A long chain amine (Amberlite LA-2) and an organophosphorus solvent (TBP) have been investigated. Since orthophosphoric acid was found to have a similar role as sulphuric acid, it was interesting to carry out a systematic investigation on the extraction behaviour of the halides of the three elements Cs, Zn and Ag in orthophosphoric acid medium. The separation of Cd from Zn or Ag is frequently encountered in chemical as well as radiochemical analysis. The results presented here give many possibilities for such separation. Amberlite LA-2 was always used as 5 vol% and TBP as 50 vol% in benzene. The presence of phosphoric acid was found to enhance considerably the extraction of most halides. The mechanism of extraction has been discussed in light of the obtained results. (T.G.)

  15. Solvent selection methodology for pharmaceutical processes: Solvent swap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadakis, Emmanouil; Kumar Tula, Anjan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2016-01-01

    A method for the selection of appropriate solvents for the solvent swap task in pharmaceutical processes has been developed. This solvent swap method is based on the solvent selection method of Gani et al. (2006) and considers additional selection criteria such as boiling point difference...... in pharmaceutical processes as well as new solvent swap alternatives. The method takes into account process considerations such as batch distillation and crystallization to achieve the swap task. Rigorous model based simulations of the swap operation are performed to evaluate and compare the performance...

  16. Improvements in solvent extraction columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aughwane, K.R.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent extraction columns are used in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel. For an effective reprocessing operation a solvent extraction column is required which is capable of distributing the feed over most of the column. The patent describes improvements in solvent extractions columns which allows the feed to be distributed over an increased length of column than was previously possible. (U.K.)

  17. Solvent extraction columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, P.; Smith, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    In pulsed columns for use in solvent extraction processes, e.g. the reprocessing of nuclear fuel, the horizontal perforated plates inside the column are separated by interplate spacers manufactured from metallic neutron absorbing material. The spacer may be in the form of a spiral or concentric circles separated by radial limbs, or may be of egg-box construction. Suitable neutron absorbing materials include stainless steel containing boron or gadolinium, hafnium metal or alloys of hafnium. (UK)

  18. Hazardous solvent substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twitchell, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    Eliminating hazardous solvents is good for the environment, worker safety, and the bottom line. However, even though we are motivated to find replacements, the big question is 'What can we use as replacements for hazardous solvents?'You, too, can find replacements for your hazardous solvents. All you have to do is search for them. Search through the vendor literature of hundreds of companies with thousands of products. Ponder the associated material safety data sheets, assuming of course that you can obtain them and, having obtained them, that you can read them. You will want to search the trade magazines and other sources for product reviews. You will want to talk to users about how well the product actually works. You may also want to check US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other government reports for toxicity and other safety information. And, of course, you will want to compare the product's constituent chemicals with the many hazardous constituency lists to ensure the safe and legal use of the product in your workplace

  19. SOLVENT FIRE BY-PRODUCTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-05-22

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) conducted a burn test of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent to determine the combustion products. The testing showed hydrogen fluoride gas is not a combustion product from a solvent fire when up to 70% of the solvent is consumed. The absence of HF in the combustion gases may reflect concentration of the modifier containing the fluoride groups in the unburned portion. SwRI reported results for other gases (CO, HCN, NOx, formaldehyde, and hydrocarbons). The results, with other supporting information, can be used for evaluating the consequences of a facility fire involving the CSSX solvent inventory.

  20. Solvent Retention Capacities of Oat Flour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianwen Niu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study measured the solvent retention capacities (SRCs of flours from eight oat varieties and one wheat variety against different solvents to explore the swelling volume of oat flour with different solvents, and thus provide a theoretical basis for quick β-glucan analysis. The SRC profile consists of water SRC (WSRC, 50% sucrose SRC (SSRC, 5% lactic acid SRC (LASRC, 5% Na2CO3 SRC (SCASRC, NaCl SRC (SCSRC, CaCl2 SRC (CCSRC, FeCl3 SRC (FCSRC, sodium cholate SRC (SCHSRC, NaOH (pH 10 SRC (SHSRC, Na2CO3 (pH 10 SRC (SCABSRC and SDS (pH 10 SRC (SDSSRC values, and a Chopin SRC kit was used to measure the SRC value. SRCs of the oat flours increased when the solvents turned from neutral (water and NaCl to acidic (5% lactic acid or alkaline (5% Na2CO3, CaCl2, FeCl3, NaOH and pH 10 Na2CO3, and rose as the metal ion valencies of the metal salts (NaCl, CaCl2 and FeCl3 increased. The β-glucan contents were significantly positively correlated with the SCSRC (0.83**, CCSRC (0.82**, SCHSRC (0.80** and FCSRC (0.78*. SRC measurements of β-glucan in oat flours revealed that the CCSRC values were related with β-glucan (0.64* but not related with protein and starch. CaCl2 could therefore potentially be exploited as a reagent for β-glucan assay.

  1. Desulfurization of Diesel Fuel by Oxidation and Solvent Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Wadood Taher Mohammed; Raghad Fareed Kassim Almilly; Sheam Bahjat Abdulkareem Al-Ali

    2015-01-01

    This research presents a study in ultra-desulfurization of diesel fuel produced from conventional hydro desulfurization process, using oxidation and solvent extraction techniques. Dibenzothiophene (DBT) was the organosulfur compound that had been detected in sulfur removal. The oxidation process used hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant and acetic acid as homogeneous catalyst . The solvent extraction process used acetonitrile (ACN) and N-methyl – 2 - pyrrolidone (NMP) as extractants . Also the ef...

  2. Compressed air-assisted solvent extraction (CASX) for metal removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chi-Wang; Chen, Yi-Ming; Hsiao, Shin-Tien

    2008-03-01

    A novel process, compressed air-assisted solvent extraction (CASX), was developed to generate micro-sized solvent-coated air bubbles (MSAB) for metal extraction. Through pressurization of solvent with compressed air followed by releasing air-oversaturated solvent into metal-containing wastewater, MSAB were generated instantaneously. The enormous surface area of MSAB makes extraction process extremely fast and achieves very high aqueous/solvent weight ratio (A/S ratio). CASX process completely removed Cr(VI) from acidic electroplating wastewater under A/S ratio of 115 and extraction time of less than 10s. When synthetic wastewater containing Cd(II) of 50mgl(-1) was treated, A/S ratios of higher than 714 and 1190 could be achieved using solvent with extractant/diluent weight ratio of 1:1 and 5:1, respectively. Also, MSAB have very different physical properties, such as size and density, compared to the emulsified solvent droplets, making separation and recovery of solvent from treated effluent very easy.

  3. The role of the resid solvent in coprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this project is to determine the role of petroleum resid in coprocessing of coal and resid. The question being asked is whether the resid is a reactant in the system or whether the resid is a merely a diluent that is being simultaneously upgraded? To fulfill the objective the hydrogen transfer from model compounds, naphthenes that represent petroleum resids to model acceptors is being determined. The specificity of different catalytic systems for promoting the hydrogen transfer from naphthenes to model acceptors and to coal is also being determined. In addition the efficacy of hydrogen transfer from and solvancy of whole and specific resid fractions under coprocessing conditions is being determined.

  4. Solvent effects in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Buncel, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces the concepts, theory and experimental knowledge concerning solvent effects on the rate and equilibrium of chemical reactions of all kinds.  It begins with basic thermodynamics and kinetics, building on this foundation to demonstrate how a more detailed understanding of these effects may be used to aid in determination of reaction mechanisms, and to aid in planning syntheses. Consideration is given to theoretical calculations (quantum chemistry, molecular dynamics, etc.), to statistical methods (chemometrics), and to modern day concerns such as ""green"" chemistry, where ut

  5. Model compounds for heavy crude oil components and tetrameric acids: Characterization and interfacial behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordgaard, Erland Loeken

    2009-07-01

    The tendency during the past decades in the quality of oil reserves shows that conventional crude oil is gradually being depleted and the demand being replaced by heavy crude oils. These oils contain more of a class high-molecular weight components termed asphaltenes. This class is mainly responsible for stable water-in-crude oil emulsions. Both heavy and lighter crude oils in addition contain substantial amounts of naphthenic acids creating naphthenate deposits in topside facilities. The asphaltene class is defined by solubility and consists of several thousand different structures which may behave differently in oil-water systems. The nature of possible sub fractions of the asphaltene has been received more attention lately, but still the properties and composition of such is not completely understood. In this work, the problem has been addressed by synthesizing model compounds for the asphaltenes, on the basis that an acidic function incorporated could be crucial. Such acidic, poly aromatic surfactants turned out to be highly inter facially active as studied by the pendant drop technique. Langmuir monolayer compressions combined with fluorescence of deposited films indicated that the interfacial activity was a result of an efficient packing of the aromatic cores in the molecules, giving stabilizing interactions at the o/w interface. Droplet size distributions of emulsions studied by PFG NMR and adsorption onto hydrophilic silica particles demonstrated the high affinity to o/w interfaces and that the efficient packing gave higher emulsion stability. Comparing to a model compound lacking the acidic group, it was obvious that sub fractions of asphaltenes that contain an acidic, or maybe similar hydrogen bonding functions, could be responsible for stable w/o emulsions. Indigenous tetrameric acids are the main constituent of calcium naphthenate deposits. Several synthetic model tetra acids have been prepared and their properties have been compared to the indigenous

  6. The solvent absorption-extractive distillation (SAED) process for ethanol recovery from gas/vapor streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, M.C.

    1993-12-31

    A low energy system for ethanol recovery and dehydration has been developed. This system utilizes a solvent for (1) absorption of ethanol vapors, and then the same solvent for (2) extractive distillation. The ideal solvent for this process would have a high affinity for ethanol, and no affinity for water. Heavy alcohols such as dodecanol, and tridecanol, some phosphorals, and some fatty acids have been determined to meet the desired specifications. These solvents have the effect of making water more volatile than ethanol. Thus, a water stream is taken off initially in the dehydration column, and a near anhydrous ethanol stream is recovered from the ethanol/solvent stripper column. Thus the solvent serves dual uses (1) absorption media, and (2) dehydration media. The SAED process as conceptualized would use a solvent similar to solvents used for direct extractive separation of ethanol from aqueous ethanol solutions.

  7. Solvent effects in the synergistic solvent extraction of Co2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandil, A.T.; Ramadan, A.

    1979-01-01

    The extraction of Co 2+ from a 0.1M ionic strength aqueous phase (Na + , CH 3 COOH) of pH = 5.1 was studied using thenoyltrifluoroacetone, HTTA, in eight different solvents and HTTA + trioctylphosphine oxide, TOPO, in the same solvents. A comparison of the effect of solvent dielectric constant on the equilibrium constant shows a synergism as a result of the increased hydrophobic character imparted to the metal complex due to the formation of the TOPO adduct. (author)

  8. Molecular and ionic hydrogen bond formation in fluorous solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Kristi L; Weber, Stephen G

    2009-01-08

    There are only a few studies of noncovalent association in fluorous solvents and even fewer that are quantitative. A full understanding, particularly of stoichiometry and binding strength of noncovalent interactions in fluorous solvents could be very useful in improved molecular-receptor-based extractions, advancements in sensor technologies, crystal engineering, and supramolecular chemistry. This work investigates hydrogen bonding between heterocyclic bases and a perfluoropolyether with a terminal carboxylic acid group (Krytox 157FSH (1)), chiefly in FC-72 (a mixture of perfluorohexanes). In particular, we were interested in whether or not proton transfer occurs, and if so, under what conditions in H-bonded complexes. Continuous variations experiments show that in FC-72 weaker bases (pyrazine, pyrimidine, and quinazoline) form 1:1 complexes with 1, whereas stronger bases (quinoline, pyridine, and isoquinoline) form 1:3 complexes. Ultraviolet and infrared spectral signatures reveal that the 1:1 complexes are molecular (B.HA) whereas the 1:3 complexes are ionic (BH+.A-HAHA). Infrared spectra of 1:3 ionic complexes are discussed in detail. Literature and experimental data on complexes between N-heterocyclic bases and carboxylic acids in a range of solvents are compiled to compare solvent effects on proton transfer. Polar solvents support ionic hydrogen bonds at a 1:1 mol ratio. In nonpolar organic solvents, ionic hydrogen bonds are only observed in complexes with 1:2 (base/acid) stoichiometries. In fluorous solvents, a larger excess of acid, 1:3, is necessary to facilitate proton transfer in hydrogen bonds between carboxylic acids and the bases studied.

  9. Molecular and supramolecular speciations of solvent extraction systems based on malonamide and/or dialkyl-phosphoric acids for An(III)/Ln(III); Speciations moleculaire et supramoleculaire de systemes d'extraction liquide-liquide a base de malonamide et/ou d'acides dialkylphosphoriques pour la separation An(III)/Ln(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gannaz, B

    2006-06-15

    The solvent extraction system used in the DIAMEX-SANEX process, developed for the actinide(III)/lanthanide(III) separation, is based on the use of mixtures of the malonamide DMDOHEMA and a dialkyl-phosphoric acid (HDEHP or HDHP), in hydrogenated tetra-propylene. The complexity of these systems urges on a novel approach to improve the conventional methods (thermodynamics, solvent extraction) which hardly explain the macroscopic behaviors observed (3. phase, over-stoichiometry). This approach combines studies on both supramolecular (VPO, SANS, SAXS) and molecular (liquid-liquid extraction, ESI-MS, IR, EXAFS) speciations of single extractant systems (DMDOHEMA or HDHP in in n-dodecane) and their mixture. In spite of safety constraints due to the handling of radio-material, they were used in the studies as much as possible, like for SAXS measurements on americium-containing samples, a worldwide first-time. In each of the investigated systems, actinides(III) and lanthanides(III) are extracted to the organic phase in polar cores of reversed micelles, the inner and outer-sphere compositions of which are proposed. Thus, the 4f and 5f cations are extracted by reversed micelles such as [(DMDOHEMA){sub 2}M(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sub inn} (DMDOHEMA){sub x}(HNO{sub 3}){sub z}(H{sub 2}O){sub w}]{sub out} and M(DHP){sub 3}(HDHP){sub y-3}(H{sub 2}O){sub w} with y = 3 to 6, for the single extractant systems. In the case of the two extractants system, the less concentrated one acts like a co-surfactant regarding the mixed aggregate formation [(DMDOHEMA){sub 2}M(NO{sub 3}){sub 3-v}(DHP){sub v}]{sub inn} [(DMDOFIEMA){sub x}(HDHP){sub y}(HNO{sub 3})z(H{sub 2}O){sub w}]{sub out}. (author)

  10. Chemistry and electrochemistry in trifluoroacetic acid. Comparison with acetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, Gerard

    1972-01-01

    As the trifluoroacetic acid is, with the acetic acid, one of most often used carboxylic acids as solvent, notably in organic chemistry, this research thesis addresses some relatively simple complexing and redox reactions to highlight the peculiar feature of this acid, and to explain its very much different behaviour with respect to acetic acid. The author develops the notion of acidity level in solvents of low dielectric constant. The second part addresses a specific solvent: BF 3 (CH 3 COOH) 2 . The boron trifluoride strengthens the acidity of acetic acid and modifies its chemical and physical-chemical properties. In the third part, the author compares solvent properties of CF 3 COOH and CH 3 COOH. Noticed differences explain why the trifluoroacetic acid is a more interesting reaction environment than acetic acid for reactions such as electrophilic substitutions or protein solubilisation [fr

  11. Accumulation of solvent-soluble and solvent-insoluble antioxidant phenolics in edible bean sprouts: implication of germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren-You Gan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Edible bean sprouts are popular fresh vegetables widely recognized for their nutritional quality. However, while their antioxidant capacity and phenolic composition in both solvent-soluble and solvent-insoluble extracts has not been systematically evaluated. Methods: The antioxidant capacity and phenolic composition in both solvent-soluble and solvent-insoluble fractions of 12 cultivars of edible bean sprouts were evaluated, and relationships of antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content were also analyzed. Results: Sprouts demonstrated a wide range of antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content, with lower but substantial antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content in the solvent-insoluble fractions. Highest levels were found in the green mung bean sprout. Phenolic compounds, such as catechin, ellagic acid, ferulic acid, gallic acid and p-coumaric acid were widely detected in these sprouts. Additionally, a positive correlation was discovered between antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content in these edible bean sprouts. Conclusions: Germination generally resulted in the accumulation of antioxidant phenolics in the most edible bean sprouts. Edible bean sprouts with high antioxidant phenolics can be valuable natural sources of dietary antioxidants for the prevention of oxidative stress-related chronic diseases.

  12. Recent progress in actinide and lanthanide solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musikas, C.; Hubert, H.; Benjelloun, N.; Vitorge, P.; Bonnin, M.; Forchioni, A.; Chachaty, C.

    1983-04-01

    Work in progress on actinide solvent extraction is briefly reviewed in this paper. 1 H and 31 P NMR are used to elucidate several fundamental unsolved problems concerning organophosphorous extractants often used in actinides extraction: determination of site of dialkylthiophosphate protonation and addition of basic phosphine oxide to dibutylthiophosphoric acid dimer. Extraction of Am III and Eu from high radioactivity level wastes by tetrasubsituted methylene diamides is investigated. Trivalent actinide-lanthanide group are separated by solvent extraction using soft donor ligand complexes which are more stable. The synergism of dinonylnaphtalene sulfonic acid (HDNNS) associated with several neutral donors like TBP, TOPO, amides are examined in the trivalent and tetravalent actinide extraction

  13. Purification of degraded TBP solvent using macroreticular anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartha, P.K.S.; Kutty, P.V.E.; Janaradanan, C.; Ramanujam, A.; Dhumwad, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) diluted with a suitable diluent is commonly used for solvent extraction in Purex process for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from irradiated nuclear fuels. This solvent gets degraded due to various factors, the main degradation product being dibutyl phosphoric acid (HDBP). A solvent cleanup step is generally incorporated in the process for removing the degradation products from the used solvent. A liquid-liquid cleanup system using sodium carbonate or sodium hydroxide solution is routinely used. Considering certain advantages, like the possibility of loading the resin almost to saturation capacity and the subsequent disposal of the spent resin by incineration and the feasibility of adopting it to the process, a liquid-solid system has been tried as an alternate method, employing various available macroreticular anion exchange resins in OH - form for the sorption of HDBP from TBP. After standardizing the various conditions for the satisfactory removal of HDBP from TBP using synthetic mixtures, resins were tested with process solvent in batch contacts. The parameters studied were (1) capacity of different resins for HDBP sorption (2) influence of acidity, uranium and HDBP on the sorption behaviour of the latter (3) removal of fission products from the solvent by the resin and (4) regeneration and recycling of the resin. (author). 2 figs., 13 tabs., 17 refs

  14. Solvent refining of low-temperature tar with liquid ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, K

    1953-01-01

    The middle fractions of low-temperature tar were treated with mixed solutions of H/sub 2/O and liquid NH/sub 3/ at 0/sup 0/ and 20/sup 0/, and with liquid NH/sub 3/ at -10, 0, + 10, and 20/sup 0/, and phase equilibrium between tar acids, neutral oil, and solvents were studied. The distribution ratio ranged from less than 1 to greater than 1 when the solvent contained about 20 percent (by weight) H/sub 2/O. When the solvent contained less than 85 percent (by weight) NH/sub 3/, the yield of extract was small but the purity of phenols in the extracted oil was above 90 percent. Solvent containing about 85 percent NH/sub 3/ (by weight) is considered optimum for separating tar acids from oils. A novel definition is proposed for solvent selectivity as the difference between the concentration of the solute in the extract layer, on a solvent-free basis, and the concentration in the raffinate layer.

  15. Synthesis of SERS active Au nanowires in different noncoordinating solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou Xiaomiao; Zhang Xiaoling, E-mail: zhangxl@bit.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, School of Science (China); Fang Yan, E-mail: fangyan@mail.cnu.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory for Nano-Photonics and Nano-Structure (NPNS), Capital Normal University (China); Chen Shutang; Li Na; Zhou Qi [Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, School of Science (China)

    2011-06-15

    Au nanowires with length up to micrometers were synthesized through a simple and one-pot solution growth method. HAuCl{sub 4} was reduced in a micellar structure formed by 1-octadecylamine and oleic acid in hexane, heptane, toluene and chloroform, respectively. As the non-polarity of noncoordinating solvents can affect the nucleation and growth rates of Au nanostructures, Au nanowires with different diameters could be obtained by changing the noncoordinating solvents in the synthetic process. The influences of the solvents on the morphology of Au nanowires were systematically studied. When using hexane as reaction solvent, the product turned to be high portion of Au nanowires with more uniform size than the others. Furthermore, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrum of 2-thionaphthol was obtained on the Au nanowire-modified substrate, indicating that the as-synthesized Au nanowires have potential for highly sensitive optical detection application.

  16. Recovery of plutonium from solvent wash solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyser, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    A number of potential alternatives to the acid hydrolysis recovery of Pu were investigated. The most promising alternative for short-term use appears to be an anion exchange process that would eliminate the long boiling times and the multiple-pass concentration steps needed with the solvent extraction process because it separates the Pu from the dibutyl phosphate (DBP) while at the same time concentrating the Pu. However, restart of the Primary Recovery Column (PRC) to process this solution would require significant administrative effort. The original boiling recovery by acid hydrolysis followed by solvent extraction is probably the most expedient way to process the Pu-DBP-carbonate solution currently stored in tank 13.5 even with its long processing times and dilute product concentration. Anion exchange of a heat stabilized acidified solution is a more efficient process, but requires restart of the PRC. Extended-boiling acid hydrolysis or anion exchange of a heat stabilized acidified solution provide two well developed alternatives for recovery of the Pu from the tank 13.5 carbonate. Further work defining additional recovery processes is not planned at this time

  17. Selection and design of solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul

    and design of solvents will be presented together with application examples. The selection problem is defined as finding known chemicals that match the desired functions of a solvent for a specified set of applications. The design problem is defined as finding the molecular structure (or mixture of molecules....... With increasing interest on issues such as waste, sustainability, environmental impact and green chemistry, the selection and design of solvents have become important problems that need to be addressed during chemical product-process design and development. Systematic methods and tools suitable for selection......) that match the desired functions of a solvent for a specified set of applications. Use of organic chemicals and ionic liquids as solvents will be covered....

  18. Solvent extraction studies on cadmium Part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alian, A.; El-Kot, A.

    1976-01-01

    An extraction study was performed on various concentrations of cadmium, zinc and cobalt halides in the presence of sulphuric acid. A long chain amine (Amberlite LA-2) and an organophosphorus solvent (TBP) were used. In most cases the value of the distribution ratio decreases with the increase of metal concentration in the aqueous phase. The various possibilities of chemical and radiochemical separations of cadmium from accompanying metal species are reported: separation of (sup109m)Ag from irradiated Cd targets, separation of (sup115m)In using HDEHP, separation of Cd and Zn from their mixtures. (T.G.)

  19. Aerosols released from solvent fire accidents in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, S.; Lindner, W.

    1985-01-01

    Thermodynamic, aerosol characterizing and radiological data of solvent fires in reprocessing plants have been established in experiments. These are the main results: Depending on the ventilation in the containment, kerosene-TBP mixtures burn at a rate up to 120 kg/m 2 h. The aqueous phase of inorganic-organic mixtures might be released during the fire. The gaseous reaction products contain unburnable acidic compounds. Solvents with TBP-nitrate complex shows higher (up to 25%) burning rates than pure solvents (kerosene-TBP). The nitrate complex decomposes violently at about 130 0 C with a release of acid and unburnable gases. Up to 20% of the burned kerosene-TBP solvents are released during the fire in the form of soot particles, phosphoric acid and TBP decomposition products. The particles have an aerodynamic mass median diameter of about 0.5 μm and up to 1.5% of the uranium fixed in the TBP-nitrate complex is released during solvent fires. (orig.)

  20. ASAView: Database and tool for solvent accessibility representation in proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawareh Hamed

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accessible surface area (ASA or solvent accessibility of amino acids in a protein has important implications. Knowledge of surface residues helps in locating potential candidates of active sites. Therefore, a method to quickly see the surface residues in a two dimensional model would help to immediately understand the population of amino acid residues on the surface and in the inner core of the proteins. Results ASAView is an algorithm, an application and a database of schematic representations of solvent accessibility of amino acid residues within proteins. A characteristic two-dimensional spiral plot of solvent accessibility provides a convenient graphical view of residues in terms of their exposed surface areas. In addition, sequential plots in the form of bar charts are also provided. Online plots of the proteins included in the entire Protein Data Bank (PDB, are provided for the entire protein as well as their chains separately. Conclusions These graphical plots of solvent accessibility are likely to provide a quick view of the overall topological distribution of residues in proteins. Chain-wise computation of solvent accessibility is also provided.

  1. Molecular accessibility in solvent swelled coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kispert, L.D.

    1993-02-01

    An EPR technique developed in this lab is being used to determine the pore size and number distribution changes after swelling the coal samples with various solvents. Stable nitroxide radical spin probes of different sizes, shapes and reactivity are dissolved in an appropriate solvent, the coal sample is added to the resulting solution, stirred over night at elevated temperature, filtered, washed with a non swelling solvent to eliminate any spin probes that are not trapped in the pores and the spin concentration is measured. Comparing these spin probe measurements to DRIFT data have shown that the relative number distribution of acidic functionalities can be accurately predicted by the spin probe method. The spin probe method had also been used to predict the increase in elongated voids in Pittsburgh No. 8 (APCS No. 4) upon swelling with pyridine in agreement with independent SANS data. NMR relaxation data show that it is possible to deduce the pore (accessibility) distribution as a function of size (up to 6 mn). It has also been possible by variable temperature and ENDOR measurements to determine the presence of hydrogen bonding as a function of pore shape and size. The advantage of the EPR method is that it permits molecules of selected shape and size to be used as probes of accessible regions of coal, thus providing information on the importance of molecular shape.

  2. Solvent effects in ionic liquids: empirical linear energy-density relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda-Monje, A; Aizman, A; Tapia, R A; Chiappe, C; Contreras, R

    2012-07-28

    Multiparameter linear energy-density relationships to model solvent effects in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) are introduced and tested. The model incorporates two solvent dependent and two specific solute-solvent parameters represented by a set of electronic indexes derived from the conceptual density functional theory. The specific solute-solvent interactions are described in terms of the electronic chemical potential for proton migration between the anion or cation and the transition state structure of a specific reaction. These indexes provide a quantitative estimation of the hydrogen bond (HB) acceptor basicity and the hydrogen bond donor acidity of the ionic solvent, respectively. A sound quantitative scale of HB strength is thereby obtained. The solvent dependent contributions are described by the global electrophilicity of the cation and nucleophilicity of the anion forming the ionic liquid. The model is illustrated for the kinetics of cycloaddition of cyclopentadiene towards acrolein. In general, cation HB acidity outweighs the remaining parameters for this reaction.

  3. Cesium Concentration in MCU Solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D

    2006-01-01

    During Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) operations, Cs-137 concentrations in product streams will vary depending on the location in the process and on the recent process conditions. Calculations of cesium concentrations under a variety of operating conditions reveal the following: (1) Under nominal operations with salt solution feed containing 1.1 Ci Cs-137 per gallon, the maximum Cs-137 concentration in the process will occur in the strip effluent (SE) and equal 15-16.5 Ci/gal. (2) Under these conditions, the majority of the solvent will contain 0.005 to 0.01 Ci/gal, with a limited portion of the solvent in the contactor stages containing ∼4 Ci/gal. (3) When operating conditions yield product near 0.1 Ci Cs-137/gal in the decontaminated salt solution (DSS), the SE cesium concentration will be the same or lower than in nominal operations, but majority of the stripped solvent will increase to ∼2-3 Ci/gal. (4) Deviations in strip and waste stream flow rates cause the largest variations in cesium content: (a) If strip flow rates deviate by -30% of nominal, the SE will contain ∼23 Ci/gal, although the cesium content of the solvent will increase to only 0.03 Ci/gal; (b) If strip flow rate deviates by -77% (i.e., 23% of nominal), the SE will contain 54 Ci/gal and solvent will contain 1.65 Ci/gal. At this point, the product DSS will just reach the limit of 0.1 Ci/gal, causing the DSS gamma monitors to alarm; and (c) Moderate (+10 to +30%) deviations in waste flow rate cause approximately proportional increases in the SE and solvent cesium concentrations. Recovery from a process failure due to poor cesium stripping can achieve any low cesium concentration required. Passing the solvent back through the contactors while recycling DSS product will produce a ∼70% reduction during one pass through the contactors (assuming the stripping D value is no worse than 0.36). If the solvent is returned to the solvent hold tank (containing additional

  4. High temperature solvent extraction of oil shale and bituminous coal using binary solvent mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, G.K.E. [Lehrstuhl fuer Geologie, Geochemie und Lagerstaetten des Erdoels und der Kohle, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    A high volatile bituminous coal from the Saar Basin and an oil shale from the Messel deposit, both Germany, were extracted with binary solvent mixtures using the Advanced Solvent Extraction method (ASE). Extraction temperature and pressure were kept at 100 C, respectively 150 C, and 20,7 MPa. After the heating phase (5 min) static extractions were performed with mixtures (v:v, 1:3) of methanol with toluene, respectively trichloromethane, for further 5 min. Extract yields were the same or on a higher level compared to those from classical soxhlet extractions (3 days) using the same solvents at 60 C. Comparing the results from ASE with those from supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) the extract yields were similar. Increasing the temperature in ASE releases more soluble organic matter from geological samples, because compounds with higher molecular weight and especially more polar substances were solubilized. But also an enhanced extraction efficiency resulted for aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons which are used as biomarkers in Organic Geochemistry. Application of thermochemolysis with tetraethylammonium hydroxide (TEAH) using pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) on the extraction residues shows clearly that at higher extraction temperatures minor amounts of free fatty acids or their methyl esters (original or produced by ASE) were trapped inside the pore systems of the oil shale or the bituminous coal. ASE offers a rapid and very efficient extraction method for geological samples reducing analysis time and costs for solvents. (orig.)

  5. Tri-n-butyl phosphate - the universal solvent for the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naylor, A.; Eccles, H.

    1988-01-01

    Tri-n-butyl phosphates (TBP) is now Widely used in the processes of solvent extraction, especially in those, used in nuclear fuel cycle. Problems, related with actinide separation and purification, can be solved easily by accurate sampling of diluent, concentration and purification degree of a solvent, aqueous phase acidity and temperature. Physical and chemical properties of TBP, mechanism of actinide solvent extraction, TBP hydrolysis and radiolysis are considered

  6. Processing of polymers using reactive solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemstra, P.J.; Kurja, J.; Meijer, H.E.H.; Meijer, H.E.H.

    1997-01-01

    A review with many refs. on processing of polymers using reactive solvents including classification of synthetic polymers, guidelines for the selection of reactive solvents, basic aspects of processing, examples of intractable and tractable polymer/reactive solvent system

  7. Handbook of organic solvent properties

    CERN Document Server

    Smallwood, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The properties of 72 of the most commonly used solvents are given, tabulated in the most convenient way, making this book a joy for industrial chemists to use as a desk reference. The properties covered are those which answer the basic questions of: Will it do the job? Will it harm the user? Will it pollute the air? Is it easy to handle? Will it pollute the water? Can it be recovered or incinerated? These are all factors that need to be considered at the early stages of choosing a solvent for a new product or process.A collection of the physical properties of most commonly used solvents, their

  8. Acetone-based cellulose solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostag, Marc; Liebert, Tim; Heinze, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Acetone containing tetraalkylammonium chloride is found to be an efficient solvent for cellulose. The addition of an amount of 10 mol% (based on acetone) of well-soluble salt triethyloctylammonium chloride (Et3 OctN Cl) adjusts the solvent's properties (increases the polarity) to promote cellulose dissolution. Cellulose solutions in acetone/Et3 OctN Cl have the lowest viscosity reported for comparable aprotic solutions making it a promising system for shaping processes and homogeneous chemical modification of the biopolymer. Recovery of the polymer and recycling of the solvent components can be easily achieved. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Hydrophobic deep eutectic solvents as water-immiscible extractants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osch, van D.J.G.P.; Zubeir, L.F.; Bruinhorst, van den A.; Alves da Rocha, M.A.; Kroon, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobic deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are presented for the first time. They consist of decanoic acid and various quaternary ammonium salts. The effect of the alkyl chains on the hydrophobicity and the equilibrium of the two-phase DES–water system were investigated. These new DESs were

  10. Effect of the Various Solvents on the In Vitro Permeability of Vitamin B

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of different solvents on the in vitro skin permeability of vitamin B12. Method: Vitamin B12 (B12) permeability experiments through rat skin pretreated with various solvents namely, propylene glycol, oleoyl macrogol-6-glycerides, propylene glycol monocaprylate and oleic acid, were performed ...

  11. Raffinate wash of second cycle solvent in the recovery of uranium from phosphate rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abodishish, H.A.; Ritchey, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Precipitation of Fe 3 HN 4 H 8 (PO 4 ) 6 is prevented in the second cycle extractor, in a two cycle uranium recovery process, by washing ammonia laden organic solvent stream, from the second cycle stripper, with first cycle raffinate iron stream containing phosphoric acid, prior to passing the solvent stream into the second cycle extractor

  12. Uranium refining by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraikaew, J.

    1996-01-01

    The yellow cake refining was studied in both laboratory and semi-pilot scales. The process units mainly consist of dissolution and filtration, solvent extraction, and precipitation and filtration. Effect of flow ratio (organic flow rate/ aqueous flow rate) on working efficiencies of solvent extraction process was studied. Detailed studies were carried out on extraction, scrubbing and stripping processes. Purity of yellow cake product obtained is high as 90.32% U 3 O 8

  13. Initiate test loop irradiations of ALSEP process solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterman, Dean R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Olson, Lonnie G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McDowell, Rocklan G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the initial results of the study of the impacts of gamma radiolysis upon the efficacy of the ALSEP process and is written in completion of milestone M3FT-14IN030202. Initial irradiations, up to 100 kGy absorbed dose, of the extraction section of the ALSEP process have been completed. The organic solvent used for these experiments contained 0.05 M TODGA and 0.75 M HEH[EHP] dissolved in n-dodecane. The ALSEP solvent was irradiated while in contact with 3 M nitric acid and the solutions were sparged with compressed air in order to maintain aerated conditions. The irradiated phases were used for the determination of americium and europium distribution ratios as a function of absorbed dose for the extraction and stripping conditions. Analysis of the irradiated phases in order to determine solvent composition as a function of absorbed dose is ongoing. Unfortunately, the failure of analytical equipment necessary for the analysis of the irradiated samples has made the consistent interpretation of the analytical results difficult. Continuing work will include study of the impacts of gamma radiolysis upon the extraction of actinides and lanthanides by the ALSEP solvent and the stripping of the extracted metals from the loaded solvent. The irradiated aqueous and organic phases will be analyzed in order to determine the variation in concentration of solvent components with absorbed gamma dose. Where possible, radiolysis degradation product will be identified.

  14. Solvent extraction for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masui, Jinichi

    1986-01-01

    The purex process provides a solvent extraction method widely used for separating uranium and plutonium from nitric acid solution containing spent fuel. The Tokai Works has adopted the purex process with TPB-n dodecane as the extraction agent and a mixer settler as the solvent extraction device. The present article outlines the solvent extraction process and discuss the features of various extraction devices. The chemical principle of the process is described and a procedure for calculating the number of steps for countercurrent equilibrium extraction is proposed. Discussion is also made on extraction processes for separating and purifying uranium and plutonium from fission products and on procedures for managing these processes. A small-sized high-performance high-reliability device is required for carrying out solvent extraction in reprocessing plants. Currently, mixer settler, pulse column and centrifugal contactor are mainly used in these plants. Here, mixer settler is comparted with pulse column with respect to their past achievements, design, radiation damage to solvent, operation halt, controllability and maintenance. Processes for co-extraction, partition, purification and solvent recycling are described. (Nogami, K.)

  15. ELECTROCHEMICAL BEHAVIOUR OF METHYLENE BLUE IN NON-AQUEOUS SOLVENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caram, J.A.; Suárez, J.F. Martínez; Gennaro, A.M.; Mirífico, M.V.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The dye is electro-reduced in two separated monoelectronic charge transfers. • Solvent/supporting electrolyte/acid/base modifies the electrochemical parameters. • A dissociation equilibrium of the dye in non-aqueous solvent is proposed. • The electro-generated and stable dye-radical is also chemically produced in EDA or KOH/DMF. • A new species is reversibly formed in KOH/EtOH or ACN. - Abstract: The electrochemical behaviour of methylene blue in solution of non-aqueous solvents with different supporting electrolytes was studied by cyclic voltammetry. Dye electro-reduction presents two well-defined processes of monoelectronic charge transfer yielding a free radical in the first process and an anion in the second electron transfer. Free radical and anion are long living species in some of the studied media. Effects of supporting electrolyte and solvent on the peak potentials, the peak current functions and the reversibility of the charge transfer processes are reported. A dissociation equilibrium of the dye in solution of non-aqueous solvents and the acid or base added determine markedly the electrochemical responses. In the particular cases of KOH/DMF or EDA basic media the chemical formation of the stable methylene blue radical was detected and it was characterized by EPR spectroscopy. A general reaction scheme is proposed

  16. Wet SiO2 As a Suitable Media for Fast and Efficient Reduction of Carbonyl Compounds with NaBH3CN under Solvent-Free and Acid-Free Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouhkan, Mehri; Zeynizadeh, Behzad

    2010-01-01

    Reduction of carbonyl compounds such as aldehydes, ketones, α,β-unsaturated enals and enones, α-diketones and acyloins was carried out readily with NaBH 3 CN in the presence of wet SiO 2 as a neutral media. The reactions were performed at solvent-free conditions in oil bath (70 - 80 .deg. C) or under microwave irradiation (240 W) to give the product alcohols in high to excellent yields. Regioselective 1,2-reduction of conjugated carbonyl compounds took place in a perfect selectivity without any side product formation

  17. Wet SiO{sub 2} As a Suitable Media for Fast and Efficient Reduction of Carbonyl Compounds with NaBH{sub 3}CN under Solvent-Free and Acid-Free Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouhkan, Mehri; Zeynizadeh, Behzad [Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Reduction of carbonyl compounds such as aldehydes, ketones, α,β-unsaturated enals and enones, α-diketones and acyloins was carried out readily with NaBH{sub 3}CN in the presence of wet SiO{sub 2} as a neutral media. The reactions were performed at solvent-free conditions in oil bath (70 - 80 .deg. C) or under microwave irradiation (240 W) to give the product alcohols in high to excellent yields. Regioselective 1,2-reduction of conjugated carbonyl compounds took place in a perfect selectivity without any side product formation.

  18. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  19. Uranium reextraction from D2EHPA-TOPO solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Neto, J.

    1985-01-01

    A comparative study for recovering uranium from the solvent D 2 EHPA-TOPO (di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid - tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide) with ammonium carbonate and sodium carbonate solutions has been made. The paper discusses the precipitation of iron during stripping and the extracctant solubilization in the aqueous phases. Continuous tests showed that uranium is efficiently stripped from the solvent by using both solutions and that the choice of a specific system is dependent on the uranium precipitation mechanism to be employed. (Author) [pt

  20. Solvent extraction of uranium and molybdenum in sulfuric media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Neto, J.

    1980-01-01

    A Solvent extraction process for recovering the uranium and molibdenum from the sulfuric acid solution produced from Figueira ores was developed. The leach solution contains molibdenum with a mean ratio Mo/U = 35%. THe solvent used was a terciary amine-Alamine 336, modified with tridecanol in querosine. An investigation was made to evaluate the variables affecting the extraction and stripping of uranium and molibdenum. The Alamine 336 showed a significant extraction power for uranium and molibdenum. In the stripping step of uranium using acidified sodium cloride it was observed the presence of an insoluble amine-molibdenum-arsenic complex. (author) [pt

  1. Effect of Different Solvents on the Measurement of Phenolics and the Antioxidant Activity of Mulberry (Morus atropurpurea Roxb.) with Accelerated Solvent Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiufang; Ou, XiaoQun; Zhang, Xiaoxu; Zhou, ZiYing; Ma, LiYan

    2017-03-01

    The effects of 9 different solvents on the measurement of the total phenolics and antioxidant activities of mulberry fruits were studied using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). Sixteen to 22 types of phenolics (flavonols, flavan-3-ols, flavanol, hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids, and stilbenes) from different mulberry extracts were characterized and quantified using HPLC-MS/MS. The principal component analysis (PCA) was used to determine the suitable solvents to distinguish between different classes of phenolics. Additionally, the phenolic extraction abilities of ASE and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) were compared. The highest extraction efficiency could be achieved by using 50% acidified methanol (50MA) as ASE solvents with 15.14 mg/gallic acid equivalents g dry weight of mulberry fruit. The PCA results revealed that the 50MA followed by 50% acidified acetone (50AA) was the most efficient solvent for the extraction of phenolics, particularly flavonols (627.12 and 510.31 μg/g dry weight, respectively), while water (W) was not beneficial to the extraction of all categories of phenolics. Besides, the results of 3 antioxidant capability assays (DPPH, ABTS free radical-scavenging assay, and ferric-reducing antioxidant power assay) showed that water-based organic solvents increased the antioxidant capabilities of the extracts compared with water or pure organic solvents. ASE was more suitable for the extraction of phenolics than UAE. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  2. Solvents interactions with thermochromic print

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Rožić

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the interactions between different solvents (benzene, acetone, cyclohexanone, various alcohols and water and thermochromic printing ink were investigated. Thermochromic printing ink was printed on metal surface. Components of thermochromic printing inks are polymeric microcapsules and classic yellow offset printing ink. Below its activation temperature, dye and developer within the microcapsules form a blue coloured complex. Therefore, thermochromic print is green. By heating above the activation temperature, blue colour of the complex turns into the leuco dye colourless state and the green colour of the prints turns into the yellow colour of the classic offset pigment. The results of the interaction with various solvents show that the thermochromic print is stable in all tested solvents except in ethanol, acetone and cyclohexanone. In ethanol, the green colour of the print becomes yellow. SEM analysis shows that microcapsules are dissolved. In acetone and cyclohexanone, the green colour of the print turns into blue, and the microcapsules become significantly more visible. Thus, the yellow pigment interacts with examined ketones. Based on the obtained interactions it can be concluded that the microcapsules have more polar nature than the classical pigment particles. Solvent-thermocromic print interactions were analysed using Hansen solubility parameters that rank the solvents based on their estimated interaction capabilities.

  3. Sterically hindered solvent extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solka, J.L.; Reis, A.H. Jr.; Mason, G.W.; Lewey, S.M.; Peppard, D.F.

    1978-01-01

    Di-t-pentylphosphinic acid, [C(CH 3 ) 2 (CH 2 CH 3 )] 2 PO(OH), H[Dt-PeP], has been shown by single-crystal X-ray diffraction data to be dimeric in the solid state. H[Dt-PeP] crystallizes in the centro-symmetric orthorhombic space group, Cmca, with unit cell parameters, a = 17.694(7), b = 11.021(4), and c = 13.073(5) A, and Z = 8, indicating that the molecule must conform to a crystallographic mirror plane or 2-fold axis. A measured density of 1.088 g/cm 3 is in good agreement with a calculated value of 1.074 g/cm 3 for a unit cell volume of 2549.3(A) 3 and a formula weight of 206.25 g. A total of 646 three-dimensional X-ray data were collected on an automated XRD-490 G.E. diffractometer. The structure was solved using a combination of direct methods, Patterson, Fourier, and least-squares refinement techniques. Refinement of the data indicates that H[Dt-PeP] is dimeric, and contains a mirror plane in which the hydrogen-bonded, eight-membered ring lies. A structural disorder involving principally the ethylene carbon but affecting the methyl carbons as well precluded a precise determination of the carbon positions and severely reduced the precision of the final refinement. In the liquid-liquid extraction system consisting of a solution of H[Dt-PeP] in benzene vs an acidic aqueous chloride phase, the extraction of UO 2 2+ follows the stoichiometry: UO 2 sub(A) 2+ + 2(HY) 2 subO = UO 2 (HY 2 ) 2 sub(O) + 2Hsub(A) + where (HY) 2 represents the dimer of H[Dt-PeP] and A and O represent the mutually equilibrated aqueous and organic phases. The expression for the distribution ratio, k, for UO 2 2+ is given. (author)

  4. Solvent effect in implicit/explicit model on FT-IR, 1H, 13C and 19F NMR, UV-vis and fluorescence spectra, linear, second- and third-nonlinear optical parameters of 2-(trifluoromethyl)benzoic acid: Experimental and computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avcı, Davut; Altürk, Sümeyye; Tamer, Ömer; Kuşbazoğlu, Mustafa; Atalay, Yusuf

    2017-09-01

    FT-IR, 1H, 13C and 19F NMR, UV-vis and fluorescence spectra for 2-(trifluoromethyl)benzoic acid (2-TFMBA) were recorded. DFT//B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) calculations were used to determine the optimized molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, 1H, 13C and 19F GIAO-NMR chemical shifts of 2-TFMBA. The detailed assignments of vibrational frequencies were carried out on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) by using VEDA program. TD-DFT/B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) calculations with the PCM (polarizable continuum model) in ethanol and DMSO solvents based on implicit/explicit model and gas phase in the excited state were employed to investigate UV-vis absorption and fluorescence emission wavelengths. The UV-vis and emission spectra were given in ethanol and DMSO solvents, and the major contributions to the electronic transitions were obtained. In addition, the NLO parameters (β, γ and χ(3)) and frontier molecular orbital energies of 2-TFMBA were calculated by using B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) level. The NLO parameters of 2-TFMBA were compared with that of para-Nitroaniline (pNA) and urea which are the typical NLO materials. The refractive index (n) is calculated by using the Lorentz-Lorenz equation to observe polarization behavior of 2-TFMBA in DMSO and ethanol solvents. In order to investigate intramolecular and hydrogen bonding interactions, NBO calculations were also performed by the same level. To sum up, considering the well-known biological role, photochemical properties of 2-TFMBA were discussed.

  5. Organic solvent pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for biofuels and biochemicals: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Pei, Zhijian; Wang, Donghai

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass represents the largest potential volume and lowest cost for biofuel and biochemical production. Pretreatment is an essential component of biomass conversion process, affecting a majority of downstream processes, including enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, and final product separation. Organic solvent pretreatment is recognized as an emerging way ahead because of its inherent advantages, such as the ability to fractionate lignocellulosic biomass into cellulose, lignin, and hemicellulose components with high purity, as well as easy solvent recovery and solvent reuse. Objectives of this review were to update and extend previous works on pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for biofuels and biochemicals using organic solvents, especially on ethanol, methanol, ethylene glycol, glycerol, acetic acid, and formic acid. Perspectives and recommendations were given to fully describe implementation of proper organic solvent pretreatment for future research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Versatile Production of Poly(Epsilon-Caprolactone Fibers by Electrospinning Using Benign Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Liverani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The electrospinning technique is widely used for the fabrication of micro- and nanofibrous structures. Recent studies have focused on the use of less toxic and harmful solvents (benign solvents for electrospinning, even if those solvents usually require an accurate and longer process of optimization. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the versatility of the use of benign solvents, like acetic acid and formic acid, for the fabrication of microfibrous and nanofibrous electrospun poly(epsilon-caprolactone mats. The solvent systems were also shown to be suitable for the fabrication of electrospun structures with macroporosity, as well as for the fabrication of composite electrospun mats, fabricated by the addition of bioactive glass (45S5 composition particles in the polymeric solution.

  7. Influences of surface and solvent on retention of HEMA/mixture components after evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Fernanda C P; Wang, Linda; Pereira, Lúcia C G; de Andrade e Silva, Safira M; Júnior, Luiz M; Carrilho, Marcela Rocha de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the retention of solvents within experimental HEMA/solvent primers after two conditions for solvent evaporation: from a free surface or from dentine surface. Experimental primers were prepared by mixing 35% HEMA with 65% water, methanol, ethanol or acetone (v/v). Aliquots of each primer (50 microl) were placed on glass wells or they were applied to the surface of acid-etched dentine cubes (2mm x 2mm x 2mm) (n=5). For both conditions (i.e. from free surface or dentine cubes), change in primers mass due to solvent evaporation was gravimetrically measured for 10min at 51% RH and 21 degrees C. The rate of solvent evaporation was calculated as a function of loss of primers mass (%) over time. Data were analysed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls (pevaporation rate (%/min) depending on the solvent present in the primer and the condition for evaporation (from free surface or dentine cubes) (pevaporation for HEMA/acetone primer was almost 2- to 10-times higher than for HEMA/water primer depending whether evaporation occurred, respectively, from a free surface or dentine cubes. The rate of solvent evaporation varied with time, being in general highest at the earliest periods. The rate of solvent evaporation and its retention into HEMA/solvent primers was influenced by the type of the solvent and condition allowed for their evaporation.

  8. Multiple sclerosis and organic solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, J T; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Rasmussen, K

    1998-01-01

    We investigated a possible causal relation between exposure to organic solvents in Danish workers (housepainters, typographers/printers, carpenters/cabinetmakers) and onset of multiple sclerosis. Data on men included in the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Register (3,241 men) were linked with data from......, and butchers. Over a follow-up period of 20 years, we observed no increase in the incidence of multiple sclerosis among men presumed to be exposed to organic solvents. It was not possible to obtain data on potential confounders, and the study design has some potential for selection bias. Nevertheless......, the study does not support existing hypotheses regarding an association between occupational exposure to organic solvents and multiple sclerosis....

  9. Alternatives to Organic Solvents in Industrial Cleaning Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    To control chemical hazards in work places, substitution of harmful substances with less harmful or non-toxic products is now a method used in many countries and in many companies. It has previously been demonstrated that it is desirable and possible to use non-volatile, low-toxic vegetable...... cleaning agents in offset printing companies instead of volatile, toxic organic solvents. The present study is based on a project with the aim of defining other industrial processes, where organic solvents used for cleaning or degreasing can be replaced by non-volatile, low-toxic products, which are based...... on esters from fatty acids of vegetable origin (vegetable esters - VE).The study indicates that industrial cleaning/degreasing with organic solvents may be substituted with VEs on metal surfaces and on some coated surfaces, in manufacture of paints and inks, use of paints, use of inks (printing), metal...

  10. Recovery of hafnium values from loaded extraction solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abodishish, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a process for recovering high purity hafnium hydroxide from a methyl isobutyl ketone organic solvent that is substantially free of sulfate ions and contains hafnium thiocyanate and thiocyanic acid. The improvement comprising reacting the organic solvent with ammonia to produce a reaction product in the form of a methyl isobutyl ketone organic solvent that is substantially free of sulfate ions and contains ammonium thiocyanite solution and hafnium hydroxide; separating the constituents of the reaction product in accordance with their respective specific gravities to produce a hafnium hydroxide sludge as one of the separation products; and removing the liquid component of the sludge to yield a high purity hafnium hydroxide ready for calcination to hafnium oxide

  11. Solvent sorting in (mixed solvent electrolyte) systems: Time-resolved ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    lar solvents as an effective single component dipo- lar liquid that is characterized ... and time (t) dependent solvation energy of mobile dipo- lar solute with density ..... Even though this way for modification of C is purely ad- hoc, the observation ...

  12. Safety confirmation study of TRUEX solvent by accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yoshihiko; Hirumachi, Suguru; Takeda, Shinso; Kanazawa, Yoshito; Sasaya, Shinji

    1999-02-01

    In order to confirm the engineering safety on the TRUEX solvent (mixed solvent of CMPO/TBP/n-dodecane) for separating the transuranics from high-level activity liquid waste in advanced nuclear fuel recycling technological R and D, thermal behavior and pressure behavior in heating PUREX solvent (mixed solvent of 30% TBP-n-dodecane), TRUEX solvent and in the exothermic reaction of TRUEX solvent etc. and nitric acid in sealed adiabatic system which was severer condition than actual plant were measured by using accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC). The Arrhenius parameters (activation energy and frequency factor) which are necessary for the evaluation of reaction rate was examined from the measurement data in ARC. Analytical method and analysis condition of reaction products were examined in order to clarify chemical form of reaction products in exothermic reaction between solvent and nitric acid in ARC, and the qualitative evaluation was carried out. Main results are shown in the following. 1) TBP, CMPO, n-dodecane and 10 M nitric acid hardly exothermed in the simple substance. 2) On the solvent phase after the solvent contacted with 10 M nitric acid and the equilibrium has been attained (single-phase sample), the heat quantity per unit sample weight of the TRUEX solvent tended to be bigger than that of the PUREX solvent when heat quantity was evaluated in ARC. However, on the mixed sample of solvent and 10 M nitric acid enclosed in a sample container simultaneously (two phase system sample), the heat quantity per unit solvent weight was almost equivalent for PUREX solvent and TRUEX solvent. 3) The kinetic analysis was carried out, and on the TBP-10 M nitric acid single-phase sample, the activation energy of the reaction was evaluated to be 118 kJ/mol. Its activation energy was approximately equal to 112 kJ/mol by Nichols. The reaction rate constant was calculated, and it was shown that reaction rate constants of PUREX solvent-10 M nitric acid single-phase sample and

  13. Management of spent solvents of reprocessing origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohar, S.; Srinivas, C.; Vincent, T.; Wattal, P.K.

    2001-01-01

    Spent solvents of reprocessing origin constitute a major portion of radioactive liquid organic wastes arising from nuclear activity. An in-depth study of this waste stream has led to the evolution of a complete management option, which addresses not only the concern of radioactivity but also its organic nature. This is based on alkaline hydrolysis of Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), which converts it into aqueous soluble products, viz. sodium salt of dibutyl phosphoric acid and butanol. During the process of alkaline hydrolysis almost all the activity associated with the waste gets transferred into the aqueous phase. The recovered diluent virtually free of activity and TBP can be recycled, and in case of it not meeting reprocessing standards, can be incinerated. The process generated aqueous waste is found compatible with cement and can be immobilized in cement matrix. (author)

  14. Risk assessment for halogenated solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    A recent development in the cancer risk area is the advent of biologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models. These models allow for the incorporation of biological and mechanistic data into the risk assessment process. These advances will not only improve the risk assessment process for halogenated solvents but will stimulate and guide basic research in the biological area

  15. Solvent extraction and its practical application for the recovery of copper and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, J.

    1975-01-01

    In recent years solvent extraction has been developed to a stage that allows practical application first for the recovery of uranium and later also for winning copper from low-grade acid-soluble ores. By now it has been realized in several plants with great technical and ecomomic success. Solvent extraction includes the following essential operations: leaching, solvent extraction, back extraction of the organically bonded valuable mineral to an acid, aqueous solution and finally separation of the valuable metal from the final acid by precipitation or electrolytic procedures. Upon assessing the cost of the solvent extraction process for the recovery of copper it turns out that from an economic point of view it is significantly superior to the conventional cementation process. (orig.) [de

  16. Cleanup of Savannah River Plant solvent using solid sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1985-04-01

    The degradation products produced in Purex solvent by exposure to nitric acid and radiation can be divided into two groups: those which are removed by scrubbing with sodium carbonate solutions and those which are not; these latter materials are called secondary degradation products. This study investigated the use of solid sorbents for removal of the secondary degradation products from first-cycle Savannah River Plant solvent that had been previously washed with sodium carbonate solution. Silica gel, activated charcoal, macroreticular resin, attapulgite clay and activated alumina were the sorbents investigated in preliminary testing. Activated alumina was found to be most effective for improving phase separation of the solvent from sodium carbonate solutions and for increasing the interfacial tension. The activated alumina was also the sorbent most useful for removing complexants which retain plutonium at low acidity, but it was less effective in removing anionic surfactants and ruthenium. We found that the capacity of the activated alumina was greatly improved by drying the solvent before treatment

  17. Synergistic solvent extraction investigation of Am (III), Eu (III), Zn(II), and Cs(I), using 2-heptyl-2-methyl-nonanoic acid mixed with different organophosphorus compounds from nitrate media. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, H.A.; Ramadan, A.; Abdel-Fattah, A.

    1996-01-01

    Extraction studies for investigating the effect of mixing 2-heptyl-2-methyl nonanoic acid (HA) with a number of organophosphorus compounds; namely tributyl phosphate (TBP), terphenyl phosphate oxide (TPPO); tri octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) or bis-2-(ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in benzene on the extraction of trace elements Am(III), Eu(III), Zn(II), and Cs(I) from nitrate media of ionic strength, I=0.1 M were carried out. The effect of adding different organophosphorus compounds to HA was tested to account for the presence or absence of the phenomenon of synergism. It was found that TBP, TPPO, and TOPO causing some antagonistic effects for the elements studied. Extraction enhancement was only observed with bis- (2-ethyl-hexyl) -phosphoric acid (HDEHP) for all the elements investigated. The extraction mechanisms as well as the thermodynamic parameters for the mixed extracted species are discussed. 19 figs

  18. Synergistic solvent extraction investigation of Am (III), Eu (III), Zn(II), and Cs(I), using 2-heptyl-2-methyl-nonanoic acid mixed with different organophosphorus compounds from nitrate media. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Naggar, H A; Ramadan, A; Abdel-Fattah, A [Nuclear Chemistry Department, Hot Laboratories Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Extraction studies for investigating the effect of mixing 2-heptyl-2-methyl nonanoic acid (HA) with a number of organophosphorus compounds; namely tributyl phosphate (TBP), terphenyl phosphate oxide (TPPO); tri octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) or bis-2-(ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) in benzene on the extraction of trace elements Am(III), Eu(III), Zn(II), and Cs(I) from nitrate media of ionic strength, I=0.1 M were carried out. The effect of adding different organophosphorus compounds to HA was tested to account for the presence or absence of the phenomenon of synergism. It was found that TBP, TPPO, and TOPO causing some antagonistic effects for the elements studied. Extraction enhancement was only observed with bis- (2-ethyl-hexyl) -phosphoric acid (HDEHP) for all the elements investigated. The extraction mechanisms as well as the thermodynamic parameters for the mixed extracted species are discussed. 19 figs.

  19. Uranium extraction from colofanite via organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Valeria Aparecida Leitao

    2007-01-01

    This work describes the use of pure or combined extractants dissolved in organic solvents for quantitative uranium recovery from colofanite, a fluoroapatite ore, from Itataia, Santa Quiteria, Ceara, Brazil. This ore contains the highest brazilian uranium reserve. The metal is associated to phosphate species. The ore is digested with sulfuric acid (wet process), producing phosphoric acid, which is used for manufacturing of fertilizers and animal food. >From the acid leaching, some systems for uranium recovery were tested. Among them, PC88A (2-ethyl-hexyl phosphonic acid, mono-2-ethyl-hexyl ester) 40% vol. and DEHPA (di(2-ethyl-hexyl)phosphoric acid) 40% vol. in kerosene presented the highest values for the distribution coefficient (D) for uranium. When synergistic systems were employed, the best results were obtained for DEHPA 40%vol. + PC88A 40%vol. and DEHPA 40% vol. + TOPO (trioctylphosphine oxide) 5% vol. in kerosene. 15% wt/v sodium carbonate was the best medium for uranium stripping and separation from iron, the main interfering element. Uranium was precipitated as sodium diuranate by adding sodium hydroxide (5,0 mol L -1 ). Thorium in the raffinate was extracted by TOPO (0,1% vol.) in cyclohexane. The radioactivity level of the final aqueous waste is similar to natural background, according to CNEN-NE 6.05 Norm. After neutralization, the solid can be co-processed, according to the Directory 264 from the National Brazilian Environmental Council (CONAMA), whereas the treated effluent can be discarded according to the Directory 357 from CONAMA. (author)

  20. Uranium recovery from wet-process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCullough, J.F.; Phillips, J.F. Jr.; Tate, L.R.

    1979-01-01

    A method of recovering uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid is claimed where the acid is treated with a mixture of an ammonium salt or ammonia, a reducing agent, and then a miscible solvent. Solids are separated from the phosphoric acid liquid phase. The solid consists of a mixture of metal phosphates and uranium. It is washed free of adhering phosphoric acid with fresh miscible solvent. The solid is dried and dissolved in acid whereupon uranium is recovered from the solution. Miscible solvent and water are distilled away from the phosphoric acid. The distillate is rectified and water discarded. All miscible solvent is recovered for recycle. 5 claims

  1. Separation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides with some substituted oligopyridines and triazines in synergy with 2-bromodecanoic acid. (Presented at the International Solvent Extraction Conference, July 1999 in Barcelona)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enarsson, Aa.; Spjuth, L.; Liljenzin, J.O.; Kaellvenius, G.

    2000-01-01

    The separation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides with some substituted oligopyridines and triazines in synergy with 2-bromodecanoic acid was studied. All ligands, except the quinolinyl-derivatives, showed high metal extraction and good separation factors for trivalent actinides over lanthanides. The substituted di-pyridyltriazines and the quaterpyridine showed the highest distribution ratios and quater- and quinquepyridine the highest separation factors, at low nitric acid concentration. The basicity of the different ligands were determined by non-aqueous titration in acetonitrile media and was related to the metal extraction. The substituted di-pyridyltriazines, which showed the highest metal extraction also showed the lowest basicity

  2. Production of levulinic acid, furfural, and gamma valerolactone from C.sub.5 and C.sub.6 carbohydrates in mono- and biphasic systems using gamma-valerolactone as a solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumesic, James A.; Alonso, David Martin; Gurbuz, Elif I.; Wettstein, Stephanie G.

    2013-03-19

    A method to make levulinic acid (LA), furfural, or gamma-valerolactone (GVL). React cellulose (and/or other C.sub.6 carbohydrates) or xylose (and/or other C.sub.5 carbohydrates) or combinations thereof in a monophasic reaction medium comprising GVL and an acid; or (ii) a biphasic reaction system comprising an organic layer comprising GVL, and a substantially immiscible aqueous layer. At least a portion of the cellulose (and/or other C.sub.6 carbohydrates), if present, is converted to LA and at least a portion of the xylose (and/or other C.sub.5 carbohydrates), if present, is converted into furfural.

  3. Containment of Nitric Acid Solutions of Plutonium-238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Silver, G.L.; Pansoy-Hjelvik, L.; Ramsey, K.

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion of various metals that could be used to contain nitric acid solutions of Pu-238 has been studied. Tantalum and tantalum/2.5% tungsten resisted the test solvent better than 304L stainless steel and several INCONEL alloys. The solvent used to imitate nitric acid solutions of Pu-238 contained 70% nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid, and ammonium hexanitratocerate

  4. Iodine removing method in organic solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takeo; Sakurai, Manabu

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively remove iodine in an organic solvent to thereby remove iodine in the solvent that can be re-used or put to purning treatment. Method: Organic solvent formed from wastes of nuclear facilities is mixed with basic lead acetate, or silica gel or activated carbon incorporated with such a compound to adsorb iodine in the organic solvent to the basic lead acetate. Then, iodine in the organic solvent is removed by separating to eliminate the basic lead acetate adsorbing iodine from the organic solvent or by passing the organic solvent through a tower or column charged or pre-coated with silica gel or activated carbon incorporated with lead acetate. By using basic lead acetate as the adsorbents, iodine can effective by adsorbed and eliminated. Thus, the possibility of circumstantial release of iodine can be reduced upon reusing or burning treatment of the organic solvent. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Computer Aided Solvent Selection and Design Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitrofanov, Igor; Conte, Elisa; Abildskov, Jens

    and computer-aided tools and methods for property prediction and computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) principles. This framework is applicable for solvent selection and design in product design as well as process design. The first module of the framework is dedicated to the solvent selection and design...... in terms of: physical and chemical properties (solvent-pure properties); Environment, Health and Safety (EHS) characteristic (solvent-EHS properties); operational properties (solvent–solute properties). 3. Performing the search. The search step consists of two stages. The first is a generation and property...... identification of solvent candidates using special software ProCAMD and ProPred, which are the implementations of computer-aided molecular techniques. The second consists of assigning the RS-indices following the reaction–solvent and then consulting the known solvent database and identifying the set of solvents...

  6. Canyon solvent cleaning with solid adsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The HM Process at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) uses 7.5% tributyl phosphate in n-paraffin as an extraction solvent. During use, the solvent is altered due to hydrolysis and radiolysis, forming materials that influence product losses, product decontamination, and separation efficiencies. Laboratory studies to improve online solvent cleaning have shown that carbonate washing, although removing residual solvent activity, does not remove binding ligands that hold fission products in the solvent. Treatment of solvent with a solid adsorbent removes binding ligands and significantly improves recycle solvent performance. Both laboratory work defining a full-scale adsorption process and the use of the process to clean HM Process first cycle solvent are presented

  7. Recent solvent extraction experience at Savannah River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Burney, G.A.; Gray, J.H.; Hodges, M.E.; Holt, D.L.; Macafee, I.M.; Reif, D.J.; Shook, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Tributyl phosphate-based solvent extraction processes have been used at Savannah River for more than 30 years to separate and purify thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium isotopes. This report summarizes the advancement of solvent extraction technology at Savannah River during the 1980's. Topics that are discussed include equipment improvements, solvent treatment, waste reduction, and an improved understanding of the various chemistries in the process streams entering, within, and leaving the solvent extraction processes

  8. Solvent extraction studies of RERTR silicide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, Anthony P.

    1983-01-01

    Uranium silicide fuels, which are candidate RERTR fuel compositions, may require special considerations in solvent extraction reprocessing. Since Savannah River Plant may be reprocessing RERTR fuels as early as 1985, studies have been conducted at Savannah River Laboratory to demonstrate the solvent extraction behavior of this fuel. Results of solvent extraction studies with both unirradiated and irradiated fuel are presented along with the preliminary RERTR solvent extraction reprocessing flow sheet for Savannah River Plant. (author)

  9. Improvement of solvents for chemical decontamination: nickel ferrites removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, Carlos A.; Morando, Pedro J.; Blesa, Miguel A.

    1999-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are usually included in commercial solvents for the chemical cleaning and decontamination of metal surfaces from the oxide layers grown and/or deposited from high temperature water by corrosive process. In particular oxalic acid is included in second path of AP-Citrox method. However, in some cases, their use shows low efficiency. This fact is attributed to the special passivity of the mixed oxides as nickel ferrites. This work reports a kinetic study of dissolution of a synthetic nickel ferrite (NiFe 2 O 4 ) confronted with simple oxides (NiO and Fe 2 O 3 ) in mineral acids and oxalic acid. The dissolution factor and reaction rate were determined in several conditions (reactive concentrations, pH and added ferrous ions). Experimental data of dissolution (with and without Fe(II) added) show a congruent kinetic regime. Pure nickel oxide (NiO) is rather resistant to the attack by oxalic acid solutions, and ferrous ions do not accelerate dissolution. In fact, nickel oxide dissolves better by oxidative attack that takes advantage of the higher lability of Ni 3+ . It may be concluded that oxalic acid operates to dissolve iron, and the ensuing disruption of the solid framework accelerates the release of nickel. Our results point to use more reactive solvents in iron from mixed oxides and to the possibility of using one stage decontamination method. (author)

  10. Multiphoton photodegradation of indocyanine green: Solvent protolysis effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuyuki, Masanori, E-mail: mn.fuyuki@kio.ac.jp

    2016-02-15

    The multiphoton photodegradation mechanism of indocyanine green (ICG) was investigated by using femtosecond near-infrared (NIR) pump and probe pulses. In the pump fluence region from 2 mJ/cm{sup 2} to 4 mJ/cm{sup 2}, the photodegradation rate was higher in acetic acid than in ethanol, and the rate was proportional to pump fluence to the 2.3th power in acetic acid and the 3.9th in ethanol. Considering that the degree of auto-protolysis of acetic acid is much higher than that of ethanol, the experimental results indicate that self-ionized solvent molecules played an essential role in the degradation of ICG molecules excited by NIR multiphoton process. - Highlights: • Photodegradation of ICG by femtosecond near-infrared pulses. • Photodegradation rate of ICG was higher in acetic acid than in ethanol. • Photodegradation rate was proportional to pump fluence to 2.3th power in acetic acid. • Photodegradation rate was proportional to pump fluence to 3.9th power in ethanol. • Self-ionized solvent molecules promoted ICG photodegradation in acetic acid.

  11. Refining of yellow cake by solvent extraction. Pakistan status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunus, M.; Muzaffar, A.; Qureshi, M.T.; Qazi, N.K.; Khan, J.R.; Chughtai, N.A.; Zaidi, S.M.H.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes the pilot-plant studies made at the Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, Rawalpindi, on refining yellow cake. The process units mainly consist of digestion and filtration, solvent extraction, precipitation and filtration, and calcining and reduction. Extraction parameters, such as free acidity in terms of nitrate ion concentration, throughputs and AF index, have been studied in some detail. Product of satisfactory chemical purity, as confirmed by spectrochemical analysis, was produced by this method. (author)

  12. Study of the tributyl phosphate - 30% dodecane solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, P.

    1967-01-01

    This study, originating mainly from a literature survey, gives the principal chemical and physical features of the tributyl-phosphate (TBP) agent diluted at 30 volumes per cent in dodecane. The mixture is a very commonly used extractant in nuclear fuel processing. In this paper, the main following points are reported: -) the components (TBP and diluents) -) the TBP-diluents systems (non-loaded), -) the TBP-diluents-water systems, -) TBP-diluents-water-nitric acid systems, and -) industrial solvents. (author) [fr

  13. Novel, Solvent-Free, Single Ion Conductive Polymer Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-20

    liquid oligomeric analogue PEODME (ε = 8, dioxane:CH3CN mass ratio 48:7). The choice of the solvent mixture was a compromise between the...trifluoride – a derivative of Lewis acid properties. An increase in the degree of dissociation, decrease in the share of ionic associates and increase in...diphenylphosphinate this product is a solid, and in reaction with lithium diphenylphosphate the second fraction is a viscous, light-brown liquid , and

  14. Restoring solvent for nuclear separation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Solvent extraction separation processes are used to recover usable nuclear materials from spent fuels. These processes involve the use of an extractant/diluent (solvent) for separation of the reusable actinides from unwanted fission products. The most widely used processes employ tributyl phosphate as an extractant diluted with a normal-paraffin hydrocarbon. During use, the solvent is altered due to hydrolysis and radiolysis, forming materials that influence product losses, product decontamination, and separation efficiencies. In most processes, the solvent is recycled after cleaning. Solvent cleaning generally involves scrubbing with a sodium carbonate solution. Studies at the Savannah River Laboratory have shown that carbonate washing, although removing residual solvent activity, does not remove more solvent-soluble binding ligands (formed by solvent degradation), which hold fission products in the solvent. Treatment of the solvent with a solid adsorbent after carbonate washing removes binding ligands and significantly improves recycled solvent performance. Laboratory work to establish the advantage of adsorbent cleaning and the development of a full-scale adsorption process is described. The application of this process for cleaning the first cycle solvent of a Savannah River Plant production process is discussed

  15. Adaptive Resolution Simulation of MARTINI Solvents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zavadlav, Julija; Melo, Manuel N.; Cunha, Ana V.; de Vries, Alex H.; Marrink, Siewert J.; Praprotnik, Matej

    We present adaptive resolution dynamics simulations of aqueous and apolar solvents coarse-grained molecular models that are compatible with the MARTINI force field. As representatives of both classes solvents we have chosen liquid water and butane, respectively, at ambient temperature. The solvent

  16. Selective recognition of sulfate anions in a 95% ethanol solvent with a simple neutral salicylaldehyde dansyl hydrazine Schiff base tuned by Brønsted-Lowry acid-base reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Gao-Ning; Zhang, Jing-Li; Jia, Cang; Fan, Wei-Zhen; Lin, Li-Rong

    2014-07-01

    A new Schiff base compound, 5-(dimethylamino)-N‧-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)naphthalene-1-sulfonohydrazide (R), has been synthesized, characterized, and employed as a selective fluorescence receptor for the recognition of sulfate anions. UV-vis absorption, fluorescence emission, 1H NMR spectra and DFT calculation studies on the system have been carried out to determine the nature of the interactions between R and anions. The results reveal that the deprotonation of the phenol without the need of a strong base leads to the formation of a hydrogen-bonding complex with a sbnd SO2sbnd NHsbnd group, which is responsible for the spectra changes. The deprotonation process for the selectivity recognition of sulfate can be tuned by the Brønsted-Lowry acid-base reaction in nonaqueous solutions, revealing that suitable phenolic hydroxyl acidity is the key factor for anion recognition selectivity.

  17. Relation between separation factor of carbon isotope and chemical reaction of CO2 with amine in nonaqueous solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeshita, Kenji; Kitamoto, Asashi

    1989-01-01

    The separation factor for carbon isotope exchange reaction between CO 2 and amine in nonaqueous solvent was related to absorption reaction of CO 2 in a solution. The test solutions were mixtures of primary amine (such as butylamine and tert-butylamine) or secondary amine (such as diethylamine, dipropylamine and dibutylamine) diluted with nonpolar solvent (octane or triethyalmine) or polar solvent (methanol), respectively. The isotope exchange reaction consists of three steps related to chemical reaction of CO 2 in amine and nonaqueous solvent mixture, namely the reaction between CO 2 and carbamic acid, that between CO 2 and amine carbamate, and that between CO 2 and carbamic ion. Above all, the isotope separation factor between CO 2 and carbamic acid had the highest value. The overall separation factor can be higher in amine-nonaqueous solvent mixture where the concentration of carbamic acid becomes higher. (author)

  18. The Solvent Selection framework: solvents for organic synthesis, separation processes and ionic-organic synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitrofanov, Igor; Sansonetti, Sascha; Abildskov, Jens

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic integrated framework for solvent selection and solvent design. The framework is divided into several modules, which can tackle specific problems in various solvent-based applications. In particular, three modules corresponding to the following solvent selection pr...

  19. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  20. Analysis of cesium extracting solvent using GCMS and HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, T.L.; Herman, C.C.; Crump, S.L.; Marinik, A.R.; Lambert, D.P.; Eibling, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    A high-level waste (HLW) remediation process scheduled to begin in 2007 at the Savannah River Site is the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU). The MCU will use a hydrocarbon solvent (diluent) containing a cesium extractant, a calix[4]arene compound, to extract radioactive cesium from caustic HLW. The resulting decontaminated HLW waste or raffinate will be processed into grout at the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). The cesium containing CSSX stream will undergo washing with dilute nitric acid followed by stripping of the cesium nitrate into a very dilute nitric acid or the strip effluent stream and the CSSX solvent will be recycled. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will receive the strip effluent stream and immobilize the cesium into borosilicate glass. Excess CSSX solvent carryover from the MCU creates a potential flammability problem during DWPF processing. Bench-scale DWPF process testing was performed with simulated waste to determine the fate of the CSSX solvent components. A simple high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed to identify the modifier (which is used to increase Cs extraction and extractant solubility) and extractant within the DWPF process. The diluent and trioctylamine (which is used to suppress impurity effect and ion-pair disassociation) were determined using gas chromatography mass spectroscopy (GCMS). To close the organic balance, two types of sample preparation methods were needed. One involved extracting aqueous samples with methylene chloride or hexane, and the second was capturing the off gas of the DWPF process using carbon tubes and rinsing the tubes with carbon disulfide for analysis. This paper addresses the development of the analytical methods and the bench-scale simulated waste study results. (author)

  1. Phosphates and phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, P [Compagnie Francaise de l' Azote, Paris (France)

    1983-01-01

    In chapter 8.5 the following aspects of uranium recovery are treated: basis of extraction process, extraction principle, solvents, strength of the acid to be treated, technology, main processes in use, impact of uranium recovery on phosphoric acid plants, and economics of uranium recovery plants.

  2. Recovering uranium from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abodishish, H.A.; Ritchey, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    Precipitation of Fe 3 HN 4 H 8 (PO 4 ) 6 is prevented in the second cycle extractor, in a two cycle uranium recovery process, by washing ammonia laden organic solvent stream, from the second cycle stripper, with first cycle raffinate iron stream containing phosphoric acid, prior to passing the solvent stream into the second cycle extractor. (author)

  3. Manipulating the Morphology of P3HT–PCBM Bulk Heterojunction Blends with Solvent Vapor Annealing

    KAUST Repository

    Verploegen, Eric; Miller, Chad E.; Schmidt, Kristin; Bao, Zhenan; Toney, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Using grazing incidence X-ray scattering, we observe the effects of solvent vapors upon the morphology of poly(3-hexylthiophene)-phenyl-C 61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT-PCBM) bulk heterojunction thin film blends in real time; allowing us to observe morphological rearrangements that occur during this process as a function of solvent. We detail the swelling of the P3HT crystallites upon the introduction of solvent and the resulting changes in the P3HT crystallite morphology. We also demonstrate the ability for tetrahydrofuran vapor to induce crystallinity in PCBM domains. Additionally, we measure the nanoscale phase segregated domain size as a function of solvent vapor annealing and correlate this to the changes observed in the crystallite morphology of each component. Finally, we discuss the implications of the morphological changes induced by solvent vapor annealing on the device properties of BHJ solar cells. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  4. Manipulating the Morphology of P3HT–PCBM Bulk Heterojunction Blends with Solvent Vapor Annealing

    KAUST Repository

    Verploegen, Eric

    2012-10-23

    Using grazing incidence X-ray scattering, we observe the effects of solvent vapors upon the morphology of poly(3-hexylthiophene)-phenyl-C 61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT-PCBM) bulk heterojunction thin film blends in real time; allowing us to observe morphological rearrangements that occur during this process as a function of solvent. We detail the swelling of the P3HT crystallites upon the introduction of solvent and the resulting changes in the P3HT crystallite morphology. We also demonstrate the ability for tetrahydrofuran vapor to induce crystallinity in PCBM domains. Additionally, we measure the nanoscale phase segregated domain size as a function of solvent vapor annealing and correlate this to the changes observed in the crystallite morphology of each component. Finally, we discuss the implications of the morphological changes induced by solvent vapor annealing on the device properties of BHJ solar cells. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  5. Influence of Solvent Composition on the Performance of Spray-Dried Co-Amorphous Formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Jaya; Rades, Thomas; Löbmann, Korbinian

    2018-01-01

    Ball-milling is usually used to prepare co-amorphous drug–amino acid (AA) mixtures. In this study, co-amorphous drug–AA mixtures were produced using spray-drying, a scalable industrially preferred preparation method. The influence of the solvent type and solvent composition was investigated....... Mixtures of indomethacin (IND) and each of the three AAs arginine, histidine, and lysine were ball-milled and spray-dried at a 1:1 molar ratio, respectively. Spray-drying was performed at different solvent ratios in (a) ethanol and water mixtures and (b) acetone and water mixtures. Different ratios...... that using spray-drying as a preparation method, all IND–AA mixtures could be successfully converted into the respective co-amorphous forms, irrespective of the type of solvent used, but depending on the solvent mixture ratios. Both ball-milled and spray-dried co-amorphous samples showed an enhanced...

  6. Estudo da Degradação In Vitro de Blendas de Poli(p-dioxanona/Poli(l-Ácido Láctico (PPD/PLLA Preparadas por Evaporação de Solvente Degradation of Poly (L-Lactic Acid (PLLA and Poly-p-Dioxanone (PPD Blends Prepared by Casting: In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana P. T. Pezzin

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Blendas de dois polímeros semi-cristalinos biorreabsorvíveis, o poli(ácido láctico (PLLA e a poli(p-dioxanona (PPD, foram preparadas por evaporação de solvente em diferentes composições. As blendas foram imersas em tubos de ensaio contendo solução tampão fosfato (pH = 7,4 em um banho termostatizado a 37 ± 1 °C e avaliadas por calorimetria diferencial de varredura (DSC, análise termogravimétrica (TGA e microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV. Foi observado através do estudo in vitro que o PLLA apresenta uma taxa de degradação mais lenta que a PPD e que as blendas apresentam taxa de degradação intermediária, mostrando que é possível variar a taxa de degradação das blendas alterando sua composição.Blends of two crystalline bioreabsorbable polymers, poly(L-lactic acid (PLLA and poly(p-dioxanone (PPD, have been prepared by solvent casting in different compositions. The blends were immersed in tubes containing a phosphate buffer solution (pH = 7.4 in a thermally controlled bath of 37 ± 1°C and studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. It was observed by in vitro study that PLLA has a slower degradation rate than PPD and the blends presented an intermediate degradation rate. This shows that it is possible to vary the degradation rate of the blend by changing its composition.

  7. Insecticide solvents: interference with insecticidal action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brattsten, L B; Wilkinson, C F

    1977-06-10

    Several commercial solvent mixtures commonly used as insecticide carriers in spray formulations increase by more than threefold the microsomal N-demethylation of p-chloro N-methylaniline in midgut preparations of southern army-worm (Spodoptera eridania) larvae exposed orally to the test solvents. Under laboratory conditions, the same solvent mixtures exhibit a protective action against the in vivo toxicity of the insecticide carbaryl to the larvae. The data are discussed with respect to possible solvent-insecticide interactions occurring under field conditions and, more broadly, to potential toxicological hazards of these solvents to humans.

  8. Organic solvents in electromembrane extraction: recent insights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Chuixiu; Gjelstad, Astrid; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2016-01-01

    the introduction. Under the influence of an electrical field, EME is based on electrokinetic migration of the analytes through a supported liquid membrane (SLM), which is an organic solvent immobilized in the pores of the polymeric membrane, and into the acceptor solution. Up to date, close to 150 research...... articles with focus on EME have been published. The current review summarizes the performance of EME with different organic solvents and discusses several criteria for efficient solvents in EME. In addition, the authors highlight their personal perspective about the most promising organic solvents for EME...... and have indicated that more fundamental work is required to investigate and discover new organic solvents for EME....

  9. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells Solvent additives for tuning the photovoltaic properties of polymer – fullerene solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sio, Antonietta De; Madena, Thomas; Huber, Ralph; Deschler, Felix; Como, Enrico Da; Esposito, Salvatore; Hauff, Elizabeth Von

    2011-01-01

    We use solvent additives as a simple method to tune the photovoltaic performance of poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) bulk heterojuncton solar cells. 1,2-dichlorobenzene (oDCB) was used as the reference solvent; chlorobenzene (CB) and 1,2,3,4-

  10. Solubility of sulfur compounds in commercial physical solvents and an ionic liquid from Monte Carlo simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamali, S.H.; Ramdin, M.; Becker, T.M.; Torres-Knoop, Ariana; Dubbeldam, D.; Buijs, W.; Vlugt, T.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Natural gas, synthesis gas, and flue gas typically contain a large number of impurities (e.g., acidic gases), which should be removed to avoid environmental and technological problems, and to meet customer specifications. One approach is to use physical solvents to remove the acidic gases. If no

  11. Sodium borohydride reduction of aromatic carboxylic acids via ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    using a sodium borohydride–THF–methanol system. The alcohols ... rature using ethanol or methanol as solvent. Although, .... acids, phenylacetic acids, phenylpropanoic acid and cinnamic ... excess of reagent in water or alcohol, involved a.

  12. Effect of solvents on the enzyme mediated degradation of copolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Aditi; Chatterjee, Kaushik; Madras, Giridhar

    2015-01-01

    The biodegradation of polycaprolactone (PCL), polylactic acid (PLA), polyglycolide (PGA) and their copolymers, poly (lactide-co-glycolide) and poly (D, L-lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLCL) was investigated. The influence of different solvents on the degradation of these polymers at 37 °C in the presence of two different lipases namely Novozym 435 and the free lipase of porcine pancreas was investigated. The rate coefficients for the polymer degradation and enzyme deactivation were determined using continuous distribution kinetics. Among the homopolymers, the degradation of PGA was nearly an order of magnitude lower than that for PCL and PLA. The overall rate coefficients of the copolymers were higher than their respective homopolymers. Thus, PLCL degraded faster than either PCL or PLA. The degradation was highly dependent on the viscosity of the solvent used with the highest degradation observed in acetone. The degradation of the polymers in acetone was nearly twice that observed in dimethyl sulfoxide indicating that the degradation decreases with increase in the solvent viscosity. The degradation of the polymers in water-solvent mixtures indicated an optimal water content of 2.5 wt% of water. (paper)

  13. Sequentially solution-processed, nanostructured polymer photovoltaics using selective solvents

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Do Hwan; Mei, Jianguo; Ayzner, Alexander L.; Schmidt, Kristin; Giri, Gaurav; Appleton, Anthony L.; Toney, Michael F.; Bao, Zhenan

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate high-performance sequentially solution-processed organic photovoltaics (OPVs) with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 5% for blend films using a donor polymer based on the isoindigo-bithiophene repeat unit (PII2T-C10C8) and a fullerene derivative [6,6]-phenyl-C[71]-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM). This has been accomplished by systematically controlling the swelling and intermixing processes of the layer with various processing solvents during deposition of the fullerene. We find that among the solvents used for fullerene deposition that primarily swell but do not re-dissolve the polymer underlayer, there were significant microstructural differences between chloro and o-dichlorobenzene solvents (CB and ODCB, respectively). Specifically, we show that the polymer crystallite orientation distribution in films where ODCB was used to cast the fullerene is broad. This indicates that out-of-plane charge transport through a tortuous transport network is relatively efficient due to a large density of inter-grain connections. In contrast, using CB results in primarily edge-on oriented polymer crystallites, which leads to diminished out-of-plane charge transport. We correlate these microstructural differences with photocurrent measurements, which clearly show that casting the fullerene out of ODCB leads to significantly enhanced power conversion efficiencies. Thus, we believe that tuning the processing solvents used to cast the electron acceptor in sequentially-processed devices is a viable way to controllably tune the blend film microstructure. © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Application of Solvent-In-Pulp Technique for Uranium Extraction from Mineralization Granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.M.; Hussein, A.E.M.; Youseif, W.M.; El Didamony, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Investigations on uranium extraction from a representative mineralized granite sample (Gattar granite GII) by solvent-in-pulp (SIP) technique were carried out in the present study. For this purpose, the solvent (tri-butyl amine) (TBA) was mixed with the leaching slurry without prior filtration. The influence of various factors affecting the SIP process, such as contact time, solvent concentration, dilution factor, type of surfactant, surfactant/solid ratio were studied. About 91% uranium extraction efficiency was attained by the application of the chosen extraction SIP conditions. Also, about 96% of the loaded uranium could be stripped by using sulfuric acid as an effective stripping agent

  15. Standardization of solvent extraction procedure for determination of uranium in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukanta Maity; Sahu, S.K.; Pandit, G.G.

    2015-01-01

    Solvent extraction procedure using ammonium pyrolidine dithiocarbamate complexing agent in methyl isobutyl ketone organic phase and acid exchange back-extraction is described for the simultaneous quantitative pre-concentration of uranium in seawater followed by its determination by differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetry. Solvent extraction time is optimized for extraction of uranium from seawater. Solvent extraction efficiency for uranium in seawater at different pH was carried out. The method gives a recovery of 98 ± 2 % for 400 mL sample at pH 3.0 ± 0.02, facilitating the rapid and interference free analysis of seawater samples. (author)

  16. Removing oxygen from a solvent extractant in an uranium recovery process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.; Brown, G.M.; Posey, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in effecting uranium recovery from phosphoric acid solutions is provided by sparging dissolved oxygen contained in solutions and solvents used in a reductive stripping stage with an effective volume of a nonoxidizing gas before the introduction of the solutions and solvents into the stage. Effective volumes of nonoxidizing gases, selected from the group consisting of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, and mixtures thereof, displace oxygen from the solutions and solvents thereby reduce deleterious effects of oxygen such as excessive consumption of elemental or ferrous and accumulation of complex iron phosphates or cruds

  17. Effect of pH on desorption of CO2 from alkanolamine - rich solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Min

    2017-08-01

    Adipic acid was used as a pH regulator, which was added to 0.4 mol/L MEA, DEA and MDEA solvents during CO2 desorption process. It is found that when pH value of the solvents swing between 8-10, CO2 desorption rate enhanced, and energy consumption has declined obviously. This research may have reference significance on optimization of alkanolamine CO2 capture process.

  18. Solubility and crystallization of piroxicam from different solvents in evaporative and cooling crystallizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Haiyan; Ostergaard, Iben

    2018-01-01

    polarities; It has been found that the solubility of piroxicam in the solvents is in the following order: chloroform > dichloromethane > acetone > ethyl acetate > acetonitrile > acetic acid > methanol > hexane. Crystallization of piroxicam from different solvents has been performed with evaporative.......Results obtained in the present work showed the stochastic nature of nucleation of different polymorphs as well as the complexity of the crystallization of a polymorphic system....

  19. Elimination of di-laurylamine from the trilaurylamine-dodecane solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germain, M.; Bathellier, A.

    1968-01-01

    Di-laurylamine and carboxylic acids are the main degradation products of the trilaurylamine solvent. Di-laurylamine can be separated from the TLA by the precipitation of very slightly soluble di-laurylammonium salts. The main factors governing this removal and the subsequent filtration have been studied. The chemical stability of the solvent after the above treatment using different salts has been measured. From these considerations it appears that di-laurylammonium formiate precipitation gives satisfactory results. (authors) [fr

  20. Oxidative Desulfurization of Gasoline by Ionic Liquids Coupled with Extraction by Organic Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Abro, Rashid; Gao, Shurong; Chen, Xiaochun; Yu, Guangren; Abdeltawab, Ahmed A.; Al-Deyab, Salem S.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, desulfurization of real fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) gasoline was investigated in dual steps; first in oxidative desulfurization (ODS) using imidazolium and pyrrolidonium based Brønsted acidic ionic liquids (ILs) as solvent and catalyst and hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. In second step, extractive desulfurization took place using organic solvents of furfural, furfural alcohol and ethylene glycol. Variety of factors such as temperature, time, mass ratio of oil/ILs and regene...

  1. Solvent Flux Method (SFM): A Case Study of Water Access to Candida antarctica Lipase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Sven P; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2014-11-11

    The solvent flux method (SFM) was developed to comprehensively characterize the influx of solvent molecules from the solvent environment into the active site of a protein in the framework of molecular dynamics simulations. This was achieved by introducing a solvent concentration gradient as well as partially reorienting and rescaling the velocity vector of all solvent molecules contained within a spherical volume enclosing the protein, thus inducing an accelerated solvent influx toward the active site. In addition to the detection of solvent access pathway within the protein structure, it is hereby possible to identify potential amino acid positions relevant to solvent-related enzyme engineering with high statistical significance. The method is particularly aimed at improving the reverse hydrolysis reaction rates in nonaqueous media. Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) binds to a triglyceride-water interface with its substrate entrance channel oriented toward the hydrophobic substrate interface. The lipase-triglyceride-water system served as a model system for SFM to evaluate the influx of water molecules to the active site. As a proof of principle for SFM, a previously known water access pathway in CALB was identified as the primary water channel. In addition, a secondary water channel and two pathways for water access which contribute to water leakage between the protein and the triglyceride-water interface were identified.

  2. Solvent extraction in analytical chemistry of tungsten (Review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.M.; Busev, A.I.; Sokolova, T.A.

    1975-01-01

    The use of extraction for isolating and concentrating tungsten with subsequent determination by various methods is considered. For tungsten extractants of all types are employed: neutral, basic and acidic. Neutral extractants are used for isolating and concentrating tungsten, basic and acidic ones are employed, as a rule, for the isolation and subsequent determination of tungsten. This type of extractants is highly promising, since, selectively extracting tungsten, they allow its simultaneous determination. Neutral extractants are oxygen-containing solvents, TBP; basic extractants are aniline, pyridine, 1-naphthylamine, trialkylbenzylammoniumanitrate. As acidic reagents use is made of 8-oxyquinoline and its derivatives, oximes and hydroxamic acids, β-diketones, carbaminates. In the extraction radioactive isotope 185 W is employed

  3. Solvent extraction of Zr(IV) and Nb(V) with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4benzoyl-pyrazole-5-one and tri-iso-octylamine from different mineral acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, M.Y.; Nwabue, F.I.; Ahmed, S.

    1981-01-01

    The extraction of Zr(IV) and Nb(V) from aqueous solutions of mineral acids with 1% 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-pyrazole-5-one and 5% tri-iso-octylamine solutions in chloroform has been investigated respectively. The mechanism of extraction and the composition of the extracted species have been suggested and the effect of complexing and salting-out agents also determined. Separation factors of various metals with respect to niobium have been estimated and separation from zirconium and many other elements has been achieved. Procedures are recommended for the separation of 95 Nb from 95 Zr- 95 Nb mixture as well as from the fission products. (orig.) [de

  4. Effect of solvent extraction on Tunisian esparto wax composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saâd Inès

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The increase of needs for renewable and vegetable based materials will help to drive the market growth of vegetable waxes. Because of their highly variable composition and physicochemical properties, plant waxes have found numerous applications in the: food, cosmetic, candle, coating, polish etc... The aim of this project is to determine the effect of solvent extraction (petroleum ether and ethanol on Tunisian esparto wax composition. The GC-MS was applied in order to determine the waxes compositions. Then, physicochemical parameters of these two samples of waxes: acid value, saponification value, iodine value and melting point were measured in order to deduct their properties and possible fields of uses. Results showed that esparto wax composition depended on the solvent extraction and that major components of the two samples of waxes were: alkanes, esters of fatty acids and phenols. Furthermore, esparto waxes were characterized by an antioxidant and antibacterial activities but the potential of these activities depended on the solvent of wax extraction.

  5. Solvent-dependent transformation of aflatoxin B1 in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, James M; Rushing, Blake R; Selim, Mustafa I

    2017-08-01

    To date, all studies of aflatoxin B 1 (AFB 1 ) transformation in soil or in purified mineral systems have identified aflatoxins B 2 (AFB 2 ) and G 2 (AFG 2 ) as the primary transformation products. However, identification in these studies was made using thin layer chromatography which has relatively low resolution, and these studies did not identify a viable mechanism by which such transformations would occur. Further, the use of methanol as the solvent delivery vehicle in these studies may have contributed to formation of artifactual transformation products. In this study, we investigated the role of the solvent vehicle in the transformation of AFB 1 in soil. To do this, we spiked soils with AFB 1 dissolved in water (93:7, water/methanol) or methanol and used HPLC-UV and HPLC-MS to identify the transformation products. Contrasting previous published reports, we did not detect AFB 2 or AFG 2 . In an aqueous-soil environment, we identified aflatoxin B 2a (AFB 2a ) as the single major transformation product. We propose that AFB 2a is formed from hydrolysis of AFB 1 with the soil acting as an acid catalyst. Alternatively, when methanol was used, we identified methoxy aflatoxin species likely formed via acid-catalyzed addition of methanol to AFB 1 . These results suggest that where soil moisture is adequate, AFB 1 is hydrolyzed to AFB 2a and that reactive organic solvents should be avoided when replicating natural conditions to study the fate of AFB 1 in soil.

  6. Theory of polyelectrolytes in solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitanvis, Shirish M

    2003-12-01

    Using a continuum description, we account for fluctuations in the ionic solvent surrounding a Gaussian, charged chain and derive an effective short-ranged potential between the charges on the chain. This potential is repulsive at short separations and attractive at longer distances. The chemical potential can be derived from this potential. When the chemical potential is positive, it leads to a meltlike state. For a vanishingly low concentration of segments, this state exhibits scaling behavior for long chains. The Flory exponent characterizing the radius of gyration for long chains is calculated to be approximately 0.63, close to the classical value obtained for second order phase transitions. For short chains, the radius of gyration varies linearly with N, the chain length, and is sensitive to the parameters in the interaction potential. The linear dependence on the chain length N indicates a stiff behavior. The chemical potential associated with this interaction changes sign, when the screening length in the ionic solvent exceeds a critical value. This leads to condensation when the chemical potential is negative. In this state, it is shown using the mean-field approximation that spherical and toroidal condensed shapes can be obtained. The thickness of the toroidal polyelectrolyte is studied as a function of the parameters of the model, such as the ionic screening length. The predictions of this theory should be amenable to experimental verification.

  7. "Winterização" de óleo de pescado via solvente Winterization of fish oil with solvent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Colembergue Cunha

    2009-03-01

    type, solvent proportion, and agitation in the second cooling stage were studied. The fatty acid compositions were determined through gas chromatography. Percentage variations of the contents of unsaturated and saturated fatty acids were analyzed. As a result, the use of hexane as solvent, 40% in relation to the oil mass without agitation in the second step of the cooling were recommended. Under such conditions, it were obtained an oil with polyunsaturated fatty acid content (PUFA of 64.3%. A percentage increase of approximately 9.2 % in the content of unsaturated fatty acids and a percentage reduction of 13.3% in the content of saturated fatty acids in relation to bleached fish oil was observed.

  8. Efficient solvent extraction of antioxidant-rich extract from a tropical diatom, Chaetoceros calcitrans (Paulsen Takano 1968

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Chern Foo

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: Methanol was the recommended solvent for the production of antioxidant rich extract from C. calcitrans. Both carotenoids and phenolic acids were found to be positively correlated to the antioxidant capacities of C. calcitrans. Lead bioactives confirmed by subsequent high performance liquid chromatography studies were fucoxanthin, gallic acid and protocatechuic acid.

  9. The solvent extraction of ytterbium from a molten eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lengyel, T.

    1977-01-01

    The paper summarizes the results which were obtained in measurements performed with different binary mixtures of solvents being capable of effectively extracting ytterbium from the molten eutectic lithium nitrate--ammonium nitrate. In the course of elaborating the possible ways of extractive separation of rare earths systematic investigations regarding the individual members of the group are required. The binary solvent mixtures consisted of thenoyl-trifluoracetone (TTA), β-isopropil-tropolone (IPT), tributyl phosphate (TBP), di-2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (HDEHP), 2,2'-bipyridyl (bipy), dibutyl phtalate (DBP) and Amberlite LA-2 (LA-2). The concentration of the central ion was kept at 5x10 -6 M by using Yb-169 of high specific activity as a tracer for the radiometric assay. (T.I.)

  10. Experiment on the treatment of waste extraction solvent from the molybdenum-99 process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsien-Ming Hsiao; Chang-Liang Hu; Kuang-Li Chien; Wen-Cheng Lee; Tsong-Yang Wei [Division of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, P.O. Box 3-7, Longtan 32546 Taiwan (China)

    2013-07-01

    In the Mo-99 (Molybdenum-99) isotope extraction test process for radiopharmaceutical applications, organic solvent is used to extract Mo-99 from an irradiated UO{sub 2} dissolution. The extraction solvent was stored when the test work was stopped. A total of about 120 liters of waste solvent was stored at INER (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan). The extraction solvent consisted of 5% di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) and kerosene. The radionuclides found in the waste solvent include Cs-137, Am-241, Tc-99, and Sr-90, which give off gross alpha and beta radioactivity of 1898 and 471 Bq/ml, respectively. This study aims to remove radionuclides from the waste solvent using sodium carbonate and sodium hydroxide solutions in different concentrations. After mixing the waste solvent with the alkaline solution followed by settling, a third phase other than organic and aqueous phase appeared which is expected due to the saponification reaction. The experimental results showed that increasing the number of washing and the alkaline solution concentration could enhance the radionuclides removal rate. An optimal removal method was proposed using 2 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution twice followed by 1 M NaOH solution one time for the third phase generated early in the mixing stages. The remaining gross alpha and beta radioactivity of the treated organic solvent was 2 and 3 Bq/ml, respectively. The treated solvent could be stabilized by ashing at 500 deg. C and then immobilized. The alkaline solution would be neutralized by hydrochloric or nitric acid and then treated using a variety of adsorbents or bone char via adsorption to remove nuclides to meet the wastewater discharge limitation. (authors)

  11. Sustainable development of gree solvent separation process

    OpenAIRE

    Lisickov, Kiril; Fidancevska, Emilija; Grujic, Radoslav; Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Kuvendziev, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Solvents defi ne a major part of the environmental performance of processes in the chemical industry and impact on cost, safety and health issues. The idea of green solvents expresses the goal to minimize the environmental impact resulting from the use of solvents in chemical production. In spite of conventional separation methods, precise process green technologies are based on the application of modern processes and process equipment as well as control and management...

  12. Supercritical solvent extraction of oil sand bitumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanbayev, Ye. I.; Ongarbayev, Ye. K.; Tileuberdi, Ye.; Mansurov, Z. A.; Golovko, A. K.; Rudyk, S.

    2017-08-01

    The supercritical solvent extraction of bitumen from oil sand studied with organic solvents. The experiments were performed in autoclave reactor at temperature above 255 °C and pressure 29 atm with stirring for 6 h. The reaction resulted in the formation of coke products with mineral part of oil sands. The remaining products separated into SARA fractions. The properties of the obtained products were studied. The supercritical solvent extraction significantly upgraded extracted natural bitumen.

  13. Canyon solvent cleaning with activated alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents recent work at SRL concerning the cleaning of solvent extraction solvent used at SRP. The paper explains why we undertook the work, and some laboratory studies on two approaches to solvent cleaning, namely extended carbonate washing and use of solid adsorbents. The paper then discusses scale-up of the preferred method and the results of the full-scale cleaning. 19 figs

  14. Continuous solvent extraction feed adjustment for HTGR fuel reprocessing. Interim development report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olguin, L.J.

    1978-06-01

    The two-cycle Acid-Thorex solvent extraction process requires that the feed stream to each thorium cycle be processed to reduce its nitric acid concentration (feed adjustment). This interim development report presents the results of bench-scale and pilot-plant-scale feed adjustment experiments using a continuous mode of operation. An examination of formic acid denitration and fluoride ion volatilization is also included

  15. Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shridharani, K.G.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1983-02-15

    A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260/sup 0/ C to 315/sup 0/ C in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275/sup 0/ C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350/sup 0/ C.

  16. Process for hydrogenating coal and coal solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrer, Arthur R.; Shridharani, Ketan G.

    1983-01-01

    A novel process is described for the hydrogenation of coal by the hydrogenation of a solvent for the coal in which the hydrogenation of the coal solvent is conducted in the presence of a solvent hydrogenation catalyst of increased activity, wherein the hydrogenation catalyst is produced by reacting ferric oxide with hydrogen sulfide at a temperature range of 260.degree. C. to 315.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere to produce an iron sulfide hydrogenation catalyst for the solvent. Optimally, the reaction temperature is 275.degree. C. Alternately, the reaction can be conducted in a hydrogen atmosphere at 350.degree. C.

  17. Aminosilicone solvent recovery methods and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiry, Irina Pavlovna; Perry, Robert James; Wood, Benjamin Rue; Singh, Surinder Prabhjot; Farnum, Rachel Lizabeth; Genovese, Sarah Elizabeth

    2018-02-13

    The present invention is directed to aminosilicone solvent recovery methods and systems. The methods and systems disclosed herein may be used to recover aminosilicone solvent from a carbon dioxide containing vapor stream, for example, a vapor stream that leaves an aminosilicone solvent desorber apparatus. The methods and systems of the invention utilize a first condensation process at a temperature from about 80.degree. C. to about 150.degree. C. and a second condensation process at a temperature from about 5.degree. C. to about 75.degree. C. The first condensation process yields recovered aminosilicone solvent. The second condensation process yields water.

  18. Molecular Thermodynamic Modeling of Mixed Solvent Solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Martin Dela; Abildskov, Jens; O’Connell, John P.

    2010-01-01

    A method based on statistical mechanical fluctuation solution theory for composition derivatives of activity coefficients is employed for estimating dilute solubilities of 11 solid pharmaceutical solutes in nearly 70 mixed aqueous and nonaqueous solvent systems. The solvent mixtures range from...... nearly ideal to strongly nonideal. The database covers a temperature range from 293 to 323 K. Comparisons with available data and other existing solubility methods show that the method successfully describes a variety of observed mixed solvent solubility behaviors using solute−solvent parameters from...

  19. Solvent Isotope-induced Equilibrium Perturbation for Isocitrate Lyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartararo, Christine E.; Hadi, Timin; Cahill, Sean M.; Blanchard, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Isocitrate lyase (ICL) catalyzes the reversible retro-aldol cleavage of isocitrate to generate glyoxylate and succinate. ICL is the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, which allows for the anaplerosis of citric acid cycle intermediates under nutrient limiting conditions. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the source of ICL for these studies, ICL is vital for the persistence phase of the bacteria’s life cycle. Solvent kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) in the direction of isocitrate cleavage of D2OV = 2.0 ± 0.1 and D2O[V/Kisocitrate] = 2.2 ± 0.3 arise from the initial deprotonation of the C2 hydroxyl group of isocitrate or the protonation of the aci-acid of succinate product of the isocitrate aldol cleavage by a solvent-derived proton. This KIE suggested that an equilibrium mixture of all protiated isocitrate, glyoxylate and succinate prepared in D2O, would undergo transient changes in equilibrium concentrations as a result of the solvent KIE and solvent-derived deuterium incorporation into both succinate and isocitrate. No change in the isotopic composition of glyoxylate was expected or observed. We have directly monitored the changing concentrations of all isotopic species of all reactants and products using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Continuous monitoring of glyoxylate by 1H NMR spectroscopy shows a clear equilibrium perturbation in D2O. The final equilibrium isotopic composition of reactants in D2O revealed di-deuterated succinate, protiated glyoxylate, and mono-deuterated isocitrate, with the transient appearance and disappearance of mono-deuterated succinate. A model for the equilibrium perturbation of substrate species, and their time-dependent isotopic composition is presented. PMID:24261638

  20. Justification of the solvent choice for the industrial amizon substance production

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    V. A. Georgiyants

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION In recent years, the rapid development gets implementing principles of quality management in the pharmaceutical industry. It should be noted that instead of the mechanical control of the quality associated with the chemical characteristics of pharmaceutical substances and drugs innovative ways to ensure the quality associated primarily with the understanding of the processes occurring during the manufacturing process come. Objective: To study solvent selection for the industrial production of methiodide benzyl amide isonicotinic acid substance considering the conception “Quality by design”. MATERIALS AND METHODS Solution of 0.1 moles of isonicotinic acid in 0.12 moles of benzylamine was heated at 160-185°C during 4-5 hours while distilling off water and excess benzylamine. The resulting melt - cooled isonicotinic acid benzylamide was dissolved in acetone and filtered. It was used in further synthesis without further purification. 0.1 moles of isonicotinic acid benzylamide was dissolved in0.6 litersof a suitable solvent and 0.12 mole of methyl iodide was added to the solution at room temperature. The mixture was heated at 40-50 ° C for 3-4 hours, the reaction mixture was cooled, filtered the product was dried. After calculating the aim product was recrystallized from an appropriate solvent. Isonicotinic acid benzylamide iodomethylate quantitative content was determined by acid-base titration in non-aqueous medium (fixing the endpoint - potentiometrically. The impurity content benzylamide isonicotinic acid – by HPLC. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION When solvent have been chosen we took into account previously developed scheme of laboratory synthesis. We guided primarily data about security and efficiency. The least toxic solvents conventionally used in pharmaceutical production , included 2- propanol and ethanol (limit of residual amounts of these solvents, allowable HFC substances was 0.5 % and 1 %, respectively. Therefore, these