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Sample records for nanotube swcnt bundles

  1. Piezoresistivity of mechanically drawn single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films-: mechanism and optimizing principle

    Obitayo, Waris

    The individual carbon nanotube (CNT) based strain sensors have been found to have excellent piezoresistive properties with a reported gauge factor (GF) of up to 3000. This GF on the other hand, has been shown to be structurally dependent on the nanotubes. In contrast, to individual CNT based strain sensors, the ensemble CNT based strain sensors have very low GFs e.g. for a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin film strain sensor, GF is ~1. As a result, studies which are mostly numerical/analytical have revealed the dependence of piezoresistivity on key parameters like concentration, orientation, length and diameter, aspect ratio, energy barrier height and Poisson ratio of polymer matrix. The fundamental understanding of the piezoresistive mechanism in an ensemble CNT based strain sensor still remains unclear, largely due to discrepancies in the outcomes of these numerical studies. Besides, there have been little or no experimental confirmation of these studies. The goal of my PhD is to study the mechanism and the optimizing principle of a SWCNT thin film strain sensor and provide experimental validation of the numerical/analytical investigations. The dependence of the piezoresistivity on key parameters like orientation, network density, bundle diameter (effective tunneling area), and length is studied, and how one can effectively optimize the piezoresistive behavior of a SWCNT thin film strain sensors. To reach this goal, my first research accomplishment involves the study of orientation of SWCNTs and its effect on the piezoresistivity of mechanically drawn SWCNT thin film based piezoresistive sensors. Using polarized Raman spectroscopy analysis and coupled electrical-mechanical test, a quantitative relationship between the strain sensitivity and SWCNT alignment order parameter was established. As compared to randomly oriented SWCNT thin films, the one with draw ratio of 3.2 exhibited ~6x increase on the GF. My second accomplishment involves studying the

  2. Novel four-point-probe design and nanorobotic dual endeffector strategy for electrical characterization of as-grown SWCNT bundles

    Eichhorn, V; Fatikow, S; Sardan Sukas, Özlem

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a novel nanorobotic strategy for non-destructive and direct electrical characterization of as-grown bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is presented. For this purpose, test patterns of SWCNT bundles having different diameters are grown on a silicon substrate...... by chemical vapor deposition. A new design of microstructured four-point-probes is proposed and fabricated allowing for direct contacting of vertically aligned bundles of SWCNTs. A nanorobotic setup is upgraded into a dual endeffector system to achieve good electrical contact between four...

  3. FDTD technique based crosstalk analysis of bundled SWCNT interconnects

    Duksh, Yograj Singh; Kaushik, Brajesh Kumar; Agarwal, Rajendra P.

    2015-01-01

    The equivalent electrical circuit model of a bundled single-walled carbon nanotube based distributed RLC interconnects is employed for the crosstalk analysis. The accurate time domain analysis and crosstalk effect in the VLSI interconnect has emerged as an essential design criteria. This paper presents a brief description of the numerical method based finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique that is intended for estimation of voltages and currents on coupled transmission lines. For the FDTD implementation, the stability of the proposed model is strictly restricted by the Courant condition. This method is used for the estimation of crosstalk induced propagation delay and peak voltage in lossy RLC interconnects. Both functional and dynamic crosstalk effects are analyzed in the coupled transmission line. The effect of line resistance on crosstalk induced delay, and peak voltage under dynamic and functional crosstalk is also evaluated. The FDTD analysis and the SPICE simulations are carried out at 32 nm technology node for the global interconnects. It is observed that the analytical results obtained using the FDTD technique are in good agreement with the SPICE simulation results. The crosstalk induced delay, propagation delay, and peak voltage obtained using the FDTD technique shows average errors of 4.9%, 3.4% and 0.46%, respectively, in comparison to SPICE. (paper)

  4. Signal Integrity Analysis in Single and Bundled Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Majumder, M.K.; Pandya, N.D.; Kaushik, B.K.; Manhas, S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CN T) can be considered as an emerging interconnect material in current nano scale regime. They are more promising than other interconnect materials such as Al or Cu because of their robustness to electromigration. This research paper aims to address the crosstalk-related issues (signal integrity) in interconnect lines. Different analytical models of single- (SWCNT), double- (DWCNT), and multiwalled CNTs (MWCNT) are studied to analyze the crosstalk delay at global interconnect lengths. A capacitively coupled three-line bus architecture employing CMOS driver is used for accurate estimation of crosstalk delay. Each line in bus architecture is represented with the equivalent RLC models of single and bundled SWCNT, DWCNT, and MWCNT interconnects. Crosstalk delay is observed at middle line (victim) when it switches in opposite direction with respect to the other two lines (aggressors). Using the data predicted by ITRS 2012, a comparative analysis on the basis of crosstalk delay is performed for bundled SWCNT/DWCNT and single MWCNT interconnects. It is observed that the overall crosstalk delay is improved by 40.92% and 21.37% for single MWCNT in comparison to bundled SWCNT and bundled DWCNT interconnects, respectively.

  5. A novel single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) functionalization agent facilitating in vivo combined chemo/thermo therapy

    Zhang, Liwen; Rong, Pengfei; Chen, Minglong; Gao, Shi; Zhu, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown intriguing applications in biotechnological and biomedical fields due to their unique shape and properties. However, the fact that unmodified CNTs are prone to aggregation, stunts CNTs applications under physiological conditions. In this research, we found that as little as 1/5th the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) weight of Evans Blue (EB) is capable of dispersing SWCNT as well as facilitating SWCNT functionalization. In view of the binding between EB and albumin, the yielding product (SWCNT/EB) demonstrated extreme stability for weeks under physiological conditions and it can be endowed with a therapeutic ability by simply mixing SWCNT/EB with an albumin based drug. Specifically, the formed SWCNT/EB/albumin/PTX nanocomplex exhibits strong near-infrared (NIR) absorbance, and can serve as an agent for chemo/thermal therapeutic purposes. Our in vivo result reveals that SWCNT/EB/albumin/PTX after being administered into the MDA-MB-435 tumor would effectively ablate the tumor by chemo and photothermal therapy. Such a combined treatment strategy provides remarkable therapeutic outcomes in restraining tumor growth compared to chemo or photothermal therapy alone. Overall, our strategy of dispersing SWCNTs by EB can be used as a platform for carrying other drugs or functional genes with the aid of albumin to treat diseases. The present study opens new opportunities in surface modification of SWCNTs for future clinical disease treatment.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown intriguing applications in biotechnological and biomedical fields due to their unique shape and properties. However, the fact that unmodified CNTs are prone to aggregation, stunts CNTs applications under physiological conditions. In this research, we found that as little as 1/5th the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) weight of Evans Blue (EB) is capable of dispersing SWCNT as well as facilitating SWCNT functionalization. In view of the binding between EB and

  6. Nanotube bundle oscillators: Carbon and boron nitride nanostructures

    Thamwattana, Ngamta; Hill, James M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the oscillation of a fullerene that is moving within the centre of a bundle of nanotubes. In particular, certain fullerene-nanotube bundle oscillators, namely C 60 -carbon nanotube bundle, C 60 -boron nitride nanotube bundle, B 36 N 36 -carbon nanotube bundle and B 36 N 36 -boron nitride nanotube bundle are studied using the Lennard-Jones potential and the continuum approach which assumes a uniform distribution of atoms on the surface of each molecule. We address issues regarding the maximal suction energies of the fullerenes which lead to the generation of the maximum oscillation frequency. Since bundles are also found to comprise double-walled nanotubes, this paper also examines the oscillation of a fullerene inside a double-walled nanotube bundle. Our results show that the frequencies obtained for the oscillation within double-walled nanotube bundles are slightly higher compared to those of single-walled nanotube bundle oscillators. Our primary purpose here is to extend a number of established results for carbon to the boron nitride nanostructures.

  7. Development of the tangential mode in the Raman spectra of SWCNT bundles during electrochemical charging

    Kalbáč, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2008), s. 1257-1264 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400400601; GA ČR GC203/07/J067; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : wall carbon nanotubes * spectroelectrochemistry * fullerenes Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 10.371, year: 2008

  8. Polyaniline/single-wall carbon nanotube (PANI/SWCNT) composites for high performance supercapacitors

    Gupta, Vinay; Miura, Norio [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyushu University, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2006-12-01

    PANI/SWCNT composites were prepared by electrochemical polymerisation of polyaniline onto SWCNTs and their capacitive performance was evaluated by means of cyclic voltammetry and charge-discharge cycling in 1M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electrolyte. The PANI/SWCNT composites single electrode showed much higher specific capacitance, specific energy and specific power than pure PANI and SWCNTs. The highest specific capacitance, specific power and specific energy values of 485F/g, 228Wh/kg and 2250W/kg were observed for 73wt.% PANI deposited onto SWCNTs. PANI/SWCNT composites also showed long cyclic stability. Based upon the variations in the surface morphologies and specific capacitance of the composite, a mechanism is proposed to explain enhancement in the capacitive characteristics. The PANI/SWCNT composites have demonstrated the potential as excellent electrode materials for application in high performance supercapacitors. (author)

  9. Superconductivity in an Inhomogeneous Bundle of Metallic and Semiconducting Nanotubes

    Ilya Grigorenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Bogoliubov-de Gennes formalism for inhomogeneous systems, we have studied superconducting properties of a bundle of packed carbon nanotubes, making a triangular lattice in the bundle's transverse cross-section. The bundle consists of a mixture of metallic and doped semiconducting nanotubes, which have different critical transition temperatures. We investigate how a spatially averaged superconducting order parameter and the critical transition temperature depend on the fraction of the doped semiconducting carbon nanotubes in the bundle. Our simulations suggest that the superconductivity in the bundle will be suppressed when the fraction of the doped semiconducting carbon nanotubes will be less than 0.5, which is the percolation threshold for a two-dimensional triangular lattice.

  10. Multifunctional Nanotube Polymer Nanocomposites for Aerospace Applications: Adhesion between SWCNT and Polymer Matrix

    Park, Cheol; Wise, Kristopher E.; Kang, Jin Ho; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Lowther, Sharon E.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Smith, Michael W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; hide

    2008-01-01

    Multifunctional structural materials can enable a novel design space for advanced aerospace structures. A promising route to multifunctionality is the use of nanotubes possessing the desired combination of properties to enhance the characteristics of structural polymers. Recent nanotube-polymer nanocomposite studies have revealed that these materials have the potential to provide structural integrity as well as sensing and/or actuation capabilities. Judicious selection or modification of the polymer matrix to promote donor acceptor and/or dispersion interactions can improve adhesion at the interface between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix significantly. The effect of nanotube incorporation on the modulus and toughness of the polymer matrix will be presented. Very small loadings of single wall nanotubes in a polyimide matrix yield an effective sensor material that responds to strain, stress, pressure, and temperature. These materials also exhibit significant actuation in response to applied electric fields. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that physical properties of multifunctional material systems can be tailored for specific applications by controlling nanotube treatment (different types of nanotubes), concentration, and degree of alignment.

  11. Highly graphitized laterally interconnected SWCNT network synthesis via a sandwich-grown method

    Teng, I-Ju; Chen, Kai-Ling; Wang, Li-Chun; Kuo, Cheng-Tzu; Hsu, Hui-Lin; Jian, Sheng-Rui; Chen, Jung-Hsuan; Wang, Wei-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    We present a sandwich-grown method for growing laterally interconnected single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks with a high degree of graphitization by microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD). An Al 2 O 3 -supported Fe catalyst precursor layer deposited on an oxidized Si substrate with an upper Si cover is first pretreated in pure hydrogen, and then exposed to a gas mixture of methane/hydrogen for growth process at a lower growth temperature and a faster rate. The effects of various parameters, such as catalyst film thickness, gas flow rate, working pressure, growth time and plasma power, on the morphologies and structural characteristics of the SWCNT networks are investigated, and therefore provide the essential conditions for direct growth of laterally interconnected SWCNT networks. Analytical results demonstrate that the SWCNT-based lateral architecture comprises a mixture of graphene-sheet-wrapped catalyst particles and laterally interconnected nanotubes, isolated or branched or assembled into bundles. The results also show that the formation of the laterally interconnected SWCNT networks is related to the sandwich-like stack approach and the addition of an Al 2 O 3 layer in the MPCVD process. The successful growth of lateral SWCNT networks provides new experimental information for simply and efficiently preparing lateral SWCNTs on unpatterned substrates, and opens a pathway to create network-structured nanotube-based devices.

  12. Immunosensors Based on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT for the Detection of Deep Venous Thrombosis

    Sondes BOURIGUA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to their properties, Single-Walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT open a new way to the fabrication of Immunosensors with the particularity to amplify the response signal from antibody–antigen interaction and to improve the Immunosensors characteristics. In this context, two new impedimetric immunosensors were developed by immobilizing antibody on Single-Walled carbon, the later was immobilized following two ways the first consist of immobilizing the carbon nanotubes on a polypyrrole layer by adsorption and the second consist of functionalized gold with amino thiol and then immobilizing the carbon nanotubes with covalent binding. The electrical properties and the morphology of the immunosensors have been characterized respectively by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and Atomic Force Spectroscopy. A low detection limit for both immunosensors was determined as 1 pg/ml and linear ranges up to 10 ng/ml with polypyrrole and up to 100 ng/ml with amino thiol were obtained. Moreover, the studied Immunosensors exhibited high sensitivity, stability and reproducibility.

  13. Self-assembly behavior of poly(fluorenyl styrene)-block-poly(2-vinyl pyridine) and their blends with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele; Li, Chaoxu; Hsu, Jung-Ching; Chen, Wen-Chang; Sugiyama, Kenji; Hirao, Akira

    2010-03-01

    We describe a supramolecular strategy to disperse carbon nanotubes in block copolymer matrices. To achieve the desired functions and morphologies, comb-type architectures in which one and two fluorene units attached on the styrene ring of polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinyl pyridine) were studied. Depending on the pendant fluorene units, the block ratio, the casting solvent and thermal annealing history, multiple morphologies were found. The phase diagram, compared to PS-b-P2VP, was interpreted in terms of the conformational asymmetry arising from grafting of fluorene units of variable lengths. Hydrogen bonds between COOH-SWCNT and P2VP favor miscibility of SWCNT within P2VP domains and the blending of these two components is reflected both on the final morphologies and on the electron conductivity of the blends.

  14. Mass Transport Through Carbon Nanotube-Polystyrene Bundles

    Lin, Rongzhou; Tran, Tuan

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been widely used as test channels to study nanofluidic transport, which has been found to have distinctive properties compared to transport of fluids in macroscopic channels. A long-standing challenge in the study of mass transport through carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is the determination of flow enhancement. Various experimental investigations have been conducted to measure the flow rate through CNTs, mainly based on either vertically aligned CNT membranes or individual CNTs. Here, we proposed an alternative approach that can be used to quantify the mass transport through CNTs. This is a simple method relying on the use of carbon nanotube-polystyrene bundles, which are made of CNTs pulled out from a vertically aligned CNT array and glued together by polystyrene. We experimentally showed by using fluorescent tagging that the composite bundles allowed measureable and selective mass transport through CNTs. This type of composite bundle may be useful in various CNT research areas as they are simple to fabricate, less likely to form macroscopic cracks, and offer a high density of CNT pores while maintaining the aligned morphology of CNTs.

  15. Condensation of helium in interstitial sites of carbon nanotubes bundles

    Marcone, B.; Orlandini, E.; Toigo, F.; Ancilotto, F.

    2006-01-01

    Helium atoms are believed to be strongly bound within the interstitial channels in bundles of carbon nanotubes. In a recent paper [F. Ancilotto et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 165422 (2004)] inhomogeneity in the size distribution of nanotube radii was shown to make a system of 4 He atoms in such an environment effectively a four-dimensional Bose gas, thus permitting a Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of the adsorbed atoms into the minimum energy state. This surprising result was obtained for a model of noninteracting atoms in a continuum distribution of (virtually) infinite interstitial channels. Here we investigate how the singular thermal properties of the ideal system and the occurrence of BEC are affected by a more realistic modeling of a bundle of nanotubes where (i) the number of nanotubes is finite and where (ii) 4 He atoms adsorbed within the same interstitial channel interact among themselves. Also in this case we observe an anomalous heat capacity close to the ideal condensation temperature, suggesting the persistence of the condensation transition for interacting 4 He atoms, which might be experimentally observed

  16. Ion-irradiation-induced defects in bundles of carbon nanotubes

    Salonen, E.; Krasheninnikov, A.V.; Nordlund, K.

    2002-01-01

    We study the structure and formation yields of atomic-scale defects produced by low-dose Ar ion irradiation in bundles of single-wall carbon nanotubes. For this, we employ empirical potential molecular dynamics and simulate ion impact events over an energy range of 100-1000 eV. We show that the most common defects produced at all energies are vacancies on nanotube walls, which at low temperatures are metastable but long-lived defects. We further calculate the spatial distribution of the defects, which proved to be highly non-uniform. We also show that ion irradiation gives rise to the formations of inter-tube covalent bonds mediated by carbon recoils and nanotube lattice distortions due to dangling bond saturation. The number of inter-tube links, as well as the overall damage, linearly grows with the energy of incident ions

  17. Helium Adsorption on Carbon Nanotube Bundles with Different Diameters:. Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Majidi, R.; Karami, A. R.

    2013-05-01

    We have used molecular dynamics simulation to study helium adsorption capacity of carbon nanotube bundles with different diameters. Homogeneous carbon nanotube bundles of (8,8), (9,9), (10,10), (11,11), and (12,12) single walled carbon nanotubes have been considered. The results indicate that the exohedral adsorption coverage does not depend on the diameter of carbon nanotubes, while the endohedral adsorption coverage is increased by increasing the diameter.

  18. Pressure effects on single wall carbon nanotube bundles

    Teredesai, P.V.; Sharma, S.M.; Karmakar, S.; Sikka, S.K.; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C.N.R.

    2001-01-01

    We report high pressure Raman studies on single wall carbon nanotube bundles under hydrostatic conditions using two different pressure transmitting media, alcohol mixture and pure water. The radial and tangential modes show a blue shift when SWNT bundle is immersed in the liquids at ambient pressures. The pressure dependence of the radial modes is the same in both liquids. However, the pressure derivatives dω/dP of the tangential modes are slightly higher for the water medium. Raman results are compared with studies under non-hydrostatic conditions and with recent high-pressure X-ray studies. It is seen that the mode frequencies of the recovered sample after pressure cycling from 26 GPa are downshifted by ∝7-10 cm -1 as compared to the starting sample. (orig.)

  19. Fabrication of high strength PVA/SWCNT composite fibers by gel spinning

    Xu, Xuezhu; Uddin, Ahmed Jalal; Aoki, Kenta; Gotoh, Yasuo; Saito, Takeshi; Yumura, Motoo

    2010-01-01

    High-strength composite fibers were prepared from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) (Degree of polymerization: 1500) reinforced by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) containing few defects. The SWCNTs were dispersed in a 10 wt.% PVA/dimethylsulfoxide solution using a mechanical homogenizer that reduced the size of SWCNT aggregations to smaller bundles. The macroscopically homogeneous dispersion was extruded into cold methanol to form fibers by gel spinning followed by a hot-drawing. The tensile st...

  20. Optical absorption and thermal transport of individual suspended carbon nanotube bundles.

    Hsu, I-Kai; Pettes, Michael T; Bushmaker, Adam; Aykol, Mehmet; Shi, Li; Cronin, Stephen B

    2009-02-01

    A focused laser beam is used to heat individual single-walled carbon nanotube bundles bridging two suspended microthermometers. By measurement of the temperature rise of the two thermometers, the optical absorption of 7.4-10.3 nm diameter bundles is found to be between 0.03 and 0.44% of the incident photons in the 0.4 microm diameter laser spot. The thermal conductance of the bundle is obtained with the additional measurement of the temperature rise of the nanotubes in the laser spot from shifts in the Raman G band frequency. According to the nanotube bundle diameter determined by transmission electron microscopy, the thermal conductivity is obtained.

  1. SWCNT Composites, Interfacial Strength and Mechanical Properties

    Ma, Jing; Larsen, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT) have despite the superior mechanical properties not fully lived up to the promise as reinforcement in SWCNT composites. The strain transfer from matrix to carbon nanotubes (CNT) is poorly understood and is caused by both fewer localized strong...... is applied to the composite materials. The effect of polymer matrix, modification and concentration of the CNTs are discussed. The strain transfer i.e. 2D band shift under tension is compared to the mechanical properties of the SWCNT composite material....

  2. Superconductivity in bundles of double-wall carbon nanotubes.

    Shi, Wu; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Qiucen; Zheng, Yuan; Ieong, Chao; He, Mingquan; Lortz, Rolf; Cai, Yuan; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Haijing; Tang, Zikang; Sheng, Ping; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Araujo, Paulo T; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2012-01-01

    We present electrical and thermal specific heat measurements that show superconductivity in double-wall carbon nanotube (DWCNT) bundles. Clear evidence, comprising a resistance drop as a function of temperature, magnetoresistance and differential resistance signature of the supercurrent, suggest an intrinsic superconducting transition below 6.8 K for one particular sample. Additional electrical data not only confirm the existence of superconductivity, but also indicate the T(c) distribution that can arise from the diversity in the diameter and chirality of the DWCNTs. A broad superconducting anomaly is observed in the specific heat of a bulk DWCNT sample, which yields a T(c) distribution that correlates well with the range of the distribution obtained from the electrical data. As quasi one dimensionality of the DWCNTs dictates the existence of electronic density of state peaks, confirmation of superconductivity in this material system opens the exciting possibility of tuning the T(c) through the application of a gate voltage.

  3. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of structural and electronic properties of silicon carbide nanotube bundles

    Moradian, Rostam; Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad

    2008-10-01

    By using ab initio density functional theory the structural and electronic properties of isolated and bundled (8,0) and (6,6) silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) are investigated. Our results show that for such small diameter nanotubes the inter-tube interaction causes a very small radial deformation, while band splitting and reduction of the semiconducting energy band gap are significant. We compared the equilibrium interaction energy and inter-tube separation distance of (8,0) SiCNT bundle with (10,0) carbon nanotube (CNT) bundle where they have the same radius. We found that there is a larger inter-tube separation and weaker inter-tube interaction in the (8,0) SiCNT bundle with respect to (10,0) CNT bundle, although they have the same radius.

  4. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of structural and electronic properties of silicon carbide nanotube bundles

    Moradian, Rostam; Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad

    2008-01-01

    By using ab initio density functional theory the structural and electronic properties of isolated and bundled (8,0) and (6,6) silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) are investigated. Our results show that for such small diameter nanotubes the inter-tube interaction causes a very small radial deformation, while band splitting and reduction of the semiconducting energy band gap are significant. We compared the equilibrium interaction energy and inter-tube separation distance of (8,0) SiCNT bundle with (10,0) carbon nanotube (CNT) bundle where they have the same radius. We found that there is a larger inter-tube separation and weaker inter-tube interaction in the (8,0) SiCNT bundle with respect to (10,0) CNT bundle, although they have the same radius

  5. Reinforcement of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles by intertube bridging

    Kis, A.; Csányi, G.; Salvetat, J.-P.; Lee, Thien-Nga; Couteau, E.; Kulik, A. J.; Benoit, W.; Brugger, J.; Forró, L.

    2004-03-01

    During their production, single-walled carbon nanotubes form bundles. Owing to the weak van der Waals interaction that holds them together in the bundle, the tubes can easily slide on each other, resulting in a shear modulus comparable to that of graphite. This low shear modulus is also a major obstacle in the fabrication of macroscopic fibres composed of carbon nanotubes. Here, we have introduced stable links between neighbouring carbon nanotubes within bundles, using moderate electron-beam irradiation inside a transmission electron microscope. Concurrent measurements of the mechanical properties using an atomic force microscope show a 30-fold increase of the bending modulus, due to the formation of stable crosslinks that effectively eliminate sliding between the nanotubes. Crosslinks were modelled using first-principles calculations, showing that interstitial carbon atoms formed during irradiation in addition to carboxyl groups, can independently lead to bridge formation between neighbouring nanotubes.

  6. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of electronic properties of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    Moradian, Rostam; Behzad, Somayeh; Azadi, Sam

    2008-09-01

    By using ab initio density functional theory we investigated the structural and electronic properties of semiconducting (7, 0), (8, 0) and (10, 0) carbon nanotube bundles. The energetic and electronic evolutions of nanotubes in the bundling process are also studied. The effects of inter-tube coupling on the electronic dispersions of semiconducting carbon nanotube bundles are demonstrated. Our results show that the inter-tube coupling decreases the energy gap in semiconducting nanotubes. We found that bundles of (7, 0) and (8, 0) carbon nanotubes have metallic feature, while (10, 0) bundle is a semiconductor with an energy gap of 0.22 eV. To clarify our results the band structures of isolated and bundled nanotubes are compared.

  7. Quantitative study of bundle size effect on thermal conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Feng, Ya; Inoue, Taiki; An, Hua; Xiang, Rong; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2018-05-01

    Compared with isolated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), thermal conductivity is greatly impeded in SWNT bundles; however, the measurement of the bundle size effect is difficult. In this study, the number of SWNTs in a bundle was determined based on the transferred horizontally aligned SWNTs on a suspended micro-thermometer to quantitatively study the effect of the bundle size on thermal conductivity. Increasing the bundle size significantly degraded the thermal conductivity. For isolated SWNTs, thermal conductivity was approximately 5000 ± 1000 W m-1 K-1 at room temperature, three times larger than that of the four-SWNT bundle. The logarithmical deterioration of thermal conductivity resulting from the increased bundle size can be attributed to the increased scattering rate with neighboring SWNTs based on the kinetic theory.

  8. The effect of purification of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles on the alcohol sensitivity of nanocomposite Langmuir-Blodgett films for SAW sensing applications

    Penza, M; Tagliente, M A; Aversa, P; Re, M; Cassano, G

    2007-01-01

    HiPco (high-pressure CO dissociation process) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles containing Fe particles were purified in a two-step purification process by thermal annealing in oxygen and post-treatment in HCl. Nanocomposite films of pristine and purified SWCNTs embedded in an organic matrix of cadmium arachidate (CdA) were prepared by a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) molecular engineering technique with a fixed weight filler content of 75 wt% onto a surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer operating as an oscillator at a frequency of 433 MHz. The raw and purified samples were characterized at various stages of the purification process using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), along with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Functional characterizations of the SWCNT-nanocomposite-based SAW sensors were investigated towards methanol, isopropanol and ethanol, and demonstrated high sensitivity, reversibility, fast response and ppm level detection at room temperature. Results indicate that the sensitivity of the SAW sensors based on a nanocomposite film of oxygen-annealed SWCNTs is enhanced to the alcohols tested at room temperature. Purification of the SWCNTs in the nanocomposite film affects the SAW sensitivity to alcohol by modulating the sensing properties. The sensing mechanisms are analysed and discussed

  9. The effect of purification of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles on the alcohol sensitivity of nanocomposite Langmuir-Blodgett films for SAW sensing applications

    Penza, M; Tagliente, M A; Aversa, P; Re, M; Cassano, G [ENEA, Department of Physical Technologies and New Materials, SS 7, Appia, km 714-72100 Brindisi (Italy)

    2007-05-09

    HiPco (high-pressure CO dissociation process) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles containing Fe particles were purified in a two-step purification process by thermal annealing in oxygen and post-treatment in HCl. Nanocomposite films of pristine and purified SWCNTs embedded in an organic matrix of cadmium arachidate (CdA) were prepared by a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) molecular engineering technique with a fixed weight filler content of 75 wt% onto a surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer operating as an oscillator at a frequency of 433 MHz. The raw and purified samples were characterized at various stages of the purification process using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), along with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Functional characterizations of the SWCNT-nanocomposite-based SAW sensors were investigated towards methanol, isopropanol and ethanol, and demonstrated high sensitivity, reversibility, fast response and ppm level detection at room temperature. Results indicate that the sensitivity of the SAW sensors based on a nanocomposite film of oxygen-annealed SWCNTs is enhanced to the alcohols tested at room temperature. Purification of the SWCNTs in the nanocomposite film affects the SAW sensitivity to alcohol by modulating the sensing properties. The sensing mechanisms are analysed and discussed.

  10. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of Li-intercalated silicon carbide nanotube bundles

    Moradian, Rostam; Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of ab initio density functional theory calculations on the energetic, and geometric and electronic structure of Li-intercalated (6,6) silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNT) bundles. Our results show that intercalation of lithium leads to the significant changes in the geometrical structure. The most prominent effect of Li intercalation on the electronic band structure is a shift of the Fermi energy which occurs as a result of charge transfer from lithium to the SiCNTs. All the Li-intercalated (6,6) SiCNT bundles are predicted to be metallic representing a substantial change in electronic properties relative to the undoped bundle, which is a wide band gap semiconductor. Both inside of the nanotube and the interstitial space are susceptible for intercalation. The present calculations suggest that the SiCNT bundle is a promising candidate for the anode material in battery applications.

  11. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of Li-intercalated silicon carbide nanotube bundles

    Moradian, Rostam; Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad

    2009-06-01

    We present the results of ab initio density functional theory calculations on the energetic, and geometric and electronic structure of Li-intercalated ( 6,6) silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNT) bundles. Our results show that intercalation of lithium leads to the significant changes in the geometrical structure. The most prominent effect of Li intercalation on the electronic band structure is a shift of the Fermi energy which occurs as a result of charge transfer from lithium to the SiCNTs. All the Li-intercalated ( 6,6) SiCNT bundles are predicted to be metallic representing a substantial change in electronic properties relative to the undoped bundle, which is a wide band gap semiconductor. Both inside of the nanotube and the interstitial space are susceptible for intercalation. The present calculations suggest that the SiCNT bundle is a promising candidate for the anode material in battery applications.

  12. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of Li-intercalated silicon carbide nanotube bundles

    Moradian, Rostam [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Science and Technology Research Center, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Computational Physical Science Research Laboratory, Department of Nano Science, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: moradian.rostam@gmail.com; Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    We present the results of ab initio density functional theory calculations on the energetic, and geometric and electronic structure of Li-intercalated (6,6) silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNT) bundles. Our results show that intercalation of lithium leads to the significant changes in the geometrical structure. The most prominent effect of Li intercalation on the electronic band structure is a shift of the Fermi energy which occurs as a result of charge transfer from lithium to the SiCNTs. All the Li-intercalated (6,6) SiCNT bundles are predicted to be metallic representing a substantial change in electronic properties relative to the undoped bundle, which is a wide band gap semiconductor. Both inside of the nanotube and the interstitial space are susceptible for intercalation. The present calculations suggest that the SiCNT bundle is a promising candidate for the anode material in battery applications.

  13. Structure and Characterization of Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    Marquez, F.; Morant, C.; Elizalde, E.; Roque-Malherbe, R.; Lopez, V.; Zamora, F.; Domingo, C.

    2010-01-01

    Arrays of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube bundles, SWCNTs, have been synthesized by simple alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition process, carried out at 800 degree C. The formed SWCNTs are organized in small groups perpendicularly aligned and attached to the substrate. These small bundles show a constant diameter of ca. 30 nm and are formed by the adhesion of no more than twenty individual SWCNTs perfectly aligned along their length.

  14. Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes over vertically aligned silicon nanowire bundles for achieving uniform field emission.

    Hung, Yung-Jr; Huang, Yung-Jui; Chang, Hsuan-Chen; Lee, Kuei-Yi; Lee, San-Liang

    2014-01-01

    A fabrication strategy is proposed to enable precise coverage of as-grown carbon nanotube (CNT) mats atop vertically aligned silicon nanowire (VA-SiNW) bundles in order to realize a uniform bundle array of CNT-SiNW heterojunctions over a large sample area. No obvious electrical degradation of as-fabricated SiNWs is observed according to the measured current-voltage characteristic of a two-terminal single-nanowire device. Bundle arrangement of CNT-SiNW heterojunctions is optimized to relax the electrostatic screening effect and to maximize the field enhancement factor. As a result, superior field emission performance and relatively stable emission current over 12 h is obtained. A bright and uniform fluorescent radiation is observed from CNT-SiNW-based field emitters regardless of its bundle periodicity, verifying the existence of high-density and efficient field emitters on the proposed CNT-SiNW bundle arrays.

  15. Polymer-Assisted Direct Deposition of Uniform Carbon Nanotube Bundle Networks for High Performance Transparent Electrodes

    Hellstrom, Sondra L.; Lee, Hang Woo; Bao, Zhenan

    2009-01-01

    Flexible transparent electrodes are crucial for touch screen, flat panel display, and solar cell technologies. While carbon nanotube network electrodes show promise, characteristically poor dispersion properties have limited their practicality. We report that addition of small amounts of conjugated polymer to nanotube dispersions enables straightforward fabrication of uniform network electrodes by spin-coating and simultaneous tuning of parameters such as bundle size and density. After treatment in thionyl chloride, electrodes have sheet resistances competitive with other reported carbon nanotube based transparent electrodes to date. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  16. Polymer-Assisted Direct Deposition of Uniform Carbon Nanotube Bundle Networks for High Performance Transparent Electrodes

    Hellstrom, Sondra L.

    2009-06-23

    Flexible transparent electrodes are crucial for touch screen, flat panel display, and solar cell technologies. While carbon nanotube network electrodes show promise, characteristically poor dispersion properties have limited their practicality. We report that addition of small amounts of conjugated polymer to nanotube dispersions enables straightforward fabrication of uniform network electrodes by spin-coating and simultaneous tuning of parameters such as bundle size and density. After treatment in thionyl chloride, electrodes have sheet resistances competitive with other reported carbon nanotube based transparent electrodes to date. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  17. Enhancing the efficiency of lithium intercalation in carbon nanotube bundles using surface functional groups.

    Xiao, Shiyan; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Lei; Chen, Liping; Liang, Haojun

    2014-08-14

    The effect of surface functionalization on the ability and kinetics of lithium intercalation in carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles has been studied by comparing the dynamical behaviors of lithium (Li) ions in pristine and -NH2 functionalized CNTs via ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. It was observed that lithium intercalation has been achieved quickly for both the pristine and surface functionalized CNT bundle. Our calculations demonstrated for the first time that CNT functionalization improved the efficiency of lithium intercalation significantly at both low and high Li ion density. Moreover, we found that keeping the nanotubes apart with an appropriate distance and charging the battery at a rational rate were beneficial to achieve a high rate of lithium intercalation. Besides, the calculated adsorption energy curves indicated that the potential wells in the system of -NH2 functionalized CNT were deeper than that of the pristine CNT bundle by 0.74 eV, and a third energy minimum with a value of 2.64 eV existed at the midpoint of the central axis of the nanotube. Thus, it would be more difficult to remove Li ions from the nanotube interior after surface functionalization. The barrier for lithium diffusion in the interior of the nanotube is greatly decreased because of the surface functional groups. Based on these results, we would suggest to "damage" the nanotube by introducing defects at its sidewall in order to improve not only the capacity of surface functionalized CNTs but also the efficiency of lithium intercalation and deintercalation processes. Our results presented here are helpful in understanding the mechanism of lithium intercalation into nanotube bundles, which may potentially be applied in the development of CNT based electrodes.

  18. Gas sensing at the nanoscale: engineering SWCNT-ITO nano-heterojunctions for the selective detection of NH3 and NO2 target molecules

    Rigoni, F.; Drera, G.; Pagliara, S.; Perghem, E.; Pintossi, C.; Goldoni, A.; Sangaletti, L.

    2017-01-01

    The gas response of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) functionalized with indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles (NP) has been studied at room temperature and an enhanced sensitivity to ammonia and nitrogen dioxide is demonstrated. The higher sensitivity in the functionalized sample is related to the creation of nano-heterojunctions at the interface between SWCNT bundles and ITO NP. Furthermore, the different response of the two devices upon NO2 exposure provides a way to enhance also the selectivity. This behavior is rationalized by considering a gas sensing mechanism based on the build-up of space-charge layers at the junctions. Finally, full recovery of the signal after exposure to NO2 is achieved by UV irradiation for the functionalized sample, where the ITO NP can play a role to hinder the poisoning effects on SWCNT due to NO2 chemisorption.

  19. Enhanced field emission properties of carbon nanotube bundles confined in SiO2 pits

    Lim, Yu Dian; Grapov, Dmitry; Hu, Liangxing; Kong, Qinyu; Tay, Beng Kang; Labunov, Vladimir; Miao, Jianmin; Coquet, Philippe; Aditya, Sheel

    2018-02-01

    It has been widely reported that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit superior field emission (FE) properties due to their high aspect ratios and unique structural properties. Among the various types of CNTs, random growth CNTs exhibit promising FE properties due to their reduced inter-tube screening effect. However, growing random growth CNTs on individual catalyst islands often results in spread out CNT bundles, which reduces overall field enhancement. In this study, significant improvement in FE properties in CNT bundles is demonstrated by confining them in microfabricated SiO2 pits. Growing CNT bundles in narrow (0.5 μm diameter and 2 μm height) SiO2 pits achieves FE current density of 1-1.4 A cm-2, which is much higher than for freestanding CNT bundles (76.9 mA cm-2). From the Fowler Nordheim plots, confined CNT bundles show a higher field enhancement factor. This improvement can be attributed to the reduced bundle diameter by SiO2 pit confinement, which yields bundles with higher aspect ratios. Combining the obtained outcomes, it can be conclusively summarized that confining CNTs in SiO2 pits yields higher FE current density due to the higher field enhancement of confined CNTs.

  20. Characterization of bundled and individual triple-walled carbon nanotubes by resonant Raman spectroscopy.

    Hirschmann, Thomas Ch; Araujo, Paulo T; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Zhang, Xu; Nielsch, Kornelius; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2013-03-26

    The optical characterization of bundled and individual triple-walled carbon nanotubes was studied for the first time in detail by using resonant Raman spectroscopy. In our approach, the outer tube of a triple-walled carbon nanotube system protects the two inner tubes (or equivalently the inner double-walled carbon nanotube) from external environment interactions making them a partially isolated system. Following the spectral changes and line-widths of the radial breathing modes and G-band by performing laser energy dependent Raman spectroscopy, it is possible to extract important information as regards to the electronic and vibrational properties, tube diameters, wall-to-wall distances, radial breathing mode, and G-band resonance evolutions as well as high-curvature intertube interactions in isolated double- and triple-walled carbon nanotube systems.

  1. High pressure Raman spectroscopy of single-walled carbon nanotubes: Effect of chemical environment on individual nanotubes and the nanotube bundle

    Proctor, John E.; Halsall, Matthew P.; Ghandour, Ahmad; Dunstan, David J.

    2006-12-01

    The pressure-induced tangential mode Raman peak shifts for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been studied using a variety of different solvents as hydrostatic pressure-transmitting media. The variation in the nanotube response to hydrostatic pressure with different pressure transmitting media is evidence that the common solvents used are able to penetrate the interstitial spaces in the nanotube bundle. With hexane, we find the surprising result that the individual nanotubes appear unaffected by hydrostatic pressures (i.e. a flat Raman response) up to 0.7 GPa. Qualitatively similar results have been obtained with butanol. Following the approach of Amer et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 121 (2004) 2752], we speculate that this is due to the inability of SWNTs to adsorb some solvents onto their surface at lower pressures. We also find that the role of cohesive energy density in the solvent nanotube interaction is more complex than previously thought.

  2. Liquefaction of H2 molecules upon exterior surfaces of carbon nanotube bundles

    Han, Sang Soo; Kang, Jeung Ku; Lee, Hyuck Mo; Duin, Adri C.T. van; Goddard, William A. III

    2005-01-01

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to investigate interaction of H 2 molecules on the exterior surfaces of carbon nanotubes (CNTs): single and bundle types. At 80 K and 10 MPa, it is found that charge transfer occurs from a low curvature region to a high curvature region of the deformed CNT bundle, which develops charge polarization only on the deformed structure. The long-range electrostatic interactions of polarized charges on the deformed CNT bundle with hydrogen molecules are observed to induce a high local-ordering of H 2 gas that results in hydrogen liquefaction. Our predicted heat of hydrogen liquefaction on the CNT bundle is 97.6 kcal kg -1 . On the other hand, hydrogen liquefaction is not observed in the CNT of a single type. This is because charge polarization is not developed on the single CNT as it is symmetrically deformed under the same pressure. Consequently, the hydrogen storage capacity on the CNT bundle is much higher due to liquefaction than that on the single CNT. Additionally, our results indicate that it would also be possible to liquefy H 2 gas on a more strongly polarized CNT bundle at temperatures higher than 80 K

  3. Electrostatically actuated oscillator of bundle and double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Kang, Jeong Won; Song, Ki Oh; Hwang, Ho Jung [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ha; Lee, Hoong Joo [Sangmyung University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Keun [Semyung University, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Sik; Song, Young Jin [Konyang University, Nonsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    Schematics of capacitively driven carbon nanotube (CNT) oscillators were presented and investigated by using classical molecular dynamics simulations. While the capacitive force acting on a CNT oscillator extruded it, the force exerted by the excess van der Waals energy sucked the CNT oscillator into the bundle or outer shell. The CNT oscillator could be oscillated by using both the Coulomb and the van der Waals interactions. The van der Waals force of the bundle-type CNT oscillator was less than the van der Waals force of the double-walled CNT oscillator. Molecular dynamics simulation results showed that double-walled CNT oscillators were better than bundle-type CNT oscillators in the aspects of both energy dissipation and stable operation.

  4. Electronic structure and optical properties of boron nitride nanotube bundles from first principles

    Behzad, Somayeh

    2015-06-01

    The electronic and optical properties of bundled armchair and zigzag boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are investigated by using density functional theory. Owing to the inter-tube coupling, the dispersions along the tube axis and in the plane perpendicular to the tube axis of BNNT bundles are significantly varied, which are characterized by the decrease of band gap, the splitting of the doubly degenerated states, the expansions of valence and conduction bands. The calculated dielectric functions of the armchair and zigzag bundles are similar to that of the isolated tubes, except for the appearance of broadened peaks, small shifts of peak positions about 0.1 eV and increasing of peak intensities.

  5. Scalable synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes bundles using green natural precursor: neem oil

    Kumar Rajesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Practical application of aligned carbon nanotubes (ACNTs would have to be determined by a matter of its economical and large-scale preparation. In this study, neem oil (also named Margoaa oil, extracted from the seeds of the neem--Azadirachta indica was used as carbon source to fabricate the bundles of ACNTs. ACNTs have been synthesized by spray pyrolysis of neem oil and ferrocene mixture at 825°C. The major components of neem oil are hydrocarbon with less amount of oxygen, which provided the precursor species in spray pyrolysis growth of CNTs. The bundles of ACNTs have been grown directly inside the quartz tube. The as-grown ACNTs have been characterized through Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopic (SEM/TEM techniques. SEM images reveal that the bundles of ACNTs are densely packed and are of several microns in length. High-resolution TEM analysis reveals these nanotubes to be multi-walled CNTs. These multi-walled CNTs were found to have inner diameter between 15 and 30 nm. It was found that present technique gives high yield with high density of bundles of ACNTs.

  6. Thermophysical properties of multi-wall carbon nanotube bundles at elevated temperatures up to 830 K

    Wang, Xinwei; Wang, Jianmei; Huang, Xiaopeng; Eres, Gyula

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the results of thermal transport measurements in multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) bundles at elevated temperatures. A novel generalized electrothermal technique (GET) was developed for measuring the thermal diffusivity ( ) and conductivity (k) of MWCNT bundles. The results show that the feeding current has a negligible effect on the thermal properties. The measured k is larger than the reported values for unaligned bundles, and is comparable to that of typical aligned arrays. Compared with experimental and theoretical data for individual CNTs, k of the MWCNT bundles is two to three orders of magnitude lower, suggesting that the thermal transport in CNT bundles is dominated by the thermal contact resistance of tube-to-tube junctions. The effective density for the two MWCNT bundles, which is difficult to measure using other techniques, was determined to be 116 kg/m3 and 234 kg/m3, respectively. The temperature dependences of and k at temperatures up to 830 K was obtained. slightly decreases with temperature while k exhibits a small increase with temperature up to 500 K and then decreases. For the first time, the behavior of specific heat cp(T) for CNTs above room temperature was determined. The specific heat is close to graphite at 300-400 K but is lower than that for graphite above 400 K, indicating that the behavior of phonons in MWCNT bundles is dominated by boundary scattering rather than by the three-phonon Umklapp process. The length of the mean curvature between two adjacent tube contact points in these bundles is estimated to be on the order of micrometer to millimeter. The analysis of the radiation heat loss suggests that it needs to be considered when measuring the thermophysical properties of micro/nano wires of high aspect ratios at elevated temperatures, especially for individual CNTs due to their extremely small diameter.

  7. A six degree of freedom nanomanipulator design based on carbon nanotube bundles

    Artyukhov, Vasilii I

    2010-01-01

    Scanning probe imaging and manipulation of matter is of crucial importance for nanoscale science and technology. However, its resolution and ability to manipulate matter at the atomic scale is limited by rather poor control over the fine structure of the probe. In the present paper, a strategy is proposed to construct a molecular nanomanipulator from ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotubes. Covalent modification of a nanotube cap at predetermined atomic sites makes the nanotube act as a support for a functional 'tooltip' molecule. Then, a small bundle of nanotubes (three or four) with aligned ends can act as an extremely high aspect ratio parallel nanomanipulator for a suspended molecule, where protraction or retraction of individual nanotubes results in controlled tilting of the tooltip in two dimensions. Together with the usual scanning probe microscopy three degrees of freedom and augmented with rotation of the system as a whole, the design offers six degrees of freedom for imaging and manipulation of matter with the precision and freedom so much needed for advanced nanotechnology. A similar design might be possible to implement with other high aspect ratio nanostructures, such as oxide nanowires.

  8. Influence of carbon nanotubes on the buckling of microtubule bundles in viscoelastic cytoplasm using nonlocal strain gradient theory

    A. Farajpour

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are a new class of microtubule-stabilizing agents since they interact with protein microtubules in living cells, interfering with cell division and inducing apoptosis. In the present work, a modified beam model is developed to investigate the effect of carbon nanotubes on the buckling of microtubule bundles in living cell. A realistic interaction model is employed using recent experimental data on the carbon nanotube-stabilized microtubules. Small scale and surface effects are taken into account applying the nonlocal strain gradient theory and surface elasticity theory. Pasternak model is used to describe the normal and shearing effects of enclosing filament matrix on the buckling behavior of the system. An exact solution is obtained for the buckling growth rates of the mixed bundle in viscoelastic surrounding cytoplasm. The present results are compared with those reported in the open literature for single microtubules and an excellent agreement is found. Finally, the effects of different parameters such as the size, chirality, position and surface energy of carbon nanotubes on the buckling growth rates of microtubule bundles are studied. It is found that the buckling growth rate may increase or decrease by adding carbon nanotubes, depending on the diameter and chirality of carbon nanotubes. Keywords: Microtubules, Carbon nanotubes, Buckling, Size effects

  9. {sup 4}He on the outside of a bundle of (10,10) carbon nanotubes

    Gordillo, M C [Departamento de Sistemas Fisicos, Quimicos y Naturales. Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Sevilla (Spain)], E-mail: cgorbar@upo.es

    2009-02-01

    Diffusion Monte Carlo calculations were performed on the subject of {sup 4}He adsorbed on the external surface of (10,10) carbon nanotube bundles. The carbon nanotubes were considered to be defectless and perfectly parallel cylinders in which all individual carbon-helium interactions were considered. This corrugation makes this substrate a very inhomogeneous one, with a range of {sup 4}He binding energies in the infinity dilution limit between {approx} 227 and 202 K. On increasing the helium density, we go from a quasi one-dimensional phase on the grooves between two tubes, to a liquid monolayer, with a three-line arrangement in between. No stable solid helium monolayer at high density was found. Instead, helium atoms are promoted to a second quasi-one dimensional phase on top of the liquid first layer. On increasing the helium intake, a two layer structure is formed in which the helium directly in contact with the carbon surface solidifies.

  10. Effects of fullerene (C60), multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and hydroxyl and carboxyl modified single wall carbon nanotubes on riverine microbial communities.

    Lawrence, J R; Waiser, M J; Swerhone, G D W; Roy, J; Tumber, V; Paule, A; Hitchcock, A P; Dynes, J J; Korber, D R

    2016-05-01

    Commercial production of nanoparticles (NP) has created a need for research to support regulation of nanotechnology. In the current study, microbial biofilm communities were developed in rotating annular reactors during continuous exposure to 500 μg L(-1) of each nanomaterial and subjected to multimetric analyses. Scanning transmission X-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) was used to detect and estimate the presence of the carbon nanomaterials in the biofilm communities. Microscopy observations indicated that the communities were visibly different in appearance with changes in abundance of filamentous cyanobacteria in particular. Microscale analyses indicated that fullerene (C60) did not significantly (p carbon utilization revealed few significant effects with the exception of the utilization of carboxylic acids. PCA and ANOSIM analyses of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) results indicated that the bacterial communities exposed to fullerene were not different from the control, the MWCNT and SWNT-OH differed from the control but not each other, whereas the SWCNT and SWCNT-COOH both differed from all other treatments and were significantly different from the control (p carbon nanomaterials significantly alter aspects of microbial community structure and function supporting the need for further evaluation of their effects in aquatic habitats.

  11. Roles of inter-SWCNT junctions in resistive humidity response

    Zhang, Kang; Zou, Jianping; Zhang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    As a promising chemiresistor for gas sensing, the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network has not yet been fully utilized for humidity detection. In this work, it is found that as humidity increases from 10% to 85%, the resistance of as-grown SWCNT networks first decreases and then increases. This non-monotonic resistive response to humidity limits their sensing capabilities. The competition between SWCNT resistance and inter-tube junction resistance changes is then found to be responsible for the non-monotonic resistive humidity responses. Moreover, creating sp"3 scattering centers on the SWCNT sidewall by monovalent functionalization of four-bromobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate is shown to be capable of eliminating the influence from the inter-tube junctions, resulting in a continuous resistance drop as humidity increases from 10% to 85%. Our results revealed the competing resistive humidity sensing process in as-grown SWCNT networks, which could also be helpful in designing and optimizing as-grown SWCNT networks for humidity sensors and other gas sensors. (paper)

  12. Field emission from carbon nanotube bundle arrays grown on self-aligned ZnO nanorods

    Li Chun; Fang Guojia; Yuan Longyan; Liu Nishuang; Ai Lei; Xiang Qi; Zhao Dongshan; Pan Chunxu; Zhao Xingzhong

    2007-01-01

    The field emission (FE) properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundle arrays grown on vertically self-aligned ZnO nanorods (ZNRs) are reported. The ZNRs were first synthesized on ZnO-seed-coated Si substrate by the vapour phase transport method, and then the radically grown CNTs were grown directly on the surface of the ZNRs from ethanol flames. The CNT/ZNR composite showed a turn-on field of 1.5 V μm -1 (at 0.1 μA cm -2 ), a threshold field of 4.5 V μm -1 (at 1 mA cm -2 ) and a stable emission current with fluctuations of 5%, demonstrating significantly enhanced FE of ZNRs due to the low work function and high aspect ratio of the CNTs, and large surface-to-volume ratio of the underlying ZNRs

  13. Rectification effect about vacuum separating carbon nanotube bundle predicted by first-principles study

    Min, Y., E-mail: minshiyi@gmail.com [School of Science, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu, 226007 (China); Fang, J.H.; Zhong, C.G. [School of Science, Nantong University, Nantong, Jiangsu, 226007 (China); Yao, K.L. [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China)

    2012-05-07

    For the molecular spintronics transport systems, we propose that the spin current rectifier can be constructed using the nonmagnetic lead. The proposal is confirmed according to the first-principles study of the transport characteristics of a vacuum separating (15,0) carbon nanotube bundle where only one zigzag edge is hydrogenated. The strong rectification effect for spin (charge) current is obtained in the case of the magnetic parallel (anti-parallel) configuration of two zigzag edges. Our investigations indicate that such device can be used as the spin filter and the counterpart of the p–n junction in the field of molecular electronics. -- Highlights: ► We propose that nonmagnetic leads can construct spin current rectifier. ► We propose a spin diode and a filter using CNT. ► The spin and charge current all have the rectification effect in the one-dimensional spin diode.

  14. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of crystalline bundles of polygonized single-walled silicon carbide nanotubes

    Moradian, Rostam; Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: moradian.rostam@gmail.com

    2008-11-19

    By using ab initio density functional theory, the structural characterizations and electronic properties of two large-diameter (13, 13) and (14, 14) armchair silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNT) bundles are investigated. Full structural optimizations show that the cross sections of these large-diameter SiCNTs in the bundles have a nearly hexagonal shape. The effects of inter-tube coupling on the electronic dispersions of large-diameter SiCNT bundles are demonstrated. By comparing the band structures of the triangular lattices of (14, 14) SiCNTs with nearly hexagonal and circular cross sections we found that the polygonization of the tubes in the bundle leads to a further dispersion of the occupied bands and an increase in the bandgap by 0.18 eV.

  15. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of crystalline bundles of polygonized single-walled silicon carbide nanotubes

    Moradian, Rostam; Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad

    2008-01-01

    By using ab initio density functional theory, the structural characterizations and electronic properties of two large-diameter (13, 13) and (14, 14) armchair silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNT) bundles are investigated. Full structural optimizations show that the cross sections of these large-diameter SiCNTs in the bundles have a nearly hexagonal shape. The effects of inter-tube coupling on the electronic dispersions of large-diameter SiCNT bundles are demonstrated. By comparing the band structures of the triangular lattices of (14, 14) SiCNTs with nearly hexagonal and circular cross sections we found that the polygonization of the tubes in the bundle leads to a further dispersion of the occupied bands and an increase in the bandgap by 0.18 eV.

  16. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of crystalline bundles of polygonized single-walled silicon carbide nanotubes

    Moradian, Rostam; Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad

    2008-11-01

    By using ab initio density functional theory, the structural characterizations and electronic properties of two large-diameter (13, 13) and (14, 14) armchair silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNT) bundles are investigated. Full structural optimizations show that the cross sections of these large-diameter SiCNTs in the bundles have a nearly hexagonal shape. The effects of inter-tube coupling on the electronic dispersions of large-diameter SiCNT bundles are demonstrated. By comparing the band structures of the triangular lattices of (14, 14) SiCNTs with nearly hexagonal and circular cross sections we found that the polygonization of the tubes in the bundle leads to a further dispersion of the occupied bands and an increase in the bandgap by 0.18 eV.

  17. Tuning vertical alignment and field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    Sreekanth, M.; Ghosh, S.; Srivastava, P.

    2018-01-01

    We report the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube bundles on Si substrate by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique. Vertical alignment was achieved without any carrier gas or lithography-assisted deposition. Growth has been carried out at 850 °C for different quantities of solution of xylene and ferrocene ranging from 2.25 to 3.00 ml in steps of 0.25 ml at a fixed concentration of 0.02 gm (ferrocene) per ml. To understand the growth mechanism, deposition was carried out for different concentrations of the solution by changing only the ferrocene quantity, ranging from 0.01 to 0.03 gm/ml. A tunable vertical alignment of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been achieved by this process and examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopic techniques. Micro-crystalline structural analysis has been done using Raman spectroscopy. A systematic variation in field emission (FE) current density has been observed. The highest FE current density is seen for the film grown with 0.02 gm/ml concentration, which is attributed to the better alignment of CNTs, less structural disorder and less entanglement of CNTs on the surface. The alignment of CNTs has been qualitatively understood on the basis of self-assembled catalytic particles.

  18. Tin-oxide-coated single-walled carbon nanotube bundles supporting platinum electrocatalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    Hsu, Ryan S; Higgins, Drew; Chen Zhongwei

    2010-01-01

    Novel tin-oxide (SnO 2 )-coated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles supporting platinum (Pt) electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation were developed for direct ethanol fuel cells. SnO 2 -coated SWNT (SnO 2 -SWNT) bundles were synthesized by a simple chemical-solution route. SnO 2 -SWNT bundles supporting Pt (Pt/SnO 2 -SWNTs) electrocatalysts and SWNT-supported Pt (Pt/SWNT) electrocatalysts were prepared by an ethylene glycol reduction method. The catalysts were physically characterized using TGA, XRD and TEM and electrochemically evaluated through cyclic voltammetry experiments. The Pt/SnO 2 -SWNTs showed greatly enhanced electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation in acid medium, compared to the Pt/SWNT. The optimal SnO 2 loading of Pt/SnO 2 -SWNT catalysts with respect to specific catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation was also investigated.

  19. Tin-oxide-coated single-walled carbon nanotube bundles supporting platinum electrocatalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells.

    Hsu, Ryan S; Higgins, Drew; Chen, Zhongwei

    2010-04-23

    Novel tin-oxide (SnO(2))-coated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles supporting platinum (Pt) electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation were developed for direct ethanol fuel cells. SnO(2)-coated SWNT (SnO(2)-SWNT) bundles were synthesized by a simple chemical-solution route. SnO(2)-SWNT bundles supporting Pt (Pt/SnO(2)-SWNTs) electrocatalysts and SWNT-supported Pt (Pt/SWNT) electrocatalysts were prepared by an ethylene glycol reduction method. The catalysts were physically characterized using TGA, XRD and TEM and electrochemically evaluated through cyclic voltammetry experiments. The Pt/SnO(2)-SWNTs showed greatly enhanced electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation in acid medium, compared to the Pt/SWNT. The optimal SnO(2) loading of Pt/SnO(2)-SWNT catalysts with respect to specific catalytic activity for ethanol oxidation was also investigated.

  20. SWCNT-Based Biosensor Modelling for pH Detection

    Mohammad Javad Kiani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of CNT delivery have been discovered with several biomedical functions during past decades. The mechanisms of the cellular uptake of CNTs are mainly maintained due to the chemical nature, the cell type, and the features of the molecules, which are used to functionalize the nanotube exterior. Since single-wall carbon Nanotube (SWCNT has unique chemical and physical properties, it is a great applicant for pH sensing. In addition, ion sensitive FET (ISFET base on nanostructured SWCNT have covered a new method to help genetic investigators restructure metabolic pathways in cells, recognize the progression of disease, and expand diagnostics and therapeutics. Particularly, because PH sensing is very crucial for the constancy of enzymes, it is essential to extend the cost efficient types of this sensing. In this research, the conductance changes of the CNT-based ISFET device with different pH values can be modelled by ion concentration of the solution. In addition, the electrical current of channel is imagined as a function of pH levels, which can be controlled by a control factor (α. Thus, ISFET based nanostructured SWCNT is proposed focusing on the area of electrical detection of hydrogen ions of the electrolyte membrane. Besides, electrical detection of hydrogen ion applications is suggested to be used by modelling the delivery of SWCNT sheets. In the end, after comparing the proposed model and experimental data, it has been reported that there is a good compatibility between them.

  1. DNA-templated synthesis of Pt nanoparticles on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Dong, Lifeng

    2009-11-18

    A series of electron microscopy characterizations demonstrate that single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (ssDNA) can bind to nanotube surfaces and disperse bundled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) into individual tubes. The ssDNA molecules on the nanotube surfaces demonstrate various morphologies, such as aggregated clusters and spiral wrapping around a nanotube with different pitches and spaces, indicating that the morphology of the SWCNT/DNA hybrids is not related solely to the base sequence of the ssDNA or the chirality or the diameter of the nanotubes. In addition to serving as a non-covalent dispersion agent, the ssDNA molecules bonded to the nanotube surface can provide addresses for localizing Pt(II) complexes along the nanotubes. The Pt nanoparticles obtained by a reduction of the Pt2+-DNA adducts are crystals with a size of direct ethanol/methanol fuel cells and nanoscale electronics.

  2. On the preparation of as-produced and purified single-walled carbon nanotube samples for standardized X-ray diffraction characterization

    Allaf, Rula M.; Rivero, Iris V.; Spearman, Shayla S.; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research was to specify proper sample conditioning for acquiring representative X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles for single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) samples. In doing so, a specimen preparation method for quantitative XRD characterization of as-produced and purified arc-discharge SWCNT samples has been identified. Series of powder XRD profiles were collected at different temperatures, states, and points of time to establish appropriate conditions for acquiring XRD profiles without inducing much change to the specimen. It was concluded that heating in the 300-450 deg. C range for 20 minutes, preferably vacuum-assisted, and then sealing the sample is an appropriate XRD specimen preparation technique for purified arc-discharge SWCNT samples, while raw samples do not require preconditioning for characterization. - Graphical Abstract: A sample preparation method for XRD characterization of as-produced and purified arc-discharge SWCNT samples is identified. The preparation technique seeks to acquire representative XRD profiles without inducing changes to the samples. Purified samples required 20 minutes of heating at (300-450)deg. C, while raw samples did not require preconditioning for characterization. Highlights: → Purification routines may induce adsorption onto the SWCNT samples. → Heating a SWCNT sample may result in material loss, desorption, and SWCNTs closing. → Raw arc-discharge samples do not require preparation for XRD characterization. → Heating is appropriate specimen preparation for purified and heat-treated samples. → XRD data fitting is required for structural analysis of SWCNT bundles.

  3. Effects of antifreezes and bundled material on the stability and optical limiting in aqueous suspensions of carbon nanotubes

    Vlasov, Andrey Yu.; Venediktova, Anastasia V.; Sokolova, Ekaterina P. [Department of Chemistry, St. Petersburg State University, Universitetsky Pr. 26, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Videnichev, Dmitry A. [S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute, Birzhevaya line 12, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg National Research University ITMO, Kronverksky pr. 49, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Lasers and Optical Systems JSC, Birzhevaya line 12, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Kislyakov, Ivan M. [S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute, Birzhevaya line 12, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg National Research University ITMO, Kronverksky pr. 49, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Obraztsova, Elena D. [A.M. Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Str. 38, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-15

    This work gives data on the stability of dispersions of single wall carbon nanotubes stabilized by sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate in binary polar solvents ''water + antifreeze'' (glycerol, polyethyleneglycole) with eutectic compositions. The absorption spectra of the suspensions demonstrate no changes during 1-year storage with temperature spanning from -40 to +40 C. The systems provide relevant optical power limiting properties, the one with glycerol showing good resistance to optical bleaching effects. We also demonstrate that aqueous dispersions of nanotubes exhibit considerable enhancement of optical limiting parameters alongside an increase of the bundled material populace. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Covalent functionalization of SWCNT with combretastatin A4 for cancer therapy

    Assali, Mohyeddin; Naser Zaid, Abdel; Kittana, Naim; Hamad, Deema; Amer, Johnny

    2018-06-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are currently under intensive investigation by many labs all over the world for being promising candidates for cancer chemotherapy delivery. On the other hand, combretastatin A4 (CA4) is an anticancer drug that induces cell apoptosis by inhibiting tubulin polymerization. However, it has the disadvantage of low water solubility and the non-selective targeting. Therefore, we aim to create nano-drug from the functionalization of SWCNT covalently with CA4 through click reaction in the presence of tetraethylene glycol linker in order to improve its dispersibility. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed good dispersibility of the functionalized SWCNT with diameters of 5–15 nm. Moreover, thermogravometric analysis showed that the efficiency of SWCNT functionalization was around 45%. The in vitro release profile of CA4 at physiological conditions showed that approximately 90% of the loaded drug was released over 50 h. After that MTS test was used to determine the suitable concentration range for the in vitro investigation of the SWCNT-CA4. After that the cytotoxic activity of the SWCNT-CA4 was evaluated by flow cytometry using annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) test. In comparison with free CA4, SWCNT-CA4 treatment demonstrated a significant increase in necrotic cells (around 50%) at the expense of the proportion of the apoptotic cells. Moreover, cell cycle PI test demonstrated that free CA4 and SWCNT-CA4 caused G2/M arrest. However with CA4 treatment higher proportion of cells were in the S-phase while with SWCNT-CA4 treatment greater proportion of cells appeared to be in the G1-phase. Taken together, the provided data suggest that the novel SWCNT-CA4 has a significant anticancer activity that might be superior to that of free CA4.

  5. In-Situ TEM-STM Observations of SWCNT Ropes/Tubular Transformations

    Sola, F.; Lebron-Colon, M.; Ferreira, P. J.; Fonseca, L. F.; Meador, M. A.; Marin, C.

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) prepared by the HiPco process were purified using a modified gas phase purification technique. A TEM-STM holder was used to study the morphological changes of SWCNT ropes as a function of applied voltage. Kink formation, buckling behavior, tubular transformation and eventual breakdown of the system were observed. The tubular formation was attributed to a transformation from SWCNT ropes to multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) structures. It is likely mediated by the patching and tearing mechanism which is promoted primarily by the mobile vacancies generated due to current-induced heating and, to some extent, by electron irradiation.

  6. Methanol Gas-Sensing Properties of SWCNT-MIP Composites

    Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Qin; Zhang, Yumin; Zhu, Zhongqi; Liu, Qingju

    2016-11-01

    The single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-molecularly imprinted powder (MIP) composites in this paper were prepared by mixing SWCNTs with MIPs. The structure and micrograph of the as-prepared SWCNTs-MIPs samples were characterized by XRD and TEM. The gas-sensing properties were tested through indirect-heating sensors based on SWCNT-MIP composites fabricating on an alumina tube with Au electrodes and Pt wires. The results showed that the structure of SWCNTs-MIPs is of orthogonal perovskite and the average particle size of the SWCNTs-MIPs was in the range of 10-30 nm. SWCNTs-MIPs exhibit good methanol gas-sensitive properties. At 90 °C, the response to 1 ppm methanol is 19.7, and the response to the interferent is lower than 5 to the other interferent gases (ethanol, formaldehyde, toluene, acetone, ammonia, and gasoline). The response time and recovery time are 50 and 58 s, respectively.

  7. Gas phase synthesis of non-bundled, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes with near-armchair chiralities

    Mustonen, K.; Laiho, P.; Kaskela, A.; Zhu, Z.; Reynaud, O.; Houbenov, N.; Tian, Y.; Jiang, H.; Kauppinen, E. I., E-mail: esko.kauppinen@aalto.fi [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 15100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Susi, T. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nasibulin, A. G. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 15100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Nobel str. 3, 143026 (Russian Federation); Saint-Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 29 Polytechniheskaya st., St. Petersburg, 195251 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-06

    We present a floating catalyst synthesis route for individual, i.e., non-bundled, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a narrow chiral angle distribution peaking at high chiralities near the armchair species. An ex situ spark discharge generator was used to form iron particles with geometric number mean diameters of 3–4 nm and fed into a laminar flow chemical vapour deposition reactor for the continuous synthesis of long and high-quality SWCNTs from ambient pressure carbon monoxide. The intensity ratio of G/D peaks in Raman spectra up to 48 and mean tube lengths up to 4 μm were observed. The chiral distributions, as directly determined by electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope, clustered around the (n,m) indices (7,6), (8,6), (8,7), and (9,6), with up to 70% of tubes having chiral angles over 20°. The mean diameter of SWCNTs was reduced from 1.10 to 1.04 nm by decreasing the growth temperature from 880 to 750 °C, which simultaneously increased the fraction of semiconducting tubes from 67% to 80%. Limiting the nanotube gas phase number concentration to ∼10{sup 5 }cm{sup −3} prevented nanotube bundle formation that is due to collisions induced by Brownian diffusion. Up to 80% of 500 as-deposited tubes observed by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy were individual. Transparent conducting films deposited from these SWCNTs exhibited record low sheet resistances of 63 Ω/□ at 90% transparency for 550 nm light.

  8. Direct measurement of the charge distribution along a biased carbon nanotube bundle using electron holography

    Beleggia, Marco; Kasama, Takeshi; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    Nanowires and nanotubes can be examined in the transmission electron microscope under an applied bias. Here we introduce a model-independent method, which allows the charge distribution along a nanowire or nanotube to be measured directly from the Laplacian of an electron holographic phase image....

  9. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    Generalov, A A; Anoshkin, I V; Lioubtchenko, D V; Räisänen, A V; Erdmanis, M; Ovchinnikov, V; Nasibulin, A G

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling. (paper)

  10. Enhanced mechanical properties of single walled carbon nanotube-borosilicate glass composite due to cushioning effect and localized plastic flow

    Sujan Ghosh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A borosilicate glass composite has been fabricated incorporating Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT in the glass matrix by melt-quench technique. Hardness and the fracture toughness of the composite, were found to increase moderately with respect to the base glass. Interestingly one can observe accumulation of SWCNT bundles around the crack zone though no such accumulation was observed in the crack free indentation zone. The enhanced hardness of the composite was discussed by correlating the cushioning as well as toughening behavior of the agglomerated SWCNT bundles. On the other hand enhanced plastic flow was proposed to be the prime reason for the accumulation of SWCNT bundles around the crack, which increases the toughness of the composite by reducing the crack length. Moreover to ascertain the enhanced plasticity of the composite than that of the glass we calculated the recovery resistance of glass and the composite where recovery resistance of composite was found to be higher than that of the glass.

  11. The fabrication of vertically aligned and periodically distributed carbon nanotube bundles and periodically porous carbon nanotube films through a combination of laser interference ablation and metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition.

    Yuan, Dajun; Lin, Wei; Guo, Rui; Wong, C P; Das, Suman

    2012-06-01

    Scalable fabrication of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles is essential to future advances in several applications. Here, we report on the development of a simple, two-step method for fabricating vertically aligned and periodically distributed CNT bundles and periodically porous CNT films at the sub-micron scale. The method involves laser interference ablation (LIA) of an iron film followed by CNT growth via iron-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition. CNT bundles with square widths ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 µm in width, and 50-200 µm in length, are grown atop the patterned catalyst over areas spanning 8 cm(2). The CNT bundles exhibit a high degree of control over square width, orientation, uniformity, and periodicity. This simple scalable method of producing well-placed and oriented CNT bundles demonstrates a high application potential for wafer-scale integration of CNT structures into various device applications, including IC interconnects, field emitters, sensors, batteries, and optoelectronics, etc.

  12. Tailored SWCNT functionalization optimized for compatibility with epoxy matrices

    Martinez-Rubi, Y; Kingston, C T; Daroszewska, M; Barnes, M; Simard, B; Gonzalez-Dominguez, J M; Ansón-Casaos, A; Martinez, M T; Hubert, P; Cattin, C

    2012-01-01

    We have modified single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with well defined matrix-based architectures to improve interface interaction in SWCNT/epoxy composites. The hardener and two pre-synthesized oligomers containing epoxy and hardener moieties were covalently attached to the SWCNT walls by in situ diazonium or carboxylic coupling reactions. In this way, SWCNTs bearing amine or epoxide-terminated fragments of different molecular weights, which resemble the chemical structure of the cured resin, were synthesized. A combination of characterization techniques such as Raman and infrared absorption (FTIR) spectroscopy, elemental analysis and coupled thermogravimetry-FTIR spectroscopy were used to identify both the functional groups and degree of functionalization of SWCNTs synthesized by the laser ablation and arc-discharge methods. Depending on the type of reaction employed for the chemical functionalization and the molecular weight of the attached fragment, it was possible to control the degree of functionalization and the electronic properties of the functionalized SWCNTs. Improved dispersion of SWCNTs in the epoxy matrix was achieved by direct integration without using solvents, as observed from optical microscopy and rheology measurements of the SWCNT/epoxy mixtures. Composite materials using these fillers are expected to exhibit improved properties while preserving the thermosetting architecture. (paper)

  13. Effects of inter-tube coupling on the electro-optical properties of silicon carbide nanotube bundles studied by density functional theory

    Behzad, Somayeh

    2015-09-01

    The electronic and optical properties of bundled armchair and zigzag silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) are investigated by using density functional theory. The effects of inter-tube coupling on the electronic dispersions of SiCNT bundles are demonstrated. It was found that the band structure of (6, 0) SiCNT bundle shows metallic feature. The calculated dielectric functions of the armchair and zigzag bundles are similar to that of the isolated tubes, except for the appearance of broadened peaks, small shifts of peak positions about 0.1 eV and increasing of peak intensities. For (6, 0) SiCNT with smaller radius, by considering interband and interaband transitions, the band structure coupling causes an extra peak at low energies.

  14. Synergistic enhancement of supercapacitance upon integration of nickel (II) octa[(3,5-biscarboxylate)-phenoxy] phthalocyanine with SWCNT-phenylamine

    Agboola, BO

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Supercapacitive behaviour of a novel functional material, nickel (II) octa [(3,5-biscarboxylate)-phenoxy] phthalocyanine (NiOBCPPc) upon covalent integration with phenylamine functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT...

  15. Highly conductive interwoven carbon nanotube and silver nanowire transparent electrodes

    Andrew J Stapleton, Rakesh A Afre, Amanda V Ellis, Joe G Shapter, Gunther G Andersson, Jamie S Quinton and David A Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrodes fabricated using commercially available silver nanowires (AgNWs and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs produced sheet resistances in the range 4–24 Ω squ−1 with specular transparencies up to 82 %. Increasing the aqueous dispersibility of SWCNTs decreased the bundle size present in the film resulting in improved SWCNT surface dispersion in the films without compromising transparency or sheet resistance. In addition to providing conduction pathways between the AgNW network, the SWCNTs also provide structural support, creating stable self-supporting films. Entanglement of the AgNWs and SWCNTs was demonstrated to occur in solution prior to deposition by monitoring the transverse plasmon resonance mode of the AgNWs during processing. The interwoven AgNW/SWCNT structures show potential for use in optoelectronic applications as transparent electrodes and as an ITO replacement.

  16. Improvement in Electrode Performance of Novel SWCNT Loaded Three-Dimensional Porous RVC Composite Electrodes by Electrochemical Deposition Method

    Almoigli, Mohammed; Meriey, Al Yahya; Alharbi, Khalid N.

    2018-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) composite electrodes were prepared by depositing different amounts of acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (a-SWCNTs) on porous reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) through the electrochemical deposition method. The SWCNT was functionalized by the reflux method in nitric acid and was proven by Raman and visible spectra. The optimum time for sonication to disperse the functionalized SWCNT (a-SWCNT) in dimethyl formamide (DMF) well was determined by UV spectra. The average pore size of RVC electrodes was calculated from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. Moreover, the surface morphology of composite electrodes was also examined by SEM study. All 3D electrodes were evaluated for their electrochemical properties by cyclic voltammetry. The result showed that the value of specific capacitance of the electrode increases with the increase in the amount of a-SWCNT in geometric volume. However, the value of specific capacitance per gram decreases with the increase in scan rate as well as the amount of a-SWCNT. The stability of the electrodes was also tested. This revealed that all the electrodes were stable; however, lower a-SWCNT-loaded electrodes had excellent cyclic stability. These results suggest that the a-SWCNT-coated RVC electrodes have promise as an effective technology for desalination. PMID:29301258

  17. Effect of COOH-functionalized SWCNT addition on the electrical and photovoltaic characteristics of Malachite Green dye based photovoltaic cells

    Chakraborty, S.; Manik, N. B.

    2014-01-01

    We report the effect of COOH-functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (COOH-SWCNT) on the electrical and photovoltaic characteristics of Malachite Green (MG) dye based photovoltaic cells. Two different types of photovoltaic cells were prepared, one with MG dye and another by incorporating COOH-SWCNT with this dye. Cells were characterized through different electrical and photovoltaic measurements including photocurrent measurements with pulsed radiation. From the dark current—voltage (I–V) characteristic results, we observed a certain transition voltage (V th ) for both the cells beyond which the conduction mechanism of the cells change sharply. For the MG dye, V th is 3.9 V whereas for COOH-SWCNT mixed with this dye, V th drops to 2.7 V. The device performance improves due to the incorporation of COOH-SWCNT. The open circuit voltage and short circuit current density change from 4.2 to 97 mV and from 108 to 965 μA/cm 2 respectively. Observations from photocurrent measurements show that the rate of growth and decay of the photocurrent are quite faster in the presence of COOH-SWCNT. This observation indicates a faster charge separation processes due to the incorporation of COOH-SWCNT in the MG dye cells. The high aspect ratio of COOH-SWCNT allows efficient conduction pathways for the generated charge carriers. (semiconductor devices)

  18. Selective synthesis of double helices of carbon nanotube bundles grown on treated metallic substrates

    Cervantes-Sodi, Felipe; Iniguez-Rabago, Agustin; Rosas-Melendez, Samuel; Ballesteros-Villarreal, Monica [Departamento de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prolongacion Paseo de la Reforma 880, Lomas de Santa Fe (Mexico); Vilatela, Juan J. [IMDEA Materials Institute, E.T.S. de Ingenieros de Caminos, Madrid (Spain); Reyes-Gutierrez, Lucio G.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, Jose A. [Ingenieria Industrial, Grupo JUMEX, Ecatepec de Morelos, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Palacios, Eduardo [Lab. de Microscopia Electronica de Ultra Alta Resolucion, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, San Bartolo Atepehuacan (Mexico); Terrones, Mauricio [Department of Physics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Research Center for Exotic Nanocarbons (JST), Shinshu University, Nagano (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Double-helix microstructures consisting of two parallel strands of hundreds of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been synthesized by chemical vapour deposition of ferrocene/toluene vapours on metal substrates. Growth of coiled carbon nanostructures with site selectivity is achieved by varying the duration of thermochemical pretreatment to deposit a layer of SiO{sub x} on the metallic substrate. Production of multibranched structures of MWCNTs converging in SiO{sub x} microstructure is also reported. In the abstract figure, panel (a) shows a coloured micrograph of a typical double-helix coiled microstructure of MWCNTs grown on SiO{sub x} covered steel substrate. Green and blue show each of the two individual strands of MWCNTs. Panel (b) is an amplification of a SiO{sub x} microparticle (white) on the tip of the double-stranded coil (green and blue). The microparticle guides the collective growth of hundreds of MWCNTs to form the coiled structure. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Measuring the electrical resistivity and contact resistance of vertical carbon nanotube bundles for application as interconnects

    Chiodarelli, Nicolo'; Li, Yunlong; Arstila, Kai; Richard, Olivier; Cott, Daire J; Heyns, Marc; De Gendt, Stefan; Groeseneken, Guido; Vereecken, Philippe M; Masahito, Sugiura; Kashiwagi, Yusaku

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are known to be materials with potential for manufacturing sub-20 nm high aspect ratio vertical interconnects in future microchips. In order to be successful with respect to contending against established tungsten or copper based interconnects, though, CNT must fulfil their promise of also providing low electrical resistance in integrated structures using scalable integration processes fully compatible with silicon technology. Hence, carefully engineered growth and integration solutions are required before we can fully exploit their potentialities. This work tackles the problem of optimizing a CNT integration process from the electrical perspective. The technique of measuring the CNT resistance as a function of the CNT length is here extended to CNT integrated in vertical contacts. This allows extracting the linear resistivity and the contact resistance of the CNT, two parameters to our knowledge never reported separately for vertical CNT contacts and which are of utmost importance, as they respectively measure the quality of the CNT and that of their metal contacts. The technique proposed allows electrically distinguishing the impact of each processing step individually on the CNT resistivity and the CNT contact resistance. Hence it constitutes a powerful technique for optimizing the process and developing CNT contacts of superior quality. This can be of relevant technological importance not only for interconnects but also for all those applications that rely on the electrical properties of CNT grown with a catalytic chemical vapor deposition method at low temperature.

  20. Processing-structure-property relationships of carbon nanotube and nanoplatelet enabled piezoresistive sensors

    Luo, Sida

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess excellent piezoresistive performance, which is manifested by the significant electrical resistance change when subject to mechanical deformation. In comparison to individual CNTs, the CNT thin films, formed by a random assembly of individual tubes or bundles, show much lower piezoresistive sensitivity. Given the progress made to date in developing CNT ensemble based-piezoresistive sensors, the related piezoresistive mechanism(s) are still not well understood. The crucial step to obtain a better understanding of this issue is to study the effects of CNT structure in the dispersion on the piezoresistivity of CNT ensemble based-piezoresistive sensors. To reach this goal, my Ph.D. research first focuses on establishing the processing-structure-property relationship of SWCNT thin film piezoresistive sensors. The key accomplishment contains: 1) developing the combined preparative ultracentrifuge method (PUM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) method to quantitatively characterized SWCNT particle size in dispersions under various sonication conditions; 2) designing combined ultrasonication and microfluidization processing protocol for high throughput and large-scale production of high quality SWCNT dispersions; 3) fabricating varied SWCNT thin film piezoresistive sensors through spray coating technique and immersion-drying post-treatment; and 4) investigating the effect of microstructures of SWCNTs on piezoresistivity of SWCNT thin film sensors. This experimental methodology for quantitative and systematic investigation of the processing-structure-property relationships provides a means for the performance optimization of CNT ensemble based piezoresistive sensors. As a start to understand the piezoresistive mechanism, the second focus of my Ph.D. research is studying charge transport behaviors in SWCNT thin films. It was found that the temperature-dependent sheet resistance of SWCNT thin films could be explained by a 3D variable

  1. Single and competitive adsorption of OMPs by carbon nanotubes - mechanism and fitting models

    Kamińska, Gabriela; Dudziak, Mariusz; Bohdziewicz, Jolanta; Kudlek, Edyta

    2017-11-01

    The adsorption of three organic micropollutants (diclofenac - DFN, pentachlorophenol - PCP and octylphenol - OP) on two kinds of carbon nanotubes (single walled carbon nanotubes - SWCNT and single walled carbon nanotubes with amine group - SWCNT-NH2) was investigated, in single and bicomponent solution at pH 5. SWCNT-NH2 had three times lower specific surface area than SWCNT. Significant differences were observed in sorption capacity of SWCNT and SWCNT-NH2 for given chemicals. The sorption uptake changes in the following order: OP > PCP > DFN for SWCNT and DFN > PCP > OP for SWCNT-NH2. A few times higher adsorption of OP on SWCNT came from low OP solubility in water in comparison to PCP and DFN. While, higher adsorption of DFN and PCP on SWCNT-NH2 was a result of electrostatic attraction between dissociated form of these chemicals and positively charged SWCNT-NH2 at pH 5. In adsorption from bicomponent solution, significant competition was observed between PCP and DFN due to similar adsorption mechanism on SWCNT-NH2. Opposite tendency was observed for SWCNT, DFN did not greatly affect adsorption of PCP and OP since they were very easily absorbable by sigma-sigma interaction.

  2. Single and competitive adsorption of OMPs by carbon nanotubes – mechanism and fitting models

    Kamińska Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of three organic micropollutants (diclofenac – DFN, pentachlorophenol – PCP and octylphenol – OP on two kinds of carbon nanotubes (single walled carbon nanotubesSWCNT and single walled carbon nanotubes with amine group – SWCNT-NH2 was investigated, in single and bicomponent solution at pH 5. SWCNT-NH2 had three times lower specific surface area than SWCNT. Significant differences were observed in sorption capacity of SWCNT and SWCNT-NH2 for given chemicals. The sorption uptake changes in the following order: OP > PCP > DFN for SWCNT and DFN > PCP > OP for SWCNT-NH2. A few times higher adsorption of OP on SWCNT came from low OP solubility in water in comparison to PCP and DFN. While, higher adsorption of DFN and PCP on SWCNT-NH2 was a result of electrostatic attraction between dissociated form of these chemicals and positively charged SWCNT-NH2 at pH 5. In adsorption from bicomponent solution, significant competition was observed between PCP and DFN due to similar adsorption mechanism on SWCNT-NH2. Opposite tendency was observed for SWCNT, DFN did not greatly affect adsorption of PCP and OP since they were very easily absorbable by sigma-sigma interaction.

  3. Enhancing the superconducting temperature of MgB2 by SWCNT dilution

    Ma, Danhao; Jayasingha, Ruwantha; Hess, Dustin T.; Adu, Kofi W.; Sumanasekera, Gamini U.; Terrones, Mauricio

    2014-02-01

    We report, for the first time, an increase in the superconducting critical temperature, TC of commercial “dirty” MgB2 by a nonsubstitutional hole-doping of the MgB2 structure using minute, single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) inclusions. We varied the SWCNTs concentration from 0.05 wt% to 5 wt% and investigated the temperature-dependent resistivity from 10 K to 300 K. We used micro-Raman spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction to analyze the interfacial interactions between the SWCNTs and the MgB2 grains. We obtained an increase in TC from 33.0 to 37.8 K (ΔTC+=4.8 K), which is attributed to charge transfer from the MgB2 structure to the SWCNT structure. The charge transfer phenomenon is confirmed by micro-Raman analysis of the phonon states of the SWCNT tangential band frequency in the composites. We determined the charge transfer per carbon atom to be 0.0023/C, 0.0018/C and 0.0008/C for 0.05 wt%, 0.5 wt% and 5 wt% SWCNT inclusions, respectively, taking into account the contributions from the softening of the lattice constant and the nonadiabatic (dynamic) effects at the Fermi level. This report provides an experimental, alternative pathway to hole-doping of MgB2 without appealing to chemical substitution.

  4. Investigation Effects of Magnetetic Impurity Doping on Average Magnetization of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    Saeedeh Ghafourian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT extensively are attractive from both theoretical and experimental point of view, due to its technological applications such as nano electronics devises. SWCNT are created by rolling a graphen sheet into a cyclindrical form. We have investigated the possibility of making a ferromagnetic semiconductor zigzag SWCNT by doping magnetic impurities. We found by increasing magnetic impurities doping on a zigzag SWCNT, average magnetization is increased and one can make a ferromagnetic semiconductor

  5. The Kinetics of Chirality Assignment in Catalytic Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Growth

    Xu, Ziwei; Yan, Tianying; Ding, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Chirality-selected single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) ensure a great potential of building ~1 nm sized electronics. However, the reliable method for chirality-selected SWCNT is still pending. Here we present a theoretical study on the SWCNT's chirality assignment and control during the catalytic growth. This study reveals that the chirality of a SWCNT is determined by the kinetic incorporation of the pentagon formation during SWCNT nucleation. Therefore, chirality is randomly assigned on...

  6. Indium tin oxide-rod/single walled carbon nanotube based transparent electrodes for ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Yun, Min Ju; Kim, Hee-Dong; Kim, Kyeong Heon; Sung, Hwan Jun; Park, Sang Young; An, Ho-Myoung; Kim, Tae Geun

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report a transparent conductive oxide electrode scheme working for ultraviolet light-emitting diodes based on indium tin oxide (ITO)-rod and a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) layer. We prepared four samples with ITO-rod, SWCNT/ITO-rod, ITO-rod/SWCNT, and SWCNT/ITO-rod/SWCNT structures for comparison. As a result, the sample with SWCNT/ITO-rod/SWCNT structures showed the highest transmittance over 90% at 280 nm and the highest Ohmic behavior (with sheet resistance of 5.33 kΩ/□) in the current–voltage characteristic curves. - Highlights: • Transparent conductive oxide (TCO) electrodes are proposed for UV light-emitting diodes. • These TCO electrodes are based on evaporated indium tin oxide (ITO)-rods. • Single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) layers are used as a current spreading layer. • The proposed TCO electrode structures show more than 90% transmittance at 280 nm

  7. Fabrication of SWCNT-Ag nanoparticle hybrid included self-assemblies for antibacterial applications.

    Sayanti Brahmachari

    Full Text Available The present article reports the development of soft nanohybrids comprising of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT included silver nanoparticles (AgNPs having superior antibacterial property. In this regard aqueous dispersing agent of carbon nanotube (CNT containing a silver ion reducing unit was synthesised by the inclusion of tryptophan and tyrosine within the backbone of the amphiphile. The dispersions were characterized spectroscopically and microscopically using TEM, AFM and Raman spectroscopy. The nanotube-nanoparticle conjugates were prepared by the in situ photoreduction of AgNO3. The phenolate residue and the indole moieties of tyrosine and tryptophan, respectively reduces the sliver ion as well as acts as stabilizing agents for the synthesized AgNPs. The nanohybrids were characterized using TEM and AFM. The antibacterial activity of the nanohybrids was studied against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella aerogenes. The SWCNT dispersions showed moderate killing ability (40-60% against Gram-positive bacteria however no antibacterial activity was observed against the Gram negative ones. Interestingly, the developed SWCNT-amphiphile-AgNP nanohybrids exhibited significant killing ability (∼90% against all bacteria. Importantly, the cell viability of these newly developed self-assemblies was checked towards chinese hamster ovarian cells and high cell viability was observed after 24 h of incubation. This specific killing of bacterial cells may have been achieved due to the presence of higher -SH containing proteins in the cell walls of the bacteria. The developed nanohybrids were subsequently infused into tissue engineering scaffold agar-gelatin films and the films similarly showed bactericidal activity towards both kinds of bacterial strains while allowing normal growth of eukaryotic cells on the surface of the films.

  8. Retracted-Enhanced X-Ray Absorption Property of Gold-Doped Single Wall Carbon Nanotube

    Alimin Alimin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced X-ray absorption property of single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT through gold (Au doping (Au@SWCNT has been studied. Mass attenuation coefficient of SWCNT increased 5.2-fold after Au doping treatment. The use of ethanol in the liquid phase adsorption could produce Au nanoparticles as confirmed by the X-ray Diffraction (XRD patterns. The possibility of gold nanoparticles encapsulated in the internal tube space of SWCNT was observed by transmission electron microscope technique. A significant decrease of nitrogen uptakes and upshifts of Radial Breathing Mode (RBM of Au@SWCNT specimen suggest that the nanoparticles might be encapsulated in the internal tube spaces of the nanotube. In addition, a decrease intensity of XRD pattern of Au@SWCNT at around 2θ ≈ 2.6° supports the suggestion that Au nanoparticles are really encapsulated into SWCNT.

  9. Theoretical study of adsorption of lithium atom on carbon nanotube

    Senami, Masato; Ikeda, Yuji; Fukushima, Akinori; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the adsorption of lithium atoms on the surface of the (12, 0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) by using ab initio quantum chemical calculations. The adsorption of one lithium atom on the inside of this SWCNT is favored compared to the outside. We check this feature by charge transfer and regional chemical potential density. The adsorption of multiple lithium atoms on the interior of the SWCNT is studied in terms of adsorption energy and charge transfer. We show that repulsiv...

  10. Combined microfluidization and ultrasonication: a synergistic protocol for high-efficient processing of SWCNT dispersions with high quality

    Luo, Sida, E-mail: s.luo@buaa.edu.cn [Beihang University, School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation (China); Liu, Tao, E-mail: tliu@fsu.edu [Florida State University, High-Performance Materials Institute (United States); Wang, Yong; Li, Liuhe [Beihang University, School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation (China); Wang, Guantao; Luo, Yun [China University of Geosciences, Center of Safety Research, School of Engineering and Technology (China)

    2016-08-15

    High-efficient and large-scale production of high-quality CNT dispersions is necessary for meeting the future needs to develop various CNT-based electronic devices. Herein, we have designed novel processing protocols by combining conventional ultrasonication process with a new microfluidization technique to produce high-quality SWCNT dispersions with improved processing efficiency. To judge the quality of SWCNT dispersions, one critical factor is the degree of exfoliation, which could be quantified by both geometrical dimension of the exfoliated nanotubes and percentage of individual tubes in a given dispersion. In this paper, the synergistic effect of the combined protocols was systematically investigated through evaluating SWCNT dispersions with newly developed characterization techniques, namely preparative ultracentrifuge method (PUM) and simultaneous Raman scattering and photoluminescence spectroscopy (SRSPL). The results of both techniques draw similar conclusions that as compared with either of the processes operated separately, a low-pass microfluidization followed by a reasonable duration of ultrasonication could substantially improve the processing efficiency to produce high-quality SWCNT dispersions with averaged particle length and diameter as small as ~600 and ~2 nm, respectively.Graphical abstract.

  11. Exposure to Carbon Nanotube Material: Assessment of Nanotube Cytotoxicity Using Human Keratinocyte Cells

    Shvedova, Anna A.; Castranova, Vincent; Kisin, Elena R.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Murray, Ashley R.; Gandelsman, Vadim Z.; Maynard, Andrew; Baron, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are new members of carbon allotropes similar to fullerenes and graphite. Because of their unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties, carbon nanotubes are important for novel applications in the electronics, aerospace, and computer industries. Exposure to graphite and carbon materials has been associated with increased incidence of skin diseases, such as carbon fiber dermatitis, hyperkeratosis, and naevi. We investigated adverse effects of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) using a cell culture of immortalized human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT). After 18 h of exposure of HaCaT to SWCNT, oxidative stress and cellular toxicity were indicated by formation of free radicals, accumulation of peroxidative products, antioxidant depletion, and loss of cell viability. Exposure to SWCNT also resulted in ultrastructural and morphological changes in cultured skin cells. These data indicate that dermal exposure to unrefined SWCNT may lead to dermal toxicity due to accelerated oxidative stress in the skin of exposed workers.

  12. Ultrasensitive, Stretchable Strain Sensors Based on Fragmented Carbon Nanotube Papers

    Zhou, Jian; Yu, Hu; Xu, Xuezhu; Han, Fei; Lubineau, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    The development of strain sensors featuring both ultra high sensitivity and high stretchability is still a challenge. We demonstrate that strain sensors based on fragmented single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) paper embedded in poly

  13. Self Assembled Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Ultracapacitors, Phase I

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this NASA STTR program is to develop single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based ultracapacitors for energy storage devices (ESD) application, using...

  14. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube/SiO2and Carbon Nanotube/SiO2/Ag Nanoparticles Hybrids by Using Plasma Treatment

    Li Haiqing

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Based on plasma-treated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, SWCNT/SiO2and thiol groups-functionalized SWCNT/SiO2hybrids have been fabricated through a sol–gel process. By means of thiol groups, Ag nanoparticles have been in situ synthesized and bonded onto the SiO2shell of SWCNT/SiO2in the absence of external reducing agent, resulting in the stable carbon nanotube/SiO2/Ag nanoparticles hybrids. This strategy provides a facile, low–cost, and green methodology for the creation of carbon nanotube/inorganic oxides-metal nanoparticles hybrids.

  15. Decellularized Bovine Articular Cartilage Matrix Reinforced by Carboxylated-SWCNT for Tissue Engineering Application

    Zari Majidi Mohammadie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nanotubes with their unique properties have diversified mechanical and biological applications. Due to similarity of dimensions with extracellular matrix (ECM elements, these materials are used in designing scaffolds. In this research, Carboxylated Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes in optimization of decellularized scaffold of bovine articular cartilage was used. At first, the articular cartilage was decellularized. Then the scaffolds were analyzed in: (i decellularized scaffolds, and (ii scaffolds plunged into homogenous suspension of nanotubes in distilled water, were smeared with Carboxylated-SWCNT. The tissue rings derived from the rabbit's ear were assembled with reinforced scaffolds and they were placed in a culture media for 15 days. The scaffolds in two groups and the assembled scaffolds underwent histologic and electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the structure of ECM of articular cartilage has been maintained well after decellularization. Fourier transform infrared analysis showed that the contents of ECM have not been changed under treatment process. Atomic force microscopy analysis showed the difference in surface topography and roughness of group (ii scaffolds in comparison with group (i. Transmission electron microscopy studies showed the Carboxylated-SWCNT bond with the surface of decellularized scaffold and no penetration of these compounds into the scaffold. The porosity percentage with median rate of 91.04 in group (i scaffolds did not have significant difference with group (ii scaffolds. The electron microscopy observations confirmed migration and penetration of the blastema cells into the group (ii assembled scaffolds. This research presents a technique for provision of nanocomposite scaffolds for cartilage engineering applications.

  16. Superconductivity in single wall carbon nanotubes

    H Yavari

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available   By using Greens function method we first show that the effective interaction between two electrons mediated by plasmon exchange can become attractive which in turn can lead to superconductivity at a high critical temperature in a singl wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT. The superconducting transition temperature Tc for the SWCNT (3,3 obtained by this mechanism agrees with the recent experimental result. We also show as the radius of SWCNT increases, plasmon frequency becomes lower and leads to lower Tc.

  17. Experimental evaluation of SWCNT-water nanofluid as a secondary fluid in a refrigeration system

    Vasconcelos, Adriano Akel; Cárdenas Gómez, Abdul Orlando; Bandarra Filho, Enio Pedone; Parise, José Alberto Reis

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • SWCNT-water nanofluid was used as secondary fluid for a refrigeration system. • For a given HTFS mass flow rate and inlet temperature, nanofluid performed better than base fluid. • Total power consumption was not significantly affected by volume concentration. • Nanoparticle volume fraction ranged from 0 to 0.21%. - Abstract: SWCNT-water (single walled carbon nanotube) nanofluid was tested as a secondary fluid for a 4–9 kW indirect vapor compression refrigeration system. The evaporator, with boiling refrigerant HCFC-22 extracting heat from the nanofluid, was of the brazed plate counter-flow type. A semi-hermetic compressor, an electronic expansion valve (EEV) and an air-cooled condenser were the other main components of the refrigeration cycle. Tests were carried out with the experimental apparatus operating over a range of different volumetric fractions of nanoparticles (0–0.21%) as well as nanofluid inlet temperatures (30–40 °C) and mass flow rates (40–80 g/s). Overall, the performance of the system working with nanofluid as a secondary fluid was superior to that where just the base fluid (i.e., pure water) circulated in the secondary fluid loop, at the same mass flow rate and inlet temperature. The enhanced thermal conductivity of the nanofluid is believed to be the main reason why the refrigeration system with the nanofluid loop, if compared to that with pure water, presented a higher refrigerating capacity.

  18. Free Vibrations of a Cantilevered SWCNT with Distributed Mass in the Presence of Nonlocal Effect

    M. A. De Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hamilton principle is applied to deduce the free vibration frequencies of a cantilever single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT in the presence of an added mass, which can be distributed along an arbitrary part of the span. The nonlocal elasticity theory by Eringen has been employed, in order to take into account the nanoscale effects. An exact formulation leads to the equations of motion, which can be solved to give the frequencies and the corresponding vibration modes. Moreover, two approximate semianalytical methods are also illustrated, which can provide quick parametric relationships. From a more practical point of view, the problem of detecting the mass of the attached particle has been solved by calculating the relative frequency shift due to the presence of the added mass: from it, the mass value can be easily deduced. The paper ends with some numerical examples, in which the nonlocal effects are thoroughly investigated.

  19. Enhancement of heterogeneous electron transfer dynamics tuning single-walled carbon nanotube forest height and density

    Lamberti, Francesco; Ferraro, Davide; Giomo, Monica; Elvassore, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical sensors are growing in number and importance. Surface modifications could enhance charge transfer properties occurring at the interfaces and carbon nanoassemblies is one of the most used strategy to improve sensitivity to measurements. However, well defined protocols of surface modification are needed in order to fabricate electrochemically effective nanostructured sensors. Therefore, we aim at investigating the electrochemical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) forests as a function of height and nanotube surface density. Height of the forests is accurately controlled tuning the oxidation temperatures in the range of 293–313 K of SWCNTs. The surface density of carbon nanotubes was adjusted developing cysteamine/2-mercaptoethanol (CYS/ME) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold surfaces at different ratios (1:0, 1:3, 1:10, 1:100, 0:1). Apparent electron transfer rate was analyzed with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and experimental data show that transfer rate constant, k app , increases from 1 × 10 −4 cm/s to 6 × 10 −4 cm/s rising oxidation temperatures (i.e. lowering forest height); therefore forests with reduced height show higher electron transfer rate without significant difference in electrodic reversibility. On the other hand, tuning SWCNT surface density, forests obtained with no ME show optimal Δ peak value of 0.087 ± 0.015 V and highest k app value of 9.15 × 10 −3 cm/s. Surprisingly, electrochemical surface area analysis shows that samples with lower amount of cysteamine have an active surface area three times bigger than samples with 1:3 CYS/ME ratio. Low electrochemical efficiency associated with high active surface may be related to unwanted SWCNT bundles adsorbed on the surface for 1:10 and 1:100 CYS/ME ratio samples as confirmed by AFM morphological characterization. Further investigation shows that a transition from a semi-infinite planar diffusion mechanism to a radial diffusion one takes

  20. Inkjet printing of aligned single-walled carbon-nanotube thin films

    Takagi, Yuki; Nobusa, Yuki; Gocho, Shota; Kudou, Hikaru; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Kataura, Hiromichi; Takenobu, Taishi

    2013-04-01

    We report a method for the inkjet printing of aligned single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWCNT) films by combining inkjet technology with the strong wettability contrast between hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas based on the patterning of self-assembled monolayers. Both the drying process control using the strong wettability boundary and the coffee-stain effect strongly promote the aggregation of SWCNTs along the contact line of a SWCNT ink droplet, thereby demonstrating our achievement of inkjet-printed aligned SWCNT films. This method could open routes for developing high-performance and environmentally friendly SWCNT printed electronics.

  1. Biomimetic three-dimensional nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotube chitosan nanocomposite for bone regeneration

    Im, Owen; Li, Jian; Wang, Mian; Zhang, Lijie Grace; Keidar, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Many shortcomings exist in the traditional methods of treating bone defects, such as donor tissue shortages for autografts and disease transmission for allografts. The objective of this study was to design a novel three-dimensional nanostructured bone substitute based on magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), biomimetic hydrothermally treated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite, and a biocompatible hydrogel (chitosan). Both nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT have a biomimetic nanostructure, excellent osteoconductivity, and high potential to improve the load-bearing capacity of hydrogels. Methods Specifically, three-dimensional porous chitosan scaffolds with different concentrations of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT were created to support the growth of human osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) using a lyophilization procedure. Two types of SWCNT were synthesized in an arc discharge with a magnetic field (B-SWCNT) and without a magnetic field (N-SWCNT) for improving bone regeneration. Results Nanocomposites containing magnetically synthesized B-SWCNT had superior cytocompatibility properties when compared with nonmagnetically synthesized N-SWCNT. B-SWCNT have much smaller diameters and are twice as long as their nonmagnetically prepared counterparts, indicating that the dimensions of carbon nanotubes can have a substantial effect on osteoblast attachment. Conclusion This study demonstrated that a chitosan nanocomposite with both B-SWCNT and 20% nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite could achieve a higher osteoblast density when compared with the other experimental groups, thus making this nanocomposite promising for further exploration for bone regeneration. PMID:22619545

  2. Nicotine adsorption on single wall carbon nanotubes

    Girao, Eduardo C. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil); Fagan, Solange B.; Zanella, Ivana [Area de Ciencias Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario Franciscano - UNIFRA, 97010-032 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Filho, Antonio G. Souza, E-mail: agsf@fisica.ufc.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-900 Fortaleza, Ceara (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    This work reports a theoretical study of nicotine molecules interacting with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through ab initio calculations within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Different adsorption sites for nicotine on the surface of pristine and defective (8,0) SWCNTs were analyzed and the total energy curves, as a function of molecular position relative to the SWCNT surface, were evaluated. The nicotine adsorption process is found to be energetically favorable and the molecule-nanotube interaction is intermediated by the tri-coordinated nitrogen atom from the nicotine. It is also predicted the possibility of a chemical bonding between nicotine and SWCNT through the di-coordinated nitrogen.

  3. Physisorption of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotube with vacant defects

    Sun, Gang; Shen, Huaze; Wang, Enge; Xu, Limei, E-mail: limei.xu@pku.edu.cn [International Center for Quantum Materials and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Tangpanitanon, Jirawat [University of Cambridge, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire CB2 1TP (United Kingdom); Wen, Bo [International Center for Quantum Materials and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Heqing Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Xue, Jianming [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-05-28

    Physisorption of molecular hydrogen on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is important for its engineering applications and hydrogen energy storage. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we study the physisorption of molecular hydrogen on a SWCNT with a vacant defect, focusing on the effect of the vacant defect size and external parameters such as temperature and pressure. We find that hydrogen can be physisorbed inside a SWCNT through a vacant defect when the defect size is above a threshold. By controlling the size of the defects, we are able to extract hydrogen molecules from a gas mixture and store them inside the SWCNT. We also find that external parameters, such as low temperature and high pressure, enhance the physisorption of hydrogen molecules inside the SWCNT. In addition, the storage efficiency can be improved by introducing more defects, i.e., reducing the number of carbon atoms on the SWCNT.

  4. Physisorption of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotube with vacant defects

    Sun, Gang; Tangpanitanon, Jirawat; Shen, Huaze; Wen, Bo; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Enge; Xu, Limei

    2014-05-01

    Physisorption of molecular hydrogen on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is important for its engineering applications and hydrogen energy storage. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we study the physisorption of molecular hydrogen on a SWCNT with a vacant defect, focusing on the effect of the vacant defect size and external parameters such as temperature and pressure. We find that hydrogen can be physisorbed inside a SWCNT through a vacant defect when the defect size is above a threshold. By controlling the size of the defects, we are able to extract hydrogen molecules from a gas mixture and store them inside the SWCNT. We also find that external parameters, such as low temperature and high pressure, enhance the physisorption of hydrogen molecules inside the SWCNT. In addition, the storage efficiency can be improved by introducing more defects, i.e., reducing the number of carbon atoms on the SWCNT.

  5. Physisorption of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotube with vacant defects

    Sun, Gang; Shen, Huaze; Wang, Enge; Xu, Limei; Tangpanitanon, Jirawat; Wen, Bo; Xue, Jianming

    2014-01-01

    Physisorption of molecular hydrogen on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is important for its engineering applications and hydrogen energy storage. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we study the physisorption of molecular hydrogen on a SWCNT with a vacant defect, focusing on the effect of the vacant defect size and external parameters such as temperature and pressure. We find that hydrogen can be physisorbed inside a SWCNT through a vacant defect when the defect size is above a threshold. By controlling the size of the defects, we are able to extract hydrogen molecules from a gas mixture and store them inside the SWCNT. We also find that external parameters, such as low temperature and high pressure, enhance the physisorption of hydrogen molecules inside the SWCNT. In addition, the storage efficiency can be improved by introducing more defects, i.e., reducing the number of carbon atoms on the SWCNT

  6. Iron(III) protoporphyrin IX-single-wall carbon nanotubes modified electrodes for hydrogen peroxide and nitrite detection

    Turdean, Graziella L.; Popescu, Ionel Catalin; Curulli, Antonella; Palleschi, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Iron(III) protoporphyrin IX (Fe(III)P), adsorbed either on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) or on hydroxyl-functionalized SWCNT (SWCNT-OH), was incorporated within a Nafion matrix immobilized on the surface of a graphite electrode. From cyclic voltammetric measurements, performed under different experimental conditions (pH and potential scan rate), it was established that the Fe(III)P/Fe(II)P redox couple involves 1e - /1H + . The heterogeneous electron transfer process occurred faster when Fe(III)P was adsorbed on SWCNT-OH (∼11 s -1 ) than on SWCNT (∼4.9 s -1 ). Both the SWCNT-Fe(III)P- and SWCNT-OH-Fe(III)P-modified graphite electrodes exhibit electrocatalytic activity for H 2 O 2 and nitrite reduction. The modified electrodes sensitivities were found varying in the following sequences: S SWCNT-OH-Fe(III)P = 2.45 mA/M ∼ S SWCNT-Fe(III)P = 2.95 mA/M > S Fe(III)P = 1.34 mA/M for H 2 O 2 , and S SWCNT-Fe(III)P = 3.54 mA/M > S Fe(III)P 1.44 mA/M > S SWCNT-OH-Fe(III)P = 0.81 mA/M for NO 2 -

  7. Influence of the reaction stoichiometry on the mechanical and thermal properties of SWCNT-modified epoxy composites

    Ashrafi, Behnam; Johnston, Andrew; Martinez-Rubi, Yadienka; Kingston, Christopher T; Simard, Benoit; Khoun, Lolei; Yourdkhani, Mostafa; Hubert, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a considerable influence on the curing behavior and crosslink density of epoxy resins. This invariably has an important effect on different thermal and mechanical properties of the epoxy network. This work focuses on the important role of the epoxy/hardener mixing ratio on the mechanical and thermal properties of a high temperature aerospace-grade epoxy (MY0510 Araldite as an epoxy and 4,4′-diaminodiphenylsulfone as an aromatic hardener) modified with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The effects of three different stoichiometries (stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric) on various mechanical and thermal properties (fracture toughness, tensile properties, glass transition temperature) of the epoxy resin and its SWCNT-modified composites were obtained. The results were also supported by Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For the neat resin, it was found that an epoxy/hardener molar ratio of 1:0.8 provides the best overall properties. In contrast, the pattern in property changes with the reaction stoichiometry was considerably different for composites reinforced with unfunctionalized SWCNTs and reduced SWCNTs. A comparison among composites suggests that a 1:1 molar ratio considerably outperforms the other two ratios examined in this work (1:0.8 and 1:1.1). This composition at 0.2 wt% SWCNT loading provides the highest overall mechanical properties by improving fracture toughness, ultimate tensile strength and ultimate tensile strain of the epoxy resin by 40%, 34%, 54%, respectively. (paper)

  8. Diameter sensitive effect in singlewalled carbon nanotubes upon acid treatment

    Costa, S.; Borowiak-Palen, E.

    2009-01-01

    Singlewalled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) exhibit very unique properties. As an electronic system they undergo amphoteric doping effects (n-type and p-type) which can be reversed. These processes affect the optical and vibronic properties of the carbon nanotubes. The most common and widely used procedure which changes the properties of the SWCNT is acid treatment applied as a purification procedure. This effect has been widely studied but not fully understood so far. Here, we present a study, in which a diameter sensitive effect has been observed. Therefore, two kinds of SWCNT samples have been studied: (i) produced via chemical vapour deposition with a broad diameter distribution, and (ii) synthesised by the laser ablation technique which is commonly known to result in narrow diameter distribution bulk SWCNT samples. Resonance Raman spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, and Fourier transform middle-infrared spectroscopy have been applied for the characterisation of the samples.

  9. Polyelectrolyte bundles

    Limbach, H J; Sayar, M; Holm, C [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2004-06-09

    Using extensive molecular dynamics simulations we study the behaviour of polyelectrolytes with hydrophobic side chains, which are known to form cylindrical micelles in aqueous solution. We investigate the stability of such bundles with respect to hydrophobicity, the strength of the electrostatic interaction and the bundle size. We show that for the parameter range relevant for sulfonated poly(para-phenylenes) (PPP) one finds a stable finite bundle size. In a more generic model we also show the influence of the length of the precursor oligomer on the stability of the bundles. We also point out that our model has close similarities to DNA solutions with added condensing agents, hinting at the possibility that the size of DNA aggregates is, under certain circumstances, thermodynamically limited.

  10. Polyelectrolyte bundles

    Limbach, H J; Sayar, M; Holm, C

    2004-01-01

    Using extensive molecular dynamics simulations we study the behaviour of polyelectrolytes with hydrophobic side chains, which are known to form cylindrical micelles in aqueous solution. We investigate the stability of such bundles with respect to hydrophobicity, the strength of the electrostatic interaction and the bundle size. We show that for the parameter range relevant for sulfonated poly(para-phenylenes) (PPP) one finds a stable finite bundle size. In a more generic model we also show the influence of the length of the precursor oligomer on the stability of the bundles. We also point out that our model has close similarities to DNA solutions with added condensing agents, hinting at the possibility that the size of DNA aggregates is, under certain circumstances, thermodynamically limited

  11. Polyelectrolyte bundles

    Limbach, H. J.; Sayar, M.; Holm, C.

    2004-06-01

    Using extensive Molecular Dynamics simulations we study the behavior of polyelectrolytes with hydrophobic side chains, which are known to form cylindrical micelles in aqueous solution. We investigate the stability of such bundles with respect to hydrophobicity, the strength of the electrostatic interaction, and the bundle size. We show that for the parameter range relevant for sulfonated poly-para-phenylenes (PPP) one finds a stable finite bundle size. In a more generic model we also show the influence of the length of the precursor oligomer on the stability of the bundles. We also point out that our model has close similarities to DNA solutions with added condensing agents, hinting to the possibility that the size of DNA aggregates is under certain circumstances thermodynamically limited.

  12. Theoretical study of adsorption of lithium atom on carbon nanotube

    Masato Senami

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the adsorption of lithium atoms on the surface of the (12,0 single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT by using ab initio quantum chemical calculations. The adsorption of one lithium atom on the inside of this SWCNT is favored compared to the outside. We check this feature by charge transfer and regional chemical potential density. The adsorption of multiple lithium atoms on the interior of the SWCNT is studied in terms of adsorption energy and charge transfer. We show that repulsive force between lithium atoms destabilizes a system for the large number of lithium atoms.

  13. Titanium dioxide, single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Gonghu; Gray, Kimberly; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides titanium dioxide/single-walled carbon nanotube composites (TiO.sub.2/SWCNTs), articles of manufacture, and methods of making and using such composites. In certain embodiments, the present invention provides membrane filters and ceramic articles that are coated with TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material. In other embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using TiO.sub.2/SWCNT composite material to purify a sample, such as a water or air sample.

  14. Buckling of ZnS-filled single-walled carbon nanotubes – The influence of aspect ratio

    Monteiro, André O.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Cachim, Paulo B.; Holec, David

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical response of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) filled with crystalline zinc sulphide (ZnS) nanowires under uniaxial compression is studied using classical molecular dynamics. These simulations were used to analyse the behaviour

  15. Facile Preparation of Carbon-Nanotube-based 3-Dimensional Transparent Conducting Networks for Flexible Noncontact Sensing Device

    Tai, Yanlong; Lubineau, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the controllable fabrication of transparent conductive films (TCFs) for moisture-sensing applications based on heating-rate-triggered, 3-dimensional porous conducting networks of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3

  16. Properties of Cs-intercalated single wall carbon nanotubes investigated by 133Cs Nuclear Magnetic resonance

    Schmid, Marc R.

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated Cs-intercalated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using 133Cs Nuclear Magnetic resonance. We show that there are two types of Cs cations depending on the insertion level. Indeed, at low concentrations, Static spectra analysis shows that the Cs (α)+ species are fully ionized, i.e. α equal ca.1, while at higher concentrations a second paramagnetically shifted line appears, indicating the formation of Cs (β)+ ions with β < α ∼ +1. At low concentrations and low temperatures the Cs (α)+ ions exhibit a weak hyperfine coupling to the SWCNT conduction electrons, whereas, at higher temperatures, a thermally activated slow-motion diffusion process of the Cs (α)+ ions occurs along the interstitial channels present within the carbon nanotube bundles. At high concentrations, the Cs (β)+ ions seem to occupy well defined positions relative to the carbon lattice. As a matter of fact, the Korringa relaxation behavior suggests a strong hyperfine coupling between Cs nuclei and conduction electrons in the carbon nanotubes and a partial charge transfer, which suggest a plausible Cs(6s)-C(2p) hybridization. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dosimetry characteristics of HDPE–SWCNT nanocomposite for real time application

    Malekie, Shahryar [Radiation Application Research School, Nuclear Science & Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 11365-3486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ziaie, Farhood, E-mail: fziaie@aeoi.org.ir [Radiation Application Research School, Nuclear Science & Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 11365-3486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Feizi, Shahzad [Radiation Application Research School, Nuclear Science & Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 11365-3486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esmaeli, Abdolreza [Plasma and Fusion Research School, Nuclear Science & Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-11

    In this experimental work, different dosimetric characteristics of high density polyethylene-single wall carbon nanotube nanocomposite were investigated. The nanocomposite samples were prepared with different nanotube contents of 0.22, 0.25, and 0.39 weight percentages which were before, exactly in, and after percolation region of the nanocomposite, respectively. The samples were exposed to {sup 60}Co gamma radiation source over the dose rate of 65–214 mGy/min, while the applied bias was 100 V. A linear response achieved for the sample contained 0.25 nanotube wt% verified that the percolation threshold is the optimum point for dosimetric purposes. The current–voltage characteristics curve measured for 0.25 CNT wt% nanocomposite showed that the behavior of this sample was bias polarity independent. Also, the results showed that the response of this nanocomposite was energy-independent. The maximum discrepancy of photocurrent due to angular variation within 0–90° with respect to beam incidence and the reproducibility of the response were measured as 5.4% and 0.8%, respectively. The stability study showed that this material may be suitable for protection dose level control. Therefore, this kind of nanocomposite requiring calibration can be used as a real-time dosimeter. - Highlights: • HDPE–SWCNT nanocomposite was used in this experiment. • Achieved linear response in EPT region verifying that is optimum point for dosimetric purposes. • The response of this nanocomposite was energy-independent. • The angular dependence and the reproducibility of the response were measured. • The stability study shows that this material is suitable for protection dose level control.

  18. pH-sensitive intracellular photoluminescence of carbon nanotube-fluorescein conjugates in human ovarian cancer cells

    Chen, M T; Ishikawa, F N; Gundersen, M A; Gomez, L M; Vernier, P T; Zhou, C

    2009-01-01

    To add to the understanding of the properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes in biological applications, we report a monotonic pH sensitivity of the intracellular fluorescence emission of single-walled carbon nanotube-fluorescein carbazide (SWCNT-FC) conjugates in human ovarian cancer cells. Light-stimulated intracellular hydrolysis of the amide linkage and localized intracellular pH changes are proposed as mechanisms. SWCNT-FC conjugates may serve as intracellular pH sensors.

  19. Quantum conductance of carbon nanotube peapods

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Mazzoni, Mario S.C.; Louie, Steven G.

    2003-01-01

    We present a first-principles study of the quantum conductance of hybrid nanotube systems consisting of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) encapsulating either an isolated single C60 molecule or a chain of C60 molecules (nanotube peapods). The calculations show a rather weak bonding interaction between the fullerenes and the SWCNTs. The conductance of a (10,10) SWCNT with a single C60 molecule is virtually unaffected at the Fermi level, but exhibits quantized resonant reductions at the molecular levels. The nanotube peapod arrangement gives rise to high density of states for the fullerene highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital bands

  20. Thermogravimetric Analysis of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Arepalli, Sivram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2010-01-01

    An improved protocol for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of samples of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) material has been developed to increase the degree of consistency among results so that meaningful comparisons can be made among different samples. This improved TGA protocol is suitable for incorporation into the protocol for characterization of carbon nanotube material. In most cases, TGA of carbon nanotube materials is performed in gas mixtures that contain oxygen at various concentrations. The improved protocol is summarized.

  1. Superemission in vertically-aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Makarov, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    Presently we used two samples of vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes (VA SWCNTs) with parallelepiped geometry, sized 0.02 cm × 0.2 cm × 1.0 cm and 0.2 cm × 0.2 cm × 1.0 cm. We report absorption and emission properties of the VA SWCNTs, including strong anisotropy in both their absorption and emission spectra. We found that the emission spectra extend from the middle-IR range to the near-IR range, with such extended spectra being reported for the first time. Pumping the VA SWCNTs in the direction normal to their axis, superemission (SE) was observed in the direction along their axis. The SE band maximum is located at 7206 ± 0.4 cm-1. The energy and the power density of the superemission were estimated, along with the diffraction-limited divergence. At the pumping energy of 3 mJ/pulse, the SE energy measured by the detector was 0.74 mJ/pulse, corresponding to the total SE energy of 1.48 mJ/pulse, with the energy density of 18.5 mJ cm-2/pulse and the SE power density of 1.2 × 105 W cm-2/pulse. We report that a bundle of VA SWCNTs is an emitter with a relatively small divergence, not exceeding 3.9 × 10-3 rad. We developed a theoretical approach to explain such absorption and emission spectra. The developed theory is based on the earlier proposed SSH theory, which we extended to include the exchange interactions between the closest SWCNT neighbors. The developed theoretical ideas were implemented in a homemade FORTRAN code. This code was successfully used to calculate and reproduce the experimental spectra and to determine the SWCNT species that originate the respective absorption bands, with acceptable agreement between theory and experiment.

  2. Surface modification of polyester fabric with plasma pretreatment and carbon nanotube coating for antistatic property improvement

    Wang, C.X., E-mail: cxwang@mail.dhu.edu.cn [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Ecological Building Materials and Environmental Protection Equipments, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Technology in Environmental Protection, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Lv, J.C. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Ren, Y. [School of Textile and Clothing, Nantong University, Jiangsu 226019 (China); Zhi, T.; Chen, J.Y.; Zhou, Q.Q. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Lu, Z.Q.; Gao, D.W. [College of Textiles and Clothing, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Ecological Building Materials and Environmental Protection Equipments, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Key Laboratory for Advanced Technology in Environmental Protection, Jiangsu 224051 (China); Jin, L.M. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PET was finished by plasma treatment and SWCNT coating to improve antistatic property. • Plasma modification had a positive effect on SWCNT coating on PET fiber surface. • O{sub 2} plasma was more effective in SWCNT coating than Ar plasma in the shorter time. • Antistatic enhanced and then declined with enhancing treatment time and output power. • Antistatic increased with increasing concentration, curing time, curing temperature. - Abstract: This study introduced a green method to prepare antistatic polyester (PET) fabrics by plasma pretreatment and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) coating. The influences of plasma conditions and SWCNT coating parameters on antistatic property of PET fabrics were investigated. PET fabrics were pretreated under various plasma conditions such as different treatment times, output powers and working gases, and then SWCNT coating on the plasma treated PET fabrics was carried out by coating-dry-cure using various coating parameters including different SWCNT concentrations, curing times and curing temperatures. PET fabrics were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and volume resistivity. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated PET fabrics revealed the increase in surface roughness and oxygen/nitrogen containing groups on the PET fiber surface. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics indicated the SWCNT coating on PET fiber surface. The plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics exhibited a good antistatic property, which increased and then decreased with the increasing plasma treatment time and output power. The antistatic property of the O{sub 2} plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric was better and worse than that of N{sub 2} or Ar plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric in the shorter treatment time and the longer treatment time, respectively. In addition, the antistatic property of the

  3. Surface modification of polyester fabric with plasma pretreatment and carbon nanotube coating for antistatic property improvement

    Wang, C.X.; Lv, J.C.; Ren, Y.; Zhi, T.; Chen, J.Y.; Zhou, Q.Q.; Lu, Z.Q.; Gao, D.W.; Jin, L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PET was finished by plasma treatment and SWCNT coating to improve antistatic property. • Plasma modification had a positive effect on SWCNT coating on PET fiber surface. • O 2 plasma was more effective in SWCNT coating than Ar plasma in the shorter time. • Antistatic enhanced and then declined with enhancing treatment time and output power. • Antistatic increased with increasing concentration, curing time, curing temperature. - Abstract: This study introduced a green method to prepare antistatic polyester (PET) fabrics by plasma pretreatment and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) coating. The influences of plasma conditions and SWCNT coating parameters on antistatic property of PET fabrics were investigated. PET fabrics were pretreated under various plasma conditions such as different treatment times, output powers and working gases, and then SWCNT coating on the plasma treated PET fabrics was carried out by coating-dry-cure using various coating parameters including different SWCNT concentrations, curing times and curing temperatures. PET fabrics were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and volume resistivity. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated PET fabrics revealed the increase in surface roughness and oxygen/nitrogen containing groups on the PET fiber surface. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics indicated the SWCNT coating on PET fiber surface. The plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics exhibited a good antistatic property, which increased and then decreased with the increasing plasma treatment time and output power. The antistatic property of the O 2 plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric was better and worse than that of N 2 or Ar plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric in the shorter treatment time and the longer treatment time, respectively. In addition, the antistatic property of the plasma treated

  4. Relaxation Dynamics of the Glass Transition in PMMA+SWCNT Composites by Temperature-Modulated DSC

    Pradhan, Nihar; Iannacchione, Germano

    2010-03-01

    Temperature Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimeter (TMDSC) used to investigate the thermal relaxation dynamics of PMMA-Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through the glass transition as a function of frequency. A strong dependence of the temperature dependence peak in imaginary part of complex heat capacity (Tmax) was found during the transition from glass like to liquid like region and can be described by Arhenius law. The activation energy shows increases while the charactersistic time decreases with increasing mass fraction (φm) of SWCNTs. Decreasing of enthalpy, while heating and slowly increasing while cooling at 2.0 K/min scan rate was observed and as frequency of temperature modulation increases. There is no relative change of enthalpy in heating and cooling observed at sufficiently slow scan rate. The glass transition temperature (Tg) shows increases as a function of frequency of temperature modulation, φm of SWCNTs and with increasing scan rate. From imaginary part of heat capacity, it obvious that Tmax is not the actual glass transition temperature of pure polymer but Tmax and Tg values can be superimpose when φm of SWCNT increases in polymer.

  5. A facile synthesis of a novel optoelectric material: a nanocomposite of SWCNT/ZnO nanostructures embedded in sulfonated polyaniline

    Rajesh K. Agrawalla

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (f-SWCNTs hybridized with freshly prepared zinc oxide (ZnO nanocrystals have been found to be good luminescent material with tuned emission properties. A three-phase nanocomposite of sulfonated polyaniline embedded with such SWCNT/ZnO nanostructures has been prepared by a simple solution mixing chemical process and characterized by using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The study of UV-visible absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopies reveal that the ternary polymer nanocomposite is a luminescent material with enhanced emission intensity. Also an increase in DC conductivity indicates that the nanocomposite is also a good conductive material, satisfying Mott’s variable range hopping model for a two-dimensional conduction. Such a three-phase nanocomposite may find extensive application in dye-sensitized solar cells, sensors, and supercapacitors.

  6. DFT studies on armchair (5,5) SWCNT functionalization. Modification of selected structural and spectroscopic parameters upon two-atom molecule attachment

    Jankowska, M.; Kupka, T.; Stobinski, L.; Kaminský, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, Feb (2015), s. 105-114 ISSN 1093-3263 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) M200551205; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005; GA MŠk(CZ) ED3.2.00/08.0144 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) * absorption * DFT and GIAO NMR * HOMO/LUMO gap * IR/Raman Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.674, year: 2015

  7. Single walled carbon nanotube composites for bone tissue engineering.

    Gupta, Ashim; Woods, Mia D; Illingworth, Kenneth David; Niemeier, Ryan; Schafer, Isaac; Cady, Craig; Filip, Peter; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLAGA) composites for orthopedic applications and to evaluate the interaction of human stem cells (hBMSCs) and osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1 cells) via cell growth, proliferation, gene expression, extracellular matrix production and mineralization. PLAGA and SWCNT/PLAGA composites were fabricated with various amounts of SWCNT (5, 10, 20, 40, and 100 mg), characterized and degradation studies were performed. Cells were seeded and cell adhesion/morphology, growth/survival, proliferation and gene expression analysis were performed to evaluate biocompatibility. Imaging studies demonstrated uniform incorporation of SWCNT into the PLAGA matrix and addition of SWCNT did not affect the degradation rate. Imaging studies revealed that MC3T3-E1 and hBMSCs cells exhibited normal, non-stressed morphology on the composites and all were biocompatible. Composites with 10 mg SWCNT resulted in highest rate of cell proliferation (p PLAGA composites imparted beneficial cellular growth capabilities and gene expression, and mineralization abilities were well established. These results demonstrate the potential of SWCNT/PLAGA composites for musculoskeletal regeneration and bone tissue engineering (BTE) and are promising for orthopedic applications. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  8. Fabrication and electrochemical properties of free-standing single-walled carbon nanotube film electrodes

    Niu Zhi-Qiang; Ma Wen-Jun; Dong Hai-Bo; Li Jin-Zhu; Zhou Wei-Ya

    2011-01-01

    An easily manipulative approach was presented to fabricate electrodes using free-standing single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films grown directly by chemical vapor deposition. Electrochemical properties of the electrodes were investigated. In comparison with the post-deposited SWCNT papers, the directly grown SWCNT film electrodes manifested enhanced electrochemical properties and sensitivity of sensors as well as excellent electrocatalytic activities. A transition from macroelectrode to nanoelectrode behaviours was observed with the increase of scan rate. The heat treatment of the SWCNT film electrodes increased the current signals of electrochemical analyser and background current, because the heat-treatment of the SWCNTs in air could create more oxide defects on the walls of the SWCNTs and make the surfaces of SWCNTs more hydrophilic. The excellent electrochemical properties of the directly grown and heat-treated free-standing SWCNT film electrodes show the potentials in biological and electrocatalytic applications. (cross-disciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  9. A study on AFM manipulation of single-wall carbon nanotube

    Tian Xiaojun; Dong Zaili; Yu Peng; Liu Zhu [State Key Lab. of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)], E-mail: xjtian@sia.cn

    2009-09-01

    As single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) has special electrical and physical property, it can be used as excellent material to construct various nano electronic device. However, in the fabrication process, the modification of size, shape and even the electronic property, especially to the metallic SWCNT, is a key problem to be overcome. Here a modified nanomanipulation technology based on atomic force microscope (AFM) is utilized to perform various kinds of SWCNT manipulation, such as SWCNT separation, catalyst remove, continual nano buckles fabrication and even stretch to break, thus to modify the size, shape and eventually the electrical property of the SWCNT. In addition, the manipulation results are analyzed based on the mechanical mechanism.

  10. Investigation of the interfacial properties of polyurethane/carbon nanotube hybrid composites: A molecular dynamics study

    Goclon, Jakub; Panczyk, Tomasz; Winkler, Krzysztof

    2018-03-01

    Considering the varied applications of hybrid polymer/carbon nanotube composites and the constant progress in the synthesis methods of such materials, we report a theoretical study of interfacial layer formation between pristine single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and polyurethane (PU) using molecular dynamic simulations. We vary the SWCNT diameter and the number of PU chains to examine various PU-SWCNT interaction patterns. Our simulations indicate the important role of intra-chain forces in PU. No regular polymeric structures could be identified on the carbon nanotube surface during the simulations. We find that increasing the SWCNT diameter results in stronger polymer binding. However, higher surface loadings of PU lead to stronger interpenetration by the polymeric segments; this effect is more apparent for SWCNTs with small diameters. Our core finding is that the attached PU binds most strongly to the carbon nanotubes with the largest diameters. Polymer dynamics reveal the loose distribution of PU chains in these systems.

  11. Biomimetic three-dimensional nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotube chitosan nanocomposite for bone regeneration

    Im O

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Owen Im1, Jian Li2, Mian Wang2, Lijie Grace Zhang2,3, Michael Keidar2,31Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC; 2Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 3Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Institute for Nanotechnology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USABackground: Many shortcomings exist in the traditional methods of treating bone defects, such as donor tissue shortages for autografts and disease transmission for allografts. The objective of this study was to design a novel three-dimensional nanostructured bone substitute based on magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT, biomimetic hydrothermally treated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite, and a biocompatible hydrogel (chitosan. Both nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT have a biomimetic nanostructure, excellent osteoconductivity, and high potential to improve the load-bearing capacity of hydrogels.Methods: Specifically, three-dimensional porous chitosan scaffolds with different concentrations of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT were created to support the growth of human osteoblasts (bone-forming cells using a lyophilization procedure. Two types of SWCNT were synthesized in an arc discharge with a magnetic field (B-SWCNT and without a magnetic field (N-SWCNT for improving bone regeneration.Results: Nanocomposites containing magnetically synthesized B-SWCNT had superior cytocompatibility properties when compared with nonmagnetically synthesized N-SWCNT. B-SWCNT have much smaller diameters and are twice as long as their nonmagnetically prepared counterparts, indicating that the dimensions of carbon nanotubes can have a substantial effect on osteoblast attachment.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that a chitosan nanocomposite with both B-SWCNT and 20% nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite could achieve a higher osteoblast density when compared with the other experimental groups, thus making this nanocomposite

  12. Si-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes under axial loads: An atomistic simulation study

    Song Haiyang; Zha Xinwei

    2007-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the Si-coated imperfect (5, 5) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), the imperfect (5, 5) SWCNT and several perfect armchair SWCNTs under axial loads were investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. The interactions between atoms were modeled using the empirical Tersoff potential and the Tersoff-Brenner potential coupled with the Lennard-Jones potential. We get Young's modulus of the defective (5, 5) nanotube with and without the Si coating under axial tension 1107.92 and 1076.02 GPa, respectively. The results also show that the structure failure of the Si-coated imperfect (5, 5) SWCNT under axial compression occurs at a slightly higher strain than for the perfect (5, 5) SWCNT. Therefore, we can confirm the protective effect of Si as a coating material for defective SWCNTs. We also obtain the critical buckling strains of perfect SWCNTs

  13. Electronic properties of pristine and modified single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Kharlamova, M V

    2013-01-01

    The current status of research on the electronic properties of filled single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is reviewed. SWCNT atomic structure and electronic properties are described, and their correlation is discussed. Methods for modifying the electronic properties of SWCNTs are considered. SWCNT filling materials are systematized. Experimental and theoretical data on the electronic properties of filled SWCNTs are analyzed. Possible application areas for filled SWCNTs are explored. (reviews of topical problems)

  14. Long-term stability of superhydrophilic oxygen plasma-modified single-walled carbon nanotube network surfaces and the influence on ammonia gas detection

    Min, Sungjoon [Department of Biomicrosystem Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joonhyub [Department of Control and Instrumentation Engineering, Korea University, 2511 Sejong-ro, Sejong City 339-770 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chanwon [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Joon-Hyung, E-mail: jj1023@chol.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kyonggi University, 154-42 Gwanggyosan-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 16227 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Nam Ki, E-mail: nkmin@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biomicrosystem Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Superhydrophilic single-walled carbon nanotube obtained by O{sub 2} plasma treatment voluntarily and non-reversibly reverts to a metastable state. This aerobic aging is an essential process to develop a stable carbon nanotube-based sensor. - Highlights: • Superhydrophilic single-walled carbon nanotube network can be obtained by O{sub 2} plasma-based surface modification. • The modified carbon nanotube surface invariably reverts to a metastable state in a non-reversible manner. • Aerobic aging is essential to stabilize the modified carbon nanotube and the carbon nanotube-based sensing device due to minimized sensor-to-sensor variation. - Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks are subjected to a low-powered oxygen plasma for the surface modification. Changes in the surface chemical composition and the stability of the plasma-treated SWCNT (p-SWCNT) with aging in air for up to five weeks are studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle analysis. The contact angle decreases from 120° of the untreated hydrophobic SWCNT to 0° for the superhydrophilic p-SWCNT. Similarly, the ratio of oxygen to carbon (O:C) based on the XPS spectra increases from 0.25 to 1.19, indicating an increase in surface energy of the p-SWCNT. The enhanced surface energy is gradually dissipated and the p-SWCNT network loses the superhydrophilic surface property. However, it never revert to the original hydrophobic surface state but to a metastable hydrophilic state. The aging effect on sensitivity of the p-SWCNT network-based ammonia sensor is investigated to show the importance of the aging process for the stabilization of the p-SWCNT. The best sensitivity for monitoring NH{sub 3} gas is observed with the as-prepared p-SWCNT, and the sensitivity decreases as similar as the p-SWCNT loses its hydrophilicity with time goes by. After a large performance degradation during the aging time for about two weeks, the response

  15. Confinement in single walled carbon nanotubes investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Battie, Y.; Jamon, D.; Lauret, J.S.; Gu, Q.; Gicquel-Guézo, M.; En Naciri, A.; Loiseau, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thick films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameter and chirality distributions are characterized by combining transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The dependence of the dielectric function with the increase of the SWCNT diameter occurs with a drastic redshift of the S 11 , S 22 and M 11 transition energies. The transfer integral parameter γ 0 of SWCNT is also evaluated and analyzed. We demonstrate that parts of the optical properties of SWCNTs are attributed to a one dimensional confinement effect. - Highlights: • Ellipsometric measurements are performed on carbon nanotube thick films. • The complex dielectric functions of conventional carbon nanotubes are given. • Confinement effects explain the variations of dielectric function of nanotubes

  16. Sonochemical optimization of the conductivity of single wall nanotube networks

    Kaempgen, M.; Lebert, M.; Haluska, M.; Nicoloso, N.; Roth, S.

    2008-01-01

    Networks of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are covalently functionalized with oxygen-containing groups. In lower concentration, these functional groups act as stable dopands improving the conductivity of the SWCNT material. In higher concentration however, their role as defects with a certain

  17. Ambient effects on the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes

    Roch, Aljoscha; Greifzu, Moritz; Roch Talens, Esther

    2015-01-01

    We show that the electrical conductivity of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) networks is affected by oxygen and air humidity under ambient conditions by more than a magnitude. Later, we intentionally modified the electrical conductivity by functionalization with iodine and investigated...

  18. Sensors based on carbon nanotube field-effect transistors and molecular recognition approaches

    Cid Salavert, Cristina Carlota

    2009-01-01

    The general objective of this thesis is to develop chemical sensors whose sensing capacities are based on the principle of molecular recognition and where the transduction is carried out by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT).The sensing device used is the carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET). The new structure of the CNTFET allows nanotubes to be integrated at the surface of the devices, thus exploiting SWCNTs' sensitivity to changes in their environment. The functionalization...

  19. TEM Nano-Moiré Pattern Analysis of a Copper/Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Synthesized by Laser Surface Implanting

    Jay F. Tu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In our previous studies, we have developed a wet process to synthesize a copper-single walled carbon nanotube (Cu–SWCNT metal nanocomposite with excellent mechanical properties. The nanostructure of this Cu–SWCNT composite was confirmed independently by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy mapping, spectroscopy measurements, and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM images with discernable SWCNT clusters in nano sizes. However, TEM images with discernable nano-sized SWCNT clusters are rare. In this paper, we present analysis of indirect TEM image patterns, such as moiré fringes, to infer the existence of SWCNT clusters within the copper matrix. Moiré fringes or patterns in the TEM images of a Cu–SWCNT nanocomposite could be generated due to the overlapping of more than one thin crystals with similar periodic arrangements of atoms, promoted by SWCNT clusters. However, the presence of moiré patterns is not a sufficient or a necessary condition for the existence of SWCNT clusters. It was found that based on the overlapping angle of two periodic arrangements, it is feasible to distinguish the moiré fringes induced by SWCNT clusters from those by other factors, such as dislocations. The ability to identify SWCNTs within the copper matrix based on indirect TEM moiré patterns helps to widen the usability of TEM images.

  20. In vitro evaluation of three-dimensional single-walled carbon nanotube composites for bone tissue engineering.

    Gupta, Ashim; Main, Benjamin J; Taylor, Brittany L; Gupta, Manu; Whitworth, Craig A; Cady, Craig; Freeman, Joseph W; El-Amin, Saadiq F

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop three-dimensional single-walled carbon nanotube composites (SWCNT/PLAGA) using 10-mg single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) for bone regeneration and to determine the mechanical strength of the composites, and to evaluate the interaction of MC3T3-E1 cells via cell adhesion, growth, survival, proliferation, and gene expression. PLAGA (polylactic-co-glycolic acid) and SWCNT/PLAGA microspheres and composites were fabricated, characterized, and mechanical testing was performed. MC3T3-E1 cells were seeded and cell adhesion/morphology, growth/survival, proliferation, and gene expression analysis were performed to evaluate biocompatibility. Imaging studies demonstrated microspheres with uniform shape and smooth surfaces, and uniform incorporation of SWCNT into PLAGA matrix. The microspheres bonded in a random packing manner while maintaining spacing, thus resembling trabeculae of cancellous bone. Addition of SWCNT led to greater compressive modulus and ultimate compressive strength. Imaging studies revealed that MC3T3-E1 cells adhered, grew/survived, and exhibited normal, nonstressed morphology on the composites. SWCNT/PLAGA composites exhibited higher cell proliferation rate and gene expression compared with PLAGA. These results demonstrate the potential of SWCNT/PLAGA composites for musculoskeletal regeneration, for bone tissue engineering, and are promising for orthopedic applications as they possess the combined effect of increased mechanical strength, cell proliferation, and gene expression. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Nonabelian bundle 2-gerbes

    Jurco, Branislav

    2009-01-01

    We define 2-crossed module bundle 2-gerbes related to general Lie 2-crossed modules and discuss their properties. A 2-crossed module bundle 2-gerbe over a manifold is defined in terms of a so called 2-crossed module bundle gerbe, which is a crossed module bundle gerbe equipped with an extra sructure. It is shown that string structures can be described and classified using 2-crossed module bundle 2-gerbes.

  2. Effects of Graphene Oxide and Oxidized Carbon Nanotubes on the Cellular Division, Microstructure, Uptake, Oxidative Stress, and Metabolic Profiles.

    Hu, Xiangang; Ouyang, Shaohu; Mu, Li; An, Jing; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-09-15

    Nanomaterial oxides are common formations of nanomaterials in the natural environment. Herein, the nanotoxicology of typical graphene oxide (GO) and carboxyl single-walled carbon nanotubes (C-SWCNT) was compared. The results showed that cell division of Chlorella vulgaris was promoted at 24 h and then inhibited at 96 h after nanomaterial exposure. At 96 h, GO and C-SWCNT inhibited the rates of cell division by 0.08-15% and 0.8-28.3%, respectively. Both GO and C-SWCNT covered the cell surface, but the uptake percentage of C-SWCNT was 2-fold higher than that of GO. C-SWCNT induced stronger plasmolysis and mitochondrial membrane potential loss and decreased the cell viability to a greater extent than GO. Moreover, C-SWCNT-exposed cells exhibited more starch grains and lysosome formation and higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels than GO-exposed cells. Metabolomics analysis revealed significant differences in the metabolic profiles among the control, C-SWCNT and GO groups. The metabolisms of alkanes, lysine, octadecadienoic acid and valine was associated with ROS and could be considered as new biomarkers of ROS. The nanotoxicological mechanisms involved the inhibition of fatty acid, amino acid and small molecule acid metabolisms. These findings provide new insights into the effects of GO and C-SWCNT on cellular responses.

  3. Effect of single walled carbon nanotubes on the threshold voltage of dye based photovoltaic devices

    Chakraborty, S.; Manik, N.B.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being widely used in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices as their usage has been reported to enhance the device efficiency along with other related parameters. In this work we have studied the energy (E_c) effect of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) on the threshold voltage (V_t_h) and also on the trap states of dye based photovoltaic devices. SWCNT is added in a series of dyes such as Rose Bengal (RB), Methyl Red (MR), Malachite Green (MG) and Crystal Violet (CV). By analysing the steady state dark current–voltage (I–V) characteristics V_t_h and E_c is estimated for the different devices with and without addition of SWCNT. It is observed that on an average for all the dyes V_t_h is reduced by about 30% in presence of SWCNT. The trap energy E_c also reduces in case of all the dyes. The relation between V_t_h, E_c and total trap density is discussed. From the photovoltaic measurements it is seen that the different photovoltaic parameters change with addition of SWCNT to the dye based devices. Both the short circuit current density and fill factor are found to increase for all the dye based devices in presence of SWCNT.

  4. Flue gas adsorption by single-wall carbon nanotubes: A Monte Carlo study

    Romero-Hermida, M. I.; Romero-Enrique, J. M.; Morales-Flórez, V.; Esquivias, L.

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption of flue gases by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) has been studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The flue gas is modeled as a ternary mixture of N 2 , CO 2 , and O 2 , emulating realistic compositions of the emissions from power plants. The adsorbed flue gas is in equilibrium with a bulk gas characterized by temperature T, pressure p, and mixture composition. We have considered different SWCNTs with different chiralities and diameters in a range between 7 and 20 Å. Our results show that the CO 2 adsorption properties depend mainly on the bulk flue gas thermodynamic conditions and the SWCNT diameter. Narrow SWCNTs with diameter around 7 Å show high CO 2 adsorption capacity and selectivity, but they decrease abruptly as the SWCNT diameter is increased. For wide SWCNT, CO 2 adsorption capacity and selectivity, much smaller in value than for the narrow case, decrease mildly with the SWCNT diameter. In the intermediate range of SWCNT diameters, the CO 2 adsorption properties may show a peculiar behavior, which depend strongly on the bulk flue gas conditions. Thus, for high bulk CO 2 concentrations and low temperatures, the CO 2 adsorption capacity remains high in a wide range of SWCNT diameters, although the corresponding selectivity is moderate. We correlate these findings with the microscopic structure of the adsorbed gas inside the SWCNTs.

  5. Flue gas adsorption by single-wall carbon nanotubes: A Monte Carlo study.

    Romero-Hermida, M I; Romero-Enrique, J M; Morales-Flórez, V; Esquivias, L

    2016-08-21

    Adsorption of flue gases by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) has been studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The flue gas is modeled as a ternary mixture of N2, CO2, and O2, emulating realistic compositions of the emissions from power plants. The adsorbed flue gas is in equilibrium with a bulk gas characterized by temperature T, pressure p, and mixture composition. We have considered different SWCNTs with different chiralities and diameters in a range between 7 and 20 Å. Our results show that the CO2 adsorption properties depend mainly on the bulk flue gas thermodynamic conditions and the SWCNT diameter. Narrow SWCNTs with diameter around 7 Å show high CO2 adsorption capacity and selectivity, but they decrease abruptly as the SWCNT diameter is increased. For wide SWCNT, CO2 adsorption capacity and selectivity, much smaller in value than for the narrow case, decrease mildly with the SWCNT diameter. In the intermediate range of SWCNT diameters, the CO2 adsorption properties may show a peculiar behavior, which depend strongly on the bulk flue gas conditions. Thus, for high bulk CO2 concentrations and low temperatures, the CO2 adsorption capacity remains high in a wide range of SWCNT diameters, although the corresponding selectivity is moderate. We correlate these findings with the microscopic structure of the adsorbed gas inside the SWCNTs.

  6. Comparison of the mechanical properties between carbon nanotube and nanocrystalline cellulose polypropylene based nano-composites

    Huang, Jun; Rodrigue, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • SWCNT and NCC can effectively improve the mechanical properties of nano-composites. • SWCNT is more effective than NCC to increase modulus and strength. • Longer NCC is more effective to improve the mechanical properties of nano-composites. • It is more economic to use NCC than SWCNT to improve mechanical properties. - Abstract: Using beam and tetrahedron elements to simulate nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and polypropylene (PP), finite element method (FEM) is used to predict the mechanical properties of nano-composites. The bending, shear and torsion behaviors of nano-composites are especially investigated due to the limited amount of information in the present literature. First, mixed method (MM) and FEM are used to compare the bending stiffness of NCC/PP and SWCNT/PP composites. Second, based on mechanics of materials, the shear moduli of both types of nano-composites are obtained. Finally, fixing the number of fibers and for different volume contents, four NCC lengths are used to determine the mechanical properties of the composites. The bending and shearing performances are also compared between NCC and SWCNT based composites. In all cases, the elastic–plastic analyses are carried out and the stress or strain distributions for specific regions are also investigated. From all the results obtained, an economic analysis shows that NCC is more interesting than SWCNT to reinforce PP

  7. Adsorption of triclosan on single wall carbon nanotubes: A first principle approach

    Castro, S.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, 65080-805 SãoLuís, MA (Brazil); Araújo, A.B. [Instituto Federal do Maranhão, Campus São Luis-Centro Histórico, 65010-500 SãoLuís, MA (Brazil); Nogueira, R.F.P. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Instituto de Química de Araraquara, UNESP e Univ Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP 14801-970 (Brazil); Guerini, S., E-mail: silvete@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, 65080-805 SãoLuís, MA (Brazil)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • The interaction between the (8,0) SWCNT and triclosan molecule occurs via chemical process in parallel configuration. • The semiconductor SWCNT present predominantly binding energies larger than that of metallic SWCNT. • Triclosan behaves as an electron donor or acceptor depending on configuration. - Abstract: The interaction of triclosan on (8,0) and (5,5) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was investigated using density functional calculations. The results show that the adsorption of triclosan modifies the electronic properties of pristine (8,0) and (5,5) SWCNT and induced changes in the electronic properties are dependent on the triclosan adsorption site. It was observed through binding energy that triclosan molecule interacts mainly via chemical process in parallel configuration to (8,0) SWCNT, while interaction via physical process was observed with both (8,0) and (5,5) SWCNT. It is proposed that these SWCNTs are a potential filter device due to reasonable physical interaction with triclosan molecule. Furthermore, this type of filter could be reusable, therefore after the filtering, the SWCNTs could be separated from triclosan molecule.

  8. Flue gas adsorption by single-wall carbon nanotubes: A Monte Carlo study

    Romero-Hermida, M. I. [Departamento de Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cádiz, Campus Río San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Departamento de Física Condensada, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Romero-Enrique, J. M. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Área de Física Teórica, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Morales-Flórez, V.; Esquivias, L. [Departamento de Física Condensada, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC/US), Av. Américo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2016-08-21

    Adsorption of flue gases by single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) has been studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The flue gas is modeled as a ternary mixture of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}, emulating realistic compositions of the emissions from power plants. The adsorbed flue gas is in equilibrium with a bulk gas characterized by temperature T, pressure p, and mixture composition. We have considered different SWCNTs with different chiralities and diameters in a range between 7 and 20 Å. Our results show that the CO{sub 2} adsorption properties depend mainly on the bulk flue gas thermodynamic conditions and the SWCNT diameter. Narrow SWCNTs with diameter around 7 Å show high CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and selectivity, but they decrease abruptly as the SWCNT diameter is increased. For wide SWCNT, CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and selectivity, much smaller in value than for the narrow case, decrease mildly with the SWCNT diameter. In the intermediate range of SWCNT diameters, the CO{sub 2} adsorption properties may show a peculiar behavior, which depend strongly on the bulk flue gas conditions. Thus, for high bulk CO{sub 2} concentrations and low temperatures, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity remains high in a wide range of SWCNT diameters, although the corresponding selectivity is moderate. We correlate these findings with the microscopic structure of the adsorbed gas inside the SWCNTs.

  9. Strategic Aspects of Bundling

    Podesta, Marion

    2008-01-01

    The increase of bundle supply has become widespread in several sectors (for instance in telecommunications and energy fields). This paper review relates strategic aspects of bundling. The main purpose of this paper is to analyze profitability of bundling strategies according to the degree of competition and the characteristics of goods. Moreover, bundling can be used as price discrimination tool, screening device or entry barriers. In monopoly case bundling strategy is efficient to sort consumers in different categories in order to capture a maximum of surplus. However, when competition increases, the profitability on bundling strategies depends on correlation of consumers' reservations values. (author)

  10. Electrodeposition of polyfluorene on a carbon nanotube electrode

    Valentini, L; Mengoni, F; Mattiello, L; Kenny, J M

    2007-01-01

    Electrophoretically deposited single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films on a transparent conducting surface are used as electrodes for the electrodeposition of a π-conjugated polymer formed by the oxidative coupling of fluorene units. This method provides a uniform coverage of the conducting surface with respect to SWCNTs chemically assembled on a gold substrate. Electron microscopy reveals the formation of a polymer-SWCNT nanostructure which imparts distinct electrical properties from those of the polymer electrodeposited on the neat electrode. By combining the attractive properties of SWCNTs and polyfluorene, these nanocomposites open up new opportunities to achieve electrical contacts in nano- to micro-devices

  11. Radial collapse and physical mechanism of carbon nanotube with divacancy and 5-8-5 defects

    Zhang Ya-Ping; Ling Cui-Cui; Li Gui-Xia; Zhu Hai-Feng; Zhang Meng-Yu

    2015-01-01

    By employing molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the radial collapses and elasticities of different chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with divacancy, and 5-8-5 defects. It is found that divacancy and 5-8-5 defect can reduce the collapse pressure (P c ) of SWCNT (10, 10) while 5-8-5 defect can greatly increase P c of SWCNT (17, 0). For example, 5-8-5 defect can make P c of SWCNT (17, 0) increase by 500%. A model is established to understand the effects of chirality, divacancy, and 5-8-5 defect on radial collapse of SWCNTs. The results are particularly of value for understanding the mechanical behavior of SWCNT with divacancy, and the 5-8-5 defect that may be considered as a filler of high loading composites. (paper)

  12. Electrical transport through single-wall carbon nanotube-anodic aluminum oxide-aluminum heterostructures

    Kukkola, Jarmo; Rautio, Aatto; Sala, Giovanni; Pino, Flavio; Toth, Geza; Leino, Anne-Riikka; Maeklin, Jani; Jantunen, Heli; Uusimaeki, Antti; Kordas, Krisztian; Gracia, Eduardo; Terrones, Mauricio; Shchukarev, Andrey; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2010-01-01

    Aluminum foils were anodized in sulfuric acid solution to form thick porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) films of thickness ∼6 μm. Electrodes of carboxyl-functionalized single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films were inkjet printed on the anodic oxide layer and the electrical characteristics of the as-obtained SWCNT-AAO-Al structures were studied. Nonlinear current-voltage transport and strong temperature dependence of conduction through the structure was measured. The microstructure and chemical composition of the anodic oxide layer was analyzed using transmission and scanning electron microscopy as well as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Schottky emission at the SWCNT-AAO and AAO-Al interfaces allowed by impurity states in the anodic aluminum oxide film together with ionic surface conduction on the pore walls of AAO gives a reasonable explanation for the measured electrical conduction. Calcined AAO is proposed as a dielectric material for SWCNT-field effect transistors.

  13. Influence of the microstructure on the supercapacitive behavior of polyaniline/single-wall carbon nanotube composites

    Gupta, Vinay; Miura, Norio [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Environment and Energy, KASTEC, Kyushu University, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2006-06-19

    Polyaniline/single-wall carbon nanotube (PANI/SWCNT) composites were prepared by in situ potentiostatic deposition of PANI onto SWCNTs at the potential of 0.75V versus SCE, with the aim to investigate the influence of microstructure on the specific capacitance of PANI/SWCNT composites. It was found that the specific capacitance of the PANI/SWCNT composites is strongly influenced by their microstructure, which is correlated to the wt.% of the PANI deposited onto the SWCNTs. The optimum condition, corresponding to the highest specific capacitance, 463Fg{sup -1} (at 10mAcm{sup -2}), was obtained for 73wt.% PANI deposited onto SWCNTs. The specific capacitance of the PANI/SWCNT composite electrode was highly stable, with a capacitive decrease of 5% during the first 500 cycles and just 1% during the next 1000 cycles, indicative of the excellent cyclic stability of the composite for supercapacitor applications. (author)

  14. Purity Evaluation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using Thermogravimetric Analysis

    Goak, Jeung Choon; Kim, Tae Yang; Jung, Jongwan; Seo, Young-Soo; Lee, Naesung; Sok, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the purity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the arc-synthesized SWCNT samples by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The as-produced SWCNT samples were heat-treated in air for 20 h at 275-475°C and characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopes and TGA to establish oxidation temperature ranges of SWCNTs and carbonaceous impurities comprising the samples. Based on these oxidation temperature ranges, derivative thermogravimetric curves were deconvoluted, and differentiated peaks were assigned to SWCNTs and carbonaceous impurities. The compositions and the SWCNT purities of the samples were obtained simply by calculating the areal ratios under the deconvoluted curves. TGA studies on purity evaluation and thermal stabilities of SWCNTs and carbonaceous impurities are likely to provide us with a simple route of thermal oxidation purification to acquire high-purity SWCNT samples.

  15. Interaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes and saxitoxin: Ab initio simulations and biological responses in hippocampal cell line HT-22.

    Ramos, Patrícia; Schmitz, Marcos; Filgueira, Daza; Votto, Ana Paula; Durruthy, Michael; Gelesky, Marcos; Ruas, Caroline; Yunes, João; Tonel, Mariana; Fagan, Solange; Monserrat, José

    2017-07-01

    Saxitoxins (STXs) are potent neurotoxins that also induce cytotoxicity through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are nanomaterials that can promote a Trojan horse effect, facilitating the entry of toxic molecules to cells when adsorbed to nanomaterials. The interaction of pristine single-walled (SW)CNTs and carboxylated (SWCNT-COOH) nanotubes with STX was evaluated by ab initio simulation and bioassays using the cell line HT-22. Cells (5 × 10 4  cells/mL) were exposed to SWCNT and SWCNT-COOH (5 μg mL -1 ), STX (200 μg L -1 ), SWCNT+STX, and SWCNT-COOH+STX for 30 min or 24 h. Results of ab initio simulation showed that the interaction between SWCNT and SWCNT-COOH with STX occurs in a physisorption. The interaction of SWCNT+STX induced a decrease in cell viability. Cell proliferation was not affected in any treatment after 30 min or 24 h of exposure (p > 0.05). Treatment with SWCNT-COOH induced high reactive oxygen species levels, an effect attenuated in SWCNT-COOH+STX treatment. In terms of cellular oxygen consumption, both CNTs when coexposed with STX antagonize the toxin effect. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the results obtained in vitro corroborate the semiempirical evidence found using density functional theory ab initio simulation. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1728-1737. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  16. Bundle Branch Block

    ... known cause. Causes can include: Left bundle branch block Heart attacks (myocardial infarction) Thickened, stiffened or weakened ... myocarditis) High blood pressure (hypertension) Right bundle branch block A heart abnormality that's present at birth (congenital) — ...

  17. Pulmonary exposure to particles from diesel exhaust, urban dust or single-walled carbon nanotubes and oxidatively damaged DNA and vascular function in apoE(-/-)mice

    Vesterdal, Lise K; Jantzen, Kim; Sheykhzade, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This study compared the oxidative stress level and vasomotor dysfunction after exposure to urban dust, diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). DEP and SWCNT increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured endothelial cells and acell......Abstract This study compared the oxidative stress level and vasomotor dysfunction after exposure to urban dust, diesel exhaust particles (DEP) or single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). DEP and SWCNT increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured endothelial cells...... and acellullarly, whereas the exposure to urban dust did not generate ROS. ApoE(-/-) mice, which were exposed twice to 0.5 mg/kg of the particles by intratracheal instillation, had unaltered acetylcholine-elicited vasorelaxation in aorta segments. There was unaltered pulmonary expression level of Vcam-1, Icam-1...

  18. Mechanical properties of nickel-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes and their embedded gold matrix composites

    Song Haiyang; Zha Xinwei

    2010-01-01

    The effects of nickel coating on the mechanical behaviors of armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and their embedded gold matrix composites under axial tension are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method. The results show that the Young's moduli and tensile strength of SWCNTs obviously decrease after nickel coating. For armchair SWCNTs, the decreased ratio of the Young's moduli of SWCNTs with smaller radius is larger than that of SWCNTs with larger radius. A comparison is made between the response to Young's modulus of a composite with parallel embedded nanotube and the response of a composite with vertically embedded nanotube. The results show that the uncoated SWCNT can enhance the Young's modulus of composite under the condition of parallel embedment, but such improvement disappears under the condition of vertical embedment because the interaction between SWCNT and gold matrix is too weak for effective load transfer. However, the nickel-coated SWCNT can indeed significantly improve the composite behavior.

  19. Flexible, Transparent, Thickness-Controllable SWCNT/PEDOT:PSS Hybrid Films Based on Coffee-Ring Lithography for Functional Noncontact Sensing Device

    Tai, Yanlong

    2015-12-08

    Flexible transparent conductive films (FTCFs) as the essential components of the next generation of functional circuits and devices are presently attracting more attention. Here, a new strategy has been demonstrated to fabricate thickness-controllable FTCFs through coffee ring lithography (CRL) of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) hybrid ink. The influence of ink concentration and volume on the thickness and size of hybrid film has been investigated systematically. Results show that the final FTCFs present a high performance, including a homogeneous thickness of 60-65 nm, a sheet resistance of 1.8 kohm/sq, a visible/infrared-range transmittance (79%, PET = 90%), and a dynamic mechanical property (>1000 cycle, much better than ITO film), respectively, when SWCNT concentration is 0.2 mg/mL, ink volume is 0.4 μL, drying at room temperature. Moreover, the benefits of these kinds of FTCFs have been verified through a full transparent, flexible noncontact sensing panel (3 × 4 sensing pixels) and a flexible battery-free wireless sensor based on a humidity sensing mechanism, showing excellent human/machine interaction with high sensitivity, good stability, and fast response/recovery ability. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  20. Flexible, Transparent, Thickness-Controllable SWCNT/PEDOT:PSS Hybrid Films Based on Coffee-Ring Lithography for Functional Noncontact Sensing Device

    Tai, Yanlong; Yang, Zhen Guo

    2015-01-01

    Flexible transparent conductive films (FTCFs) as the essential components of the next generation of functional circuits and devices are presently attracting more attention. Here, a new strategy has been demonstrated to fabricate thickness-controllable FTCFs through coffee ring lithography (CRL) of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) hybrid ink. The influence of ink concentration and volume on the thickness and size of hybrid film has been investigated systematically. Results show that the final FTCFs present a high performance, including a homogeneous thickness of 60-65 nm, a sheet resistance of 1.8 kohm/sq, a visible/infrared-range transmittance (79%, PET = 90%), and a dynamic mechanical property (>1000 cycle, much better than ITO film), respectively, when SWCNT concentration is 0.2 mg/mL, ink volume is 0.4 μL, drying at room temperature. Moreover, the benefits of these kinds of FTCFs have been verified through a full transparent, flexible noncontact sensing panel (3 × 4 sensing pixels) and a flexible battery-free wireless sensor based on a humidity sensing mechanism, showing excellent human/machine interaction with high sensitivity, good stability, and fast response/recovery ability. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  1. On/off ratio enhancement in single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistor by controlling network density via sonication

    Jang, Ho-Kyun; Choi, Jun Hee; Kim, Do-Hyun; Kim, Gyu Tae

    2018-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is generally used as a networked structure in the fabrication of a field-effect transistor (FET) since it is known that one-third of SWCNT is electrically metallic and the remains are semiconducting. In this case, the presence of metallic paths by metallic SWCNT (m-SWCNT) becomes a significant technical barrier which hinders the networks from achieving a semiconducting behavior, resulting in a low on/off ratio. Here, we report on an easy method of controlling the on/off ratio of a FET where semiconducting SWCNT (s-SWCNT) and m-SWCNT constitute networks between source and drain electrodes. A FET with SWCNT networks was simply sonicated under water to control the on/off ratio and network density. As a result, the FET having an almost metallic behavior due to the metallic paths by m-SWCNT exhibited a p-type semiconducting behavior. The on/off ratio ranged from 1 to 9.0 × 104 along sonication time. In addition, theoretical calculations based on Monte-Carlo method and circuit simulation were performed to understand and explain the phenomenon of a change in the on/off ratio and network density by sonication. On the basis of experimental and theoretical results, we found that metallic paths contributed to a high off-state current which leads to a low on/off ratio and that sonication formed sparse SWCNT networks where metallic paths of m-SWCNT were removed, resulting in a high on/off ratio. This method can open a chance to save the device which has been considered as a failed one due to a metallic behavior by a high network density leading to a low on/off ratio.

  2. Biocompatibility of single-walled carbon nanotube composites for bone regeneration.

    Gupta, A; Liberati, T A; Verhulst, S J; Main, B J; Roberts, M H; Potty, A G R; Pylawka, T K; El-Amin Iii, S F

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vivo biocompatibility of novel single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT)/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLAGA) composites for applications in bone and tissue regeneration. A total of 60 Sprague-Dawley rats (125 g to 149 g) were implanted subcutaneously with SWCNT/PLAGA composites (10 mg SWCNT and 1gm PLAGA 12 mm diameter two-dimensional disks), and at two, four, eight and 12 weeks post-implantation were compared with control (Sham) and PLAGA (five rats per group/point in time). Rats were observed for signs of morbidity, overt toxicity, weight gain and food consumption, while haematology, urinalysis and histopathology were completed when the animals were killed. No mortality and clinical signs were observed. All groups showed consistent weight gain, and the rate of gain for each group was similar. All groups exhibited a similar pattern for food consumption. No difference in urinalysis, haematology, and absolute and relative organ weight was observed. A mild to moderate increase in the summary toxicity (sumtox) score was observed for PLAGA and SWCNT/PLAGA implanted animals, whereas the control animals did not show any response. Both PLAGA and SWCNT/PLAGA showed a significantly higher sumtox score compared with the control group at all time intervals. However, there was no significant difference between PLAGA and SWCNT/PLAGA groups. Our results demonstrate that SWCNT/PLAGA composites exhibited in vivo biocompatibility similar to the Food and Drug Administration approved biocompatible polymer, PLAGA, over a period of 12 weeks. These results showed potential of SWCNT/PLAGA composites for bone regeneration as the low percentage of SWCNT did not elicit a localised or general overt toxicity. Following the 12-week exposure, the material was considered to have an acceptable biocompatibility to warrant further long-term and more invasive in vivo studies. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:70-7. ©2015 The British Editorial

  3. Fabrication of PDMS/SWCNT thin films as saturable absorbers

    Hernandez-Romano, I; Sanchez-Mondragon, J J; Davila-Rodriguez, J; Delfyett, P J; May-Arrioja, D A

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel technique to fabricate a saturable absorber thin film based on Polydimethylsiloxane doped with Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes. Using this film a passive mode-locked fiber laser in a standard ring cavity configuration was built by inserting the film between two angled connectors. Self-starting passively mode-locked laser operation was easily observed. The generated pulses have a width of 1.26 ps at a repetition rate of 22.7 MHz with an average power of 4.89 mW.

  4. Ultrasensitive, Stretchable Strain Sensors Based on Fragmented Carbon Nanotube Papers

    Zhou, Jian

    2017-01-17

    The development of strain sensors featuring both ultra high sensitivity and high stretchability is still a challenge. We demonstrate that strain sensors based on fragmented single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) paper embedded in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) can sustain their sensitivity even at very high strain levels (with a gauge factor of over 10(7) at 50% strain). This record sensitivity is ascribed to the low initial electrical resistance (5-28 Omega) of the SWCNT paper and the wide change in resistance (up to 10(6) Omega) governed by the percolated network of SWCNT in the cracked region. The sensor response remains nearly unchanged after 10 000 strain cycles at 20% proving the robustness of this technology. This fragmentation based sensing system brings opportunities to engineer highly sensitive stretchable sensors.

  5. Carbonyl Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Hb Crosslinked Network: A Novel Platform for Studying Bio-Electrochemistry and Electrocatalysis of Hemoglobin.

    Kafi, A K M; Yam, C C L; Azmi, N S; Yusoff, Mashitah M

    2018-04-01

    In this work, the direct electrochemistry of hemoglobin (Hb), which was immobilized on carbonyl functionalized single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and deposited onto a gold (Au) electrode has been described. The synthesis of the network of crosslinked SWCNT/Hb was done with the help of crosslinking agent EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide). The UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopy of SWCNT/Hb networks showed that Hb maintained its natural structure and kept good stability. In addition with this, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) illustrated that SWCNT/Hb networks had a featured layered structure and Hb being strongly liked with SWCNT surface. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to study and to optimize the performance of the resulting modified electrode. The cyclic voltammetric (CV) responses of SWCNT/Hb networks in pH 7.0 exhibit prominent redox couple for the FeIII/II redox process with a midpoint potential of -0.46 V and -0.34, cathodic and anodic respectively. Furthermore, SWCNT/Hb networks are utilized for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Electrochemical measurements reveal that the resulting SWCNT/Hb electrodes display high electrocatalytic activity to H2O2 with high sensitivity, wide linear range, and low detection limit. Overall, the electrochemical results are due to excellent biocompatibility and excellent electron transport efficiency of CNT as well as high Hb loading and synergistic catalytic effect of the modified electrode toward H2O2.

  6. ONIOM Studies of Esterification at Oxidized Carbon Nanotube Tips

    Contreras-Torres, F F; Basiuk, V A [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior C.U., A. Postal 70-543, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2007-03-15

    Esterification of oxidized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can open a new route for the separation of zigzag and armchair nanotubes. We studied theoretically (by using hybrid DFT within the ONIOM embedding protocol) the reactions of monocarboxy-substituted oxidized tips of zigzag and armchair single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) with methanol. According to the calculated values of activation energy, Gibbs free-activation barriers, and enthalpies of formation for the SWCNT-(COOH)H5 models, the zigzag nanotube isomer is more reactive as compared to its armchair counterpart. For other models we obtained variable results.

  7. Interactions of carbon nanotubes and/or graphene with manganese peroxidase during biodegradation of endocrine disruptors and triclosan.

    Chen, Ming; Zeng, Guangming; Lai, Cui; Zhang, Chang; Xu, Piao; Yan, Min; Xiong, Weiping

    2017-10-01

    Molecular-level biodegradation processes of bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP) and triclosan (TCS) mediated by manganese peroxidase (MnP) were investigated with and without single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and/or graphene (GRA). Although the incorporation of SWCNT, GRA or their combination (SWCNT+GRA) did not break up the complexes composed of manganese peroxidase (MnP) and these substrates, they had different effects on the native contacts between the substrates and MnP. GRA tended to decrease the overall stability of the binding between MnP and its substrates. SWCNT or SWCNT+GRA generally had a minor impact on the mean binding energy between MnP and its substrates. We detected some sensitive residues from MnP that were dramatically disturbed by the GRA, SWCNT or SWCNT+GRA. Nanomaterials changed the number and behavior of water molecules adjacent to both MnP and its substrates, which was not due to the destruction of H-bond network formed by sensitive regions and water molecules. The present results are useful for understanding the molecular basis of pollutant biodegradation affected by the nanomaterials in the environment, and are also helpful in assessing the risks of these materials to the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Water-based squeezing flow in the presence of carbon nanotubes between two parallel disks

    Haq Rizwan Ul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Present study is dedicated to investigate the water functionalized carbon nanotubes squeezing flow between two parallel discs. Moreover, we have considered magnetohydrodynamics effects normal to the disks. In addition we have considered two kind of carbon nanotubes named: single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT and multiple wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT with in the base fluid. Under this squeezing flow mechanism model has been constructed in the form of partial differential equation. Transformed ordinary differential equations are solved numerically with the help of Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method. Results for velocity and temperature are constructed against all the emerging parameters. Comparison among the SWCNT and MWCNT are drawn for skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number. Conclusion remarks are drawn under the observation of whole analysis.

  9. Silicon spectral response extension through single wall carbon nanotubes in hybrid solar cells

    Del Gobbo, Silvano; Castrucci, P.; Fedele, S.; Riele, L.; Convertino, A.; Morbidoni, M.; De Nicola, F.; Scarselli, M.; Camilli, L.; De Crescenzi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Photovoltaic devices based on single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and n-silicon multiple heterojunctions have been fabricated by a SWCNT film transferring process. We report on the ability of the carbon nanotubes to extend the Si spectral range towards the near ultraviolet (UV) and the near infrared regions. Semiconducting and about metallic SWCNT networks have been studied as a function of the film sheet resistance, Rsh. Optical absorbance and Raman spectroscopy have been used to assign nanotube chirality and electronic character. This gave us hints of evidence of the participation of the metal nanotubes in the photocurrent generation. Moreover, we provide evidence that the external quantum efficiency spectral range can be modulated as a function of the SWCNT network sheet resistance in a hybrid SWCNT/Si solar cell. This result will be very useful to further design/optimize devices with improved performance in spectral regions generally not covered by conventional Si p-n devices. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. Polycation induced actin bundles

    Muhlrad, Andras; Grintsevich, Elena E.; Reisler, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Three polycations, polylysine, the polyamine spermine and the polycationic protein lysozyme were used to study the formation, structure, ionic strength sensitivity and dissociation of polycation-induced actin bundles. Bundles form fast, simultaneously with the polymerization of MgATP-G-actins, upon addition of polycations to solutions of actins at low ionic strength conditions. This indicates that nuclei and/or nascent filaments bundle due to attractive, electrostatic effect of polycations an...

  11. Polycation induced actin bundles.

    Muhlrad, Andras; Grintsevich, Elena E; Reisler, Emil

    2011-04-01

    Three polycations, polylysine, the polyamine spermine and the polycationic protein lysozyme were used to study the formation, structure, ionic strength sensitivity and dissociation of polycation-induced actin bundles. Bundles form fast, simultaneously with the polymerization of MgATP-G-actins, upon the addition of polycations to solutions of actins at low ionic strength conditions. This indicates that nuclei and/or nascent filaments bundle due to attractive, electrostatic effect of polycations and the neutralization of repulsive interactions of negative charges on actin. The attractive forces between the filaments are strong, as shown by the low (in nanomolar range) critical concentration of their bundling at low ionic strength. These bundles are sensitive to ionic strength and disassemble partially in 100 mM NaCl, but both the dissociation and ionic strength sensitivity can be countered by higher polycation concentrations. Cys374 residues of actin monomers residing on neighboring filaments in the bundles can be cross-linked by the short span (5.4Å) MTS-1 (1,1-methanedyl bismethanethiosulfonate) cross-linker, which indicates a tight packing of filaments in the bundles. The interfilament cross-links, which connect monomers located on oppositely oriented filaments, prevent disassembly of bundles at high ionic strength. Cofilin and the polysaccharide polyanion heparin disassemble lysozyme induced actin bundles more effectively than the polylysine-induced bundles. The actin-lysozyme bundles are pathologically significant as both proteins are found in the pulmonary airways of cystic fibrosis patients. Their bundles contribute to the formation of viscous mucus, which is the main cause of breathing difficulties and eventual death in this disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Novel Catalyst for the Chirality Selective Synthesis of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    2015-05-12

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 03-April-2013 to 02-April-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Novel Catalyst for the Chirality Selective...Distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Chiral single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are known to possess unique... chirality control in SWCNT synthesis. A model catalyst based on CoSO4/SiO2 was developed that showed good selectivity to (9,8) nanotubes. Remote plasma

  13. Synthesis of high quality single-walled carbon nanotubes via a catalytic layer reinforced by self-assembled monolayers

    Adhikari, Prashanta Dhoj; Song, Wooseok; Cha, Myoung-Jun; Park, Chong-Yun

    2013-01-01

    This work reports the synthesis of high quality single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) using a catalytic layer reinforced by self-assembled monolayers (SAM). Amine-SAM was introduced on a SiO 2 /Si substrate and then an iron nanoparticles solution was dropped on the substrate by spin-coating. This catalytic template was used to grow carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition and the synthesized SWCNT were observed to be prominent, based on the size distribution. Highly dense SWCNT with a diameter of about 1.1-1.2 nm were produced at 800-850 °C. Moreover, the diameter distribution of the SWCNT was more selective at a growth temperature of 900 °C. These findings provide important insights for a SAM support layer that can play the role as a restriction for the agglomeration of iron catalyst and is promising for the synthesis of high quality SWCNT. - Highlights: • Fe nanoparticles on self-assembled monolayers (SAM) containing template is underlined. • Its catalytic behavior to synthesis single-walled carbon nanotubes is studied. • The role of SAM on catalytic template is explored

  14. Solution-processed single-wall carbon nanotube transistor arrays for wearable display backplanes

    Byeong-Cheol Kang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate solution-processed single-wall carbon nanotube thin-film transistor (SWCNT-TFT arrays with polymeric gate dielectrics on the polymeric substrates for wearable display backplanes, which can be directly attached to the human body. The optimized SWCNT-TFTs without any buffer layer on flexible substrates exhibit a linear field-effect mobility of 1.5cm2/V-s and a threshold voltage of around 0V. The statistical plot of the key device metrics extracted from 35 SWCNT-TFTs which were fabricated in different batches at different times conclusively support that we successfully demonstrated high-performance solution-processed SWCNT-TFT arrays which demand excellent uniformity in the device performance. We also investigate the operational stability of wearable SWCNT-TFT arrays against an applied strain of up to 40%, which is the essential for a harsh degree of strain on human body. We believe that the demonstration of flexible SWCNT-TFT arrays which were fabricated by all solution-process except the deposition of metal electrodes at process temperature below 130oC can open up new routes for wearable display backplanes.

  15. Environmental Impacts from Photovoltaic Solar Cells Made with Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Celik, Ilke; Mason, Brooke E; Phillips, Adam B; Heben, Michael J; Apul, Defne

    2017-04-18

    An ex-ante life cycle inventory was developed for single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) PV cells, including a laboratory-made 1% efficient device and an aspirational 28% efficient four-cell tandem device. The environmental impact of unit energy generation from the mono-Si PV technology was used as a reference point. Compared to monocrystalline Si (mono-Si), the environmental impacts from 1% SWCNT was ∼18 times higher due mainly to the short lifetime of three years. However, even with the same short lifetime, the 28% cell had lower environmental impacts than mono-Si. The effects of lifetime and efficiency on the environmental impacts were further examined. This analysis showed that if the SWCNT device efficiency had the same value as the best efficiency of the material under comparison, to match the total normalized impacts of the mono- and poly-Si, CIGS, CdTe, and a-Si devices, the SWCNT devices would need a lifetime of 2.8, 3.5, 5.3, 5.1, and 10.8 years, respectively. It was also found that if the SWCNT PV has an efficiency of 4.5% or higher, its energy payback time would be lower than other existing and emerging PV technologies. The major impacts of SWCNT PV came from the cell's materials synthesis.

  16. Integrated molecular targeting of IGF1R and HER2 surface receptors and destruction of breast cancer cells using single wall carbon nanotubes

    Shao Ning; Lu Shaoxin; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2007-01-01

    Molecular targeting and photodynamic therapy have shown great potential for selective cancer therapy. We hypothesized that monoclonal antibodies that are specific to the IGF1 receptor and HER2 cell surface antigens could be bound to single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) in order to concentrate SWCNT on breast cancer cells for specific near-infrared phototherapy. SWCNT functionalized with HER2 and IGF1R specific antibodies showed selective attachment to breast cancer cells compared to SWCNT functionalized with non-specific antibodies. After the complexes were attached to specific cancer cells, SWCNT were excited by ∼808 nm infrared photons at ∼800 mW cm -2 for 3 min. Viability after phototherapy was determined by Trypan blue exclusion. Cells incubated with SWCNT/non-specific antibody hybrids were still alive after photo-thermal treatment due to the lack of SWNT binding to the cell membrane. All cancerous cells treated with IGF1R and HER2 specific antibody/SWCNT hybrids and receiving infrared photons showed cell death after the laser excitation. Quantitative analysis demonstrated that all the cells treated with SWCNT/IGF1R and HER2 specific antibody complex were completely destroyed, while more than 80% of the cells with SWCNT/non-specific antibody hybrids remained alive. Following multi-component targeting of IGF1R and HER2 surface receptors, integrated photo-thermal therapy in breast cancer cells led to the complete destruction of cancer cells. Functionalizing SWCNT with antibodies in combination with their intrinsic optical properties can therefore lead to a new class of molecular delivery and cancer therapeutic systems

  17. An in situ Raman spectroscopy study of stress transfer between carbon nanotubes and polymer

    Mu Minfang; Winey, Karen I; Osswald, Sebastian; Gogotsi, Yury

    2009-01-01

    The transfer mechanism of applied stress in single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanocomposites was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy on composite fibers. These SWCNT/PMMA nanocomposite fibers have no specific SWCNT-polymer interactions and the high degree of nanotube alignment minimizes the contributions from nanotube-nanotube interactions. Although tensile testing found significantly improved overall mechanical properties of the fibers, effective stress transfer to SWCNTs is limited to a small strain regime (ε<0.2%). At higher strains, the stress on the SWCNTs decreases due to the slippage at the nanotube-polymer interface. Slippage was also evident in scanning electron micrographs of fracture surfaces produced by tensile testing of the composite fibers. Above ε = 0.2%, the strain-induced slippage was accompanied by irreversible responses in stress and Raman peak shifts. This paper shows that efficient stress transfer to nanotubes as monitored by Raman spectroscopy is crucial to improving the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites and to detecting internal damage in nanocomposites.

  18. Length-dependent optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube samples

    Naumov, Anton V.; Tsyboulski, Dmitri A.; Bachilo, Sergei M.; Weisman, R. Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Length-independent absorption per atom in single-walled carbon nanotubes. ► Reduced fluorescence quantum yield for short nanotubes. ► Exciton quenching at nanotube ends, sidewall defects probably limits quantum yield. - Abstract: Contradictory findings have been reported on the length dependence of optical absorption cross sections and fluorescence quantum yields in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). To clarify these points, studies have been made on bulk SWCNT dispersions subjected to length fractionation by electrophoretic separation or by ultrasonication-induced scission. Fractions ranged from ca. 120 to 760 nm in mean length. Samples prepared by shear-assisted dispersion were subsequently shortened by ultrasonic processing. After accounting for processing-induced changes in the surfactant absorption background, SWCNT absorption was found constant within ±11% as average nanotube length changed by a factor of 3.8. This indicates that the absorption cross-section per carbon atom is not length dependent. By contrast, in length fractions prepared by both methods, the bulk fluorescence efficiency or average quantum yield increased with SWCNT average length and approached an apparent asymptotic limit near 1 μm. This result is interpreted as reflecting the combined contributions of exciton quenching by sidewall defects and by the ends of shorter nanotubes

  19. Ultrafast electron transfer in all-carbon-based SWCNT-C60 donor-acceptor nanoensembles connected by poly(phenylene-ethynylene) spacers

    Barrejón, Myriam; Gobeze, Habtom B.; Gómez-Escalonilla, María J.; Fierro, José Luis G.; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; D'Souza, Francis; Langa, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an electron donating or accepting photosensitizer while the second part should fulfil the role of an electron acceptor or donor. In the present work, we have successfully addressed this issue by synthesizing covalently linked all-carbon-based donor-acceptor nanoensembles using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the donor and C60 as the acceptor. The donor-acceptor entities in the nanoensembles were connected by phenylene-ethynylene spacer units to achieve better electronic communication and to vary the distance between the components. These novel SWCNT-C60 nanoensembles have been characterized by a number of techniques, including TGA, FT-IR, Raman, AFM, absorbance and electrochemical methods. The moderate number of fullerene addends present on the side-walls of the nanotubes largely preserved the electronic structure of the nanotubes. The thermodynamic feasibility of charge separation in these nanoensembles was established using spectral and electrochemical data. Finally, occurrence of ultrafast electron transfer from the excited nanotubes in these donor-acceptor nanohybrids has been established by femtosecond transient absorption studies, signifying their utility in building light energy harvesting devices.Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an

  20. The electrochemical catalytic activity of single-walled carbon nanotubes towards VO2+/VO2+ and V3+/V2+ redox pairs for an all vanadium redox flow battery

    Li Wenyue; Liu Jianguo; Yan Chuanwei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► SWCNT shows excellent electrochemical catalytic activity towards VO 2 + /VO 2+ and V 3+ /V 2+ redox couples. ► The anodic reactions are more sensitive to the surface oxygen atom content change compared with the cathodic reactions. ► The enhanced battery performance clearly demonstrated that the SWCNT is suitable to be used as an electrode catalyst for VRFB. - Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was used as an electrode catalyst for an all vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). The electrochemical property of SWCNT towards VO 2 + /VO 2+ and V 3+ /V 2+ was carefully characterized by cyclic voltammetric (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The peak current values for these redox pairs were significantly higher on the modified glassy carbon electrode compared with those obtained on the bare electrode, suggesting the excellent electrochemical activity of the SWCNT. Moreover, it was proved that the anodic process was more dependent on the surface oxygen of the SWCNT than the cathodic process through changing its surface oxygen content. Detailed EIS analysis of different modified electrodes revealed that the charge and mass transfer processes were accelerated at the modified electrode–electrolyte interface, which could be ascribed to the large specific surface area, the surface defects and the oxygen functional groups of the SWCNT. The enhanced battery performance effectively demonstrated that the SWCNT was suitable to serve as an electrode catalyst for the VRFB.

  1. Principal noncommutative torus bundles

    Echterhoff, Siegfried; Nest, Ryszard; Oyono-Oyono, Herve

    2008-01-01

    of bivariant K-theory (denoted RKK-theory) due to Kasparov. Using earlier results of Echterhoff and Williams, we shall give a complete classification of principal non-commutative torus bundles up to equivariant Morita equivalence. We then study these bundles as topological fibrations (forgetting the group...

  2. Less severe processing improves carbon nanotube photovoltaic performance

    Shea, Matthew J.; Wang, Jialiang; Flach, Jessica T.; Zanni, Martin T.; Arnold, Michael S.

    2018-05-01

    Thin film semiconducting single walled carbon nanotube (s-SWCNT) photovoltaics suffer losses due to trapping and quenching of excitons by defects induced when dispersing s-SWCNTs into solution. We study these aspects by preparing photovoltaic devices from (6,5) carbon nanotubes isolated by different processes: extended ultrasonication, brief ultrasonication, and shear force mixing. Peak quantum efficiency increases from 28% to 38% to 49% as the processing harshness decreases and is attributed to both increasing s-SWCNT length and reducing sidewall defects. Fill-factor and open-circuit voltage also improve with shear force mixing, highlighting the importance of obtaining long, defect-free s-SWCNTs for efficient photoconversion devices.

  3. Net energy benefits of carbon nanotube applications

    Zhai, Pei; Isaacs, Jacqueline A.; Eckelman, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Life cycle net energy benefits are examined. • CNT-enabled and the conventional technologies are compared. • Flash memory with CNT switches show significant positive net energy benefit. • Lithium-ion batteries with MWCNT cathodes show positive net energy benefit. • Lithium-ion batteries with SWCNT anodes tend to exhibit negative net energy benefit. - Abstract: Implementation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in various applications can reduce material and energy requirements of products, resulting in energy savings. However, processes for the production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are energy-intensive and can require extensive purification. In this study, we investigate the net energy benefits of three CNT-enabled technologies: multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) reinforced cement used as highway construction material, single-walled CNT (SWCNT) flash memory switches used in cell phones and CNT anodes and cathodes used in lithium-ion batteries used in electric vehicles. We explore the avoided or additional energy requirement in the manufacturing and use phases and estimate the life cycle net energy benefits for each application. Additional scenario analysis and Monte Carlo simulation of parameter uncertainties resulted in probability distributions of net energy benefits, indicating that net energy benefits are dependent on the application with confidence intervals straddling the breakeven line in some cases. Analysis of simulation results reveals that SWCNT switch flash memory and MWCNT Li-ion battery cathodes have statistically significant positive net energy benefits (α = 0.05) and SWCNT Li-ion battery anodes tend to have negative net energy benefits, while positive results for MWCNT-reinforced cement were significant only under an efficient CNT production scenario and a lower confidence level (α = 0.1).

  4. Comment on “Shape transition of unstrained flattest single-walled carbon nanotubes under pressure” [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 044512 (2014)

    Vassilev, Vassil M., E-mail: vasilvas@imbm.bas.bg; Djondjorov, Peter A., E-mail: padjon@imbm.bas.bg [Institute of Mechanics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Block 4, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Mladenov, Ivaïlo M., E-mail: mladenov@bio21.bas.bg [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Block 21, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria)

    2015-05-21

    Recently, Mu et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 044512 (2014)] have developed an analytic approach to describe some special shapes of a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) under hydrostatic pressure. These authors have found approximate analytic expressions for the parametric equations of the tube cross section profile and its curvature at the convex-to-concave transition pressure using a shell-like 2D continuum model describing the shapes of such nanotubes. In this comment, we provide additional insight into this problem taking into account the exact analytic representation of the shapes that a SWCNT attains when subjected to hydrostatic pressure according to the very same continuum model.

  5. Polymer functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube composites and semi-fluorinated quaternary ammonium polymer colloids and coatings

    Paul, Abhijit

    Scope and Method of Study: Current study focused on understanding of "wetting" and "dewetting" phenomena between surfaces of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) which are lightly grafted with polymer chains by reversible-deactivation radical polymerization, when they are mixed with matrix chains of the same architecture as grafts. Effects of grafts to matrix chain lengths on SWCNT dispersion in matrix polymers were studied by measuring electrical conductivity, glass transition temperature, and storage and loss moduli of nanocomposites. Another area of work was to design semi-fluorinated copolymers with core-shell morphology by emulsion polymerization, study their catalytic activities for hydrolyses of Paraoxon, a toxic insecticide, in the forms of both colloidal dispersions and films, and to characterize the surfaces of the films by atomic force microscopy and by dynamic contact angle measurements. Findings and Conclusions: The glass transition temperature ( Tg) of polystyrene (PS) filled with SWCNT grafted with PS of different lengths increased from 99 to 109 °C at 6 wt% of SWCNT followed by a plateau. The heat capacity (DeltaCp ) at Tg continued to decrease only for the smallest chain length grafted PS nanocomposites. SWCNT/PS nanocomposites had low electrical conductivity and showed no percolation threshold due to the thick polymer coatings. A key finding was that the SWCNT surface can accommodate only a fixed numbers of styrene units. Similar results on change in Tg were obtained for SWCNT/PMMA nanocomposites when molecular weight of matrix (Mmatrix) ≥ molecular weight of grafts (Mgraft). No change in DeltaCp was observed for SWCNT/PMMA nanocomposites. "Wetting" to "dewetting" occurred Mmatrix/ Mgraft ≈ 1. For Mmatrix > Mgraft, electrical conductivity of nanocomposites reached the value of 10-9 S cm-1 at 1.0 wt% nanotube loading and had percolation threshold of electrical conductivity at ˜0.25 wt% SWCNT. Raman and UV-vis-NIR data confirmed that

  6. Toxicity of single walled carbon nanotubes to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): Respiratory toxicity, organ pathologies, and other physiological effects

    Smith, Catherine J.; Shaw, Benjamin J.; Handy, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian studies have raised concerns about the toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), but there is very limited data on ecotoxicity to aquatic life. We describe the first detailed report on the toxicity of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) to rainbow trout, using a body systems approach. Stock solutions of dispersed SWCNT were prepared using a combination of solvent (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS) and sonication. A semi-static test system was used to expose rainbow trout to either a freshwater control, solvent control, 0.1, 0.25 or 0.5 mg l -1 SWCNT for up to 10 days. SWCNT exposure caused a dose-dependent rise in ventilation rate, gill pathologies (oedema, altered mucocytes, hyperplasia), and mucus secretion with SWCNT precipitation on the gill mucus. No major haematological or blood disturbances were observed in terms of red and white blood cell counts, haematocrits, whole blood haemoglobin, and plasma Na + or K + . Tissue metal levels (Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , Cu, Zn and Co) were generally unaffected. However some dose-dependent changes in brain and gill Zn or Cu were observed (but not tissue Ca 2+ ), that were also partly attributed to the solvent. SWCNT exposure caused statistically significant increases in Na + K + -ATPase activity in the gills and intestine, but not in the brain. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) showed dose-dependent and statistically significant decreases especially in the gill, brain and liver during SWCNT exposure compared to controls. SWCNT exposure caused statistically significant increases in the total glutathione levels in the gills (28%) and livers (18%), compared to the solvent control. Total glutathione in the brain and intestine remained stable in all treatments. Pathologies in the brain included possible aneurisms or swellings on the ventral surface of the cerebellum. Liver cells exposed to SWCNT showed condensed nuclear bodies (apoptotic bodies) and cells in abnormal nuclear division. Overt fatty change or wide

  7. Toxicity of single walled carbon nanotubes to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): Respiratory toxicity, organ pathologies, and other physiological effects

    Smith, Catherine J. [Ecotoxicology and Stress Biology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Shaw, Benjamin J. [Ecotoxicology and Stress Biology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Handy, Richard D. [Ecotoxicology and Stress Biology Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: rhandy@plymouth.ac.uk

    2007-05-01

    Mammalian studies have raised concerns about the toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), but there is very limited data on ecotoxicity to aquatic life. We describe the first detailed report on the toxicity of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) to rainbow trout, using a body systems approach. Stock solutions of dispersed SWCNT were prepared using a combination of solvent (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS) and sonication. A semi-static test system was used to expose rainbow trout to either a freshwater control, solvent control, 0.1, 0.25 or 0.5 mg l{sup -1} SWCNT for up to 10 days. SWCNT exposure caused a dose-dependent rise in ventilation rate, gill pathologies (oedema, altered mucocytes, hyperplasia), and mucus secretion with SWCNT precipitation on the gill mucus. No major haematological or blood disturbances were observed in terms of red and white blood cell counts, haematocrits, whole blood haemoglobin, and plasma Na{sup +} or K{sup +}. Tissue metal levels (Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Cu, Zn and Co) were generally unaffected. However some dose-dependent changes in brain and gill Zn or Cu were observed (but not tissue Ca{sup 2+}), that were also partly attributed to the solvent. SWCNT exposure caused statistically significant increases in Na{sup +}K{sup +}-ATPase activity in the gills and intestine, but not in the brain. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) showed dose-dependent and statistically significant decreases especially in the gill, brain and liver during SWCNT exposure compared to controls. SWCNT exposure caused statistically significant increases in the total glutathione levels in the gills (28%) and livers (18%), compared to the solvent control. Total glutathione in the brain and intestine remained stable in all treatments. Pathologies in the brain included possible aneurisms or swellings on the ventral surface of the cerebellum. Liver cells exposed to SWCNT showed condensed nuclear bodies (apoptotic bodies) and cells in abnormal nuclear

  8. Three-Dimensional Graphene/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Aerogel Anchored with SnO2 Nanoparticles for High Performance Lithium Storage.

    Wang, Jing; Fang, Fang; Yuan, Tao; Yang, Junhe; Chen, Liang; Yao, Chi; Zheng, Shiyou; Sun, Dalin

    2017-02-01

    A unique 3D graphene-single walled carbon nanotube (G-SWNT) aerogel anchored with SnO 2 nanoparticles (SnO 2 @G-SWCNT) is fabricated by the hydrothermal self-assembly process. The influences of mass ratio of SWCNT to graphene on structure and electrochemical properties of SnO 2 @G-SWCNT are investigated systematically. The SnO 2 @G-SWCNT composites show excellent electrochemical performance in Li-ion batteries; for instance, at a current density of 100 mA g -1 , a specific capacity of 758 mAh g -1 was obtained for the SnO 2 @G-SWCNT with 50% SWCNT in G-SWCNT and the Coulombic efficiency is close to 100% after 200 cycles; even at current density of 1 A g -1 , it can still maintain a stable specific capacity of 537 mAh g -1 after 300 cycles. It is believed that the 3D G-SWNT architecture provides a flexible conductive matrix for loading the SnO 2 , facilitating the electronic and ionic transportation and mitigating the volume variation of the SnO 2 during lithiation/delithiation. This work also provides a facile and reasonable strategy to solve the pulverization and agglomeration problem of other transition metal oxides as electrode materials.

  9. Tuning the Slide-Roll Motion Mode of Carbon Nanotubes via Hydroxyl Groups

    Li, Rui; Wang, Shiwei; Peng, Qing

    2018-05-01

    Controlling the motion of carbon nanotubes is critical in manipulating nanodevices, including nanorobots. Herein, we investigate the motion behavior of SWCNT (10,10) on Si substrate utilizing molecular dynamics simulations. We show that hydroxyl groups have sensitive effect on the carbon nanotube's motion mode. When the hydroxyl groups' ratio on carbon nanotube and silicon substrate surfaces is larger than 10 and 20%, respectively, the motion of carbon nanotube transforms from sliding to rolling. When the hydroxyl groups' ratio is smaller, the slide or roll mode can be controlled by the speed of carbon nanotube, which is ultimately determined by the competition between the interface potential energy and kinetic energy. The change of motion mode holds true for different carbon nanotubes with hydroxyl groups. The chirality has little effect on the motion behavior, as opposed to the diameter, attributed to the hydroxyl groups' ratio. Our study suggests a new route to control the motion behavior of carbon nanotube via hydroxyl groups.

  10. Phonon-assisted tunnelling in electrical conductivity of individual carbon nanotubes and networks ones

    Pipinys, P. [Department of Physics, Vilnius Pedagogical University, Studentu 39, LT-08106 Vilnius (Lithuania)], E-mail: pipiniai@takas.lt; Kiveris, A. [Department of Physics, Vilnius Pedagogical University, Studentu 39, LT-08106 Vilnius (Lithuania)], E-mail: studsk@vpu.lt

    2008-10-01

    Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), measured in the low temperatures by Tang et al. [Science 292 (2001) 2462] and transparent SWCNT networks presented by Jaiswal et al. [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 19 (2007) 446006], are reinterpreted in the framework of phonon-assisted tunnelling theory as a free charge carriers generation mechanism in the strong electrical field. The good fit of the temperature-dependent I-V data in low temperature region (i.e., T<25 K) has been achieved using the phonons of energy <1 meV.

  11. Phonon-assisted tunnelling in electrical conductivity of individual carbon nanotubes and networks ones

    Pipinys, P.; Kiveris, A.

    2008-01-01

    Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), measured in the low temperatures by Tang et al. [Science 292 (2001) 2462] and transparent SWCNT networks presented by Jaiswal et al. [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 19 (2007) 446006], are reinterpreted in the framework of phonon-assisted tunnelling theory as a free charge carriers generation mechanism in the strong electrical field. The good fit of the temperature-dependent I-V data in low temperature region (i.e., T<25 K) has been achieved using the phonons of energy <1 meV

  12. Fabrication and electrochemical behavior of single-walled carbon nanotube/graphite-based electrode

    Moghaddam, Abdolmajid Bayandori; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Razavi, Taherehsadat; Riahi, Siavash; Rezaei-Zarchi, Saeed; Norouzi, Parviz

    2009-01-01

    An electrochemical method for determining the dihydroxybenzene derivatives on glassy carbon (GC) has been developed. In this method, the performance of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/graphite-based electrode, prepared by mixing SWCNTs and graphite powder, was described. The resulting electrode shows an excellent behavior for redox of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DBA). SWCNT/graphite-based electrode presents a significant decrease in the overvoltage for DBA oxidation as well as a dramatic improvement in the reversibility of DBA redox behavior in comparison with graphite-based and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) procedures performed for used SWCNTs

  13. Laser-induced forward transfer of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Palla-Papavlu, A.; Dinescu, M.; Wokaun, A.; Lippert, T.

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this work is the application of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) for the fabrication of chemiresistor sensors. The receiver substrate is an array with metal electrodes and the active materials placed by LIFT are single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The functionality of such sensors depends on the geometry of the active material onto the metallic electrodes. First the best geometry for the sensing materials and electrodes was determined, including the optimization of the process parameters for printing uniform pixels of SWCNT onto the sensor electrodes. The sensors were characterized in terms of their sensing characteristics, i.e., upon exposure to ammonia, proving the feasibility of LIFT.

  14. Inkjet printed ambipolar transistors and inverters based on carbon nanotube/zinc tin oxide heterostructures

    Kim, Bongjun; Jang, Seonpil; Dodabalapur, Ananth; Geier, Michael L.; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    We report ambipolar field-effect transistors (FETs) consisting of inkjet printed semiconductor bilayer heterostructures utilizing semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO). The bilayer structure allows for electron transport to occur principally in the amorphous oxide layer and hole transport to occur exclusively in the SWCNT layer. This results in balanced electron and hole mobilities exceeding 2 cm 2 V −1 s −1 at low operating voltages ( 10). This work provides a pathway for realizing solution processable, inkjet printable, large area electronic devices, and systems based on SWCNT-amorphous oxide heterostructures

  15. The effect of fibronectin on structural and biological properties of single walled carbon nanotube

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farokhi, Mehdi [National cell bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Atyabi, Fatemeh [Department of Pharmaceutical Nanoechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omidvar, Ramin [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali, E-mail: mashokrgozar@pasteur.ac.ir [National cell bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghizadeh, Majid, E-mail: sadeghma@modares.ac.ir [Department Genetics, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the cytocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotube by loading fibronectin. • Enhancing the hydrophilicity and nanosurface roughness of single walled carbon nanotube after loading fibronectin. • Fibronectin makes the surface properties of single walled carbon nanotube more suitable for cell proliferation and growth. - Abstract: Despite the attractive properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), cytoxicity and hydrophobicity are two main considerable features which limit their application in biomedical fields. It was well established that treating CNTs with extracellular matrix components could reduce these unfavourable characteristics. In an attempt to address these issues, fibronectin (FN) with different concentrations was loaded on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) substrate. Scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angles and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were preformed in order to characterize FN loaded SWCNTs substrates. According to XPS and AFM results, FN could interact with SWCNTs and for this, the hydrophilicity of SWCNTs was improved. Additionally, SWCNT modified with FN showed less cytotoxicity compared with neat SWCNT. Finally, FN was shown to act as an interesting extracellular component for enhancing the biological properties of SWCNT.

  16. The effect of fibronectin on structural and biological properties of single walled carbon nanotube

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh; Farokhi, Mehdi; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Omidvar, Ramin; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the cytocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotube by loading fibronectin. • Enhancing the hydrophilicity and nanosurface roughness of single walled carbon nanotube after loading fibronectin. • Fibronectin makes the surface properties of single walled carbon nanotube more suitable for cell proliferation and growth. - Abstract: Despite the attractive properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), cytoxicity and hydrophobicity are two main considerable features which limit their application in biomedical fields. It was well established that treating CNTs with extracellular matrix components could reduce these unfavourable characteristics. In an attempt to address these issues, fibronectin (FN) with different concentrations was loaded on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) substrate. Scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angles and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were preformed in order to characterize FN loaded SWCNTs substrates. According to XPS and AFM results, FN could interact with SWCNTs and for this, the hydrophilicity of SWCNTs was improved. Additionally, SWCNT modified with FN showed less cytotoxicity compared with neat SWCNT. Finally, FN was shown to act as an interesting extracellular component for enhancing the biological properties of SWCNT

  17. Vibration of fuel bundles

    Chen, S.S.

    1975-06-01

    Several mathematical models have been proposed for calculating fuel rod responses in axial flows based on a single rod consideration. The spacing between fuel rods in liquid metal fast breeder reactors is small; hence fuel rods will interact with one another due to fluid coupling. The objective of this paper is to study the coupled vibration of fuel bundles. To account for the fluid coupling, a computer code, AMASS, is developed to calculate added mass coefficients for a group of circular cylinders based on the potential flow theory. The equations of motion for rod bundles are then derived including hydrodynamic forces, drag forces, fluid pressure, gravity effect, axial tension, and damping. Based on the equations, a method of analysis is presented to study the free and forced vibrations of rod bundles. Finally, the method is applied to a typical LMFBR fuel bundle consisting of seven rods

  18. Electrocatalytic Study of Paracetamol at a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Nickel Nanocomposite Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Koh Sing Ngai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid, simple, and sensitive method for the electrochemical determination of paracetamol was developed. A single-walled carbon nanotube/nickel (SWCNT/Ni nanocomposite was prepared and immobilized on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE surface via mechanical attachment. This paper reports the voltammetry study on the effect of paracetamol concentration, scan rate, pH, and temperature at a SWCNT/Ni-modified electrode in the determination of paracetamol. The characterization of the SWCNT/Ni/GCE was performed by cyclic voltammetry. Variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VPSEM and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectrometer were used to examine the surface morphology and elemental profile of the modified electrode, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry showed significant enhancement in peak current for the determination of paracetamol at the SWCNT/Ni-modified electrode. A linear calibration curve was obtained for the paracetamol concentration between 0.05 and 0.50 mM. The SWCNT/Ni/GCE displayed a sensitivity of 64 mA M−1 and a detection limit of 1.17 × 10−7 M in paracetamol detection. The proposed electrode can be applied for the determination of paracetamol in real pharmaceutical samples with satisfactory performance. Results indicate that electrodes modified with SWCNT and nickel nanoparticles exhibit better electrocatalytic activity towards paracetamol.

  19. The effect of defects on the catalytic activity of single Au atom supported carbon nanotubes and reaction mechanism for CO oxidation.

    Ali, Sajjad; Fu Liu, Tian; Lian, Zan; Li, Bo; Sheng Su, Dang

    2017-08-23

    The mechanism of CO oxidation by O 2 on a single Au atom supported on pristine, mono atom vacancy (m), di atom vacancy (di) and the Stone Wales defect (SW) on single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) surface is systematically investigated theoretically using density functional theory. We determine that single Au atoms can be trapped effectively by the defects on SWCNTs. The defects on SWCNTs can enhance both the binding strength and catalytic activity of the supported single Au atom. Fundamental aspects such as adsorption energy and charge transfer are elucidated to analyze the adsorption properties of CO and O 2 and co-adsorption of CO and O 2 molecules. It is found that CO binds stronger than O 2 on Au supported SWCNT. We clearly demonstrate that the defected SWCNT surface promotes electron transfer from the supported single Au atom to O 2 molecules. On the other hand, this effect is weaker for pristine SWCNTs. It is observed that the high density of spin-polarized states are localized in the region of the Fermi level due to the strong interactions between Au (5d orbital) and the adjacent carbon (2p orbital) atoms, which influence the catalytic performance. In addition, we elucidate both the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms of CO oxidation by O 2 . For the LH pathway, the barriers of the rate-limiting step are calculated to be 0.02 eV and 0.05 eV for Au/m-SWCNT and Au/di-SWCNT, respectively. To regenerate the active sites, an ER-like reaction occurs to form a second CO 2 molecule. The ER pathway is observed on Au/m-SWCNT, Au/SW-SWCNT and Au/SWCNT in which the Au/m-SWCNT has a smaller barrier. The comparison with a previous study (Lu et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2009, 113, 20156-20160.) indicates that the curvature effect of SWCNTs is important for the catalytic property of the supported single Au. Overall, Au/m-SWCNT is identified as the most active catalyst for CO oxidation compared to pristine SWCNT, SW-SWCNT and di-SWCNT. Our findings give a

  20. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes

    Salvetat, J.-P.; Bonard, J.-M.; Thomson, N. H.; Kulik, A. J.; Forró, L.; Benoit, W.; Zuppiroli, L.

    A variety of outstanding experimental results on the elucidation of the elastic properties of carbon nanotubes are fast appearing. These are based mainly on the techniques of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine the Young's moduli of single-wall nanotube bundles and multi-walled nanotubes, prepared by a number of methods. These results are confirming the theoretical predictions that carbon nanotubes have high strength plus extraordinary flexibility and resilience. As well as summarising the most notable achievements of theory and experiment in the last few years, this paper explains the properties of nanotubes in the wider context of materials science and highlights the contribution of our research group in this rapidly expanding field. A deeper understanding of the relationship between the structural order of the nanotubes and their mechanical properties will be necessary for the development of carbon-nanotube-based composites. Our research to date illustrates a qualitative relationship between the Young's modulus of a nanotube and the amount of disorder in the atomic structure of the walls. Other exciting results indicate that composites will benefit from the exceptional mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, but that the major outstanding problem of load transfer efficiency must be overcome before suitable engineering materials can be produced.

  1. Vibration analysis of viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotubes resting on a viscoelastic foundation

    Zhang, Da Peng; Lei, Yong Jun; Shen, Zhi Bin; Wang, Cheng Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Vibration responses were investigated for a viscoelastic Single-walled carbon nanotube (visco-SWCNT) resting on a viscoelastic foundation. Based on the nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model, velocity-dependent external damping and Kelvin viscoelastic foundation model, the governing equations were derived. The Transfer function method (TFM) was then used to compute the natural frequencies for general boundary conditions and foundations. In particular, the exact analytical expressions of both complex natural frequencies and critical viscoelastic parameters were obtained for the Kelvin-Voigt visco-SWCNTs with full foundations and certain boundary conditions, and several physically intuitive special cases were discussed. Substantial nonlocal effects, the influence of geometric and physical parameters of the SWCNT and the viscoelastic foundation were observed for the natural frequencies of the supported SWCNTs. The study demonstrates the efficiency and robustness of the developed model for the vibration of the visco-SWCNT-viscoelastic foundation coupling system

  2. Vibration of nonuniform carbon nanotube with attached mass via nonlocal Timoshenko beam theory

    Tang, Hai Li; Shen, Zhi Bin; Li, Dao Kui

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the vibrational behavior of nonuniform single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) carrying a nanoparticle. A nonuniform cantilever beam with a concentrated mass at the free end is analyzed according to the nonlocal Timoshenko beam theory. A governing equation of a nonuniform SWCNT with attached mass is established. The transfer function method incorporating with the perturbation method is utilized to obtain the resonant frequencies of a vibrating nonlocal cantilever-mass system. The effects of the nonlocal parameter, taper ratio and attached mass on the natural frequencies and frequency shifts are discussed. Obtained results indicate that the sensitivity of the frequency shifts on the attached mass increases when the length-to-diameter ratio decreases. Tapered SWCNT possesses higher fundamental frequencies if the taper ratio becomes larger.

  3. Inkjet printed ambipolar transistors and inverters based on carbon nanotube/zinc tin oxide heterostructures

    Kim, Bongjun; Jang, Seonpil; Dodabalapur, Ananth, E-mail: ananth.dodabalapur@engr.utexas.edu [Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Geier, Michael L.; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Hersam, Mark C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    We report ambipolar field-effect transistors (FETs) consisting of inkjet printed semiconductor bilayer heterostructures utilizing semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO). The bilayer structure allows for electron transport to occur principally in the amorphous oxide layer and hole transport to occur exclusively in the SWCNT layer. This results in balanced electron and hole mobilities exceeding 2 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} at low operating voltages (<5 V) in air. We further show that the SWCNT-ZTO hybrid ambipolar FETs can be integrated into functional inverter circuits that display high peak gain (>10). This work provides a pathway for realizing solution processable, inkjet printable, large area electronic devices, and systems based on SWCNT-amorphous oxide heterostructures.

  4. Spectral triangulation: a 3D method for locating single-walled carbon nanotubes in vivo

    Lin, Ching-Wei; Bachilo, Sergei M.; Vu, Michael; Beckingham, Kathleen M.; Bruce Weisman, R.

    2016-05-01

    Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and imaging of cancer tumours, when linked to selective targeting agents such as antibodies. However, such applications face the challenge of sensitively detecting and localizing the source of SWIR emission from inside tissues. A new method, called spectral triangulation, is presented for three dimensional (3D) localization using sparse optical measurements made at the specimen surface. Structurally unsorted SWCNT samples emitting over a range of wavelengths are excited inside tissue phantoms by an LED matrix. The resulting SWIR emission is sampled at points on the surface by a scanning fibre optic probe leading to an InGaAs spectrometer or a spectrally filtered InGaAs avalanche photodiode detector. Because of water absorption, attenuation of the SWCNT fluorescence in tissues is strongly wavelength-dependent. We therefore gauge the SWCNT-probe distance by analysing differential changes in the measured SWCNT emission spectra. SWCNT fluorescence can be clearly detected through at least 20 mm of tissue phantom, and the 3D locations of embedded SWCNT test samples are found with sub-millimeter accuracy at depths up to 10 mm. Our method can also distinguish and locate two embedded SWCNT sources at distinct positions.Nanomaterials with luminescence in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) region are of special interest for biological research and medical diagnostics because of favorable tissue transparency and low autofluorescence backgrounds in that region. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) show well-known sharp SWIR spectral signatures and therefore have potential for noninvasive detection and

  5. A Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Network Gas Sensing Device

    I-Ju Teng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research was to develop a chemical gas sensing device based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT networks. The SWCNT networks are synthesized on Al2O3-deposted SiO2/Si substrates with 10 nm-thick Fe as the catalyst precursor layer using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD. The development of interconnected SWCNT networks can be exploited to recognize the identities of different chemical gases by the strength of their particular surface adsorptive and desorptive responses to various types of chemical vapors. The physical responses on the surface of the SWCNT networks cause superficial changes in the electric charge that can be converted into electronic signals for identification. In this study, we tested NO2 and NH3 vapors at ppm levels at room temperature with our self-made gas sensing device, which was able to obtain responses to sensitivity changes with a concentration of 10 ppm for NO2 and 24 ppm for NH3.

  6. Nanomaterial release characteristics in a single-walled carbon nanotube manufacturing workplace

    Ji, Jun Ho; Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Gwangjae; Bae, Gwi-Nam

    2015-01-01

    As carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are widely used in various applications, exposure assessment also increases in importance with other various toxicity tests for CNTs. We conducted 24-h continuous nanoaerosol measurements to identify possible nanomaterial release in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) manufacturing workplace. Four real-time aerosol instruments were used to determine the nanosized and microsized particle numbers, particle surface area, and carbonaceous species. Task-based exposure assessment was carried out for SWCNT synthesis using the arc plasma and thermal decomposition processes to remove amorphous carbon components as impurities. During the SWCNT synthesis, the black carbon (BC) concentration was 2–12 μg/m 3 . The maximum BC mass concentrations occurred when the synthesis chamber was opened for harvesting the SWCNTs. The number concentrations of particles with sizes 10–420 nm were 10,000–40,000 particles/cm 3 during the tasks. The maximum number concentration existed when a vacuum pump was operated to remove exhaust air from the SWCNT synthesis chamber due to the penetration of highly concentrated oil mists through the window opened. We analyzed the particle mass size distribution and particle number size distribution for each peak episode. Using real-time aerosol detectors, we distinguished the SWCNT releases from background nanoaerosols such as oil mist and atmospheric photochemical smog particles. SWCNT aggregates with sizes of 1–10 μm were mainly released from the arc plasma synthesis. The harvesting process was the main release route of SWCNTs in the workplace

  7. Electrochemical determination of cadmium and lead on pristine single-walled carbon nanotube electrodes.

    Bui, Minh-Phuong Ngoc; Li, Cheng Ai; Han, Kwi Nam; Pham, Xuan-Hung; Seong, Gi Hun

    2012-01-01

    A flexible, transparent, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) film electrode was prepared by vacuum filtering methods, followed by photolithographic patterning of a photoresist polymer on the SWCNT surface. The morphology of the SWCNT film electrode surface was characterized using a field-emission scanning electron microscope coupled to an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrophotometer. The electrodes were successfully used as a mercury-free electrochemical sensor for individual and simultaneous detection of cadmium (Cd(2+)) and lead (Pb(2+)) in 0.02 M HCl by square-wave stripping voltammetry. Some important operational parameters, including deposition time, deposition potential, square-wave amplitude, and square wave-frequency were optimized for the detection of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+). The newly developed sensor showed good linear behavior in the examined concentration. For individual Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) ion detection, the linear range was found from 0.033 to 0.228 ppm with detection limits of 0.7 ppb (R(2) = 0.985) for Cd(2+) and 0.8 ppb (R(2) = 0.999) for Pb(2+). For simultaneous detection, the linear range was found from 0.033 to 0.280 ppm with a limit of detection of 2.2 ppb (R(2) = 0.976) and 0.6 ppb (R(2) = 0.996) for Cd(2+) and Pb(2+), respectively. SWCNT film electrodes offered favorable reproducibility of ± 5.4% and 4.3% for Cd(2+) and Pb(2+), respectively. The experiments demonstrated the applicability of carbon nanotubes, specifically in the preparation of SWCNT films. The results suggest that the proposed flexible SWCNT film electrodes can be applied as simple, efficient, cost-effective, and/or disposable electrodes for simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions.

  8. Nanomaterial release characteristics in a single-walled carbon nanotube manufacturing workplace

    Ji, Jun Ho [EcoPictures Co., Ltd (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Gwangjae; Bae, Gwi-Nam, E-mail: gnbae@kist.re.kr [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Center for Environment, Health and Welfare Research (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    As carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are widely used in various applications, exposure assessment also increases in importance with other various toxicity tests for CNTs. We conducted 24-h continuous nanoaerosol measurements to identify possible nanomaterial release in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) manufacturing workplace. Four real-time aerosol instruments were used to determine the nanosized and microsized particle numbers, particle surface area, and carbonaceous species. Task-based exposure assessment was carried out for SWCNT synthesis using the arc plasma and thermal decomposition processes to remove amorphous carbon components as impurities. During the SWCNT synthesis, the black carbon (BC) concentration was 2–12 μg/m{sup 3}. The maximum BC mass concentrations occurred when the synthesis chamber was opened for harvesting the SWCNTs. The number concentrations of particles with sizes 10–420 nm were 10,000–40,000 particles/cm{sup 3} during the tasks. The maximum number concentration existed when a vacuum pump was operated to remove exhaust air from the SWCNT synthesis chamber due to the penetration of highly concentrated oil mists through the window opened. We analyzed the particle mass size distribution and particle number size distribution for each peak episode. Using real-time aerosol detectors, we distinguished the SWCNT releases from background nanoaerosols such as oil mist and atmospheric photochemical smog particles. SWCNT aggregates with sizes of 1–10 μm were mainly released from the arc plasma synthesis. The harvesting process was the main release route of SWCNTs in the workplace.

  9. Investigations of niobium carbide contact for carbon-nanotube-based devices

    Huang, L; Chor, E F; Wu, Y; Guo, Z

    2010-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field effect transistors (FETs) with Nb contacts have been fabricated and upon annealing in vacuum at 700 deg. C for 1 h, niobium carbide (Nb 2 C) is formed at the Nb/SWCNT interface. The Nb 2 C/SWCNT contacts demonstrate a very small Schottky barrier height of ∼ 18 meV (decreased by > 80% relative to that of pristine Nb/SWCNT contact of ∼ 98 meV) to p-type transport. This is attributed to the higher work function of Nb 2 C (∼5.2 eV) than Nb (∼4.3 eV) and better bonding between Nb 2 C and SWCNTs. The performance of Nb 2 C-contacted SWCNT FETs is as follows: the p-channel ON current is as high as 0.5 μA at V DS = 0.1 V, the I ON /I OFF ratio is up to ∼ 10 5 and the subthreshold slope is ∼ 550 mV/dec, which is as good as that of titanium carbide (TiC-) and Pd-contacted SWCNT FETs. Compared with TiC, Nb 2 C contacts yield more unipolar p-type SWCNT FETs, as a result of the Nb 2 Cs higher work function. More importantly, Nb 2 C contacts can form near-ohmic contacts to both large-(≥1.6 nm) and small-diameter (∼1 nm) SWCNTs, while Pd can only form near-ohmic contacts for large-diameter SWCNTs. Moreover, the Nb 2 C contacts demonstrate good stability in air.

  10. Sequence Dependent Interactions Between DNA and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Roxbury, Daniel

    It is known that single-stranded DNA adopts a helical wrap around a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), forming a water-dispersible hybrid molecule. The ability to sort mixtures of SWCNTs based on chirality (electronic species) has recently been demonstrated using special short DNA sequences that recognize certain matching SWCNTs of specific chirality. This thesis investigates the intricacies of DNA-SWCNT sequence-specific interactions through both experimental and molecular simulation studies. The DNA-SWCNT binding strengths were experimentally quantified by studying the kinetics of DNA replacement by a surfactant on the surface of particular SWCNTs. Recognition ability was found to correlate strongly with measured binding strength, e.g. DNA sequence (TAT)4 was found to bind 20 times stronger to the (6,5)-SWCNT than sequence (TAT)4T. Next, using replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations, equilibrium structures formed by (a) single-strands and (b) multiple-strands of 12-mer oligonucleotides adsorbed on various SWCNTs were explored. A number of structural motifs were discovered in which the DNA strand wraps around the SWCNT and 'stitches' to itself via hydrogen bonding. Great variability among equilibrium structures was observed and shown to be directly influenced by DNA sequence and SWCNT type. For example, the (6,5)-SWCNT DNA recognition sequence, (TAT)4, was found to wrap in a tight single-stranded right-handed helical conformation. In contrast, DNA sequence T12 forms a beta-barrel left-handed structure on the same SWCNT. These are the first theoretical indications that DNA-based SWCNT selectivity can arise on a molecular level. In a biomedical collaboration with the Mayo Clinic, pathways for DNA-SWCNT internalization into healthy human endothelial cells were explored. Through absorbance spectroscopy, TEM imaging, and confocal fluorescence microscopy, we showed that intracellular concentrations of SWCNTs far exceeded those of the incubation

  11. Transient reflectivity on vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Galimberti, Gianluca; Ponzoni, Stefano; Ferrini, Gabriele; Hofmann, Stephan; Arshad, Muhammad; Cepek, Cinzia; Pagliara, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    One-color transient reflectivity measurements are carried out on two different samples of vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotube bundles and compared with the response recently published on unaligned bundles. The negative sign of the optical response for both samples indicates that the free

  12. Strategic Functionalization of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes to Manipulate Their Electronic and Optical Properties

    Gifford, Brendan Joel

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are unique materials that exhibit chirality-specific properties due to their one-dimensional confinement. As a result, they are explored for a wide range of applications including single-photon sources in communications devices. Despite progress in this area, SWCNTs still suffer from a relatively narrow range of energies of emission features that fall short of the 1500 nm desired for long-distance lossless data transfer. One approach that is frequently used to resolve this involves chemical functionalization with aryl groups. However, this approach is met with a number of fundamental issues. First, chirality-specific SWCNTs must be acquired for subsequent functionalization. Synthesis of such samples has thus far eluded experimental efforts. As such, post-synthetic non-covalent functionalization is required to break bundles and create disperse SWCNTs that can undergo further separation, processing, and functionalization. Second, a number of low-energy emission features are introduced upon functionalization across a 200 nm range. The origin of such diverse emission features remains unknown. The research presented here focuses on computationally addressing these issues. A series of polyfluorene polymers possessing sidechains of varying length are explored using molecular mechanics to determine the impact of alkyl sidechains on SWCNT-conjugated polymer interaction strength and morphology. Additionally, density functional theory (DFT) and linear-response time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) are used to explore the effect of functionalization on emission features. A prerequisite to these calculations involves constructing finite-length SWCNT systems with similar electronic structure to their infinite counterparts: a methodological approach for the formation of such systems is presented. The optical features for aryl-functionalized SWCNTs are then explored. It is shown that the predominant effect on the energies of emission features involves

  13. Materials Integration and Doping of Carbon Nanotube-based Logic Circuits

    Geier, Michael

    Over the last 20 years, extensive research into the structure and properties of single- walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) has elucidated many of the exceptional qualities possessed by SWCNTs, including record-setting tensile strength, excellent chemical stability, distinctive optoelectronic features, and outstanding electronic transport characteristics. In order to exploit these remarkable qualities, many application-specific hurdles must be overcome before the material can be implemented in commercial products. For electronic applications, recent advances in sorting SWCNTs by electronic type have enabled significant progress towards SWCNT-based integrated circuits. Despite these advances, demonstrations of SWCNT-based devices with suitable characteristics for large-scale integrated circuits have been limited. The processing methodologies, materials integration, and mechanistic understanding of electronic properties developed in this dissertation have enabled unprecedented scales of SWCNT-based transistor fabrication and integrated circuit demonstrations. Innovative materials selection and processing methods are at the core of this work and these advances have led to transistors with the necessary transport properties required for modern circuit integration. First, extensive collaborations with other research groups allowed for the exploration of SWCNT thin-film transistors (TFTs) using a wide variety of materials and processing methods such as new dielectric materials, hybrid semiconductor materials systems, and solution-based printing of SWCNT TFTs. These materials were integrated into circuit demonstrations such as NOR and NAND logic gates, voltage-controlled ring oscillators, and D-flip-flops using both rigid and flexible substrates. This dissertation explores strategies for implementing complementary SWCNT-based circuits, which were developed by using local metal gate structures that achieve enhancement-mode p-type and n-type SWCNT TFTs with widely separated and

  14. The Impact of Sonication on the Surface Quality of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Koh, Byumseok; Cheng, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Sonication process is regularly adopted for dispersing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in an aqueous medium. This can be achieved by either covalent functionalization of SWCNTs with strong acid or by noncovalent functionalization using dispersants that adsorb onto the surface of SWCNTs during dispersion. Because the dispersion process is usually performed using sonication, unintentional free radical formation during sonication process may induce covalent modification of SWCNT surface. Herein, we have systematically investigated the status of SWCNT surface modification under various sonication conditions using Raman spectroscopy. Comparing ID /IG (Raman intensities between D and G bands) ratio of SWCNTs under various sonication conditions suggests that typical sonication conditions (1-6 h bath sonication with sonication power between 3 and 80 W) in aqueous media do not induce covalent modification of SWCNT surface. In addition, we confirm that SWCNT dispersion with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) involves noncovalent adsorption of ssDNA onto the surface of SWCNTs, but not covalent linkage between ssDNA and SWCNT surface. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  15. In vitro nanotoxicity of single-walled carbon nanotube-dendrimer nanocomplexes against murine myoblast cells.

    Cancino, J; Paino, I M M; Micocci, K C; Selistre-de-Araujo, H S; Zucolotto, V

    2013-05-10

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and polyamidoamine dendrimers (PAMAM) have been proposed for a variety of biomedical applications. The combination of both molecules makes this new composite nanomaterial highly functionalizable and versatile to theranostic and drug-delivery systems. However, recent toxicological studies have shown that nanomaterials such as SWCNTs and PAMAM may have high toxicity in biological environments. Aiming to elucidate such behavior, in vitro studies with different cultured cells have been conducted in the past few years. This study focuses on the effects of SWCNT-PAMAM nanomaterials and their individual components on the C2C12 murine cell line, which is a mixed population of stem and progenitor cells. The interactions between the cells and the nanomaterials were studied with different techniques usually employed in toxicological analyses. The results showed that SWCNT-PAMAM and PAMAM inhibited the proliferation and caused DNA damage of C2C12 cells. Data from flow cytometry revealed a less toxicity in C2C12 cells exposed to SWCNT compared to the other nanomaterials. The results indicated that the toxicity of SWCNT, SWCNT-PAMAM and PAMAM in C2C12 cells can be strongly correlated with the charge of the nanomaterials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Altered Cell Mechanics from the Inside: Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Integrate with and Restructure Actin

    Mohammad F. Islam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With a range of desirable mechanical and optical properties, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs are a promising material for nanobiotechnologies. SWCNTs also have potential as biomaterials for modulation of cellular structures. Previously, we showed that highly purified, dispersed SWCNTs grossly alter F-actin inside cells. F-actin plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell structure, force transduction, transport and cytokinesis. Thus, quantification of SWCNT-actin interactions ranging from molecular, sub-cellular and cellular levels with both structure and function is critical for developing SWCNT-based biotechnologies. Further, this interaction can be exploited, using SWCNTs as a unique actin-altering material. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions of SWCNTs with actin filaments. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that SWCNTs were located within ~5 nm of F-actin in cells but did not interact with G-actin. SWCNTs did not alter myosin II sub-cellular localization, and SWCNT treatment in cells led to significantly shorter actin filaments. Functionally, cells with internalized SWCNTs had greatly reduced cell traction force. Combined, these results demonstrate direct, specific SWCNT alteration of F-actin structures which can be exploited for SWCNT-based biotechnologies and utilized as a new method to probe fundamental actin-related cellular processes and biophysics.

  17. Uptake of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Conjugated with DNA by Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    Joseph Harvey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs have been proposed to have great therapeutic potential. SWCNTs conjugated with drugs or genes travel in the systemic circulation to reach target cells or tissues following extravasation from microvessels although the interaction between SWCNT conjugates and the microvascular endothelial cells (ECs remains unknown. We hypothesized that SWCNT-DNA conjugates would be taken up by microvascular ECs and that this process would be facilitated by SWCNTs compared to facilitation by DNA alone. ECs were treated with various concentrations of SWCNT-DNA-FITC conjugates, and the uptake and intracellular distribution of these conjugates were determined by a confocal microscope imaging system followed by quantitative analysis of fluorescence intensity. The uptake of SWCNT-DNA-FITC conjugates (2 μg/mL by microvascular ECs was significantly greater than that of DNA-FITC (2 μg/mL, observed at 6 hrs after treatment. For the intracellular distribution, SWCNT-DNA-FITC conjugates were detected in the nucleus of ECs, while DNA-FITC was restricted to the cytoplasm. The fluorescence intensity and distribution of SWCNTs were concentration and time independent. The findings demonstrate that SWCNTs facilitate DNA delivery into microvascular ECs, thus suggesting that SWCNTs serving as drug and gene vehicles have therapeutic potential.

  18. Flow in rod bundles

    Hazi, G.; Mayer, G.

    2005-01-01

    For power upgrading VVER-440 reactors we need to know exactly how the temperature measured by the thermocouples is related to the average outlet temperature of the fuel assemblies. Accordingly, detailed knowledge on mixing process in the rod bundles and in the fuel assembly head have great importance. Here we study the hydrodynamics of rod bundles based on the results of direct numerical and large eddy simulation of flows in subchannels. It is shown that secondary flow and flow pulsation phenomena can be observed using both methodologies. Some consequences of these observations are briefly discussed. (author)

  19. Standard-model bundles

    Donagi, Ron; Pantev, Tony; Waldram, Dan; Donagi, Ron; Ovrut, Burt; Pantev, Tony; Waldram, Dan

    2002-01-01

    We describe a family of genus one fibered Calabi-Yau threefolds with fundamental group ${\\mathbb Z}/2$. On each Calabi-Yau $Z$ in the family we exhibit a positive dimensional family of Mumford stable bundles whose symmetry group is the Standard Model group $SU(3)\\times SU(2)\\times U(1)$ and which have $c_{3} = 6$. We also show that for each bundle $V$ in our family, $c_{2}(Z) - c_{2}(V)$ is the class of an effective curve on $Z$. These conditions ensure that $Z$ and $V$ can be used for a phenomenologically relevant compactification of Heterotic M-theory.

  20. Growth of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with metallic chirality through faceted FePt-Au catalysts

    Ohashi, Toshiyuki; Iwama, Hiroki; Shima, Toshiyuki

    2016-02-01

    Direct synthesis of vertically aligned metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (m-SWCNT forests) is a difficult challenge. We have successfully synthesized m-SWCNT forests using faceted iron platinum-gold catalysts epitaxially grown on a single crystalline magnesium oxide substrate. The metallic content of the forests estimated by Raman spectroscopy reaches 90%. From the standpoint of growth rate of the forests, the growth mechanism is probably based on the catalyst of solid state. It is suggested that preferential growth of m-SWCNTs is achieved when both factors are satisfied, namely, {111} dominant octahedral facet and ideal size (fine particles) of FePt particles.

  1. Buckling of ZnS-filled single-walled carbon nanotubes – The influence of aspect ratio

    Monteiro, André O.

    2014-08-16

    The mechanical response of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) filled with crystalline zinc sulphide (ZnS) nanowires under uniaxial compression is studied using classical molecular dynamics. These simulations were used to analyse the behaviour of SWCNT, with and without ZnS filling, in terms of critical force and critical strain. Force versus strain curves have been computed for hollow and filled systems, the latter clearly showing an improvement of the mechanical behaviour caused by the ZnS nanowire. The same simulations were repeated for a large range of dimensions in order to evaluate the influence of the aspect ratio on the mechanical response of the tubes.

  2. Chirality-Controlled Synthesis and Applications of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    Liu, Bilu; Wu, Fanqi; Gui, Hui; Zheng, Ming; Zhou, Chongwu

    2017-01-24

    Preparation of chirality-defined single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is the top challenge in the nanotube field. In recent years, great progress has been made toward preparing single-chirality SWCNTs through both direct controlled synthesis and postsynthesis separation approaches. Accordingly, the uses of single-chirality-dominated SWCNTs for various applications have emerged as a new front in nanotube research. In this Review, we review recent progress made in the chirality-controlled synthesis of SWCNTs, including metal-catalyst-free SWCNT cloning by vapor-phase epitaxy elongation of purified single-chirality nanotube seeds, chirality-specific growth of SWCNTs on bimetallic solid alloy catalysts, chirality-controlled synthesis of SWCNTs using bottom-up synthetic strategy from carbonaceous molecular end-cap precursors, etc. Recent major progresses in postsynthesis separation of single-chirality SWCNT species, as well as methods for chirality characterization of SWCNTs, are also highlighted. Moreover, we discuss some examples where single-chirality SWCNTs have shown clear advantages over SWCNTs with broad chirality distributions. We hope this review could inspire more research on the chirality-controlled preparation of SWCNTs and equally important inspire the use of single-chirality SWCNT samples for more fundamental studies and practical applications.

  3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on Fe and Co catalysts during the first stages of ethanol chemical vapor deposition for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    Oida, S.; McFeely, F.R.; Bol, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Optimized chemical vapor deposition processes for single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) can lead to the growth of dense, vertically aligned, mm-long forests of SWCNTs. Precise control of the growth process is however still difficult, mainly because of poor understanding of the interplay between

  4. Electrochemical characterization of mixed self-assembled films of water-soluble single-walled carbon nanotube-poly(m-aminobenzene sulfonic acid) and Iron(II) tetrasulfophthalocyanine

    Agboola, BO

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The redox activities of water-soluble iron(II) tetrasulfophthalocyanine (FeTSPc) and single-walled carbon nanotube-poly(m-aminobenzene sulfonic acid) (SWCNT-PABS) adsorbed on a gold surface precoated with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 2...

  5. Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Nanocomposites Flexible Stress and Strain Sensors

    Kang, Jin Ho; Sauti, Godfrey; Park, Cheol; Scholl, Jonathan A.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    2008-01-01

    Conformable stress and strain sensors are required for monitoring the integrity of airframe structures as well as for sensing the mechanical stimuli in prosthetic arms. For this purpose, we have developed a series of piezoresistive single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/polymer nanocomposites. The electromechanical coupling of pressure with resistance changes in these nanocomposites is exceptionally greater than that of metallic piezoresistive materials. In fact, the piezoresistive stress coefficient (pi) of a SWCNT/polymer nanocomposite is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that of a typical metallic piezoresistive. The piezoresistive stress coefficient is a function of the nanotube concentration wherein the maximum value occurs at a concentration just above the percolation threshold concentration (phi approx. 0.05 %). This response appears to originate from a change in intrinsic resistivity under compression/tension. A systematic study of the effect of the modulus of the polymer matrix on piezoresistivity allowed us to make flexible and conformable sensors for biomedical applications. The prototype haptic sensors using these nanocomposites are demonstrated. The piezocapacitive properties of SWCNT/polymer are also characterized by monitoring the capacitance change under pressure.

  6. Application of a Cantilevered SWCNT with Mass at the Tip as a Nanomechanical Sensor

    Mehdipour, I.; Barari, Amin; Domairry, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the continuum mechanics method and a bending model is applied to obtain the resonant frequency of the fixed-free SWCNT where the mass is rigidly attached to the tip. This method used the Euler–Bernoulli theory with cantilevered boundary conditions where the effect of attached mass ...... of resonant frequency are decreased. The validity and the accuracy of these formulas are examined with other sensor equations in the literatures. The results indicate that the new sensor equations can be used for CNT like CNT-based biosensors with reasonable accuracy....

  7. Irradiated fuel bundle counter

    Campbell, J.W.; Todd, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    The design of a prototype safeguards instrument for determining the number of irradiated fuel assemblies leaving an on-power refueled reactor is described. Design details include radiation detection techniques, data processing and display, unattended operation capabilities and data security methods. Development and operating history of the bundle counter is reported. (U.S.)

  8. Irradiated fuel bundle counter

    Campbell, J.W.; Todd, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    The design of a prototype safeguards instrument for determining the number of irradiated fuel assemblies leaving an on-power refueled reactor is described. Design details include radiation detection techniques, data processing and display, unattended operation capabilities and data security methods. Development and operating history of the bundle counter is reported

  9. ALUMINUM BOX BUNDLING PRESS

    Iosif DUMITRESCU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In municipal solid waste, aluminum is the main nonferrous metal, approximately 80- 85% of the total nonferrous metals. The income per ton gained from aluminum recuperation is 20 times higher than from glass, steel boxes or paper recuperation. The object of this paper is the design of a 300 kN press for aluminum box bundling.

  10. Kernel bundle EPDiff

    Sommer, Stefan Horst; Lauze, Francois Bernard; Nielsen, Mads

    2011-01-01

    In the LDDMM framework, optimal warps for image registration are found as end-points of critical paths for an energy functional, and the EPDiff equations describe the evolution along such paths. The Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Kernel Bundle Mapping (LDDKBM) extension of LDDMM allows scale space...

  11. High-sensitivity pH sensor using separative extended-gate field-effect transistors with single-walled carbon-nanotube networks

    Pyo, Ju-Young; Cho, Won-Ju

    2018-04-01

    We fabricate high-sensitivity pH sensors using single-walled carbon-nanotube (SWCNT) network thin-film transistors (TFTs). The sensing and transducer parts of the pH sensor are composed of separative extended-sensing gates (ESGs) with SnO2 ion-sensitive membranes and double-gate structure TFTs with thin SWCNT network channels of ∼1 nm and AlO x top-gate insulators formed by the solution-deposition method. To prevent thermal process-induced damages on the SWCNT channel layer due to the post-deposition annealing process and improve the electrical characteristics of the SWCNT-TFTs, microwave irradiation is applied at low temperatures. As a result, a pH sensitivity of 7.6 V/pH, far beyond the Nernst limit, is obtained owing to the capacitive coupling effect between the top- and bottom-gate insulators of the SWCNT-TFTs. Therefore, double-gate structure SWCNT-TFTs with separated ESGs are expected to be highly beneficial for high-sensitivity disposable biosensor applications.

  12. A modal analysis of carbon nanotube using elastic network model

    Kim, Min Hyeok; Seo, Sang Jae; Lim, Byeong Soo; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Moon Ki; Liu, Wing Kam

    2012-01-01

    Although it is widely known that both size and chirality play significant roles in vibration behaviors of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), there haven't been yet enough studies specifying the relationship between structure and vibration mode shape of SWCNTs. We have analyzed the chirality and length dependence of SWCNT by using normal mode analysis based elastic network model in which all interatomic interactions of the given SWCNTs structure are represented by a network of linear spring connections. As this method requires relatively short computation time compared to molecular dynamics simulation, we can efficiently analyze vibration behavior of SWCNTs. To ensure the relationship between SWCNT structure and its vibration mode shapes, we simulated more than one hundred SWCNTs having different types of chirality and length. Results indicated that the first two major mode shapes are bending and breathing. The minimum length of nanotube for maintaining the bending mode does not depend on chirality but on its diameter. Our simulations pointed out that there is a critical aspect ratio between diameter and length to determine vibration mode shapes, and it can be empirically formulated as a function of nanotube length and diameter. Therefore, uniformity control is the most important premise in order to utilize vibration features of SWCNTs. It is also expected that the obtained vibration aspect will play an important role in designing nanotube based devices such as resonators and sensors more accurately

  13. The double-edged effects of annealing MgO underlayers on the efficient synthesis of single-wall carbon nanotube forests.

    Tsuji, Takashi; Hata, Kenji; Futaba, Don N; Sakurai, Shunsuke

    2017-11-16

    Recently, the millimetre-scale, highly efficient synthesis of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) forests from Fe catalysts has been reported through the annealing of the magnesia (MgO) underlayer. Here, we report the double-edged effects of underlayer annealing on the efficiency and structure of the SWCNT forest synthesis through a temperature-dependent examination. Our results showed that the efficiency of the SWCNT forests sharply increased with increased underlayer annealing temperatures from 600 °C up to 900 °C due to a temperature-dependent structural modification, characterized by increased grain size and reduced defects, of the MgO underlayer. Beyond this temperature, the SWCNT fraction also decreased as a result of further structural modification of the MgO underlayer. This exemplifies the double-edged effects of annealing. Specifically, for underlayer annealing below 600 °C, the catalyst subsurface diffusion was found to limit the growth efficiency, and for excessively high underlayer annealing temperatures (>900 °C), catalyst coalescence/ripening led to the formation of double-wall carbon nanotubes. As a result, three distinct regions of synthesis were observed: (i) a "low yield" region below a threshold temperature (∼600 °C); (ii) an "increased yield" region from 600 to 900 °C, and (iii) a "saturation" region above 900 °C. The efficient SWCNT forest synthesis could only occur within a specific annealing temperature window as a result of this double-edged effects of underlayer annealing.

  14. Theoretical study of hydrogen adsorption of graphene and carbon nanotubes decorated with palladium

    Lopez Corral, Ignacio; German, Estefania; Volpe, Maria A; Brizuela, Graciela; Juan, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes (CNT) have awakened great interest in materials science thanks to their extraordinary structural, electronic and mechanical properties which facilitate their application in many different areas. One of the most promising applications is the possibility of using CNT to store hydrogen for use in small scale fuel cells. Unfortunately, experimental studies performed some years ago have often led to controversial conclusions, causing a continuing debate that has still not been resolved. The most recent work suggests that the storage of hydrogen for practical purposes can be achieved with CNT decorated with transition metals, for example Pd. In this context, theoretical modeling methods have to be used for a detailed understanding of the influence and scope of this type of modification in the interaction of the nanotubes with atomic or molecular hydrogen. This work studied hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) doped with Pd atoms, using density functional theory (DFT) and semi-empirical methods. As a preliminary approximation to the system a graphene sheet was used, modeled with a 190 atom cluster of C in a hexagonal arrangement, on which a single Pd atom was placed in adsorption sites. Then C 190 clusters were used to simulate two different types of SWCNT: the zigzag SWCNT of quirality (10.0) and the armchair SWCNT of quirality (5.5), both decorated similarly on the graphene. Geometric optimization procedures for the system's different components were carried out with these models, and then the changes produced during the adsorption process in the electronic occupation of atomic orbitals and unions, for which crystal orbital overlap population (COOP) curves and overlap population (OP) values were evaluated. The results obtained with the graphene and nanotube approximations are in agreement and show that the SWCNT modified with Pd have more capacity to trap hydrogen than the non doped SWCNT. The

  15. Effect of Longitudinal Magnetic Field on Vibration Characteristics of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Viscoelastic Medium

    Zhang, D. P.; Lei, Y.; Shen, Z. B.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of longitudinal magnetic field on vibration response of a sing-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) embedded in viscoelastic medium is investigated. Based on nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, Maxwell's relations, and Kelvin viscoelastic foundation model, the governing equations of motion for vibration analysis are established. The complex natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes in closed form for the embedded SWCNT with arbitrary boundary conditions are obtained using transfer function method (TFM). The new analytical expressions for the complex natural frequencies are also derived for certain typical boundary conditions and Kelvin-Voigt model. Numerical results from the model are presented to show the effects of nonlocal parameter, viscoelastic parameter, boundary conditions, aspect ratio, and strength of the magnetic field on vibration characteristics for the embedded SWCNT in longitudinal magnetic field. The results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed methods for vibration analysis of embedded SWCNTs under magnetic field.

  16. Enhanced efficiency of hybrid amorphous silicon solar cells based on single-walled carbon nanotubes/polymer composite thin film.

    Rajanna, Pramod Mulbagal; Gilshteyn, Evgenia; Yagafarov, Timur; Alekseeva, Alena; Anisimov, Anton; Sergeev, Oleg; Neumueller, Alex; Bereznev, Sergei; Maricheva, Jelena; Nasibulin, Albert

    2018-01-09

    We report a simple approach to fabricate hybrid solar cells (HSCs) based on a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) film and a thin film hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Randomly oriented high quality SWCNTs with an enhanced conductivity by means of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate are used as a window layer and a front electrode. A series of HSCs are fabricated in ambient conditions with different SWCNT film thicknesses. The polymethylmethacrylate layer drop-casted on fabricated HSCs reduces the reflection fourfold and enhances the short-circuit Jsc, open-circuit Voc, and efficiency by nearly 10%. A state-of-the-art J-V performance is shown for SWCNT/a-Si HSC with an open-circuit voltage of 900 mV and efficiency of 3.4% under simulated one-sun AM 1.5G direct illumination. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  17. Enhanced efficiency of hybrid amorphous silicon solar cells based on single-walled carbon nanotubes and polymer composite thin film

    Rajanna, Pramod M.; Gilshteyn, Evgenia P.; Yagafarov, Timur; Aleekseeva, Alena K.; Anisimov, Anton S.; Neumüller, Alex; Sergeev, Oleg; Bereznev, Sergei; Maricheva, Jelena; Nasibulin, Albert G.

    2018-03-01

    We report a simple approach to fabricate hybrid solar cells (HSCs) based on a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) film and thin film hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Randomly oriented high-quality SWCNTs with conductivity enhanced by means of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate are used as a window layer and a front electrode. A series of HSCs are fabricated in ambient conditions with varying SWCNT film thicknesses. The polymethylmethacrylate layer drop-casted on fabricated HSCs reduces the reflection fourfold and enhances the short-circuit J sc , open-circuit V oc , and efficiency by nearly 10%. A state-of-the-art J-V performance is shown for SWCNT/a-Si HSC with an open-circuit voltage of 900 mV and an efficiency of 3.4% under simulated one-sun AM 1.5 G direct illumination.

  18. Right bundle branch block

    Bussink, Barbara E; Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Jespersen, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    AimsTo determine the prevalence, predictors of newly acquired, and the prognostic value of right bundle branch block (RBBB) and incomplete RBBB (IRBBB) on a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram in men and women from the general population.Methods and resultsWe followed 18 441 participants included...... in the Copenhagen City Heart Study examined in 1976-2003 free from previous myocardial infarction (MI), chronic heart failure, and left bundle branch block through registry linkage until 2009 for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular outcomes. The prevalence of RBBB/IRBBB was higher in men (1.4%/4.7% in men vs. 0.......5%/2.3% in women, P block was associated with significantly...

  19. Bundling harvester; Nippukorjausharvesteri

    Koponen, K. [Eko-Log Oy, Kuopio (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The staring point of the project was to design and construct, by taking the silvicultural point of view into account, a harvesting and processing system especially for energy-wood, containing manually driven bundling harvester, automatizing of the harvester, and automatized loading. The equipment forms an ideal method for entrepreneur`s-line harvesting. The target is to apply the system also for owner`s-line harvesting. The profitability of the system promotes the utilization of the system in both cases. The objectives of the project were: to construct a test equipment and prototypes for all the project stages, to carry out terrain and strain tests in order to examine the usability and durability, as well as the capacity of the machine, to test the applicability of the Eko-Log system in simultaneous harvesting of energy and pulp woods, and to start the marketing and manufacturing of the products. The basic problems of the construction of the bundling harvester have been solved using terrain-tests. The prototype machine has been shown to be operable. Loading of the bundles to form sufficiently economically transportable loads has been studied, and simultaneously, the branch-biomass has been tried to be utilized without loosing the profitability of transportation. The results have been promising, and will promote the profitable utilization of wood-energy

  20. Bundling harvester; Nippukorjausharvesteri

    Koponen, K [Eko-Log Oy, Kuopio (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The staring point of the project was to design and construct, by taking the silvicultural point of view into account, a harvesting and processing system especially for energy-wood, containing manually driven bundling harvester, automatizing of the harvester, and automatized loading. The equipment forms an ideal method for entrepreneur`s-line harvesting. The target is to apply the system also for owner`s-line harvesting. The profitability of the system promotes the utilization of the system in both cases. The objectives of the project were: to construct a test equipment and prototypes for all the project stages, to carry out terrain and strain tests in order to examine the usability and durability, as well as the capacity of the machine, to test the applicability of the Eko-Log system in simultaneous harvesting of energy and pulp woods, and to start the marketing and manufacturing of the products. The basic problems of the construction of the bundling harvester have been solved using terrain-tests. The prototype machine has been shown to be operable. Loading of the bundles to form sufficiently economically transportable loads has been studied, and simultaneously, the branch-biomass has been tried to be utilized without loosing the profitability of transportation. The results have been promising, and will promote the profitable utilization of wood-energy

  1. Formulation of curcumin delivery with functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes: characteristics and anticancer effects in vitro.

    Li, Haixia; Zhang, Nan; Hao, Yongwei; Wang, Yali; Jia, Shasha; Zhang, Hongling; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2014-08-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), an important class of artificial nanomaterials with unique physicochemical properties, were used as novel carriers of curcumin. Formulation and evaluation of curcumin-loaded SWCNTs systems for utilizing the curcumin's anticancer potential by circumventing conventional limitations of extremely low aqueous solubility and instability under physiological conditions, and combining SWCNTs photothermal therapy enabled by the strong optical absorbance of SWCNTs in the 0.8-1.4 μm resulting in excessive local heating. After functionalized SWCNTs were confirmed, they were conjugated with curcumin (SWCNT-Cur). Subsequently, the formulation was analyzed for size, zeta-potential and morphology. And the solubility, stability and release of curcumin were assessed using spectrofluorometer, and the solid state of the curcumin was determined using X-ray diffraction and UV spectroscopy. Furthermore, in PC-3 cells, photothermal response was further determined by irradiating laser after the antitumor effect of SWCNT-Cur was evaluated. SWCNTs were functionalized, and subsequent SWCNT-Cur conjugates were found to possess an average size of 170.4 nm, a zeta potential of -12.5 mV and to significantly enhance the solubility and stability of curcumin, overcoming the barriers to adequate curcumin delivery. Moreover, curcumin in SWCNT-Cur was in an amorphous form and could be rapidly released. In PC-3 cells, improved inhibition efficacy was achieved by SWCNT-Cur compared with native curcumin. Meanwhile, the SWCNTs in SWCNT-Cur served not only as scaffolds but also as thermal ablation agents, further inhibiting PC-3 cell growth. SWCNT-Cur assemblies may provide a promising delivery system for curcumin for use in cancer therapy.

  2. Powerful greenhouse gas nitrous oxide adsorption onto intrinsic and Pd doped Single walled carbon nanotube

    Yoosefian, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Investigation of the adsorption of Nitrous oxide on SWCNT and Pd/SWCNT. • Nitrous oxide adsorbed on Pd/SWCNT system demonstrates a strong adsorption. • The Pd/SWCNT is potential sensor for the Nitrous oxide gaseous molecule detection. - Abstract: Density functional studies on the adsorption behavior of nitrous oxide (N_2O) onto intrinsic carbon nanotube (CNT) and Pd-doped (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotube (Pd-CNT) have been reported. Introduction of Pd dopant facilitates in adsorption of N_2O on the otherwise inert nanotube as observed from the adsorption energies and global reactivity descriptor values. Among three adsorption features of N_2O onto CNT, the horizontal adsorption with E_a_d_s = −0.16 eV exhibits higher adsorption energy. On the other hand the Pd-CNT exhibit strong affinity toward gas molecule and would cause a huge increase in N_2O adsorption energies. Chemical and electronic properties of CNT and Pd-CNT in the absence and presence of N_2O were investigated. Adsorption of N_2O gas molecule would affect the electronic conductance of Pd-CNT that can serve as a signal of gas sensors and the increased energy gaps demonstrate the formation of more stable systems. The atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and the natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations were performed to get more details about the nature and charge transfers in intermolecular interactions within adsorption process. As a final point, the density of states (DOSs) calculations was achieved to confirm previous results. According to our results, intrinsic CNT cannot act as a suitable adsorbent while Pd-CNT can be introduced as novel detectable complex for designing high sensitive, fast response and high efficient carbon nanotube based gas sensor to detect N_2O gas as an air pollutant. Our results could provide helpful information for the design and fabrication of the N_2O sensors.

  3. Hybridization of Homopolynucleotides with Different Base Ordering on the Carbon Nanotube Surface

    Karachevtsev, M. V.; Gladchenko, G. O.; Andrushchenko, Valery; Leontiev, V. S.; Karachevtsev, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 21 (2015), s. 11991-12001 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA ČR GA15-09072S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA hybridization * nucleic acids * carbon nanotubes * SWCNT * UV absorption spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.509, year: 2015

  4. The kinetics of chirality assignment in catalytic single-walled carbon nanotube growth and the routes towards selective growth.

    Xu, Ziwei; Qiu, Lu; Ding, Feng

    2018-03-21

    Depending on its specific structure, or so-called chirality, a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) can be either a conductor or a semiconductor. This feature ensures great potential for building ∼1 nm sized electronics if chirality-selected SWCNTs could be achieved. However, due to the limited understanding of the growth mechanism of SWCNTs, reliable methods for chirality-selected SWCNTs are still pending. Here we present a theoretical model on the chirality assignment and control of SWCNTs during the catalytic growth. This study reveals that the chirality of a SWCNT is determined by the kinetic incorporation of pentagons, especially the last (6 th ) one, during the nucleation stage. Our analysis showed that the chirality of a SWCNT is randomly assigned on a liquid or liquid-like catalyst surface, and two routes of synthesizing chirality-selected SWCNTs, which are verified by recent experimental achievements, are demonstrated. They are (i) by using high melting point crystalline catalysts, such as Ta, W, Re, Os, or their alloys, and (ii) by frequently changing the chirality of SWCNTs during their growth. This study paves the way for achieving chirality-selective SWCNT growth for high performance SWCNT based electronics.

  5. Photoluminescence quenching, structures, and photovoltaic properties of ZnO nanostructures decorated plasma grown single walled carbon nanotubes

    Aïssa, Brahim, E-mail: brahim.aissa@mpbc.ca [University of Quebec, Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS-EMT (Canada); Nedil, Mourad [Telebec Wireless Underground Communication Laboratory, UQAT (Canada); Belaidi, Abdelhak; Isaifan, Rima J. [Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar Foundation, Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (Qatar); Bentouaf, Ali [University Hassiba Ben Bouali, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Algeria); Fauteux, Christian; Therriault, Daniel [École Polytechnique de Montréal, Laboratory for Multiscale Mechanics (LM2), Mechanical Engineering Department (Canada)

    2017-05-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures were successfully grown directly on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) template through the CO{sub 2} laser-induced chemical liquid deposition (LCLD) process. Photoluminescence (PL) of the deposited ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites exhibits, at room temperature, a narrow near UV band located at 390 nm with no emission bands in the visible region, indicating a high degree of crystalline quality of the ZnO nanostructures. Moreover, when the relative SWCNT loads are varied within the composites, the PL intensity and the diffused optical reflectance diminish in comparison with those of ZnO alone, owing to the transfer of photo-excited electrons from ZnO to the SWCNT, and the enhancement of the optical absorbance, respectively. Finally, these ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites are integrated into a heterojunction photovoltaic-based device, using PEDOT:PSS on ITO/glass substrate. The devices show an evident p–n junction behavior in the dark, and a clear I–V curve shift downward when illuminated with an open-circuit voltage of 1.1 V, a short circuit current density of 14.05 μA cm{sup −2}, and a fill factor of ∼35%. These results indicate that these composites fabricated via LCLD process could be promising for optoelectronic and energy-harvesting devices.

  6. A comparative study of dye-sensitized solar cells added carbon nanotubes to electrolyte and counter electrodes

    Uk Lee, Sung; Hong, Byungyou [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (Korea); Seok Choi, Won [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanbat National University (Korea)

    2010-04-15

    For the purpose of increasing the energy conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were added to electrolyte and PtCl{sub 4}-treated electrode. We used two different powders containing single-wall CNT (SWCNT) and multi-wall CNT (MWCNT). We added CNTs to PtCl{sub 4}-treated electrode (called as CNT-counter electrode) or electrolyte (called as CNT-electrolyte) and then fabricated four kinds of DSSCs with SWCNT-counter electrode, MWCNT-counter electrode, SWCNT-electrolyte, and MWCNT-electrolyte. The efficiency of CNT-counter electrode DSSC was improved to 4.03% (SWCNT) and 4.36% (MWCNT), respectively. In case of CNT-electrolyte DSSC, MWCNT-electrolyte DSSC showed higher efficiency (4.2%) than SWCNT-electrolyte DSSC (3.62%). Compared with a standard DSSC without CNTs whose efficiency was 3.22%, the energy conversion efficiency increased up to about 26% and 24% for the MWCNT-electrode DSSC and the MWCNT-electrolyte DSSC, respectively. (author)

  7. Co-doping as a tool for tuning the optical properties of singlewalled carbon nanotubes: A first principles study

    Sharma, Deepa; Jaggi, Neena

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a first principles study on the effect of co-doping on various optical spectra of a zigzag single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Optical spectra of a pristine SWCNT, SWCNT co-doped with Aluminum (Al) & Phosphorus (P) and another one co-doped with Al, P and Nitrogen (N) have been calculated using density functional theory (DFT).The theory has been implemented using the Cambridge sequential total energy package (CASTEP) code available as a userfriendly module with the software 'Material Studio'. Polarized and unpolarized light as well as light through polycrystalline media have been considered. The dependence of various spectra on the status of incident light presents a clear evidence of anisotropicity in the optical properties. Analysis of the simulated spectra involves calculation and comparison of different optical properties like dielectric function, reflectivity, refractive index, conductivity and loss function for the pristine and co-doped SWCNTs. Noticeable variations are observed in the optical properties on simultaneously doping the SWCNT with Al and P and then further introducing N atom into the structure so that it can be concluded that co-doping (simultaneous doping with different combinations of dopants) can be evolved as a novel and effective tool for tailoring the optical properties of SWCNTs as per the requirements while designing an optical device. It will prove to be highly significant for effective designing of SWCNT based sensitive optical devices for a variety of technological applications.

  8. The Atiyah bundle and connections on a principal bundle

    be the fiber bundle constructed as in (1.1) for the universal principal G-bundle. In a work in progress, we hope to show that the universal G-connection can be realized as a fiber bundle over C(EG). Turning this ... a G-invariant vector field on EG|U . In other words, we get a bijective linear map between. A(EG)(U) (the space of ...

  9. Amino acids interacting with defected carbon nanotubes: ab initio calculations

    M. Darvish Ganji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of a number of amino acids on a defected single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT is investigated by using the density-functional theory (DFT calculations. The adsorption energies and equilibrium distances are calculated for various configurations such as amino acid attaching to defect sites heptagon, pentagon and hexagon in defective tube and also for several molecular orientations with respect to the nanotube surface. The results showed that amino acids prefer to be physisorbed on the outer surface of the defected nanotube with different interaction strength following the hierarchy histidine > glycine > phenylalanine > cysteine. Comparing these findings with those obtained for perfect SWCNTs reveals that the adsorption energy of the amino acids increase for adsorption onto defected CNTs. The adsorption nature has also been evaluated by means of electronics structures analysis within the Mulliken population and DOS spectra for the interacting entities.

  10. Immunological and cytotoxicological characterization of tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) conjugated to single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Zeinali, Majid; Jammalan, Mostafa; Ardestani, Sussan K; Mosaveri, Nader

    2009-09-22

    Tuberculosis (TB) represents one of the leading killers among all infectious disease. Protection against TB depends on the activation of T-helper type I (Th1) immune response. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted considerable attention because of their potential applications as new nanovehicle. In the current study, tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) was conjugated to carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Cytotoxicity of the carboxylated SWCNT and SWCNT-PPD conjugate was analyzed with MTT assay and by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) generation. Male BALB/c mice were immunized with BCG, PPD, SWCNT-PPD conjugate and PPD in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Induction of cellular immune response was analyzed by measuring the levels of Th1 cytokines (IFN-gamma and IL-12) and Th2 cytokines (IL-10 and IL-5). Immunization with non-conjugated PPD or PPD in Freund's adjuvant induced a Th2 cytokine response while immunization with BCG resulted to a mixed Th1/Th2 cytokine response. In contrast, PPD in conjugation with SWCNT generated preferentially a Th1-type cytokine response in the absence of potential cytotoxic effects.

  11. Micromechanical characterization of single-walled carbon nanotube reinforced ethylidene norbornene nanocomposites for self-healing applications

    Aïssa, B; Haddad, E; Jamroz, W; Hassani, S; Farahani, R D; Therriault, D; Merle, P G

    2012-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of self-healing nanocomposite materials, consisting of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) reinforced 5-ethylidene-2-norbornene (5E2N) healing agent—reacted with ruthenium Grubbs catalyst—by means of ultrasonication, followed by a three-roll mixing mill process. The kinetics of the 5E2N ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) was studied as a function of the reaction temperature and the SWCNT loads. Our results demonstrated that the ROMP reaction was still effective in a large temperature domain ( − 15–45 °C), occurring at very short time scales (less than 1 min at 40 °C). On the other hand, the micro-indentation analysis performed on the SWCNT/5E2N nanocomposite material after its ROMP polymerization showed a clear increase in both the hardness and the Young modulus—up to nine times higher than that of the virgin polymer—when SWCNT loads range only from 0.1 to 2 wt%. The approach demonstrated here opens new prospects for using carbon nanotube and healing agent nanocomposite materials for self-repair functionality, especially in a space environment. (paper)

  12. Free vibration of a single-walled carbon nanotube containing a fluid flow using the Timoshenko beam model

    Chang, W.-J.; Lee, H.-L.

    2009-01-01

    The flexural vibration of the fluid-conveying single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is derived by the Timoshenko beam model, including rotary inertia and transverse shear deformation. The effects of the flow velocity and the aspect ratio of length to diameter on the vibration frequency and mode shape of the SWCNT are analyzed. Results show that the effects of rotary inertia and transverse shear deformation result in a reduction of the vibration frequencies, especially for higher modes of vibration and short nanotubes. The frequency is also compared with the previous study based on Euler beam model. In addition, if the ratio of length to diameter increased to 60, the influence of the shear deformation and rotary inertia on the mode shape and the resonant frequencies can be neglected. However, the influence is very obvious when the ratio decreased to 20. As the flow velocity of the fluid increases in the vicinity of 2π, the SWCNT reveals the divergence instability. It regains stability when the flow velocity reaches about 9. As the velocity increases further, the SWCNT undergoes a coupled-mode flutter and results in a larger amplitude

  13. Managing bundled payments.

    Draper, Andrew

    2011-04-01

    Results of Medicare's ACE demonstration project and Geisinger Health System's ProvenCare initiative provide insight into the challenges hospitals will face as bundled payment proliferates. An early analysis of these results suggests that hospitals would benefit from bringing full automation using clinical IT tools to bear in their efforts to meet these challenges. Other important factors contributing to success include board and physician leadership, organizational structure, pricing methodology for bidding, evidence-based medical practice guidelines, supply cost management, process efficiency management, proactive and aggressive case management, business development and marketing strategy, and the financial management system.

  14. Muon bundles from the Universe

    Kankiewicz P.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently the CERN ALICE experiment, in its dedicated cosmic ray run, observed muon bundles of very high multiplicities, thereby confirming similar findings from the LEP era at CERN (in the CosmoLEP project. Significant evidence for anisotropy of arrival directions of the observed high multiplicity muonic bundles is found. Estimated directionality suggests their possible extragalactic provenance. We argue that muonic bundles of highest multiplicity are produced by strangelets, hypothetical stable lumps of strange quark matter infiltrating our Universe.

  15. Infinitesimal bundles and projective relativity

    Evans, G.T.

    1973-01-01

    An intrinsic and global presentation of five-dimensional relativity theory is developed, in which special coordinate conditions are replaced by conditions of Lie invariance. The notion of an infinitesimal bundle is introduced, and the theory of connexions on principal bundles is extended to infinitesimal bundles. Global aspects of projective relativity are studied: it is shown that projective relativity can describe almost any space-time. In particular, it is not necessary to assume that the electromagnetic field have a global potential. (author)

  16. Low-frequency plasmons in metallic carbon nanotubes

    Lin, M.F.; Chuu, D.S.; Shung, K.W.

    1997-01-01

    A metallic carbon nanotube could exhibit a low-frequency plasmon, while a semiconducting carbon nanotube or a graphite layer could not. This plasmon is due to the free carriers in the linear subbands intersecting at the Fermi level. The low-frequency plasmon, which corresponds to the vanishing transferred angular momentum, belongs to an acoustic plasmon. For a smaller metallic nanotube, it could exist at larger transferred momenta, and its frequency is higher. Such a plasmon behaves as that in a one-dimensional electron gas (EGS). However, it is very different from the π plasmons in all carbon nanotubes. Intertube Coulomb interactions in a metallic multishell nanotube and a metallic nanotube bundle have been included. They have a strong effect on the low-frequency plasmon. The intertube coupling among coaxial nanotubes markedly modifies the acoustic plasmons in separate metallic nanotubes. When metallic carbon nanotubes are packed in the bundle form, the low-frequency plasmon would change into an optical plasmon, and behave like that in a three-dimensional EGS. Experimental measurements could be used to distinguish metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  17. Selective Deposition and Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Assisted by Dielectrophoresis: From Thin Films to Individual Nanotubes

    Li, Pengfei; Xue, Wei

    2010-06-01

    Dielectrophoresis has been used in the controlled deposition of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with the focus on the alignment of nanotube thin films and their applications in the last decade. In this paper, we extend the research from the selective deposition of SWNT thin films to the alignment of small nanotube bundles and individual nanotubes. Electrodes with “teeth”-like patterns are fabricated to study the influence of the electrode width on the deposition and alignment of SWNTs. The entire fabrication process is compatible with optical lithography-based techniques. Therefore, the fabrication cost is low, and the resulting devices are inexpensive. A series of SWNT solutions is prepared with concentrations ranging from 0.0125 to 0.2 mg/ml. The alignment of SWNT thin films, small bundles, and individual nanotubes is achieved under the optimized experimental conditions. The electrical properties of these samples are characterized; the linear current-voltage plots prove that the aligned SWNTs are mainly metallic nanotubes. The microscopy inspection of the samples demonstrates that the alignment of small nanotube bundles and individual nanotubes can only be achieved using narrow electrodes and low-concentration solutions. Our investigation shows that it is possible to deposit a controlled amount of SWNTs in desirable locations using dielectrophoresis.

  18. Selective Deposition and Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Assisted by Dielectrophoresis: From Thin Films to Individual Nanotubes

    Li Pengfei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dielectrophoresis has been used in the controlled deposition of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs with the focus on the alignment of nanotube thin films and their applications in the last decade. In this paper, we extend the research from the selective deposition of SWNT thin films to the alignment of small nanotube bundles and individual nanotubes. Electrodes with “teeth”-like patterns are fabricated to study the influence of the electrode width on the deposition and alignment of SWNTs. The entire fabrication process is compatible with optical lithography-based techniques. Therefore, the fabrication cost is low, and the resulting devices are inexpensive. A series of SWNT solutions is prepared with concentrations ranging from 0.0125 to 0.2 mg/ml. The alignment of SWNT thin films, small bundles, and individual nanotubes is achieved under the optimized experimental conditions. The electrical properties of these samples are characterized; the linear current–voltage plots prove that the aligned SWNTs are mainly metallic nanotubes. The microscopy inspection of the samples demonstrates that the alignment of small nanotube bundles and individual nanotubes can only be achieved using narrow electrodes and low-concentration solutions. Our investigation shows that it is possible to deposit a controlled amount of SWNTs in desirable locations using dielectrophoresis.

  19. Heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics and electrocatalytic behaviour of mixed self-assembled ferrocenes and SWCNT layers

    Nkosi, D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron transfer dynamics and electrocatalytic behaviour of ferrocene-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), co-adsorbed with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on a gold electrode, have been interrogated for the first time...

  20. Properties of Cs-intercalated single wall carbon nanotubes investigated by 133Cs Nuclear Magnetic resonance

    Schmid, Marc R.; Mahfouz, Remi; Bouhrara, Mohamed; Saih, Youssef; Mehring, Michael; Basset, Jean-Marie; Goze-Bac, Christophe; Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2012-01-01

    present within the carbon nanotube bundles. At high concentrations, the Cs (β)+ ions seem to occupy well defined positions relative to the carbon lattice. As a matter of fact, the Korringa relaxation behavior suggests a strong hyperfine coupling between Cs

  1. REBEKA bundle experiments

    Wiehr, K.

    1988-05-01

    This report is a summary of experimental investigations describing the fuel rod behavior in the refilling and reflooding phase of a loss-of-coolant accident of a PWR. The experiments were performed with 5x5 and 7x7 rod bundles, using indirectly electrically heated fuel rod simulators of full length with original PWR-KWU-geometry, original grid spacers and Zircaloy-4-claddings (Type Biblis B). The fuel rod simulators showed a cosine shaped axial power profile in 7 steps and continuous, respectively. The results describe the influence of the different parameters such as bundle size on the maximum coolant channel blockage, that of the cooling on the size of the circumferential strain of the cladding (azimuthal temperature distribution) a cold control rod guide thimble and the flow direction (axial temperature distribution) on the resulting coolant channel blockage. The rewetting behavior of different fuel rod simulators including ballooned and burst Zircaloy claddings is discussed as well as the influence of thermocouples on the cladding temperature history and the rewetting behavior. All results prove the coolability of a PWR in the case of a LOCA. Therefore, it can be concluded that the ECC-criteria established by licensing authorities can be fulfilled. (orig./HP) [de

  2. Nefness of adjoint bundles for ample vector bundles

    Hidetoshi Maeda

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available Let E be an ample vector bundle of rank >1 on a smooth complex projective variety X of dimension n. This paper gives a classification of pairs (X,E whose adjoint bundles K_X+det E are not nef in the case when  r=n-2.

  3. Torsional properties of hexagonal boron nitride nanotubes, carbon nanotubes and their hybrid structures: A molecular dynamics study

    Xiong, Qi-lin, E-mail: xiongql@hust.edu.cn [Department of Mechanics, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Engineering Structural Analysis and Safety Assessment, Luoyu Road 1037, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tian, Xiao Geng [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Structure Strength and Vibration, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2015-10-15

    The torsional mechanical properties of hexagonal single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and their hybrid structures (SWBN-CNTs) are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Two approaches - force approach and energy approach, are adopted to calculate the shear moduli of SWBNNTs and SWCNTs, the discrepancy between two approaches is analyzed. The results show that the shear moduli of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), including SWBNNTs and SWCNTs are dependent on the diameter, especially for armchair SWNTs. The armchair SWNTs show the better ability of resistance the twisting comparable to the zigzag SWNTs. The effects of diameter and length on the critical values of torque of SWNTs are obtained by comparing the torsional behaviors of SWNTs with different diameters and different lengths. It is observed that the MD results of the effect of diameter and length on the critical values of torque agrees well with the prediction of continuum shell model. The shear modulus of SWBN-CNT has a significant dependence on the percentages of SWCNT and the hybrid style has also an influence on shear modulus. The critical values of torque of SWBN-CNTs increase with the increase of the percentages of SWCNT. This phenomenon can be interpreted by the function relationship between the torque of different bonds (B-N-X, C-C-X, C-B-X, C-N-X) and the angles of bonds.

  4. Electronic setup for fluorescence emission measurements and long-time constant-temperature maintenance of Single-Walled Carbon Nano-Tubes in water solutions

    De Rosa Matteo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In our previous research we have observed that the fluorescence emission from water solutions of Single-Walled Carbon Nano-Tubes (SWCNT, excited by a laser with a wavelength of 830nm, diminishes with the time. We have already proved that such a fading is a function of the storage time and the storage temperature. In order to study the emission of the SWCNT as a function of these two parameters we have designed and realized a special measurement compartment with a cuvette holder where the SWCNT solutions can be measured and stored at a fixed constant temperature for periods of time as long as several weeks. To maintain the measurement setup under a constant temperature we have designed special experimental setup based on two Peltier cells with electronic temperature control.

  5. Mediatorless electron transfer in glucose dehydrogenase/laccase system adsorbed on carbon nanotubes

    Ratautas, D.; Marcinkevičienė, L.; Meškys, R.; Kulys, J.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Glucose dehydrogenase from Ewingella americana (GDH) demonstrated an effective mediatorless oxidation of glucose on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). • Laccase from Trichaptum abietinum (LAC) exhibited mediatorless oxygen reduction when the enzyme was adsorbed on SWCNT. • Simultaneous adsorption of GDH and LAC on SWCNT formed an electron transfer chain in which glucose and lactose were oxidized by oxygen in mediatorless manner. - Abstract: A mediatorless electron transfer in the chain of glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and laccase (LAC) catalysing the oxidation of glucose by molecular oxygen was studied. To demonstrate mediatorless processes, the GDH from Ewingella americana was adsorbed on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The effective mediatorless oxidation of glucose proceeded at 0.2–0.4 V vs. SCE. The electrode was most active at pH 6.1, and generated 0.8 mA cm −2 biocatalytic current in the presence of 50 mM glucose. The electrode showed a bell-shaped pH dependence with pK a values of 4.1 and 7.5. LAC from Trichaptum abietinum adsorbed on SWCNT exhibited mediatorless oxygen reduction at electrode potential less than 0.65 V. The electrode was most active at pH 3.0–4.0 and generated 1.1 mA cm −2 biocatalytic current in the presence of 0.254 mM oxygen, with an apparent pK a of 1.0 and 5.4. The electrodes prepared by simultaneous adsorption of GDH and LAC on SWCNT exhibited glucose oxidation at a potential higher than 0.25 V. The oxygen consumption in the chain was demonstrated using a Clark-type oxygen electrode. The dependence of oxygen consumption on glucose and lactose concentrations as well as activity of the system on pH were measured. A model of the pH dependence as well as mediatorless consecutive glucose oxidation with oxygen catalysed by LAC/GDH system is presented. This work provides a novel approach towards the synthesis of artificial multi enzyme systems by wiring oxidoreductases with SWCNT, and offers a better

  6. Bundle Security Protocol for ION

    Burleigh, Scott C.; Birrane, Edward J.; Krupiarz, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This software implements bundle authentication, conforming to the Delay-Tolerant Networking (DTN) Internet Draft on Bundle Security Protocol (BSP), for the Interplanetary Overlay Network (ION) implementation of DTN. This is the only implementation of BSP that is integrated with ION.

  7. CANFLEX fuel bundle impact test

    Chang, Seok Kyu; Chung, C. H.; Park, J. S.; Hong, S. D.; Kim, B. D.

    1997-08-01

    This document outlines the test results for the impact test of the CANFLEX fuel bundle. Impact test is performed to determine and verify the amount of general bundle shape distortion and defect of the pressure tube that may occur during refuelling. The test specification requires that the fuel bundles and the pressure tube retain their integrities after the impact test under the conservative conditions (10 stationary bundles with 31kg/s flow rate) considering the pressure tube creep. The refuelling simulator operating with pneumatic force and simulated shield plug were fabricated and the velocity/displacement transducer and the high speed camera were also used in this test. The characteristics of the moving bundle (velocity, displacement, impacting force) were measured and analyzed with the impact sensor and the high speed camera system. The important test procedures and measurement results were discussed as follows. 1) Test bundle measurements and the pressure tube inspections 2) Simulated shield plug, outlet flange installation and bundle loading 3) refuelling simulator, inlet flange installation and sensors, high speed camera installation 4) Perform the impact test with operating the refuelling simulator and measure the dynamic characteristics 5) Inspections of the fuel bundles and the pressure tube. (author). 8 refs., 23 tabs., 13 figs

  8. Connections on discrete fibre bundles

    Manton, N.S.; Cambridge Univ.

    1987-01-01

    A new approach to gauge fields on a discrete space-time is proposed, in which the fundamental object is a discrete version of a principal fibre bundle. If the bundle is twisted, the gauge fields are topologically non-trivial automatically. (orig.)

  9. Sasakian and Parabolic Higgs Bundles

    Biswas, Indranil; Mj, Mahan

    2018-03-01

    Let M be a quasi-regular compact connected Sasakian manifold, and let N = M/ S 1 be the base projective variety. We establish an equivalence between the class of Sasakian G-Higgs bundles over M and the class of parabolic (or equivalently, ramified) G-Higgs bundles over the base N.

  10. Functionalized carbon nanotubes as suitable scaffold materials for proliferation and differentiation of canine mesenchymal stem cells

    Das K

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Kinsuk Das,1 AP Madhusoodan,1 Bhabesh Mili,1 Ajay Kumar,2 AC Saxena,3 Kuldeep Kumar,1 Mihir Sarkar,1 Praveen Singh,4 Sameer Srivastava,5 Sadhan Bag1 1Division of Physiology and Climatology, 2Biochemistry and Food Science Section, 3Division of Surgery, 4Biophysics, Electron Microscopy and Instrumentation Section, 5Division of Veterinary Biotechnology, Indian Council of Agricultural Research – Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh, India Abstract: In the field of regenerative medicine, numerous potential applications of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be envisaged, due to their ability to differentiate into a range of tissues on the basis of the substrate on which they grow. With the advances in nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes (CNTs have been widely explored for use as cell culture substrate in tissue engineering applications. In this study, canine bone marrow-derived MSCs were considered as the cellular model for an in vitro study to elucidate the collective cellular processes, using three different varieties of thin films of functionalized carbon nanotubes (COOH-single-walled CNTs [SWCNTs], COOH-multiwalled CNTs [MWCNTs] and polyethylene glycol [PEG]-SWCNTs, which were spray dried onto preheated cover slips. Cells spread out better on the CNT films, resulting in higher cell surface area and occurrence of filopodia, with parallel orientation of stress fiber bundles. Canine MSCs proliferated at a slower rate on all types of CNT substrates compared to the control, but no decline in cell number was noticed during the study period. Expression of apoptosis-associated genes decreased on the CNT substrates as time progressed. On flow cytometry after AnnexinV-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide (PI staining, total number of apoptotic and necrotic cells remained lower in COOH-functionalized films compared to PEG-functionalized ones. Collectively, these results indicate that COOH-MWCNT substrate provided an

  11. Reinforced Thermoplastic Polyimide with Dispersed Functionalized Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.; Gaier, James R.; Sola, Francisco; Scheiman, Daniel A.; McCorkle, Linda S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular pi-complexes were formed from pristine HiPCO single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and 1-pyrene- N-(4- N'-(5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxyimido)phenyl butanamide, 1. Polyimide films were prepared with these complexes as well as uncomplexed SWCNTs and the effects of nanoadditive addition on mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of these films were evaluated. Although these properties were enhanced by both nanoadditives, larger increases in tensile strength and thermal and electrical conductivities were obtained when the SWCNT/1 complexes were used. At a loading level of 5.5 wt %, the Tg of the polyimide increased from 169 to 197 C and the storage modulus increased 20-fold (from 142 to 3045 MPa). The addition of 3.5 wt % SWCNT/1 complexes increased the tensile strength of the polyimide from 61.4 to 129 MPa; higher loading levels led to embrittlement and lower tensile strengths. The electrical conductivities (DC surface) of the polyimides increased to 1 x 10(exp -4) Scm(exp -1) (SWCNT/1 complexes loading level of 9 wt %). Details of the preparation of these complexes and their effects on polyimide film properties are discussed.

  12. Computational modeling of a carbon nanotube-based DNA nanosensor

    Kalantari-Nejad, R; Bahrami, M [Mechanical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafii-Tabar, H [Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering and Research Centre for Medical Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rungger, I; Sanvito, S, E-mail: mbahrami@aut.ac.ir [School of Physics and CRANN, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-11-05

    During the last decade the design of biosensors, based on quantum transport in one-dimensional nanostructures, has developed as an active area of research. Here we investigate the sensing capabilities of a DNA nanosensor, designed as a semiconductor single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) connected to two gold electrodes and functionalized with a DNA strand acting as a bio-receptor probe. In particular, we have considered both covalent and non-covalent bonding between the DNA probe and the SWCNT. The optimized atomic structure of the sensor is computed both before and after the receptor attaches itself to the target, which consists of another DNA strand. The sensor's electrical conductance and transmission coefficients are calculated at the equilibrium geometries via the non-equilibrium Green's function scheme combined with the density functional theory in the linear response limit. We demonstrate a sensing efficiency of 70% for the covalently bonded bio-receptor probe, which drops to about 19% for the non-covalently bonded one. These results suggest that a SWCNT may be a promising candidate for a bio-molecular FET sensor.

  13. Computational modeling of a carbon nanotube-based DNA nanosensor

    Kalantari-Nejad, R; Bahrami, M; Rafii-Tabar, H; Rungger, I; Sanvito, S

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade the design of biosensors, based on quantum transport in one-dimensional nanostructures, has developed as an active area of research. Here we investigate the sensing capabilities of a DNA nanosensor, designed as a semiconductor single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) connected to two gold electrodes and functionalized with a DNA strand acting as a bio-receptor probe. In particular, we have considered both covalent and non-covalent bonding between the DNA probe and the SWCNT. The optimized atomic structure of the sensor is computed both before and after the receptor attaches itself to the target, which consists of another DNA strand. The sensor's electrical conductance and transmission coefficients are calculated at the equilibrium geometries via the non-equilibrium Green's function scheme combined with the density functional theory in the linear response limit. We demonstrate a sensing efficiency of 70% for the covalently bonded bio-receptor probe, which drops to about 19% for the non-covalently bonded one. These results suggest that a SWCNT may be a promising candidate for a bio-molecular FET sensor.

  14. Twisted Vector Bundles on Pointed Nodal Curves

    Abstract. Motivated by the quest for a good compactification of the moduli space of -bundles on a nodal curve we establish a striking relationship between Abramovich's and Vistoli's twisted bundles and Gieseker vector bundles.

  15. Hybrid metal grid-polymer-carbon nanotube electrodes for high luminance organic light emitting diodes

    Sam, F Laurent M; Dabera, G Dinesha M R; Lai, Khue T; Mills, Christopher A; Rozanski, Lynn J; Silva, S Ravi P

    2014-01-01

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) incorporating grid transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs) with wide grid line spacing suffer from an inability to transfer charge carriers across the gaps in the grids to promote light emission in these areas. High luminance OLEDs fabricated using a hybrid TCE composed of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS PH1000) or regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene)-wrapped semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (rrP3HT-SWCNT) in combination with a nanometre thin gold grid are reported here. OLEDs fabricated using the hybrid gold grid/PH1000 TCE have a luminance of 18 000 cd m −2 at 9 V; the same as the reference indium tin oxide (ITO) OLED. The gold grid/rrP3HT-SWCNT OLEDs have a lower luminance of 8260 cd m −2 at 9 V, which is likely due to a rougher rrP3HT-SWCNT surface. These results demonstrate that the hybrid gold grid/PH1000 TCE is a promising replacement for ITO in future plastic electronics applications including OLEDs and organic photovoltaics. For applications where surface roughness is not critical, e.g. electrochromic devices or discharge of static electricity, the gold grid/rrP3HT-SWCNT hybrid TCE can be employed. (paper)

  16. Hydrodynamic phonon drift and second sound in a (20,20) single-wall carbon nanotube

    Lee, Sangyeop; Lindsay, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    Here, two hydrodynamic features of phonon transport, phonon drift and second sound, in a (20,20) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) are discussed using lattice dynamics calculations employing an optimized Tersoff potential for atomic interactions. We formally derive a formula for the contribution of drift motion of phonons to total heat flux at steady state. It is found that the drift motion of phonons carry more than 70% and 90% of heat at 300 K and 100 K, respectively, indicating that phonon flow can be reasonably approximated as hydrodynamic if the SWCNT is long enough to avoid ballistic phonon transport. The dispersion relation of second sound is derived from the Peierls-Boltzmann transport equation with Callaway s scattering model and quantifies the speed of second sound and its relaxation. The speed of second sound is around 4000 m/s in a (20,20) SWCNT and the second sound can propagate more than 10 m in an isotopically pure (20,20) SWCNT for frequency around 1 GHz at 100 K.

  17. A single-walled carbon nanotube thin film-based pH-sensing microfluidic chip.

    Li, Cheng Ai; Han, Kwi Nam; Pham, Xuan-Hung; Seong, Gi Hun

    2014-04-21

    A novel microfluidic pH-sensing chip was developed based on pH-sensitive single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). In this study, the SWCNT thin film acted both as an electrode and a pH-sensitive membrane. The potentiometric pH response was observed by electronic structure changes in the semiconducting SWCNTs in response to the pH level. In a microfluidic chip consisting of a SWCNT pH-sensing working electrode and an Ag/AgCl reference electrode, the calibration plot exhibited promising pH-sensing performance with an ideal Nernstian response of 59.71 mV pH(-1) between pH 3 and 11 (standard deviation of the sensitivity is 1.5 mV pH(-1), R(2) = 0.985). Moreover, the SWCNT electrode in the microfluidic device showed no significant variation at any pH value in the range of the flow rate between 0.1 and 15 μl min(-1). The selectivity coefficients of the SWCNT electrode revealed good selectivity against common interfering ions.

  18. A Molecular Dynamics Study of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) Dispersed in Bile Salt Surfactants

    Phelan, Frederick, Jr.; Sun, Huai

    2014-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNCTs) are materials with structural, electronic and optical properties that make them attractive for a myriad of advanced technology applications. A practical barrier to their use is that SWCNT synthesis techniques produce heterogeneous mixtures of varying lengths and chirality, whereas applications generally require tubes with narrow size distributions and individual type. Most separation techniques currently in use to obtain monodisperse tube fractions rely on dispersion of these materials in aqueous solution using surfactants. The dispersion process results in a mixture of colloidal structures in which individual tubes are dispersed and contained in a surfactant shell. Understanding the structure and properties of the SWCNT-surfactant complex at the molecular level, and how this is affected by chirality, is key to understanding and improving separations processes. In this study, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the structure and properties of SWCNT-surfactant colloidal complexes. We tested a number of methods and protocols in order to build an accurate model for simulating SWCNT systems for a variety of bile salt surfactants as well as anionic co-surfactants, components that are widely used and important in experimental separation studies at NIST. The custom force field parameters used here will be stored in WebFF, a Web-hosted smart force-field repository for polymeric and organic materials being developed at NIST for the Materials Genome Initiative.

  19. Probing Exciton Diffusion and Dissociation in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube-C60 Heterojunctions

    Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Mistry, Kevin S.; Johnson, Justin C.; Reid, Obadiah G.; Blackburn, Jeffrey L.

    2016-05-19

    The efficiency of thin-film organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices relies heavily upon the transport of excitons to type-II heterojunction interfaces, where there is sufficient driving force for exciton dissociation and ultimately the formation of charge carriers. Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are strong near-infrared absorbers that form type-II heterojunctions with fullerenes such as C60. Although the efficiencies of SWCNT-fullerene OPV devices have climbed over the past few years, questions remain regarding the fundamental factors that currently limit their performance. In this study, we determine the exciton diffusion length in the C60 layer of SWCNT-C60 bilayer active layers using femtosecond transient absorption measurements. We demonstrate that hole transfer from photoexcited C60 molecules to SWCNTs can be tracked by the growth of narrow spectroscopic signatures of holes in the SWCNT 'reporter layer'. In bilayers with thick C60 layers, the SWCNT charge-related signatures display a slow rise over hundreds of picoseconds, reflecting exciton diffusion through the C60 layer to the interface. A model based on exciton diffusion with a Beer-Lambert excitation profile, as well as Monte Carlo simulations, gives the best fit to the data as a function of C60 layer thickness using an exciton diffusion length of approximately 5 nm.

  20. Adsorption of nucleic acid bases and amino acids on single-walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study.

    Zheng, Jiaxin; Song, Wei; Wang, Lu; Lu, Jing; Luo, Guangfu; Zhou, Jing; Qin, Rui; Li, Hong; Gao, Zhengxiang; Lai, Lin; Li, Guangping; Mei, Wai Ning

    2009-11-01

    We study the adsorptions of nucleic acid bases adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine (G), thymine (T), and uracil (U) and four amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, alanine on the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) by using density functional theory. We find that the aromatic content plays a critical role in the adsorption. The adsorptions of nucleic acid bases and amino acids on the (7, 7) SWBNNT are stronger than those on the (7, 7) SWCNT. Oxidative treatment of SWCNTs favors the adsorption of biomolecules on nanotubes.

  1. Textor bundle divertor

    Yang, T.F.; Wan, A.; Gierszewski, P.; Rapperport, E.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary bundle divertor conceptual design for installation on the TEXTOR tokamak. An advanced cascade T-shaped coil configuration is used. This divertor design has the following important characteristics: (1) the current density in the conductor is less than 6 kAmp/cm 2 , and the maximum field is less than 6 Tesla; (2) the divertor can be operated at steady-state either for copper or superconducting conductors; (3) the power consumption is about 7 MW for a normal conductor; (4) the divertor can be inserted into the existing geometry of TEXTOR; (5) the ripple on axis is only 0.3% and the mirror ratio is 2 to 4; (6) the stagnation axis is concave toward the plasma, therefore q/sub D/ is smaller, the acceptance angle is larger, and the efficiency may be better than the conventional circular coil design

  2. TEXTOR bundle divertor

    Yang, T.F.; Wan, A.; Gierszewski, P.; Rapperport, E.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary bundle divertor conceptual design for installation on the TEXTOR tokamak. An advanced cascade T-shaped coil configuration is used. This divertor design has the following important characteristics: (1) the current density in the conductor is less than 6 kAmp/cm 2 , and the maximum field is less than 6 Tesla; (2) the divertor can be operated at steady-state either for copper or superconducting conductors; (3) the power consumption is about 7 MW for a normal conductor; (4) the divertor can be inserted into the existing geometry of TEXTOR; (5) the ripple on axis is only 0.3% and the mirror ratio is 2 to 4; (6) the stagnation axis is concave toward the plasma, therefore q/sub D/ is smaller, the acceptance angle is larger, and the efficiency may be better than the conventional circular coil design

  3. Pulmonary exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes does not affect the early immune response against Toxoplasma gondii

    Swedin Linda

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT trigger pronounced inflammation and fibrosis in the lungs of mice following administration via pharyngeal aspiration or inhalation. Human exposure to SWCNT in an occupational setting may occur in conjunction with infections and this could yield enhanced or suppressed responses to the offending agent. Here, we studied whether the sequential exposure to SWCNT via pharyngeal aspiration and infection of mice with the ubiquitous intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii would impact on the immune response of the host against the parasite. Methods C57BL/6 mice were pre-exposed by pharyngeal administration of SWCNT (80 + 80 μg/mouse for two consecutive days followed by intravenous injection with either 1x103 or 1x104 green fluorescence protein and luciferase-expressing T. gondii tachyzoites. The dissemination of T. gondii was monitored by in vivo bioluminescence imaging in real time for 7 days and by plaque formation. The inflammatory response was analysed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid, and by assessment of morphological changes and immune responses in lung and spleen. Results There were no differences in parasite distribution between mice only inoculated with T. gondii or those mice pre-exposed for 2 days to SWCNT before parasite inoculum. Lung and spleen histology and inflammation markers in BAL fluid reflected the effects of SWCNT exposure and T. gondii injection, respectively. We also noted that CD11c positive dendritic cells but not F4/80 positive macrophages retained SWCNT in the lungs 9 days after pharyngeal aspiration. However, co-localization of T. gondii with CD11c or F4/80 positive cells could not be observed in lungs or spleen. Pre-exposure to SWCNT did not affect the splenocyte response to T. gondii. Conclusions Taken together, our data indicate that pre-exposure to SWCNT does not enhance or suppress the early immune response to T. gondii in mice.

  4. Enhanced visible light photocatalytic degradation of eriochrome black T and eosin blue shade in water using tridoped titania decorated on SWCNTs and MWCNTs: Effect of the type of carbon nanotube incorporated

    Mamba, G.; Mbianda, X.Y. [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, Faculty of Science, P.O. Box 17011, Doornfontein, 2028 Johannesburg (South Africa); DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, WITS 2050 Johannesburg (South Africa); Mishra, A.K., E-mail: amishra@uj.ac.za [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, Faculty of Science, P.O. Box 17011, Doornfontein, 2028 Johannesburg (South Africa); DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, WITS 2050 Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2015-01-15

    Oxidised single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were each incorporated into a neodymium, nitrogen and sulphur tridoped TiO{sub 2} (Nd,N,S–TiO{sub 2}) to form composite photocatalysts: SWCNT/Nd,N,S–TiO{sub 2} and MWCNT/Nd,N,S–TiO{sub 2}. The fabricated composite photocatalysts were exploited for the photocatalytic degradation of eriochrome black T (EBT) and eosin blue shade (EBS) from single and mixed dye solutions. Incorporation of the carbon nanotubes significantly improved visible light response and the photocatalytic activity of the composites compared to MWCNT/TiO{sub 2}, SWCNT/TiO{sub 2} and tridoped TiO{sub 2}. The SWCNTs incorporating photocatalyst displayed superior photocatalytic activity over its MWCNTs incorporating counterpart. From single dye solutions degradation studies, the SWCNT/Nd,N,S–TiO{sub 2} reached maximum degradation efficiencies of 96.9% and 89.2% for EBS and EBT, respectively. Similarly, maximum degradation efficiencies of 61.4% and 54.1% were recorded from mixed dye solutions using SWCNT/Nd,N,S–TiO{sub 2}, for EBS and EBT, respectively. First order kinetics studies revealed that EBS is degraded faster than EBT both from single and mixed dye solutions. Total organic carbon (TOC) analyses suggest a relatively high degree of complete mineralisation of both EBS (73.6% TOC removal) and EBT (66.2% TOC removal). The SWCNT/Nd,N,S–TiO{sub 2} composite photocatalyst displayed sufficient stability (88.8% EBS removal) after being reused for five times. - Highlights: • SWCNT/Nd,N,S–TiO{sub 2} and MWCNT/Nd,N,S–TiO{sub 2} were prepared via sol–gel method. • EBS and EBT degradation was studied in single and mixed dye solution. • SWCNT/Nd,N,S–TiO{sub 2} displayed higher photocatalytic activity than MWCNT/Nd,N,S–TiO{sub 2}. • Relatively high TOC removal for EBS and EBT by SWCNT/Nd,N,S–TiO{sub 2}. • SWCNT/Nd,N,S–TiO{sub 2} displayed good stability for reuse.

  5. Effect of different oxidants on polyaniline/single walled carbon nanotubes composites synthesized via ultrasonically initiated in-situ chemical polymerization

    Gull, Nafisa, E-mail: gullchemist@gmail.com [Department of Polymer Engineering and Technology, University of the Punjab, Lahore, 54590 (Pakistan); Khan, Shahzad Maqsood, E-mail: shahzadkhan81@hotmail.com [Department of Polymer Engineering and Technology, University of the Punjab, Lahore, 54590 (Pakistan); Islam, Atif; Zia, Saba; Shafiq, Muhammad; Sabir, Aneela; Munawar, Muhammad Azeem [Department of Polymer Engineering and Technology, University of the Punjab, Lahore, 54590 (Pakistan); Butt, Muhammad Taqi Zahid [College of Engineering and Emerging Technologies, University of the Punjab, Lahore, 54590 (Pakistan); Jamil, Tahir [Department of Polymer Engineering and Technology, University of the Punjab, Lahore, 54590 (Pakistan)

    2016-04-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the effect of different oxidants on properties of polyaniline/single walled carbon nanotubes (PANI/SWCNT) composites and scrutinizing a suitable oxidant to improve the properties of composites. PANI/SWCNT composites were fabricated via ultrasonically initiated in-situ chemical polymerization technique using four different oxidants; hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), ammonium peroxidisulphate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8}), potassium dichromate (K{sub 2}Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}) and potassium iodate (KIO{sub 3}). Percent yield (97%), molecular weight (45532 g mol{sup −1}) and electrical conductivity (0.835 S cm{sup −1}) were found maximum for composite prepared in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Structural confirmation of PANI and charge transfer complex formation between PANI and SWCNT were confirmed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV–visible spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis verified that the PANI/SWCNT composite synthesized using H{sub 2}O{sub 2} had maximum thermal stability with least thermal degradation (∼28%). Minimal thermal transitions of the composite were also observed for same composite by differential scanning calorimetry. Scanning electron microscopic images of PANI/SWCNT composites revealed that SWCNT were properly dispersed in PANI matrix when H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was used. Above results provide the valuable suggestion that; H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is a promising oxidant to enhance structural, thermal, electrical and microscopic properties of composites. - Highlights: • Ultrasonically initiated in-situ chemical polymerization protocol was devised for synthesis of PANI/SWCNT composites. • SEM micrographs of PANI/SWCNT-1 showed uniform dispersed structure. • Better thermal stability and conductivity was evidenced for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} based PANI/SWCNT composite. • π–π interaction between PANI and SWCNT is confirmed by FTIR and UV

  6. Transient reflectivity on vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Galimberti, Gianluca; Ponzoni, Stefano; Ferrini, Gabriele [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Advanced Materials Physics (i-LAMP) and Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, I-25121 Brescia (Italy); Hofmann, Stephan [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Arshad, Muhammad [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen (Netherlands); ICTP, Strada Costiera 11, I-34151 Trieste (Italy); National Centre for Physics Quaid-i-Azam University Islamabad (Pakistan); Cepek, Cinzia [Istituto Officina dei Materiali — CNR, Laboratorio TASC, Area Science Park, Basovizza, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Pagliara, Stefania, E-mail: pagliara@dmf.unicatt.it [Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Advanced Materials Physics (i-LAMP) and Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, I-25121 Brescia (Italy)

    2013-09-30

    One-color transient reflectivity measurements are carried out on two different samples of vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotube bundles and compared with the response recently published on unaligned bundles. The negative sign of the optical response for both samples indicates that the free electron character revealed on unaligned bundles is only due to the intertube interactions favored by the tube bending. Neither the presence of bundles nor the existence of structural defects in aligned bundles is able to induce a free-electron like behavior of the photoexcited carriers. This result is also confirmed by the presence of non-linear excitonic effects in the transient response of the aligned bundles. - Highlights: • Transient reflectivity measurements on two aligned carbon nanotube samples • Relationship between unalignment and/or bundling and intertube interaction • The bundling is not able to modify the intertube interactions • The presence of structural defects does not affect the intertube interactions • A localized exciton-like behavior has been revealed in these samples.

  7. Tuning Selectivity of Fluorescent Carbon Nanotube-Based Neurotransmitter Sensors.

    Mann, Florian A; Herrmann, Niklas; Meyer, Daniel; Kruss, Sebastian

    2017-06-28

    Detection of neurotransmitters is an analytical challenge and essential to understand neuronal networks in the brain and associated diseases. However, most methods do not provide sufficient spatial, temporal, or chemical resolution. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been used as building blocks for sensors/probes that detect catecholamine neurotransmitters, including dopamine. This approach provides a high spatial and temporal resolution, but it is not understood if these sensors are able to distinguish dopamine from similar catecholamine neurotransmitters, such as epinephrine or norepinephrine. In this work, the organic phase (DNA sequence) around SWCNTs was varied to create sensors with different selectivity and sensitivity for catecholamine neurotransmitters. Most DNA-functionalized SWCNTs responded to catecholamine neurotransmitters, but both dissociation constants ( K d ) and limits of detection were highly dependent on functionalization (sequence). K d values span a range of 2.3 nM (SWCNT-(GC) 15 + norepinephrine) to 9.4 μM (SWCNT-(AT) 15 + dopamine) and limits of detection are mostly in the single-digit nM regime. Additionally, sensors of different SWCNT chirality show different fluorescence increases. Moreover, certain sensors (e.g., SWCNT-(GT) 10 ) distinguish between different catecholamines, such as dopamine and norepinephrine at low concentrations (50 nM). These results show that SWCNTs functionalized with certain DNA sequences are able to discriminate between catecholamine neurotransmitters or to detect them in the presence of interfering substances of similar structure. Such sensors will be useful to measure and study neurotransmitter signaling in complex biological settings.

  8. Control of the Diameter and Chiral Angle Distributions during Production of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Nikolaev, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Many applications of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), especially in microelectronics, will benefit from use of certain (n,m) nanotube types (metallic, small gap semiconductor, etc.) Especially fascinating is the possibility of quantum conductors that require metallic armchair nanotubes. However, as produced SWCNT samples are polydisperse, with many (n,m) types present and typical approx.1:2 metal/semiconductor ratio. Nanotube nucleation models predict that armchair nuclei are energetically preferential due to formation of partial triple bonds along the armchair edge. However, nuclei can not reach any meaningful thermal equilibrium in a rapidly expanding and cooling plume of carbon clusters, leading to polydispersity. In the present work, SWCNTs were produced by a pulsed laser vaporization (PLV) technique. The carbon vapor plume cooling rate was either increased by change in the oven temperature (expansion into colder gas), or decreased via "warm-up" with a laser pulse at the moment of nucleation. The effect of oven temperature and "warm-up" on nanotube type population was studied via photoluminescence, UV-Vis-NIR absorption and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that reduced temperatures leads to smaller average diameters, progressively narrower diameter distributions, and some preference toward armchair structures. "Warm-up" shifts nanotube population towards arm-chair structures as well, but the effect is small. Possible improvement of the "warm-up" approach to produce armchair SWCNTs will be discussed. These results demonstrate that PLV production technique can provide at least partial control over the nanotube (n,m) population. In addition, these results have implications for the understanding the nanotube nucleation mechanism in the laser oven.

  9. Evaluating big deal journal bundles.

    Bergstrom, Theodore C; Courant, Paul N; McAfee, R Preston; Williams, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    Large commercial publishers sell bundled online subscriptions to their entire list of academic journals at prices significantly lower than the sum of their á la carte prices. Bundle prices differ drastically between institutions, but they are not publicly posted. The data that we have collected enable us to compare the bundle prices charged by commercial publishers with those of nonprofit societies and to examine the types of price discrimination practiced by commercial and nonprofit journal publishers. This information is of interest to economists who study monopolist pricing, librarians interested in making efficient use of library budgets, and scholars who are interested in the availability of the work that they publish.

  10. Single-walled carbon nanotubes alter Schwann cell behavior differentially within 2D and 3D environments.

    Behan, Brenda L; DeWitt, Daniel G; Bogdanowicz, Danielle R; Koppes, Abigail N; Bale, Shyam S; Thompson, Deanna M

    2011-01-01

    Both spinal cord injury (SCI) and large-gap peripheral nerve defects can be debilitating affecting a patient's long-term quality of life and presently, there is no suitable treatment for functional regeneration of these injured tissues. A number of works have suggested the benefits of electrical stimulation to promote both glial migration and neuronal extension. In this work, an electrically conductive hydrogel containing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) for neural engineering applications is presented and the Schwann cell (SC) response to SWCNT is examined in both 2D and 3D microenvironments. Results from clonogenic and alamarBlue® assays in 2D indicate that SWCNT (10-50 μg mL(-1)) inhibit SC proliferation but do not affect cell viability. Following SWCNT exposure in 2D, changes in SC morphology can be observed with the nanomaterial attached to the cell membrane at concentrations as low as 10 μg mL(-1). In contrast to the results gathered in 2D, SC embedded within the 3D hydrogel loaded with 10-50 μg mL(-1) of SWCNT exhibited little or no measurable change in cell proliferation, viability, or morphology as assessed using a digestion assay, alamarBlue, and confocal microscopy. Collectively, this highlights that an electrically-conductive SWCNT collagen I-Matrigel™ biomaterial may be suitable for neural tissue engineering and is able to sustain populations of SC. Findings suggest that 2D nanoparticle toxicity assays may not be accurate predictors of the 3D response, further motivating the examination of these materials in a more physiologically relevant environment. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Factoring-in agglomeration of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for better prediction of their toxicity versus asbestos

    Murray Ashley R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbon nanotubes (CNT and carbon nanofibers (CNF are allotropes of carbon featuring fibrous morphology. The dimensions and high aspect ratio of CNT and CNF have prompted the comparison with naturally occurring asbestos fibers which are known to be extremely pathogenic. While the toxicity and hazardous outcomes elicited by airborne exposure to single-walled CNT or asbestos have been widely reported, very limited data are currently available describing adverse effects of respirable CNF. Results Here, we assessed pulmonary inflammation, fibrosis, oxidative stress markers and systemic immune responses to respirable CNF in comparison to single-walled CNT (SWCNT and asbestos. Pulmonary inflammatory and fibrogenic responses to CNF, SWCNT and asbestos varied depending upon the agglomeration state of the particles/fibers. Foci of granulomatous lesions and collagen deposition were associated with dense particle-like SWCNT agglomerates, while no granuloma formation was found following exposure to fiber-like CNF or asbestos. The average thickness of the alveolar connective tissue - a marker of interstitial fibrosis - was increased 28 days post SWCNT, CNF or asbestos exposure. Exposure to SWCNT, CNF or asbestos resulted in oxidative stress evidenced by accumulations of 4-HNE and carbonylated proteins in the lung tissues. Additionally, local inflammatory and fibrogenic responses were accompanied by modified systemic immunity, as documented by decreased proliferation of splenic T cells ex vivo on day 28 post exposure. The accuracies of assessments of effective surface area for asbestos, SWCNT and CNF (based on geometrical analysis of their agglomeration versus estimates of mass dose and number of particles were compared as predictors of toxicological outcomes. Conclusions We provide evidence that effective surface area along with mass dose rather than specific surface area or particle number are significantly correlated with toxicological

  12. Factoring-in agglomeration of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for better prediction of their toxicity versus asbestos.

    Murray, Ashley R; Kisin, Elena R; Tkach, Alexey V; Yanamala, Naveena; Mercer, Robert; Young, Shih-Houng; Fadeel, Bengt; Kagan, Valerian E; Shvedova, Anna A

    2012-04-10

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanofibers (CNF) are allotropes of carbon featuring fibrous morphology. The dimensions and high aspect ratio of CNT and CNF have prompted the comparison with naturally occurring asbestos fibers which are known to be extremely pathogenic. While the toxicity and hazardous outcomes elicited by airborne exposure to single-walled CNT or asbestos have been widely reported, very limited data are currently available describing adverse effects of respirable CNF. Here, we assessed pulmonary inflammation, fibrosis, oxidative stress markers and systemic immune responses to respirable CNF in comparison to single-walled CNT (SWCNT) and asbestos. Pulmonary inflammatory and fibrogenic responses to CNF, SWCNT and asbestos varied depending upon the agglomeration state of the particles/fibers. Foci of granulomatous lesions and collagen deposition were associated with dense particle-like SWCNT agglomerates, while no granuloma formation was found following exposure to fiber-like CNF or asbestos. The average thickness of the alveolar connective tissue--a marker of interstitial fibrosis--was increased 28 days post SWCNT, CNF or asbestos exposure. Exposure to SWCNT, CNF or asbestos resulted in oxidative stress evidenced by accumulations of 4-HNE and carbonylated proteins in the lung tissues. Additionally, local inflammatory and fibrogenic responses were accompanied by modified systemic immunity, as documented by decreased proliferation of splenic T cells ex vivo on day 28 post exposure. The accuracies of assessments of effective surface area for asbestos, SWCNT and CNF (based on geometrical analysis of their agglomeration) versus estimates of mass dose and number of particles were compared as predictors of toxicological outcomes. We provide evidence that effective surface area along with mass dose rather than specific surface area or particle number are significantly correlated with toxicological responses to carbonaceous fibrous nanoparticles. Therefore

  13. Temperature profiles of three types CNTs (SWCNT, MWCNT and MWCNT-COOH) loaded environmental matrices generated from a microwave induced heating quantification method

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Relationships of temperature and CNT mass (SWCNT, MWCNT, MWCNT-COOH) were developed for three environmental matrices (sand, soil and sludge) spiked with known...

  14. A DFT study of SO2 and H2S gas adsorption on Au-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Dai, Ziqiang; Chen, Qinchuan; Tang, Ju

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) show limited toxic gas detection, thus, we need to develop a method to fabricate a novel CNT sensor that has good sensitivity. In this study, density functional theory (DFT) was applied to determine the adsorption behavior of Au-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes (Au-SWCNTs) to SO 2 and H 2 S. The calculated results show that Au-SWCNTs have a high sensitivity to SO 2 and H 2 S. When SO 2 adsorbs on the surface of the nanotube, a large number of electrons transfer from the Au-SWCNT to SO 2 , which results in a decrease in the frontier orbital energy gap and an increase in electrical conductivity. On the other hand, when H 2 S adsorbs on the surface of the nanotube, the electrons transfer from H 2 S to the Au-SWCNT, the frontier orbital energy gap increases, and the electrical conductivity decreases. Thus, SO 2 and H 2 S could be detected by Au-SWCNTs. This conclusion is useful for the development of CNT-based gas sensors and provides a theoretical basis to fabricate Au-SWCNT-based gas sensors. (papers)

  15. DFT investigation of NH_3, PH_3, and AsH_3 adsorptions on Sc-, Ti-, V-, and Cr-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Buasaeng, Prayut; Rakrai, Wandee; Wanno, Banchob; Tabtimsai, Chanukorn

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Transition metal-doped single wall carbon nanotubes and their adsorption with NH_3, PH_3 and AsH_3 molecules were investigated using a DFT method. • Adsorptions of NH_3, PH_3 and AsH_3 molecules on pristine single wall carbon nanotubeswere improved by transition metal doping. • Structural and electronic properties of single wall carbon nanotubes were significantly changed by transition metal doping and gas adsorptions. - Abstract: The adsorption properties of ammonia (NH_3), phosphine (PH_3), and arsine (AsH_3) on pristine and transition metal- (TM = Sc, Ti, V, and Cr) doped (5,5) armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were theoretically investigated. The geometric and electronic properties and adsorption abilities for the most stable configuration of NH_3, PH_3, and AsH_3 adsorptions on pristine and TM-doped SWCNTs were calculated. It was found that the binding abilities of TMs to the SWCNT were in the order: Cr > V > Sc > Ti. However, the adsorption energy showed that the pristine SWCNT weakly adsorbed gas molecules and its electronic properties were also insensitive to gas molecules. By replacing a C atom with TM atoms, all doping can significantly enhance the adsorption energy of gas/SWCNT complexes and their adsorption ability was in the same order: NH_3 > PH_3 > AsH_3. A remarkable increase in adsorption energy and charge transfer of these systems was expected to induce significant changes in the electrical conductivity of the TM-doped SWCNTs. This work revealed that the sensitivity of SWCNT-based chemical gas adsorptions and sensors can be greatly improved by introducing an appropriate TM dopant. Accordingly, TM-doped SWCNTs are more suitable for gas molecule adsorptions and detections than the pristine SWCNT.

  16. Electronic properties of prismatic modifications of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Tomilin, O. B.; Muryumin, E. E.; Rodionova, E. V.; Ryskina, N. P.

    2018-01-01

    The article shows the possibility of target modifying the prismatic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by regular chemisorption of fluorine atoms in the graphene surface. It is shown that the electronic properties of prismatic SWCNT modifications are determined by the interaction of π- and ρ(in-plane)-electron conjugation in the carbon-conjugated subsystems (tracks) formed in the faces. The contributions of π- and ρ(in-plane)-electron conjugation depend on the structural characteristics of the tracks. It was found that the minimum of degree deviation of the track from the plane of the prism face and the maximum of the track width ensure the maximum contribution of the π-electron conjugation, and the band gap of the prismatic modifications of the SWCNT tends to the band gap of the hydrocarbon analog of the carbon track. It is established that the maximum of degree deviation of the track from the plane of the prism face and the maximum of track width ensure the maximum contribution of the ρ(in-plane) electron interface, and the band gap of the prismatic modifications of the SWCNT tends to the band gap of the unmodified carbon nanotube. The calculation of the model systems has been carried out using an ab initio Hartree-Fock method in the 3-21G basis.

  17. Electrical Transport and Magnetoresistance in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Films

    Vitaly KSENEVICH

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrical transport properties and magnetoresistance of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT films were investigated within temperature range (2 – 300 K and in magnetic fields up to 8 T. A crossover between metallic (dR/dT > 0 and non-metallic (dR/dT < 0 temperature dependence of the resistance as well as low-temperature saturation of the resistance in high bias regime indicated on the diminishing of role of the contact barriers between individual nanotubes essential for the charge transport in SWCNT arrays. The magnetoresistance (MR data demonstrated influence of weak localization and electron-electron interactions on charge transport properties in SWCNT films. The low-field negative MR with positive upturn was observed at low temperatures. At T > 10 K only negative MR was observed in the whole range of available magnetic fields. The negative MR can be approximated using 1D weak localization (WL model. The low temperature positive MR is induced by contribution from electron-electron interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.2.6311

  18. Distribution and clearance of PEG-single-walled carbon nanotube cancer drug delivery vehicles in mice.

    Bhirde, Ashwin A; Patel, Sachin; Sousa, Alioscka A; Patel, Vyomesh; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Ji, Youngmi; Leapman, Richard D; Gutkind, J Silvio; Rusling, James F

    2010-12-01

    To study the distribution and clearance of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-ylated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNTs) as drug delivery vehicles for the anticancer drug cisplatin in mice. PEG layers were attached to SWCNTs and dispersed in aqueous media and characterized using dynamic light scattering, scanning transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Cytotoxicity was assessed in vitro using Annexin-V assay, and the distribution and clearance pathways in mice were studied by histological staining and Raman spectroscopy. Efficacy of PEG-SWCNT-cisplatin for tumor growth inhibition was studied in mice. PEG-SWCNTs were efficiently dispersed in aqueous media compared with controls, and did not induce apoptosis in vitro. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, and Raman bands for SWCNTs in tissues from several vital organs from mice injected intravenously with nanotube bioconjugates revealed that control SWCNTs were lodged in lung tissue as large aggregates compared with the PEG-SWCNTs, which showed little or no accumulation. Characteristic SWCNT Raman bands in feces revealed the presence of bilary or renal excretion routes. Attachment of cisplatin on bioconjugates was visualized with Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy. PEG-SWCNT-cisplatin with the attached targeting ligand EGF successfully inhibited growth of head and neck tumor xenografts in mice. PEG-SWCNTs, as opposed to control SWCNTs, form more highly dispersed delivery vehicles that, when loaded with both cisplatin and EGF, inhibit growth of squamous cell tumors.

  19. Single-electron transfer living radical copolymerization of SWCNT-g-PMMA via graft from approach

    Jaisankar, S. N.; Haridharan, N.; Murali, A.; Ponyrko, Sergii; Špírková, Milena; Mandal, A. B.; Matějka, Libor

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 13 (2014), s. 2959-2966 ISSN 0032-3861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/1459 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : single electron transfer * single-walled carbon nanotubes * controlled radical polymerization Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.562, year: 2014

  20. Electrochemical detection of Hg(II in water using self-assembled single walled carbon nanotube-poly(m-amino benzene sulfonic acid on gold electrode

    Gauta Gold Matlou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This work reports on the detection of mercury using single walled carbon nanotube-poly (m-amino benzene sulfonic acid (SWCNT-PABS modified gold electrode by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs technique. A thiol containing moiety (dimethyl amino ethane thiol (DMAET was used to facilitate the assembly of the SWCNT-PABS molecules onto the Au electrode surface. The successfully assembled monolayers were characterised using atomic force microscopy (AFM. Cyclic voltammetric and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic studies of the modified electrode (Au-DMAET-(SWCNT-PABS showed improved electron transfer over the bare Au electrode and the Au-DMAET in [Fe (CN6]3−/4− solution. The Au-DMAET-(SWCNT-PABS was used for the detection of Hg in water by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV analysis at the following optimized conditions: deposition potential of −0.1 V, deposition time of 30 s, 0.1 M HCl electrolyte and pH 3. The sensor showed a good sensitivity and a limit of detection of 0.06 μM with a linear concentration range of 20 ppb to 250 ppb under the optimum conditions. The analytical applicability of the proposed method with the sensor electrode was tested with real water sample and the method was validated with inductively coupled plasma – optical emission spectroscopy. Keywords: Self-assembly, Gold electrode, Carbon nanotubes, Electrochemical detection, Mercury

  1. Left bundle-branch block

    Risum, Niels; Strauss, David; Sogaard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between myocardial electrical activation by electrocardiogram (ECG) and mechanical contraction by echocardiography in left bundle-branch block (LBBB) has never been clearly demonstrated. New strict criteria for LBBB based on a fundamental understanding of physiology have recently...

  2. MAVEN EUV Modelled Data Bundle

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This bundle contains solar irradiance spectra in 1-nm bins from 0-190 nm. The spectra are generated based upon the Flare Irradiance Spectra Model - Mars (FISM-M)...

  3. MAVEN SEP Calibrated Data Bundle

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The maven.sep.calibrated Level 2 Science Data Bundle contains fully calibrated SEP data, as well as the raw count data from which they are derived, and ancillary...

  4. Bundling ecosystem services in Denmark

    Turner, Katrine Grace; Odgaard, Mette Vestergaard; Bøcher, Peder Klith

    2014-01-01

    We made a spatial analysis of 11 ecosystem services at a 10 km × 10 km grid scale covering most of Denmark. Our objective was to describe their spatial distribution and interactions and also to analyze whether they formed specific bundle types on a regional scale in the Danish cultural landscape....... We found clustered distribution patterns of ecosystem services across the country. There was a significant tendency for trade-offs between on the one hand cultural and regulating services and on the other provisioning services, and we also found the potential of regulating and cultural services...... to form synergies. We identified six distinct ecosystem service bundle types, indicating multiple interactions at a landscape level. The bundle types showed specialized areas of agricultural production, high provision of cultural services at the coasts, multifunctional mixed-use bundle types around urban...

  5. Line bundles and flat connections

    1School of Mathematics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, .... sequence for complex analytic bundles, Appendix to Topological Methods ... Society of Japan 15 (1987) (Iwanami Shoten Publishers and Princeton ...

  6. Nature and strength of bonding in a crystal of semiconducting nanotubes: van der Waals density functional calculations and analytical results

    Kleis, Jesper; Schröder, Elsebeth; Hyldgaard, Per

    2008-01-01

    calculations, the vdW-DF study predicts an intertube vdW bonding with a strength that is consistent with recent observations for the interlayer binding in graphitics. It also produces a nanotube wall-to-wall separation, which is in very good agreement with experiments. Moreover, we find that the vdW-DF result...... for the nanotube-crystal binding energy can be approximated by a sum of nanotube-pair interactions when these are calculated in vdW-DR This observation suggests a framework for an efficient implementation of quantum-physical modeling of the carbon nanotube bundling in more general nanotube bundles, including......The dispersive interaction between nanotubes is investigated through ab initio theory calculations and in an analytical approximation. A van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) [M. Dion et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004)] is used to determine and compare the binding of a pair of nanotubes...

  7. Holomorphic bundles over elliptic manifolds

    Morgan, J.W.

    2000-01-01

    In this lecture we shall examine holomorphic bundles over compact elliptically fibered manifolds. We shall examine constructions of such bundles as well as (duality) relations between such bundles and other geometric objects, namely K3-surfaces and del Pezzo surfaces. We shall be dealing throughout with holomorphic principal bundles with structure group GC where G is a compact, simple (usually simply connected) Lie group and GC is the associated complex simple algebraic group. Of course, in the special case G = SU(n) and hence GC = SLn(C), we are considering holomorphic vector bundles with trivial determinant. In the other cases of classical groups, G SO(n) or G = Sympl(2n) we are considering holomorphic vector bundles with trivial determinant equipped with a non-degenerate symmetric, or skew symmetric pairing. In addition to these classical cases there are the finite number of exceptional groups. Amazingly enough, motivated by questions in physics, much interest centres around the group E8 and its subgroups. For these applications it does not suffice to consider only the classical groups. Thus, while often first doing the case of SU(n) or more generally of the classical groups, we shall extend our discussions to the general semi-simple group. Also, we shall spend a good deal of time considering elliptically fibered manifolds of the simplest type, namely, elliptic curves

  8. Adsorption of multimeric T cell antigens on carbon nanotubes

    Fadel, Tarek R; Li, Nan; Shah, Smith

    2013-01-01

    Antigen-specific activation of cytotoxic T cells can be enhanced up to three-fold more than soluble controls when using functionalized bundled carbon nanotube substrates ((b) CNTs). To overcome the denaturing effects of direct adsorption on (b) CNTs, a simple but robust method is demonstrated...... to stabilize the T cell stimulus on carbon nanotube substrates through non-covalent attachment of the linker neutravidin....

  9. Nonhomogeneous morphology and the elastic modulus of aligned carbon nanotube films

    Won, Yoonjin; Gao, Yuan; Kenny, Thomas W; Goodson, Kenneth E; Guzman de Villoria, Roberto; Wardle, Brian L; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays offer the potential to develop nanostructured materials that leverage their outstanding physical properties. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs), also named CNT forests, CNT arrays, or CNT turfs, can provide high heat conductivity and sufficient mechanical compliance to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch for use as thermal interface materials (TIMs). This paper reports measurements of the in-plane moduli of vertically aligned, single-walled CNT (SWCNT) and multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) films. The mechanical response of these films is related to the nonhomogeneous morphology of the grown nanotubes, such as entangled nanotubes of a top crust layer, aligned CNTs in the middle region, and CNTs in the bottom layer. To investigate how the entanglements govern the overall mechanical moduli of CNT films, we remove the crust layer consisting of CNT entanglements by etching the CNT films from the top. A microfabricated cantilever technique shows that crust removal reduces the resulting moduli of the etched SWCNT films by as much as 40%, whereas the moduli of the etched MWCNT films do not change significantly, suggesting a minimal crust effect on the film modulus for thick MWCNT films (>90 μm). This improved understanding will allow us to engineer the mechanical moduli of CNT films for TIMs or packaging applications. (paper)

  10. Nonhomogeneous morphology and the elastic modulus of aligned carbon nanotube films

    Won, Yoonjin; Gao, Yuan; Guzman de Villoria, Roberto; Wardle, Brian L.; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo; Kenny, Thomas W.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays offer the potential to develop nanostructured materials that leverage their outstanding physical properties. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs), also named CNT forests, CNT arrays, or CNT turfs, can provide high heat conductivity and sufficient mechanical compliance to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch for use as thermal interface materials (TIMs). This paper reports measurements of the in-plane moduli of vertically aligned, single-walled CNT (SWCNT) and multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) films. The mechanical response of these films is related to the nonhomogeneous morphology of the grown nanotubes, such as entangled nanotubes of a top crust layer, aligned CNTs in the middle region, and CNTs in the bottom layer. To investigate how the entanglements govern the overall mechanical moduli of CNT films, we remove the crust layer consisting of CNT entanglements by etching the CNT films from the top. A microfabricated cantilever technique shows that crust removal reduces the resulting moduli of the etched SWCNT films by as much as 40%, whereas the moduli of the etched MWCNT films do not change significantly, suggesting a minimal crust effect on the film modulus for thick MWCNT films (>90 μm). This improved understanding will allow us to engineer the mechanical moduli of CNT films for TIMs or packaging applications.

  11. The microwave absorbing properties of SmCo attached single wall carbon nanotube/epoxy composites

    Yu, Liming; Li, Bo; Sheng, Leimei; An, Kang; Zhao, Xinluo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The SmCo nanoparticles attached SWCNTs were prepared by dc arc discharge method. •The nano-composite prepared by a rare earth permanent magnet Sm 2 Co 17 as catalyst. •The SmCo attached SWCNT/epoxy composites have an excellent electromagnetic matching characteristics. •The reflection loss and bandwidth below −20 dB of the composite can reach −23.7 dB, 6.2 GHz, respectively. -- Abstract: The SmCo nanoparticles attached single wall carbon nanotubes (SmCo attached SWCNTs) were prepared by hydrogen dc arc discharge method using 2:17 type SmCo permanent powder as catalyst. The SmCo attached SWCNT/epoxy composites with different doping ratios were investigated in the frequency region of 2–18 GHz. The complex permittivity and permeability of the SmCo attached SWCNT/epoxy composites were calculated. The reflection loss properties were simulated by transmission line theory and the microwave absorptive mechanisms were discussed. The results indicate that, due to the better interfacial polarization absorption mechanism of SmCo attached SWCNTs and the electromagnetic (EM) matching of magnetic loss and dielectric loss, the microwave absorption properties of SmCo attached SWCNT/epoxy are evidently improved. When the SmCo attached SWCNTs is doped by 1 wt%, the composite display a larger and wider absorption peak, and the bandwidth of the reflection loss below −20 dB is larger than 6 GHz with the thickness of 3.3 mm. It is expected that the new SmCo attached SWCNT/epoxy composites will be a good microwave absorbing material for the applications in X band, Ku band, or even K band

  12. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field

    Amanda García-García

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules.

  13. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    Jiwuer, Jilili

    2014-07-07

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization.

  14. Curvature dependence of single-walled carbon nanotubes for SO2 adsorption and oxidation

    Chen, Yanqiu; Yin, Shi; Li, Yueli; Cen, Wanglai; Li, Jianjun; Yin, Huaqiang

    2017-05-01

    Porous carbon-based catalysts showing high catalytic activity for SO2 oxidation to SO3 is often used in flue gas desulfurization. Their catalytic activity has been ascribed in many publications to the microporous structure and the effect of its spatial confinement. First principles method was used to investigate the adsorption and oxidation of SO2 on the inner and outer surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameters. It is interesting to found that there is a direct correlation: the barrier for the oxidation O_SWCNT + SO2 → SO3 + SWCNT monotonically decreases with the increase of SWCNTs' curvature. The oxygen functional located at the inner wall of SWCNTs with small radius is of higher activity for SO2 oxidation, which is extra enhanced by the spatial confinement effects of SWCNTs. These findings can be useful for the development of carbon-based catalysts and provide clues for the optimization and design of porous carbon catalysts.

  15. Purity and Defect Characterization of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Yasumitsu Miyata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the purity and defects of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs produced by various synthetic methods including chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge, and laser ablation. The SWCNT samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and Raman spectroscopy. Quantitative analysis of SEM images suggested that the G-band Raman intensity serves as an index for the purity. By contrast, the intensity ratio of G-band to D-band (G/D ratio reflects both the purity and the defect density of SWCNTs. The combination of G-band intensity and G/D ratio is useful for a quick, nondestructive evaluation of the purity and defect density of a SWCNT sample.

  16. Planar silver nanowire, carbon nanotube and PEDOT:PSS nanocomposite transparent electrodes

    Stapleton, Andrew J.; Yambem, Soniya D.; Johns, Ashley H.; Afre, Rakesh A.; Ellis, Amanda V.; Shapter, Joe G.; Andersson, Gunther G.; Quinton, Jamie S.; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul; Lewis, David A.

    2015-04-01

    Highly conductive, transparent and flexible planar electrodes were fabricated using interwoven silver nanowires and single-walled carbon nanotubes (AgNW:SWCNT) in a PEDOT:PSS matrix via an epoxy transfer method from a silicon template. The planar electrodes achieved a sheet resistance of 6.6 ± 0.0 Ω/□ and an average transmission of 86% between 400 and 800 nm. A high figure of merit of 367 Ω-1 is reported for the electrodes, which is much higher than that measured for indium tin oxide and reported for other AgNW composites. The AgNW:SWCNT:PEDOT:PSS electrode was used to fabricate low temperature (annealing free) devices demonstrating their potential to function with a range of organic semiconducting polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction blend systems.

  17. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    Jiwuer, Jilili; Abdurahman, Ayjamal; Gü lseren, Oğuz; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization.

  18. Manipulation and soldering of carbon nanotubes using atomic force microscope

    Kashiwase, Yuta; Ikeda, Takayuki; Oya, Takahide; Ogino, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    Manipulation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by an atomic force microscope (AFM) and soldering of CNTs using Fe oxide nanoparticles are described. We succeeded to separate a CNT bundle into two CNTs or CNT bundles, to move the separated CNT to a desirable position, and to bind it to another bundle. For the accurate manipulation, load of the AFM cantilever and frequency of the scan were carefully selected. We soldered two CNTs using an Fe oxide nanoparticle prepared from a ferritin molecule. The adhesion forces between the soldered CNTs were examined by an AFM and it was found that the CNTs were bound, though the binding force was not strong

  19. Study on electroactive and electrocatalytic surfaces of single walled carbon nanotube-modified electrodes

    Salinas-Torres, David [Departamento de Quimica Fisica and Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. de Correos 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Huerta, Francisco [Departamento de Ingenieria Textil y Papelera, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Plaza Ferrandiz y Carbonell, 1. E-03801 Alcoy (Spain); Montilla, Francisco, E-mail: francisco.montilla@ua.e [Departamento de Quimica Fisica and Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. de Correos 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Morallon, Emilia [Departamento de Quimica Fisica and Instituto Universitario de Materiales de Alicante, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. de Correos 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2011-02-01

    An investigation of the electrocatalysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes modified electrodes has been performed in this work. Nanotube-modified electrodes present a surface area much higher than the bare glassy carbon surfaces as determined by capacitance measurements. Several redox probes were selected for checking the reactivity of specific sites at the carbon nanotube surface. The presence of carbon nanotubes on the electrode improves the kinetics for all the reactions studied compared with the bare glassy carbon electrode with variations of the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant up to 5 orders of magnitude. The most important effects are observed for the benzoquinone/hydroquinone and ferrocene/ferricinium redox couples, which show a remarkable improvement of their electron transfer kinetics on SWCNT-modified electrodes, probably due to strong {pi}-{pi} interaction between the organic molecules and the walls of the carbon nanotubes. For many of the reactions studied, less than 1% of the nanotube-modified electrode surface is transferring charge to species in solution. This result suggests that only nanotube tips are active sites for the electron transfer in such cases. On the contrary, the electroactive surface for the reactions of ferrocene and quinone is higher indicating that the electron transfer is produced also from the nanotube walls.

  20. Study on electroactive and electrocatalytic surfaces of single walled carbon nanotube-modified electrodes

    Salinas-Torres, David; Huerta, Francisco; Montilla, Francisco; Morallon, Emilia

    2011-01-01

    An investigation of the electrocatalysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes modified electrodes has been performed in this work. Nanotube-modified electrodes present a surface area much higher than the bare glassy carbon surfaces as determined by capacitance measurements. Several redox probes were selected for checking the reactivity of specific sites at the carbon nanotube surface. The presence of carbon nanotubes on the electrode improves the kinetics for all the reactions studied compared with the bare glassy carbon electrode with variations of the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant up to 5 orders of magnitude. The most important effects are observed for the benzoquinone/hydroquinone and ferrocene/ferricinium redox couples, which show a remarkable improvement of their electron transfer kinetics on SWCNT-modified electrodes, probably due to strong π-π interaction between the organic molecules and the walls of the carbon nanotubes. For many of the reactions studied, less than 1% of the nanotube-modified electrode surface is transferring charge to species in solution. This result suggests that only nanotube tips are active sites for the electron transfer in such cases. On the contrary, the electroactive surface for the reactions of ferrocene and quinone is higher indicating that the electron transfer is produced also from the nanotube walls.

  1. Electronic structures and three-dimensional effects of boron-doped carbon nanotubes

    Koretsune, Takashi; Saito, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    We study boron-doped carbon nanotubes by first-principles methods based on the density functional theory. To discuss the possibility of superconductivity, we calculate the electronic band structure and the density of states (DOS) of boron-doped (10,0) nanotubes by changing the boron density. It is found that the Fermi level density of states D(ε F ) increases upon lowering the boron density. This can be understood in terms of the rigid band picture where the one-dimensional van Hove singularity lies at the edge of the valence band in the DOS of the pristine nanotube. The effect of three-dimensionality is also considered by performing the calculations for bundled (10,0) nanotubes and boron-doped double-walled carbon nanotubes (10,0)/(19,0). From the calculation of the bundled nanotubes, it is found that interwall dispersion is sufficiently large to broaden the peaks of the van Hove singularity in the DOS. Thus, to achieve the high D(ε F ) using the bundle of nanotubes with single chirality, we should take into account the distance from each nanotube. In the case of double-walled carbon nanotubes, we find that the holes introduced to the inner tube by boron doping spread also on the outer tube, while the band structure of each tube remains almost unchanged.

  2. SWCNT photocathodes sensitised with InP/ZnS core–shell nanocrystals

    Macdonald, Thomas J.; Tune, Daniel D.; Dewi, Melissa R.; Bear, Joseph C.; McNaughter, Paul D.; Mayes, Andrew G.; Skinner, William M.; Parkin, Ivan P.; Shapter, Joseph G.; Nann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the light harvesting efficiency of photocathodes is an integral part of optimising the future efficiencies of solar technologies. In contrast to the more extensively studied photoanode systems, current state-of-the-art photocathodes are less efficient and are commonly replaced with rare and expensive materials such as platinum group metals. The significance of photocathodes is in the development of tandem electrodes, enhancing the performance of existing devices. Carbon nanotubes a...

  3. SWCNT photocathodes sensitised with InP/ZnS core-shell nanocrystals

    Macdonald, T. J.; Tune, D. D.; Dewi, M. R.; Bear, J. C.; McNaughter, P. D.; Mayes, A. G.; Skinner, W. M.; Parkin, I. P.; Shapter, J. G.; Nann, T.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the light harvesting efficiency of photocathodes is an integral part of optimising the future efficiencies of solar technologies. In contrast to the more extensively studied photoanode systems, current state-of-the-art photocathodes are less efficient and are commonly replaced with rare and expensive materials such as platinum group metals. The significance of photocathodes is in the development of tandem electrodes, enhancing the performance of existing devices. Carbon nanotubes a...

  4. Thermal Resistance across Interfaces Comprising Dimensionally Mismatched Carbon Nanotube-Graphene Junctions in 3D Carbon Nanomaterials

    Jungkyu Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is employed to study thermal resistance across interfaces comprising dimensionally mismatched junctions of single layer graphene floors with (6,6 single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT pillars in 3D carbon nanomaterials. Results obtained from unit cell analysis indicate the presence of notable interfacial thermal resistance in the out-of-plane direction (along the longitudinal axis of the SWCNTs but negligible resistance in the in-plane direction along the graphene floor. The interfacial thermal resistance in the out-of-plane direction is understood to be due to the change in dimensionality as well as phonon spectra mismatch as the phonons propagate from SWCNTs to the graphene sheet and then back again to the SWCNTs. The thermal conductivity of the unit cells was observed to increase nearly linearly with an increase in cell size, that is, pillar height as well as interpillar distance, and approaches a plateau as the pillar height and the interpillar distance approach the critical lengths for ballistic thermal transport in SWCNT and single layer graphene. The results indicate that the thermal transport characteristics of these SWCNT-graphene hybrid structures can be tuned by controlling the SWCNT-graphene junction characteristics as well as the unit cell dimensions.

  5. The Surface Reactivities of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Related Toxicities

    Ren, Lei

    After 20 years of extensive exploration, people are more and more convinced on the great potentials of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the applications of many different areas. On the other hand, the properties and toxicities have also been closely watched for the safe utilization. In this dissertation I focus on the surface properties of SWCNTs and their related toxicities. In chapter 2, we revealed the generation of peroxyl radical by the unmodified SWCNT and the poly(ethylene glycol) functionalized SWCNT in aqueous solution with capillary electrophoresis (CE) and a reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicator, 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (H2DCF). According to the results, we identified peroxyl radical, ROO• as the major ROS in our system. Peroxyl radical could be produced from the adsorption of oxygen on the SWCNT surface. In chapter 3, we studied oxidation of several biologically relevant reducing agents in the presence of SWCNTs in aqueous solutions. H2DCF and several small antioxidants (vitamin C, Trolox, and cysteine), and a high-molecular-weight ROS scavenger (bovine serum albumin (BSA)) were selected as reductants. We revealed that the unmodified or carboxylated SWCNT played duplex roles by acting as both oxidants and catalysts in the reaction. In chapter 4, we confirmed that SWCNTs bind to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) at a site proximate to the enzyme's activity center and participating in the ET process, enhancing the activity of (HRP) in the solution-based redox reaction. The capability of SWCNT in receiving electrons and the direct attachment of HRP to the surface of SWCNT strongly affected the enzyme activity due to the direct involvement of SWCNT in ET. In chapter 5, the toxicity of SWCNTs coated with different concentrations of BSA to a human fibroblast cell line was explored. The result indicates that the toxicity of SWCNTs decrease with the higher coating degree as assumed. Then we choose mitochondrion to study the interactions between

  6. Raman spectroscopic characterization of multiwall carbon nanotubes and of composites

    L. Bokobza

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work Raman spectroscopy was used for extensive characterization of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNTs and of MWCNTs/rubber composites. We have measured the Raman spectra of bundled and dispersed multiwall carbon nanotubes. All the Raman bands of the carbon nanotubes are seen to shift to higher wavenumbers upon debundling on account of less intertube interactions. Effects of laser irradiation were also investigated. Strong effects are observed by changing the wavelength of the laser excitation. On the other hand, at a given excitation wavelength, changes on the Raman bands are observed by changing the laser power density due to sample heating during the measurement procedure.

  7. GPU Parallel Bundle Block Adjustment

    ZHENG Maoteng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To deal with massive data in photogrammetry, we introduce the GPU parallel computing technology. The preconditioned conjugate gradient and inexact Newton method are also applied to decrease the iteration times while solving the normal equation. A brand new workflow of bundle adjustment is developed to utilize GPU parallel computing technology. Our method can avoid the storage and inversion of the big normal matrix, and compute the normal matrix in real time. The proposed method can not only largely decrease the memory requirement of normal matrix, but also largely improve the efficiency of bundle adjustment. It also achieves the same accuracy as the conventional method. Preliminary experiment results show that the bundle adjustment of a dataset with about 4500 images and 9 million image points can be done in only 1.5 minutes while achieving sub-pixel accuracy.

  8. Influence of solution pH on the electron transport of the self-assembled nanoarrays of single-walled carbon nanotube-cobalt tetra-aminophthalocyanine on gold electrodes: Electrocatalytic detection of epinephrine

    Ozoemena, Kenneth I. [Chemistry Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)], E-mail: kenneth.ozoemena@up.ac.za; Nkosi, Dudu; Pillay, Jeseelan [Chemistry Department, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2008-02-15

    This paper provides first evidence of the impact of solution pH on the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants of self-assembled films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and SWCNT integrated to cobalt(II)tetra-aminophthalocyanine (SWCNT-CoTAPc) by sequential self-assembly. Using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, we proved that both SAMs exhibit notable differences in their response to different buffered solution pH, with and without the presence of redox probe, [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 4-}/[Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3-}. Surface pK{sub a} value for the Au-Cys-SWCNT-CoTAPc was estimated as ca. 7.8, compared to that of the Au-Cys-SWCNT of about 5.5. Interestingly, both redox-active SAMs gave similar analytical response for epinephrine, giving well-resolved square wave voltammograms, with linear concentration range up to 130 {mu}M, sensitivity of ca. 9.4 x 10{sup -3} AM{sup -1}, and limit of detection ca. 6 {mu}M. This analytical result implies that there is no detectable advantage of one of the SAMs over the other in the electrocatalytic detection of this neurotransmitter.

  9. Principal bundles the classical case

    Sontz, Stephen Bruce

    2015-01-01

    This introductory graduate level text provides a relatively quick path to a special topic in classical differential geometry: principal bundles.  While the topic of principal bundles in differential geometry has become classic, even standard, material in the modern graduate mathematics curriculum, the unique approach taken in this text presents the material in a way that is intuitive for both students of mathematics and of physics. The goal of this book is to present important, modern geometric ideas in a form readily accessible to students and researchers in both the physics and mathematics communities, providing each with an understanding and appreciation of the language and ideas of the other.

  10. Characterization and mechanical testing of alumina-based nanocomposites reinforced with niobium and/or carbon nanotubes fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    Thomson, K.E.; Jiang, D.; Yao, W.; Ritchie, R.O.; Mukherjee, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    Alumina-based nanocomposites reinforced with niobium and/or carbon nanotubes (CNT) were fabricated by advanced powder processing techniques and consolidated by spark plasma sintering. Raman spectroscopy revealed that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) begin to break down at sintering temperatures >1150 °C. Nuclear magnetic resonance showed that, although thermodynamically unlikely, no Al 4 C 3 formed in the CNT–alumina nanocomposites, such that the nanocomposite can be considered as purely a physical mixture with no chemical bond formed between the nanotubes and ceramic matrix. In addition, in situ single-edge notched bend tests were conducted on niobium and/or CNT-reinforced alumina nanocomposites to assess their toughness. Despite the absence of subcritical crack growth, average fracture toughness values of 6.1 and 3.3 MPa m 1/2 were measured for 10 vol.% Nb and 10 vol.% Nb–5 vol.% SWCNT–alumina, respectively. Corresponding tests for the alumina nanocomposites containing 5 vol.% SWCNT, 10 vol.% SWCNT, 5 vol.% double-walled-CNT and 10 vol.% Nb yielded average fracture toughnesses of 3.0, 2.8, 3.3 and 4.0 MPa m 1/2 , respectively. It appears that the reason for not observing improvement in fracture toughness of CNT-reinforced samples is because of either damage to CNTs or possibly non-optimal interfacial bonding between CNT-alumina.

  11. Interaction between fullerene halves C{sub n} (n ≤ 40) and single wall carbon nanotube

    Sharma, Amrish, E-mail: amrish99@gmail.com; Kaur, Sandeep, E-mail: sipusukhn@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala (India); Mudahar, Isha, E-mail: isha@pbi.ac.in [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences, Punjabi University, Patiala (India)

    2016-05-06

    We have investigated the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube with small fullerene halves C{sub n} (n ≤ 40) which are covalently bonded to the side wall of an armchair single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) using first principle method based on density functional theory. The fullerene size results in weak bonding between fullerene halves and carbon nanotube (CNT). Further, it was found that the C-C bond distance that attaches the fullerene half and CNT is of the order of 1.60 Å. The calculated binding energies indicate the stability of the complexes formed. The HOMO-LUMO gaps and electron density of state plots points towards the metallicity of the complex formed. Our calculations on charge transfer reveal that very small amount of charge is transferred from CNT to fullerene halves.

  12. Interaction between fullerene halves C_n (n ≤ 40) and single wall carbon nanotube

    Sharma, Amrish; Kaur, Sandeep; Mudahar, Isha

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube with small fullerene halves C_n (n ≤ 40) which are covalently bonded to the side wall of an armchair single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) using first principle method based on density functional theory. The fullerene size results in weak bonding between fullerene halves and carbon nanotube (CNT). Further, it was found that the C-C bond distance that attaches the fullerene half and CNT is of the order of 1.60 Å. The calculated binding energies indicate the stability of the complexes formed. The HOMO-LUMO gaps and electron density of state plots points towards the metallicity of the complex formed. Our calculations on charge transfer reveal that very small amount of charge is transferred from CNT to fullerene halves.

  13. Sharper and faster "nano darts" kill more bacteria: a study of antibacterial activity of individually dispersed pristine single-walled carbon nanotube.

    Liu, Shaobin; Wei, Li; Hao, Lin; Fang, Ning; Chang, Matthew Wook; Xu, Rong; Yang, Yanhui; Chen, Yuan

    2009-12-22

    To further our understanding on the antibacterial activity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), high purity SWCNTs with average diameter of 0.83 nm and (7,5) chirality as dominate (n,m) structure were dispersed in a biocompatible surfactant solution. Ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared radiation absorption spectroscopy was employed to monitor the aggregation of SWCNTs. The results demonstrated that individually dispersed SWCNTs were more toxic than SWCNT aggregates toward bacteria (gram-negative Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis). Individually dispersed SWCNTs can be visualized as numerous moving "nano darts" in the solution, constantly attacking the bacteria; thereby, degrading the bacterial cell integrity and causing the cell death. Controlled experimental results suggested that inhibiting cell growth and oxidative stress were not the major causes responsible for the death of cells. Furthermore, the detrimental effects of Co metal residues (up to 1 mug/mL) on SWCNT samples can be ruled out. Atomic force microscope study conducted in suspension proved that the death rates of bacteria were strongly correlated with their mechanical properties; soft cells were more vulnerable to SWCNT piercing. The antibacterial activity of SWCNTs can be remarkably improved by enhancing the SWCNT physical puncture on bacteria in the following ways: (1) dispersing SWCNTs individually to sharpen the nano darts; (2) increasing SWCNT concentration to raise the population density of nano darts; and (3) elevating the shaking speed of incubation to speed up the nano darts. This study elucidated several factors controlling the antibacterial activity of pristine SWCNTs and it provided an insight in developing strategies that can maximize the SWCNT application potentials while minimizing the health and environment risks.

  14. Flow-driven voltage generation in carbon nanotubes

    The flow of various liquids and gases over single-walled carbon nanotube bundles induces an electrical signal (voltage/current) in the sample along the direction of the flow. The electrical response generated by the flow of liquids is found to be logarithmic in the flow speed over a wide range. In contrast, voltage generated ...

  15. Chemisorption and Diffusion of H on a Graphene Sheet and Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor; Menon, Madhu

    2000-01-01

    Recent experiments on hydrogen storage in single wall nanotubes and nanotube bundles have reported large fractional weight of stored molecular hydrogen which are not in agreement with theoretical estimates based of simulation of hydrogen storage by physisorption mechanisms. Hydrogen storage in catalytically doped nanotube bundles indicate that atomic H might undergo chemisorption changing the basic nature of the storage mechanism under investigation by many groups. Using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GTBMD) method for reactive C-H dynamics, we investigate chemisorption and diffusion of atomic H on graphene sheet and C nanotubes. Effective potential energy surfaces (EPS) for chemisorption and diffusion are calculated for graphene sheet and nanotubes of different curvatures. Analysis of the activation barriers and quantum rate constants, computed via wave-packet dynamics method, will be discussed in this presentation.

  16. Single-walled carbon nanotube electromechanical switching behavior with shoulder slip

    Ryan, Peter; Wu, Yu-Chiao; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Adams, George; McGruer, Nicol

    2011-04-01

    Several electromechanical devices, each consisting of a small bundle of single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended over an actuation electrode, have been fabricated and operated electrically. The nanotubes are assembled on the electrodes using dielectrophoresis, a potential high-rate nanomanufacturing process. A large decrease in the threshold voltage was seen after the first actuation. This is a result of the nanotubes sliding inward on their supports as they are pulled down toward the actuation electrode, leaving slack in the nanotube bundle for subsequent actuations. The electrical measurements agree well with an electromechanical model that uses a literature-reported value of the shear stress between the nanotubes and the SiO2 shoulders. Electrical measurements were performed in dry nitrogen as a large build-up of contamination was seen when the measurements were performed in lab air. We present measurements as well as a detailed mechanics model that support the interpretation of the data.

  17. Single-walled carbon nanotube electromechanical switching behavior with shoulder slip

    Ryan, Peter; Wu, Yu-Chiao; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Adams, George; McGruer, Nicol

    2011-01-01

    Several electromechanical devices, each consisting of a small bundle of single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended over an actuation electrode, have been fabricated and operated electrically. The nanotubes are assembled on the electrodes using dielectrophoresis, a potential high-rate nanomanufacturing process. A large decrease in the threshold voltage was seen after the first actuation. This is a result of the nanotubes sliding inward on their supports as they are pulled down toward the actuation electrode, leaving slack in the nanotube bundle for subsequent actuations. The electrical measurements agree well with an electromechanical model that uses a literature-reported value of the shear stress between the nanotubes and the SiO 2 shoulders. Electrical measurements were performed in dry nitrogen as a large build-up of contamination was seen when the measurements were performed in lab air. We present measurements as well as a detailed mechanics model that support the interpretation of the data.

  18. DFT investigation of NH{sub 3}, PH{sub 3}, and AsH{sub 3} adsorptions on Sc-, Ti-, V-, and Cr-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Buasaeng, Prayut; Rakrai, Wandee [Computational Chemistry Center for Nanotechnology and Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajabhat Maha Sarakham University, Maha Sarakham, 44000 (Thailand); Wanno, Banchob [Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry and Supramolecular Chemistry Research Unit, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahasarakham University, Maha Sarakham, 44150 (Thailand); Tabtimsai, Chanukorn, E-mail: tabtimsai.c@gmail.com [Computational Chemistry Center for Nanotechnology and Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajabhat Maha Sarakham University, Maha Sarakham, 44000 (Thailand)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Transition metal-doped single wall carbon nanotubes and their adsorption with NH{sub 3}, PH{sub 3} and AsH{sub 3} molecules were investigated using a DFT method. • Adsorptions of NH{sub 3}, PH{sub 3} and AsH{sub 3} molecules on pristine single wall carbon nanotubeswere improved by transition metal doping. • Structural and electronic properties of single wall carbon nanotubes were significantly changed by transition metal doping and gas adsorptions. - Abstract: The adsorption properties of ammonia (NH{sub 3}), phosphine (PH{sub 3}), and arsine (AsH{sub 3}) on pristine and transition metal- (TM = Sc, Ti, V, and Cr) doped (5,5) armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were theoretically investigated. The geometric and electronic properties and adsorption abilities for the most stable configuration of NH{sub 3}, PH{sub 3}, and AsH{sub 3} adsorptions on pristine and TM-doped SWCNTs were calculated. It was found that the binding abilities of TMs to the SWCNT were in the order: Cr > V > Sc > Ti. However, the adsorption energy showed that the pristine SWCNT weakly adsorbed gas molecules and its electronic properties were also insensitive to gas molecules. By replacing a C atom with TM atoms, all doping can significantly enhance the adsorption energy of gas/SWCNT complexes and their adsorption ability was in the same order: NH{sub 3} > PH{sub 3} > AsH{sub 3}. A remarkable increase in adsorption energy and charge transfer of these systems was expected to induce significant changes in the electrical conductivity of the TM-doped SWCNTs. This work revealed that the sensitivity of SWCNT-based chemical gas adsorptions and sensors can be greatly improved by introducing an appropriate TM dopant. Accordingly, TM-doped SWCNTs are more suitable for gas molecule adsorptions and detections than the pristine SWCNT.

  19. Evaluation of the potential cationic dye removal using adsorption by graphene and carbon nanotubes as adsorbents surfaces

    Akbar Elsagh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We are employed in the present study of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs, carboxylate group functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-COOH, graphene (G and graphene oxide (GO as alternative adsorbents for the removal of cationic dye Basic Red 46 (BR 46, from aqueous solution. Various physico-chemical parameters were studied such as electrical conductivity behaviors, contact time, solution pH, and dye concentration. The experimental results show that SWCNTs, SWCNT-COOH, G and GO are promising adsorbents for removing BR 46. The adsorption equilibrium data were analyzed using various adsorption isotherms, and the results have shown that adsorption behavior of BR 46 could be described reasonably well by the Langmuir isotherm. Results showed that the removal of BR 46 increased with increasing initial dye concentration, contact time and pH. Adsorption kinetics data were modeled using the pseudo-first and pseudo-second order, and intra-particle diffusion models. Results show that the pseudo-first order kinetic model for SWCNTs, SWCNT-COOH and the pseudo-second order for G and GO were found to correlate the experimental data well.

  20. Screen-printed electrodes modified with carbon nanotubes or graphene for simultaneous determination of melatonin and serotonin

    Gomez, Federico José Vicente; Martín, Aída; Escarpa, Alberto; Silva, María Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and graphene have been tested as carbon allotropes for the modification of carbon screen-printed electrodes (CSPEs) to simultaneously determine melatonin (MT) and serotonin (5-HT). Two groups of CSPEs, both 4 mm in diameter, were explored: The first includes commercial SWCNT, MWCNT and graphene, the second includes SWCNT, MWCNT, graphene oxide nanoribbons and reduced nanoribbons that were drop casted on the electrodes. The carbon nanomaterials enhanced the electroactive area in the following order: CSPE

  1. PDS4 Bundle Creation Governance Using BPMN

    Radulescu, C.; Levoe, S. R.; Algermissen, S. S.; Rye, E. D.; Hardman, S. H.

    2015-06-01

    The AMMOS-PDS Pipeline Service (APPS) provides a Bundle Builder tool, which governs the process of creating, and ultimately generates, PDS4 bundles incrementally, as science products are being generated.

  2. Exploring Bundling Theory with Geometry

    Eckalbar, John C.

    2006-01-01

    The author shows how instructors might successfully introduce students in principles and intermediate microeconomic theory classes to the topic of bundling (i.e., the selling of two or more goods as a package, rather than separately). It is surprising how much students can learn using only the tools of high school geometry. To be specific, one can…

  3. Episodic payments (bundling): PART I.

    Jacofsky, D J

    2017-10-01

    Episodic, or bundled payments, is a concept now familiar to most in the healthcare arena, but the models are often misunderstood. Under a traditional fee-for-service model, each provider bills separately for their services which creates financial incentives to maximise volumes. Under a bundled payment, a single entity, often referred to as a convener (maybe the hospital, the physician group, or a third party) assumes the risk through a payer contract for all services provided within a defined episode of care, and receives a single (bundled) payment for all services provided for that episode. The time frame around the intervention is variable, but defined in advance, as are included and excluded costs. Timing of the actual payment in a bundle may either be before the episode occurs (prospective payment model), or after the end of the episode through a reconciliation (retrospective payment model). In either case, the defined costs over the defined time frame are borne by the convener. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1280-5. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  4. Resonant ablation of single-wall carbon nanotubes by femtosecond laser pulses

    Arutyunyan, N R; Komlenok, M S; Kononenko, V V; Pashinin, V P; Pozharov, A S; Konov, V I; Obraztsova, E D

    2015-01-01

    The thin 50 nm film of bundled arc-discharge single-wall carbon nanotubes was irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses with wavelengths 675, 1350 and 1745 nm corresponding to the absorption band of metallic nanotubes E 11 M , to the background absorption and to the absorption band of semiconducting nanotubes E 11 S , respectively. The aim was to induce a selective removal of nanotubes of specific type from the bundled material. Similar to conducted thermal heating experiments, the effect of laser irradiation results in suppression of all radial breathing modes in the Raman spectra, with preferential destruction of the metallic nanotubes with diameters less than 1.26 nm and of the semiconducting nanotubes with diameters 1.36 nm. However, the etching rate of different nanotubes depends on the wavelength of the laser irradiation. It is demonstrated that the relative content of nanotubes of different chiralities can be tuned by a resonant laser ablation of undesired nanotube fraction. The preferential etching of the resonant nanotubes has been shown for laser wavelengths 675 nm (E 11 M ) and 1745 nm (E 11 S ). (paper)

  5. Focused Ion Beam Nanopatterning for Carbon Nanotube Ropes Based Sensor

    Vera LA FERRARA

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Focused Ion Beam (FIB technology has been used to realize electrode patterns for contacting Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs ropes for chemical gas sensor applications. Two types of transducers, based on a single rope and on bundles, have been realized starting from silicon/Si3N4 substrate. Electrical behaviour, at room temperature, in toxic gas environments, has been investigated and compared to evaluate contribution of a single rope based sensor respect to bundles one. For all the devices, upon exposure to NO2 and NH3, the conductance has been found to increase or decrease respectively. Conductance signal is stronger for sensor based on bundles, but it also evident that response time in NO2 is faster for device based on a single rope. FIB technology offers, then, the possibility to contact easily a single sensitive nanowire, as carbon nanotube rope.

  6. Combining portable Raman probes with nanotubes for theranostic applications.

    Bhirde, Ashwinkumar A; Liu, Gang; Jin, Albert; Iglesias-Bartolome, Ramiro; Sousa, Alioscka A; Leapman, Richard D; Gutkind, J Silvio; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    Recently portable Raman probes have emerged along with a variety of applications, including carbon nanotube (CNT) characterization. Aqueous dispersed CNTs have shown promise for biomedical applications such as drug/gene delivery vectors, photo-thermal therapy, and photoacoustic imaging. In this study we report the simultaneous detection and irradiation of carbon nanotubes in 2D monolayers of cancer cells and in 3D spheroids using a portable Raman probe. A portable handheld Raman instrument was utilized for dual purposes: as a CNT detector and as an irradiating laser source. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were dispersed aqueously using a lipid-polymer (LP) coating, which formed highly stable dispersions both in buffer and cell media. The LP coated SWCNT and MWCNT aqueous dispersions were characterized by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The cellular uptake of the LP-dispersed SWCNTs and MWCNTs was observed using confocal microscopy, and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-nanotube conjugates were found to be internalized by ovarian cancer cells by using Z-stack fluorescence confocal imaging. Biocompatibility of SWCNTs and MWCNTs was assessed using a cell viability MTT assay, which showed that the nanotube dispersions did not hinder the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells at the dosage tested. Ovarian cancer cells treated with SWCNTs and MWCNTs were simultaneously detected and irradiated live in 2D layers of cancer cells and in 3D environments using the portable Raman probe. An apoptotic terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay carried out after laser irradiation confirmed that cell death occurred only in the presence of nanotube dispersions. We show for the first time that both SWCNTs and MWCNTs can be selectively irradiated and detected in cancer cells using a simple

  7. Lithium storage properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes prepared by CVD

    Ahn, J.-O.; Andong National University,; Wang, G.X.; Liu, H.K.; Dou, S.X.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesised by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method using acetylene gas. The XRD pattern of as prepared carbon nanotubes showed that the d 002 value is 3.44 Angstroms. The morphology and microstructure of carbon nanotubes were characterized by HRTEM. Most of carbon nanotubes are entangled together to form bundles or ropes. The diameter of the carbon nanotubes is in the range of 10 ∼ 20 nm. There is a small amount of amorphous carbon particles presented in the sample. However, the yield of carbon nanotubes is more than 95%. Electrochemical properties of carbon nanotubes were characterised via a variety of electrochemical testing techniques. The result of CV test showed that the Li insertion potential is quite low, which is very close to O V versus Li + /Li reference electrode, whereas the potential for Li de-intercalation is in the range of 0.2-0.4 V. There exists a slight voltage hysteresis between Li intercalation and Li de-intercalation, which is similar to the other carbonaceous materials. The intensity of redox peaks of carbon nanotubes decrease with scanning cycle, indicating that the reversible Li insertion capacity gradually decreases. The carbon nanotubes electrode demonstrated a reversible lithium storage capacity of 340 mAh/g with good cyclability at moderate current density. Further improvement of Li storage capacity is possible by opening the end of carbon nanotubes to allow lithium insertion into inner graphene sheet of carbon nanotubes. The kinetic properties of lithium insertion in carbon nanotube electrodes were characterised by a.c. impedance measurements. It was found that the lithium diffusion coefficient d Li decreases with an increase of Li ion concentration in carbon nanotube host

  8. High-resolution 13C nuclear magnetic resonance evidence of phase transition of Rb,Cs-intercalated single-walled nanotubes

    Bouhrara, M.; Saih, Y.; Wågberg, T.; Goze-Bac, C.; Abou-Hamad, E.

    2011-01-01

    charge transfer is applicable at low intercalation level. The new phase at high intercalation level is accompanied by a hybridization of alkali (s) orbitals with the carbon (sp2) orbitals of the single walled nanotubes, which indicate bundle surface sites

  9. Deformation quantization of principal fibre bundles

    Weiss, S.

    2007-01-01

    Deformation quantization is an algebraic but still geometrical way to define noncommutative spacetimes. In order to investigate corresponding gauge theories on such spaces, the geometrical formulation in terms of principal fibre bundles yields the appropriate framework. In this talk I will explain what should be understood by a deformation quantization of principal fibre bundles and how associated vector bundles arise in this context. (author)

  10. Output commitment through product bundling : Experimental evidence

    Hinloopen, Jeroen; Mueller, Wieland; Normann, Hans-Theo

    We analyze the impact of product bundling in experimental markets. One firm has monopoly power in a first market but competes with another firm la Cournot in a second market. We compare treatments where the multi-product firm (i) always bundles, (ii) never bundles, and (iii) chooses whether to

  11. Carbon Nanotube-Based Synthetic Gecko Tapes

    Dhinojwala, Ali

    2008-03-01

    Wall-climbing geckos have unique ability to attach to different surfaces without the use of any viscoelastic glues. On coming in contact with any surface, the micron-size gecko foot-hairs deform, enabling molecular contact over large areas, thus translating weak van der Waals (vdW) interactions into enormous shear forces. We will present our recent results on the development of synthetic gecko tape using aligned carbon nanotubes to mimic the keratin hairs found on gecko feet. The patterned carbon nanotube-based gecko tape can support a shear stress (36 N/cm^2) nearly four times higher than the gecko foot and sticks to a variety of surfaces, including Teflon. Both the micron-size setae (replicated by nanotube bundles) and nanometer-size spatulas (individual nanotubes) are necessary to achieve macroscopic shear adhesion and to translate the weak vdW interactions into high shear forces. The carbon nanotube based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics and space applications. The mechanism behind these large shear forces and self-cleaning properties of these carbon nanotube based synthetic gecko tapes will be discussed. This work was performed in collaboration with graduate students Liehui Ge, and Sunny Sethi, and collaborators from RPI; Lijie Ci and Professor Pulickel Ajayan.

  12. New application of carbon nanotubes in haemostatic dressing filled with anticancer substance.

    Nowacki, M; Wiśniewski, M; Werengowska-Ciećwierz, K; Terzyk, A P; Kloskowski, T; Marszałek, A; Bodnar, M; Pokrywczyńska, M; Nazarewski, Ł; Pietkun, K; Jundziłł, A; Drewa, T

    2015-02-01

    The drug-carrier system used as innovative haemostatic dressing with oncostatic action is studied. It is obtained from CDDP (cisplatin) doped SWCNT (single walled carbon nanotubes), modified and purified by H2O2 in hydrothermal treatment process. In the in vivo nephron sparing surgery (NSS) study we used 35 BALB/c nude mice with induced renal cancer using adenocarcinoma 786-o cells. Animals were divided into four groups: CDDP(M-), CDDP(M+), CONTROL(M-) and CONTROL(M+). In CDDP(M-) and CDDP(M+) groups we used, intraoperatively, carbon nanotubes filled with cisplatin (CDDP). In CONTROL(M-) and CONTROL(M+) groups carbon nanotubes were used alone. During NSS free margin (M-) or positive margin (M+) was performed. In the CDDP(M-) group, we do not observe local tumor recurrences. In Group CDDP(M+) only one animal was diagnosed with tumor recurrence. In control groups the recurrent tumor formation was observed. In our study, it is shown that CDDP filled SWCNT inhibit cancer recurrence in animal model NSS study, and can be successfully applied as haemostatic dressings for local chemoprevention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Remarkable influence of slack on the vibration of a single-walled carbon nanotube resonator

    Ning, Zhiyuan; Fu, Mengqi; Wu, Gongtao; Qiu, Chenguang; Shu, Jiapei; Guo, Yao; Wei, Xianlong; Gao, Song; Chen, Qing

    2016-04-01

    We for the first time quantitatively investigate experimentally the remarkable influence of slack on the vibration of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) resonator with a changeable channel length fabricated in situ inside a scanning electron microscope, compare the experimental results with the theoretical predictions calculated from the measured geometric and mechanical parameters of the same SWCNT, and find the following novel points. We demonstrate experimentally that as the slack s is increased from about zero to 1.8%, the detected vibration transforms from single-mode to multimode vibration, and the gate-tuning ability gradually attenuates for all the vibration modes. The quadratic tuning coefficient α decreases linearly with when the gate voltage Vdcg is small and the nanotube resonator operates in the beam regime. The linear tuning coefficient γ decreases linearly with when Vdcg has an intermediate value and the nanotube resonator operates in the catenary regime. The calculated α and γ fit the experimental values of the even in-plane mode reasonably well. As the slack is increased, the quality factor Q of the resonator linearly goes up, but the increase is far less steep than that predicted by the previous theoretical study. Our results are important to understand and design resonators based on CNT and other nanomaterials.

  14. Comparative Proteomics and Pulmonary Toxicity of Instilled Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes, Crocidolite Asbestos, and Ultrafine Carbon Black in Mice

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Waters, Katrina M.; Murray, Ashley R.; Kisin, Elena R.; Varnum, Susan M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Zanger, Richard C.; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2011-01-01

    Reflecting their exceptional potential to advance a range of biomedical, aeronautic, and other industrial products, carbon nanotube (CNT) production and the potential for human exposure to aerosolized CNTs are increasing. CNTs have toxicologically significant structural and chemical similarities to asbestos (AB) and have repeatedly been shown to cause pulmonary inflammation, granuloma formation, and fibrosis after inhalation/instillation/aspiration exposure in rodents, a pattern of effects similar to those observed following exposure to AB. To determine the degree to which responses to single-walled CNTs (SWCNT) and AB are similar or different, the pulmonary response of C57BL/6 mice to repeated exposures to SWCNTs, crocidolite AB, and ultrafine carbon black (UFCB) were compared using high-throughput global high performance liquid chromatography fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (HPLC-FTICR-MS) proteomics, histopathology, and bronchoalveolar lavage cytokine analyses. Mice were exposed to material suspensions (40 micrograms per mouse) twice a week for 3 weeks by pharyngeal aspiration. Histologically, the incidence and severity of inflammatory and fibrotic responses were greatest in mice treated with SWCNTs. SWCNT treatment affected the greatest changes in abundance of identified lung tissue proteins. The trend in number of proteins affected (SWCNT [376] > AB [231] > UFCB [184]) followed the potency of these materials in three biochemical assays of inflammation (cytokines). SWCNT treatment uniquely affected the abundance of 109 proteins, but these proteins largely represent cellular processes affected by AB treatment as well, further evidence of broad similarity in the tissue-level response to AB and SWCNTs. Two high-sensitivity markers of inflammation, one (S100a9) observed in humans exposed to AB, were found and may be promising biomarkers of human response to SWCNT exposure. PMID:21135415

  15. On modeling biomolecular–surface nonbonded interactions: application to nucleobase adsorption on single-wall carbon nanotube surfaces

    Akdim, B; Pachter, R; Day, P N; Kim, S S; Naik, R R

    2012-01-01

    In this work we explored the selectivity of single nucleobases towards adsorption on chiral single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by density functional theory calculations. Specifically, the adsorption of molecular models of guanine (G), adenine (A), thymine (T), and cytosine (C), as well as of AT and GC Watson–Crick (WC) base pairs on chiral SWCNT C(6, 5), C(9, 1) and C(8, 3) model structures, was analyzed in detail. The importance of correcting the exchange–correlation functional for London dispersion was clearly demonstrated, yet limitations in modeling such interactions by considering the SWCNT as a molecular model may mask subtle effects in a molecular–macroscopic material system. The trend in the calculated adsorption energies of the nucleobases on same diameter C(6, 5) and C(9, 1) SWCNT surfaces, i.e. G > A > T > C, was consistent with related computations and experimental work on graphitic surfaces, however contradicting experimental data on the adsorption of single-strand short homo-oligonucleotides on SWCNTs that demonstrated a trend of G > C > A > T (Albertorio et al 2009 Nanotechnology 20 395101). A possible role of electrostatic interactions in this case was partially captured by applying the effective fragment potential method, emphasizing that the interplay of the various contributions in modeling nonbonded interactions is complicated by theoretical limitations. Finally, because the calculated adsorption energies for Watson–Crick base pairs have shown little effect upon adsorption of the base pair farther from the surface, the results on SWCNT sorting by salmon genomic DNA could be indicative of partial unfolding of the double helix upon adsorption on the SWCNT surface. (paper)

  16. Thread-Like CMOS Logic Circuits Enabled by Reel-Processed Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Transistors via Selective Doping.

    Heo, Jae Sang; Kim, Taehoon; Ban, Seok-Gyu; Kim, Daesik; Lee, Jun Ho; Jur, Jesse S; Kim, Myung-Gil; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Hong, Yongtaek; Park, Sung Kyu

    2017-08-01

    The realization of large-area electronics with full integration of 1D thread-like devices may open up a new era for ultraflexible and human adaptable electronic systems because of their potential advantages in demonstrating scalable complex circuitry by a simply integrated weaving technology. More importantly, the thread-like fiber electronic devices can be achieved using a simple reel-to-reel process, which is strongly required for low-cost and scalable manufacturing technology. Here, high-performance reel-processed complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits are reported on 1D fiber substrates by using selectively chemical-doped single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) transistors. With the introduction of selective n-type doping and a nonrelief photochemical patterning process, p- and n-type SWCNT transistors are successfully implemented on cylindrical fiber substrates under air ambient, enabling high-performance and reliable thread-like CMOS inverter circuits. In addition, it is noteworthy that the optimized reel-coating process can facilitate improvement in the arrangement of SWCNTs, building uniformly well-aligned SWCNT channels, and enhancement of the electrical performance of the devices. The p- and n-type SWCNT transistors exhibit field-effect mobility of 4.03 and 2.15 cm 2 V -1 s -1 , respectively, with relatively narrow distribution. Moreover, the SWCNT CMOS inverter circuits demonstrate a gain of 6.76 and relatively good dynamic operation at a supply voltage of 5.0 V. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Metronomic Doses of Temozolomide Enhance the Efficacy of Carbon Nanotube CpG Immunotherapy in an Invasive Glioma Model.

    Mao Ouyang

    Full Text Available Even when treated with aggressive current therapies, most patients with glioblastoma survive less than two years. Rapid tumor growth, an invasive nature, and the blood-brain barrier, which limits the penetration of large molecules into the brain, all contribute to the poor tumor response associated with conventional therapies. Immunotherapy has emerged as a therapeutic approach that may overcome these challenges. We recently reported that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs can be used to dramatically increase the immunotherapeutic efficacy of CpG oligonucleotides in a mouse model of glioma. Following implantation in the mouse brain, the tumor cell line used in these previous studies (GL261 tends to form a spherical tumor with limited invasion into healthy brain. In order to evaluate SWCNT/CpG therapy under more clinically-relevant conditions, here we report the treatment of a more invasive mouse glioma model (K-Luc that better recapitulates human disease. In addition, a CpG sequence previously tested in humans was used to formulate the SWCNT/CpG which was combined with temozolomide, the standard of care chemotherapy for glioblastoma patients. We found that, following two intracranial administrations, SWCNT/CpG is well-tolerated and improves the survival of mice bearing invasive gliomas. Interestingly, the efficacy of SWCNT/CpG was enhanced when combined with temozolomide. This enhanced anti-tumor efficacy was correlated to an increase of tumor-specific cytotoxic activity in splenocytes. These results reinforce the emerging understanding that immunotherapy can be enhanced by combining it with chemotherapy and support the continued development of SWCNT/CpG.

  18. Theoretical study of hydrogen adsorption of graphene and carbon nanotubes decorated with palladium; Estudio teorico de la adsorcion de hidrogeno sobre grafeno y nanotubos de carbono decorados con paladio

    Lopez Corral, Ignacio; German, Estefania [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Volpe, Maria A [Planta Piloto de Ingenieria Quimica (UNS/CONICET), Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Brizuela, Graciela; Juan, Alfredo [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2008-10-15

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes (CNT) have awakened great interest in materials science thanks to their extraordinary structural, electronic and mechanical properties which facilitate their application in many different areas. One of the most promising applications is the possibility of using CNT to store hydrogen for use in small scale fuel cells. Unfortunately, experimental studies performed some years ago have often led to controversial conclusions, causing a continuing debate that has still not been resolved. The most recent work suggests that the storage of hydrogen for practical purposes can be achieved with CNT decorated with transition metals, for example Pd. In this context, theoretical modeling methods have to be used for a detailed understanding of the influence and scope of this type of modification in the interaction of the nanotubes with atomic or molecular hydrogen. This work studied hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) doped with Pd atoms, using density functional theory (DFT) and semi-empirical methods. As a preliminary approximation to the system a graphene sheet was used, modeled with a 190 atom cluster of C in a hexagonal arrangement, on which a single Pd atom was placed in adsorption sites. Then C{sub 190} clusters were used to simulate two different types of SWCNT: the zigzag SWCNT of quirality (10.0) and the armchair SWCNT of quirality (5.5), both decorated similarly on the graphene. Geometric optimization procedures for the system's different components were carried out with these models, and then the changes produced during the adsorption process in the electronic occupation of atomic orbitals and unions, for which crystal orbital overlap population (COOP) curves and overlap population (OP) values were evaluated. The results obtained with the graphene and nanotube approximations are in agreement and show that the SWCNT modified with Pd have more capacity to trap hydrogen than the non doped SWCNT. The

  19. Morphology-controlled SWCNT/polymeric microsphere arrays by a wet chemical self-assembly technique and their application for sensors

    Huang Xingjiu; Li Yue; Im, Hyung-Soon; Yarimaga, Oktay; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Jang, Doon-Yoon; Cho, Sung-Oh; Cai Weiping; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2006-01-01

    Large-scale morphology-controlled SWCNT/polymeric microsphere arrays can be obtained by a wet chemical self-assembly technique. The loading of SWCNTs, the length of SWCNTs, and the size and nature of polymeric microspheres can easily be controlled. Similar results can also be reached using this method for MWCNTs. In both types of CNTs, they form an interesting interactive 'net' structure on spheres and sphere joints. The SWCNT/PS-modified Au electrode was used for detection of uric acid by cyclic voltammetry and single-potential time-based techniques. The preliminary results show that the modified electrode presents good sensitivity and stability to uric acid

  20. Higher order jet prolongations type gauge natural bundles over vector bundles

    Jan Kurek

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Let $rgeq 3$ and $mgeq 2$ be natural numbers and $E$ be a vector bundle with $m$-dimensional basis. We find all gauge natural bundles ``similar" to the $r$-jet prolongation bundle $J^rE$ of $E$. We also find all gauge natural bundles ``similar" to the vector $r$-tangent bundle $(J^r_{fl}(E,R_0^*$ of $E$.

  1. Highly catalytic carbon nanotube counter electrode on plastic for dye solar cells utilizing cobalt-based redox mediator

    Aitola, Kerttu; Halme, Janne; Feldt, Sandra; Lohse, Peter; Borghei, Maryam; Kaskela, Antti; Nasibulin, Albert G.; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Lund, Peter D.; Boschloo, Gerrit; Hagfeldt, Anders

    2013-01-01

    A flexible, slightly transparent and metal-free random network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on plain polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic substrate outperformed platinum on conductive glass and on plastic as the counter electrode (CE) of a dye solar cell employing a Co(II/III)tris(2,2′-bipyridyl) complex redox mediator in 3-methoxypropionitrile solvent. The CE charge-transfer resistance of the SWCNT film was 0.60 Ω cm 2 , 4.0 Ω cm 2 for sputtered platinum on indium tin oxide-PET substrate and 1.7 Ω cm 2 for thermally deposited Pt on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass, respectively. The solar cell efficiencies were in the same range, thus proving that an entirely carbon-based SWCNT film on plastic is as good CE candidate for the Co electrolyte

  2. Dye-assisted dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes for solution fabrication of NO2 sensors

    M. M. Ramli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct golden orange dye molecules were used as a dispersing agent to produce suspensions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs in water. Uniform, thin film networks were fabricated by vacuum filtration using different concentrations of SWCNT and transferred subsequently to glass substrates. The dispersion efficiency was compared to other surfactants. Measurement of the sheet resistance as a function of SWCNT concentration showed a transition from 2D percolation to 3D conduction behaviour when the concentration of SWCNTs exceeded 0.001 mg/mL. The electrical response to NO2 gas exposure was investigated as a function of temperature and an optimum response was observed at 200°C.

  3. Oxidatively damaged DNA in rats exposed by oral gavage to C60 fullerenes and single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Folkmann, Janne K; Risom, Lotte; Jacobsen, Nicklas R

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C60 fullerenes and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are projected to be used in medicine and consumer products with potential human exposure. The hazardous effects of these particles are expected to involve oxidative stress with generation of oxidatively damaged DNA that might...... be the initiating event in the development of cancer. OBJECTIVE: In this study we investigated the effect of a single oral administration of C60 fullerenes and SWCNT. METHODS: We measured the level of oxidative damage to DNA as the premutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in the colon mucosa...... of genotoxicity, whereas corn oil per se generated more genotoxicity than the particles. Although there was increased mRNA expression of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase in the liver of C60 fullerene-treated rats, we found no significant increase in repair activity. CONCLUSIONS: Oral exposure to low doses of C60...

  4. Amidation of single-walled carbon nanotubes by a hydrothermal process for the electrooxidation of nitric oxide

    Kan Kan; Xia Tingliang; Li Li; Bi Hongmei; Fu Honggang; Shi Keying

    2009-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been amidated by hydrothermal treatment with different aliphatic amines. The amido groups modified on the surface of the SWCNTs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The electrooxidation of nitric oxide (NO) at the modified electrodes of amidated SWCNTs was investigated. The modified electrodes of amidated SWCNTs exhibited different electrocatalytic activity for NO when different aliphatic amines were being used. The electrode amidated by ammonia has the highest activity, which is 1.8 times value of the SWCNT modified electrode. The electrocatalytic activity of the amidated SWCNT modified electrodes depends on the length of the alkyl groups. The results demonstrate that hydrothermal treatment is an efficient way to modify SWCNTs with amines, and the reaction rate of NO electrooxidation can be changed by the amidation of SWCNTs.

  5. HFCVD growth of various carbon nanostructures on SWCNT paper controlled by surface treatment

    Varga, M.; Izak, T.; Kromka, A.; Kotlar, M.; Vretenar, V.; Ledinsky, M.; Michalka, M.; Skakalova, V.; Vesely, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the nanocomposite material formation, particularly the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond and carbon nanowalls (CNWs) on single-wall carbon nanotubes buckypaper (BP). One part of the buckypaper substrate was nucleated by nanodiamond powder. The growth was carried out in a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system. Contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were used for the surface morphology analysis and characterization of carbon phases. Due to a different surface pretreatment, different carbon nanostructures were formed: diamond film was grown on the nucleated BP area; non-treated area of the BP was covered with a dense field of CNWs. Covering a part of the BP surface prevented an access of the HF-plasma and so the growth of any carbon structures. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Co-Higgs bundles on P^1

    Rayan, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Co-Higgs bundles are Higgs bundles in the sense of Simpson, but with Higgs fields that take values in the tangent bundle instead of the cotangent bundle. Given a vector bundle on P^1, we find necessary and sufficient conditions on its Grothendieck splitting for it to admit a stable Higgs field. We characterize the rank-2, odd-degree moduli space as a universal elliptic curve with a globally-defined equation. For ranks r=2,3,4, we explicitly verify the conjectural Betti numbers emerging from t...

  7. Powerful greenhouse gas nitrous oxide adsorption onto intrinsic and Pd doped Single walled carbon nanotube

    Yoosefian, Mehdi, E-mail: m.yoosefian@kgut.ac.ir

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Investigation of the adsorption of Nitrous oxide on SWCNT and Pd/SWCNT. • Nitrous oxide adsorbed on Pd/SWCNT system demonstrates a strong adsorption. • The Pd/SWCNT is potential sensor for the Nitrous oxide gaseous molecule detection. - Abstract: Density functional studies on the adsorption behavior of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) onto intrinsic carbon nanotube (CNT) and Pd-doped (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotube (Pd-CNT) have been reported. Introduction of Pd dopant facilitates in adsorption of N{sub 2}O on the otherwise inert nanotube as observed from the adsorption energies and global reactivity descriptor values. Among three adsorption features of N{sub 2}O onto CNT, the horizontal adsorption with E{sub ads} = −0.16 eV exhibits higher adsorption energy. On the other hand the Pd-CNT exhibit strong affinity toward gas molecule and would cause a huge increase in N{sub 2}O adsorption energies. Chemical and electronic properties of CNT and Pd-CNT in the absence and presence of N{sub 2}O were investigated. Adsorption of N{sub 2}O gas molecule would affect the electronic conductance of Pd-CNT that can serve as a signal of gas sensors and the increased energy gaps demonstrate the formation of more stable systems. The atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and the natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations were performed to get more details about the nature and charge transfers in intermolecular interactions within adsorption process. As a final point, the density of states (DOSs) calculations was achieved to confirm previous results. According to our results, intrinsic CNT cannot act as a suitable adsorbent while Pd-CNT can be introduced as novel detectable complex for designing high sensitive, fast response and high efficient carbon nanotube based gas sensor to detect N{sub 2}O gas as an air pollutant. Our results could provide helpful information for the design and fabrication of the N{sub 2}O sensors.

  8. Artificial atom and quantum terahertz response in carbon nanotube quantum dots

    Ishibashi, K; Moriyama, S; Fuse, T; Kawano, Y; Toyokawa, S; Yamaguchi, T

    2008-01-01

    Artificial atom behaviours have been observed in single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) quantum dots (QDs). Two-electron shell structures and the Zeeman splitting of single-particle states were revealed in single-electron transport measurements in low temperatures. To demonstrate that the charging energy of the dot lies in a terahertz (THz) range, the THz photon-assisted tunnelling was tested, and was really observed as a satellite Coulomb peak. Some satellite peaks moved as a frequency was changed, but other peaks did not move. We give possible models to explain the existence of two different satellite peaks.

  9. Visualizing the growth dynamics of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Zhang, Lili; He, Maoshuai

    In order to meet the increasing demand of faster and more flexible electronics and optical devices and at the same time decrease the use of the critical metals, carbon based devices are in fast development. Single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based electronics is a way of addressing...... around the studied sample at elevated temperature gives a unique way of monitoring gas-solid interactions such as CNT growth. Here we show the direct experimental evidence on the growth dynamics of SW-CNTs from Co/MgO catalysts using CO as carbon source inside the environmental TEM. The evolution...

  10. In vivo biodistribution and biological impact of injected carbon nanotubes using magnetic resonance techniques

    Achraf Al Faraj

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Achraf Al Faraj1,2, Florence Fauvelle3, Nathalie Luciani4, Ghislaine Lacroix5, Michael Levy4, Yannick Crémillieux1, Emmanuelle Canet-Soulas1Université Lyon1, Créatis-LRMN, Lyon, France; 2King Saud University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3CRSSA, Biophysique Cellulaire et Moléculaire, Laboratoire de RMN, La Tronche, France; 4Université Paris7-Paris Diderot, Matières et Systèmes Complexes, Paris, France; 5Institut National de l’Environnement et des Risques Industriels, Verneuil-en-Halatte, FranceBackground: Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT hold promise for applications as contrast agents and target delivery carriers in the field of nanomedicine. When administered in vivo, their biodistribution and pharmacological profile needs to be fully characterized. The tissue distribution of carbon nanotubes and their potential impact on metabolism depend on their shape, coating, and metallic impurities. Because standard radiolabeled or fluorescently-labeled pharmaceuticals are not well suited for long-term in vivo follow-up of carbon nanotubes, alternative methods are required.Methods: In this study, noninvasive in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI investigations combined with high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS, Raman spectroscopy, iron assays, and histological analysis ex vivo were proposed and applied to assess the biodistribution and biological impact of intravenously injected pristine (raw and purified and functionalized SWCNT in a 2-week longitudinal study. Iron impurities allowed raw detection of SWCNT in vivo by susceptibility-weighted MRI.Results: A transitional accumulation in the spleen and liver was observed by MRI. Raman spectroscopy, iron assays, and histological findings confirmed the MRI readouts. Moreover, no acute toxicological effect on the liver metabolic profile was observed using the HR-MAS technique, as confirmed by quantitative real

  11. Boiling heat transfer on horizontal tube bundles

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Nucleate boiling heat transfer characteristics for a tube in a bundle differ from that for a single tube in a pool and this difference is known as 'tube bundle effect.' There exist two bundle effects, positive and negative. The positive bundle effect enhances heat transfer due to convective flow induced by rising bubbles generated from the lower tubes, while the negative bundle effect deteriorates heat transfer due to vapor blanketing caused by accumulation of bubbles. Staggered tube bundles tested and found that the upper tubes in bundles have higher heat transfer coefficients than the lower tubes. The effects of various parameters such as pressure, tube geometry and oil contamination on heat transfer have been examined. Some workers attempted to clarify the mechanism of occurrence of 'bundle effect' by testing tube arrangements of small scale. All reported only enhancement in heat transfer but results showed the symptom of heat transfer deterioration at higher heat fluxes. As mentioned above, it has not been clarified so far even whether the 'tube bundle effect' should serve as enhancement or deterioration of heat transfer in nucleate boiling. In this study, experiments are performed in detail by using bundles of small scale, and effects of heat flux distribution, pressure and tube location are clarified. Furthermore, some consideration on the mechanisms of occurrence of 'tube bundle effect' is made and a method for prediction of heat transfer rate is proposed

  12. Strain on field effect transistors with single–walled–carbon nanotube network on flexible substrate

    Kim, T. G. [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Research center for Time-domain Nano-functional Device, Giheung, Yong-In, Gyeonggi 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, U. J.; Lee, E. H. [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Frontier Research Laboratory, Giheung, Yong-In, Gyeonggi 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, J. S. [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, S. W., E-mail: swnano.hwang@samsung.com, E-mail: sangsig@korea.ac.kr [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Research center for Time-domain Nano-functional Device, Giheung, Yong-In, Gyeonggi 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Frontier Research Laboratory, Giheung, Yong-In, Gyeonggi 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S., E-mail: swnano.hwang@samsung.com, E-mail: sangsig@korea.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-07

    We have systematically analyzed the effect of strain on the electrical properties of flexible field effect transistors with a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network on a polyethersulfone substrate. The strain was applied and estimated at the microscopic scale (<1 μm) by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with indigenously designed special bending jig. Interestingly, the strain estimated at the microscopic scale was found to be significantly different from the strain calculated at the macroscopic scale (centimeter-scale), by a factor of up to 4. Further in-depth analysis using SEM indicated that the significant difference in strain, obtained from two different measurement scales (microscale and macroscale), could be attributed to the formation of cracks and tears in the SWCNT network, or at the junction of SWCNT network and electrode during the strain process. Due to this irreversible morphological change, the electrical properties, such as on current level and field effect mobility, lowered by 14.3% and 4.6%, respectively.

  13. Fluid structure interaction in tube bundles

    Brochard, D.; Jedrzejewski, F.; Gibert, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    A lot of industrial components contain tube bundles immersed in a fluid. The mechanical analysis of such systems requires the study of the fluid structure interaction in the tube bundle. Simplified methods, based on homogenization methods, have been developed to analyse such phenomenon and have been validated through experimental results. Generally, these methods consider only the fluid motion in a plan normal to the bundle axis. This paper will analyse, in a first part, the fluid structure interaction in a tube bundle through a 2D finite element model representing the bundle cross section. The influence of various parameters like the bundle size, and the bundle confinement will be studied. These results will be then compared with results from homogenization methods. Finally, the influence of the 3D fluid motion will be investigated, in using simplified methods. (authors). 11 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Development of CANFLEX fuel bundle

    Suk, Ho Chun; Hwang, Woan; Jeong, Young Hwan

    1991-12-01

    This research project is underway in cooperation with AECL to develop the CANDU advanced fuel bundle(so-called CANFLEX) which can enhance reactor safety and fuel economy in comparison with the current CANDU fuel and which can be used with natural uranium, slightly enriched uranium and other advanced fuel cycle. As the final schedule, the advanced fuel will be verified by carrying out a large scale demonstration of the bundle irradiation in a commercial CANDU reactors for 1996 and 1997, and consequently will be used in the existing and future reactors in Korea. The research activities during this year include the basic design of CANFLEX fuel with slightly enriched uranium(CANFLEX-SEU), with emphasis on the extension of fuel operation limit. Based on this basic design, CANFLEX fuel was mocked up. Out-of-pile hydraulic scoping tests were conducted with the fuel. (Author)

  15. Reduced Graphene Oxide/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Films Using Various p-Type Dopants and Their Application to GaN-Based Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Lee, Byeong Ryong; Kim, Tae Geun

    2017-01-01

    This article reports the electrical and optical properties of the reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films using various p-type dopants and their application to GaN-based light-emitting diodes. To enhance the current injection and spreading of the RGO/SWCNT films on the light-emitting diodes (LEDs), we increased the work function (Φ) of the films using chemical doping with AuCl₃, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) oxidized with poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and MoO₃; thereby reduced the Schottky barrier height between the RGO/SWCNT films and p-GaN. By comparison, LEDs fabricated with work-function-tuned RGO/SWCNT film doped with MoO₃ exhibited the decrease of the forward voltage from 5.3 V to 5.02 V at 20 mA and the increase of the output power up to 1.26 times. We also analyzed the current injection mechanism using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  16. Effects of Taiwan Roselle anthocyanin treatment and single-walled carbon nanotube addition on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells

    Chou, C S; Huang, Y H; Chen, Y S; Tsai, P J; Wu, P; Shu, G G

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the performance of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) sensitized by a natural sensitizer of Taiwan Roselle anthocyanin (TRA) and fabrication process conditions of the DSSC. A set of systematic experiments has been carried out at various soaking temperatures, soaking periods, sensitizer concentrations, pH values, and additions of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT). An absorption peak (520 nm) is found for TRA, and it is close to that of the N719 dye (518 nm). At a fixed concentration of TRA and a fixed soaking period, a lower pH of the extract or a lower soaking temperature is found favorable to the formation of pigment cations, which leads to an enhanced power conversion efficiency (η) of DSSC. For instance, by applying 17.53 mg/100ml TRA at 30 for 10 h, as the pH of the extract decreases to 2.00 from 2.33 (the original pH of TRA), the η of DSSC with TiO 2 +SWCNT electrode increases to 0.67% from 0.11% of a traditional DSSC with TiO 2 electrode. This performance improvement can be explained by the combined effect of the pH of sensitizer and the additions of SWCNT, a first investigation in DSSC using the natural sensitizer with SWCNT.

  17. Effects of Taiwan Roselle anthocyanin treatment and single-walled carbon nanotube addition on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells

    Chou, C. S.; Tsai, P. J.; Wu, P.; Shu, G. G.; Huang, Y. H.; Chen, Y. S.

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the performance of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) sensitized by a natural sensitizer of Taiwan Roselle anthocyanin (TRA) and fabrication process conditions of the DSSC. A set of systematic experiments has been carried out at various soaking temperatures, soaking periods, sensitizer concentrations, pH values, and additions of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT). An absorption peak (520 nm) is found for TRA, and it is close to that of the N719 dye (518 nm). At a fixed concentration of TRA and a fixed soaking period, a lower pH of the extract or a lower soaking temperature is found favorable to the formation of pigment cations, which leads to an enhanced power conversion efficiency (η) of DSSC. For instance, by applying 17.53 mg/100ml TRA at 30 for 10 h, as the pH of the extract decreases to 2.00 from 2.33 (the original pH of TRA), the η of DSSC with TiO2+SWCNT electrode increases to 0.67% from 0.11% of a traditional DSSC with TiO2 electrode. This performance improvement can be explained by the combined effect of the pH of sensitizer and the additions of SWCNT, a first investigation in DSSC using the natural sensitizer with SWCNT.

  18. Improvement in interfacial characteristics of low-voltage carbon nanotube thin-film transistors with solution-processed boron nitride thin films

    Jeon, Jun-Young; Ha, Tae-Jun, E-mail: taejunha0604@gmail.com

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • We demonstrate the potential of solution-processed boron nitride (BN) thin films for nanoelectronics. • Improved interfacial characteristics reduced the leakage current by three orders of magnitude. • The BN encapsulation improves all the device key metrics of low-voltage SWCNT-TFTs. • Such improvements were achieved by reduced interaction of interfacial localized states. - Abstract: In this article, we demonstrate the potential of solution-processed boron nitride (BN) thin films for high performance single-walled carbon nanotube thin-film transistors (SWCNT-TFTs) with low-voltage operation. The use of BN thin films between solution-processed high-k dielectric layers improved the interfacial characteristics of metal-insulator-metal devices, thereby reducing the current density by three orders of magnitude. We also investigated the origin of improved device performance in SWCNT-TFTs by employing solution-processed BN thin films as an encapsulation layer. The BN encapsulation layer improves the electrical characteristics of SWCNT-TFTs, which includes the device key metrics of linear field-effect mobility, sub-threshold swing, and threshold voltage as well as the long-term stability against the aging effect in air. Such improvements can be achieved by reduced interaction of interfacial localized states with charge carriers. We believe that this work can open up a promising route to demonstrate the potential of solution-processed BN thin films on nanoelectronics.

  19. A DFT comparative study of single and double SO2 adsorption on Pt-doped and Au-doped single-walled carbon nanotube

    Yoosefian, Mehdi; Zahedi, Mansour; Mola, Adeleh; Naserian, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Investigation of the adsorption of SO 2 on Au/SWCNT and Pt/SWCNT. • SO 2 adsorbed on Au/SWCNT and Pt/SWCNT system demonstrate a strong chemisorption. • NBO analysis was done to reach more understanding about intermolecular interactions. - Abstract: Adsorption of single and double SO 2 gas molecule(s) on the surface of Pt-doped and Au-doped (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes (Pt/CNT-V and Au/CNT-V) were investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/LANL2DZ level. The results showed the following: firstly, adsorption on Au/CNT-V is independent of special orientation, secondly, SO 2 adsorption on Pt/CNT-V in single case is stronger than Au/CNT-V, and finally, adsorption of the first molecule influences adsorption of the second one. Upon adsorption of SO 2 molecule(s), the energy gap of Pt/CNT-V were considerably reduced, resulting in enhanced electrical conductivity but in Au/CNT-V, despite of adsorption energy similar to Pt/CNT-V, E g slightly increased. In order to consider the effect of adsorption on electronic properties, DOS and PDOS calculations were performed. Moreover, NBO analysis was done to reach more understanding about intermolecular interactions. In conclusion, chemical reactivity was investigated in terms of chemical hardness, softness and work function (ϕ)

  20. Fabrication of single walled carbon nanotubes/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) layers under enhanced gravity drying

    Rincón, M.E.; Alvarado-Tenorio, G.; Vargas, M.G.; Ramos, E.; Sánchez-Tizapa, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution, we explore the use of enhanced gravity in order to achieve composite films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) with improved properties. The samples were characterized by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, in order to determine the differences caused by the enhanced gravity. Impedance spectroscopy results show that there is an improvement of the electrical properties of the SWCNT/PEDOT:PSS junction, manifested as lower contact resistance, modified chemical capacitance, and induced p-type doping. A force-induced interpenetration of the polymer into the SWCNT network and the efficient removal of water and PSS are proposed to explain the results. The transparency and electrical properties of these films forecast their application as a buffer layer in organic solar cell heterojunctions, or as hole transporting materials in perovskite-based solar cells. - Highlights: • A technique to fabricate conductive films of SWCNT/PEDOT:PSS is presented. • The technique is based on enhanced gravity drying. • Improved interpenetration of the bilayer SWCNT/PEDOT:PSS system • Enhanced gravity increases the p-type conductivity of the film. • Impedance spectroscopy confirms the improvement on the electrical properties.

  1. Competitive nonlinear pricing and bundling

    Armstrong, Mark; Vickers, John

    2006-01-01

    We examine the impact of multiproduct nonlinear pricing on profit, consumer surplus and welfare in a duopoly. When consumers buy all their products from one firm (the one-stop shopping model), nonlinear pricing leads to higher profit and welfare, but often lower consumer surplus, than linear pricing. By contrast, in a unit-demand model where consumers may buy one product from one firm and another product from another firm, bundling generally acts to reduce profit and welfare and to boost cons...

  2. Nanotube cathodes.

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  3. Nanotube cathodes

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  4. New tools for nanotechnology and measurement of the mechanical properties of individual carbon nanotubes

    Yu, Min-Feng

    A new tool capable of three-dimensional manipulation and measurement of the mechanics of nanometer-sized materials inside a scanning electron microscopy is developed and demonstrated. The design and function of this home-built SEM nanomanipulator is explained. The first free-space manipulation of carbon nanotubes is presented. The tensile strength and the breaking mechanism of individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) ropes are measured using the nanomanipulator, and from the data set the stress-strain relationship is determined. The results indicate that carbon nanotubes have remarkably high tensile strength values, about 50 GPa. The shear strength measurement of sliding nested shells in individual MWCNTs is also achieved for the first time. The experiment provides a new way to directly study the nano-scale interaction involved in the motion of a nanobearing. In a separate work, atomic force microscopy is used to study the lateral deformability of individual MWCNTs. The average force provided by the tapping tip in tapping mode AFM is investigated by both simulation and experiment. An imaging procedure for controlling the average tapping force is developed and is used to study the deformability of carbon nanotubes. The stability of different structures of carbon nanotube is also experimentally studied.

  5. Channeling potential in single-walled carbon nanotubes: The effect of radial deformation

    Abu-Assy, M.K.; Soliman, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of radial deformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), due to one external factor, on the channeling potential. The calculations covered the channeling potential for positrons of 100 MeV move along the z-axis, which is the axis of the radially deformed SWCNTs (6, 0), (8, 0) under external mechanical stress at different values for the induced strain and also for radially deformed SWCNT (5, 5) under external transverse electric field of 1.8 and 2.6 V/Å. The calculations executed according to the continuum model approximation given by Lindhard for the case of an axial channeling in single crystals. The results of the calculations in this work agreed well with previous calculations depending on the equilibrium electron density in perfect carbon nanotubes. It has been found that, for perfect nanotubes, the channeling potential, i.e., the potential at any point (x, y) in a plane normal to the nanotube axis (xy-plane), is a function of the distance from the nanotube center whatever the (x, y) coordinate and hence, it could be expressed in terms of one independent variable. On the other hand, in radially deformed SWCNTs, the channeling potential was found to be a function of two independent variables (x, y) and could be given here by a general formula in terms of fitting parameters for each nanotube with chiral index (n, m). The obtained formula has been used in plotting the contour plot for the channeling potential.

  6. Channeling potential in single-walled carbon nanotubes: The effect of radial deformation

    Abu-Assy, M.K. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez-Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt); Soliman, M.S., E-mail: Mahmoud_einstien2@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez-Canal University, El-Arish (Egypt)

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of radial deformation in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), due to one external factor, on the channeling potential. The calculations covered the channeling potential for positrons of 100 MeV move along the z-axis, which is the axis of the radially deformed SWCNTs (6, 0), (8, 0) under external mechanical stress at different values for the induced strain and also for radially deformed SWCNT (5, 5) under external transverse electric field of 1.8 and 2.6 V/Å. The calculations executed according to the continuum model approximation given by Lindhard for the case of an axial channeling in single crystals. The results of the calculations in this work agreed well with previous calculations depending on the equilibrium electron density in perfect carbon nanotubes. It has been found that, for perfect nanotubes, the channeling potential, i.e., the potential at any point (x, y) in a plane normal to the nanotube axis (xy-plane), is a function of the distance from the nanotube center whatever the (x, y) coordinate and hence, it could be expressed in terms of one independent variable. On the other hand, in radially deformed SWCNTs, the channeling potential was found to be a function of two independent variables (x, y) and could be given here by a general formula in terms of fitting parameters for each nanotube with chiral index (n, m). The obtained formula has been used in plotting the contour plot for the channeling potential.

  7. A molecular-mechanics based finite element model for strength prediction of single wall carbon nanotubes

    Meo, M.; Rossi, M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a finite element model based on molecular mechanics to predict the ultimate strength and strain of single wallet carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The interactions between atoms was modelled by combining the use of non-linear elastic and torsional elastic spring. In particular, with this approach, it was tried to combine the molecular mechanics approach with finite element method without providing any not-physical data on the interactions between the carbon atoms, i.e. the CC-bond inertia moment or Young's modulus definition. Mechanical properties as Young's modulus, ultimate strength and strain for several CNTs were calculated. Further, a stress-strain curve for large deformation (up to 70%) is reported for a nanotube Zig-Zag (9,0). The results showed that good agreement with the experimental and numerical results of several authors was obtained. A comparison of the mechanical properties of nanotubes with same diameter and different chirality was carried out. Finally, the influence of the presence of defects on the strength and strain of a SWNT was also evaluated. In particular, the stress-strain curve a nanotube with one-vacancy defect was evaluated and compared with the curve of a pristine one, showing a reduction of the ultimate strength and strain for the defected nanotube. The FE model proposed demonstrate to be a reliable tool to simulate mechanical behaviour of carbon nanotubes both in the linear elastic field and the non-linear elastic field

  8. Few-layered MnO2/SWCNT hybrid in-plane supercapacitor with high energy density

    Dutta, Shibsankar; Pal, Shreyasi; De, Sukanta

    2018-05-01

    In this present work we have synthesized few layered MnO2 nanosheets by mixed solvent exfoliation process for the application as electrode material of in-plane supercapacitor. The Structure and surface morphology of the as prepared samples are characterized by Raman, Transmission electron microscopy and Scanning electron microscopy. The patterns of the hybrids were directly fabricated by (50: 50 wt %) mixture of MnO2 and SWCNT dispersions with the help of a customized mask, and directly transferred onto a flexible PET substrate. Remarkably, the prepared in-plane supercapacitors deliver high energy density of 2.62mWh/cm2. Furthermore, our supercapacitors shows exceptional flexibility and stable performance under bending conditions

  9. High-Purity Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: A Key Enabling Material in Emerging Electronics.

    Lefebvre, Jacques; Ding, Jianfu; Li, Zhao; Finnie, Paul; Lopinski, Gregory; Malenfant, Patrick R L

    2017-10-17

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (sc-SWCNTs) are emerging as a promising material for high-performance, high-density devices as well as low-cost, large-area macroelectronics produced via additive manufacturing methods such as roll-to-roll printing. Proof-of-concept demonstrations have indicated the potential of sc-SWCNTs for digital electronics, radiofrequency circuits, radiation hard memory, improved sensors, and flexible, stretchable, conformable electronics. Advances toward commercial applications bring numerous opportunities in SWCNT materials development and characterization as well as fabrication processes and printing technologies. Commercialization in electronics will require large quantities of sc-SWCNTs, and the challenge for materials science is the development of scalable synthesis, purification, and enrichment methods. While a few synthesis routes have shown promising results in making near-monochiral SWCNTs, gram quantities are available only for small-diameter sc-SWCNTs, which underperform in transistors. Most synthesis routes yield mixtures of SWCNTs, typically 30% metallic and 70% semiconducting, necessitating the extraction of sc-SWCNTs from their metallic counterparts in high purity using scalable postsynthetic methods. Numerous routes to obtain high-purity sc-SWCNTs from raw soot have been developed, including density-gradient ultracentrifugation, chromatography, aqueous two-phase extraction, and selective DNA or polymer wrapping. By these methods (termed sorting or enrichment), >99% sc-SWCNT content can be achieved. Currently, all of these approaches have drawbacks and limitations with respect to electronics applications, such as excessive dilution, expensive consumables, and high ionic impurity content. Excess amount of dispersant is a common challenge that hinders direct inclusion of sc-SWCNTs into electronic devices. At present, conjugated polymer extraction may represent the most practical route to sc-SWCNTs. By the use of

  10. Signal detection by active, noisy hair bundles

    O'Maoiléidigh, Dáibhid; Salvi, Joshua D.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2018-05-01

    Vertebrate ears employ hair bundles to transduce mechanical movements into electrical signals, but their performance is limited by noise. Hair bundles are substantially more sensitive to periodic stimulation when they are mechanically active, however, than when they are passive. We developed a model of active hair-bundle mechanics that predicts the conditions under which a bundle is most sensitive to periodic stimulation. The model relies only on the existence of mechanotransduction channels and an active adaptation mechanism that recloses the channels. For a frequency-detuned stimulus, a noisy hair bundle's phase-locked response and degree of entrainment as well as its detection bandwidth are maximized when the bundle exhibits low-amplitude spontaneous oscillations. The phase-locked response and entrainment of a bundle are predicted to peak as functions of the noise level. We confirmed several of these predictions experimentally by periodically forcing hair bundles held near the onset of self-oscillation. A hair bundle's active process amplifies the stimulus preferentially over the noise, allowing the bundle to detect periodic forces less than 1 pN in amplitude. Moreover, the addition of noise can improve a bundle's ability to detect the stimulus. Although, mechanical activity has not yet been observed in mammalian hair bundles, a related model predicts that active but quiescent bundles can oscillate spontaneously when they are loaded by a sufficiently massive object such as the tectorial membrane. Overall, this work indicates that auditory systems rely on active elements, composed of hair cells and their mechanical environment, that operate on the brink of self-oscillation.

  11. In situ measurements and transmission electron microscopy of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    Kim, Taekyung; Kim, Seongwon; Olson, Eric; Zuo Jianmin

    2008-01-01

    We present the design and operation of a transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-compatible carbon nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistor (FET). The device is configured with microfabricated slits, which allows direct observation of CNTs in a FET using TEM and measurement of electrical transport while inside the TEM. As demonstrations of the device architecture, two examples are presented. The first example is an in situ electrical transport measurement of a bundle of carbon nanotubes. The second example is a study of electron beam radiation effect on CNT bundles using a 200 keV electron beam. In situ electrical transport measurement during the beam irradiation shows a signature of wall- or tube-breakdown. Stepwise current drops were observed when a high intensity electron beam was used to cut individual CNT bundles in a device with multiple bundles

  12. Study of the surface chemistry and morphology of single walled carbon nanotube-magnetite composites

    Marquez-Linares, F.; Uwakweh, O.N.C.; Lopez, N.; Chavez, E.; Polanco, R.; Morant, C.; Sanz, J.M.; Elizalde, E.; Neira, C.; Nieto, S.; Roque-Malherbe, R.

    2011-01-01

    The study of the morphologies of the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), magnetite nanoparticles (MNP), and the composite based on them was carried with combined X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). These techniques together with thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) confirmed the production of pure single phases, and that the composite material consisted of MNP attached to the outer surface of the SWCNT. The Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) research showed the presence of a large quantity of Lewis acid sites in the highly dispersed magnetite particles supported on the SWCNT outer surface. The DRIFTS carbon dioxide adsorption study of the composites revealed significant adsorption of carbon dioxide, fundamentally in the Lewis acid sites. Then, the Lewis acid sites were observed to be catalytically active. Further, the electron exchange between the Lewis acid sites and the basic or amphoteric adsorbed molecules could influence the magnetic properties of the magnetite. Consequently, together with this first ever use of MS in the study of Lewis acid sites, this investigation revealed the potential of the composites for catalytic and sensors applications. -- Graphical abstract: A large amount of Lewis acid sites were found in the highly dispersed magnetite which is supported on the SWCNT outer surface. Display Omitted Research highlights: → The obtained materials were completely characterized with XRD, Raman and SEM-TEM. → DRIFT, TGA and adsorption of the composites allowed understand the material formation. → This is the first report of a study of Lewis sites by Moessbauer spectroscopy.

  13. Chemical sensors using coated or doped carbon nanotube networks

    Li, Jing (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods for using modified single wall carbon nanotubes ("SWCNTs") to detect presence and/or concentration of a gas component, such as a halogen (e.g., Cl.sub.2), hydrogen halides (e.g., HCl), a hydrocarbon (e.g., C.sub.nH.sub.2n+2), an alcohol, an aldehyde or a ketone, to which an unmodified SWCNT is substantially non-reactive. In a first embodiment, a connected network of SWCNTs is coated with a selected polymer, such as chlorosulfonated polyethylene, hydroxypropyl cellulose, polystyrene and/or polyvinylalcohol, and change in an electrical parameter or response value (e.g., conductance, current, voltage difference or resistance) of the coated versus uncoated SWCNT networks is analyzed. In a second embodiment, the network is doped with a transition element, such as Pd, Pt, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os and/or Au, and change in an electrical parameter value is again analyzed. The parameter change value depends monotonically, not necessarily linearly, upon concentration of the gas component. Two general algorithms are presented for estimating concentration value(s), or upper or lower concentration bounds on such values, from measured differences of response values.

  14. Properties of electrophoretically deposited single wall carbon nanotube films

    Lim, Junyoung; Jalali, Maryam; Campbell, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes techniques for rapidly producing a carbon nanotube thin film by electrophoretic deposition at room temperature and determines the film mass density and electrical/mechanical properties of such films. The mechanism of electrophoretic deposition of thin layers is explained with experimental data. Also, film thickness is measured as a function of time, electrical field and suspension concentration. We use Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy to determine the film mass density. Films created in this manner have a resistivity of 2.14 × 10 −3 Ω·cm, a mass density that varies with thickness from 0.12 to 0.54 g/cm 3 , and a Young's modulus between 4.72 and 5.67 GPa. The latter was found to be independent of thickness from 77 to 134 nm. We also report on fabricating free-standing films by removing the metal seed layer under the CNT film, and selectively etching a sacrificial layer. This method could be extended to flexible photovoltaic devices or high frequency RF MEMS devices. - Highlights: • We explain the electrophoretic deposition process and mechanism of thin SWCNT film deposition. • Characterization of the SWCNT film properties including density, resistivity, transmittance, and Young's modulus. • The film density and resistivity are found to be a function of the film thickness. • Techniques developed to create free standing layers of SW-CNTs for flexible electronics and mechanical actuators

  15. Carbon Nanotubes as Counter Electrodes for Gratzel Solar Cells

    Shodive, Hasan; Aliev, Ali; Zhang, Mei; Lee, Sergey; Baughman, Ray; Zakhidov, Anvar

    2006-03-01

    The role of interfaces is very critical for solar cell devices which use nanostructured materials. Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSC) are devices which parts are interfacial in character and physico --chemical processes occur at the interface of two distinct media. DSSC are of great interest due to combination of their high efficiency and relatively low cost. An effective counterelectrode with high electrochemical activity is an important component of DSSC to enhance its practical utility. Presently used Pt coated ITO counterelectrode can not be applied in flexible DSSC architectures, while there is a growing need for flexible anodes which are transparent and have desired interface characteristics. In this work in order to search for such materials for counter electrode in dye sensitized solar cells, newly developed strong and transparent and modified carbon nanotube sheets [1] are used in interfacial counter electrode. To increase the electrochemical activity of the anode the CNT sheets are coated with highly conductive SWCNT and compared with pure multiwall CNT sheets. We show that the transparent sheets of SWCNT/MWCNT perform as a flexible anode and as electrochemical catalyst and also can be used in tandems of dye sensitized solar cells as transparent charge recombination or interconnect layers. [1] M. Zhang, S.Fang, A.Zakhidov, S.B.Lee, A.Aliev et.al., Science, 309,(2005) 1215

  16. Use of alkali metal salts to prepare high purity single-walled carbon nanotube solutions and thin films

    Ashour, Rakan F.

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) display interesting electronic and optical properties desired for many advanced thin film applications, such as transparent conductive electrodes or thin-film transistors. Large-scale production of SWCNTs generally results in polydispersed mixtures of nanotube structures. Since SWCNT electronic character (conducting or semiconducting nature) depends on the nanotube structure, application performance is being held back by this inability to discretely control SWCNT synthesis. Although a number of post-production techniques are able to separate SWCNTs based on electronic character, diameter, or chirality, most still suffer from the disadvantage of high costs of materials, equipment, or labor intensity to be relevant for large-scale production. On the other hand, chromatographic separation has emerged as a method that is compatible with large scale separation of metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs. In this work, SWCNTs, in an aqueous surfactant suspension of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), are separated by their electronic character using a gel chromatography process. Metallic SWCNTs (m-SWCNTs) are collected as initial fractions since they show minimum interaction with the gel medium, whereas, semiconducting SWCNTs (sc- SWCNTs) remain adsorbed to the gel. The process of sc-SWCNT retention in the gel is found to be driven by the packing density of SDS around the SWCNTs. Through a series of separation experiments, it is shown that sc-SWCNTs can be eluted from the gel simply by disturbing the configuration of the SDS/SWCNT micellar structure. This is achieved by either introducing a solution containing a co-surfactant, such as sodium cholate (SC), or solutions of alkali metal ionic salts. Analysis of SWCNT suspensions by optical absorption provides insights into the effect of changing the metal ion (M+ = Li+, Na+, and K+) in the eluting solution. Salts with smaller metal ions (e.g. Li+) require higher concentrations to achieve

  17. Aligned, isotropic and patterned carbon nanotube substrates that control the growth and alignment of Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Abdullah, Che Azurahanim Che; Asanithi, Piyapong; Brunner, Eric W; Jurewicz, Izabela; Bo, Chiara; Sear, Richard P; Dalton, Alan B [Department of Physics and Surrey Materials Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Azad, Chihye Lewis; Ovalle-Robles, Raquel; Fang Shaoli; Lima, Marcio D; Lepro, Xavier; Collins, Steve; Baughman, Ray H, E-mail: r.sear@surrey.ac.uk [Alan G MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080-3021 (United States)

    2011-05-20

    Here we culture Chinese hamster ovary cells on isotropic, aligned and patterned substrates based on multiwall carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes provide the substrate with nanoscale topography. The cells adhere to and grow on all substrates, and on the aligned substrate, the cells align strongly with the axis of the bundles of the multiwall nanotubes. This control over cell alignment is required for tissue engineering; almost all tissues consist of oriented cells. The aligned substrates are made using straightforward physical chemistry techniques from forests of multiwall nanotubes; no lithography is required to make inexpensive large-scale substrates with highly aligned nanoscale grooves. Interestingly, although the cells strongly align with the nanoscale grooves, only a few also elongate along this axis: alignment of the cells does not require a pronounced change in morphology of the cell. We also pattern the nanotube bundles over length scales comparable to the cell size and show that the cells follow this pattern.

  18. Job Management and Task Bundling

    Berkowitz, Evan; Jansen, Gustav R.; McElvain, Kenneth; Walker-Loud, André

    2018-03-01

    High Performance Computing is often performed on scarce and shared computing resources. To ensure computers are used to their full capacity, administrators often incentivize large workloads that are not possible on smaller systems. Measurements in Lattice QCD frequently do not scale to machine-size workloads. By bundling tasks together we can create large jobs suitable for gigantic partitions. We discuss METAQ and mpi_jm, software developed to dynamically group computational tasks together, that can intelligently backfill to consume idle time without substantial changes to users' current workflows or executables.

  19. Job Management and Task Bundling

    Berkowitz Evan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available High Performance Computing is often performed on scarce and shared computing resources. To ensure computers are used to their full capacity, administrators often incentivize large workloads that are not possible on smaller systems. Measurements in Lattice QCD frequently do not scale to machine-size workloads. By bundling tasks together we can create large jobs suitable for gigantic partitions. We discuss METAQ and mpi_jm, software developed to dynamically group computational tasks together, that can intelligently backfill to consume idle time without substantial changes to users’ current workflows or executables.

  20. Fuel bundle for nuclear reactor

    Long, J.W.; Flora, B.S.; Ford, K.L.

    1977-01-01

    The invention concerns a new, simple and inexpensive system for assembling and dismantling a nuclear reactor fuel bundle. Several fuel rods are fitted in parallel rows between two retaining plates which secure the fuel rods in position and which are maintained in an assembled position by means of several stays fixed to the two end plates. The invention particularly refers to an improved apparatus for fixing the stays to the upper plate by using locking fittings secured to rotating sleeves which are applied against this plate [fr

  1. Reduction of symplectic principal R-bundles

    Lacirasella, Ignazio; Marrero, Juan Carlos; Padrón, Edith

    2012-01-01

    We describe a reduction process for symplectic principal R-bundles in the presence of a momentum map. These types of structures play an important role in the geometric formulation of non-autonomous Hamiltonian systems. We apply this procedure to the standard symplectic principal R-bundle associated with a fibration π:M→R. Moreover, we show a reduction process for non-autonomous Hamiltonian systems on symplectic principal R-bundles. We apply these reduction processes to several examples. (paper)

  2. ACM Bundles on Del Pezzo surfaces

    Joan Pons-Llopis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available ACM rank 1 bundles on del Pezzo surfaces are classified in terms of the rational normal curves that they contain. A complete list of ACM line bundles is provided. Moreover, for any del Pezzo surface X of degree less or equal than six and for any n ≥ 2 we construct a family of dimension ≥ n − 1 of non-isomorphic simple ACM bundles of rank n on X.

  3. Bundling and mergers in energy markets

    Granier, Laurent; Podesta, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Does bundling trigger mergers in energy industries? We observe mergers between firms belonging to various energy markets, for instance between gas and electricity providers. These mergers enable firms to bundle. We consider two horizontally differentiated markets. In this framework, we show that bundling strategies in energy markets create incentives to form multi-market firms in order to supply bi-energy packages. Moreover, we find that this type of merger is detrimental to social welfare. (author)

  4. Relaxation dynamics of glass transition in PMMA + SWCNT composites by temperature-modulated DSC

    Pradhan, N. R.; Iannacchione, G. S.

    2010-03-01

    The experimental technique offered by temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimeter (TMDSC) used to investigate the thermal relaxation dynamics through the glass transition as a function of frequency was studied for pure PMMA and PMMA-single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) composites. A strong dependence of the temperature dependence peak in the imaginary part of complex heat capacity (Tmax) is found during the transition from the glass-like to the liquid-like region. The frequency dependence of Tmax of the imaginary part of heat capacity (Cp) is described by Arrhenius law. The activation energy obtained from the fitting shows increases while the characteristic relaxation time decreases with increasing mass fraction (phim) of SWCNTs. The dynamics of the composites during glass transition, at slow and high scan rates, are also the main focus of this experimental study. The change in enthalpy during heating and cooling is also reported as a function of scan rate and frequency of temperature modulation. The glass transition temperature (Tg) shows increases with increasing frequency of temperature modulation and phim of SWCNTs inside the polymer host. Experimental results show that Tg is higher at higher scan rates but as the frequency of temperature modulation increases, the Tg values of different scan rates coincide with each other and alter the scan rate dependence. From the imaginary part of heat capacity, it is obvious that Tmax is not the actual glass transition temperature of pure polymer but Tmax and Tg values can be superimposed when phim increases in the polymer host or when the sample undergoes a transition with a certain frequency of temperature modulation.

  5. Super-bridges suspended over carbon nanotube cables

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper the new concept of 'super-bridges', i.e. kilometre-long bridges suspended over carbon nanotube cables, is introduced. The analysis shows that the use of realistic (thus defective) carbon nanotube bundles as suspension cables can enlarge the current limit main span by a factor of ~3. Too large compliance and dynamic self-excited resonances could be avoided by additional strands, rendering the super-bridge anchored as a spider's cobweb. As an example, we have computed the limit main spans of the current existing 19 suspended-deck bridges longer than 1 km assuming them to have substituted their cables with carbon nanotube bundles (thus maintaining the same geometry, with the exception of the length) finding spans of up to ~6.3 km. We thus suggest that the design of the Messina bridge in Italy, which would require a main span of ~3.3 km, could benefit from the use of carbon nanotube bundles. We believe that their use represents a feasible and economically convenient solution. The plausibility of these affirmations is confirmed by a statistical analysis of the existing 100 longest suspended bridges, which follow a Zipf's law with an exponent of 1.1615: we have found a Moore-like (i.e. exponential) law, in which the doubling of the capacity (here the main span) per year is substituted by the factor 1.0138. Such a law predicts that the realization of the Messina bridge using conventional materials will only occur around the middle of the present century, whereas it could be expected in the near future if carbon nanotube bundles were used. A simple cost analysis concludes the paper.

  6. Super-bridges suspended over carbon nanotube cables

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Pugno, Nicola M

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the new concept of 'super-bridges', i.e. kilometre-long bridges suspended over carbon nanotube cables, is introduced. The analysis shows that the use of realistic (thus defective) carbon nanotube bundles as suspension cables can enlarge the current limit main span by a factor of ∼3. Too large compliance and dynamic self-excited resonances could be avoided by additional strands, rendering the super-bridge anchored as a spider's cobweb. As an example, we have computed the limit main spans of the current existing 19 suspended-deck bridges longer than 1 km assuming them to have substituted their cables with carbon nanotube bundles (thus maintaining the same geometry, with the exception of the length) finding spans of up to ∼6.3 km. We thus suggest that the design of the Messina bridge in Italy, which would require a main span of ∼3.3 km, could benefit from the use of carbon nanotube bundles. We believe that their use represents a feasible and economically convenient solution. The plausibility of these affirmations is confirmed by a statistical analysis of the existing 100 longest suspended bridges, which follow a Zipf's law with an exponent of 1.1615: we have found a Moore-like (i.e. exponential) law, in which the doubling of the capacity (here the main span) per year is substituted by the factor 1.0138. Such a law predicts that the realization of the Messina bridge using conventional materials will only occur around the middle of the present century, whereas it could be expected in the near future if carbon nanotube bundles were used. A simple cost analysis concludes the paper.

  7. Electroluminescence from single-wall carbon nanotube network transistors.

    Adam, E; Aguirre, C M; Marty, L; St-Antoine, B C; Meunier, F; Desjardins, P; Ménard, D; Martel, R

    2008-08-01

    The electroluminescence (EL) properties from single-wall carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors (NNFETs) and small bundle carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNFETs) are studied using spectroscopy and imaging in the near-infrared (NIR). At room temperature, NNFETs produce broad (approximately 180 meV) and structured NIR spectra, while they are narrower (approximately 80 meV) for CNFETs. EL emission from NNFETs is located in the vicinity of the minority carrier injecting contact (drain) and the spectrum of the emission is red shifted with respect to the corresponding absorption spectrum. A phenomenological model based on a Fermi-Dirac distribution of carriers in the nanotube network reproduces the spectral features observed. This work supports bipolar (electron-hole) current recombination as the main mechanism of emission and highlights the drastic influence of carrier distribution on the optoelectronic properties of carbon nanotube films.

  8. Carbon nanotubes for interconnects process, design and applications

    Dijon, Jean; Maffucci, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference on the use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as interconnect material for horizontal, on-chip and 3D interconnects. The authors demonstrate the uses of bundles of CNTs, as innovative conducting material to fabricate interconnect through-silicon vias (TSVs), in order to improve the performance, reliability and integration of 3D integrated circuits (ICs). This book will be first to provide a coherent overview of exploiting carbon nanotubes for 3D interconnects covering aspects from processing, modeling, simulation, characterization and applications. Coverage also includes a thorough presentation of the application of CNTs as horizontal on-chip interconnects which can potentially revolutionize the nanoelectronics industry. This book is a must-read for anyone interested in the state-of-the-art on exploiting carbon nanotubes for interconnects for both 2D and 3D integrated circuits. Provides a single-source reference on carbon nanotubes for interconnect applications; Includes c...

  9. Entropy for frame bundle systems and Grassmann bundle systems induced by a diffeomorphism

    SUN; Weniang(孙文祥)

    2002-01-01

    ALiao hyperbolic diffeomorphism has equal measure entropy and topological entropy to that ofits induced systems on frame bundles and Grassmann bundles. This solves a problem Liao posed in 1996 forLiao hyperbolic diffeomorphisms.

  10. Hydraulic characteristics of HANARO fuel bundles

    Cho, S.; Chung, H. J.; Chun, S. Y.; Yang, S. K.; Chung, M. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents the hydraulic characteristics measured by using LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry) in subchannels of HANARO, KAERI research reactor, fuel bundle. The fuel bundle consists of 18 axially finned rods with 3 spacer grids, which are arranged in cylindrical configuration. The effects of the spacer grids on the turbulent flow were investigated by the experimental results. Pressure drops for each component of the fuel bundle were measured, and the friction factors of fuel bundle and loss coefficients for the spacer grids were estimated from the measured pressure drops. Implications regarding the turbulent thermal mixing were discussed. Vibration test results measured by using laser vibrometer were presented. 9 refs., 12 figs. (Author)

  11. Hydraulic characteristics of HANARO fuel bundles

    Cho, S; Chung, H J; Chun, S Y; Yang, S K; Chung, M K [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents the hydraulic characteristics measured by using LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry) in subchannels of HANARO, KAERI research reactor, fuel bundle. The fuel bundle consists of 18 axially finned rods with 3 spacer grids, which are arranged in cylindrical configuration. The effects of the spacer grids on the turbulent flow were investigated by the experimental results. Pressure drops for each component of the fuel bundle were measured, and the friction factors of fuel bundle and loss coefficients for the spacer grids were estimated from the measured pressure drops. Implications regarding the turbulent thermal mixing were discussed. Vibration test results measured by using laser vibrometer were presented. 9 refs., 12 figs. (Author)

  12. Cotangent bundle approach to noninertial frames

    DeFacio, B.; Retzloff, D.

    1980-01-01

    The most general possible noninertial acceleration in special relativity is formulated with differential forms in the cotangent bundle. We show that the Lie derivative plays the same role in the cotangent bundle that the covariant derivative plays in the tangent bundle. We also show that a cotangent bundle analog of Fermi--Walker transport can be based upon the, ''cotangent-geodesic'' equation, L/sub u/ω=0. This gives a generalization of the work by Kiehn on classical Hamiltonian mechanics to special relativity

  13. Nanotube phonon waveguide

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2013-10-29

    Disclosed are methods and devices in which certain types of nanotubes (e.g., carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes conduct heat with high efficiency and are therefore useful in electronic-type devices.

  14. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes for sensing unidirectional fluid flow

    Kiani, Keivan, E-mail: k_kiani@kntu.ac.ir

    2015-05-15

    From applied mechanics points of view, potential application of ensembles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as fluid flow sensors is aimed to be examined. To this end, useful nonlocal analytical and numerical models are developed. The deflection of the ensemble of SWCNTs at the tip is introduced as a measure of its sensitivity. The influences of the length and radius of the SWCNT, intertube distance, fluid flow velocity, and distance of the ensemble from the leading edge of the rigid base on the deflection field of the ensemble are comprehensively examined. The obtained results display how calibration of an ensemble of SWCNTs can be methodically carried out in accordance with the characteristics of the ensemble and the external fluid flow.

  15. Energetics of carbon nanotubes: insights from calorimetry and neutron scattering

    Levchenko, Andrey A.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Trofymluk, Olga; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are only moderately less stable than graphite, and are significantly more stable than their fullerene counterparts. They are 7 kJ mol-1 metastable relative to graphite, and just 5 kJ mol-1 less stable than diamond. Despite striking differences in vibrational dynamics of carbon atoms in SWCNTs and graphite, their thermodynamic properties at room and higher temperatures are dominated by the same set of high energy vibrations, reflected in very similar vibrational entropies. However, the energetics of SWCNT are governed by counter-acting enthalpic contributions of the diameter-dependent strain induced by the roll-up of graphene sheets into tubes and of carbon-carbon bonding at the edges of graphene sheets in the graphite, but not the specifics of phonon density of states (PDOS).

  16. Polychiral semiconducting carbon nanotube-fullerene solar cells.

    Gong, Maogang; Shastry, Tejas A; Xie, Yu; Bernardi, Marco; Jasion, Daniel; Luck, Kyle A; Marks, Tobin J; Grossman, Jeffrey C; Ren, Shenqiang; Hersam, Mark C

    2014-09-10

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have highly desirable attributes for solution-processable thin-film photovoltaics (TFPVs), such as broadband absorption, high carrier mobility, and environmental stability. However, previous TFPVs incorporating photoactive SWCNTs have utilized architectures that have limited current, voltage, and ultimately power conversion efficiency (PCE). Here, we report a solar cell geometry that maximizes photocurrent using polychiral SWCNTs while retaining high photovoltage, leading to record-high efficiency SWCNT-fullerene solar cells with average NREL certified and champion PCEs of 2.5% and 3.1%, respectively. Moreover, these cells show significant absorption in the near-infrared portion of the solar spectrum that is currently inaccessible by many leading TFPV technologies.

  17. Excitons in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Dynamics

    Amori, Amanda R.; Hou, Zhentao; Krauss, Todd D.

    2018-04-01

    Understanding exciton dynamics in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is essential to unlocking the many potential applications of these materials. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding exciton photophysics and, in particular, exciton dynamics in SWCNTs. We outline the basic physical and electronic properties of SWCNTs, as well as bright and dark transitions within the framework of a strongly bound one-dimensional excitonic model. We discuss the many facets of ultrafast carrier dynamics in SWCNTs, including both single-exciton states (bright and dark) and multiple-exciton states. Photophysical properties that directly relate to excitons and their dynamics, including exciton diffusion lengths, chemical and structural defects, environmental effects, and photoluminescence photon statistics as observed through photon antibunching measurements, are also discussed. Finally, we identify a few key areas for advancing further research in the field of SWCNT excitons and photonics.

  18. Printable Thin Film Supercapacitors Using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Kaempgen, Martti

    2009-05-13

    Thin film supercapacitors were fabricated using printable materials to make flexible devices on plastic. The active electrodes were made from sprayed networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) serving as both electrodes and charge collectors. Using a printable aqueous gel electrolyte as well as an organic liquid electrolyte, the performances of the devices show very high energy and power densities (6 W h/kg for both electrolytes and 23 and 70 kW/kg for aqueous gel electrolyte and organic electrolyte, respectively) which is comparable to performance in other SWCNT-based supercapacitor devices fabricated using different methods. The results underline the potential of printable thin film supercapacitors. The simplified architecture and the sole use of printable materials may lead to a new class of entirely printable charge storage devices allowing for full integration with the emerging field of printed electronics. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  19. Optically and biologically active mussel protein-coated double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Jung, Yong Chae; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Kim, Jin Hee; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2011-12-02

    A method of dispersing strongly bundled double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) via a homogeneous coating of mussel protein in an aqueous solution is presented. Optical activity, mechanical strength, as well as electrical conductivity coming from the nanotubes and the versatile biological activity from the mussel protein make mussel-coated DWNTs promising as a multifunctional scaffold and for anti-fouling materials. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Electrical measurements on submicronic synthetic conductors : carbon nanotubes

    Langer, L [Unite de Physico-Chimie et de Physique des Materiaux, Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Stockman, L [Lab. voor Vaste Stof-Fysika en Magnetisme, Katholieke Univ. Leuven (Belgium); Heremans, J P [Physics Dept., General Motors Research, Warren, MI (United States); Bayot, V [Unite de Physico-Chimie et de Physique des Materiaux, Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Olk, C H [Physics Dept., General Motors Research, Warren, MI (United States); Haesendonck, C van [Lab. voor Vaste Stof-Fysika en Magnetisme, Katholieke Univ. Leuven (Belgium); Bruynseraede, Y [Lab. voor Vaste Stof-Fysika en Magnetisme, Katholieke Univ. Leuven (Belgium); Issi, J P [Unite de Physico-Chimie et de Physique des Materiaux, Univ. Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    1995-03-15

    The synthesis of very small samples has raised the need for a drastic miniaturization of the classical four-probe technique in order to realize electrical resistance measurements. Two methods to realize electrical contacts on very small fibers are described here. Using classical photolithography the electrical resistivity of a submicronic catalytic chemical vapour deposited filament is estimated. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) lithography allowed to attach small gold contacts to a small bundle (diameter 50 nm) of carbon nanotubes. This bundle is found to exhibit a semimetallic behavior at higher temperature and an unexpected drop of the electrical resistivity at lower temperature. (orig.)

  1. IrOx-carbon nanotube hybrids: a nanostructured material for electrodes with increased charge capacity in neural systems.

    Carretero, Nina M; Lichtenstein, Mathieu P; Pérez, Estela; Cabana, Laura; Suñol, Cristina; Casañ-Pastor, Nieves

    2014-10-01

    Nanostructured iridium oxide-carbon nanotube hybrids (IrOx-CNT) deposited as thin films by dynamic electrochemical methods are suggested as novel materials for neural electrodes. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) serve as scaffolds for growing the oxide, yielding a tridimensional structure with improved physical, chemical and electrical properties, in addition to high biocompatibility. In biological environments, SWCNT encapsulation by IrOx makes more resistant electrodes and prevents the nanotube release to the media, preventing cellular toxicity. Chemical, electrochemical, structural and surface characterization of the hybrids has been accomplished. The high performance of the material in electrochemical measurements and the significant increase in cathodal charge storage capacity obtained for the hybrid in comparison with bare IrOx represent a significant advance in electric field application in biosystems, while its cyclability is also an order of magnitude greater than pure IrOx. Moreover, experiments using in vitro neuronal cultures suggest high biocompatibility for IrOx-CNT coatings and full functionality of neurons, validating this material for use in neural electrodes. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genotoxicity of carbon nanofibers: Are they potentially more or less dangerous than carbon nanotubes or asbestos?

    Kisin, E.R.; Murray, A.R.; Sargent, L.; Lowry, D.; Chirila, M.; Siegrist, K.J.; Schwegler-Berry, D.; Leonard, S.; Castranova, V.; Fadeel, B.; Kagan, V.E.; Shvedova, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The production of carbon nanofibers and nanotubes (CNF/CNT) and their composite products is increasing globally. CNF are generating great interest in industrial sectors such as energy production and electronics, where alternative materials may have limited performance or are produced at a much higher cost. However, despite the increasing industrial use of carbon nanofibers, information on their potential adverse health effects is limited. In the current study, we examine the cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of carbon-based nanofibers (Pyrograf (registered) -III) and compare this material with the effects of asbestos fibers (crocidolite) or single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). The genotoxic effects in the lung fibroblast (V79) cell line were examined using two complementary assays: the comet assay and micronucleus (MN) test. In addition, we utilized fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect the chromatin pan-centromeric signals within the MN indicating their origin by aneugenic (chromosomal malsegregation) or clastogenic (chromosome breakage) mechanisms. Cytotoxicity tests revealed a concentration- and time-dependent loss of V79 cell viability after exposure to all tested materials in the following sequence: asbestos > CNF > SWCNT. Additionally, cellular uptake and generation of oxygen radicals was seen in the murine RAW264.7 macrophages following exposure to CNF or asbestos but not after administration of SWCNT. DNA damage and MN induction were found after exposure to all tested materials with the strongest effect seen for CNF. Finally, we demonstrated that CNF induced predominately centromere-positive MN in primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) indicating aneugenic events. Further investigations are warranted to elucidate the possible mechanisms involved in CNF-induced genotoxicity.

  3. The kinetics of chirality assignment in catalytic single-walled carbon nanotube growth and the routes towards selective growth† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, definition of interfacial formation energy (IFE), cap formation energy and fitting equation, Fig. S1–S4 and Table S1. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc04714b

    Xu, Ziwei; Qiu, Lu

    2018-01-01

    Depending on its specific structure, or so-called chirality, a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) can be either a conductor or a semiconductor. This feature ensures great potential for building ∼1 nm sized electronics if chirality-selected SWCNTs could be achieved. However, due to the limited understanding of the growth mechanism of SWCNTs, reliable methods for chirality-selected SWCNTs are still pending. Here we present a theoretical model on the chirality assignment and control of SWCNTs during the catalytic growth. This study reveals that the chirality of a SWCNT is determined by the kinetic incorporation of pentagons, especially the last (6th) one, during the nucleation stage. Our analysis showed that the chirality of a SWCNT is randomly assigned on a liquid or liquid-like catalyst surface, and two routes of synthesizing chirality-selected SWCNTs, which are verified by recent experimental achievements, are demonstrated. They are (i) by using high melting point crystalline catalysts, such as Ta, W, Re, Os, or their alloys, and (ii) by frequently changing the chirality of SWCNTs during their growth. This study paves the way for achieving chirality-selective SWCNT growth for high performance SWCNT based electronics. PMID:29732090

  4. Direct growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on silicon substrate by spray pyrolysis of Glycine max oil

    K. T. Karthikeyan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes have been synthesized by spray pyrolysis from Glycine max oil on silicon substrate using ferrocene as catalyst at 650 °C. Glycine max oil, a plant-based hydrocarbon precursor was used as a source of carbon and argon as a carrier gas. The as-grown vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopic images reveal that the dense bundles of aligned carbon nanotubes. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy observations indicate that as-grown aligned carbon nanotubes are well graphitized.

  5. Surface and bulk plasmon excitations in carbon nanotubes. Comparison with the hydrodynamic model

    Zapata Herrera, Mario [Instituto Balseiro and Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, 8400 S.C. Bariloche (Argentina)], E-mail: mzapatah@gmail.com; Gervasoni, Juana L. [Instituto Balseiro and Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, 8400 S.C. Bariloche (Argentina); Carrera de Investigador Cientificoy Tecnologico del CONICET (Argentina)], E-mail: gervason@cab.cnea.gov.ar

    2009-01-15

    In this work, we compare two models describing the interaction of external charged particles with carbon nanotubes. One is the semiclassical dielectric response model (DRM) in the Drude approximation, which approximate the valence electrons of the system by a gas of non interacting classical particles. The other is the hydrodynamic model (HDM) which uses Fluid Dynamics to describe their collective excitations. We found that both models agree for those cases where it is possible to define a dispersion relation which depends on a single frequency {omega}{sub p}. We found that in the description of the electronic response of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with the DRM, the connection between a three- and a two-dimensional system is non trivial and the equivalence is not direct. In spite of this, the DRM can be an important basic tool for the calculation and physical interpretation of the plasmon excitations in a nanodimensions system.

  6. Band Gap Changes Of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes Under Uniaxial Strain

    Dereli, G.

    2010-01-01

    The study of the band gap variation with mechanical deformation is important in manipulations of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT). In this study we investigated the electronic band structure and the mechanical properties of (12,0) and (13,0) SWCNTs under the effect of uniaxial strain. Electronic and mechanical properties are studied using a parallel, order N, tight-binding molecular dynamics (O(N) TBMD) simulation code designed by G. Dereli et. al. We showed the effect of uniaxial strain on the variations of band gaps and the total energy per atom of (12,0) and (13,0) SWCNTs. We calculated Young's modulus and the Poisson ratio of these SWCNTs. The research reported here was supported through the Yildiz Technical University Research Found Project No: 24-01-01-04. Simulations are performed in parallel environment at Carbon Nanotube Simulation Laboratory of Yildiz Technical University.

  7. Computational analysis for velocity slip and diffusion species with carbon nanotubes

    T. Hayat

    Full Text Available This article addresses a computational study for carbon nanotubes with diffusion species. Mathematical analysis and modeling are formulated in the presence of slip effect, Darcy porous medium and chemical species. Diffusion coefficients are accounted as equal amount. Optimal Homotopy Analysis Method (OHAM is implemented in taking care for convergence control parameters. Residual errors and its graphs are plotted for CNTs nanofluids. The current data is compared with the previous published work. The results are found in favorable agreement. Physically interesting parameters are highlighted. The velocity is dominated for MWCNT than SWCNT. The velocity profile increases for power index when m>1 while opposite trend is observed for power index when m<1. Permeability parameter and volume fraction reduce the skin friction coefficient and reverse trend is noticed for slip parameter and wall thickness parameter. Opposite behavior is noticed for concentration profile at surface for homogenous-heterogeneous reactions parameters. Keywords: Chemical species, Carbon nanotubes, Nonuniform stretching sheet, Slip effects

  8. Optical properties of graphene nanoribbons encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Chernov, Alexander I; Fedotov, Pavel V; Talyzin, Alexandr V; Suarez Lopez, Inma; Anoshkin, Ilya V; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I; Obraztsova, Elena D

    2013-07-23

    We report the photoluminescence (PL) from graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). New PL spectral features originating from GNRs have been detected in the visible spectral range. PL peaks from GNRs have resonant character, and their positions depend on the ribbon geometrical structure in accordance with the theoretical predictions. GNRs were synthesized using confined polymerization and fusion of coronene molecules. GNR@SWCNTs material demonstrates a bright photoluminescence both in infrared (IR) and visible regions. The photoluminescence excitation mapping in the near-IR spectral range has revealed the geometry-dependent shifts of the SWCNT peaks (up to 11 meV in excitation and emission) after the process of polymerization of coronene molecules inside the nanotubes. This behavior has been attributed to the strain of SWCNTs induced by insertion of the coronene molecules.

  9. Thermal conductivity of multi-walled carbon nanotube sheets: radiation losses and quenching of phonon modes

    Aliev, Ali E; Lima, Marcio H; Baughman, Ray H [Alan G MacDiarmid NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Silverman, Edward M, E-mail: Ali.Aliev@utdallas.edu [Northrop Grumman Space Technology, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States)

    2010-01-22

    The extremely high thermal conductivity of individual carbon nanotubes, predicted theoretically and observed experimentally, has not yet been achieved for large nanotube assemblies. Resistances at tube-tube interconnections and tube-electrode interfaces have been considered the main obstacles for effective electronic and heat transport. Here we show that, even for infinitely long and perfect nanotubes with well-designed tube-electrode interfaces, excessive radial heat radiation from nanotube surfaces and quenching of phonon modes in large bundles are additional processes that substantially reduce thermal transport along nanotubes. Equivalent circuit simulations and an experimental self-heating 3{omega} technique were used to determine the peculiarities of anisotropic heat flow and thermal conductivity of single MWNTs, bundled MWNTs and aligned, free-standing MWNT sheets. The thermal conductivity of individual MWNTs grown by chemical vapor deposition and normalized to the density of graphite is much lower ({kappa}{sub MWNT} = 600 {+-} 100 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}) than theoretically predicted. Coupling within MWNT bundles decreases this thermal conductivity to 150 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}. Further decrease of the effective thermal conductivity in MWNT sheets to 50 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1} comes from tube-tube interconnections and sheet imperfections like dangling fiber ends, loops and misalignment of nanotubes. Optimal structures for enhancing thermal conductivity are discussed.

  10. Lower limits of detection in using carbon nanotubes as thermoluminescent dosimeters of beta radiation

    Alanazi, Abdulaziz; Jurewicz, Izabela; Alalawi, Amani I.; Alyahyawi, Amjad; Alsubaie, Abdullah; Hinder, Steven; Bañuls-Ciscar, Jorge; Alkhorayef, Mohammed; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    World-wide, on-going intensive research is being seen in adaptation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for a wide variety of applications, particular interest herein being in the thermoluminescent (TL) properties of CNTs and their sensitivity towards energetic radiations. Using beta radiation delivering dose levels of a few Gy it has been observed in previous study that strain and impurity defects in CNTs give rise to significant TL yields, providing an initial measure of the extent to which electron trapping centres exist in various qualities of CNT, from super-pure to raw. This in turn points to the possibility that there may be considerable advantage in using such media for radiation dosimetry applications, including for in vivo dosimetry. CNTs also have an effective atomic number similar to that of adipose tissue, making them suitable for soft tissue dosimetry. In present investigations various single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) samples in the form of buckypaper have been irradiated to doses in the range 35-1.3 Gy, use being made of a 90Sr beta source, the response of the CNTs buckypaper with dose showing a trend towards linearity. It is shown for present production methodology for buckypaper samples that the raw SWCNT buckypaper offer the greatest sensitivity, detecting doses down to some few tens of mGy.

  11. Toxicology Study of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Reduced Graphene Oxide in Human Sperm

    Asghar, Waseem; Shafiee, Hadi; Velasco, Vanessa; Sah, Vasu R.; Guo, Shirui; El Assal, Rami; Inci, Fatih; Rajagopalan, Adhithi; Jahangir, Muntasir; Anchan, Raymond M.; Mutter, George L.; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S.; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-08-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide are currently being evaluated for biomedical applications including in vivo drug delivery and tumor imaging. Several reports have studied the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials, but their effects on human male reproduction have not been fully examined. Additionally, it is not clear whether the nanomaterial exposure has any effect on sperm sorting procedures used in clinical settings. Here, we show that the presence of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-COOH) and reduced graphene oxide at concentrations of 1-25 μg/mL do not affect sperm viability. However, SWCNT-COOH generate significant reactive superoxide species at a higher concentration (25 μg/mL), while reduced graphene oxide does not initiate reactive species in human sperm. Further, we demonstrate that exposure to these nanomaterials does not hinder the sperm sorting process, and microfluidic sorting systems can select the sperm that show low oxidative stress post-exposure.

  12. Toxicology Study of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Reduced Graphene Oxide in Human Sperm.

    Asghar, Waseem; Shafiee, Hadi; Velasco, Vanessa; Sah, Vasu R; Guo, Shirui; El Assal, Rami; Inci, Fatih; Rajagopalan, Adhithi; Jahangir, Muntasir; Anchan, Raymond M; Mutter, George L; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-08-19

    Carbon-based nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide are currently being evaluated for biomedical applications including in vivo drug delivery and tumor imaging. Several reports have studied the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials, but their effects on human male reproduction have not been fully examined. Additionally, it is not clear whether the nanomaterial exposure has any effect on sperm sorting procedures used in clinical settings. Here, we show that the presence of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-COOH) and reduced graphene oxide at concentrations of 1-25 μg/mL do not affect sperm viability. However, SWCNT-COOH generate significant reactive superoxide species at a higher concentration (25 μg/mL), while reduced graphene oxide does not initiate reactive species in human sperm. Further, we demonstrate that exposure to these nanomaterials does not hinder the sperm sorting process, and microfluidic sorting systems can select the sperm that show low oxidative stress post-exposure.

  13. High-performance thin-film-transistors based on semiconducting-enriched single-walled carbon nanotubes processed by electrical-breakdown strategy

    Aïssa, B., E-mail: aissab@emt.inrs.ca [Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650, boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (QEERI), Qatar Foundation, P.O. Box 5825, Doha (Qatar); Nedil, M. [Telebec Wireless Underground Communication Laboratory, UQAT, 675, 1" è" r" e Avenue, Val d’Or, Québec J9P 1Y3 (Canada); Habib, M.A. [Computer Sciences and Engineering Department, Yanbu University College, P.O. Box 30031 (Saudi Arabia); Abdul-Hafidh, E.H. [High Energy Physics Department, Yanbu University College, P.O. Box 30031 (Saudi Arabia); Rosei, F. [Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650, boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We selectively burn metallic single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) by electrical breakdown. • We successfully achieve a semiconducting enriched-SWCNT in TFT configuration. • High performance, like On/Off of 10{sup 5} and a subthreshold swing of 165 mV/decades were obtained. • After PMMA coating, the SWCNT–TFTs were found stables for more than 4 months. - Abstract: Over the past two decades, among remarkable variety of nanomaterials, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) remain the most intriguing and uniquely well suited materials for applications in high-performance electronics. The most advanced technologies require the ability to form purely semiconducting SWCNTs. Here, we report on our strategy based on the well known progressive electrical breakdown process that offer this capability and serves as highly efficient means for selectively removing metallic carbon nanotubes from electronically heterogeneous random networks, deposited on silicon substrates in a thin film transistor (TFT) configuration. We demonstrate the successful achievement of semiconducting enriched-SWCNT networks in TFT scheme that reach On/Off switching ratios of ∼100,000, on-conductance of 20 μS, and a subthreshold swing of less than 165 mV/decades. The obtained TFT devices were then protected with thin film poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) to keep the percolation level of the SWCNTs network spatially and temporally stable, while protecting it from atmosphere exchanges. TFT devices were found to be air-stable and maintained their excellent characteristics in ambient atmosphere for more than 4 months. This approach could work as a platform for future nanotube-based nanoelectronics.

  14. Carbon nanotubes polymerization induced by self-irradiation

    Moura, Cassio Stein [Faculdade de Fisica, Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Full text: We discuss our recent results on the formation of cross-links between neighboring carbon nanotubes within a bundle. Classical molecular dynamics was used to follow the evolution of the system when it is bombarded by low-energy carbon atoms. We show that it is possible to polymerize carbon nanotubes through irradiation and discuss the most common types of defects produced. Cross-links are created mainly in the direction perpendicular to the surface, and for higher energies, defects are created deeper in the rope. The final defects geometries may provide a realistic input to electronic density first principle calculations. (author)

  15. Carbon nanotubes polymerization induced by self-irradiation

    Moura, Cassio Stein

    2008-01-01

    Full text: We discuss our recent results on the formation of cross-links between neighboring carbon nanotubes within a bundle. Classical molecular dynamics was used to follow the evolution of the system when it is bombarded by low-energy carbon atoms. We show that it is possible to polymerize carbon nanotubes through irradiation and discuss the most common types of defects produced. Cross-links are created mainly in the direction perpendicular to the surface, and for higher energies, defects are created deeper in the rope. The final defects geometries may provide a realistic input to electronic density first principle calculations. (author)

  16. CANFLEX fuel bundle junction pressure drop

    Chung, H. J.; Chung, C. H.; Jun, J. S.; Hong, S. D.; Chang, S. K.; Kim, B. D.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes the junction pressure drop test results which are to used to determine the alignment angle between bundles to achieve the most probable fuel string pressure drop for randomly aligned bundles for use in the fuel string total pressure drop test. (author). 4 tabs., 17 figs

  17. Anatomic Double-bundle ACL Reconstruction

    Schreiber, Verena M.; van Eck, Carola F.; Fu, Freddie H.

    2010-01-01

    Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most frequent forms of knee trauma. The traditional surgical treatment for ACL rupture is single-bundle reconstruction. However, during the past few years there has been a shift in interest toward double-bundle reconstruction to closely

  18. CANFLEX fuel bundle strength tests (test report)

    Chang, Seok Kyu; Chung, C. H.; Kim, B. D.

    1997-08-01

    This document outlines the test results for the strength tests of the CANFLEX fuel bundle. Strength tests are performed to determine and verify the amount of the bundle shape distortion which is against the side-stops when the bundles are refuelling. There are two cases of strength test; one is the double side-stop test which simulates the normal bundle refuelling and the other is the single side-stop test which simulates the abnormal refuelling. the strength test specification requires that the fuel bundle against the side-stop(s) simulators for this test were fabricated and the flow rates were controlled to provide the required conservative hydraulic forces. The test rig conditions of 120 deg C, 11.2 MPa were retained for 15 minutes after the flow rate was controlled during the test in two cases, respectively. The bundle loading angles of number 13- number 15 among the 15 bundles were 67.5 deg CCW and others were loaded randomly. After the tests, the bundle shapes against the side-stops were measured and inspected carefully. The important test procedures and measurements were discussed as follows. (author). 5 refs., 22 tabs., 5 figs

  19. CANFLEX fuel bundle junction pressure drop

    Chung, H. J.; Chung, C. H.; Jun, J. S.; Hong, S. D.; Chang, S. K.; Kim, B. D.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes the junction pressure drop test results which are to used to determine the alignment angle between bundles to achieve the most probable fuel string pressure drop for randomly aligned bundles for use in the fuel string total pressure drop test. (author). 4 tabs., 17 figs.

  20. Output commitment through product bundling: experimental evidence

    Hinloopen, J.; Mueller, W.; Normann, H.T.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the impact of product bundling in experimental markets. A firm has monopoly power in one market but faces competition by a second firm in another market. We compare treatments where the monopolist can bundle its two products to treatments where it cannot, and we contrast simultaneous and

  1. Phosphatidylserine targeted single-walled carbon nanotubes for photothermal ablation of bladder cancer

    Virani, Needa A.; Davis, Carole; McKernan, Patrick; Hauser, Paul; Hurst, Robert E.; Slaton, Joel; Silvy, Ricardo P.; Resasco, Daniel E.; Harrison, Roger G.

    2018-01-01

    Bladder cancer has a 60%-70% recurrence rate most likely due to any residual tumour left behind after a transurethral resection (TUR). Failure to completely resect the cancer can lead to recurrence and progression into higher grade tumours with metastatic potential. We present here a novel therapy to treat superficial tumours with the potential to decrease recurrence. The therapy is a heat-based approach in which bladder tumour specific single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are delivered intravesically at a very low dose (0.1 mg SWCNT per kg body weight) followed 24 h later by a short 30 s treatment with a 360° near-infrared light that heats only the bound nanotubes. The energy density of the treatment was 50 J cm-2, and the power density that this treatment corresponds to is 1.7 W cm-2, which is relatively low. Nanotubes are specifically targeted to the tumour via the interaction of annexin V (AV) and phosphatidylserine, which is normally internalised on healthy tissue but externalised on tumours and the tumour vasculature. SWCNTs are conjugated to AV, which binds specifically to bladder cancer cells as confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Due to this specific localisation, NIR light can be used to heat the tumour while conserving the healthy bladder wall. In a short-term efficacy study in mice with orthotopic MB49 murine bladder tumours treated with the SWCNT-AV conjugate and NIR light, no tumours were visible on the bladder wall 24 h after NIR light treatment, and there was no damage to the bladder. In a separate survival study in mice with the same type of orthotopic tumours, there was a 50% cure rate at 116 days when the study was ended. At 116 days, no treatment toxicity was observed, and no nanotubes were detected in the clearance organs or bladder.

  2. Fuel bundle movement due to reverse flow

    Wahba, N N; Akalin, O [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    When a break occurs in the inlet feeder or inlet header, the rapid depressurization will cause the channel flow to reverse forcing the string of bundles to accelerate and impact with upstream shield plug. A model has been developed to predict the bundle motion due to the channel flow reversal. The model accounts for various forces acting on the bundle. A series of five reverse flow, bundle acceleration experiments have been conducted simulating a break in the inlet feeder of a CANDU fuel channel. The model has been validated against the experiments. The predicted impact velocities are in good agreement with the measured values. It is demonstrated that the model may be successfully used in predicting bundle relocation timing following a large LOCA (loss of coolant). (author). 7 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs.

  3. Electrochemically decorated ZnTe nanodots on single-walled carbon nanotubes for room-temperature NO2 sensor application.

    Kim, Donguk; Park, Ki-Moon; Shanmugam, Rajakumar; Yoo, Bongyoung

    2014-11-01

    A gas sensor with ZnTe nanodot-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is demonstrated for NO2 detection at room temperature. ZnTe nanodots are electrochemically deposited in an aqueous solution containing ZnSO4, TeO2 and citrate. A deposition potential range of ZnTe formation of -0.65 to -0.9 V is determined by cyclic voltammetry, and an intermetallic ZnTe compound is formed at above 50 degrees C bath. SWCNT-based sensors show the highly sensitive response down to 1 ppm NO2 gas at room temperature. In particular, the sensitivity of ZnTe nanodot-modified SWCNTs is increased by 6 times as compared to that of pristine SWCNT sensors. A selectivity test of SWCNT-ZnTe nanodots sensors is carried out with ammonia gas (NH3) and methanol vapor (MeOH), and the result confirms an excellent selectivity to NO2 gas.

  4. Observation of localized strains on vertically grown single-walled carbon nanotube forests via polarized Raman spectroscopy

    Park, June; Seong, Maeng-Je; Heo, Kwang; Hong, Seunghun; Min, Yo-Sep

    2014-01-01

    Vertically grown single-walled carbon nanotube (V-SWCNT) forests, synthesized by water-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, were studied using polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy. Among three different sections (root, center and end) along the vertical growth direction, the degree of V-SWCNT alignment was highest in the center section. Raman frequency red-shifts up to 7 and 13 cm −1 , for RBM and G-band, respectively, were observed in the center section, with respect to the Raman frequencies measured in the root and the end sections. Raman frequency downshift and concurrent linewidth broadening of the G-band, revealing a localized strain, were also observed in the center section. The existence of a localized strain in the center section of the V-SWCNT was further confirmed by observing a strong polarization anisotropy of up to 8 cm −1 in the G-band Raman frequency for different polarized Raman scattering configurations at the same probed spot. (paper)

  5. Theoretical Investigation on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Doped with Nitrogen, Pyridine-Like Nitrogen Defects, and Transition Metal Atoms

    Michael Mananghaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the inherent difficulty in synthesizing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with uniform chirality and well-defined electronic properties through the introduction of dopants, topological defects, and intercalation of metals. Depending on the desired application, one can modify the electronic and magnetic properties of SWCNTs through an appropriate introduction of imperfections. This scheme broadens the application areas of SWCNTs. Under this motivation, we present our ongoing investigations of the following models: (i (10, 0 and (5, 5 SWCNT doped with nitrogen (CNxNT, (ii (10, 0 and (5, 5 SWCNT with pyridine-like defects (3NV-CNxNT, (iii (10, 0 SWCNT with porphyrine-like defects (4ND-CNxNT. Models (ii and (iii were chemically functionalized with 14 transition metals (TMs: Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pd, Ag, Pt and Au. Using the spin-unrestricted density functional theory (DFT, stable configurations, deformations, formation and binding energies, the effects of the doping concentration of nitrogen, pyridine-like and porphyrine-like defects on the electronic properties were all examined. Results reveal that the electronic properties of SWCNTs show strong dependence on the concentration and configuration of nitrogen impurities, its defects, and the TMs adsorbed.

  6. Industrially synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes: compositional data for users, environmental risk assessments, and source apportionment

    Plata, D L; Gschwend, P M [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Reddy, C M [Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)], E-mail: dplata@whoi.edu

    2008-05-07

    Commercially available single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) contain large percentages of metal and carbonaceous impurities. These fractions influence the SWCNT physical properties and performance, yet their chemical compositions are not well defined. This lack of information also precludes accurate environmental risk assessments for specific SWCNT stocks, which emerging local legislation requires of nanomaterial manufacturers. To address these needs, we measured the elemental, molecular, and stable carbon isotope compositions of commercially available SWCNTs. As expected, catalytic metals occurred at per cent levels (1.3-29%), but purified materials also contained unexpected metals (e.g., Cu, Pb at 0.1-0.3 ppt). Nitrogen contents (up to 0.48%) were typically greater in arc-produced SWCNTs than in those derived from chemical vapor deposition. Toluene-extractable materials contributed less than 5% of the total mass of the SWCNTs. Internal standard losses during dichloromethane extractions suggested that metals are available for reductive dehalogenation reactions, ultimately resulting in the degradation of aromatic internal standards. The carbon isotope content of the extracted material suggested that SWCNTs acquired much of their carbonaceous contamination from their storage environment. Some of the SWCNTs, themselves, were highly depleted in {sup 13}C relative to petroleum-derived chemicals. The distinct carbon isotopic signatures and unique metal 'fingerprints' may be useful as environmental tracers allowing assessment of SWCNT sources to the environment.

  7. Electron transfer behaviour of single-walled carbon nanotubes electro-decorated with nickel and nickel oxide layers

    Adekunle, Abolanle S.; Ozoemena, Kenneth I. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2008-08-01

    The electron transfer behaviour of nickel film-decorated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-Ni) at edge plane pyrolytic graphite electrodes (EPPGEs) was investigated. The impact of SWCNTs on the redox properties of the nickel film was investigated with cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). From EIS data, obtained using ferrocyanide/ferricyanide as a redox probe, we show that the electrodes based on nickel and nickel oxide films follow electrical equivalent circuit models typical of partial charge transfer or adsorption-controlled kinetics, resembling the 'electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor sensors (EIS)'. From the models, we prove that EPPGE-SWCNT-Ni exhibits the least resistance to charge transport compared to other electrodes (approximately 30 times faster than the EPPGE-SWCNT-NiO, 25 times faster than EPPGE-SWCNT, and over 300 times faster than the bare EPPGE) suggesting the ability of the SWCNTs to act as efficient conducting species that facilitate electron transport of the integrated nickel and nickel oxide particles. (author)

  8. Heating-Rate-Triggered Carbon-Nanotube-based 3-Dimensional Conducting Networks for a Highly Sensitive Noncontact Sensing Device

    Tai, Yanlong

    2016-01-28

    Recently, flexible and transparent conductive films (TCFs) are drawing more attention for their central role in future applications of flexible electronics. Here, we report the controllable fabrication of TCFs for moisture-sensing applications based on heating-rate-triggered, 3-dimensional porous conducting networks through drop casting lithography of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) ink. How ink formula and baking conditions influence the self-assembled microstructure of the TCFs is discussed. The sensor presents high-performance properties, including a reasonable sheet resistance (2.1 kohm/sq), a high visible-range transmittance (>69%, PET = 90%), and good stability when subjected to cyclic loading (>1000 cycles, better than indium tin oxide film) during processing, when formulation parameters are well optimized (weight ratio of SWCNT to PEDOT:PSS: 1:0.5, SWCNT concentration: 0.3 mg/ml, and heating rate: 36 °C/minute). Moreover, the benefits of these kinds of TCFs were verified through a fully transparent, highly sensitive, rapid response, noncontact moisture-sensing device (5 × 5 sensing pixels).

  9. Increasing the luminous efficiency of an MEH-PPV based PLED using salmon DNA and single walled carbon nanotube

    Madhwal, Devinder; Singh, Inderpreet; Kumar, Jitender; Bhatia, C.S.; Bhatnagar, P.K.; Mathur, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The combined effect of a salmon deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based electron blocking layer and a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) composite-based electron transport layer on the performance of a poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) polymer light emitting diode (PLED) has been examined. The SWCNT network in the composite layer improves electron injection from cathode and the DNA blocks these high mobility electrons at the electron blocking layer-polymer interface, leading to high luminance from the device. The luminous efficiency of the PLED is increased ∼20 times compared to that of a PLED using only MEH-PPV. - Highlights: → We report fabrication of a high luminous efficiency MEH-PPV based polymer LED. → Salmon DNA-CTMA layer is used to block injected electrons in the polymer layer. → MEH-PPV-SWCNT composite is used to transport electrons in the polymer layer. → The luminous efficiency of the polymer LED thereby improves about 20 times.

  10. Multiscale modeling of the effect of carbon nanotube orientation on the shear deformation properties of reinforced polymer-based composites

    Montazeri, A. [Institute for Nano-Science and Technology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, School of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, M. [Institute for Nano-Science and Technology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naghdabadi, R., E-mail: naghdabd@sharif.ed [Institute for Nano-Science and Technology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafii-Tabar, H. [Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, School of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, and Research Centre for Medical Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-04-04

    A combination of molecular dynamics (MD), continuum elasticity and FEM is used to predict the effect of CNT orientation on the shear modulus of SWCNT-polymer nanocomposites. We first develop a transverse-isotropic elastic model of SWCNTs based on the continuum elasticity and MD to compute the transverse-isotropic elastic constants of SWCNTs. These constants are then used in an FEM-based simulation to investigate the effect of SWCNT alignment on the shear modulus of nanocomposites. Furthermore, shear stress distributions along the nanotube axis and over its cross-sectional area are investigated to study the effect of CNT orientation on the shear load transfer. - Highlights: A transverse-isotropic elastic model of SWCNTs is presented. A hierarchical MD/FEM multiscale model of SWCNT-polymer composites is developed. Behavior of these nanocomposites under shear deformation is studied. A symmetric shear stress distribution occurs only in SWCNTs with 45{sup o} orientation. The total shear load sustained is greatest in the case of 45{sup o} orientation.

  11. Multiscale modeling of the effect of carbon nanotube orientation on the shear deformation properties of reinforced polymer-based composites

    Montazeri, A.; Sadeghi, M.; Naghdabadi, R.; Rafii-Tabar, H.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of molecular dynamics (MD), continuum elasticity and FEM is used to predict the effect of CNT orientation on the shear modulus of SWCNT-polymer nanocomposites. We first develop a transverse-isotropic elastic model of SWCNTs based on the continuum elasticity and MD to compute the transverse-isotropic elastic constants of SWCNTs. These constants are then used in an FEM-based simulation to investigate the effect of SWCNT alignment on the shear modulus of nanocomposites. Furthermore, shear stress distributions along the nanotube axis and over its cross-sectional area are investigated to study the effect of CNT orientation on the shear load transfer. - Highlights: → A transverse-isotropic elastic model of SWCNTs is presented. → A hierarchical MD/FEM multiscale model of SWCNT-polymer composites is developed. → Behavior of these nanocomposites under shear deformation is studied. → A symmetric shear stress distribution occurs only in SWCNTs with 45 o orientation. → The total shear load sustained is greatest in the case of 45 o orientation.

  12. Chiral equations and fiber bundles

    Mateos, T.; Becerril, R.

    1992-01-01

    Using the hypothesis g = g (lambda i ), the chiral equations (rhog, z g -1 ), z -bar + (rhog, z -barg -1 ), z = 0 are reduced to a Killing equation of a p-dimensional space V p , being lambda i lambda i (z, z-bar) 'geodesic' parameters of V p . Supposing that g belongs to a Lie group G, one writes the corresponding Lie algebra elements (F) in terms of the Killing vectors of V p and the generators of the subalgebra of F of dimension d = dimension of the Killing space. The elements of the subalgebras belong to equivalence classes which in the respective group form a principal fiber bundle. This is used to integrate the matrix g in terms of the complex variables z and z-bar ( Author)

  13. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  14. Constructing co-Higgs bundles on CP^2

    Rayan, Steven

    2013-01-01

    On a complex manifold, a co-Higgs bundle is a holomorphic vector bundle with an endomorphism twisted by the tangent bundle. The notion of generalized holomorphic bundle in Hitchin's generalized geometry coincides with that of co-Higgs bundle when the generalized complex manifold is ordinary complex. Schwarzenberger's rank-2 vector bundle on the projective plane, constructed from a line bundle on the double cover CP^1 \\times CP^1 \\to CP^2, is naturally a co-Higgs bundle, with the twisted endom...

  15. Large-area fluidic assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes through dip-coating and directional evaporation

    Kim, Pilnam; Kang, Tae June

    2017-12-01

    We present a simple and scalable fluidic-assembly approach, in which bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are selectively aligned and deposited by directionally controlled dip-coating and solvent evaporation processes. The patterned surface with alternating regions of hydrophobic polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) (height 100 nm) strips and hydrophilic SiO2 substrate was withdrawn vertically at a constant speed ( 3 mm/min) from a solution bath containing SWCNTs ( 0.1 mg/ml), allowing for directional evaporation and subsequent selective deposition of nanotube bundles along the edges of horizontally aligned PDMS strips. In addition, the fluidic assembly was applied to fabricate a field effect transistor (FET) with highly oriented SWCNTs, which demonstrate significantly higher current density as well as high turn-off ratio (T/O ratio 100) as compared to that with randomly distributed carbon nanotube bundles (T/O ratio <10).

  16. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  17. Large-scale single-chirality separation of single-wall carbon nanotubes by simple gel chromatography

    Liu, Huaping; Nishide, Daisuke; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2011-01-01

    Monostructured single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are important in both scientific research and electronic and biomedical applications; however, the bulk separation of SWCNTs into populations of single-chirality nanotubes remains challenging. Here we report a simple and effective method for the large-scale chirality separation of SWCNTs using a single-surfactant multicolumn gel chromatography method utilizing one surfactant and a series of vertically connected gel columns. This method is based on the structure-dependent interaction strength of SWCNTs with an allyl dextran-based gel. Overloading an SWCNT dispersion on the top column results in the adsorption sites of the column becoming fully occupied by the nanotubes that exhibit the strongest interaction with the gel. The unbound nanotubes flow through to the next column, and the nanotubes with the second strongest interaction with the gel are adsorbed in this stage. In this manner, 13 different (n, m) species were separated. Metallic SWCNTs were finally collected as unbound nanotubes because they exhibited the lowest interaction with the gel. PMID:21556063

  18. Evaluation of droplet deposition in rod bundle

    Ji, W.; Gu, C.Y.; Anglart, H.

    1997-01-01

    Deposition model for droplets in gas droplet two-phase flow in rod bundle is developed in this work using the Lagrangian method. The model is evaluated in a 9-rod bundle geometry. The deposition coefficient in the bundle geometry are compared with that in round tube. The influences of the droplet size and gas mass flow rate on deposition coefficient are investigated. Furthermore, the droplet motion is studied in more detail by dividing the bundle channel into sub-channels. The results show that the overall deposition coefficient in the bundle geometry is close to that in the round tube with the diameter equal to the bundle hydraulic diameter. The calculated deposition coefficient is found to be higher for higher gas mass flux and smaller droplets. The study in the sub-channels show that the ratio between the local deposition coefficient for a sub-channel and the averaged value for the whole bundle is close to a constant value, deviations from the mean value for all the calculated cases being within the range of ±13%. (author)

  19. Preliminary report: NIF laser bundle review

    Tietbohl, G.L.; Larson, D.W.; Erlandson, A.C.

    1995-01-01

    As requested in the guidance memo 1 , this committe determined whether there are compelling reasons to recommend a change from the NIF CDR baseline laser. The baseline bundle design based on a tradeoff between cost and technical risk, which is replicated four times to create the required 192 beams. The baseline amplifier design uses bottom loading 1x4 slab and flashlamp cassettes for amplifier maintenance and large vacuum enclosures (2.5m high x 7m wide in cross-section for each of the two spatial filters in each of the four bundles. The laser beams are arranged in two laser bays configured in a u-shape around the target area. The entire bundle review effort was performed in a very short time (six weeks) and with limited resources (15 personnel part-time). This should be compared to the effort that produced the CDR design (12 months, 50 to 100 personnel). This committee considered three alternate bundle configurations (2x2, 4x2, and 4x4 bundles), and evaluated each bundle against the baseline design using the seven requested issues in the guidance memo: Cost; schedule; performance risk; maintainability/operability; hardware failure cost exposure; activation; and design flexibility. The issues were reviewed to identify differences between each alternate bundle configuration and the baseline

  20. In-situ synthesis of interconnected SWCNT/OMC framework on silicon nanoparticles for high performance lithium-ion batteries

    Weiwei Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In spite of silicon has a superior theoretical capacity, the large volume expansion of Si anodes during Li+ insertion/extraction is the bottle neck that results in fast capacity fading and poor cycling performance. In this paper, we report a silicon, single-walled carbon nanotube, and ordered mesoporous carbon nanocomposite synthesized by an evaporation-induced self-assembly process, in which silicon nanoparticles and single-walled carbon nanotubes were added into the phenolic resol with F-127 for co-condensation. The ordered mesoporous carbon matrix and single-walled carbon nanotubes network could effectively accommodate the volume change of silicon nanoparticles, and the ordered mesoporous structure could also provide efficient channels for the fast transport of Li-ions. As a consequence, this hybrid material exhibits a reversible capacity of 861 mAh g−1 after 150 cycles at a current density of 400 mA g−1. It achieves significant improvement in the electrochemical performance when compared with the raw materials and Si nanoparticle anodes. Keywords: Silicon, Single-walled carbon nanotube, Ordered mesoporous carbon, Lithium ion battery

  1. Bundle duct interaction studies for fuel assemblies

    Hsia, H.T.S.; Kaplan, S.

    1981-06-01

    It is known that the wire-wrapped rods and duct in an LMFBR are undergoing a gradual structural distortion from the initially uniform geometry under the combined effects of thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling and creep. These deformations have a significant effect on flow characteristics, thus causing changes in thermal behavior such as cladding temperature and temperature distribution within a bundle. The temperature distribution may further enhance or retard irradiation induced deformation of the bundle. This report summarizes the results of the continuing effort in investigating the bundle-duct interaction, focusing on the need for the large development plant

  2. Geometry of Quantum Principal Bundles. Pt. 1

    Durdevic, M.

    1996-01-01

    A theory of principal bundles possessing quantum structure groups and classical base manifolds is presented. Structural analysis of such quantum principal bundles is performed. A differential calculus is constructed, combining differential forms on the base manifold with an appropriate differential calculus on the structure quantum group. Relations between the calculus on the group and the calculus on the bundle are investigated. A concept of (pseudo)tensoriality is formulated. The formalism of connections is developed. In particular, operators of horizontal projection, covariant derivative and curvature are constructed and analyzed. Generalizations of the first Structure Equation and of the Bianchi identity are found. Illustrative examples are presented. (orig.)

  3. Bundles of C*-categories and duality

    Vasselli, Ezio

    2005-01-01

    We introduce the notions of multiplier C*-category and continuous bundle of C*-categories, as the categorical analogues of the corresponding C*-algebraic notions. Every symmetric tensor C*-category with conjugates is a continuous bundle of C*-categories, with base space the spectrum of the C*-algebra associated with the identity object. We classify tensor C*-categories with fibre the dual of a compact Lie group in terms of suitable principal bundles. This also provides a classification for ce...

  4. Optical properties of carbon nanotubes

    Chen, Gugang

    This thesis addresses the optical properties of novel carbon filamentary nanomaterials: single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs), and SWNTs with interior C60 molecules ("peapods"). Optical reflectance spectra of bundled SWNTs are discussed in terms of their electronic energy band structure. An Effective Medium Model for a composite material was found to provide a reasonable description of the spectra. Furthermore, we have learned from optical absorption studies of DWNTs and C60-peapods that the host tube and the encapsulant interact weakly; small shifts in interband absorption structure were observed. Resonant Raman scattering studies on SWNTs synthesized via the HiPCO process show that the "zone-folding" approximation for phonons and electrons works reasonably well, even for small diameter (d effect, rather than the vdW interaction. Finally, we studied the chemical doping of DWNTs, where the dopant (Br anions) is chemically bound to the outside of the outer tube. The doped DWNT system is a model for a cylindrical molecular capacitor. We found experimentally that 90% of the positive charge resides on the outer tube, so that most of electric field on the inner tube is screened, i.e., we have observed a molecular Faraday cage effect. A self-consistent theoretical model in the tight-binding approximation with a classical electrostatic energy term is in good agreement with our experimental results.

  5. Novel Functionalized Carbon Nanotube Supercapacitor Materials: Contribution to the Supercapacitor TIF

    2014-08-01

    which are effectively the dielectric material . Thus, each electrode of a supercapacitor is in essence a conventional capacitor, and in full cell, the...promise as supercapacitor electrode materials . SWNTs, which exist in bundles of ropes, exhibit very large surface area (~1300 m2/g) [2]. Effective...Novel functionalized carbon nanotube supercapacitor materials Contribution to the supercapacitor TIF Trisha Huber

  6. Evaluation of bundle duct interaction by out of pile compressive test of FBR bundles. FFTF type bundle

    Tanaka, Kosuke; Yamamoto, Yuji; Nagamine, Tsuyoshi; Maeda, Koji [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2000-10-01

    Bundle duct interaction (BDI) caused by expansion of fuel pin bundle becomes one of the main limiting factors for fuel life times. Then, it is important for the design of fast reactor fuel assembly to understand the BDI behavior in detail. In order to understand the BDI behavior, out of pile compressive tests were conducted for FFTF type bundle by use of X-ray CT equipment. In these compressive tests, two type bundles with different accuracy of initial wire position were conducted. The objective of this test is to evaluate the influence of the initial error from standard position of wire at the same axial position. The locations of the pins and the duct flats are analyzed from CT image data. Quantitative evaluation was performed at the CT image data and discussed the bundle deformation status under BDI condition. Following results are obtained. 1) The accuracy of initial wire position is strongly depends on the pin-to-duct contact behavior. In the case of bundle with large error from standard position, pin-to-duct contact is delayed. 2) The BDI mitigation of the bundle with small error from standard wire position is following: The elastic ovality is the dominant deformation in mild BDI condition, then the wire dispersion and pin dispersion are occurred in severe BDI condition. 3) The BDI mitigation of the bundle with large error from standard wire position is following: The elastic ovality and local bowing of pins with large error from standard wire position are occurred in mild BDI condition, then pin dispersion is occurred around pins with large error from standard wire position, finally wire dispersion is occurred in severe BDI condition. 4) The existence of pins with large error from standard wire position is effective to delay the pin-to-duct contact, but the existence of these pins is possible to contact of pin- to- pin. (author)

  7. The role of defects in the design of space elevator cable: From nanotube to megatube

    Pugno, Nicola M. [Department of Structural Engineering and Geotechnics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)], E-mail: nicola.pugno@polito.it

    2007-09-15

    Researchers are claiming that the feasibility of space elevator cable is now realistic, thanks to carbon nanotube technology, proposing its realization within a decade. However, the current view of basing the design of the megacable on the theoretical strength of a single carbon nanotube is naive, as has recently been emphasized. In this paper the role of thermodynamically unavoidable atomistic defects with different size and shape is quantified on brittle fracture, fatigue and elasticity, for nanotubes and nanotube bundles. Nonasymptotic regimes, elastic plasticity, rough cracks, finite domains and size effects are also discussed. The results are compared with atomistic simulations and nanotensile tests of carbon nanotubes. Key simple formulas for the design of a flaw-tolerant space elevator megacable are reported, suggesting that it would need a taper ratio (for uniform stress) of about two orders of magnitude larger than currently proposed.

  8. An innovative approach to synthesize highly-ordered TiO2 nanotubes.

    Isimjan, Tayirjan T; Yang, D Q; Rohani, Sohrab; Ray, Ajay K

    2011-02-01

    An innovative route to prepare highly-ordered and dimensionally controlled TiO2 nanotubes has been proposed using a mild sonication method. The nanotube arrays were prepared by the anodization of titanium in an electrolyte containing 3% NH4F and 5% H2O in glycerol. It is demonstrated that the TiO2 nanostructures has two layers: the top layer is TiO2 nanowire and underneath is well-ordered TiO2 nanotubes. The top layer can easily fall off and form nanowires bundles by implementing a mild sonication after a short annealing time. We found that the dimensions of the TiO2 nanotubes were only dependent on the anodizing condition. The proposed technique may be extended to fabricate reproducible well-ordered TiO2 nanotubes with large area on other metals.

  9. Role of adsorbed surfactant in the reaction of aryl diazonium salts with single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Hilmer, Andrew J; McNicholas, Thomas P; Lin, Shangchao; Zhang, Jingqing; Wang, Qing Hua; Mendenhall, Jonathan D; Song, Changsik; Heller, Daniel A; Barone, Paul W; Blankschtein, Daniel; Strano, Michael S

    2012-01-17

    Because covalent chemistry can diminish the optical and electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), there is significant interest in developing methods of controllably functionalizing the nanotube sidewall. To date, most attempts at obtaining such control have focused on reaction stoichiometry or strength of oxidative treatment. Here, we examine the role of surfactants in the chemical modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes with aryl diazonium salts. The adsorbed surfactant layer is shown to affect the diazonium derivatization of carbon nanotubes in several ways, including electrostatic attraction or repulsion, steric exclusion, and direct chemical modification of the diazonium reactant. Electrostatic effects are most pronounced in the cases of anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate and cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, where differences in surfactant charge can significantly affect the ability of the diazonium ion to access the SWCNT surface. For bile salt surfactants, with the exception of sodium cholate, we find that the surfactant wraps tightly enough such that exclusion effects are dominant. Here, sodium taurocholate exhibits almost no reactivity under the explored reaction conditions, while for sodium deoxycholate and sodium taurodeoxycholate, we show that the greatest extent of reaction is observed among a small population of nanotube species, with diameters between 0.88 and 0.92 nm. The anomalous reaction of nanotubes in this diameter range seems to imply that the surfactant is less effective at coating these species, resulting in a reduced surface coverage on the nanotube. Contrary to the other bile salts studied, sodium cholate enables high selectivity toward metallic species and small band gap semiconductors, which is attributed to surfactant-diazonium coupling to form highly reactive diazoesters. Further, it is found that the rigidity of anionic surfactants can significantly influence the ability of the surfactant layer to

  10. Nuclear fuel bundle disassembly and assembly tool

    Yates, J.; Long, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear power reactor fuel bundle is described which has a plurality of tubular fuel rods disposed in parallel array between two transverse tie plates. It is secured against disassembly by one or more locking forks which engage slots in tie rods which position the transverse plates. Springs mounted on the fuel and tie rods are compressed when the bundle is assembled thereby maintaining a continual pressure against the locking forks. Force applied in opposition to the springs permits withdrawal of the locking forks so that one tie plate may be removed, giving access to the fuel rods. An assembly and disassembly tool facilitates removal of the locking forks when the bundle is to be disassembled and the placing of the forks during assembly of the bundle. (U.S.)

  11. In-pool damaged fuel bundle recovery

    Piascik, T.G.; Patenaude, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    While preparing to rerack the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station, GPU Nuclear had need to move a damaged fuel bundle. This bundle had no upper tie plate and could not be moved in the normal manner. GPU Nuclear formed a small, dedicated project team to disassemble, package and move this damaged bundle. The team was composed of key personnel from GPU Nuclear Fuels Projects, OCNGS Operations and Proto-Power / Bisco, a specialty contractor who has fuel bundle reconstitution and rod consolidation experience, remote tooling, underwater video systems and experienced technicians. Proven tooling, clear procedures and a simple approach were important, but the key element was the spirit of teamwork and leadership exhibited by the people involved

  12. In-pool damaged fuel bundle recovery

    Piascik, T.G.; Patenaude, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    While preparing to rerack the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station, GPU Nuclear had need to move a damaged fuel bundle. This bundle had no upper tie plate and could not be moved in the normal manner. GPU Nuclear formed a small, dedicated project team to disassemble, package, and move this damaged bundle. The team was composed of key personnel from GPU Nuclear Fuels Projects, OCNGS Operations and Proto-Power/Bisco, a specialty contractor who has fuel bundle reconstitution and rod consolidation experience, remote tooling, underwater video systems and experienced technicians. Proven tooling, clear procedures and a simple approach were important, but the key element was the spirit of teamwork and leadership exhibited by the people involved. In spite of several emergent problems which a task of this nature presents, this small, close knit utility/vendor team completed the work on schedule and within the exposure and cost budgets

  13. All-carbon nanotube diode and solar cell statistically formed from macroscopic network

    Albert G. Nasibulin[1,2,3; Adinath M. Funde[3,4; Ilya V. Anoshkin[3; Igor A. Levitskyt[5,6

    2015-01-01

    Schottky diodes and solar cells are statistically created in the contact area between two macroscopic films of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) at the junction of semiconducting and quasi-metallic bundles consisting of several high quality tubes. The n-doping of one of the films allows for photovoltaic action, owing to an increase in the built-in potential at the bundle-to-bundle interface. Statistical analysis demonstrates that the Schottky barrier device contributes significantly to the I-V characteristics, compared to the p-n diode. The upper limit of photovoltaic conversion efficiency has been estimated at N20%, demonstrating that the light energy conversion is very efficient for such a unique solar cell. While there have been multiple studies on rectifying SWNT diodes in the nanoscale environment, this is the first report of a macroscopic all-carbon nanotube diode and solar cell.

  14. Carbon nanotube conditioning: ab initio simulations of the effect of defects and doping on the electronic properties of carbon nanotube systems.

    Soto, Matias; Barrera, Enrique

    Using carbon nanotubes for electrical conduction applications at the macroscale has proven to be a difficult task, mainly, due to defects and impurities present, and lack of uniform electronic properties in synthesized carbon nanotube bundles. Some researchers have suggested that growing only metallic armchair nanotubes and arranging them with an ideal contact length could lead to the ultimate electrical conductivity; however, such recipe presents too high of a cost to pay. A different route and the topic of this work is to learn to manage the defects, impurities, and the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes present, so that the electrical conduction of a bundle or even wire may be enhanced. We used density functional theory calculations to study the effect of defects and doping on the electronic structure of metallic, semi-metal and semiconducting carbon nanotubes in order to gain a clear picture of their properties. Additionally, using dopants to increase the conductance across a junction between two carbon nanotubes was studied for different configurations. Finally, interaction potentials obtained via first-principles calculations were generalized by developing mathematical models for the purpose of running simulations at a larger length scale using molecular dynamics. Partial funding was received from CONACyT Scholarship 314419.

  15. Group Coupons: Interpersonal Bundling on the Internet

    Yongmin Chen; Tianle Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Sellers sometimes offer goods for sale under both a regular price and a discount for group purchase if the consumer group reaches some minimum size. This selling practice, which we term interpersonal bundling, has been popularized on the Internet by companies such as Groupon. We explain why interpersonal bundling is a profitable strategy in the presence of demand uncertainty, and how it may further boost profits by stimulating product information dissemination. Other reasons for its profitabi...

  16. A Brief Survey of Higgs Bundles

    Zúñiga-Rojas, Ronald Alberto

    2018-01-01

    Considering a compact Riemann surface of genus greater than two, a Higgs~bundle is a pair composed of a holomorphic bundle over the Riemann surface, joint with an auxiliar vector field, so-called Higgs field. This theory started around thirty years ago, with Hitchin's work, when he reduced the self-duality equations from dimension four to dimension two, and so, studied those equations over Riemann surfaces. Hitchin baptized those fields as "Higgs fields" beacuse in the context of physics and ...

  17. Frobenius splitting of projective toric bundles

    He Xin

    2018-03-19

    Mar 19, 2018 ... Firstly it is easy to see that the image of s under the restriction map (2.5) falls in the χ-isotypical component of (Uσ , E), i.e. for all t ∈ T .... σ falls in the χ-isotypical component of (E,Uσ ). D. As mentioned in Remark 2.3, for a vector v .... The determinant of a toric bundle. LetE be a toric bundle on a toric variety X ...

  18. Dynamic behaviour of FBR fuel pin bundles

    Martin, P.H.; Van Dorsselaere, J.P.; Ravenet, A.

    1990-01-01

    A programme of shock tests on a fast neutron reactor subassembly model (SPX1 geometry) including a complete bundle of fuel pins (dummy elements) is being carried out in the BELIER test facility at Cadarache. The purpose of these tests is: to determine the distribution of dynamic forces applied to the fuel rod clads under the impact conditions encountered in a reactor during a earthquake; to reduce as much as possible the conservatism of the methods presently used for the calculation of those forces. The test programme, now being completed, consists of the following steps: impacts on the mock-up in air with an non-compact bundle (situation of the subassembly at beginning of life (BOL) with clearances within the bundle); impacts under the same conditions but with fluid (water) in the subassembly; impacts on the mock-up in air and with a compacted bundle (simulating the conditions of an end-of-life (EOL) bundle with no clearance within the bundle). The accelerations studied in these tests cover the range encountered in design calculations for the subassembly frequencies in beam mode. (author)

  19. Vibration and instability of a viscous-fluid-conveying single-walled carbon nanotube embedded in a visco-elastic medium

    Soltani, P; Farshidianfar, A; Taherian, M M

    2010-01-01

    In this study, for the first time, the transverse vibrational model of a viscous-fluid-conveying single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) embedded in biological soft tissue is developed. Nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam theory has been used to investigate fluid-induced vibration of the SWCNT while visco-elastic behaviour of the surrounding tissue is simulated by the Kelvin-Voigt model. The results indicate that the resonant frequencies and the critical flow velocity at which structural instability of nanotubes emerges are significantly dependent on the properties of the medium around the nanotube, the boundary conditions, the viscosity of the fluid and the nonlocal parameter. Detailed results are demonstrated for the dependence of damping and elastic properties of the medium on the resonant frequencies and the critical flow velocity. Three standard boundary conditions, namely clamped-clamped, clamped-pinned and pinned-pinned, are applied to study the effect of the supported end conditions. Furthermore, it is found that the visco-elastic foundation causes an obvious reduction in the critical velocity in comparison with the elastic foundation, in particular for a compliant medium, pinned-pinned boundary condition, high viscosity of the fluid and small values of the nonlocal coefficient.

  20. Freestanding bucky paper with high strength from multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    Li, Zhonglai; Xu, Ju; O'Byrne, Justin P.; Chen, Lan; Wang, Kaixue; Morris, Michael A.; Holmes, Justin D.

    2012-01-01

    Bucky papers have been investigated by some research groups, however, due to different qualities of carbon nanotubes used, various results of strength and electronic properties were reported in the literatures. In this article, the effects of carbon nanotubes synthesized over different catalysts on the qualities of bucky papers were systemically investigated. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes were synthesized over a series of MgO supported catalysts with different weight ratios of Mo and Co. As the ratios of Mo/Co in the catalysts were increased from 0 to 3, the yields of carbon nanotubes were enhanced from 7 wt% to 400 wt%. However, the yield enhancement of carbon nanotubes was achieved at the expense of higher proportion of structural defects within carbon nanotubes, which has been proved by Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetry analysis. It was demonstrated that the tensile strength of bucky paper composed of numerous MCNTs bundles strongly depends on the structure of carbon nanotubes used. By optimizing reaction conditions, a bucky paper with high strain up to 15.36 MPa and electrical conductivity of 61.17 S cm −1 was obtained by Supercritical Fluid (SCF) drying technique. -- Highlights: ► Multi-wall carbon nanotube bucky paper. ► Structural defects of carbon nanotubes. ► CoMo catalyst. ► Tensile strength of bucky paper.

  1. Optical Characterization and Applications of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Strano, Michael S.

    2005-03-01

    Recent advances in the dispersion and separation of single walled carbon nanotubes have led to new methods of optical characterization and some novel applications. We find that Raman spectroscopy can be used to probe the aggregation state of single-walled carbon nanotubes in solution or as solids with a range of varying morphologies. Carbon nanotubes experience an orthogonal electronic dispersion when in electrical contact that broadens (from 40 meV to roughly 80 meV) and shifts the interband transition to lower energy (by 60 meV). We show that the magnitude of this shift is dependent on the extent of bundle organization and the inter-nanotube contact area. In the Raman spectrum, aggregation shifts the effective excitation profile and causes peaks to increase or decrease, depending on where the transition lies, relative to the excitation wavelength. The findings are particularly relevant for evaluating nanotube separation processes, where relative peak changes in the Raman spectrum can be confused for selective enrichment. We have also used gel electrophoresis and column chromatography conducted on individually dispersed, ultrasonicated single-walled carbon nanotubes to yield simultaneous separation by tube length and diameter. Electroelution after electrophoresis is shown to produce highly resolved fractions of nanotubes with average lengths between 92 and 435 nm. Separation by diameter is concomitant with length fractionation, and nanotubes that have been cut shortest also possess the greatest relative enrichments of large-diameter species. The relative quantum yield decreases nonlinearly as the nanotube length becomes shorter. These findings enable new applications of nanotubes as sensors and biomarkers. Particularly, molecular detection using near infrared (n-IR) light between 0.9 and 1.3 eV has important biomedical applications because of greater tissue penetration and reduced auto-fluorescent background in thick tissue or whole blood media. Carbon nanotubes

  2. Optimization of single-walled carbon nanotube solubility by noncovalent PEGylation using experimental design methods

    Hadidi N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Naghmeh Hadidi1, Farzad Kobarfard2, Nastaran Nafissi-Varcheh3, Reza Aboofazeli11Department of Pharmaceutics, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranAbstract: In this study, noncovalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs with phospholipid-polyethylene glycols (Pl-PEGs was performed to improve the solubility of SWCNTs in aqueous solution. Two kinds of PEG derivatives, ie, Pl-PEG 2000 and Pl-PEG 5000, were used for the PEGylation process. An experimental design technique (D-optimal design and second-order polynomial equations was applied to investigate the effect of variables on PEGylation and the solubility of SWCNTs. The type of PEG derivative was selected as a qualitative parameter, and the PEG/SWCNT weight ratio and sonication time were applied as quantitative variables for the experimental design. Optimization was performed for two responses, aqueous solubility and loading efficiency. The grafting of PEG to the carbon nanostructure was determined by thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Aqueous solubility and loading efficiency were determined by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry and measurement of free amine groups, respectively. Results showed that Pl-PEGs were grafted onto SWCNTs. Aqueous solubility of 0.84 mg/mL and loading efficiency of nearly 98% were achieved for the prepared Pl-PEG 5000-SWCNT conjugates. Evaluation of functionalized SWCNTs showed that our noncovalent functionalization protocol could considerably increase aqueous solubility, which is an essential criterion in the design of a carbon nanotube-based drug delivery system and its biodistribution.Keywords: phospholipid-PEG, D-optimal design, loading efficiency, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, theromogravimetric analysis, carbon nanotubes

  3. The fabrication of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with semiconductors as the source and drain contact materials.

    Xiao, Z; Camino, F E

    2009-04-01

    Sb(2)Te(3) and Bi(2)Te(2)Se semiconductor materials were used as the source and drain contact materials in the fabrication of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs). Ultra-purified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were ultrasonically dispersed in N-methyl pyrrolidone solvent. Dielectrophoresis was used to deposit and align SWCNTs for fabrication of CNTFETs. The Sb(2)Te(3)- and Bi(2)Te(2)Se-based CNTFETs demonstrate p-type metal-oxide-silicon-like I-V curves with high on/off drain-source current ratio at large drain-source voltages and good saturation of drain-source current with increasing drain-source voltage. The fabrication process developed is novel and has general meaning, and could be used for the fabrication of SWCNT-based integrated devices and systems with semiconductor contact materials.

  4. Cytotoxicity Effects of Different Surfactant Molecules Conjugated to Carbon Nanotubes on Human Astrocytoma Cells

    Dong, Lifeng; Witkowski, Colette M.; Craig, Michael M.; Greenwade, Molly M.; Joseph, Katherine L.

    2009-12-01

    Phase contrast and epifluorescence microscopy were utilized to monitor morphological changes in human astrocytoma cells during a time-course exposure to single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) conjugates with different surfactants and to investigate sub-cellular distribution of the nanotube conjugates, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that cytotoxicity of the nanotube/surfactant conjugates is related to the toxicity of surfactant molecules attached on the nanotube surfaces. Both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) are toxic to cells. Exposure to CNT/SDS conjugates (0.5 mg/mL) for less than 5 min caused changes in cell morphology resulting in a distinctly spherical shape compared to untreated cells. In contrast, sodium cholate (SC) and CNT/SC did not affect cell morphology, proliferation, or growth. These data indicate that SC is an environmentally friendly surfactant for the purification and dispersion of SWCNTs. Epifluorescence microscopy analysis of CNT/DNA conjugates revealed distribution in the cytoplasm of cells and did not show adverse effects on cell morphology, proliferation, or viability during a 72-h incubation. These observations suggest that the SWCNTs could be used as non-viral vectors for diagnostic and therapeutic molecules across the blood-brain barrier to the brain and the central nervous system.

  5. Molecular perspective on diazonium adsorption for controllable functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes in aqueous surfactant solutions.

    Lin, Shangchao; Hilmer, Andrew J; Mendenhall, Jonathan D; Strano, Michael S; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2012-05-16

    Functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using diazonium salts allows modification of their optical and electronic properties for a variety of applications, ranging from drug-delivery vehicles to molecular sensors. However, control of the functionalization process remains a challenge, requiring molecular-level understanding of the adsorption of diazonium ions onto heterogeneous, charge-mobile SWCNT surfaces, which are typically decorated with surfactants. In this paper, we combine molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, experiments, and equilibrium reaction modeling to understand and model the extent of diazonium functionalization of SWCNTs coated with various surfactants (sodium cholate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide). We show that the free energy of diazonium adsorption, determined using simulations, can be used to rank surfactants in terms of the extent of functionalization attained following their adsorption on the nanotube surface. The difference in binding affinities between linear and rigid surfactants is attributed to the synergistic binding of the diazonium ion to the local "hot/cold spots" formed by the charged surfactant heads. A combined simulation-modeling framework is developed to provide guidance for controlling the various sensitive experimental conditions needed to achieve the desired extent of SWCNT functionalization.

  6. Adsorption of organic contaminants by graphene nanosheets, carbon nanotubes and granular activated carbons under natural organic matter preloading conditions.

    Ersan, Gamze; Kaya, Yasemin; Apul, Onur G; Karanfil, Tanju

    2016-09-15

    The effect of NOM preloading on the adsorption of phenanthrene (PNT) and trichloroethylene (TCE) by pristine graphene nanosheets (GNS) and graphene oxide nanosheet (GO) was investigated and compared with those of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), and two coal based granular activated carbons (GACs). PNT uptake was higher than TCE by all adsorbents on both mass and surface area bases. This was attributed to the hydrophobicity of PNT. The adsorption capacities of PNT and TCE depend on the accessibility of the organic molecules to the inner regions of the adsorbent which was influenced from the molecular size of OCs. The adsorption capacities of all adsorbents decreased as a result of NOM preloading due to site competition and/or pore/interstice blockage. However, among all adsorbents, GO was generally effected least from the NOM preloading for PNT, whereas there was not observed any trend of NOM competition with a specific adsorbent for TCE. In addition, SWCNT was generally affected most from the NOM preloading for TCE and there was not any trend for PNT. The overall results indicated that the fate and transport of organic contaminants by GNSs and CNTs type of nanoadsorbents and GACs in different natural systems will be affected by water quality parameters, characteristics of adsorbent, and properties of adsorbate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Supercapacitance of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes-Polypyrrole Composites

    Matei Raicopol

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The composites based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and conducting polymers (CPs are promising materials for supercapacitor devices due to their unique nanostructure that combines the large pseudocapacitance of the CPs with the fast charging/discharging double-layer capacitance and excellent mechanical properties of the CNTs. Here, we report a new electrochemical method to obtain polypyrrole (PPY/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT composites. In the first step, the SWCNTs are covalently functionalized with monomeric units of pyrrole by esterification of acyl chloride functionalized SWCNTs and N-(6-hydroxyhexylpyrrole. In the second step, the PPY/SWCNTs composites are obtained by copolymerizing the pyrrole monomer with the pyrrole units grafted on SWCNTs surface using controlled potential electrolysis. The composites were further characterized by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed good electrochemical charge storage properties for the synthesized composites based on PPY and SWCNTs covalently functionalized with pyrrole units making them promising electrode materials for high power supercapacitors.

  8. Simultaneous synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene in a magnetically-enhanced arc plasma.

    Li, Jian; Shashurin, Alexey; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Keidar, Michael

    2012-02-02

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and graphene attract a deluge of interest of scholars nowadays due to their very promising application for molecular sensors, field effect transistor and super thin and flexible electronic devices(1-4). Anodic arc discharge supported by the erosion of the anode material is one of the most practical and efficient methods, which can provide specific non-equilibrium processes and a high influx of carbon material to the developing structures at relatively higher temperature, and consequently the as-synthesized products have few structural defects and better crystallinity. To further improve the controllability and flexibility of the synthesis of carbon nanostructures in arc discharge, magnetic fields can be applied during the synthesis process according to the strong magnetic responses of arc plasmas. It was demonstrated that the magnetically-enhanced arc discharge can increase the average length of SWCNT (5), narrow the diameter distribution of metallic catalyst particles and carbon nanotubes (6), and change the ratio of metallic and semiconducting carbon nanotubes (7), as well as lead to graphene synthesis (8). Furthermore, it is worthwhile to remark that when we introduce a non-uniform magnetic field with the component normal to the current in arc, the Lorentz force along the J×B direction can generate the plasmas jet and make effective delivery of carbon ion particles and heat flux to samples. As a result, large-scale graphene flakes and high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes were simultaneously generated by such new magnetically-enhanced anodic arc method. Arc imaging, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze the characterization of carbon nanostructures. These findings indicate a wide spectrum of opportunities to manipulate with the properties of nanostructures produced in plasmas by means of controlling the

  9. Synergistic effect of non-covalent interaction in colloidal nematic liquid crystal doped with magnetic functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Dalir, Nima; Javadian, Soheila

    2018-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), CNT@Fe3O4, and Fe3O4 nanocomposites were doped to eutectic uniaxial nematic liquid crystal (NLC's) (E5CN7) to improve physiochemical properties such as phase transition temperature, activation energy (Ea), dielectric anisotropy, and electro-optical properties. The thermal study of nematic phase shows a decrease in the nematic to isotropic phase transition temperature as CNT is doped. However, higher doping concentration of CNTs leads to the further increase in transition temperature. The anchoring effect or π-π interaction plays a key role in N-I phase transition. The functionalization of SWCNTs with Fe3O4 diminishes the CNT aggregation while the magnetic susceptibility is increased. The functionalized CNT doping to NLC's decrease significantly the phase transition temperature compared to doping of non-functionalized CNTs. Attractive interaction between guest and host molecules by magnetic and geometry effect increased the enthalpy and entropy of phase transition in the SWCNT@Fe3O4 sample compared to non-functionalized CNT doped system. Also, the Ea values are decreased as SWCNT@Fe3O4 is doped to pure E5CN7. The difference of N-I phase transition temperature was observed in Fe3O4 and CNT@Fe3O4 compared to SWCNT doped systems. Finally, dielectric anisotropy was increased in the doped system compared to pure NLC.

  10. Laccase electrodes based on the combination of single-walled carbon nanotubes and redox layered double hydroxides: Towards the development of biocathode for biofuel cells

    Ding, Shou-Nian; Holzinger, Michael; Mousty, Christine; Cosnier, Serge

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) were combined with layered double hydroxides (LDH) intercalated with 2,2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) diammonium salt [ZnCr-ABTS] to entrap and electrically connect laccase enzyme. The resulting laccase electrodes exhibited an electro-enzymatic activity for O 2 reduction. To improve this electrocatalytic activity, varying SWCNT quantities and loading methods were tested to optimize the configuration of the laccase electrodes. Furthermore, the resulting bioelectrode was successfully used as a biocathode for the elaboration of a membrane-less glucose/air biofuel cell. In 0.1 M phosphate buffer (PBS) of pH 6.0, containing glucose (5 mM) under ambient conditions, the assembled biofuel cell yielded a maximum power density of 18 μW cm -2 at a cell voltage of 0.3 V whereas this power decreased to 8.3 μW cm -2 for a biofuel cell based on the identical biocathode setup without SWCNT.

  11. Laccase electrodes based on the combination of single-walled carbon nanotubes and redox layered double hydroxides: Towards the development of biocathode for biofuel cells

    Ding, Shou-Nian; Holzinger, Michael; Cosnier, Serge [Departement de Chimie Moleculaire UMR-5250, ICMG FR-2607, CNRS Universite Joseph Fourier, BP-53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Mousty, Christine [Laboratoire des Materiaux Inorganiques, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS UMR-6002, 63177 Aubiere Cedex (France)

    2010-08-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) were combined with layered double hydroxides (LDH) intercalated with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) diammonium salt [ZnCr-ABTS] to entrap and electrically connect laccase enzyme. The resulting laccase electrodes exhibited an electro-enzymatic activity for O{sub 2} reduction. To improve this electrocatalytic activity, varying SWCNT quantities and loading methods were tested to optimize the configuration of the laccase electrodes. Furthermore, the resulting bioelectrode was successfully used as a biocathode for the elaboration of a membrane-less glucose/air biofuel cell. In 0.1 M phosphate buffer (PBS) of pH 6.0, containing glucose (5 mM) under ambient conditions, the assembled biofuel cell yielded a maximum power density of 18 {mu}W cm{sup -2} at a cell voltage of 0.3 V whereas this power decreased to 8.3 {mu}W cm{sup -2} for a biofuel cell based on the identical biocathode setup without SWCNT. (author)

  12. Nanotubes and nanowires

    Unknown

    junction nanotubes by the pyrolysis of appropriate organic precursors. ... By making use of carbon nanotubes, nanowires of metals, metal ..... The use of activated carbon in place of ..... required for the complete removal of the carbon template.

  13. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  14. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    Zhang, Hanyuan; Sun, Jianbo; Li, Xiang; Liu, Yuxin; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Rojanasakul, Yon; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 µg cm −2 ) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  15. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    Zhang, Hanyuan; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Sun, Jianbo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang; Rojanasakul, Yon; Liu, Yuxin

    2015-07-01

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 µg cm-2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  16. Deformations of the generalised Picard bundle

    Biswas, I.; Brambila-Paz, L.; Newstead, P.E.

    2004-08-01

    Let X be a nonsingular algebraic curve of genus g ≥ 3, and let Mξ denote the moduli space of stable vector bundles of rank n ≥ 2 and degree d with fixed determinant ξ over X such that n and d are coprime. We assume that if g = 3 then n ≥ 4 and if g = 4 then n ≥ 3, and suppose further that n 0 , d 0 are integers such that n 0 ≥ 1 and nd 0 + n 0 d > nn 0 (2g - 2). Let E be a semistable vector bundle over X of rank n 0 and degree d 0 . The generalised Picard bundle W ξ (E) is by definition the vector bundle over M ξ defined by the direct image p M ξ *(U ξ x p X * E) where U ξ is a universal vector bundle over X x M ξ . We obtain an inversion formula allowing us to recover E from W ξ (E) and show that the space of infinitesimal deformations of W ξ (E) is isomorphic to H 1 (X, End(E)). This construction gives a locally complete family of vector bundles over M ξ parametrised by the moduli space M(n 0 ,d 0 ) of stable bundles of rank n 0 and degree d 0 over X. If (n 0 ,d 0 ) = 1 and W ξ (E) is stable for all E is an element of M(n 0 ,d 0 ), the construction determines an isomorphism from M(n 0 ,d 0 ) to a connected component M 0 of a moduli space of stable sheaves over M ξ . This applies in particular when n 0 = 1, in which case M 0 is isomorphic to the Jacobian J of X as a polarised variety. The paper as a whole is a generalisation of results of Kempf and Mukai on Picard bundles over J, and is also related to a paper of Tyurin on the geometry of moduli of vector bundles. (author)

  17. NIF laser bundle review. Final report

    Tietbohl, G.L.; Larson, D.W.; Erlandson, A.C.

    1995-01-01

    We performed additional bundle review effort subsequent to the completion of the preliminary report and are revising our original recommendations. We now recommend that the NIF baseline laser bundle size be changed to the 4x2 bundle configuration. There are several 4x2 bundle configurations that could be constructed at a cost similar to that of the baseline 4x12 (from $11M more to about $11M less than the baseline; unescalated, no contingency) and provide significant system improvements. We recommend that the building cost estimates (particularly for the in-line building options) be verified by an architect/engineer (A/E) firm knowledgeable about building design. If our cost estimates of the in-line building are accurate and therefore result in a change from the baseline U-shaped building layout, the acceptability of the in-line configuration must be reviewed from an operations viewpoint. We recommend that installation, operation, and maintenance of all laser components be reviewed to better determine the necessity of aisles, which add to the building cost significantly. The need for beam expansion must also be determined since it affects the type of bundle packing that can be used and increases the minimum laser bay width. The U-turn laser architecture (if proven viable) offers a reduction in building costs since this laser design is shorter than the baseline switched design and requires a shorter laser bay

  18. Synthesis and optical characterization of carbon nanotube arrays

    Rahman, Md. Mahfuzur, E-mail: mrahman@masdar.ac.ae [Institute Centre for Energy (iEnergy), Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology (MIST), P.O. Box 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Younes, Hammad [Institute Centre for Energy (iEnergy), Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology (MIST), P.O. Box 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Ni, George [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Zhang, TieJun [Institute Centre for Energy (iEnergy), Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology (MIST), P.O. Box 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Al Ghaferi, Amal, E-mail: aalghaferi@masdar.ac.ae [Institute Centre for Energy (iEnergy), Mechanical and Materials Engineering Department, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology (MIST), P.O. Box 54224, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Controlling metallicity and vertical alignment of CNT forest by changing hydrogen catalyst annealing time and growth pressure. • Verifying metallicity using Raman spectroscopy of top CNT layer. • Optical characterization of CNT forest using UV–vis–NIR spectrophotometer. - Abstract: Catalyst annealing time and growth pressure play a crucial role in the chiral selective and high-efficiency growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) during low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). We achieved a high growth rates for SWCNTs and a change the chiral distribution towards metallic (n, m) increasing the catalyst annealing time in hydrogen. A strong correlation is revealed between the catalyst annealing time at lower growth pressures and the shape of the G band, which indicates the metallic or semiconducting nature of the SWCNT and predict the chirality distribution. Under a 15 min annealing time and 10 mbar of growth pressure, the bottom of the G band is broadened with a sharp G{sup −} peak, and the G-band exhibited asymmetrical Breit–Wigner–Fano (BWF) shape. In addition, the growth of SWCNTs with smaller diameters and rich in metallic character is confirmed by the shift of the G-band to a smaller Raman frequency. Homogeneity and vertical alignment of as-grown SWCNT arrays are optically studied using UV/vis/NIR Spectrophotometer. Wavelength-independent and low reflectance resulted from the growth of uniform arrays of SWCNTs. Because of their tunable electronic and optical properties, selective growth of SWCNTs promises great application potential, particularly in electronics and solar industries.

  19. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  20. Effect of beam expansion loss in a carbon nanotube-doped PVA film on passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber lasers with different feedback ratios

    Cheng, Kuang-Nan; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Cheng, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Lo, Jui-Yung; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2014-01-01

    The effect of beam expansion induced divergent loss in a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) doped polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) based ultrafast saturable absorber (SA) film thickness on the passive mode-locking (PML) performances of erbium-doped fiber lasers are demonstrated. The variation on the PML pulsewidth of the EDFL is discussed by changing the SWCNT-PVA SA film thicknesses, together with adjusting the pumping power and the intra-cavity feedback ratio. An almost 6 dB increment of divergent loss when enlarging the SWCNT-PVA based SA film thickness from 30–130 µm is observed. When shrinking the SA thickness to 30 µm at the largest pumping power of 52.5 mW, the optical spectrum red-shifts to 1558.8 nm with its 3 dB spectral linewidth broadening up to 2.7 nm, while the pulse has already entered the soliton regime with multi-order Kelly sidebands aside the spectral shoulder. The soliton pulsewidth is as short as 790 fs, which is much shorter than those obtained with other thicker SWCNT doped PVA polymer film based SAs; therefore, the peak power from the output of the PML-EDFL is significantly enlarged accompanied by a completely suppressed residual continuous-wave level to achieve the largest on/off extinction ratio. The main mechanism of pulse shortening with reducing thickness of SWCNT doped PVA polymer film based SA is attributed to the limited beam expansion as well as the enlarged modulation depth, which results in shortened soliton pulsewidth with a clean dc background, and broadened spectrum with enriched Kelly sidebands. The increase of total SWCNT amount in the thicker SA inevitably causes a higher linear absorption; hence, the mode-locking threshold also rises accordingly. By enlarging pumping power from 38.5–52.5 mW, the highest ascent on pulse extinction of up to 32 dB is observed among all kinds of feedback conditions. Nevertheless, the enlargement on the extinction slightly decays with increasing the feedback ratio from 30–90