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Sample records for nanotube isotope-superlattice structures

  1. Film thickness determining method of the silicon isotope superlattices by SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Akio; Shimizu, Yasuo; Itoh, Kohei M.

    2008-01-01

    It is becoming important to evaluate silicon self-diffusion with progress of a silicon semiconductor industry. In order to evaluate the self-diffusion of silicon, silicon isotope superlattices (SLs) is the only marker. For this reason, it is important to correctly evaluate a film thickness and a depth distribution of isotope SLs by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). As for film thickness, it is difficult to estimate the thicknesses correctly if the cycles of SLs are short. In this work, first, we report the determination of the film thickness for short-period SLs using mixing roughness-information (MRI) analysis to SIMS profile. Next, the uncertainty of the conventional method to determine the film thicknesses of SLs is determined. It was found that the conventional methods cannot correctly determine film thickness of short-period-isotope SLs where film thickness differs for every layer

  2. Structural transformations of carbon chains inside nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, Jamie H.; Ruemmeli, Mark H.; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Buechner, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    In situ aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to examine the structural transformations of carbon chains that occur in the interior region of carbon nanotubes. We find electron-beam irradiation leads to the formation of two-dimensional carbon structures that are freely mobile inside the nanotube. The inner diameter of the nanotube influences the structural transformations of the carbon chains. As the diameter of the nanotube increases, electron-beam irradiation leads to curling of the chains and eventually the formation of closed looped structures. The closed looped structures evolve into spherical fullerenelike structures that exhibit translational motion inside the nanotubes and also coalesce to form larger nanotube structures. These results demonstrate the use of carbon nanotubes as test tubes for growing small carbon nanotubes within the interior by using only electron-beam irradiation at 80 kV.

  3. Interaction of multiwalled carbon nanotube produces structural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) has been found to produce structural changes in Calf Thymus-DNA (CT-DNA). The interaction or binding of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was investigated in order to discover if it brings about any significant changes of the DNA double helix using CD spectra ...

  4. Carbon Nanotube Infused Launch Vehicle Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For the past 5 years Orbital ATK has been investing in, prototyping, and testing carbon nanotube infused composite structures to evaluate their impact on launch...

  5. Nanotube structures, methods of making nanotube structures, and methods of accessing intracellular space

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDersarl, Jules J.; Xu, Alexander M.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Tayebi, Noureddine

    2016-02-23

    In accordance with the purpose(s) of the present disclosure, as embodied and broadly described herein, embodiments of the present disclosure, in one aspect, relate to methods of making a structure including nanotubes, a structure including nanotubes, methods of delivering a fluid to a cell, methods of removing a fluid to a cell, methods of accessing intracellular space, and the like.

  6. Micromorphology and structure of vanadium oxide nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigor'eva, A.V.; Anikina, A.V.; Tarasov, A.B.; Gudilin, E.A.; Knot'ko, A.V.; Volkov, V.V.; Dembo, K.A.; Tret'yakov, Yu.D.

    2006-01-01

    Complex analysis of structural features of V 2 O 5 nanotubes prepared using molecular template, i.e. hexadecyl amine-1 (HDA), was made using the methods of X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and IR spectroscopy. It has been ascertained that the nanotubes studied are hybrid inorganic-organic material composed of periodically arranged ordered layers of V-O, forming multilayer walls and HDA molecules between them [ru

  7. Structural properties of water around uncharged and charged carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezfoli, Amir Reza Ansari; Mehrabian, Mozaffar Ali; Rafsanjani, Hassan Hashemipour

    2013-01-01

    Studying the structural properties of water molecules around the carbon nanotubes is very important in a wide variety of carbon nanotubes applications. We studied the number of hydrogen bonds, oxygen and hydrogen density distributions, and water orientation around carbon nanotubes. The water density distribution for all carbon nanotubes was observed to have the same feature. In water-carbon nanotubes interface, a high-density region of water molecules exists around carbon nanotubes. The results reveal that the water orientation around carbon nanotubes is roughly dependent on carbon nanotubes surface charge. The water molecules in close distances to carbon nanotubes were found to make an HOH plane nearly perpendicular to the water-carbon nanotubes interface for carbon nanotubes with negative surface charge. For uncharged carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotubes with positive surface charge, the HOH plane was in tangential orientation with water-carbon nanotubes interface. There was also a significant reduction in hydrogen bond of water region around carbon nanotubes as compared with hydrogen bond in bulk water. This reduction was very obvious for carbon nanotubes with positive surface charge. In addition, the calculation of dynamic properties of water molecules in water-CNT interface revealed that there is a direct relation between the number of Hbonds and self-diffusion coefficient of water molecules

  8. Electrical conductivity of metal–carbon nanotube structures: Effect of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The electrical properties of asymmetric metal–carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been studied using ... The models with asymmetric metal contacts and carbon nanotube bear resemblance to experimental ... ordinary mechanical strength.

  9. Energy structure of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byszewski, P.; Kowalska, E.

    1997-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of C 60 can be reasonably well reproduced theoretically with the use of the quantum chemistry calculation methods. It allows investigation of the influence of a deformation of C 60 on the absorption spectrum. The deformation of the electronic density on C 60 can occur under the influence of molecules of good solvent. Similar calculations of the energetic structure of carbon nanotubes does not support the idea that their chirality may strongly influence the energy levels distribution, in particular that it may open the energy gap of nanotubes. (author). 40 refs, 13 figs, 1 tab

  10. New Insight into Carbon Nanotube Electronic Structure Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL; Jiang, Deen [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The fundamental role of aryl diazonium salts for post synthesis selectivity of carbon nanotubes is investigated using extensive electronic structure calculations. The resulting understanding for diazonium salt based selective separation of conducting and semiconducting carbon nanotubes shows how the primary contributions come from the interplay between the intrinsic electronic structure of the carbon nanotubes and that of the anion of the salt. We demonstrate how the electronic transport properties change upon the formation of charge transfer complexes and upon their conversion into covalently attached functional groups. Our results are found to correlate well with experiments and provide for the first time an atomistic description for diazonium salt based chemical separation of carbon nanotubes

  11. Simulation of the Band Structure of Graphene and Carbon Nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mina, Aziz N; Awadallah, Attia A; Ahmed, Riham R; Phillips, Adel H

    2012-01-01

    Simulation technique has been performed to simulate the band structure of both graphene and carbon nanotube. Accordingly, the dispersion relations for graphene and carbon nanotube are deduced analytically, using the tight binding model and LCAO scheme. The results from the simulation of the dispersion relation of both graphene and carbon nanotube were found to be consistent with those in the literature which indicates the correctness of the process of simulation technique. The present research is very important for tailoring graphene and carbon nanotube with specific band structure, in order to satisfy the required electronic properties of them.

  12. Structures of water molecular nanotube induced by axial tensile strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H. [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structures and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China)], E-mail: lihuilmy@hotmail.com; Zhang, X.Q. [Physics Department, Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China); Liew, K.M. [Department of Building and Constructions, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Liu, X.F. [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structures and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China)

    2008-10-06

    Five well-ordered nano-ice structures embedded in carbon nanotubes are obtained in this study. These five nano-ice phases all exhibit single walled tubular morphologies, including the pentagon, hexagon ice nanotubes whose structures are quite different from bulk ice. Our simulation results indicate that water molecules tend to rearrange into surface ring structures to reduce the number of free OH groups. The structural behavior of these ice nanotubes inside CNTs subject to axial stress is also investigated. The ice nanotubes tend to be drawn to ice nanorings or ice nanospring during the mechanical stretching. The distribution function exhibits typical order-to-disorder transition of the water network confined in carbon nanotube during the stretching. By analysis, we suggest that it is unlikely that additional water molecules will enter the tubes because of the increased volume available if the tubes are stretched at contact with a water reservoir.

  13. Structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes under hydrostatic pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ying; Cao Juexian; Yang Wei

    2008-01-01

    We studied the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes under hydrostatic pressures based on molecular dynamics simulations and first principles band structure calculations. It is found that carbon nanotubes experience a hard-to-soft transition as external pressure increases. The bulk modulus of soft phase is two orders of magnitude smaller than that of hard phase. The band structure calculations show that band gap of (10, 0) nanotube increases with the increase of pressure at low pressures. Above a critical pressure (5.70GPa), band gap of (10, 0) nanotube drops rapidly and becomes zero at 6.62GPa. Moreover, the calculated charge density shows that a large pressure can induce an sp 2 -to-sp 3 bonding transition, which is confirmed by recent experiments on deformed carbon nanotubes

  14. Electrical conductivity of metal–carbon nanotube structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electrical properties of asymmetric metal–carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been studied using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method with Atomistix tool kit. The models with asymmetric metal contacts and carbon nanotube bear resemblance to experimental set-ups. The study ...

  15. EFFECTS OF SYNTHESIS PARAMETERS ON THE STRUCTURE OF TITANIA NANOTUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. NORANI MUTI

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Detection of hydrogen is crucial for industrial process control and medical applications where presence of hydrogen in breath indicates different type of health problems particularly in infants. A better performed sensor with high sensitivity, selectivity, reliability and faster response time would be critical and sought after especially for medical applications. Titanium dioxide nanotube structure is chosen as an active component in the gas sensor because of its highly sensitive electrical resistance to hydrogen over a wide range of concentrations. The objective of the work is to investigate the effect of the anodizing conditions on the structure of titania nanotubes produced by anodizing method. The anodizing parameters namely the ambient temperature and separation of electrodes are varied accordingly to find the optimum anodizing conditions for production of good quality titania nanotubes for enhanced properties based on their uniformity, coverage, pore size and crystallinity. Samples of nanotubes produced were subjected to annealing process at varying time and temperature in order to improve the crystallinity of the nanotubes. The highly ordered porous titania nanotubes produced by this method are of tabular shape and have good uniformity and alignment over large areas. The pore size of the titania nanotubes ranges from 47 to 94 nm, while the wall thickness is in the range of 17 to 26 nm. The length of the nanotubes was found to be about 280 nm. The structure of nanotubes changes from amorphous to crystalline after undergoing annealing treatment. Nanotubes have also shown to have better crystallinity if they were subjected to annealing treatment at higher temperature. The characteristics of nanotubes obtained are found to be agreeable to those that have been reported to show improved hydrogen gas sensing properties.

  16. Fullerenes, nanotubes, onions and related carbon structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, C N.R.; Seshadri, Ram; Govindaraj, A; Sen, Rahul [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, CSIR Centre of Excellence in Chemistry and Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India)

    1995-12-01

    Fullerenes, containing five- and six-membered carbon rings, of which C{sub 6}0 and C{sub 7}0 are the prominent members, exhibit phase transitions associated with orientational ordering. When C{sub 6}0 is suitably doped with electrons, it shows novel superconducting and magnetic properties. We review these and other properties of fullerenes in bulk or in film form along with the preparative and structural aspects. Carbon nanotubes and onions (hyperfullerenes) are the other forms of carbon whose material properties have aroused considerable interest. Besides discussing these new forms of carbon, we briefly introduce other possible forms, such as those involving five-, six- and seven-membered rings and hybrids between diamond and graphite

  17. Structure of Carbon Nanotube-dendrimer composite

    OpenAIRE

    Vasumathi, V.; Pramanik, Debabrata; Sood, A. K.; Maiti, Prabal K

    2012-01-01

    Using all atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we report the microscopic picture of the nanotube-dendrimer complex for PAMAM dendrimer of generation 2 to 4 and carbon nanotube of chirality (6,5). We find compact wrapping conformations of dendrimer onto the nanotube surface for all the three generations of PAMAM dendrimer. The degree of wrapping is more for non-protonated dendrimer compared to the protonated dendrimer. For comparison we also study the interaction of another dendrimer,...

  18. Structural properties of carbon nanotubes derived from 13C NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E.; Babaa, M.-R.; Bouhrara, M.; Kim, Y.; Saih, Y.; Dennler, S.; Mauri, F.; Basset, Jean-Marie; Goze-Bac, C.; Wå gberg, T.

    2011-01-01

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on how structural properties of carbon nanotubes can be derived from 13C NMR investigations. Magic angle spinning solid state NMR experiments have been performed on single- and multiwalled

  19. Structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Oyama, A. B.; Silva-Molina, R. A.; Ruíz-García, J.; Guirado-López, R. A., E-mail: guirado@ifisica.uaslp.mx [Instituto de Física “Manuel Sandoval Vallarta,” Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Álvaro Obregón 64, 78000 San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Gámez-Corrales, R. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 5-088, 83190, Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to analyze the structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH–MWCNT). Our MWCNTs have average diameters of ∼2 nm, lengths of approximately 100–300 nm, and a hydroxyl surface coverage θ∼0.1. When deposited on the air/water interface the OH–MWCNTs are partially soluble and the floating units interact and link with each other forming extended foam-like carbon networks. Surface pressure-area isotherms of the nanotube films are performed using the Langmuir balance method at different equilibration times. The films are transferred into a mica substrate and atomic force microscopy images show that the foam like structure is preserved and reveals fine details of their microstructure. Density functional theory calculations performed on model hydroxylated carbon nanotubes show that low energy atomic configurations are found when the OH groups form molecular islands on the nanotube's surface. This patchy behavior for the OH species is expected to produce nanotubes having reduced wettabilities, in line with experimental observations. OH doping yields nanotubes having small HOMO–LUMO energy gaps and generates a nanotube → OH direction for the charge transfer leading to the existence of more hole carriers in the structures. Our synthesized OH–MWCNTs might have promising applications.

  20. Thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube cross-bar structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, William J; Keblinski, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    We use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) to compute the thermal conductivity (κ) of orthogonally ordered cross-bar structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Such structures exhibit extremely low thermal conductivity in the range of 0.02-0.07 W m -1 K -1 . These values are five orders of magnitude smaller than the axial thermal conductivity of individual carbon nanotubes, and are comparable to the thermal conductivity of still air.

  1. Structural properties of carbon nanotubes derived from 13C NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E.

    2011-10-10

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on how structural properties of carbon nanotubes can be derived from 13C NMR investigations. Magic angle spinning solid state NMR experiments have been performed on single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range from 0.7 to 100 nm and with number of walls from 1 to 90. We provide models on how diameter and the number of nanotube walls influence NMR linewidth and line position. Both models are supported by theoretical calculations. Increasing the diameter D, from the smallest investigated nanotube, which in our study corresponds to the inner nanotube of a double-walled tube to the largest studied diameter, corresponding to large multiwalled nanotubes, leads to a 23.5 ppm diamagnetic shift of the isotropic NMR line position δ. We show that the isotropic line follows the relation δ = 18.3/D + 102.5 ppm, where D is the diameter of the tube and NMR line position δ is relative to tetramethylsilane. The relation asymptotically tends to approach the line position expected in graphene. A characteristic broadening of the line shape is observed with the increasing number of walls. This feature can be rationalized by an isotropic shift distribution originating from different diamagnetic shielding of the encapsulated nanotubes together with a heterogeneity of the samples. Based on our results, NMR is shown to be a nondestructive spectroscopic method that can be used as a complementary method to, for example, transmission electron microscopy to obtain structural information for carbon nanotubes, especially bulk samples.

  2. Principles for structure analysis of carbon nanotubes by HRTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xudong, Fan; Bursill, L A

    1995-10-01

    An efficient algorithm is derived for generating all possible seamless carbon nanotube structure models. This makes use of multijugate helical lattices, a concept borrowed from some biological structures. Principles for helicity and structure analysis of carbon nanotubes using high-resolution electron microscopy and image processing techniques are then developed. Applicability is tested on experimentally obtained images. The limitations of this approach are examined. Provided the tubules contain less than three to five layers the individual component layer helicities and the order of assembly may be obtained from the high-resolution many-beam bright - and dark-field image reconstructions. 16 refs., 11 figs.

  3. Principles for structure analysis of carbon nanotubes by HRTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xudong; Bursill, L.A.

    1995-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is derived for generating all possible seamless carbon nanotube structure models. This makes use of multijugate helical lattices, a concept borrowed from some biological structures. Principles for helicity and structure analysis of carbon nanotubes using high-resolution electron microscopy and image processing techniques are then developed. Applicability is tested on experimentally obtained images. The limitations of this approach are examined. Provided the tubules contain less than three to five layers the individual component layer helicities and the order of assembly may be obtained from the high-resolution many-beam bright - and dark-field image reconstructions. 16 refs., 11 figs

  4. Atomic Structure and Energy Distribution of Collapsed Carbon Nanotubes of Different Chiralities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A. Baimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For carbon nanotubes of sufficiently large diameter at sufficiently low temperature, due to the action of the van der Waals forces, the ground state is a bilayer graphene with closed edges, the so-called collapsed configuration. Molecular dynamics simulation of collapsed carbon nanotubes is performed. The effect of length, diameter, and chirality of the nanotubes on their properties is investigated. It is shown that collapsed nanotubes after relaxation have rippled structure which is strongly dependent on the nanotube chirality. The structural properties are studied by calculating the radial distribution function and energy distribution along various regions in the collapsed carbon nanotubes.

  5. DNA nanotubes for NMR structure determination of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellot, Gaëtan; McClintock, Mark A; Chou, James J; Shih, William M

    2013-04-01

    Finding a way to determine the structures of integral membrane proteins using solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has proved to be challenging. A residual-dipolar-coupling-based refinement approach can be used to resolve the structure of membrane proteins up to 40 kDa in size, but to do this you need a weak-alignment medium that is detergent-resistant and it has thus far been difficult to obtain such a medium suitable for weak alignment of membrane proteins. We describe here a protocol for robust, large-scale synthesis of detergent-resistant DNA nanotubes that can be assembled into dilute liquid crystals for application as weak-alignment media in solution NMR structure determination of membrane proteins in detergent micelles. The DNA nanotubes are heterodimers of 400-nm-long six-helix bundles, each self-assembled from a M13-based p7308 scaffold strand and >170 short oligonucleotide staple strands. Compatibility with proteins bearing considerable positive charge as well as modulation of molecular alignment, toward collection of linearly independent restraints, can be introduced by reducing the negative charge of DNA nanotubes using counter ions and small DNA-binding molecules. This detergent-resistant liquid-crystal medium offers a number of properties conducive for membrane protein alignment, including high-yield production, thermal stability, buffer compatibility and structural programmability. Production of sufficient nanotubes for four or five NMR experiments can be completed in 1 week by a single individual.

  6. Band structure of hydrogenated Si nanosheets and nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman-Verri, G G; Lew Yan Voon, L C

    2011-01-01

    The band structures of fully hydrogenated Si nanosheets and nanotubes are elucidated by the use of an empirical tight-binding model. The hydrogenated Si sheet is a semiconductor with an indirect band gap of about 2.2 eV. The symmetries of the wavefunctions allow us to explain the origin of the gap. We predict that, for certain chiralities, hydrogenated Si nanotubes represent a new type of semiconductor, one with coexisting direct and indirect gaps of exactly the same magnitude. This behavior is different from that governed by the Hamada rule established for non-hydrogenated carbon and silicon nanotubes. A comparison to the results of an ab initio calculation is made.

  7. Carbon nanotube on Si(001): structural and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellana, W.; Fazzio, A.; Miwa, R.W.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The promising nanoscale technology based on carbon nanotubes has attracted much attention due to the unique electronic, chemical and mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) provide an ideal atomically uniform one dimensional (1D) conductors, having a strong electronic confinement around its circumference, which can be retained up to room temperature[1]. This interesting property may lead one to consider SWCNs as 1D conductors for the development of nanoscale electronic devices. In this work the structural and electronic properties of the contact between a metallic (6,6) SWCN adsorbed on a silicon (001) surface are studied from first-principles total-energy calculations. We consider two adsorption sites for the tube on the Si(001) surface: on the top of the Si-dimer rows and on the surface 'trench' between two consecutive dimer rows. Our results show a chemical bond between the nanotube and Si(001) when the tube is located along the 'trench', which corresponds to the only bound structure. We find a binding energy per tube length of 0.21 eV/angstrom. We also verified that the binding energy depends on the rotation of the tube. Typically, a rotation of 15 deg can reduce the binding energy up to 0.07 eV/angstrom. Our calculated electronic properties indicate that the most stable structure shows a subband associated to the tube/surface bond that cross the Fermi level. This result indicates an enhanced metallic behavior along the tube/surface contact characterizing a 1D quantum wire. The charge transfer between the Si surface and the tube is also discussed. [1] Z. Yao, C. Dekker, and P. Avouris in Carbon Nanotubes, M. S. Dresselhaus, G. Dresselhaus, and P. Avouris Eds., (Springer, Berlin 2001), p. 147. (author)

  8. Nanohashtag structures based on carbon nanotubes and molecular linkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Connor W.; Rybolt, Thomas R.

    2018-03-01

    Molecular mechanics was used to study the noncovalent interactions between single-walled carbon nanotubes and molecular linkers. Groups of nanotubes have the tendency to form tight, parallel bundles (||||). Molecular linkers were introduced into our models to stabilize nanostructures with carbon nanotubes held in perpendicular orientations. Molecular mechanics makes it possible to estimate the strength of noncovalent interactions holding these structures together and to calculate the overall binding energy of the structures. A set of linkers were designed and built around a 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene tether with two corannulene containing pincers that extend in opposite directions from the central cyclooctatetraene portion. Each pincer consists of a pairs of "arms." These molecular linkers were modified so that the "hand" portions of each pair of "arms" could close together to grab and hold two carbon nanotubes in a perpendicular arrangement. To illustrate the possibility of more complicated and open perpendicular CNTs structures, our primary goal was to create a model of a nanohashtag (#) CNT conformation that is more stable than any parallel CNT arrangements with bound linker molecules forming clumps of CNTs and linkers in non-hashtag arrangements. This goal was achieved using a molecular linker (C280H96) that utilizes van der Waals interactions to two perpendicular oriented CNTs. Hydrogen bonding was then added between linker molecules to augment the stability of the hashtag structure. In the hashtag structure with hydrogen bonding, four (5,5) CNTs of length 4.46 nm (18 rings) and four linkers (C276H92N8O8) stabilized the hashtag so that the average binding energy per pincer was 118 kcal/mol.

  9. Structural deformation and intertube conductance of crossed carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Mazzoni, Mario S.C.; Choi, Hyoung J.; Ihm, Jisoon; Louie, Steven G.

    2000-01-01

    We present a first-principles study of the structure and quantum electronic conductance of junctions consisting of two crossed (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes. The structures are determined by constrained minimization of total energy at a given force between the two tubes, simulating the effects of substrate-tube attraction or an applied force. We find that the intertube contact distance is very sensitive to the applied force in the range of 0-10 nN. The intertube conductance is sizable for realistic deformation expected from substrate interaction. The results explain the recent transport data on crossed nanotubes and show that these systems may be potentially useful as electromechanical devices

  10. Structural Deformation and Intertube Conductance of Crossed Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Mazzoni, Mario S. C.; Choi, Hyoung Joon; Ihm, Jisoon; Louie, Steven G.

    2001-01-01

    We present a first-principles study of the structure and quantum electronic conductance of junctions consisting of two crossed (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes. The structures are determined by constrained minimization of total energy at a given force between the two tubes, simulating the effects of substrate-tube attraction or an applied force. We find that the intertube contact distance is very sensitive to the applied force in the range of 0--10nN. The intertube conductance is sizable for realistic deformation expected from substrate interaction. The results explain the recent transport data on crossed nanotubes and show that these systems may be potentially useful as electromechanical devices

  11. Synthesis and structural determination of twisted MoS2 nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, P.; Schabes-Retchkiman, P.; Ascencio, J.A.; Mendoza, D.; Perez-Alvarez, M.; Espinosa, A.; Reza-SanGerman, C.; Camacho-Bragado, G.A.; Jose-Yacaman, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the present work we report the synthesis of MoS 2 nanotubes with diameters greater than 10 nm using a template method. The length and properties of these nanotubes are a direct result of the preparation method. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to study the structure of these highly curved entities. Molecular dynamics simulations of MoS 2 nanotubes reveal that one of the stable forms of the nanotubes is a twisted one. The twisting of the nanotubes produces a characteristic contrast in the images, which is also studied using simulation methods. The analysis of the local contrast close to the perpendicular orientation shows geometrical arrays of dots in domain-like structures, which are demonstrated to be a product of the atomic overlapping of irregular curvatures in the nanotubes. The configuration of some of the experimentally obtained nanotubes is demonstrated to be twisted with a behavior suggesting partial plasticity. (orig.)

  12. Qualitative Mapping of Structural Different Polypeptide Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Jensen, Jason; Castillo, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    that it is possible to distinguish between these three types of structures using this method. Further, an agreement between the detected signal and the structure of the hollow peptide was demonstrated; however only qualitative agreement with the mathematical expressing of the tubes is shown.......Biological self-assembled structures are receiving increasing focus within micro- and nanotechnology, for example, as sensing devices, due to the fact that they are cheap to produce and easy to functionalize. Therefore, methods for the characterization of these structures are much needed...

  13. Relationships among the structural topology, bond strength, and mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Tsou, Nien-Ti; Kang, Dun-Yen

    2015-10-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs) using a multiscale computational method and then conducted a comparison with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By comparing the potential energy estimated from molecular and macroscopic material mechanics, we were able to model the chemical bonds as beam elements for the nanoscale continuum modeling. This method allowed for simulated mechanical tests (tensile, bending, and torsion) with minimum computational resources for deducing their Young's modulus and shear modulus. The proposed approach also enabled the creation of hypothetical nanotubes to elucidate the relative contributions of bond strength and nanotube structural topology to overall nanotube mechanical strength. Our results indicated that it is the structural topology rather than bond strength that dominates the mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Finally, we investigated the relationship between the structural topology and the mechanical properties by analyzing the von Mises stress distribution in the nanotubes. The proposed methodology proved effective in rationalizing differences in the mechanical properties of AlSiNTs and SWCNTs. Furthermore, this approach could be applied to the exploration of new high-strength nanotube materials.

  14. Structure of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes produced by mechano-thermal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.; Conway, M.; FitzGerald, J.; Williams, J.S.; Chadderton, L.T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Structure of carbon and boron nitride (BN) nanotubes produced by mechano-thermal process has been investigated by using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) including high resolution TEM. FESEM and TEM reveal that nanotubes obtained have a diameter varying from several nm to 200 nm and a length of several micrometers. The size of the nanotubes appears to depend on both milling and heating conditions. Many nanotubes are extruded from particle clusters, implying a special growth mechanism. TEM reveals single- and multi- wall tubular structures and different caps. Bomboo-type nanotubes containing small metal particles inside are also observed in both carbon and BN tubes. This investigation shows that nanotubes with controlled size and structure could be produced by the mechano-thermal process

  15. Structures of water molecules in carbon nanotubes under electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winarto,; Takaiwa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising for water transport through membranes and for use as nano-pumps. The development of CNT-based nanofluidic devices, however, requires a better understanding of the properties of water molecules in CNTs because they can be very different from those in the bulk. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of axial electric fields on the structure of water molecules in CNTs having diameters ranging from (7,7) to (10,10). The water dipole moments were aligned parallel to the electric field, which increases the density of water inside the CNTs and forms ordered ice-like structures. The electric field induces the transition from liquid to ice nanotubes in a wide range of CNT diameters. Moreover, we found an increase in the lifetime of hydrogen bonds for water structures in the CNTs. Fast librational motion breaks some hydrogen bonds, but the molecular pairs do not separate and the hydrogen bonds reform. Thus, hydrogen bonds maintain the water structure in the CNTs, and the water molecules move collectively, decreasing the axial diffusion coefficient and permeation rate

  16. Structure reconstruction of TiO2-based multi-wall nanotubes: first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, A V; Evarestov, R A; Lukyanov, S I

    2014-07-28

    A new method of theoretical modelling of polyhedral single-walled nanotubes based on the consolidation of walls in the rolled-up multi-walled nanotubes is proposed. Molecular mechanics and ab initio quantum mechanics methods are applied to investigate the merging of walls in nanotubes constructed from the different phases of titania. The combination of two methods allows us to simulate the structures which are difficult to find only by ab initio calculations. For nanotube folding we have used (1) the 3-plane fluorite TiO2 layer; (2) the anatase (101) 6-plane layer; (3) the rutile (110) 6-plane layer; and (4) the 6-plane layer with lepidocrocite morphology. The symmetry of the resulting single-walled nanotubes is significantly lower than the symmetry of initial coaxial cylindrical double- or triple-walled nanotubes. These merged nanotubes acquire higher stability in comparison with the initial multi-walled nanotubes. The wall thickness of the merged nanotubes exceeds 1 nm and approaches the corresponding parameter of the experimental patterns. The present investigation demonstrates that the merged nanotubes can integrate the two different crystalline phases in one and the same wall structure.

  17. Carbon nanotubes : their synthesis and integration into nanofabricated structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Druzhinina, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    The field of nanotechnology has experienced constantly increasing interest over the past decades both from industry and academy. Commonly used nanomaterials include: nanoparticles, nanowires, quantum dots, fullerenes, and carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes, in particular, are promising building

  18. Structural and Electronic Properties of α2-Graphyne Nanotubes: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Roya

    2018-02-01

    Another form of carbon-based two-dimensional material in the graphene family, named the α2-graphyne sheet, was predicted very recently. The α2-graphyne sheet was created by doubling each acetylenic linker in an α-graphyne sheet. It exhibited semimetallic Dirac point features similar to graphene and α-graphyne sheets. In the present work, single -walled carbon nanotubes based on an α2-graphyne sheet was introduced. The structural and electronic properties of these nanotubes were studied using density functional theory. It was found that armchair α2-graphyne nanotubes showed metallic behavior, while zigzag α2-graphyne nanotubes were found to have semiconducting or metallic properties depending on tube size. The energy band gap of zigzag α2-graphyne nanotubes decreased with increasing tube diameter. The results indicated that the α2-graphyne sheet and its nanotubes can be proper materials for future nanoelectronics.

  19. Electronic structures and three-dimensional effects of boron-doped carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koretsune, Takashi; Saito, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    We study boron-doped carbon nanotubes by first-principles methods based on the density functional theory. To discuss the possibility of superconductivity, we calculate the electronic band structure and the density of states (DOS) of boron-doped (10,0) nanotubes by changing the boron density. It is found that the Fermi level density of states D(ε F ) increases upon lowering the boron density. This can be understood in terms of the rigid band picture where the one-dimensional van Hove singularity lies at the edge of the valence band in the DOS of the pristine nanotube. The effect of three-dimensionality is also considered by performing the calculations for bundled (10,0) nanotubes and boron-doped double-walled carbon nanotubes (10,0)/(19,0). From the calculation of the bundled nanotubes, it is found that interwall dispersion is sufficiently large to broaden the peaks of the van Hove singularity in the DOS. Thus, to achieve the high D(ε F ) using the bundle of nanotubes with single chirality, we should take into account the distance from each nanotube. In the case of double-walled carbon nanotubes, we find that the holes introduced to the inner tube by boron doping spread also on the outer tube, while the band structure of each tube remains almost unchanged.

  20. The electronic fine structure of 4-nitrophenyl functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Amit K; Coleman, Karl S; Dhanak, Vinod R

    2009-01-01

    Controlling the electronic structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is of great importance to various CNT based applications. Herein the electronic fine structure of single-walled carbon nanotube films modified with 4-nitrophenyl groups, produced following reaction with 4-nitrobenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate, was investigated for the first time. Various techniques such as x-ray and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure studies were used to explore the electronic structure, and the results were compared with the measured electrical resistances. A reduction in number of the π electronic states in the valence band consistent with the increased resistance of the functionalized nanotube films was observed.

  1. Influence of media with different acidity on structure of FeNi nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumskaya Alena

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed analysis of the structure features of FeNi nanotubes exposed at environment with different acidity is carried out. It is demonstrated that the exposure of the nanostructures in the environment with high acidity causes the structure deformation, leading to sharply increasing of the presents of oxide phases and partial amorphization of nanotubes walls that determined the rate of FeNi nanotubes destruction. It was established that the evolution of the crystal structure parameters concerned with appearance of oxide phases and with formation of disorder regions as a result of oxidation processes.

  2. Influence of media with different acidity on structure of FeNi nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumskaya, Alena; Kaniukov, Egor; Kutuzau, Maksim; Bundyukova, Victoria; Tulebayeva, Dinara; Kozlovskiy, Artem; Borgekov, Daryn; Kenzhina, Inesh; Zdorovets, Maxim

    2018-04-01

    A detailed analysis of the structure features of FeNi nanotubes exposed at environment with different acidity is carried out. It is demonstrated that the exposure of the nanostructures in the environment with high acidity causes the structure deformation, leading to sharply increasing of the presents of oxide phases and partial amorphization of nanotubes walls that determined the rate of FeNi nanotubes destruction. It was established that the evolution of the crystal structure parameters concerned with appearance of oxide phases and with formation of disorder regions as a result of oxidation processes.

  3. Carbon based nanostructures: diamond clusters structured with nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Shenderova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Feasibility of designing composites from carbon nanotubes and nanodiamond clusters is discussed based on atomistic simulations. Depending on nanotube size and morphology, some types of open nanotubes can be chemically connected with different facets of diamond clusters. The geometrical relation between different types of nanotubes and different diamond facets for construction of mechanically stable composites with all bonds saturated is summarized. Potential applications of the suggested nanostructures are briefly discussed based on the calculations of their electronic properties using environment dependent self-consistent tight-binding approach.

  4. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundes Fakher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs, metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS and thin film transistor (TFT structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance–voltage (C–V for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors. Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses, the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  5. Hierarchically structured carbon nanotubes for energy conversion and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Feng

    As the world population continues to increase, large amounts of energy are consumed. Reality pushes us to find new energy or use our current energy more efficiently. Researches on energy conversion and storage have become increasingly important and essential. This grand challenge research has led to a recent focus on nanostructured materials. Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) play a critical role in all of these nanotechnology challenges. CNTs have a very large surface area, a high electrochemical accessibility, high electronic conductivity and strong mechanical properties. This combination of properties makes them promising materials for energy device applications, such as FETs, supercapacitors, fuel cells, and lithium batteries. This study focuses on exploring the possibility of using vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs) as the electrode materials in these energy applications. For the application of electrode materials, electrical conductive, vertically aligned CNTs with controllable length and diameter were synthesized. Several CVD methods for VA-CNT growth have been explored, although the iron / aluminum pre-coated catalyst CVD system was the main focus. A systematic study of several factors, including growth time, temperature, gas ratio, catalyst coating was conducted. The mechanism of VA-CNTs was discussed and a model for VA-CNT length / time was proposed to explain the CNT growth rate. Furthermore, the preferential growth of semiconducting (up to 96 atom% carbon) VA-SWNTs by using a plasma enhanced CVD process combined with fast heating was also explored, and these semiconducting materials have been directly used for making FETs using simple dispersion in organic solvent, without any separation and purification. Also, by inserting electron-accepting nitrogen atoms into the conjugated VA-CNT structure during the growth process, we synthesized vertically aligned nitrogen containing carbon nanotubes (VA-NCNTs). After purification of

  6. Investigation of the structure of multiwall carbon nanotubes in polymer matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major, A Adamne; Belina, K

    2013-01-01

    In the last ten years carbon nanotube composites are in the focus of the researchers. Concentration series were prepared using carbon nanotube containing master blend by IDMX mixer. In the experiments polypropylene, polycarbonate and ABS polymers were used as matrix materials. The prepared materials were characterised by scanning electron microscopy. The carbon nanotubes can be seen on the fractured surfaces. We did not find any sign of agglomerates in the materials. The nanocomposites were investigated by LP-FTIR method. The specimens were irradiated with 1 W for 1 minute by CO 2 laser. The polymer matrix was burnt or charred by the CO 2 laser; the structure of the carbon nanotubes in the matrix was studied. The carbon nanotubes create a physical network in the polymers we used

  7. Understanding the mechanism of nanotube synthesis for controlled production of specific (n,m) structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resasco, Daniel E.

    2010-02-11

    This report shows the extensive research on the mechanism responsible for the formation of single walled carbon nanotubes in order to get control over their structural parameters (diameter and chirality). Catalyst formulations, pre-treatment conditions, and reaction conditions are described in detail as well as mechanisms to produce nanotubes structures of specific arrays (vertical forest, nanotube pillars). Applications of SWNT in different fields are also described in this report. In relation to this project five students have graduated (3 PhD and 2 MS) and 35 papers have been published.

  8. Finite element modeling of nanotube structures linear and non-linear models

    CERN Document Server

    Awang, Mokhtar; Muhammad, Ibrahim Dauda

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a new approach to modeling carbon structures such as graphene and carbon nanotubes using finite element methods, and addresses the latest advances in numerical studies for these materials. Based on the available findings, the book develops an effective finite element approach for modeling the structure and the deformation of grapheme-based materials. Further, modeling processing for single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is demonstrated in detail.

  9. Geometry, electronic structures and optical properties of phosphorus nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Tao; Hashmi, Arqum; Hong, Jisang

    2015-01-01

    Using a first principles approach, we investigated the geometry, electronic structures, and optical properties of phosphorus nanotubes (PNTs). Two possible 1D configurations, the so-called α-PNTs and β-PNTs, are proposed, which are structurally related to blue and black phosphorus monolayers, respectively. Hereby, we predict that both armchair and zigzag geometries can be synthesized in α-PNTs, but the zigzag form of β-PNT is highly unfavorable because of large strain and conformation energies. The band gap of α-PNTs is expected to be ∼2.67 eV, and this is insensitive to the chirality when the tube’s inner diameter is larger than 1.3 nm, while the armchair β-PNTs have a much smaller band gap. Interestingly, we find nearly flat band structures in the zigzag α-PNT system. This may indicate that an excited particle–hole pair has a huge effective mass. We also find asymmetric optical properties with respect to the polarization direction. The armchair α-PNT for parallel polarization shows a large refractive index of 2.6 near the ultraviolet wavelength, and also we find that the refractive index can be even smaller than 1 in certain frequency ranges. The zigzag tubes show very weak reflectivity for parallel polarization, while the armchair tube displays high reflectivity. (paper)

  10. Facile and template-free method toward chemical synthesis of polyaniline film/nanotube structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Pei [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Pennsylvania 15261; Zhu, Yisi [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Lab, Lemont Illinois 60439; Torres, Jorge [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Pennsylvania 15261; Lee, Seung Hee [Department of BIN Fusion Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-786 Korea; Yun, Minhee [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Pennsylvania 15261

    2017-09-05

    A facile and template-free method is reported to synthesize a new thin film structure: polyaniline (PANI) film/nanotubes (F/N) structure. The PANI F/N is a 100-nm thick PANI film embedded with PANI nanotubes. This well-controlled method requires no surfactant or organic acid as well as relatively low concentration of reagents. Synthesis condition studies reveal that aniline oligomers with certain structures are responsible for guiding the growth of the nanotubes. Electrical characterization also indicates that the PANI F/N possesses similar field-effect transistor characteristics to bare PANI film. With its 20% increased surface-area-to-volume (S/V) ratio contributed by surface embedded nanotubes and the excellent p-type semiconducting characteristic, PANI F/N shows clear superiority compared with bare PANI film. Such advantages guarantee the PANI F/N a promising future toward the development of ultra-high sensitivity and low-cost biosensors.

  11. Carbon Nanotubes Advanced Topics in the Synthesis, Structure, Properties and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jorio, Ado; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2008-01-01

    The carbon nanotubes field has evolved substantially since the publication of the bestseller "Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis, Structure, Properties and Applications". The present volume builds on the generic aspects of the aforementioned book, which emphasizes the fundamentals, with the new volume emphasizing areas that have grown rapidly since the first volume, guiding future directions where research is needed and highlighting applications. The volume also includes an emphasis on areas like graphene, other carbon-like and other tube-like materials because these fields are likely to affect and influence developments in nanotubes in the next 5 years.

  12. Structural Modification in Carbon Nanotubes by Boron Incorporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handuja Sangeeta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have synthesized boron-incorporated carbon nanotubes (CNTs by decomposition of ferrocene and xylene in a thermal chemical vapor deposition set up using boric acid as the boron source. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies of the synthesized CNT samples showed that there was deterioration in crystallinity and improvement in alignment of the CNTs as the boron content in precursor solution increased from 0% to 15%. Raman analysis of these samples showed a shift of ~7 cm−1in wave number to higher side and broadening of the G band with increasing boron concentration along with an increase in intensity of the G band. Furthermore, there was an increase in the intensity of the D band along with a decrease in its wave number position with increase in boron content. We speculate that these structural modifications in the morphology and microstructure of CNTs might be due to the charge transfer from boron to the graphite matrix, resulting in shortening of the carbon–carbon bonds.

  13. Wireless and embedded carbon nanotube networks for damage detection in concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saafi, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Concrete structures undergo an uncontrollable damage process manifesting in the form of cracks due to the coupling of fatigue loading and environmental effects. In order to achieve long-term durability and performance, continuous health monitoring systems are needed to make critical decisions regarding operation, maintenance and repairs. Recent advances in nanostructured materials such as carbon nanotubes have opened the door for new smart and advanced sensing materials that could effectively be used in health monitoring of structures where wireless and real time sensing could provide information on damage development. In this paper, carbon nanotube networks were embedded into a cement matrix to develop an in situ wireless and embedded sensor for damage detection in concrete structures. By wirelessly measuring the change in the electrical resistance of the carbon nanotube networks, the progress of damage can be detected and monitored. As a proof of concept, wireless cement-carbon nanotube sensors were embedded into concrete beams and subjected to monotonic and cyclic loading to evaluate the effect of damage on their response. Experimental results showed that the wireless response of the embedded nanotube sensors changes due to the formation of cracks during loading. In addition, the nanotube sensors were able to detect the initiation of damage at an early stage of loading.

  14. Wireless and embedded carbon nanotube networks for damage detection in concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saafi, Mohamed

    2009-09-01

    Concrete structures undergo an uncontrollable damage process manifesting in the form of cracks due to the coupling of fatigue loading and environmental effects. In order to achieve long-term durability and performance, continuous health monitoring systems are needed to make critical decisions regarding operation, maintenance and repairs. Recent advances in nanostructured materials such as carbon nanotubes have opened the door for new smart and advanced sensing materials that could effectively be used in health monitoring of structures where wireless and real time sensing could provide information on damage development. In this paper, carbon nanotube networks were embedded into a cement matrix to develop an in situ wireless and embedded sensor for damage detection in concrete structures. By wirelessly measuring the change in the electrical resistance of the carbon nanotube networks, the progress of damage can be detected and monitored. As a proof of concept, wireless cement-carbon nanotube sensors were embedded into concrete beams and subjected to monotonic and cyclic loading to evaluate the effect of damage on their response. Experimental results showed that the wireless response of the embedded nanotube sensors changes due to the formation of cracks during loading. In addition, the nanotube sensors were able to detect the initiation of damage at an early stage of loading.

  15. Effect of ionizing radiation on structural and conductive properties of copper nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdorovets, M. V.; Borgekov, D. B.; Kenzhina, I. E.; Kozlovskiy, A. L.

    2018-01-01

    The use of electron radiation is an effective tool for stimulating a controlled modification of structural and conductive properties of nanomaterials in modern materials science. The paper presents the results of studies of the influence of various types of radiation on structural and conductive properties of copper nanotubes obtained by electrochemical synthesis in pores of templates based on polyethylene terephthalate. Such methods as SEM, X-ray diffraction and EDS show that irradiation with a stream of high-energy electrons with doses of 50-250 kGy makes it possible to modify the crystal structure of nanotubes, increasing their conductivity and decreasing the resistance of nanostructures without destroying the structure.

  16. The effect of functionalization on structure and electrical conductivity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Cher Hon; Cervini, Raoul; Clarke, Stephen R.; Markovic, Milena Ginic; Matisons, Janis G.; Hawkins, Stephen C.; Huynh, Chi P.; Simon, George P.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are of interest in many areas of nanotechnology and used in a number of novel applications. However effective dispersion remains a problem and one solution is to functionalize the nanotubes. Any functionalization that is undertaken must preferably not influence other key properties such as strength and electrical conductivity. In this work, multi-walled CNTs are functionalized for comparison, using a range of oxidative techniques, including thermal treatment, acid reflux, and dry UV-ozonolysis. The effects of these treatments on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and their electrical properties were characterized using a range of surface and compositional techniques. The electrical conductivity of MWCNTs was found to increase with functionalization in all cases, and dry UV-ozonolysis was shown to be the treatment technique which best increased conductivity, whilst at the same time maintaining the structural integrity of the nanotubes, even though the level of modification was less than by the other treatment methods.

  17. Torsional properties of hexagonal boron nitride nanotubes, carbon nanotubes and their hybrid structures: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Qi-lin, E-mail: xiongql@hust.edu.cn [Department of Mechanics, Huazhong University of Science & Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430074 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Engineering Structural Analysis and Safety Assessment, Luoyu Road 1037, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tian, Xiao Geng [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Structure Strength and Vibration, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2015-10-15

    The torsional mechanical properties of hexagonal single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and their hybrid structures (SWBN-CNTs) are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Two approaches - force approach and energy approach, are adopted to calculate the shear moduli of SWBNNTs and SWCNTs, the discrepancy between two approaches is analyzed. The results show that the shear moduli of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), including SWBNNTs and SWCNTs are dependent on the diameter, especially for armchair SWNTs. The armchair SWNTs show the better ability of resistance the twisting comparable to the zigzag SWNTs. The effects of diameter and length on the critical values of torque of SWNTs are obtained by comparing the torsional behaviors of SWNTs with different diameters and different lengths. It is observed that the MD results of the effect of diameter and length on the critical values of torque agrees well with the prediction of continuum shell model. The shear modulus of SWBN-CNT has a significant dependence on the percentages of SWCNT and the hybrid style has also an influence on shear modulus. The critical values of torque of SWBN-CNTs increase with the increase of the percentages of SWCNT. This phenomenon can be interpreted by the function relationship between the torque of different bonds (B-N-X, C-C-X, C-B-X, C-N-X) and the angles of bonds.

  18. Enhanced Photocurrent Efficiency of a Carbon Nanotube Embedded in a Photonic Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Bryan M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Science

    2008-08-01

    One of the most rapidly-growing areas in nanoscience is the ability to artificially manipulate optical and electrical properties at the nanoscale. In particular, nanomaterials such as single-wall carbon nanotubes offer enhanced methods for converting infrared light to electrical energy due to their unique one-dimensional electronic properties. However, in order for this energy conversion to occur, a realistic nanotube device would require high-intensity light to be confined on a nanometer scale. This arises from the fact that the diameter of a single nanotube is on the order of a nanometer, and infrared light from an external source must be tightly focused on the narrow nanotube for efficient energy conversion. To address this problem, I calculate the theoretical photocurrent of a nanotube p-n junction illuminated by a highly-efficient photonic structure. These results demonstrate the utility of using a photonic structure to couple large-scale infrared sources with carbon nanotubes while still retaining all the unique optoelectronic properties found at the nanoscale.

  19. Atomic structures and mechanical properties of single-crystal GaN nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, B.; Lu, A.J.; Pan, B.C.; Yu, Q.X.

    2005-01-01

    An approach is proposed to theoretically construct a realistic single-crystal GaN nanotube at atomic scale. The generated atomic structures of the single-crystal GaN nanotubes match the structural aspects from experiment very well. Our energetic calculations show that a single-crystal GaN nanotube with [100]-oriented lateral facets is more stable than that with [110]-oriented lateral facets, when they have around the same wall thickness. For a specified orientation of the lateral facets on the single-crystal GaN nanotubes, the energetic stabilities of the tubes obey a P rule, in which P is the ratio of the number of four-coordinated atoms to the number of three-coordinated atoms. Furthermore, the Young's modulus of the considered GaN nanotubes decrease with increasing the ratio of the number of bulk atoms to the number of surface atoms in each type of tube. Our calculations and analysis demonstrate that the surface effect of a single-crystal nanotube enhances its Young's modulus significantly

  20. Fabrication and structural characterization of highly ordered titania nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hongtao; Ordonez, Rosita

    Titanium (Ti) dioxide nanotubes have drawn much attention in the past decade due to the fact that titania is an extremely versatile material with a variety of technological applications. Anodizing Ti in different electrolytes has proved to be quite successful so far in creating the nanotubes, however, their degree of order is still not nearly as good as nanoporous anodic alumina. In this work, we first deposit a thin layer of aluminum (Al) onto electropolished Ti substrates, using thermal evaporation. Such an Al layer is then anodized in 0.3 M oxalic acid, forming an ordered nanoporous alumina mask on top of Ti. Afterwards, the anodization of Ti is accomplished at 20 V in solutions containing 1 M NaH2PO4 and 0.5% HF or H2SO4, which results in the creation of ordered titania nanotube arrays. The inner pore diameter of the nanotubes can be tuned from ~50 nm to ~75 nm, depending on the anodization voltage applied to Al or Ti. X-ray diffractometry shows the as-grown titania nanotubes are amorphous. Samples annealed at different temperatures in ambient atmosphere will be also reported.

  1. Nitrogen-doping effects on the growth, structure and electrical performance of carbon nanotubes obtained by spray pyrolysis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionescu, Mihnea Ioan; Zhang Yong; Li Ruying [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B9 (Canada); Abou-Rachid, Hakima [Defense Research and Development Canada - Valcartier, 2459 Boulevard PieXI Nord, Quebec, QC G3J 1X5 (Canada); Sun Xueliang, E-mail: xsun@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B9 (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Vertically aligned nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with modulated nitrogen content have been synthesized in a large scale by using spray pyrolysis chemical vapor deposition technique. The effects of nitrogen doping on the growth, structure and electrical performance of carbon nanotubes have been systematically examined. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman techniques have been employed to characterize the morphology, composition, and vibrational properties of nanotubes. The results indicate that the nitrogen incorporation significantly influences the growth rate, morphology, size and structure of nanotubes. Electrical measurement investigation of the nanotubes indicates that the change in electrical resistance increases with temperature and pressure as the nitrogen concentration increases inside the tubes. This work presents a versatile, safe, and easy way to scale up route of growing carbon nanotubes with controlled nitrogen content and modulated structure, and may provide an insight in developing various nitrogen-doped carbon-based nanodevices.

  2. Microscopic and Macroscopic Structures of Carbon Nanotubes Produced by Pyrolysis of Iron Phthalocyanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shaoming; Dai Liming

    2002-01-01

    By pyrolysis of iron phthalocyanine (FePc), either in a patterned or non-patterned fashion, under an Ar/H 2 atmosphere, we have demonstrated the large-scale production of aligned carbon nanotubes perpendicular to the substrate surface useful for building devices with three-dimensional structures. Depending on the particular pyrolytic conditions used, carbon nanotubes with a wide range of microscopic structures having curved, helical, coiled, branched, and tube-within-tube shapes have also been prepared by the pyrolysis of FePc. This, coupled with several microfabrication methods (photolithography, soft-lithography, self-assembling, micro-contact transfer, etc.), has enabled us to produce carbon nanotube arrays of various macroscopic architectures including polyhedral, flower-like, dendritic, circular, multilayered, and micropatterned geometries. In this article, we summarize our work on the preparation of FePc-generated carbon nanotubes with the large variety of microscopic and macroscopic structures and give a brief overview on the perspectives of making carbon nanotubes with tailor-made microscopic/macroscopic structures, and hence well-defined physicochemical properties, for specific applications

  3. Ultra-fine structural characterization and bioactivity evaluation of TiO2 nanotube layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, JaeMyung; Kwon, TaeYub; Kim, KyoHan

    2008-10-01

    For an application as biomedical materials of high performance with a good biocompatibility, the TiO2 nanotube-type oxide film on Ti substrate has been fabricated by electrochemical method, and the effects of surface characteristics of TiO2 naotube layer have been investigated. The surface morphology of TiO2 nanotube layer depends on factors such as anodizing time, current density, and electrolyte temperature. Moreover, the cell and pore size gradually were increased with the passage of anodizing time. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicated that the TiO2 nanotube layer formed in acidic electrolytes was mainly composed of anatase structure containing rutile. From the analysis of chemical states of TiO2 nanotube layer using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Ti2p, P2p and O1s were observed in the nanotubes layer, which were penetrated from the electrolyte into the oxide layer during anodic process. The incorporated phosphate species were found mostly in the forms of HPO4-, PO4-, and PO3-. From the result of biological evaluation in simulated body fluid (SBF) the TiO2 nanotube layer was effective for bioactive property.

  4. Density-functional tight-binding investigation of the structure, stability and material properties of nickel hydroxide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Soran; Mosey, Nicholas J.

    2018-01-01

    Nickel hydroxide is a material composed of two-dimensional layers that can be rolled up to form cylindrical nanotubes belonging to a class of inorganic metal hydroxide nanotubes that are candidates for applications in catalysis, energy storage, and microelectronics. The stabilities and other properties of this class of inorganic nanotubes have not yet been investigated in detail. The present study uses self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding calculations to examine the stabilities, mechanical properties, and electronic properties of nickel hydroxide nanotubes along with the energetics associated with the adsorption of water by these systems. The tight-binding model was parametrized for this system based on the results of first-principles calculations. The stabilities of the nanotubes were examined by calculating strain energies and performing molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that single-walled nickel hydroxide nanotubes are stable at room temperature, which is consistent with experimental investigations. The nanotubes possess size-dependent mechanical properties that are similar in magnitude to those of other inorganic nanotubes. The electronic properties of the nanotubes were also found to be size-dependent and small nickel oxyhydroxide nanotubes are predicted to be semiconductors. Despite this size-dependence, both the mechanical and electronic properties were found to be almost independent of the helical structure of the nanotubes. The calculations also show that water molecules have higher adsorption energies when binding to the interior of the nickel hydroxide nanotubes when compared to adsorption in nanotubes formed from other two-dimensional materials such as graphene. The increased adsorption energy is due to the hydrophilic nature of nickel hydroxide. Due to the broad applications of nickel hydroxide, the nanotubes investigated here are also expected to be used in catalysis, electronics, and clean energy production.

  5. Monitoring structural defects and crystallinity of carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report the influence of catalyst formulation and reaction temperature on the formation of carbon nanotube (CNT) thin films by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method. Thin films of CNTs were grown on Fe–Mo/Al2O3-coated silicon wafer by thermal decomposition of methane at different temperatures ranging from ...

  6. Preparation and structure of TiO2 nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlova, Ewa; Lapčíková, Monika; Šlouf, Miroslav; Kužel, R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2006), s. 156-157 ISSN 1211-5894. [Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Colloquium. 22.06.2006-24.06.2006, Grenoble] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/04/0688 Keywords : nanotubes * X-ray diffraction * electron microscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry http://www. xray .cz/ms/default.htm

  7. Structural and electrical properties of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube/epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantayat, S.; Rout, D.; Swain, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotube on the structure and electrical properties of composites was investigated. Samples based on epoxy resin with different weight percentage of MWCNTs were prepared and characterized. The interaction between MWCNT & epoxy resin was noticed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The structure of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube (f-MWCNT) reinforced epoxy composite was studied by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The dispersion of f-MWCNT in epoxy resin was evidenced by high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Electrical properties of epoxy/f-MWCNT nanocomposites were measured & the result indicated that the conductivity increased with increasing concentration of f-MWCNTs.

  8. Conformational analysis and electronic structure of chiral carbon and carbon nitride nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Geraldo de Faria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Geometry and electronic structure of chiral carbon and carbon nitride (CNx nanotubes were investigated through quantum chemical methods. Finite nanotubes with diameters ranging from 5 to 10 Å and containing up to 500 atoms were considered. CNx structures were built through random substitution of carbon atoms by nitrogen. The molecules were fully optimized by semi-empirical quantum chemical method (PM3. Our results show that the energy associated with nitrogen incorporation depends strongly upon the tube helicity and diameter. The doping of nanotubes with nitrogen contributes to reduce the stress caused by the small diameter of the studied systems. Density of States (DOS results for pure carbon and CNx nanostructures, obtained through DFT and Hartree-Fock calculations, were analyzed. The introduction of nitrogen in the tube produce states in the gap region which characterizes the metallic behavior, as expected for these systems after N-doping.

  9. Tight binding electronic band structure calculation of achiral boron nitride single wall nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Prapti; Sanyal, Sankar P

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we report the Tight-Binding method, for the electronic structure calculations of achiral single wall Boron Nitride nanotubes. We have used the contribution of π electron only to define the electronic band structure for the solid. The Zone-folding method is used for the Brillouin Zone definition. Calculation of tight binding model parameters is done by fitting them to available experimental results of two-dimensional hexagonal monolayers of Boron Nitride. It has been found that all the boron nitride nanotubes (both zigzag and armchair) are constant gap semiconductors with a band gap of 5.27eV. All zigzag BNNTs are found to be direct gap semiconductors while all armchair nanotubes are indirect gap semiconductors. (author)

  10. Structure in nascent carbon nanotubes revealed by spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landois, Périne [CEA, IRAMIS, SPAM, Laboratoire Francis Perrin (CNRS URA 2453), 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR CNRS 8502, Université Paris Sud 11, 91405 Orsay (France); Pinault, Mathieu [CEA, IRAMIS, SPAM, Laboratoire Francis Perrin (CNRS URA 2453), 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Huard, Mickaël [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR CNRS 8502, Université Paris Sud 11, 91405 Orsay (France); Reita, Valérie [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Rouzière, Stéphan; Launois, Pascale [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, UMR CNRS 8502, Université Paris Sud 11, 91405 Orsay (France); Mayne-L' Hermite, Martine [CEA, IRAMIS, SPAM, Laboratoire Francis Perrin (CNRS URA 2453), 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bendiab, Nedjma, E-mail: nedjma.bendiab@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France)

    2014-10-01

    The understanding of carbon nanotube (CNT) growth is crucial for the control of their production. In particular, the identification of structural changes of carbon possibly occurring near the catalyst particle in the very early stages of their formation is of high interest. In this study, samples of nascent CNT obtained during nucleation step and samples of vertically aligned CNT obtained during growth step are analysed by combined spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. Spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy reveals that iron-based phases and carbon phases are co-localized at the same position, and indicates that sp{sup 2} carbon nucleates preferentially on iron-based particles during this nucleation step. Depth scan Raman spectroscopy analysis, performed on nascent CNT, highlights that carbon structural organisation is significantly changing from defective graphene layers surrounding the iron-based particles at their base up to multi-walled nanotube structures in the upper part of iron-based particles. - Highlights: • Spatial co-localization of iron and carbon structures in nascent carbon nanotubes • Imaging local carbon structure changes along catalyst particles by Raman spectroscopy. • In nascent nanotubes, significant structural changes occur along catalyst particle.

  11. Influence of the structural properties on the pseudocritical magnetic behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar-Enriquez, C.D. [PCM Computational Applications, Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Sede Manizales, A.A. 127 Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [PCM Computational Applications, Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Sede Manizales, A.A. 127 Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo, J. [Grupo de Magnetismo y Simulacion Gplus, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, A.A. 1226 Medellin (Colombia)

    2012-04-15

    In this work we address the influence of the crystalline structure, concretely when the system under study is formed by square or hexagonal unit cells, upon the magnetic properties and pseudocritical behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes. We focus not only on the effect of the geometrical shape of the unit cell but also on their dimensions. The model employed is based on the Monte Carlo method, the Metropolis dynamics and a nearest neighbors classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Magnetization per magnetic site, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and magnetic energy were computed. These properties were computed varying the system size, unit cell dimension and temperature. The dependence of the nearest neighbor exchange integral on the nanotubes geometrical characteristics is also discussed. Results revealed a strong influence of the system topology on the magnetic properties caused by the difference in the coordination number between square and hexagonal unit cell. Moreover, the nanotubes diameter influence on magnetic properties is only observed at very low values, when the distance between atoms is less than it, presented by the 2D sheet. On the other hand, it was concluded that the surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties, contrary to the case of other nano-systems as thin films and nanoparticles among others. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit cell geometry has strong influence on the magnetic properties in ferromagnetic nanotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanotube diameter increase produces a decrease of interaction between nearest neighbor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties.

  12. Influence of the structural properties on the pseudocritical magnetic behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar-Enríquez, C.D.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Restrepo, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we address the influence of the crystalline structure, concretely when the system under study is formed by square or hexagonal unit cells, upon the magnetic properties and pseudocritical behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes. We focus not only on the effect of the geometrical shape of the unit cell but also on their dimensions. The model employed is based on the Monte Carlo method, the Metropolis dynamics and a nearest neighbors classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Magnetization per magnetic site, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and magnetic energy were computed. These properties were computed varying the system size, unit cell dimension and temperature. The dependence of the nearest neighbor exchange integral on the nanotubes geometrical characteristics is also discussed. Results revealed a strong influence of the system topology on the magnetic properties caused by the difference in the coordination number between square and hexagonal unit cell. Moreover, the nanotubes diameter influence on magnetic properties is only observed at very low values, when the distance between atoms is less than it, presented by the 2D sheet. On the other hand, it was concluded that the surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties, contrary to the case of other nano-systems as thin films and nanoparticles among others. - Highlights: ► Unit cell geometry has strong influence on the magnetic properties in ferromagnetic nanotubes. ► The nanotube diameter increase produces a decrease of interaction between nearest neighbor. ► Surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties.

  13. Carbon nanotubes on carbon fibers: Synthesis, structures and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuhong

    The interface between carbon fibers (CFs) and the resin matrix in traditional high performance composites is characterized by a large discontinuity in mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties which can cause inefficient energy transfer. Due to the exceptional properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), their growth at the surface of carbon fibers is a promising approach to controlling interfacial interactions and achieving the enhanced bulk properties. However, the reactive conditions used to grow carbon nanotubes also have the potential to introduce defects that can degrade the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber (CF) substrate. In this study, using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, high density multi-wall carbon nanotubes have been successfully synthesized directly on PAN-based CF surface without significantly compromising tensile properties. The influence of CVD growth conditions on the single CF tensile properties and carbon nanotube (CNT) morphology was investigated. The experimental results revealed that under high temperature growth conditions, the tensile strength of CF was greatly decreased at the beginning of CNT growth process with the largest decrease observed for sized CFs. However, the tensile strength of unsized CFs with CNT was approximately the same as the initial CF at lower growth temperature. The interfacial shear strength of CNT coated CF (CNT/CF) in epoxy was studied by means of the single-fiber fragmentation test. Results of the test indicate an improvement in interfacial shear strength with the addition of a CNT coating. This improvement can most likely be attributed to an increase in the interphase yield strength as well as an improvement in interfacial adhesion due to the presence of the nanotubes. CNT/CF also offers promise as stress and strain sensors in CF reinforced composite materials. This study investigates fundamental mechanical and electrical properties of CNT/CF using nanoindentation method by designed

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Hierarchical Structured TiO2 Nanotubes and Their Photocatalytic Performance on Methyl Orange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical structured TiO2 nanotubes were prepared by mechanical ball milling of highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays grown by electrochemical anodization of titanium foil. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, specific surface area analysis, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, photocurrent measurement, photoluminescence spectra, electrochemical impedance spectra, and photocatalytic degradation test were applied to characterize the nanocomposites. Surface area increased as the milling time extended. After 5 h ball milling, TiO2 hierarchical nanotubes exhibited a corn-like shape and exhibited enhanced photoelectrochemical activity in comparison to commercial P25. The superior photocatalytic activity is suggested to be due to the combined advantages of high surface area of nanoparticles and rapid electron transfer as well as collection of the nanotubes in the hierarchical structure. The hierarchical structured TiO2 nanotubes could be applied into flexible applications on solar cells, sensors, and other photoelectrochemical devices.

  15. Design of titania nanotube structures by focused laser beam direct writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enachi, Mihai; Stevens-Kalceff, Marion A.; Sarua, Andrei; Ursaki, Veaceslav; Tiginyanu, Ion

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we report on electrochemical fabrication of titania films consisting of nanotubes (NTs) and their treatment by focused laser beam. The results of sample characterization by optical and scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence imaging, and Raman scattering scanning spectroscopy are compared to those inherent to specimens subjected to thermal treatment in a furnace. The obtained data demonstrate possibilities for controlling crystallographic structure of TiO 2 NTs by focused laser beam direct writing. These findings open new prospects for the design and fabrication of spatial architectures based on titania nanotubes

  16. Effects of surface functionalization on the electronic and structural properties of carbon nanotubes: A computational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, M. S.; Pascoini, A. L.; Knupp, W. G.; Camps, I.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have important electronic, mechanical and optical properties. These features may be different when comparing a pristine nanotube with other presenting its surface functionalized. These changes can be explored in areas of research and application, such as construction of nanodevices that act as sensors and filters. Following this idea, in the current work, we present the results from a systematic study of CNT's surface functionalized with hydroxyl and carboxyl groups. Using the entropy as selection criterion, we filtered a library of 10k stochastically generated complexes for each functional concentration (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25%). The structurally related parameters (root-mean-square deviation, entropy, and volume/area) have a monotonic relationship with functionalization concentration. Differently, the electronic parameters (frontier molecular orbital energies, electronic gap, molecular hardness, and electrophilicity index) present and oscillatory behavior. For a set of concentrations, the nanotubes present spin polarized properties that can be used in spintronics.

  17. Si/Ge hetero-structure nanotube tunnel field effect transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Hanna, A. N.

    2015-01-07

    We discuss the physics of conventional channel material (silicon/germanium hetero-structure) based transistor topology mainly core/shell (inner/outer) gated nanotube vs. gate-all-around nanowire architecture for tunnel field effect transistor application. We show that nanotube topology can result in higher performance through higher normalized current when compared to nanowire architecture at Vdd-=-1-V due to the availability of larger tunneling cross section and lower Shockley-Reed-Hall recombination. Both architectures are able to achieve sub 60-mV/dec performance for more than five orders of magnitude of drain current. This enables the nanotube configuration achieving performance same as the nanowire architecture even when Vdd is scaled down to 0.5-V.

  18. Tuning Electronic Structures of BN and C Double-Wall Hetero-Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueran Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available First principle calculations based on density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation were carried out to investigate the energetic and electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride double-wall hetero-nanotubes (C/BN-DWHNTs with different chirality and size, including an armchair (n, n carbon nanotube (CNT enclosed in (m, m boron nitride nanotube (BNNT and a zigzag (n, 0 CNT enclosed in (m, 0 BNNT. The electronic structure of these DWHNTs under a transverse electric field was also investigated. The ability to tune the band gap with changing the intertube distance (di and imposing an external electric field (F of zigzag DWHNTs provides the possibility for future electronic and electrooptic nanodevice applications.

  19. Si/Ge hetero-structure nanotube tunnel field effect transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Hanna, A. N.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the physics of conventional channel material (silicon/germanium hetero-structure) based transistor topology mainly core/shell (inner/outer) gated nanotube vs. gate-all-around nanowire architecture for tunnel field effect transistor application. We show that nanotube topology can result in higher performance through higher normalized current when compared to nanowire architecture at Vdd-=-1-V due to the availability of larger tunneling cross section and lower Shockley-Reed-Hall recombination. Both architectures are able to achieve sub 60-mV/dec performance for more than five orders of magnitude of drain current. This enables the nanotube configuration achieving performance same as the nanowire architecture even when Vdd is scaled down to 0.5-V.

  20. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of structural and electronic properties of silicon carbide nanotube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Rostam; Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad

    2008-10-01

    By using ab initio density functional theory the structural and electronic properties of isolated and bundled (8,0) and (6,6) silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) are investigated. Our results show that for such small diameter nanotubes the inter-tube interaction causes a very small radial deformation, while band splitting and reduction of the semiconducting energy band gap are significant. We compared the equilibrium interaction energy and inter-tube separation distance of (8,0) SiCNT bundle with (10,0) carbon nanotube (CNT) bundle where they have the same radius. We found that there is a larger inter-tube separation and weaker inter-tube interaction in the (8,0) SiCNT bundle with respect to (10,0) CNT bundle, although they have the same radius.

  1. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of structural and electronic properties of silicon carbide nanotube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradian, Rostam; Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad

    2008-01-01

    By using ab initio density functional theory the structural and electronic properties of isolated and bundled (8,0) and (6,6) silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) are investigated. Our results show that for such small diameter nanotubes the inter-tube interaction causes a very small radial deformation, while band splitting and reduction of the semiconducting energy band gap are significant. We compared the equilibrium interaction energy and inter-tube separation distance of (8,0) SiCNT bundle with (10,0) carbon nanotube (CNT) bundle where they have the same radius. We found that there is a larger inter-tube separation and weaker inter-tube interaction in the (8,0) SiCNT bundle with respect to (10,0) CNT bundle, although they have the same radius

  2. Structural anisotropy of magnetically aligned single wall carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B. W.; Benes, Z.; Luzzi, D. E.; Fischer, J. E.; Walters, D. A.; Casavant, M. J.; Schmidt, J.; Smalley, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Thick films of aligned single wall carbon nanotubes and ropes have been produced by filtration/deposition from suspension in strong magnetic fields. We measured mosaic distributions of rope orientations in the film plane, for samples of different thicknesses. For an ∼1 μm film the full width at half maximum (FWHM) derived from electron diffraction is 25 degree sign -28 degree sign . The FWHM of a thicker film (∼7 μm) measured by x-ray diffraction is slightly broader, 35±3 degree sign . Aligned films are denser than ordinary filter-deposited ones, and much denser than as-grown material. Optimization of the process is expected to yield smaller FWHMs and higher densities. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  3. Dielectric and Electrical Properties of WS2 Nanotubes/Epoxy Composites and Their Use for Stress Monitoring of Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sedova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric and electrical characteristics of the semiconductive WS2 nanotubes/epoxy composites were studied as a function of the nanotubes concentration and the pressure applied during their molding. In addition, the ability of WS2 nanotubes to serve as stress sensors in epoxy based nanocomposites, for health-monitoring applications, was studied. The nanocomposite elements were loaded in three-point bending configuration. The direct current was monitored simultaneously with stress-strain measurements. It was found that, in nanocomposites, above the percolation concentrations of the nanotubes, the electrical conductivity increases considerably with the applied load and hence WS2 nanotubes can be potentially used as sensors for health monitoring of structural components.

  4. Controlling Structural Characteristics of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) by Tailoring Catalyst Composition and Synthesis Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resasco, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    This report shows the extensive research on the mechanism responsible for the formation of single walled carbon nanotubes in order to get control over their structural parameters (diameter and chirality). Catalyst formulations, pre-treatment conditions, and reaction conditions are described in detail as well as mechanisms to produce nanotubes structures of specific arrays (vertical forest, nanotube pillars). Applications of SWNT in different fields are also described in this report. In relation to this project five students have graduated (3 PhD and 2 MS) and 35 papers have been published.

  5. Carbon Nanotubes: A Review on Structure and Their Interaction with Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Saifuddin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are allotropes of carbon with a nanostructure that can have a length-to-diameter ratio greater than 1,000,000. Techniques have been developed to produce nanotubes in sizeable quantities, including arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition. Developments in the past few years have illustrated the potentially revolutionizing impact of nanomaterials, especially in biomedical imaging, drug delivery, biosensing, and the design of functional nanocomposites. Methods to effectively interface proteins with nanomaterials for realizing these applications continue to evolve. The high surface-to-volume ratio offered by nanoparticles resulted in the concentration of the immobilized entity being considerably higher than that afforded by other materials. There has also been an increasing interest in understanding the influence of nanomaterials on the structure and function of proteins. Various immobilization methods have been developed, and in particular, specific attachment of enzymes on carbon nanotubes has been an important focus of attention. With the growing attention paid to cascade enzymatic reaction, it is possible that multienzyme coimmobilization would be one of the next goals in the future. In this paper, we focus on advances in methodology for enzyme immobilization on carbon nanotubes.

  6. STRUCTURAL MODIFICATION OF NEW FORMATIONS IN CEMENT MATRIX USING CARBON NANOTUBE DISPERSIONS AND NANOSILICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Khroustalev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex nanodispersed systems with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and nanodispersed silica have a significant impact on the processes of hydration, hardening and strength gain of construction composites predetermining their durability. While using a scanning electron microscope with an attachment for X-ray microanalysis and a device for infrared spectral analysis investigations have shown that the main effect of the cement matrix modification in the case of adding complex nanodispersed systems is provided by direct influence of hydration processes with subsequent crystallization of new formations. It has been noted that while adding carbon nanotube dispersion and nanosized silica a binding matrix is structured in the form of an extremely dense shell from crystalline hydrate new formations on the surface of solid phases that provides strong binding matrix in cement concrete. The addition effect of carbon nanotubes has been analyzed and quantitatively assessed through an investigation for every case of one sample with nanotubes and one sample without them with the help of a nanoindenter and scanning electron microscope. It is necessary to solve rather complicated challenging task in order to assess quantitatively the addition effect of CNT on material characteristics at a micromechanical level. At the same time it is possible to investigate surface of a concrete sample with one-micron resolution. In this case it is necessary to prepare samples for nanoindentation with exclusion of all CNT defectable effects that have been shown by a SEM. So in this case more adequate method for assessment must be a picoindenter , which combines a test method for nanoindentation with an optical SEM potential. Such equipment is in the stage of in-situ testing process at the Vienna University of Technology. The investigation is based on the fact that the main modification effect of mineral binding matrix while using incorporated complex nanodispersed systems and

  7. Structure and properties of carbon nanotubes/sol-gel nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokrass, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are promising filler materials owing to their exceptional mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties. Since their discovery in 1991, a major effort has been made in developing CNT-polymer nanocomposites, whereas CNT/ceramic based nanocomposites, in particularly, CNT/silica nanocomposites, have been very little studied. This thesis focuses on preparation and characterization of novel CNT/silica nanocomposite glasses synthesized by the Sol-Gel technology. A comprehensive analysis of their morphological, optical, and electrical properties was conducted, and analyzed according to existing theoretical models. The nanocomposites hosting matrix is a hybrid organic/inorganic glass prepared by the Fast-Sol-Gel (FSG) route. Using specific conditions in the FSG procedure, the resultant glasses are nonporous, exhibiting no contraction upon drying. Their analogous Classical-Sol-Gel (CSG) glasses, however, are porous, and do exhibit contraction upon drying. The FSG glasses are relatively new materials, and their physical and optical properties were only meagerly studied. In our present work we have conducted a comprehensive experimental research on some previously ignored characteristics such as: UV-vis-IR optical absorption and transmission, and the organic content effect on the refraction index n, density ρ, thermal expansion coefficient β, and thermo-optic coefficient dn/dT. We found that organic residues within the glass decrease the refractive index, density, and thermo-optic coefficient. The thermal expansion coefficient, however, increases with the organic content. A negative linear dependence of the thermo-optic coefficient on the thermal expansion coefficient was obtained. CNT/FSG nanocomposites were prepared by using a solution mixing method, while CNT/CSG nanocomposites were prepared by means of an in situ polymerization technique. Nanocomposites based on FSG hybrid glasses were characterized for their nonlinear optical and

  8. Effects of C3+ ion irradiation on structural, electrical and magnetic properties of Ni nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlimas, D. I.; Kozlovskiy, A. L.; Zdorovets, M. V.; Kadyrzhanov, K. K.; Uglov, V. V.; Kenzhina, I. E.; Shumskaya, E. E.; Kaniukov, E. Y.

    2018-03-01

    Ion irradiation is an attractive method for obtaining nanostructures that can be used under extreme conditions. Also, it is possible to control the technological process that allows obtaining nanomaterials with new properties at ion irradiation. In this paper, we study the effect of irradiation with 28 MeV C3+ ions and fluences up to 5 × 1011 cm-2 on the structure and properties of template-synthesized nickel nanotubes with a length of 12 μm, with diameters of 400 nm, and a wall thickness of 100 nm. It is demonstrated that the main factor influencing the degradation of nanostructures under irradiation in PET template is the processes of mixing the material of nanostructures with the surrounding polymer. The influence of irradiation with various fluences on the crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties of nickel nanotubes is studied.

  9. Nanohairs and nanotubes: Efficient structural elements for gecko-inspired artificial dry adhesives

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2009-08-01

    An overview of the recent progress in the development of gecko-inspired synthetic dry adhesives is presented, with particular emphasis on two major structural elements of nanohairs and nanotubes. With the advance of nanofabrication techniques, recently developed dry adhesives made of nanohairs and nanotubes show excellent adhesion strength, smart directional adhesion as well as rough surface adaptability by better mimicking gecko foot hairs. After a brief description of the requirements for high-performance artificial dry adhesives, a variety of synthetic adhesives are described based on materials and structural features of the gecko-inspired nanostructures. In addition, current challenges and future directions towards an optimized synthetic dry adhesive are presented. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanohairs and nanotubes: Efficient structural elements for gecko-inspired artificial dry adhesives

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Hoon Eui; Suh, Kahp Y.

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the recent progress in the development of gecko-inspired synthetic dry adhesives is presented, with particular emphasis on two major structural elements of nanohairs and nanotubes. With the advance of nanofabrication techniques, recently developed dry adhesives made of nanohairs and nanotubes show excellent adhesion strength, smart directional adhesion as well as rough surface adaptability by better mimicking gecko foot hairs. After a brief description of the requirements for high-performance artificial dry adhesives, a variety of synthetic adhesives are described based on materials and structural features of the gecko-inspired nanostructures. In addition, current challenges and future directions towards an optimized synthetic dry adhesive are presented. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Periodic density functional theory study of structural and electronic properties of single-walled zinc oxide and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marana, Naiara L. [Modeling and Molecular Simulations Group, São Paulo State University, UNESP, 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil); Albuquerque, Anderson R. [Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Sertão Pernambucano, 56400-000 Floresta, PE (Brazil); La Porta, Felipe A. [Chemistry Department, Federal Technological University of Paraná, 86036-370 Londrina, PR (Brazil); Longo, Elson [São Paulo State University, Chemistry Institute, UNESP, 14801-907 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Sambrano, Julio R. [Modeling and Molecular Simulations Group, São Paulo State University, UNESP, 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    Periodic density functional theory calculations with the B3LYP hybrid functional and all-electron Gaussian basis set were performed to simulate the structural and electronic properties as well as the strain and formation energies of single-walled ZnO nanotubes (SWZnONTs) and Carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different chiralities as functions of their diameters. For all SWZnONTs, the band gap, strain energy, and formation energy converge to ~4.5 eV, 0.0 eV/atom, and 0.40 eV/atom, respectively. This result suggests that the nanotubes are formed more easily from the surface than from the bulk. For SWCNTs, the strain energy is always positive, while the formation energy is negative for armchair and zigzag nanotubes, therefore suggesting that these types of nanotubes can be preferentially formed from the bulk. The electronic properties of SWCNTs depend on the chirality; all armchair nanotubes are metallic, while zigzag and chiral nanotubes can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on the n and m vectors. - Graphical abstract: DFT/B3LYP were performed to simulate the structural and electronic properties as well as the strain and formation energies of SWZnONTs and SWCNTs with different chiralities as functions of their diameters. - Highlights: • The energies of SWZnONTs converge for chirality with diameters up 20 Å. • SWCNTs electronic properties depend on the chirality. • The properties of SWZnONTs are very similar to those of monolayer surface.

  12. Process, Structure, and Properties of Electrospun Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Nanocomposite Yarns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir M. Uddin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are dispersed into polyacrylonitrile polymer solution and then assembled into continuous nanocomposite yarns through the drum-tape co-electrospinning process to facilitate the translation of CNT properties to higher order structures. We explore the dispersion of CNTs in a polymer matrix, the process of obtaining continuous yarn through electrospinning, and the surface morphology and mechanical properties of the nanocomposite yarn.

  13. Thermal annealing of carbon nanotubes reveals a toxicological impact of the structural defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figarol, Agathe, E-mail: figarol@emse.fr [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS: UMR 5307, LGF (France); Pourchez, Jérémie, E-mail: pourchez@emse.fr [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, CIS-EMSE, EA 4624, SFR IFRESIS, LINA (France); Boudard, Delphine [Université Jean Monnet Saint-Etienne, EA 4624, SFR IFRESIS, LINA (France); Forest, Valérie [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, CIS-EMSE, EA 4624, SFR IFRESIS, LINA (France); Berhanu, Sarah [Armines - Mines ParisTech, Centre des Matériaux, CNRS UMR 7633 (France); Tulliani, Jean-Marc [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology (Italy); Lecompte, Jean-Pierre [Centre Européen de la céramique CNRS: UMR 7315, SPCTS (France); Cottier, Michèle [Université Jean Monnet Saint-Etienne, EA 4624, SFR IFRESIS, LINA (France); Bernache-Assollant, Didier [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, CIS-EMSE, EA 4624, SFR IFRESIS, LINA (France); Grosseau, Philippe [Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, SPIN-EMSE, CNRS: UMR 5307, LGF (France)

    2015-04-15

    The biological response to pristine and annealed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was assessed on murine macrophages (RAW 264.7). First, the physicochemical features of the as-produced MWCNT and annealed at 2125 °C for 1 h were fully characterized. A decrease in structural defects, hydrophobicity and catalytic impurities was detected after annealing. Thereafter, their impact on cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and pro-inflammatory response was investigated at concentrations ranging from 15 to 120 µg mL{sup −1}. No effect of the 2125 °C treatment was detected on the cytotoxicity. In contrast, the annealed carbon nanotubes showed a significant increase of the pro-inflammatory response. We assumed that this behavior was due to the reduction in structural defects that may modify the layer of adsorbed biomolecules. Surprisingly, the purification of metallic catalysts did not have any significant impact on the oxidative stress. We suggested that the structural improvements from the 2125 °C treatment can decrease the carbon nanotube scavenging capacity and thus allow a higher free radical release which may counterbalance the decrease of oxidative stress due to a lower content of metallic impurities.

  14. Determination of material constants of vertically aligned carbon nanotube structures in compressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yupeng; Kang, Junmo; Choi, Jae-Boong; Nam, Jae-Do; Suhr, Jonghwan

    2015-01-01

    Different chemical vapour deposition (CVD) fabrication conditions lead to a wide range of variation in the microstructure and morphologies of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which actually determine the compressive mechanical properties of CNTs. However, the underlying relationship between the structure/morphology and mechanical properties of CNTs is not fully understood. In this study, we characterized and compared the structural and morphological properties of three kinds of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays from different CVD fabrication methods and performed monotonic compressive tests for each VACNT array. The compressive stress–strain responses and plastic deformation were first compared and analyzed with nanotube buckling behaviours. To quantify the compressive properties of the VACNT arrays, a strain density energy function was used to determine their intrinsic material constants. Then, the structural and morphological effects on the quantified material constants of the VACNTs were statistically investigated and analogized to cellular materials with an open-cell model. The statistical analysis shows that density, defect degree, and the moment of inertia of the CNTs are key factors in the improvement of the compressive mechanical properties of VACNT arrays. This approach could allow a model-driven CNT synthesis for engineering their mechanical behaviours. (paper)

  15. Structural, elastic and electronic Properties of isotropic cubic crystals of carbon and silicon nanotubes : Density functional based tight binding calculations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Ivanovskii

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic models of cubic crystals (CC of carbon and graphene-like Si nanotubes are offered and their structural, cohesive, elastic and electronic properties are predicted by means of the DFTB method. Our main findings are that the isotropic crystals of carbon nanotubes adopt a very high elastic modulus B and low compressibility β, namely B = 650 GPa, β = 0.0015 1/GPa. In addition, these crystals preserve the initial conductivity type of their “building blocks”, i.e. isolated carbon and Si nanotubes. This feature may be important for design of materials with the selected conductivity type.

  16. Magnetism, structures and stabilities of cluster assembled TM@Si nanotubes (TM = Cr, Mn and Fe): a density functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaka, Kapil; Bandyopadhyay, Debashis

    2016-08-02

    The present study reports transition metal (TM = Cr, Mn and Fe) doped silicon nanotubes with tunable band structures and magnetic properties by careful selection of cluster assemblies as building blocks using the first-principles density functional theory. We found that the transition metal doping and in addition, the hydrogen termination process can stabilize the pure silicon nanoclusters or cluster assemblies and then it could be extended as magnetic nanotubes with finite magnetic moments. Study of the band structures and density of states (DOS) of different empty and TM doped nanotubes (Type 1 to Type 4) show that these nanotubes are useful as metals, semiconductors, semi-metals and half-metals. These designer magnetic materials could be useful in spintronics and magnetic devices of nanoscale order.

  17. Structural studies of carbon nanotubes by powder x-ray diffraction at SPring-8 and KEK PF

    CERN Document Server

    Maniwa, Y; Fujiwara, A

    2003-01-01

    Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using synchrotron radiation are reported. In spite of the observed broad XRD peak profiles of two-dimensional triangular (hexagonal) lattice of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), it was shown that useful structural information, such as the tube diameter and its distribution, can be deduced from detailed analysis of the characteristic XRD patterns. In particular, powder-XRD measurements were performed to study the phase transition of encapsulated materials inside SWNTs. In the C sub 7 sub 0 -one dimensional (1D) crystals formed inside SWNTs, importance of one-dimensionality in the C sub 7 sub 0 -molecular dynamics was suggested. It was also shown that water inside SWNTs undergoes a phase transition from liquid to an ice-nanotube structure below -38degC. Conversion process from SWNT to double-wall carbon nanotube (DWNT) was also studied by XRD.

  18. All carbon coaxial supercapacitors based on hollow carbon nanotube sleeve structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, Xiaobei; Xu, Ruiqiao; Zhang, Yangyang; Zhang, Li; Wei, Jinquan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Li, Xinming

    2015-01-01

    All carbon coaxial supercapacitors based on hollow carbon nanotube (CNT) sleeve structure are assembled and tested. The key advantage of the structure is that the inner core electrode is variable from CNT sleeve sponges, to CNT fibers, reduced graphene oxide fibers, and graphene woven fabrics. By changing core electrodes from sleeve sponges to CNT fibers, the electrochemical performance has been significantly enhanced. The capacitance based on sleeve sponge + CNT fiber double the capacitances of double-sleeve sponge supercapacitors thanks to reduction of the series and internal resistances. Besides, the coaxial sleeve structure possesses many other features, including high rate capacitance, long cycle life, and good flexibility. (paper)

  19. Hybrid integration of carbon nanotubes in silicon photonic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Valdeiglesias, E.; Zhang, W.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Le Roux, X.; Serna, S.; Hoang, H. C.; Marris-Morini, D.; Cassan, E.; Intonti, F.; Sarti, F.; Caselli, N.; La China, F.; Gurioli, M.; Balestrieri, M.; Vivien, L.; Filoramo, A.

    2017-02-01

    Silicon photonics, due to its compatibility with the CMOS platform and unprecedented integration capability, has become the preferred solution for the implementation of next generation optical interconnects to accomplish high efficiency, low energy consumption, low cost and device miniaturization in one single chip. However, it is restricted by silicon itself. Silicon does not have efficient light emission or detection in the telecommunication wavelength range (1.3 μm-1.5 μm) or any electro-optic effect (i.e. Pockels effect). Hence, silicon photonic needs to be complemented with other materials for the realization of optically-active devices, including III-V for lasing and Ge for detection. The very different requirement of these materials results in complex fabrication processes that offset the cost-effectiveness of the Si photonics approach. For this purpose, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently been proposed as an attractive one-dimensional light emitting material. Interestingly, semiconducting single walled CNTs (SWNTs) exhibit room-temperature photo- and electro-luminescence in the near-IR that could be exploited for the implementation of integrated nano-sources. They can also be considered for the realization of photo-detectors and optical modulators, since they rely on intrinsically fast non-linear effects, such as Stark and Kerr effect. All these properties make SWNTs ideal candidates in order to fabricate a large variety of optoelectronic devices, including near-IR sources, modulators and photodetectors on Si photonic platforms. In addition, solution processed SWNTs can be integrated on Si using spin-coating or drop-casting techniques, obviating the need of complex epitaxial growth or chip bonding approaches. Here, we report on our recent progress in the coupling of SWNTs light emission into optical resonators implemented on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform. .

  20. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of structural and electronic properties of double-walled silicon carbide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Rostam; Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad

    2009-12-01

    By using ab initio density functional theory, the structural and electronic properties of (n,n)@(11,11) double-walled silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) are investigated. Our calculations reveal the existence of an energetically favorable double-walled nanotube whose interwall distance is about 4.3 Å. Interwall spacing and curvature difference are found to be essential for the electronic states around the Fermi level.

  1. First-principles investigation on structural and electronic properties of antimonene nanoribbons and nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, V.; Chandiramouli, R.

    2018-03-01

    The electronic properties of antimonene nanotubes and nanoribbons hydrogenated along the zigzag and armchair borders are investigated with the help of density functional theory (DFT) method. The structural stability of antimonene nanostructures is confirmed with the formation energy. The electronic properties of hydrogenated zigzag and armchair antimonene nanostructures are studied in terms of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) & lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap and density of states (DOS) spectrum. Moreover, due to the influence of buckled orientation, hydrogen passivation and width of antimonene nanostructures, the HOMO-LUMO gap widens in the range of 0.15-0.41 eV. The findings of the present study confirm that the electronic properties of antimonene nanostructures can be tailored with the influence of width, orientation of the edges, passivation with hydrogen and morphology of antimonene nanostructures (nanoribbons, nanotubes), which can be used as chemical sensor and for spintronic devices.

  2. Structural and electronic properties of chiral single-wall copper nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, YingNi; Zhang, JianMin; Xu, KeWei

    2014-04-01

    The structural, energetic and electronic properties of chiral ( n, m) (3⩽ n⩽6, n/2⩽ m⩽ n) single-wall copper nanotubes (CuNTs) have been investigated by using projector-augmented wave method based on density-functional theory. The (4, 3) CuNT is energetically stable and should be observed experimentally in both free-standing and tip-suspended conditions, whereas the (5, 5) and (6, 4) CuNTs should be observed in free-standing and tip-suspended conditions, respectively. The number of conductance channels in the CuNTs does not always correspond to the number of atomic strands comprising the nanotube. Charge density contours show that there is an enhanced interatomic interaction in CuNTs compared with Cu bulk. Current transporting states display different periods and chirality, the combined effects of which lead to weaker chiral currents on CuNTs.

  3. Recent development of carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamabe, Tokio [Div. of Molecular Engineering, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); [Inst. for Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto (Japan)

    1995-03-15

    Recent developments of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. Analytical solutions for the electronic structure of carbon nanotube on the basis of thight-binding approximation are presented and interpreted using the concepts of crystal orbital. The electronic properties of actual carbon nanotubes are presented. The electronic structures of carbon nanotubes in the presence of magnetic fiels are also summerized. (orig.)

  4. Multifunctional Material Structures Based on Laser-Etched Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Emplit

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available High-power electronics in the transportation and aerospace sectors need size and weight reduction. Multifunctional and multistructured materials are currently being developed to couple electromagnetic (EM and thermal properties, i.e., shielding against electromagnetic impulsions, and thermal management across the thermal interface material (TIM. In this work, we investigate laser-machined patterned carbon nanotube (CNT micro-brushes as an alternative to metallic structures for driving simultaneously EM and heat propagation. The thermal and electromagnetic response of the CNT array is expected to be sensitive to the micro-structured pattern etched in the CNT brush.

  5. Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube-Based Sensors for Damage Detection and Self Healing in Structural Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    established based on the concept of equipotential surface . The effect of nanotube length on the critical charge level is plotted in Fig. 17. Fig...walled carbon nanotubes was used to develop composites with agglomerated regions of nanotubes at the fiber surface [3]. An image of the nanotube...coating on the surface of two E-glass fibers is shown in Fig. 5. Fig. 5. (a) Carbon nanotube agglomerates on the surface of glass fibers in the

  6. Structural interpretations of deformation and fracture behavior of polypropylene/multi-walled carbon nanotube composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganss, Martin; Satapathy, Bhabani K.; Thunga, Mahendra; Weidisch, Roland; Poetschke, Petra; Jehnichen, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    The deformation and crack resistance behavior of polypropylene (PP) multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) composites have been studied and their interrelation to the structural attributes studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarization light microscopy has been discussed. The composites were produced from industrial available MWNT by extrusion melt-mixing and injection-molding. In stress-strain measurements a strong increase in the yield stress and the Young's modulus at low MWNT contents has been observed, which was attributed to an efficient load transfer between the carbon nanotubes and polypropylene matrix through a good polymer-nanotube adhesion as indicated by SEM. The extent of enhancement in mechanical properties above 1.5 wt.% of MWNT decreased due to an apparently increased tendency of clustering of carbon nanotubes. Several theoretical models have been taken into account to explain the mechanical properties and to demonstrate the applicability of such models to the system under investigation. The crack resistance behavior has been studied with the essential work of fracture (EWF) approach based on post-yield fracture mechanics (PYFM) concept. A maximum in the non-essential work of fracture was observed at 0.5 wt.% MWNT demonstrating enhanced toughness compared to pure PP, followed by a sharp decline as the MWNT content was increased to 1.5 wt.% reveals a ductile-to-semi-ductile transition. Studies on the kinetics of crack propagation aspects have revealed a qualitative picture of the nature of such a transition in the fracture modes

  7. Equilibrium structures and flows of polar and nonpolar liquids in different carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramyan, Andrey K.; Bessonov, Nick M.; Mirantsev, Leonid V.; Chevrychkina, Anastasiia A.

    2018-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of equilibrium structures and flows of polar water and nonpolar methane confined by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with circular and square cross sections and bounding walls with regular graphene structure and random (amorphous) distribution of carbon atoms have been performed. The results of these simulations show that equilibrium structures of both confined liquids depend strongly on the shape of the cross section of SWCNTs, whereas the structure of their bounding walls has a minor influence on these structures. On contrary, the external pressure driven water and methane flows through above mentioned SWCNTs depend significantly on both the shape of their cross sections and the structure of their bounding walls.

  8. Piezoresistive strain sensing of carbon nanotubes-based composite skin for aeronautical morphing structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscardi, Massimo; Arena, Maurizio; Barra, Giuseppina; Vertuccio, Luigi; Ciminello, Monica; Guadagno, Liberata

    2018-03-01

    Nowadays, smart composites based on different nano-scale carbon fillers, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), are increasingly being thought of as a more possible alternative solution to conventional smart materials, mainly for their improved electrical properties. Great attention is being given by the research community in designing highly sensitive strain sensors for more and more ambitious challenges: in such context, interest fields related to carbon nanotubes have seen extraordinary development in recent years. The authors aim to provide the most contemporary overview possible of carbon nanotube-based strain sensors for aeronautical application. A smart structure as a morphing wing needs an embedded sensing system in order to measure the actual deformation state as well as to "monitor" the structural conditions. Looking at more innovative health monitoring tools for the next generation of composite structures, a resin strain sensor has been realized. The epoxy resin was first analysed by means of a micro-tension test, estimating the electrical resistance variations as function of the load, in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the sensor. The epoxy dogbone specimen has been equipped with a standard strain gauge to quantify its strain sensitivity. The voltamperometric tests highlight a good linearity of the electrical resistance value as the load increases at least in the region of elastic deformation of the material. Such intrinsic piezoresistive performance is essentially attributable to the re-arrangement of conductive percolating network formed by MWCNT, induced by the deformation of the material due to the applied loads. The specimen has been prepared within this investigation, to demonstrate its performance for a future composite laminate typical of aerospace structures. The future carbon-fiber sensor can replace conventional metal foil strain gauges in aerospace applications. Furthermore, dynamic tests will be carried out to detect any non

  9. Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Aerospace Composite Materials A New Generation of Multifunctional Hybrid Structural Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Kostopoulos, V

    2013-01-01

    The well documented increase in the use of high performance composites as structural materials in aerospace components is continuously raising the demands in terms of dynamic performance, structural integrity, reliable life monitoring systems and adaptive actuating abilities. Current technologies address the above issues separately; material property tailoring and custom design practices aim to the enhancement of dynamic and damage tolerance characteristics, whereas life monitoring and actuation is performed with embedded sensors that may be detrimental to the structural integrity of the component. This publication explores the unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an additive in the matrix of Fibre Reinforced Plastics (FRP), for producing structural composites with improved mechanical performance as well as sensing/actuating capabilities. The successful combination of the CNT properties and existing sensing actuating technologies leads to the realization of a multifunctional FRP structure. The curre...

  10. Structural, electronic and mechanical properties of inner surface modified imogolite nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Chagas Da Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The electronic, structural and mechanical properties of the modified imogolites have been investigated using self consistent charge-density functional-tight binding method with a posteriori treatment of the dispersion interaction (SCC-DFTB-D. The zigzag (12,0 imogolite has been used as the initial structure for the calculations. The functionalization of the interior (12,0 imogolite nanotubes by organosilanes and by heat treatment leading to the dehydroxylation of the silanols were investigated. The reaction of the silanols with the trimethylmethoxysilanes is favored and the arrangement of the different substitutions that leads to the most symmetrical structures are preferred. The Young moduli and band gaps are slightly decreased. However, the dehydroxylation of the silanol groups in the inner surface of the imogolite leads to the increase of the Young moduli and a drastic decrease of the band gap of about 4.4 eV. It has been shown that the degree of the dehydroxylation can be controlled by heat treatment and tune the band gap, eventually, leading to a semiconductor material with well defined nanotube structure.

  11. The electro-structural behaviour of yarn-like carbon nanotube fibres immersed in organic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrones, Jeronimo; Windle, Alan H; Elliott, James A

    2014-01-01

    Yarn-like carbon nanotube (CNT) fibres are a hierarchically-structured material with a variety of promising applications such as high performance composites, sensors and actuators, smart textiles, and energy storage and transmission. However, in order to fully realize these possibilities, a more detailed understanding of their interactions with the environment is required. In this work, we describe a simplified representation of the hierarchical structure of the fibres from which several mathematical models are constructed to explain electro-structural interactions of fibres with organic liquids. A balance between the elastic and surface energies of the CNT bundle network in different media allows the determination of the maximum lengths that open junctions can sustain before collapsing to minimize the surface energy. This characteristic length correlates well with the increase of fibre resistance upon immersion in organic liquids. We also study the effect of charge accumulation in open interbundle junctions and derive expressions to describe experimental data on the non-ohmic electrical behaviour of fibres immersed in polar liquids. Our analyses suggest that the non-ohmic behaviour is caused by progressively shorter junctions collapsing as the voltage is increased. Since our models are not based on any property unique to carbon nanotubes, they should also be useful to describe other hierarchical structures. (paper)

  12. Structural transformation of MoO3 nanobelts into MoS2 nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deepak, Francis Leonard; Mayoral, Alvaro; Yacaman, Miguel Jose

    2009-01-01

    The structural transformation of MoO 3 nanobelts into MoS 2 nanotubes using a simple sulfur source has been reported. This transformation has been extensively investigated using electron microscopic and spectroscopic techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron diffraction (ED), and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDAX and TEM-EDX). The method described in this report will serve as a generic route for the transformation of other oxide nanostructures into the chalcogenide nanostructures. (orig.)

  13. Structural and electronic properties of boron-doped double-walled silicon carbide nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behzad, Somayeh, E-mail: somayeh.behzad@gmail.co [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradian, Rostam [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Science and Technology Research Center, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Computational Physical Science Research Laboratory, Department of Nano Science, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chegel, Raad [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-12-01

    The effects of boron doping on the structural and electronic properties of (6,0)-(14,0) double-walled silicon carbide nanotube (DWSiCNT) are investigated by using spin-polarized density functional theory. It is found that boron atom could be more easily doped in the inner tube. Our calculations indicate that a Si site is favorable for B under C-rich condition and a C site is favorable under Si-rich condition. Additionally, B-substitution at either single carbon or silicon atom site in DWSiCNT could induce spontaneous magnetization.

  14. Structural and electronic properties of boron-doped double-walled silicon carbide nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behzad, Somayeh; Moradian, Rostam; Chegel, Raad

    2010-01-01

    The effects of boron doping on the structural and electronic properties of (6,0)-(14,0) double-walled silicon carbide nanotube (DWSiCNT) are investigated by using spin-polarized density functional theory. It is found that boron atom could be more easily doped in the inner tube. Our calculations indicate that a Si site is favorable for B under C-rich condition and a C site is favorable under Si-rich condition. Additionally, B-substitution at either single carbon or silicon atom site in DWSiCNT could induce spontaneous magnetization.

  15. Structural and electronic properties of boron-doped double-walled silicon carbide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Somayeh; Moradian, Rostam; Chegel, Raad

    2010-12-01

    The effects of boron doping on the structural and electronic properties of (6,0)@(14,0) double-walled silicon carbide nanotube (DWSiCNT) are investigated by using spin-polarized density functional theory. It is found that boron atom could be more easily doped in the inner tube. Our calculations indicate that a Si site is favorable for B under C-rich condition and a C site is favorable under Si-rich condition. Additionally, B-substitution at either single carbon or silicon atom site in DWSiCNT could induce spontaneous magnetization.

  16. Study of the tunnelling initiated leakage current through the carbon nanotube embedded gate oxide in metal oxide semiconductor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Gargi; Sarkar, C K; Lu, X B; Dai, J Y

    2008-01-01

    The tunnelling currents through the gate dielectric partly embedded with semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure have been investigated. The application of the gate voltage to such an MOS device results in the band bending at the interface of the partly embedded oxide dielectric and the surface of the silicon, initiating tunnelling through the gate oxide responsible for the gate leakage current whenever the thickness of the oxide is scaled. A model for silicon MOS structures, where carbon nanotubes are confined in a narrow layer embedded in the gate dielectric, is proposed to investigate the direct and the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunnelling currents of such systems. The idea of embedding such elements in the gate oxide is to assess the possibility for charge storage for memory device applications. Comparing the FN tunnelling onset voltage between the pure gate oxide and the gate oxide embedded with carbon nanotubes, it is found that the onset voltage decreases with the introduction of the nanotubes. The direct tunnelling current has also been studied at very low gate bias, for the thin oxide MOS structure which plays an important role in scaling down the MOS transistors. The FN tunnelling current has also been studied with varying nanotube diameter

  17. A Spray-On Carbon Nanotube Artificial Neuron Strain Sensor for Composite Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyeongrak Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a nanocomposite strain sensor (NCSS to develop a novel structural health monitoring (SHM sensor that can be easily installed in a composite structure. An NCSS made of a multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT/epoxy composite was installed on a target structure with facile processing. We attempted to evaluate the NCSS sensing characteristics and benchmark compared to those of a conventional foil strain gauge. The response of the NCSS was fairly good and the result was nearly identical to the strain gauge. A neuron, which is a biomimetic long continuous NCSS, was also developed, and its vibration response was investigated for structural damage detection of a composite cantilever. The vibration response for damage detection was measured by tracking the first natural frequency, which demonstrated good result that matched the finite element (FE analysis.

  18. Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Based on TiO_2 Nanotube and Shelled Arrayed Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jie; Kusumawati, Yuly; Pauporté, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Anatase TiO_2 nanostructure arrays were synthetized starting from a template made of self-standing ZnO NWs prepared by an electrodeposition technique. By controlling the liquid phase deposition step, the obtained structures could be varied from free-standing nanotube (NT) arrays with controlled morphology to hierarchical spiky radiating core-shell rods. The nanotubes were made of assembled nanocrystals with an average size of 7–8 nm. The structures were investigated as n-type layers in DSSCs. The efficiency was enhanced for the core-shell layer and by starting with longer initial ZnO NW templates. The limitation of the cell efficiency was shown related to the specific surface area and dye loading. The cell functioning was in-depth investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy over a large applied voltage range and compared to a cell based on a nanoparticle TO_2 mesoporous layer. A slow recombination rate was found. The enhancement of electron transport with nanocrystallite size explained the conductivity results. We also found that the prepared structures presented a high charge collection efficiency.

  19. Effect of post treatments on the structure and thermal stability of titanate nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qamar, M [Institute/Faculty of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, C R [Institute/Faculty of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, H J [Institute/Faculty of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, D H [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Hanyang University, Haendang-dong, Seondong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jho, J H [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Hanyang University, Haendang-dong, Seondong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K S [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Hanyang University, Haendang-dong, Seondong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W J [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, 28-1 Sungju-Dong, Changwon, Gyeongnam 641-120 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H G [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Korea Polytechnic University, Jeongwang 1-dong, Siheung-si, Gyeonggi-do 429-793 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S J [Institute/Faculty of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-28

    TiO{sub 2} sol was prepared hydrothermally in an autoclave from aqueous TiOCl{sub 2} solutions as a starting precursor. Titanate nanotubes were obtained when the sol-gel-derived TiO{sub 2} sol was treated chemically with a 10 M NaOH solution and subsequently heated in the autoclave at 150 {sup 0}C for 48 h. The samples were characterized using XRD, TEM, SEM, EDX, Raman spectroscopy, and a BET surface area analyser. The effect of post treatments, such as washing with and without hydrochloric acid and calcination, on the phase structure, shape and morphology, pore structures, and BET surface area of the titanate nanotubes was investigated. When a sample containing 7.08 wt% Na (after washing only with water) was calcined at different temperatures from 300 to 900 {sup 0}C, it showed the formation of a mixture of sodium trititanates and sodium hexatitanates and was found to preserve the tubular morphology at higher temperatures. However, a sample containing 0.06 wt% Na obtained after prolonged washing with hydrochloric acid followed by heat treatment showed the formation of TiO{sub 2} anatase involving TiO{sub 2} (B) as an intermediate at lower temperatures and anatase was further transformed to the rutile phase when the temperature was raised. On the basis of different observations, a general formula Na{sub x}H{sub 2-x}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O has been proposed for the trititanate nanotubes.

  20. Robust Superhydrophobic Carbon Nanotube Film with Lotus Leaf Mimetic Multiscale Hierarchical Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengwei; Zhao, Tianyi; Bian, Ruixin; Wang, Guangyan; Liu, Huan

    2017-12-26

    Superhydrophobic carbon nanotube (CNT) films have demonstrated many fascinating performances in versatile applications, especially for those involving solid/liquid interfacial processes, because of their ability to affect the material/energy transfer at interfaces. Thus, developing superhydrophobic CNTs has attracted extensive research interests in the past decades, and it could be achieved either by surface coating of low-free energy materials or by constructing micro/nanohierarchical structures via various complicated processes. So far, developing a simple approach to fabricate stable superhydrophobic CNTs remains a challenge because the capillary force induced coalescence frequently happens when interacting with liquid. Herein, drawing inspirations from the lotus leaf, we proposed a simple one-step chemical vapor deposition approach with programmable controlled gas flow to directly fabricate a CNT film with rather stable superhydrophobicity, which can effectively prevent even small water droplets from permeating into the film. The robust superhydrophobicity was attributable to typical lotus-leaf-like micro/nanoscale hierarchical surface structures of the CNT film, where many microscale clusters composed of entangled nanotubes randomly protrude out of the under-layer aligned nanotubes. Consequently, dual-scale air pockets were trapped within each microscale CNT cluster and between, which could largely reduce the liquid/solid interface, leading to a Cassie state. Moreover, the superhydrophobicity of the CNT film showed excellent durability after long time exposure to air and even to corrosive liquids with a wide range of pH values. We envision that the approach developed is advantageous for versatile physicochemical interfacial processes, such as drag reduction, electrochemical catalysis, anti-icing, and biosensors.

  1. The structure of carbon nanotubes formed of graphene layers L4-8, L5-7, L3-12, L4-6-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapovalova, K. E.; Belenkov, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    We geometrically calculate the optimized structure of nanotubes based on the graphene layers, using the method of molecular mechanics MM+. It was found that only the nanotubes, based on the graphene layers L4-8, L5-7, L3-12, L4-6-12, have a cylindrical form. Calculations of the sublimation energy, carried out using the semi-empirical quantum-mechanic method PM3, show that energy increases with the increase of nanotube diameters.

  2. The impact of core-shell nanotube structures on fracture in ceramic nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xin; Yang, Yingchao; Lou, Jun; Sheldon, Brian W.

    2017-01-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be used to create ceramic nanocomposites with improved fracture toughness. In the present work, atomic layer deposition (ALD) was employed to deposit thin oxide layers on MWCNTs. These core-shell structures were then used to create nanocomposites by using a polymer derived ceramic (PDC) to produce the matrix. Variations in both the initial MWCNT structure and the oxide layers led to substantial differences in fiber-pullout behavior. Single tube pullout tests also showed that the oxide coatings led to stronger bonding with the ceramic matrix. With high defect density MWCNTs, this led to shorter pull-out lengths which is consistent with the conventional understanding of fracture in ceramic matrix composites. However, with low defect density MWCNTs longer pullout lengths were observed with the oxide layers. To interpret the different trends that were observed, we believe that the ALD coatings should not be viewed simply as a means of altering the interfacial properties. Instead, the coated MWCNTs should be viewed as more complex core-shell fibers where both interface and internal properties can be controlled with the ALD layers. - Graphical abstract: Fracture properties of core-shell nanotubes reinforced ceramic nanocomposites.

  3. Carbon nanotube induced structural and physical property transitions of syndiotactic polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrasi, Giuliana; Romeo, Valentina; Sannino, Diana; Sarno, Maria; Ciambelli, Paolo; Vittoria, Vittoria; De Vivo, Biagio; Tucci, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we have studied the effect of increasing carbon multi-walled nanotube (CNT) concentration in composites of syndiotactic polypropylene (sPP) having the same crystalline form but different morphologies. The attention was focused on the form I of sPP with different degrees of perfection (in terms of percentages of chains in helical conformation, crystal dimensions and crystallinity) obtained using two different quenching temperatures from the melt, i.e. 25 and 100 deg. C. We observed a decreasing effect of the crystallization temperature on increasing the nanotube content up to the samples with 10% of CNT, that show a very similar structural organization independent of the undercooling. Only the amorphous phase turns out more relaxed in the samples crystallized at the highest temperature. Either the thermal or the mechanical properties are improved on increasing the CNT content in both series of samples. The electrical conductivity increases in a similar manner in both series of samples and between 1 and 3 wt% it shows a sizable step of about eight orders of magnitude, a phenomenon that can be regarded as the onset of a percolating structure for which charge transport may take place

  4. Preparation and Application of Conductive Textile Coatings Filled with Honeycomb Structured Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Govaert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical conductive textile coatings with variable amounts of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are presented. Formulations of textile coatings were prepared with up to 15 wt % of CNT, based on the solid weight of the binder. The binders are water based polyacrylate dispersions. The CNTs were mixed into the binder dispersion starting from a commercially available aqueous CNT dispersion that is compatible with the binder dispersion. Coating formulations with variable CNT concentrations were applied on polyester and cotton woven and knitted fabrics by different textile coating techniques: direct coating, transfer coating, and screen printing. The coatings showed increasing electrical conductivity with increasing CNT concentration. The coatings can be regarded to be electrically conductive (sheet resistivity<103 Ohm/sq starting at 3 wt% CNT. The degree of dispersion of the carbon nanotubes particles inside the coating was visualized by scanning electron microscopy. The CNT particles form honeycomb structured networks in the coatings, proving a high degree of dispersion. This honeycomb structure of CNT particles is forming a conductive network in the coating leading to low resistivity values.

  5. Effect of interwall interaction on the electronic structure of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, M; Boyer, T A; Biradar, S; Ge, L; Vajtai, R; Ajayan, P M; Barrera, E V; Elías-Zúñiga, A

    2015-01-01

    Through this study, the results of density functional theory calculations within the local density approximation of the electronic structure of zigzag–zigzag double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs), with chiral indices (n, 0)@(m, 0) for n = 7–15, and m = 15–26, has been presented and the effects of interwall interaction and orbital hybridization on the electronic structure of these systems has been discussed. It was observed that the electronic band gap of the aforementioned DWCNTs depends on the interwall distance only for metallic–semiconductor configurations and on the intrinsic properties of the constituent tubes in all other combinations. It was also observed that the calculated band gap for most of the metallic–metallic DWCNTs was smaller than semiconductor–metallic, metallic–semiconductor, and semiconductor–semiconductor configurations. Metallic–semiconductor DWCNTs were found to be desirable for band gap tuning applications because of their dependence on interwall distance, opening up the possibility of using such systems in electronic device applications, such as transistors. Other applications include the use of DWCNTs in macroscopic carbon nanotube conducting wires, for which metallic–metallic and semiconducting–metallic zigzag–zigzag DWCNTs were found to be the most desirable configurations due to their small band gaps. (paper)

  6. Modulating the physicochemical and structural properties of gold-functionalized protein nanotubes through thiol surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreño-Fuentes, Liliana; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Palomares, Laura A; Moya, Sergio E; Ramírez, Octavio T

    2014-12-16

    Biomolecules are advantageous scaffolds for the synthesis and ordering of metallic nanoparticles. Rotavirus VP6 nanotubes possess intrinsic affinity to metal ions, a property that has been exploited to synthesize gold nanoparticles over them. The resulting nanobiomaterials have unique properties useful for novel applications. However, the formed nanobiomaterials lack of colloidal stability and flocculate, limiting their functionality. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to synthesize thiol-protected gold nanoparticles over VP6 nanotubes, which resulted in soluble nanobiomaterials. With this strategy, it was possible to modulate the size, colloidal stability, and surface plasmon resonance of the synthesized nanoparticles by controlling the content of the thiolated ligands. Two types of water-soluble ligands were tested, a small linear ligand, sodium 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonate (MPS), and a bulky ligand, 5-mercaptopentyl β-D-glucopyranoside (GlcC5SH). The synthesized nanobiomaterials had a higher stability in suspension, as determined by Z-potential measurements. To the extent of our knowledge, this is the first time that a rational strategy is developed to modulate the particular properties of metal nanoparticles in situ synthesized over a protein bioscaffold through thiol coating, achieving a high spatial and structural organization of nanoparticles in a single integrative hybrid structure.

  7. Templated Synthesis of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Specific Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Wang, Xiao; Li, Meihui; Liu, Xiyan; Zhao, Xiulan; Zhang, Daqi; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Juan; Li, Yan

    2016-04-19

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown great potential in various applications attributed to their unique structure-dependent properties. Therefore, the controlled preparation of chemically and structurally pristine SWNTs is a crucial issue for their advanced applications (e.g., nanoelectronics) and has been a great challenge for two decades. Epitaxial growth from well-defined seeds has been shown to be a promising strategy to control the structure of SWNTs. Segments of carbon nanotubes, including short pipes from cutting of preformed nanotubes and caps from opening of fullerenes or cyclodehydrogenation of polycyclic hydrocarbon precursors, have been used as the seeds to grow SWNTs. Single-chirality SWNTs were obtained with both presorted chirality-pure SWNT segments and end caps obtained from polycyclic hydrocarbon molecules with designed structure. The main challenges of nanocarbon-segment-seeded processes are the stability of the seeds, yield, and efficiency. Catalyst-mediated SWNT growth is believed to be more efficient. The composition and morphology of the catalyst nanoparticles have been widely reported to affect the chirality distribution of SWNTs. However, chirality-specific SWNT growth is hard to achieve by alternating catalysts. The specificity of enzyme-catalyzed reactions brings us an awareness of the essentiality of a unique catalyst structure for the chirality-selective growth of SWNTs. Only catalysts with the desired atomic arrangements in their crystal planes can act as structural templates for chirality-specific growth of SWNTs. We have developed a new family of catalysts, tungsten-based intermetallic compounds, which have high melting points and very special crystal structures, to facilitate the growth of SWNTs with designed chirality. By the use of W6Co7 catalysts, (12,6) SWNTs were directly grown with purity higher than 92%. Both high-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements and density functional theory simulations

  8. The structural and electronic properties of monovalent sidewall functionalized double-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalili, Seifollah; Jamali, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► (6,0)-(13,0) DWCNT, built from (6,0) and (13,0) SWCNTs, is a metallic nanotubes. ► NH 2 /(6,0)-(13,0) and COOH/(6,0)-(13,0) is semimetal and semiconductor, respectively. ► In NH 2 /(6,0)-(13,0) electrons transferred mainly from inner tube to NH 2 group. - Abstract: The structural and electronic properties of (6,0)-(13,0) double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) and monovalent sidewall functionalized DWCNTs with –NH 2 and –COOH groups were studied using density functional theory. The results show that pure (6,0)-(13,0) DWCNTs are metallic. However, by functionalizing a DWCNT, local distortions are induced in the outer tube sidewall along the radial direction. The resulting structures, NH 2 /(6,0)-(13,0) and COOH/(6,0)-(13,0) DWCNTs, exhibit significant structural changes, and are semimetal with no energy gap and semiconducting with a small energy gap, respectively. In NH 2 /(6,0)-(13,0) DWCNTs, new electronic states are created and distributed on the outer wall and NH 2 group by electron transfer from the inner tube to the NH 2 group. In COOH/(6,0)-(13,0) DWCNTs, new states are created and distributed on the inner wall, but there is insignificant charge transfer between the inner tube and the COOH group. These results confirm that local atomic structural distortion on DWCNTs caused by sidewall functionalization can modify the electronic structures of DWCNTs.

  9. Microstructural investigations of zirconium oxide—on core–shell structure of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Kaushik; Kang, Dong Jin; Kim, Jin Kuk

    2011-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes and multi-walled carbon nanotubes/ZrO 2 nanocomposites were obtained by isothermal hydrolyzing and chemical precipitation method for both the carbon nanotubes. The coating was taken place by dispersion of both the carbon nanotubes in ZrOCl 2 ·8H 2 O aqueous solution. However, a highly conformal and uniform monoclinic zirconia coating was deposited on multi-walled carbon nanotubes rather than single-walled carbon nanotubes by this new and simple method. Also, it has been observed that the thickness of the individual carbon nanotube after zirconia coating was increased by isothermal hydrolyzing process rather than traditional chemical precipitation method and it has been confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study.

  10. The Synthesis of Peculiar Structure of Springlike Multiwall Carbon Nanofibers/Nanotubes via Mechanothermal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahebali Manafi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanothermal (MT method is one of the methods used for large-scale production of carbon nanotubes/nanofibers. The different peculiar morphologies of carbon allotropes are introduced with an extraordinary structure for the first time by MT method. In this paper, the influence of milling time and annealing temperature on the crystallinity and morphology of the synthesized nanopowders was investigated. Surprisingly, in this investigation, we report the synthesis of springlike multiwalled carbon nanofibers (S-MWCNFs by a two-step annealing of milled graphite in an Ar atmosphere. On the other hand, the MT method could be used for the preparation of suitable structures with applications in nanocomposite materials, which is an important task in the era of nanotechnology.

  11. STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE MATERIAL BASED ON GYPSUM BINDER AND CARBON NANOTUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHUMAK Anastasia Gennadievna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to carry out a number of studies in the area of nanomodi­fication of gypsum binder matrix and to investigate the influence of multilayer carbon nanotubes on the structure, physical and mechanical properties of obtained compos­ites. The study of the gypsum binders structure formation mechanisms with the use of nanoadditives makes it possible to control the production processes of gypsum materi­als and articles with the given set of properties. The main tasks of the binder nanomodification are: even distribution of carbon nanostructures over the whole volume of material and provision of stability for the nanodimensional modifier during production process of the construction composite.

  12. Growth mechanism and internal structure of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsson, Erik; Kadowaki, Masayuki; Ogura, Kazuaki; Okawa, Jun; Xiang, Rong; Zhang, Zhengyi; Yamamoto, Takahisa; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2008-11-01

    An in situ optical absorbance technique was used to monitor the growth of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs) at various temperatures and pressures. The effects of the growth temperature and ethanol pressure on the initial growth rate and catalyst lifetime were investigated. It was found that the ideal pressure for VA-SWNT synthesis changes with the growth temperature, shifting toward higher pressure as the growth temperature increases. It was also found that the growth reaction is first-order below this ideal pressure. Additionally, the internal structure of the VA-SWNT film was observed at different depths into the film by transmission electron microscopy. The absence of large bundles was confirmed, and little change in the structure was observed to a depth of approximately 1 microm.

  13. Hybrid Carbon Fibers/Carbon Nanotubes Structures for Next Generation Polymeric Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Al-Haik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pitch-based carbon fibers are commonly used to produce polymeric carbon fiber structural composites. Several investigations have reported different methods for dispersing and subsequently aligning carbon nanotubes (CNTs as a filler to reinforce polymer matrix. The significant difficulty in dispersing CNTs suggested the controlled-growth of CNTs on surfaces where they are needed. Here we compare between two techniques for depositing the catalyst iron used toward growing CNTs on pitch-based carbon fiber surfaces. Electrochemical deposition of iron using pulse voltametry is compared to DC magnetron iron sputtering. Carbon nanostructures growth was performed using a thermal CVD system. Characterization for comparison between both techniques was compared via SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy analysis. It is shown that while both techniques were successful to grow CNTs on the carbon fiber surfaces, iron sputtering technique was capable of producing more uniform distribution of iron catalyst and thus multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs compared to MWCNTs grown using the electrochemical deposition of iron.

  14. Strain sensitivity of carbon nanotube cement-based composites for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Antonella; Ubertini, Filippo; Laflamme, Simon; Rallini, Marco; Materazzi, Annibale L.; Kenny, Josè M.

    2016-04-01

    Cement-based smart sensors appear particularly suitable for monitoring applications, due to their self-sensing abilities, their ease of use, and their numerous possible field applications. The addition of conductive carbon nanofillers into a cementitious matrix provides the material with piezoresistive characteristics and enhanced sensitivity to mechanical alterations. The strain-sensing ability is achieved by correlating the variation of external loads or deformations with the variation of specific electrical parameters, such as the electrical resistance. Among conductive nanofillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promise for the fabrication of self-monitoring composites. However, some issues related to the filler dispersion and the mix design of cementitious nanoadded materials need to be further investigated. For instance, a small difference in the added quantity of a specific nanofiller in a cement-matrix composite can substantially change the quality of the dispersion and the strain sensitivity of the resulting material. The present research focuses on the strain sensitivity of concrete, mortar and cement paste sensors fabricated with different amounts of carbon nanotube inclusions. The aim of the work is to investigate the quality of dispersion of the CNTs in the aqueous solutions, the physical properties of the fresh mixtures, the electromechanical properties of the hardened materials, and the sensing properties of the obtained transducers. Results show that cement-based sensors with CNT inclusions, if properly implemented, can be favorably applied to structural health monitoring.

  15. A novel structure for carbon nanotube reinforced alumina composites with improved mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, G; Omori, M; Hashida, T; Kimura, H

    2008-01-01

    Engineering ceramics have high stiffness, excellent thermostability, and relatively low density, but their brittleness impedes their use as structural materials. Incorporating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into a brittle ceramic might be expected to provide CNT/ceramic composites with both high toughness and high temperature stability. Until now, however, materials fabrication difficulties have limited research on CNT/ceramic composites. The mechanical failure of CNT/ceramic composites reported previously is primarily attributed to poor CNT-matrix connectivity and severe phase segregation. Here we show that a novel processing approach based on the precursor method can diminish the phase segregation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and render MWCNT/alumina composites highly homogeneous. The MWCNTs used in this study are modified with an acid treatment. Combined with a mechanical interlock induced by the chemically modified MWCNTs, this approach leads to improved mechanical properties. Mechanical measurements reveal that only 0.9 vol% acid-treated MWCNT addition results in 27% and 25% simultaneous increases in bending strength (689.6 ± 29.1 MPa) and fracture toughness (5.90 ± 0.27 MPa m 1/2 ), respectively

  16. Structural, electronic properties, and quantum capacitance of B, N and P-doped armchair carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi-Khoshdel, S. Morteza, E-mail: mmousavi@iust.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jahanbakhsh-bonab, Parisa [Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Targholi, Ehsan [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Abhar Branch, Islamic Azad University, Abhar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-07

    Using DFT calculations, we study the structural parameters, electronic properties and quantum capacitance of N, B, and P-doped armchair carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Fermi level shifts towards conduction band and valence band in N- and B-doped CNTs, respectively. While in the case of P atom, despite having an extra valence electron than carbon, there is no shift in Fermi level. The results revealed from a symmetric capacitance enhancement in P-doped CNT and an asymmetric capacitance enhancement in B and N-doped CNTs. The greatest amount of quantum capacitance of N-doped (6, 6) CNT could be achieved at the concentration range of 0.1–0.15. - Highlights: • Exploration of variation in quantum capacitance of CNTs through doping N, B and P atoms. • Quantum capacitance of CNTs is sensitive to impurities entered in carbon nanotubes. • Maximum quantum capacitance of N-doped CNTs is achieved at the concentration range of 0.1–0.15.

  17. Structure and Properties of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes/Polystyrene Composites Prepared via Coagulation Precipitation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Mazov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coagulation technique was applied for preparation of multiwall carbon nanotube- (MWNT-containing polystyrene (PSt composite materials with different MWNT loading (0.5–10 wt.%. Scanning and transmission electron microscopies were used for investigation of the morphology and structure of produced composites. It was shown that synthesis of MWNT/PSt composites using coagulation technique allows one to obtain high dispersion degree of MWNT in the polymer matrix. According to microscopy data, composite powder consists of the polystyrene matrix forming spherical particles with diameter ca. 100–200 nm, and the surface of MWNT is strongly wetted by the polymer forming thin layer with 5–10 nm thickness. Electrical conductivity of MWNT/PSt composites was investigated using a four-probe technique. Observed electrical percolation threshold of composite materials is near to 10 wt.%, mainly due to the insulating polymer layer deposited on the surface of nanotubes. Electromagnetic response of prepared materials was investigated in broadband region (0.01–4 and 26–36 GHz. It was found that MWNT/PSt composites are almost radiotransparent for low frequency region and possess high absorbance of EM radiation at higher frequencies.

  18. Structural dependence of the multi-functionalized carbon nanotubes to the substituents on the grafted diazo compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Rahebeh; Rasouli, Sousan; Ghasemi, Alireza; Eghbali, Babak; Mohammadi, Soutodeh

    2014-05-01

    Systematic studies on the covalent functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes were performed by a series of azo molecules with different substituents. For this investigation, 4-substituted diazonium reagents have been used in the reaction with the functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. We analyzed the effect of the substituted groups on the diazo component affinity in the grafting. Also, the structural differences of the final products were evaluated by visual dispersion test, UV-Vis absorption. Fourier transforms infrared, Raman, and several complementary techniques (scanning electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, and colorimetry test). Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to confirm the allylic protons attached to the surface of carbon nanotubes after functionalization.

  19. Altering F-Actin Structure of C17.2 Cells using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magers, Jay; Gillette, Nathan L. D.; Rotkin, Slava V.; Jedlicka, Sabrina; Pirbhai, Massooma; Lehigh Univesity Collaboration; Susquehanna University Collaboration

    Advancements in nanotechnology have become fundamental to the delivery of drugs to treat various diseases. One such advancement is that of carbon nanotubes and their possible implications on drug delivery. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have great potential in the biomedical field as a means to deliver materials such as drugs and genes into the human body due to their size and chemistry. However, the effects of the nanotubes on cells they interact with are still unknown. Previous studies have shown that a low dosage of SWCNTs can affect differentiation of C17.2 neural stem cells. In this experiment, we investigate how the tubes affect the structure of the cells. Specifically, we determined the impact on the cell by examining the actin filament length, protrusions along the edge of the cells, and actin distribution. Presenter/Author 1.

  20. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zobelli, A

    2007-10-15

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  1. Carbon nanotube embedded PVDF membranes: Effect of solvent composition on the structural morphology for membrane distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapunda, Edgar C.; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Msagati, Titus A. M.

    2017-08-01

    Rapid population increase, growth in industrial and agricultural sectors and global climate change have added significant pressure on conventional freshwater resources. Tapping freshwater from non-conventional water sources such as desalination and wastewater recycling is considered as sustainable alternative to the fundamental challenges of water scarcity. However, affordable and sustainable technologies need to be applied for the communities to benefit from the treatment of non-conventional water source. Membrane distillation is a potential desalination technology which can be used sustainably for this purpose. In this work multi-walled carbon nanotube embedded polyvinylidene fluoride membranes for application in membrane distillation desalination were prepared via non-solvent induced phase separation method. The casting solution was prepared using mixed solvents (N, N-dimethylacetamide and triethyl phosphate) at varying ratios to study the effect of solvent composition on membrane morphological structures. Membrane morphological features were studied using a number of techniques including scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, SAXSpace tensile strength analysis, membrane thickness, porosity and contact angle measurements. It was revealed that membrane hydrophobicity, thickness, tensile strength and surface roughness were increasing as the composition of N, N-dimethylacetamide in the solvent was increasing with maximum values obtained between 40 and 60% N, N-dimethylacetamide. Internal morphological structures were changing from cellular structures to short finger-like and sponge-like pores and finally to large macro void type of pores when the amount of N, N-dimethylacetamide in the solvent was changed from low to high respectively. Multi-walled carbon nanotube embedded polyvinylidene fluoride membranes of desired morphological structures and physical properties can be synthesized by regulating the composition of solvents used to prepare the

  2. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zobelli, A.

    2007-10-01

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  3. Conducting polymers, buckminsterfullerenes, and carbon nanotubes: optoelectronic materials based on architectural diversity of the π-conjugated structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, L.

    2001-01-01

    Recent discovery of superconductivity in self assembled poly(3-hexylthiophene) two-dimensional conjugated sheets indicates the possible applications of plastics even in superconducting optoelectronic devices. Just as the discovery of C 60 has created an entirely new branch of carbon chemistry, the subsequent discovery of carbon nanotubes by lijima in 1991 opened up a new era in material science and nanotechnology. These elongated nanotubes consist of carbon hexagons arranged in a concentric manner with both ends normally capped by fullerene-like structures containing pentagons. Having a conjugated all-carbon structure with unusual molecular symmetries, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes also show interesting electronic, photonic, magnetic and mechanical properties, attractive for various applications, including optical limiters, photovoltaic cells and field emitting displays. For most of the above applications, it is highly desirable to prepare ordered/micropatterned conducting polymers, fullerenes, and carbon nanotubes. Although the microfabrication of conducting polymers has been an active research area for some years, it is a very recent development for fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. Recently, we doped polyaniline (PANI) with a hydrogensulfated fullerenol derivative containing multiple -OSO 3 H groups (i.e. C 60 (OH) 6 (OSO 3 H) 6 ) to produce three-dimensional PANI conductors with a room-temperature conductivity of up to 100 S cm -1 . This value of conductivity is about six orders of magnitude higher than the typical value for C 60 doped conducting polymers. Later, in collaboration with Wan's group at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, we have also synthesized PANI nanotubes via a self assembled C 60 (OH) 6 (OSO 3 H) 6 supramolecular template using (NH 4 ) 2 S 2 O 8 as an oxidant. These results, together with the more recent discovery of a hollow sphere, self assembled by the potassium salt of pentaphenyl fullerene (Ph 5 C 60 K) in water, clearly indicate that

  4. Effect of diameter and chirality on the structure and electronic properties of BC2N nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhavan, Mojdeh; Jalili, Seifollah; Schofield, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • BC 2 N nanotubes with different diameters and four chirality types are studied. • Two lowest-diameter zigzag BC 2 N tubes are metallic and others are semiconducting. • Band gap of zigzag tubes is more sensitive to diameter compared to armchair tubes. • Even–odd oscillation is observed for the band gap of one kind of zigzag tubes. • The energy and band gap for large-diameter tubes converge to BC 2 N sheet values. - Abstract: Density functional theory calculations are used to investigate a series of BC 2 N nanotubes with a wide range of diameters. Two types of zigzag and two types of armchair nanotubes are studied to survey the effect of diameter and chirality on energetics and electronic properties of nanotubes. Two nanotubes are found to be metallic and others show semiconducting behavior. The diameter is shown to have a greater impact on the band gap of zigzag nanotubes than those of armchair tubes. (n, 0) zigzag nanotubes show an even–odd band gap oscillation, which can be explained by the electron density distribution of the lowest unoccupied crystalline orbital. The stability of the nanotubes is also assessed using strain energies and it is shown that the strain energy does not depend on nanotube type and chirality. In the limit of large diameters, the geometry and band gap of all nanotubes converge to BC 2 N sheet data

  5. Effect of halloysite nanotubes on the structure and function of important multiple blood components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Keke; Feng, Ru; Jiao, Yanpeng; Zhou, Changren

    2017-01-01

    Many researchers have investigated the application of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) in biomedicine, because of their special nanoscale hollow tubular structure. Although the cytocompatibility of HNTs has been studied, their blood compatibility has not been systematically investigated. In this work, the effect of HNTs on the structure and function of different blood components has been studied, including the morphology and hemolysis of red blood cells (RBCs). Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, optical density test and flow cytometry analysis, we found that HNTs can affect the morphology and membrane integrity of RBCs in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) in a content-dependent way. In particular, based on UV–vis absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and circular dichroism (CD) spectra, HNTs can alter the secondary structure and conformation of human fibrinogen and γ-globulins. In addition, the detection of biomarker molecules C3a and C5a in plasma suggests that HNTs can trigger complement activation. In the blood clotting assay, HNTs were found to significantly prolong the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), shorten the prothrombin time (PT) of platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and change the thromboelastography (TEG) parameters of whole blood coagulation. Furthermore, confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry analysis were used to test intracellular uptake by macrophages, and the cellular uptake of HNTs in the RAW 264.7 was found to be content-dependent, but not time-dependent. These findings provide insight for the potential use of HNTs as biofriendly nanocontainers for biomaterials in vivo. - Highlights: • Comprehensive study of blood compatibility halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) is processed. • We examine and analyze the effect of HNTs on conformation changes of three plasma proteins. • We prove HNTs can affect blood components at high content but little at low content. • We prove HNTs could be used as biomaterials

  6. Influence of Carbon Nanotubes on the Structure Formation of Cement Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrunin, S.; Vaganov, V.; Reshetniak, V.; Zakrevskaya, L.

    2015-11-01

    The potential of application of CNTs as a reinforcing agent in cement composites is governed by their unique mechanical and electronic properties. The analysis of concrete strength changes under CNTs introduction shows non-uniformity and sometimes inconsistency of results. Due to the fact that CNTs influence the hydration kinetics, structure and phase composition of concrete, an idea concerning the importance of interaction between the surface of CNTs and hydrate ions formed by the dissolution of the clinker phases has been suggested. In this paper, the theoretical and experimental study of interaction between hydrate ions and CNTs surface is discussed. Reference nanotubes and nanotubes functionalized by carboxylic groups are used in this research. Phase composition was determined by X-Ray analysis according to the Rietveld method. It was found that the presence of oxygen-containing functional groups on CNTs surface leads to intensification of the hydration process and increase in concentration of C-S-H gel from 65.9% to 74.4%. Special attention is usually paid to interactions between Ca2+ ions and CNTs, because the hardening rate and structure of cement stone are determined by principle of Ca2+ localization in the solution. In this paper the possible binding mechanisms are discussed. Based on the experimental results, the hypothesis regarding the formation of cement composite structure for different CNTs surface functionalizations is considered. According to this hypothesis, the CNTs act as the centers of crystallization for hydration products contributing to the acceleration of hydration, increase of the concentration of C-S-H gel and strength improvement of CNTs based composites.

  7. Effect of halloysite nanotubes on the structure and function of important multiple blood components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Keke; Feng, Ru; Jiao, Yanpeng, E-mail: tjiaoyp@jnu.edu.cn; Zhou, Changren

    2017-06-01

    Many researchers have investigated the application of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) in biomedicine, because of their special nanoscale hollow tubular structure. Although the cytocompatibility of HNTs has been studied, their blood compatibility has not been systematically investigated. In this work, the effect of HNTs on the structure and function of different blood components has been studied, including the morphology and hemolysis of red blood cells (RBCs). Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, optical density test and flow cytometry analysis, we found that HNTs can affect the morphology and membrane integrity of RBCs in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) in a content-dependent way. In particular, based on UV–vis absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and circular dichroism (CD) spectra, HNTs can alter the secondary structure and conformation of human fibrinogen and γ-globulins. In addition, the detection of biomarker molecules C3a and C5a in plasma suggests that HNTs can trigger complement activation. In the blood clotting assay, HNTs were found to significantly prolong the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), shorten the prothrombin time (PT) of platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and change the thromboelastography (TEG) parameters of whole blood coagulation. Furthermore, confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry analysis were used to test intracellular uptake by macrophages, and the cellular uptake of HNTs in the RAW 264.7 was found to be content-dependent, but not time-dependent. These findings provide insight for the potential use of HNTs as biofriendly nanocontainers for biomaterials in vivo. - Highlights: • Comprehensive study of blood compatibility halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) is processed. • We examine and analyze the effect of HNTs on conformation changes of three plasma proteins. • We prove HNTs can affect blood components at high content but little at low content. • We prove HNTs could be used as biomaterials

  8. Influence of Carbon Nanotubes on the Structure Formation of Cement Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrunin, S; Vaganov, V; Reshetniak, V; Zakrevskaya, L

    2015-01-01

    The potential of application of CNTs as a reinforcing agent in cement composites is governed by their unique mechanical and electronic properties. The analysis of concrete strength changes under CNTs introduction shows non-uniformity and sometimes inconsistency of results. Due to the fact that CNTs influence the hydration kinetics, structure and phase composition of concrete, an idea concerning the importance of interaction between the surface of CNTs and hydrate ions formed by the dissolution of the clinker phases has been suggested. In this paper, the theoretical and experimental study of interaction between hydrate ions and CNTs surface is discussed. Reference nanotubes and nanotubes functionalized by carboxylic groups are used in this research. Phase composition was determined by X-Ray analysis according to the Rietveld method. It was found that the presence of oxygen-containing functional groups on CNTs surface leads to intensification of the hydration process and increase in concentration of C-S-H gel from 65.9% to 74.4%. Special attention is usually paid to interactions between Ca 2+ ions and CNTs, because the hardening rate and structure of cement stone are determined by principle of Ca 2+ localization in the solution. In this paper the possible binding mechanisms are discussed. Based on the experimental results, the hypothesis regarding the formation of cement composite structure for different CNTs surface functionalizations is considered. According to this hypothesis, the CNTs act as the centers of crystallization for hydration products contributing to the acceleration of hydration, increase of the concentration of C-S-H gel and strength improvement of CNTs based composites. (paper)

  9. Effect of laser radiation on multi-wall carbon nanotubes: study of shell structure and immobilization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyoergy, Enikoe, E-mail: egyorgy@icmab.es; Perez del Pino, Angel [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (ICMAB-CSIC) (Spain); Roqueta, Jaume; Ballesteros, Belen [Centro de Investigaciones en Nanociencia y Nanotecnologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CIN2-CSIC) (Spain); Cabana, Laura; Tobias, Gerard [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (ICMAB-CSIC) (Spain)

    2013-08-15

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with diameters between 10 and 15 nm were transferred and immobilized onto SiO{sub 2} glass substrates by ultraviolet matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (UV-MAPLE). Toluene was chosen as solvent material for the preparation of the composite MAPLE targets. An UV KrF* ({lambda} = 248 nm, {tau}{sub FWHM} {approx_equal} 25 ns, {nu} = 10 Hz) excimer laser source was used for the irradiation experiments. The effects of incident laser fluence on the structure of the laser transferred MWCNTs was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The surface morphology of the laser processed MWCNTs was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy in acoustic (dynamic) configuration. Network-like structures constituted by individual nanotubes and nanotube bundles were created onto solid substrates. Changes in the nanotubes' shell structure can be induced through the tuning of the laser fluence value incident onto the composite MAPLE targets.

  10. Multistep structural transition of hydrogen trititanate nanotubes into TiO2-B nanotubes: a comparison study between nanostructured and bulk materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgado, Edisson Jr; Jardim, P M; Marinkovic, Bojan A; Rizzo, Fernando C; Abreu, Marco A S de; Zotin, Jose L; Araujo, Antonio S

    2007-01-01

    H-trititanate nanotubes obtained by alkali hydrothermal treatment of TiO 2 followed by proton exchange were compared to their bulk H 2 Ti 3 O 7 counterpart with respect to their thermally induced structural transformation paths. As-synthesized and heat-treated samples were characterized by XRD, TEM/SAED, DSC and spectroscopy techniques, indicating that H 2 Ti 3 O 7 nanotubes showed the same sequence of structural transformations as their bulk counterpart obtained by conventional solid state reaction. Nanostructured H 2 Ti 3 O 7 converts into TiO 2 (B) via multistep transformation without losing its nanotubular morphology. The transformation occurs between 120 and 400 deg. C through topotactic mechanisms with the intermediate formation of nanostructured H 2 Ti 6 O 13 and H 2 Ti 12 O 25 , which are more condensed layered titanates eventually rearranging to TiO 2 (B). Our results suggest that the intermediate tunnel structure H 2 Ti 12 O 25 is the final layered intermediate phase, on which TiO 2 (B) nucleates and grows. The conversion of nanostructured TiO 2 (B) into anatase is completed at a much lower temperature than its bulk counterpart and is accompanied by loss of the nanotubular morphology

  11. Multistep structural transition of hydrogen trititanate nanotubes into TiO2-B nanotubes: a comparison study between nanostructured and bulk materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Edisson; Jardim, P M; Marinkovic, Bojan A; Rizzo, Fernando C; de Abreu, Marco A S; Zotin, José L; Araújo, Antonio S

    2007-12-12

    H-trititanate nanotubes obtained by alkali hydrothermal treatment of TiO(2) followed by proton exchange were compared to their bulk H(2)Ti(3)O(7) counterpart with respect to their thermally induced structural transformation paths. As-synthesized and heat-treated samples were characterized by XRD, TEM/SAED, DSC and spectroscopy techniques, indicating that H(2)Ti(3)O(7) nanotubes showed the same sequence of structural transformations as their bulk counterpart obtained by conventional solid state reaction. Nanostructured H(2)Ti(3)O(7) converts into TiO(2)(B) via multistep transformation without losing its nanotubular morphology. The transformation occurs between 120 and 400 degrees C through topotactic mechanisms with the intermediate formation of nanostructured H(2)Ti(6)O(13) and H(2)Ti(12)O(25), which are more condensed layered titanates eventually rearranging to TiO(2)(B). Our results suggest that the intermediate tunnel structure H(2)Ti(12)O(25) is the final layered intermediate phase, on which TiO(2)(B) nucleates and grows. The conversion of nanostructured TiO(2)(B) into anatase is completed at a much lower temperature than its bulk counterpart and is accompanied by loss of the nanotubular morphology.

  12. Multistep structural transition of hydrogen trititanate nanotubes into TiO2-B nanotubes: a comparison study between nanostructured and bulk materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Edisson, Jr.; Jardim, P. M.; Marinkovic, Bojan A.; Rizzo, Fernando C.; de Abreu, Marco A. S.; Zotin, José L.; Araújo, Antonio S.

    2007-12-01

    H-trititanate nanotubes obtained by alkali hydrothermal treatment of TiO2 followed by proton exchange were compared to their bulk H2Ti3O7 counterpart with respect to their thermally induced structural transformation paths. As-synthesized and heat-treated samples were characterized by XRD, TEM/SAED, DSC and spectroscopy techniques, indicating that H2Ti3O7 nanotubes showed the same sequence of structural transformations as their bulk counterpart obtained by conventional solid state reaction. Nanostructured H2Ti3O7 converts into TiO2(B) via multistep transformation without losing its nanotubular morphology. The transformation occurs between 120 and 400 °C through topotactic mechanisms with the intermediate formation of nanostructured H2Ti6O13 and H2Ti12O25, which are more condensed layered titanates eventually rearranging to TiO2(B). Our results suggest that the intermediate tunnel structure H2Ti12O25 is the final layered intermediate phase, on which TiO2(B) nucleates and grows. The conversion of nanostructured TiO2(B) into anatase is completed at a much lower temperature than its bulk counterpart and is accompanied by loss of the nanotubular morphology.

  13. Multistep structural transition of hydrogen trititanate nanotubes into TiO{sub 2}-B nanotubes: a comparison study between nanostructured and bulk materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgado, Edisson Jr [PETROBRAS S.A./CENPES, Research and Development Centre, Avenida Horacio Macedo, 950, Cidade Universitaria, Quadra 7, 21941-598 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Jardim, P M [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Pontifical Catholic University, CP 38008, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Marinkovic, Bojan A [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Pontifical Catholic University, CP 38008, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Rizzo, Fernando C [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Pontifical Catholic University, CP 38008, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Abreu, Marco A S de [PETROBRAS S.A./CENPES, Research and Development Centre, Avenida Horacio Macedo, 950, Cidade Universitaria, Quadra 7, 21941-598 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Zotin, Jose L [PETROBRAS S.A./CENPES, Research and Development Centre, Avenida Horacio Macedo, 950, Cidade Universitaria, Quadra 7, 21941-598 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Araujo, Antonio S [Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, CP 1662, 59078-970 Natal-RN (Brazil)

    2007-12-12

    H-trititanate nanotubes obtained by alkali hydrothermal treatment of TiO{sub 2} followed by proton exchange were compared to their bulk H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} counterpart with respect to their thermally induced structural transformation paths. As-synthesized and heat-treated samples were characterized by XRD, TEM/SAED, DSC and spectroscopy techniques, indicating that H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} nanotubes showed the same sequence of structural transformations as their bulk counterpart obtained by conventional solid state reaction. Nanostructured H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} converts into TiO{sub 2}(B) via multistep transformation without losing its nanotubular morphology. The transformation occurs between 120 and 400 deg. C through topotactic mechanisms with the intermediate formation of nanostructured H{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13} and H{sub 2}Ti{sub 12}O{sub 25}, which are more condensed layered titanates eventually rearranging to TiO{sub 2}(B). Our results suggest that the intermediate tunnel structure H{sub 2}Ti{sub 12}O{sub 25} is the final layered intermediate phase, on which TiO{sub 2}(B) nucleates and grows. The conversion of nanostructured TiO{sub 2}(B) into anatase is completed at a much lower temperature than its bulk counterpart and is accompanied by loss of the nanotubular morphology.

  14. Nanotube cathodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  15. Nanotube cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  16. Real time sensing of structural glass fiber reinforced composites by using embedded PVA - carbon nanotube fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marioli-Riga Z.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl alcohol - carbon nanotube (PVA-CNT fibers had been embedded to glass fiber reinforced polymers (GFRP for the structural health monitoring of the composite material. The addition of the conductive PVA-CNT fiber to the nonconductive GFRP material aimed to enhance its sensing ability by means of the electrical resistance measurement method. The test specimen’s response to mechanical load and the in situ PVA-CNT fiber’s electrical resistance measurements were correlated for sensing and damage monitoring purposes. The embedded PVA-CNT fiber worked as a sensor in GFRP coupons in tensile loadings. Sensing ability of the PVA-CNT fibers was also demonstrated on an integral composite structure. PVA-CNT fiber near the fracture area of the structure recorded very high values when essential damage occurred to the structure. A finite element model of the same structure was developed to predict axial strains at locations of the integral composite structure where the fibers were embedded. The predicted FEA strains were correlated with the experimental measurements from the PVA-CNT fibers. Calculated and experimental values were in good agreement, thus enabling PVA-CNT fibers to be used as strain sensors.

  17. First-principles study of electronic structure of deformed carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuchika Iwami, Hidekazu Goto, Kikuji Hirose and Tomoya Ono

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of density functional theory, we study the electronic structures of five types of carbon nanotubes: the non-deformed (6,6 tube, the uniformly stretched tube along the tube axis, the uniformly compressed tube, the partially stretched tube and the partially compressed tube. The electron charge density increases at the compressed C–C bond of the partially stretched tube, while the density decreases at the stretched C–C bond of the partially stretched tube. In addition, the a1 and e1 states of the (6,6 tube contribute to the bonding along the tube axis and the a2 and e2 states are the bonds connecting the atoms in the same layers. Thus, the energy bands of the a1 and e1 states are sensitively affected by the deformation of the tubes along the tube axis.

  18. Chemical/structural characterization of carbon nanoparticles produced by laser pyrolysis and used for nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlanducci, S.; Valentini, F.; Piccirillo, S.; Terranova, M.L.; Botti, S.; Ciardi, R.; Rossi, M.; Palleschi, G.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanoparticles produced by CO 2 laser pyrolysis have been investigated using morphological and structural probes such as high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electron diffraction, as well as chemical probes, such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry. The produced particles resulted to have a spherical shape and a diameter of about 50 nm with graphitic domains of the order of 80 A. They contain appreciable fractions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which can be extracted with toluene, as well as fullerene units. The implications of these results for the use of carbon nanopowders in the carbon nanotube synthesis are also discussed

  19. The importance of carbon nanotube wire density, structural uniformity, and purity for fabricating homogeneous carbon nanotube-copper wire composites by copper electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Rajyashree; Yamada, Takeo; Hata, Kenji; Sekiguchi, Atsuko

    2018-04-01

    We present the influence of density, structural regularity, and purity of carbon nanotube wires (CNTWs) used as Cu electrodeposition templates on fabricating homogeneous high-electrical performance CNT-Cu wires lighter than Cu. We show that low-density CNTWs (wires) with regular macro- and microstructures and high CNT content (>90 wt %) are essential for making homogeneous CNT-Cu wires. These homogeneous CNT-Cu wires show a continuous Cu matrix with evenly mixed nanotubes of high volume fractions (˜45 vol %) throughout the wire-length. Consequently, the composite wires show densities ˜5.1 g/cm3 (33% lower than Cu) and electrical conductivities ˜6.1 × 104 S/cm (>100 × CNTW conductivity). However, composite wires from templates with higher densities or structural inconsistencies are non-uniform with discontinuous Cu matrices and poor CNT/Cu mixing. These non-uniform CNT-Cu wires show conductivities 2-6 times lower than the homogeneous composite wires.

  20. Comparison of structural health assessment capabilities in epoxy – carbon black and epoxy – carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    F. Inam; B. R. Bhat; N. Luhyna; T. Vo

    2014-01-01

    A novel method for comparing structural health of different types of brittle epoxy nanocomposites filled with carbon nanostructured fillers is presented. Epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon black (CB) and epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposite bars were prepared by calendering and thermal curing. Nanocomposite bars were subjected to Vickers diamond indentation to produce sub-surface damage. Electrical conductivities were analysed by 4-point method to estimate the structural damage caused by...

  1. Understanding the doping effects on the structural and electrical properties of ultrathin carbon nanotube networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Ying; Shimada, Satoru; Azumi, Reiko; Saito, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Similar to other semiconductor technology, doping of carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film is of great significance for performance improvement or modification. However, it still remains a challenge to seek a stable and effective dopant. In this paper, we unitize several spectroscopic techniques and electrical characterizations under various conditions to investigate the effects of typical dopants and related methods. Nitric acid (HNO 3 ) solution, I 2 vapor, and CuI nanoparticles are used to modify a series of ultrathin CNT networks. Although efficient charge transfer is achieved initially after doping, HNO 3 is not applicable because it suffers from severe reliability problems in structural and electrical properties, and it also causes a number of undesired structural defects. I 2 vapor doping at 150 °C can form some stable C-I bonding structures, resulting in relatively more stable but less efficient electrical performances. CuI nanoparticles seem to be an ideal dopant. Photonic curing enables the manipulation of CuI, which not only results in the construction of novel CNT-CuI hybrid structures but also encourages the deepest level of charge transfer doping. The excellent reliability as well as processing feasibility identify the bright perspective of CNT-CuI hybrid film for practical applications

  2. Understanding the doping effects on the structural and electrical properties of ultrathin carbon nanotube networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ying, E-mail: y-shuu@aist.go.jp; Shimada, Satoru; Azumi, Reiko [Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, 305-8565 Tsukuba (Japan); Saito, Takeshi [Nanomaterials Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, 305-8565 Tsukuba (Japan)

    2015-12-07

    Similar to other semiconductor technology, doping of carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film is of great significance for performance improvement or modification. However, it still remains a challenge to seek a stable and effective dopant. In this paper, we unitize several spectroscopic techniques and electrical characterizations under various conditions to investigate the effects of typical dopants and related methods. Nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) solution, I{sub 2} vapor, and CuI nanoparticles are used to modify a series of ultrathin CNT networks. Although efficient charge transfer is achieved initially after doping, HNO{sub 3} is not applicable because it suffers from severe reliability problems in structural and electrical properties, and it also causes a number of undesired structural defects. I{sub 2} vapor doping at 150 °C can form some stable C-I bonding structures, resulting in relatively more stable but less efficient electrical performances. CuI nanoparticles seem to be an ideal dopant. Photonic curing enables the manipulation of CuI, which not only results in the construction of novel CNT-CuI hybrid structures but also encourages the deepest level of charge transfer doping. The excellent reliability as well as processing feasibility identify the bright perspective of CNT-CuI hybrid film for practical applications.

  3. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part I: Micro-structural characterization and geometric modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei

    2014-01-01

    A computational strategy to predict the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites is proposed in this two-part paper. In Part I, the micro-structural characteristics of these nano-composites are discerned. These characteristics include networks/agglomerations of carbon nanotubes and thick polymer interphase regions between the nanotubes and the surrounding matrix. An algorithm is presented to construct three-dimensional geometric models with large amounts of randomly dispersed and aggregated nanotubes. The effects of the distribution of the nanotubes and the thickness of the interphase regions on the concentration of the interphase regions are demonstrated with numerical results. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Temperature dependent evolution of the local electronic structure of atmospheric plasma treated carbon nanotubes: Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S. S.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Okpalugo, T. I. T.; Murphy, H.

    2006-01-01

    Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy has been employed to obtain the temperature dependent evolution of the electronic structure of acid treated carbon nanotubes, which were further modified by dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing in an ammonia atmosphere. The NEXAFS studies were performed from room temperature up to 900 deg. C. The presence of oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups was observed in C K edge, N K edge, and O K edge NEXAFS spectra of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The N K edge spectra revealed three types of π* features, the source of which was decisively identified by their temperature dependent evolution. It was established that these features are attributed to pyridinelike, NO, and graphitelike structures, respectively. The O K edge indicated that both carbonyl (C=O), π*(CO), and ether C-O-C, σ*(CO), functionalities were present. Upon heating in a vacuum to 900 deg. C the π*(CO) resonances disappeared while the σ*(CO) resonances were still present confirming their higher thermal stability. Heating did not produce a significant change in the π* feature of the C K edge spectrum indicating that the tabular structure of the nanotubes is essentially preserved following the thermal decomposition of the functional groups on the nanotube surface

  5. The electronic structure and ferromagnetism of TM (TM=V, Cr, and Mn)-doped BN(5, 5) nanotube: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, K.H.; Zheng, G.; Chen, G.; Wan, M.; Ji, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    We study the electronic structure and ferromagnetism of V-, Cr-, and Mn-doped single-wall BN(5, 5) nanotube by using polarized spin calculations within first principles. The optimized structures show that the transition-metal atoms move outwards and the calculated electronic properties demonstrate that the isolated V-, Cr-, and Mn-doped BN(5, 5) nanotubes show half-metallicity. The total ferromagnetic moments are 2μ B , 3.02μ B , and 3.98μ B for V-, Cr-, and Mn-doped BN(5, 5), respectively. The study suggests that such transition-metal (TM)-doped nanotubes may be useful in spintronics and nanomagnets

  6. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part I: Micro-structural characterization and geometric modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei; Azdoud, Yan; Lubineau, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    A computational strategy to predict the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites is proposed in this two-part paper. In Part I, the micro-structural characteristics of these nano-composites are discerned

  7. NMR study of local diamagnetic properties of carbon structures with multiwalled nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, E.G.; Omel'yanovsky, O.E.; Prudkovsky, V.S.; Sadakov, A.V.; Tsebro, V.I.

    2009-01-01

    The reasons for the high diamagnetic susceptibility of carbon columns, which are covered with a nanotube mesh, from the interior part of cathode deposits have been studied by means of NMR. A comparative study is made of the 13 C NMR spectra and the magnetic susceptibility of carbon columns before and after ultrasonic processing as well as of finely dispersed material, obtained as a result of such processing, enriched with multilayer nanotubes. The strong diamagnetism of the carbon columns is apparently associated with a quite dense conglomerate of graphite particles, nanotubes, and multilayer polyhedral particles present in their core and not with the surface mesh of multilayer nanotubes. To make a more accurate determination of the character of the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of multilayer carbon nanotubes, the form of the 13 C NMR spectra of samples enriched with multilayer nanotubes, where the nanotubes are either not oriented or only partially oriented, is analyzed. It is shown that the diamagnetic susceptibility of multilayer carbon nanotubes is highest when the magnetic field is oriented perpendicular to their axis

  8. Novel bamboo structured TiO2 nanotubes for energy storage/production applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, J. J.; Beh, K. P.; Cheong, Y. L.; Yusuf, W. A. A.; Yam, F. K.

    2018-04-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 received much attention owing to its high surface-to-volume ratio, which can be advantageous in energy storage and production applications. However, the increase in energy consumption at present and possibly the foreseeable future has demanded energy storage and production devices of even higher performance. A direct approach would be manipulating the physical aspects of TiO2 nanostructures, particularly, nanotubes. In this work, dual voltage anodization system has been implemented to fabricate bamboo shaped TiO2 nanotubes, which offers even greater surface area. This unique nanostructure would be used in Dye Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) fabrication and its performance will be evaluated and compared along other forms of TiO2 nanotubes. The results showed that bamboo shaped nanotubes indeed are superior morphologically, with an increase of efficiency of 107% at 1.130% efficiency when compared to smooth walled nanotubes at 0.546% efficiency.

  9. Multi-walled carbon nanotube structural instability with/without metal nanoparticles under electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imran; Huang, Shengli; Wu, Chenxu

    2017-12-01

    The structural transformation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) under electron beam (e-beam) irradiation at room temperature is studied, with respect to a novel passivation effect due to gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). MWCNT structural evolution induced by energetic e-beam irradiation leads to faster shrinkage, as revealed via in situ transmission electron microscopy, while MWCNT surface modification with Au NPs (Au-MWCNT) slows down the shrinkage by impeding the structural evolution process for a prolonged time under the same irradiation conditions. The new relationship between MWCNT and Au-MWCNT shrinking radii and irradiation time illustrates that the MWCNT shrinkage rate is faster than either theoretical predictions or the same process in Au-MWCNTs. As compared with the outer surface energy (positive curvature), the inner surface energy (negative curvature) of the MWCNT contributes more to the athermal evaporation of tube wall atoms, leading to structural instability and shrinkage under e-beam irradiation. Conversely, Au NPs possess only outer surface energy (positive curvature) compared with the MWCNT. Their presence on MWCNT surfaces retards the dynamics of MWCNT structural evolution by slowing down the evaporation process of carbon atoms, thus restricting Au-MWCNT shrinkage. Au NP interaction and growth evolves athermally on MWCNT surfaces, exhibits increase in their size, and indicates the association of this mechanism with the coalescence induced by e-beam activated electronic excitations. Despite their growth, Au NPs show extreme structural stability, and remain crystalline under prolonged irradiation. It is proposed that the surface energy of MWCNTs and Au NPs, together with e-beam activated soft modes or lattice instability effects, predominantly govern all the above varieties of structural evolution.

  10. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/diamond double-layered structure for improved field electron emission stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L., E-mail: qiaoqin.yang@mail.usask.ca; Yang, Q.; Zhang, C.; Li, Y.S.

    2013-12-31

    A double-layered nanostructure consisting of a layer of vertically aligned Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and a layer of diamond beneath has been synthesized on silicon substrate by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition. The synthesis was achieved by first depositing a layer of diamond on silicon and then depositing a top layer of vertically aligned CNTs by applying a negative bias on the substrate holder. The growth of CNTs was catalyzed by a thin layer of spin-coated iron nitride. The surface morphology and structure of the CNTs/diamond double-layered structure were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscope, Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrum, and Raman Spectroscopy. Their field electron emission (FEE) properties were measured by KEITHLEY 237 high voltage measurement unit, showing much higher FEE current stability than single layered CNTs. - Highlights: • A new double-layered nanostructure consisting of a layer of vertically aligned CNTs and a layer of diamond beneath has been synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. • This double-layered structure exhibits superior field electron emission stability. • The improvement of emission stability is due to the combination of the unique properties of diamond and CNTs.

  11. Fabrication, morphological, structural and magnetic properties of electrodeposited Fe{sub 3}Pt nanowires and nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, U. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Adeela, N. [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Li, Wenjing; Irfan, M.; Javed, K.; Riaz, S. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Han, X.F., E-mail: xfhan@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Highly ordered Fe{sub 3}Pt nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) embedded in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template have been fabricated by dc electrodeposition method. Response of heat treatment on structural and magnetic properties of the samples has been studied with and without the presence of magnetic field (1 T). X-Ray Diffraction analysis shows chemically ordered L1{sub 2} face centered cubic (FCC) as the dominant phase for Fe{sub 3}Pt NWs and heat treatment improves crystallinity with retained its phase. Whereas, Fe{sub 3}Pt NTs show amorphous behavior with and without magnetic field annealing. Furthermore, magnetic properties of the samples have been investigated by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Magnetic parameters of Fe{sub 3}Pt including magnetic coercivity, saturation magnetization, squareness and shape of MH-loops have been investigated as a result of simple and MF annealing. - Highlights: • Fe{sub 3}Pt NWs and NTs embedded into anodic alumina templates have been synthesized by dc electrodeposition method. • Structural analysis (XRD) confirmed the formation of fcc structure. • Magnetic properties have been measured as a function of simple and magnetic field annealing.

  12. Structural, energetic and electrical properties of boron nitride nanotubes interacting with DMMP chemical agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganji, M. Darvish, E-mail: ganji_md@yahoo.com [Nanotechnology Research Institute, Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Babol Noshirvani University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholian, M.; Mohammadzadeh, S. [Department of Chemistry, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • ab initio DFT calculations were used for interaction of DMMP with BNNTs. • Full structural optimization was performed for several possible active sites. • Electronic structure of the energetically favorable complexes was analyzed. • The stability of the most stable complex was evaluated at ambient condition. • First-principles calculations showed that DMMP is strongly bound to the small diameter BNNTs. - Abstract: The adsorption of DMMP as an intoxicating chemical warfare agent onto the boron nitride nanotube has been investigated by using density functional theory calculations. Several active sites were considered for both interacting systems and full structural optimization was performed to accurately find the energetically favorable state. It is found that DMMP molecule prefers to be adsorbed strongly on the top site above the B atom of a (5, 0) BNNT with a binding energy of about −103.24 kJ mol{sup −1} and an O–B binding distance of 1.641 Å. We have performed a comparative investigation of BNNTs with different diameters and the results indicate that the DMMP adsorption ability for the side wall of the tubes significantly decreases for higher diameters BNNTs. Furthermore, the adsorption properties of DMMP molecule onto the BNNT have been investigated using the ab initio MD simulation at room temperature. Our result showed that BNNTs facilitates the DMMP detection at ambient conditions for practical applications.

  13. Structure and composition of single Pt–Ru electrocatalyst nanoparticles supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraguay-Delgado, Francisco; Malac, Marek; Alonso-Nuñez, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Individual Pt-Ru nanoparticles (NPs) supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) synthesized by microemulsion method were characterized by nano beam diffraction (NBD) and high resolution imaging in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Comparing the TEM images and NBD to simulations provided insight into particle composition, structure and morphology in three dimensions. In particular, the NBD allowed us to detect various components of the individual NPs that would be difficult to observe otherwise. We find that the NPs contain four different components: Pt–RuO 2 , Pt–Ru, RuO 2 and metallic Pt. Often an individual NP is composed of more than one component. The most frequently encountered external morphology is close to a spherical shape and ∼3.7 nm in diameter. The collective properties of NPs’ assemblies were studied by thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis and x-ray diffraction. The results allowed us to gain some insight into the relation of the NPs’ structure and composition with their catalytic performance, and revealed the presence of components not detectable by bulk methods. The electrocatalytic properties were evaluated by CO stripping, methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction. Bulk characterization methods miss many properties and structures present in the sample due to low volume fraction and due to overlap of reflections. Single NPs should be analyzed to obtain reliable indication of sample composition. (paper)

  14. Fabrication de structures tridimensionnelles de nanocomposites polymeres charges de nanotubes de carbone a simple paroi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge Lebel, Louis

    There is currently a worldwide effort for advances in micro and nanotechnologies due to their high potential for technological applications in fields such as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), organic electronics and structural microstructures for aerospace. In these applications, carbon nanotube/polymer nanocomposites represent interesting material options compared to conventional resins for their enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. However, several significant scientific and technological challenges must first be overcome in order to rapidly and cost-effectively fabricate nanocomposite-based microdevices. Fabrication techniques have emerged for fabricating one- of two-dimensional (1D/2D) nanocomposite structures but few techniques are available for three-dimensional (3D) nanocomposite structures. The overall objective of this thesis is the development of a manufacturing technique allowing the fabrication of 3D structures of single-walled carbon nanotube (C-SWNT)/polymer nanocomposite. This thesis reports the development of a direct-write fabrication technique that greatly extends the fabrication space for 3D carbon nanotube/polymer nanocomposite structures. The UV-assisted direct-write (UV-DW) technique employs the robotically-controlled micro-extrusion of a nanocomposite filament combined with a UV exposure that follows the extrusion point. Upon curing, the increased rigidity of the extruded filament enables the creation of multi-directional shapes along the trajectory of the extrusion point. The C-SWNT material is produced by laser ablation of a graphite target and purified using a nitric acid reflux. The as-grown and purified material is characterized under transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The purification procedure successfully graphed carboxylic groups on the surface of the C-SWNTs, shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. An incorporation procedure in the polymer is developed involving a non

  15. Lightweight carbon nanotube-based structural-energy storage devices for micro unmanned systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Monica; Cole, Daniel P.; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Reddy, Arava L. M.; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Karna, Shashi P.; Bundy, Mark L.

    2012-06-01

    There is a strong need for small, lightweight energy storage devices that can satisfy the ever increasing power and energy demands of micro unmanned systems. Currently, most commercial and developmental micro unmanned systems utilize commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) lithium polymer batteries for their energy storage needs. While COTS lithium polymer batteries are the industry norm, the weight of these batteries can account for up to 60% of the overall system mass and the capacity of these batteries can limit mission durations to the order of only a few minutes. One method to increase vehicle endurance without adding mass or sacrificing payload capabilities is to incorporate multiple system functions into a single material or structure. For example, the body or chassis of a micro vehicle could be replaced with a multifunctional material that would serve as both the vehicle structure and the on-board energy storage device. In this paper we present recent progress towards the development of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based structural-energy storage devices for micro unmanned systems. Randomly oriented and vertically aligned CNT-polymer composite electrodes with varying degrees of flexibility are used as the primary building blocks for lightweight structural-supercapacitors. For the purpose of this study, the mechanical properties of the CNT-based electrodes and the charge-discharge behavior of the supercapacitor devices are examined. Because incorporating multifunctionality into a single component often degrades the properties or performance of individual structures, the performance and property tradeoffs of the CNT-based structural-energy storage devices will also be discussed.

  16. High-performance lithium storage of Co3O4 achieved by constructing porous nanotube structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Zhentao; Wang, Shuguang; Zhang, Yihe; Cao, Minhua

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The porous Co 3 O 4 nanotubes (P-Co 3 O 4 -NTs) are prepared by coaxial electrospinning method followed by a fine annealing treatment. The resultant P-Co 3 O 4 -NTs exhibit excellent lithium storage performance in terms of specific capacity, rate capability, and cycling stability when used as an anode material for rechargeable lithium ion batteries (LIBs). - Abstract: Co 3 O 4 has been investigated intensively for its high specific capacity which makes it a promising candidate anode for high-performance lithium ion batteries (LIBs). However, rational design of Co 3 O 4 electrode that is beneficial for its electrochemical performance is still a great challenge. Herein, we designed and fabricated porous Co 3 O 4 nanotubes (P-Co 3 O 4 -NTs) by coaxial electrospinning method followed by a fine annealing treatment, which display one dimensional tubular structure with porous wall and hollow interior. The uniqueness of this strategy is that the morphologies of the P-Co 3 O 4 -NTs could be tuned by adjusting the mass ratio of reactants. The resultant P-Co 3 O 4 -NTs exhibit excellent lithium storage performance in terms of specific capacity, rate capability, and cycling stability, when used as an anode material for rechargeable LIBs. This unique structure endows a high reversible specific capacity of 1826.2 mA g −1 at a current density of 0.3 A g −1 after 100 cycles. Even at high current densities of 2 and 5 A g −1 , the P-Co 3 O 4 -NTs electrode still could deliver remarkable discharge capacities of 1506.2 and 1145.1 mAh g −1 , respectively. The excellent electrochemical performance can be attributed to the unique tubular and porous structure of P-Co 3 O 4 -NTs, which not only can accommodate the large volume change but also can provide an excellent ion diffusion and electronic conduction pathway. Therefore, the P-Co 3 O 4 -NTs have the potential for use as a high performance anode material in LIBs.

  17. Synthesis of suspended carbon nanotubes on silicon inverse-opal structures by laser-assisted chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, J; Lu, Y F; Wang, H; Yi, K J; Lin, Y S; Zhang, R; Liou, S H

    2006-01-01

    Suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been synthesized on Si inverse-opal structures by laser-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LCVD). A CW CO 2 laser at 10.6 μm was used to directly irradiate the substrates during the LCVD process. At a laser power density of 14.3 MW m -2 , suspended SWNT networks were found predominantly rooted at the sharp edges in the Si inverse-opal structures. Raman spectroscopy indicated that the SWNT networks were composed of high-quality defect-free SWNTs with an average diameter of 1.3 nm. At a lower laser power density (6.4 MW m -2 ), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were grown on the entire surface of the substrates. The preference for the synthesis of SWNTs or MWNTs was attributed to the difference in the catalyst sizes as well as the growth temperature in the LCVD process

  18. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of substitutional transition-metal atoms in GaN nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Min; Shi Jun-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of the transition-metal (TM) atoms (Sc—Zn, Pt and Au) doped zigzag GaN single-walled nanotubes (NTs) are investigated using first-principles spin-polarized density functional calculations. Our results show that the bindings of all TM atoms are stable with the binding energy in the range of 6–16 eV. The Sc- and V-doped GaN NTs exhibit a nonmagnetic behavior. The GaN NTs doped with Ti, Mn, Ni, Cu and Pt are antiferromagnetic. On the contrary, the Cr-, Fe-, Co-, Zn- and Au-doped GaN NTs show the ferromagnetic characteristics. The Mn- and Co-doped GaN NTs induce the largest local moment of 4μ B among these TM atoms. The local magnetic moment is dominated by the contribution from the substitutional TM atom and the N atoms bonded with it. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  19. Comparison of Electronic Structure and Magnetic Properties of Few Layer Graphene and Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekhar Chandra Ray

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study has been made for the non-catalyst based few layer graphene (FLG and Fe-catalyst based multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. Magnetic and electronic properties of FLG and MWCNTs were studied using magnetic M-H hysteresis loops and synchrotron radiation based X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy measurements. Structural defects and electronic and bonding properties of FLG/MWCNTs have been studied using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS. The work functions of FLG and MWCNTs are 4.01 eV and 3.79 eV, respectively, obtained from UPS (He-I spectra. UPS (He-II results suggest that the density of states (DOS of MWCNTs is higher than FLG and is consistent with Raman spectroscopy result that shows the defect of MWCNTs is higher than FLG. The magnetic coercivity (Hc of the MWCNTs (~750 Oe is higher than FLG (~85 Oe which could be used for various technological magnetic applications.

  20. Colloidal stability of suspended and agglomerate structures of settled carbon nanotubes in different aqueous matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwyzer, Irène; Kaegi, Ralf; Sigg, Laura; Nowack, Bernd

    2013-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are often processed in suspended form and therefore a release of CNT-suspensions into the aquatic environment is plausible. In this study, the behaviour of two physico-chemically very different CNT types in the presence of varying, environmentally relevant calcium-containing media was investigated, including the long-term colloidal stability and the sedimentary structures of settled CNTs. Calcium induced CNT flocculation, however, the stability of the CNTs in the medium did not monotonously decrease with increasing calcium concentration. At intermediate calcium concentrations (0.5-1.5 mM Ca) pre-dispersed CNTs were stabilized in humic acid medium to similar, temporarily even to higher degree than in the absence of calcium. Between pH 5 and 8 only at the highest pH an influence on CNT stability was observed by either promoting flocculation or stabilisation depending on the CNT type. Humic acid stabilized CNTs much better than fulvic acid. Generally, the colloidal stability of the long, thick CNTs with higher surface oxygen content was less affected by the media composition. An investigation of the settled CNT material using analytical electron microscopy revealed the presence of spheroidal, bundle-like and net like CNT-agglomerate structures. Calcium possibly acted as bridging agent linking CNTs in a network like manner, temporarily increasing the CNT concentrations stabilized in the supernatants due to the low density of these structures. With increasing settling time the CNTs formed a fluffy sediment layer at the bottom of the reaction vessels. Bundle-like CNT agglomerates were also observed within that layer of settled CNTs, possibly caused by calcium neutralizing the surface charges. Furthermore, the CNT suspensions contained spheroidal CNT agglomerates, most likely residues from the original dry powder that were not disaggregated. The analysis of settled CNT material is a novelty and illustrates CNT agglomerate structures possibly

  1. Growth and structural discrimination of cortical neurons on randomly oriented and vertically aligned dense carbon nanotube networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Nick

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth of cortical neurons on three dimensional structures of spatially defined (structured randomly oriented, as well as on vertically aligned, carbon nanotubes (CNT is studied. Cortical neurons are attracted towards both types of CNT nano-architectures. For both, neurons form clusters in close vicinity to the CNT structures whereupon the randomly oriented CNTs are more closely colonised than the CNT pillars. Neurons develop communication paths via neurites on both nanoarchitectures. These neuron cells attach preferentially on the CNT sidewalls of the vertically aligned CNT architecture instead than onto the tips of the individual CNT pillars.

  2. Chlorophenols Sorption on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: DFT Modeling and Structure-Property Relationship Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Watkins, Marquita; Sizochenko, Natalia; Moore, Quentarius; Golebiowski, Marek; Leszczynska, Danuta; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    Presence of chlorophenols in drinking water could be hazardous to human health. Optimization and computational modeling of experimental conditions of adsorption lead to understanding the mechanisms of this process and to creating the efficient experimental equipment. In the current study, we investigated multi-walled carbon nanotubes by means of density functional theory (DFT) approach. This is applied to study selected types of interactions between six solvents, five types of nanotubes, and ...

  3. Electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, L-C

    2006-01-01

    The properties of a carbon nanotube are dependent on its atomic structure. The atomic structure of a carbon nanotube can be defined by specifying its chiral indices (u, v), that specify its perimeter vector (chiral vector), with which the diameter and helicity are also determined. The fine electron beam available in a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) offers a unique probe to reveal the atomic structure of individual nanotubes. This review covers two aspects related to the use of the electron probe in the TEM for the study of carbon nanotubes: (a) to understand the electron diffraction phenomena for inter-pretation of the electron diffraction patterns of carbon nanotubes and (b) to obtain the chiral indices (u, v), of the carbon nanotubes from the electron diffraction patterns. For a nanotube of a given structure, the electron scattering amplitude from the carbon nanotube is first described analytically in closed form using the helical diffraction theory. From a known structure as given by the chiral indices (u, v), its electron diffraction pattern can be calculated and understood. The reverse problem, i.e. assignment of the chiral indices from an electron diffraction pattern of a carbon nanotube, is approached from the relationship between the electron scattering intensity distribution and the chiral indices (u, v). We show that electron diffraction patterns can provide an accurate and unambiguous assignment of the chiral indices of carbon nanotubes. The chiral indices (u, v) can be read indiscriminately with a high accuracy from the intensity distribution on the principal layer lines in an electron diffraction pattern. The symmetry properties of electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes and the electron diffraction from deformed carbon nanotubes are also discussed in detail. It is shown that 2mm symmetry is always preserved for single-walled carbon nanotubes, but it can break down for multiwalled carbon nanotubes under some special circumstances

  4. A study on the structure and thermal stability of titanate nano-tubes as a function of sodium content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgado, E.; Abreu, M.A.S. de; Pravia, O.R.C. [Petrobras S.A./Cenpes, Research and Development Centre, Cidade Univ., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Marinkovic, B.A.; Jardim, P.M.; Rizzo, F.C. [Pontifical Catholic Univ., Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Araujo, A.S. [University of Rio Grande do Norte, Dept. of Chemistry, RN (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Titanate Nano-Tubes (TTNT) were synthesized by hydrothermal treatment of TiO{sub 2} anatase in 10 M NaOH at 120 C followed by repeated water washing, with and without ion exchanging by HCl 0.1 M. Samples with different contents of remnant sodium in nano-tubes were characterized, as synthesized and after heat-treatment, by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, thermal analysis and N{sub 2} adsorption. It was demonstrated that TTNT consisted of a tri-titanate structure with general formula Na{sub x}H{sub 2}-xTi{sub 3}O{sub 7}.nH{sub 2}O, where 0{<=}x{<=}2 and n{<=}1.2, depending on the degree of proton exchange after washing. As-synthesized nano-tubes retained interlayer water in its multi-walled structure. The removal of sodium reduced the amount of this intercalated water and increased the specific surface area, while thermal stability was reduced. The mechanism through which TTNT dehydrated and converted into their condensed titanates and/or TiO{sub 2} polymorphs after thermal treatment as a function of the sodium content was discussed and a schematic picture of the thermal transformations was proposed. (authors)

  5. A study on the structure and thermal stability of titanate nano-tubes as a function of sodium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgado, E.; Abreu, M.A.S. de; Pravia, O.R.C.; Marinkovic, B.A.; Jardim, P.M.; Rizzo, F.C.; Araujo, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Titanate Nano-Tubes (TTNT) were synthesized by hydrothermal treatment of TiO 2 anatase in 10 M NaOH at 120 C followed by repeated water washing, with and without ion exchanging by HCl 0.1 M. Samples with different contents of remnant sodium in nano-tubes were characterized, as synthesized and after heat-treatment, by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, thermal analysis and N 2 adsorption. It was demonstrated that TTNT consisted of a tri-titanate structure with general formula Na x H 2 -xTi 3 O 7 .nH 2 O, where 0≤x≤2 and n≤1.2, depending on the degree of proton exchange after washing. As-synthesized nano-tubes retained interlayer water in its multi-walled structure. The removal of sodium reduced the amount of this intercalated water and increased the specific surface area, while thermal stability was reduced. The mechanism through which TTNT dehydrated and converted into their condensed titanates and/or TiO 2 polymorphs after thermal treatment as a function of the sodium content was discussed and a schematic picture of the thermal transformations was proposed. (authors)

  6. Influence of the applied potentials difference on structural and conductive properties of CoZnO nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimova, M. A.; Kozlovskiy, A. L.; Kenzhina, I. E.; Zdorovets, M. V.

    2018-04-01

    A series of CoZnO nanotubes was obtained by electrochemical deposition, with different atomic metal coefficients, due to a change in the applied potential difference. A systematic study of the morphology, structural and conductive properties of nanotubes was also carried out. It is established that the samples synthesized at the applied potentials difference of 1.5 and 1.75 V are three-component systems consisting of two oxide phases of ZnO and CoO1.92 cubic system and a phase of a solid solution of substitution Co0.65Zn0.35 of hexagonal type. The samples synthesized at a potential difference of 2.0 V represent an alloy of two oxide phases, ZnO and CoO1.92.

  7. Electronic structure and optical spectra of semiconducting carbon nanotubes functionalized by diazonium salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Jessica; Mayo, Michael L.; Kilina, Svetlana; Tretiak, Sergei

    2013-02-01

    We report density functional (DFT) calculations on finite-length semiconducting carbon nanotubes covalently and non-covalently functionalized by aryl diazonium moieties and their chlorinated derivatives. For these systems, we investigate (i) an accuracy of different functionals and basis sets, (ii) a solvent effect, and (iii) the impact of the chemical functionalization on optical properties of nanotubes. In contrast to B3LYP, only long-range-corrected functionals, such as CAM-B3LYP and wB97XD, properly describe the ground and excited state properties of physisorbed molecules. We found that physisorbed cation insignificantly perturbs the optical spectra of nanotubes. In contrast, covalently bound complexes demonstrate strong redshifts and brightening of the lowest exciton that is optically dark in pristine nanotubes. However, the energy and oscillator strength of the lowest state are dictated by the position of the molecule on the nanotube. Thus, if controllable and selective chemical functionalization is realized, the PL of nanotubes could be improved.

  8. Conventional hydrothermal synthesis of titanate nanotubes: Systematic discussions on structural, optical, thermal and morphological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Muniyappan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Titanate nanotubes were successfully synthesized by hydrothermal technique under acidic-base medium. The anatase and titanate phase of the starting TiO2 and tubular titanate was confirmed by powder XRD technique. The UV–vis-NIR spectroscopy was used to study the absorption nature of titanate nanotubes and the band gap was calculated as 3.3 eV. Infrared technique was employed to detect the presence of all the functional groups in the synthesized titanate nanotube material. Thermal properties of the title material were studied by TG-DTA analyses. The shrinkage of interlayer distance of TiO2 network confirms the nanotube formation. Morphology and size information about the synthesized material were carried out using FESEM and TEM analysis. Titanate nanotubes are having the maximum length of 2.24 µm and the average diameter of 169.73 nm. EDX analysis gives out the elemental composition of the as synthesized product. This report may fetch an efficient way to synthesize TiO2 nanotubes using TiO2 nanoparticles.

  9. Structural, electronic and photovoltaic characterization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes grown directly on stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Camilli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have taken advantage of the native surface roughness and the iron content of AISI-316 stainless steel to grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs by chemical vapour deposition without the addition of an external catalyst. The structural and electronic properties of the synthesized carbon nanostructures have been investigated by a range of electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. The results show the good quality and the high graphitization degree of the synthesized MWCNTs. Through energy-loss spectroscopy we found that the electronic properties of these nanostructures are markedly different from those of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG. Notably, a broadening of the π-plasmon peak in the case of MWCNTs is evident. In addition, a photocurrent was measured when MWCNTs were airbrushed onto a silicon substrate. External quantum efficiency (EQE and photocurrent values were reported both in planar and in top-down geometry of the device. Marked differences in the line shapes and intensities were found for the two configurations, suggesting that two different mechanisms of photocurrent generation and charge collection are in operation. From this comparison, we are able to conclude that the silicon substrate plays an important role in the production of electron–hole pairs.

  10. Electro-purification of carbon nanotube networks without damaging the assembly structure and crystallinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xueqin; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Huichao; Zhao, Jingna; Zhang, Xiaohua; Li, Qingwen

    2018-06-01

    Fe-containing nanoparticles are of a high mass fraction in the as-grown carbon nanotube (CNT) network. By controlling the S-to-Fe atom ratio in the growth feedstock and introducing water as a weak oxidant, highly crystalline few-walled CNT network can be obtained, with a mass fraction of over 20 wt% for the Fe-containing nanoparticles. We report here an electron-oxidation-based purification method to efficiently remove the Fe-containing nanoparticles without inducing clear damage to either the assembly structure or the tube crystallinity. The purification could increase the ratio between Raman D and G peak intensities slightly from 0.08 to 0.12, decrease the specific conductivity from 0.31 to 0.24 S m2/g and the Fe content from >20 wt% to ≈1 wt%, and modify the capacitance just by about 13 F/g. All these indicate that the CNT network was well maintained by such gentle electro-oxidation-based purification. In addition, the purified CNT network can exhibit advantages in mechanical and electrical applications.

  11. The structure and the photocatalytic activity of titania based nanotube and nanofiber coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, A.; Piszczek, P.; Topolski, A.; Lewandowska, Ż.; Talik, E.; Andersen, I. Hald; Nielsen, L. Pleth; Heikkilä, M.; Leskelä, M.

    2016-04-01

    The photocatalytic activity of TiO2 based nanotube (TNT) and nanofiber (TNF) coatings has been investigated, in correlation to their structure, morphology, specific surface area, acidity and the amount of surface H2O molecules and sbnd OH groups. Characterization of these materials was carried out using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT). The photocatalytic activity has been quantified by two different methods, based on the photodegradation of methylene blue (the pattern of water-soluble organic pollutant) and acetone (the pattern of volatile organic pollutant), respectively. Results of our investigations revealed that TNF coatings were significantly more active in case of both photodegradation processes in air and water, as compared to TNT, even if the specific surface area of TNF films was smaller than the adequate surface area of TNT. The microstructure of produced materials, the amount of adsorbed sbnd OH groups and H2O molecules located on the surface of materials, and the acidity of the surface, were the main factors which affect their photoactivity. Photocatalytic properties of tubular and porous TiO2-based materials are the resultant of the compilation of individual factors impact and any of them cannot be neglected.

  12. Hierarchically structured graphene-carbon nanotube-cobalt hybrid electrocatalyst for seawater battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Park, Sul Ki; Nakhanivej, Puritut; Kim, Youngsik; Hwang, Soo Min; Park, Ho Seok

    2017-12-01

    The design of cost-effective and highly active catalysts is a critical challenge. Inspired by the strong points of stability and conductivity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), high catalytic activity of Co nanoparticles, and rapid ion diffusion and large accessible area of three-dimensional (3D) graphene, we demonstrate a novel strategy to construct a hierarchical hybrid structure consisting of Co/CoOx nanoparticles-incorporated CNT branches onto the 3D reduced graphene oxide (rGO) architecture. The surface-modified 3D rGO by steam activation process has a large surface area and abundant defect sites, which serve as active sites to uniformly grow Co/CoOx nanoparticles. Furthermore, the CNTs preserve their performance stably by encapsulating Co nanoparticles, while the uniformly decorated Co/CoOx nanoparticles exhibit superior electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen evolution/reduction reaction due to highly exposed active sites. Employing the hybrid particle electrocatalyst, the seawater battery operates stably at 0.01 mA cm-2 during 50 cycles, owing to the good electrocatalytic ability.

  13. Structural and morphological transformations of TiO2 nanotube arrays induced by excimer laser treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Ming-Yi; Thang, Nguyen Van; Wang Chih; Leu Jihperng

    2012-01-01

    The structural and morphological transformations of TiO 2 nanotube arrays (TNAs) treated by excimer laser annealing (ELA) were investigated as a function of the laser fluence using parallel and tilted modes. Results showed that the crystallinity of the ELA-treated TNAs reached only about 50% relative to that of TNAs treated by furnace anneal at 400 °C for 1 h. The phase transformation starts from the top surface of the TNAs with surface damage resulting from short penetration depth and limited one-dimensional heat transport from the surface to the bottom under extremely short pulse duration (25 ns) of the excimer laser. When a tilted mode was used, the crystallinity of TNAs treated by ELA at 85° was increased to 90% relative to that by the furnace anneal. This can be attributed to the increased area of the laser energy interaction zone and better heat conduction to both ends of the TNAs. - Highlights: ► We examined the morphology and microstructure of TNAs treated by ELA. ► Crystallinity of parallel ELA-treated TNAs reached ∼50% of furnace anneal. ► Tilted ELA at 85o enhanced the degree of crystallization in TNAs to 90%.

  14. Local structure of Iridium organometallic catalysts covalently bonded to carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, J.; Cuartero, V.; Subías, G.; Jiménez, M. V.; Pérez-Torrente, J. J.; Oro, L. A.; Blanco, M.; Álvarez, P.; Blanco, C.; Menéndez, R.

    2016-05-01

    Hybrid catalysts based on Iridium N-heterocyclic carbenes anchored to carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been studied by XAFS spectroscopy. Oxidation of CNT yields a large amount of functional groups, mainly hydroxyl groups at the walls and carboxylic groups at the tips, defects and edges. Different kinds of esterification reactions were performed to functionalize oxidized CNT with imidazolium salts. Then, the resulting products were reacted with an Ir organometallic compound to form hybrid catalysts efficient in hydrogen transfer processes. XANES spectroscopy agree with the presence of Ir(I) in these catalysts and the EXAFS spectra detected differences in the local structure of Ir atoms between the initial Ir organometallic compound and the Ir complexes anchored to the CNT. Our results confirm that the halide atom, present in the Ir precursor, was replaced by oxygen from -OH groups at the CNT wall in the first coordination shell of Ir. The lability of this group accounts for the good recyclability and the good efficiency shown by these hybrid catalysts.

  15. Effect of halloysite nanotubes on the structure and function of important multiple blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Keke; Feng, Ru; Jiao, Yanpeng; Zhou, Changren

    2017-06-01

    Many researchers have investigated the application of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) in biomedicine, because of their special nanoscale hollow tubular structure. Although the cytocompatibility of HNTs has been studied, their blood compatibility has not been systematically investigated. In this work, the effect of HNTs on the structure and function of different blood components has been studied, including the morphology and hemolysis of red blood cells (RBCs). Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, optical density test and flow cytometry analysis, we found that HNTs can affect the morphology and membrane integrity of RBCs in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) in a content-dependent way. In particular, based on UV-vis absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and circular dichroism (CD) spectra, HNTs can alter the secondary structure and conformation of human fibrinogen and γ-globulins. In addition, the detection of biomarker molecules C3a and C5a in plasma suggests that HNTs can trigger complement activation. In the blood clotting assay, HNTs were found to significantly prolong the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), shorten the prothrombin time (PT) of platelet-poor plasma (PPP), and change the thromboelastography (TEG) parameters of whole blood coagulation. Furthermore, confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry analysis were used to test intracellular uptake by macrophages, and the cellular uptake of HNTs in the RAW 264.7 was found to be content-dependent, but not time-dependent. These findings provide insight for the potential use of HNTs as biofriendly nanocontainers for biomaterials in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. High performance natural rubber composites with a hierarchical reinforcement structure of carbon nanotube modified natural fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzounis, Lazaros; Debnath, Subhas; Rooj, Sandip; Fischer, Dieter; Mäder, Edith; Das, Amit; Stamm, Manfred; Heinrich, Gert

    2014-01-01

    A simple and facile method for depositing multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) onto the surface of naturally occurring short jute fibers (JFs) is reported. Hierarchical multi-scale structures were formed with CNT-networks uniformly distributed and fully covering the JFs (JF–CNT), as depicted by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. The impact of these hybrid fillers on the mechanical properties of a natural rubber (NR) matrix was systematically investigated. Pristine JFs were cut initially to an average length of 2.0 mm and exposed to an alkali treatment (a-JFs) to remove impurities existing in the raw jute. MWCNTs were treated under mild acidic conditions to generate carboxylic acid moieties. Afterward, MWCNTs were dispersed in an aqueous media and short a-JFs were allowed to react with them. Raman spectroscopy confirmed the chemical interaction between CNTs and JFs. The JF–CNT exposed quite hydrophobic behavior as revealed by the water contact angle measurements, improving the wettability of the non-polar NR. Consequently, the composite interfacial adhesion strength was significantly enhanced while a micro-scale “mechanical interlocking” mechanism was observed from the interphase-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. SEM analysis of the composite fracture surfaces demonstrated the interfacial strength of NR/a-JF and NR/JF–CNT composites, at different fiber loadings. It can be presumed that the CNT-coating effectively compatibillized the composite structure acting as a macromolecular coupling agent. A detailed analysis of stress-strain and dynamic mechanical spectra confirmed the high mechanical performance of the hierarchical composites, consisting mainly of materials arising from natural resources. - Highlights: • Natural rubber (NR) composites reinforced with CNT-modified short jute fibers. • MWCNTs deposited to the surface of jute fibers via non-covalent interactions. • Hierarchical reinforcement structure with

  17. Temperature driven structural-memory-effects in carbon nanotubes filled with Fe3C nano crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Filippo S.; Zhang, Xiaotian; Corrias, Anna

    2018-02-01

    We report the observation of novel temperature-driven structural-memory-effects in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled with Fe3C nano-crystals. These structural-transitions were measured by means of temperature (T) dependent x-ray diffraction (XRD) in the T-range from 298 K to 12 K. A clear reversible 2θ-shift in the 002-peak of the graphitic-CNTs-walls is found with the decrease of the temperature. As determined by Rietveld refinement, such 2θ-shift translates in a not previously reported decrease in the value of the CNT graphitic c-axis with the decrease of the temperature (from 298 K to 12 K). Also, a clear reversible 2θ-shift in the 031 and 131 diffraction-peaks of Fe3C is observed within the same T-range. Rietveld refinements confirm the existence of such memory-effect and also reveal a gradual decrease of the 010-axis of Fe3C with the decrease of the temperature. These observations imply that the observed structural-memory-effect is a characteristic of CNTs when Fe3C is the encapsulated ferromagnet. The generality of such memory-effects was further confirmed by additional measurements performed on other types of CNTs characterized by continuous Fe3C-filling. XRD measurements in the T-range from 298 K to 673 K revealed also an unusual reversible decrease of the Fe3C-peak intensities with the increase of the temperature. These observations can have important implications on the magnetic data recording applications of these nanostructures by helping in better understanding the unusual temperature-dependent magnetic instabilities of iron-based nano-crystals which have been recently reported in literature.

  18. Embedded Aligned Carbon Nanotube Sheets for Strain and Damage sensing in Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Karim Aly Abdelomoaty Elsayed

    The world demand for fiber reinforced composite materials has been steadily increasing because of the widespread adoption of this class of material in many markets. The automotive, aerospace, marine and energy sectors account for a large percentage of this grow. Outstanding fatigue performance, high specific stiffness and strength, and low density are among the most important properties that fiber reinforced polymer composites offer. Furthermore, their properties can be tailored to meet the specific needs of the final applications. However, this class of material is composed of multiple layers of inhomogeneous and anisotropic constituents, i.e. fibers and matrix. Therefore, this laminated nature make the composite material prone to intrinsic damage including interfacial debonding and delamination and their strength and failure are dependent on the fiber architecture and direction of the applied stresses. Consequently, it is of prime importance to monitor the health of these structures. New and improved methods for early detection of damage and structural health monitoring of composite materials may allow for enhanced reliability, lifetime and performance while minimizing maintenance time during a composite part's service life. Over the last few decades different non-destructive methods and materials have been investigated for use as strain sensors. Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), they have attracted much research interest due to their superior electrical, thermal and mechanical properties as well as their high aspect ratio. In this context, CNTs have been used in the recent years to enable sensing capabilities. In this dissertation, the usage of CNTs for performing strain and damage sensing in composites is evaluated. This was enabled by embedding aligned sheets of two millimeters long, interconnected CNTs into laminated structures that were then subjected to different forms of mechanical loading. The localization of the CNT sheets inside the host

  19. Chemical vapor deposition growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes with controlled structures for nanodevice applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yabin; Zhang, Jin

    2014-08-19

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), a promising substitute to engineer prospective nanoelectronics, have attracted much attention because of their superb structures and physical properties. The unique properties of SWNTs rely sensitively on their specific chiral structures, including the diameters, chiral angles, and handedness. Furthermore, high-performance and integrated circuits essentially require SWNT samples with well-aligned arrays, of single conductive type and of pure chirality. Although much effort has been devoted to chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of SWNTs, their structure control, growth mechanism, and structural characterizations are still the primary obstacles for the fabrication and application of SWNT-based nanodevices. In this Account, we focus on our established CVD growth methodology to fulfill the requirements of nanodevice applications. A rational strategy was successfully exploited to construct complex architectures, selectively enrich semiconducting (s) or metallic (m) SWNTs, and control chirality. First, well-aligned and highly dense SWNT arrays are beneficial for nanodevice integration. For the directed growth mode, anisotropic interactions between the SWNTs and the crystallographic structure of substrate are crucial for their growth orientation. Just as crystals possess various symmetries, SWNTs with controlled geometries have the corresponding turning angles. Their complex architectures come from the synergetic effect of lattice and gas flow directed modes. Especially, the aligned orientations of SWNTs on graphite are chirality-selective, and their chiral angles, handedness, and (n,m) index have been conveniently and accurately determined. Second, UV irradiation and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) washing-off methods have been explored to selectively remove m-SWNTs, leaving only s-SWNT arrays on the surface. Moreover, the UV-assisted technique takes the advantages of low cost and high efficiency and it directly produces a high

  20. Scalable synthesis of hierarchically structured carbon nanotube-graphene fibres for capacitive energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dingshan; Goh, Kunli; Wang, Hong; Wei, Li; Jiang, Wenchao; Zhang, Qiang; Dai, Liming; Chen, Yuan

    2014-07-01

    Micro-supercapacitors are promising energy storage devices that can complement or even replace batteries in miniaturized portable electronics and microelectromechanical systems. Their main limitation, however, is the low volumetric energy density when compared with batteries. Here, we describe a hierarchically structured carbon microfibre made of an interconnected network of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with interposed nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide sheets. The nanomaterials form mesoporous structures of large specific surface area (396 m2 g-1) and high electrical conductivity (102 S cm-1). We develop a scalable method to continuously produce the fibres using a silica capillary column functioning as a hydrothermal microreactor. The resultant fibres show a specific volumetric capacity as high as 305 F cm-3 in sulphuric acid (measured at 73.5 mA cm-3 in a three-electrode cell) or 300 F cm-3 in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/H3PO4 electrolyte (measured at 26.7 mA cm-3 in a two-electrode cell). A full micro-supercapacitor with PVA/H3PO4 gel electrolyte, free from binder, current collector and separator, has a volumetric energy density of ~6.3 mWh cm-3 (a value comparable to that of 4 V-500 µAh thin-film lithium batteries) while maintaining a power density more than two orders of magnitude higher than that of batteries, as well as a long cycle life. To demonstrate that our fibre-based, all-solid-state micro-supercapacitors can be easily integrated into miniaturized flexible devices, we use them to power an ultraviolet photodetector and a light-emitting diode.

  1. Field emission from optimized structure of carbon nanotube field emitter array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chouhan, V.; Noguchi, T.; Kato, S.

    2016-01-01

    The authors report a detail study on the emission properties of field emitter array (FEA) of micro-circular emitters of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The FEAs were fabricated on patterned substrates prepared with an array of circular titanium (Ti) islands on titanium nitride coated tantalum substrates. CNTs were rooted into these Ti islands to prepare an array of circular emitters. The circular emitters were prepared in different diameters and pitches in order to optimize their structure for acquiring a high emission current. The pitch was varied from 0 to 600 μm, while a diameter of circular emitters was kept constant to be 50 μm in order to optimize a pitch. For diameter optimization, a diameter was changed from 50 to 200 μm while keeping a constant edge-to-edge distance of 150 μm between the circular emitters. The FEA with a diameter of 50 μm and a pitch of 120 μm was found to be the best to achieve an emission current of 47 mA corresponding to an effective current density of 30.5 A/cm"2 at 7 V/μm. The excellent emission current was attributed to good quality of CNT rooting into the substrate and optimized FEA structure, which provided a high electric field on a whole circular emitter of 50 μm and the best combination of the strong edge effect and CNT coverage. The experimental results were confirmed with computer simulation.

  2. Field emission from optimized structure of carbon nanotube field emitter array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouhan, V., E-mail: vchouhan@post.kek.jp, E-mail: vijaychouhan84@gmail.com [School of High Energy Accelerator, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Noguchi, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Kato, S. [School of High Energy Accelerator, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2016-04-07

    The authors report a detail study on the emission properties of field emitter array (FEA) of micro-circular emitters of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The FEAs were fabricated on patterned substrates prepared with an array of circular titanium (Ti) islands on titanium nitride coated tantalum substrates. CNTs were rooted into these Ti islands to prepare an array of circular emitters. The circular emitters were prepared in different diameters and pitches in order to optimize their structure for acquiring a high emission current. The pitch was varied from 0 to 600 μm, while a diameter of circular emitters was kept constant to be 50 μm in order to optimize a pitch. For diameter optimization, a diameter was changed from 50 to 200 μm while keeping a constant edge-to-edge distance of 150 μm between the circular emitters. The FEA with a diameter of 50 μm and a pitch of 120 μm was found to be the best to achieve an emission current of 47 mA corresponding to an effective current density of 30.5 A/cm{sup 2} at 7 V/μm. The excellent emission current was attributed to good quality of CNT rooting into the substrate and optimized FEA structure, which provided a high electric field on a whole circular emitter of 50 μm and the best combination of the strong edge effect and CNT coverage. The experimental results were confirmed with computer simulation.

  3. The structure and the photocatalytic activity of titania based nanotube and nanofiber coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, A., E-mail: aradtke@umk.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, ul. Gagarina 7, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Piszczek, P.; Topolski, A.; Lewandowska, Ż. [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, ul. Gagarina 7, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Talik, E. [A. Chełkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, ul. Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Andersen, I. Hald; Nielsen, L. Pleth [Tribology Centre, Danish Technological Institute, Kongsvang Allé 29, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Heikkilä, M.; Leskelä, M. [Centre of Excellence, Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, University of Helsinki, A.I. Virtasen aukio 1, FI-00014 (Finland)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The photoactivity of TNT and TNF has been quantified by two different methods. • The influence of the TNT and TNF structure on their photoactivity was studied. • The photoactivity comparison of TNT and TNF was carried out. • TNF coatings show higher photoactivity in comparison to TNT. - Abstract: The photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} based nanotube (TNT) and nanofiber (TNF) coatings has been investigated, in correlation to their structure, morphology, specific surface area, acidity and the amount of surface H{sub 2}O molecules and −OH groups. Characterization of these materials was carried out using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT). The photocatalytic activity has been quantified by two different methods, based on the photodegradation of methylene blue (the pattern of water-soluble organic pollutant) and acetone (the pattern of volatile organic pollutant), respectively. Results of our investigations revealed that TNF coatings were significantly more active in case of both photodegradation processes in air and water, as compared to TNT, even if the specific surface area of TNF films was smaller than the adequate surface area of TNT. The microstructure of produced materials, the amount of adsorbed −OH groups and H{sub 2}O molecules located on the surface of materials, and the acidity of the surface, were the main factors which affect their photoactivity. Photocatalytic properties of tubular and porous TiO{sub 2}-based materials are the resultant of the compilation of individual factors impact and any of them cannot be neglected.

  4. Adsorption and desorption of Cd(II) onto titanate nanotubes and efficient regeneration of tubular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ting; Liu, Wen; Xu, Nan; Ni, Jinren

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Satisfactory reuse of TNTs due to easy regeneration of tubular structures. ► TNTs regeneration using only 2% of NaOH needed for virgin TNTs preparation. ► Excellent regeneration attributed to steady TNTs skeleton and complex form of TNTs-OCd + OH − onto adsorbed TNTs. -- Abstract: Efficient regeneration of desorbed titanate nanotubes (TNTs) was investigated with cycled Cd(II) adsorption and desorption processes. After desorption of Cd (II) from TNTs using 0.1 M HNO 3 , regeneration could be simply achieved with only 0.2 M NaOH at ambient temperature, i.e. 2% of the NaOH needed for virgin TNTs preparation at 130 °C. The regenerated TNTs displayed similar adsorption capacity of Cd(II) even after six recycles, while significant reduction could be detected for desorbed TNTs without regeneration. The virgin TNTs, absorbed TNTs, desorbed TNTs and regenerated TNTs were systematically characterized. As results, the ion-exchange mechanism with Na + in TNTs was convinced with obvious change of -TiO(ONa) 2 by FTIR spectroscopy. The easy recovery of the damaged tubular structures proved by TEM and XRD was ascribed to asymmetric distribution of H + and Na + on the surface side and interlayer region of TNTs. More importantly, the cost-effective regeneration was found possibly related to complex form of TNTs-OCd + OH − onto the adsorbed TNTs, which was identified with help of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and further indicated due to high relevance to an unexpected mole ratio of 1:1 between exchanged Na + and absorbed Cd(II)

  5. The structure and the photocatalytic activity of titania based nanotube and nanofiber coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, A.; Piszczek, P.; Topolski, A.; Lewandowska, Ż.; Talik, E.; Andersen, I. Hald; Nielsen, L. Pleth; Heikkilä, M.; Leskelä, M.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The photoactivity of TNT and TNF has been quantified by two different methods. • The influence of the TNT and TNF structure on their photoactivity was studied. • The photoactivity comparison of TNT and TNF was carried out. • TNF coatings show higher photoactivity in comparison to TNT. - Abstract: The photocatalytic activity of TiO_2 based nanotube (TNT) and nanofiber (TNF) coatings has been investigated, in correlation to their structure, morphology, specific surface area, acidity and the amount of surface H_2O molecules and −OH groups. Characterization of these materials was carried out using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT). The photocatalytic activity has been quantified by two different methods, based on the photodegradation of methylene blue (the pattern of water-soluble organic pollutant) and acetone (the pattern of volatile organic pollutant), respectively. Results of our investigations revealed that TNF coatings were significantly more active in case of both photodegradation processes in air and water, as compared to TNT, even if the specific surface area of TNF films was smaller than the adequate surface area of TNT. The microstructure of produced materials, the amount of adsorbed −OH groups and H_2O molecules located on the surface of materials, and the acidity of the surface, were the main factors which affect their photoactivity. Photocatalytic properties of tubular and porous TiO_2-based materials are the resultant of the compilation of individual factors impact and any of them cannot be neglected.

  6. Fibrous hydroxyapatite–carbon nanotube composites by chemical vapor deposition: In situ fabrication, structural and morphological characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosma, Vassiliki; Tsoufis, Theodoros; Koliou, Theodora; Kazantzis, Antonios; Beltsios, Konstantinos; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.; Gournis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► CNTs synthesized on fibrous HA surfaces supporting Fe–Co bi- metallic catalysts by CVD. ► CNTs are rooted on HA distinct needle-like monocrystals and needle spherulitic aggregates. ► Reaction temperature and metal loading are critical parameters for CNT production. -- Abstract: Fibrous hydroxyapatite (HA)–carbon nanotube composites were synthesized by the catalytic decomposition of acetylene over Fe–Co bimetallic catalysts supported on the fibrous HA. Two forms of fibrous HA (distinct needle-like monocrystals and spherulitic aggregates of needles) were synthesized using a simple precipitation method and loaded with bimetallic catalysts (from 2 up to 20 wt%) by a wet chemical impregnation method. The HA supported catalysts were evaluated for the in situ growth of carbon nanotubes using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition method. The effect of reaction temperature and metal loading on the yield, structural perfection and morphology of the carbon products were investigated using a combination of X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, Raman spectroscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The results revealed that both the selection of the growing conditions and the metal loading determine the yield and overall quality of the synthesized carbon nanotubes, which exhibit high graphitization degree when synthesized in high yields

  7. Fibrous hydroxyapatite–carbon nanotube composites by chemical vapor deposition: In situ fabrication, structural and morphological characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosma, Vassiliki; Tsoufis, Theodoros; Koliou, Theodora [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Kazantzis, Antonios [Department of Applied Physics, Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, NL-9747AG Groningen (Netherlands); Beltsios, Konstantinos [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); De Hosson, Jeff Th. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, NL-9747AG Groningen (Netherlands); Gournis, Dimitrios, E-mail: dgourni@cc.uoi.gr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2013-04-20

    Highlights: ► CNTs synthesized on fibrous HA surfaces supporting Fe–Co bi- metallic catalysts by CVD. ► CNTs are rooted on HA distinct needle-like monocrystals and needle spherulitic aggregates. ► Reaction temperature and metal loading are critical parameters for CNT production. -- Abstract: Fibrous hydroxyapatite (HA)–carbon nanotube composites were synthesized by the catalytic decomposition of acetylene over Fe–Co bimetallic catalysts supported on the fibrous HA. Two forms of fibrous HA (distinct needle-like monocrystals and spherulitic aggregates of needles) were synthesized using a simple precipitation method and loaded with bimetallic catalysts (from 2 up to 20 wt%) by a wet chemical impregnation method. The HA supported catalysts were evaluated for the in situ growth of carbon nanotubes using the catalytic chemical vapor deposition method. The effect of reaction temperature and metal loading on the yield, structural perfection and morphology of the carbon products were investigated using a combination of X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, Raman spectroscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The results revealed that both the selection of the growing conditions and the metal loading determine the yield and overall quality of the synthesized carbon nanotubes, which exhibit high graphitization degree when synthesized in high yields.

  8. The effect of fibronectin on structural and biological properties of single walled carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farokhi, Mehdi [National cell bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Atyabi, Fatemeh [Department of Pharmaceutical Nanoechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omidvar, Ramin [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali, E-mail: mashokrgozar@pasteur.ac.ir [National cell bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghizadeh, Majid, E-mail: sadeghma@modares.ac.ir [Department Genetics, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the cytocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotube by loading fibronectin. • Enhancing the hydrophilicity and nanosurface roughness of single walled carbon nanotube after loading fibronectin. • Fibronectin makes the surface properties of single walled carbon nanotube more suitable for cell proliferation and growth. - Abstract: Despite the attractive properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), cytoxicity and hydrophobicity are two main considerable features which limit their application in biomedical fields. It was well established that treating CNTs with extracellular matrix components could reduce these unfavourable characteristics. In an attempt to address these issues, fibronectin (FN) with different concentrations was loaded on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) substrate. Scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angles and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were preformed in order to characterize FN loaded SWCNTs substrates. According to XPS and AFM results, FN could interact with SWCNTs and for this, the hydrophilicity of SWCNTs was improved. Additionally, SWCNT modified with FN showed less cytotoxicity compared with neat SWCNT. Finally, FN was shown to act as an interesting extracellular component for enhancing the biological properties of SWCNT.

  9. The effect of fibronectin on structural and biological properties of single walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh; Farokhi, Mehdi; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Omidvar, Ramin; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the cytocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotube by loading fibronectin. • Enhancing the hydrophilicity and nanosurface roughness of single walled carbon nanotube after loading fibronectin. • Fibronectin makes the surface properties of single walled carbon nanotube more suitable for cell proliferation and growth. - Abstract: Despite the attractive properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), cytoxicity and hydrophobicity are two main considerable features which limit their application in biomedical fields. It was well established that treating CNTs with extracellular matrix components could reduce these unfavourable characteristics. In an attempt to address these issues, fibronectin (FN) with different concentrations was loaded on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) substrate. Scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angles and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were preformed in order to characterize FN loaded SWCNTs substrates. According to XPS and AFM results, FN could interact with SWCNTs and for this, the hydrophilicity of SWCNTs was improved. Additionally, SWCNT modified with FN showed less cytotoxicity compared with neat SWCNT. Finally, FN was shown to act as an interesting extracellular component for enhancing the biological properties of SWCNT

  10. Tunneling Nanotubes are Novel Cellular Structures That Communicate Signals Between Trabecular Meshwork Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Kate E; Bradley, John M; Sun, Ying Ying; Yang, Yong-Feng; Acott, Ted S

    2017-10-01

    The actin cytoskeleton of trabecular meshwork (TM) cells plays a role in regulating aqueous humor outflow. Many studies have investigated stress fibers, but F-actin also assembles into other supramolecular structures including filopodia. Recently, specialized filopodia called tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) have been described, which communicate molecular signals and organelles directly between cells. Here, we investigate TNT formation by TM cells. Human TM cells were labeled separately with the fluorescent dyes, DiO and DiD, or with mitochondrial dye. Fixed or live TM cells were imaged using confocal microscopy. Image analysis software was used to track fluorescent vesicles and count the number and length of filopodia. The number of fluorescently labeled vesicles transferred between cells was counted in response to specific inhibitors of the actin cytoskeleton. Human TM tissue was stained with phalloidin. Live-cell confocal imaging of cultured TM cells showed transfer of fluorescently labeled vesicles and mitochondria via TNTs. In TM tissue, a long (160 μm) actin-rich cell process bridged an intertrabecular space and did not adhere to the substratum. Treatment of TM cells with CK-666, an Arp2/3 inhibitor, significantly decreased the number and length of filopodia, decreased transfer of fluorescently labeled vesicles and induced thick stress fibers compared to vehicle control. Conversely, inhibiting stress fibers using Y27632 increased transfer of vesicles and induced long cell processes. Identification of TNTs provides a means by which TM cells can directly communicate with each other over long distances. This may be particularly important to overcome limitations of diffusion-based signaling in the aqueous humor fluid environment.

  11. Fully integrated carbon nanotube composite thin film strain sensors on flexible substrates for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, A. R.; Lynch, J. P.; Kurata, M.; Law, K. H.

    2017-09-01

    Multifunctional thin film materials have opened many opportunities for novel sensing strategies for structural health monitoring. While past work has established methods of optimizing multifunctional materials to exhibit sensing properties, comparatively less work has focused on their integration into fully functional sensing systems capable of being deployed in the field. This study focuses on the advancement of a scalable fabrication process for the integration of multifunctional thin films into a fully integrated sensing system. This is achieved through the development of an optimized fabrication process that can create a broad range of sensing systems using multifunctional materials. A layer-by-layer deposited multifunctional composite consisting of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) in a polyvinyl alcohol and polysodium-4-styrene sulfonate matrix are incorporated with a lithography process to produce a fully integrated sensing system deposited on a flexible substrate. To illustrate the process, a strain sensing platform consisting of a patterned SWNT-composite thin film as a strain-sensitive element within an amplified Wheatstone bridge sensing circuit is presented. Strain sensing is selected because it presents many of the design and processing challenges that are core to patterning multifunctional thin film materials into sensing systems. Strain sensors fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate are experimentally tested under cyclic loading using standard four-point bending coupons and a partial-scale steel frame assembly under lateral loading. The study reveals the material process is highly repeatable to produce fully integrated strain sensors with linearity and sensitivity exceeding 0.99 and 5 {{V}}/{ε }, respectively. The thin film strain sensors are robust and are capable of high strain measurements beyond 3000 μ {ε }.

  12. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes and dispersed nanodiamond novel hybrids: Microscopic structure evolution, physical properties, and radiation resilience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.; Farmer, J.

    2011-01-01

    We report the structure and physical properties of novel hybrids of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and ultradispersed diamond (UDD) forming nanocomposite ensemble that were subjected to 50, 100, and 10 3 kGy gamma ray doses and characterized using various analytical tools to investigate hierarchical defects evolution. This work is prompted by recent work on single-walled CNTs and UDD ensemble [Gupta et al., J. Appl. Phys. 107, 104308 (2010)] where radiation-induced microscopic defects seem to be stabilized by UDD. The present experiments show similar effects where these hybrids display only a minimal structural modification under the maximum dose. Quantitative analyses of multiwavelength Raman spectra revealed lattice defects induced by irradiation assessed through the variation in prominent D, G, and 2D bands. A minimal change in the position of D, G, and 2D bands and a marginal increase in intensity of the defect-induced double resonant Raman scattered D and 2D bands are some of the implications suggesting the radiation coupling. The in-plane correlation length (L a ) was also determined following Tunistra-Koenig relation from the ratio of D to G band (I D /I G ) besides microscopic stress. However, we also suggest the following taking into account of intrinsic defects of the constituents: (a) charge transfer arising at the interface due to the difference in electronegativity of MWCNT C sp 2 and UDD core (C sp 3 ) leading to phonon and electron energy renormalization; (b) misorientation of C sp 2 at the interface of MWCNT and UDD shell (C sp 2 ) resulting in structural disorder; (c) softening or violation of the q∼0 selection rule leading to D band broadening and a minimal change in G band intensity; and (d) normalized intensity of D and G bands with 2D band help to distinguish defect-induced double resonance phenomena. The MWCNT when combined with nanodiamond showed a slight decrease in their conductance further affected by irradiation pointing at

  13. The influence of carbon nanotubes on enzyme activity and structure: investigation of different immobilization procedures through enzyme kinetics and circular dichroism studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cang-Rong, Jason Teng; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2009-01-01

    In the last decade, many environmental organizations have devoted their efforts to identifying renewable biosystems, which could provide sustainable fuels and thus enhance energy security. Amidst the myriad of possibilities, some biofuels make use of different types of waste biomasses, and enzymes are often employed to hydrolyze these biomasses and produce sugars that will be subsequently converted into ethanol. In this project, we aimed to bridge nanotechnology and biofuel production: here we report on the activity and structure of the enzyme amyloglucosidase (AMG), physically adsorbed or covalently immobilized onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). In fact, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) present several properties that render them ideal support systems, without the diffusion limitations displayed by porous material and with the advantage of being further functionalizable at their surface. Chemical ligation was achieved both on oxidized nanotubes (via carbodiimide chemistry), as well as on amino-functionalized nanotubes (via periodate-oxidized AMG). Results showed that AMG retained a certain percentage of its specific activity for all enzyme-carbon nanotubes complexes prepared, with the physically adsorbed samples displaying better catalytic efficiency than the covalently immobilized samples. Analysis of the enzyme's structure through circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy revealed significant structural changes in all samples, the degree of change being consistent with the activity profiles. This study proves that AMG interacts differently with carbon nanotubes depending on the method employed. Due to the higher activity reported by the enzyme physically adsorbed onto CNTs, these samples demonstrated a vast potential for further development. At the same time, the possibility of inducing magnetic properties into CNTs offers the opportunity to easily separate them from the original solution. Hence, substances to which they

  14. Theoretical exploration of structural, electro-optical and magnetic properties of gallium-doped silicon carbide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad; Moradian, Rostam; Shahrokhi, Masoud

    2014-09-01

    The effects of gallium doping on the structural, electro-optical and magnetic properties of (8,0) silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNT) are investigated by using spin-polarized density functional theory. It is found from the calculation of the formation energies that gallium substitution for silicon atom is preferred. Our results show that gallium substitution at either single carbon or silicon atom site in SiCNT could induce spontaneous magnetization. The optical studies based on dielectric function indicate that new transition peaks and a blue shift are observed after gallium doping.

  15. The effect of different atmospheres on structural changes of titanate nanotubes during heating

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Václavů, T.; Rudajevová, A.; Václavů, M.; Daniš, S.; Popelková, Daniela; Kužel, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 128, č. 2 (2017), s. 779-785 ISSN 1388-6150 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : titanate nanotubes * X-ray diffraction * thermal analysis Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 1.953, year: 2016

  16. Structural and Chemical Analysis of Gadolinium Halides Encapsulated within WS 2 Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Anumol, E A

    2016-05-18

    The hollow cavities of nanotubes could serve as templates for the growth of size- and shape-confined functional nanostructures, giving rise to novel materials and properties. In this work, considering their potential application as MRI contrast agents, gadolinium halides are encapsulated within the hollow cavities of inorganic nanotubes of WS2 by capillary filling to obtain GdX3@WS2 nanotubes (where X = Cl, Br or I and @ means encapsulated in). Aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and spectroscopy is employed to understand the morphology and composition of the GdI3@WS2 nanotubes. The three dimensional morphology is studied with STEM tomography but understanding the compositional information is a non-trivial matter due to the presence of multiple high atomic number elements. Therefore, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) tomography was employed revealing the three dimensional chemical composition. Molecular dynamics simulations of the filling procedure shed light into the mechanics behind the formation of the confined gadolinium halide crystals. The quasi-1D system employed here serves as an example of a TEM-based chemical nanotomography method that could be extended to other materials, including beam-sensitive soft materials.

  17. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günay, E. [Gazi University, Mechanical Engineering Department, 06570, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-04-21

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  18. Structural and Chemical Analysis of Gadolinium Halides Encapsulated within WS 2 Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Anumol, E A; Enyashin, Andrey; Batra, Nitin M; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.; Francis, Leonard Deepak

    2016-01-01

    The hollow cavities of nanotubes could serve as templates for the growth of size- and shape-confined functional nanostructures, giving rise to novel materials and properties. In this work, considering their potential application as MRI contrast agents, gadolinium halides are encapsulated within the hollow cavities of inorganic nanotubes of WS2 by capillary filling to obtain GdX3@WS2 nanotubes (where X = Cl, Br or I and @ means encapsulated in). Aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and spectroscopy is employed to understand the morphology and composition of the GdI3@WS2 nanotubes. The three dimensional morphology is studied with STEM tomography but understanding the compositional information is a non-trivial matter due to the presence of multiple high atomic number elements. Therefore, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) tomography was employed revealing the three dimensional chemical composition. Molecular dynamics simulations of the filling procedure shed light into the mechanics behind the formation of the confined gadolinium halide crystals. The quasi-1D system employed here serves as an example of a TEM-based chemical nanotomography method that could be extended to other materials, including beam-sensitive soft materials.

  19. Electrochemical Tuning of Electronic Structure of Carbon Nanotubes and Fullerene Peapods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, L.; Kataura, H.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 42, - (2004), s. 1011-1019 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4040306; GA MŠk ME 487 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : electrochemical analysis * carbon nanotubes * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.331, year: 2004

  20. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günay, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  1. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Günay, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  2. Structure and flow behavior of dilute dispersions of carbon nanotubes in polyacrylonitrile–dimethylsulfoxide solution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karpushkin, E.; Gvozdik, N.; Klimenko, M.; Filippov, Sergey K.; Angelov, Borislav; Bessonov, I.; Sergeyev, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 294, č. 7 (2016), s. 1187-1195 ISSN 0303-402X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC15-10527J Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * alignment * aggregation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.723, year: 2016

  3. Characterization of nephelium mutabile blume-like structure of carbon nanotubes prepared from palm oil by CVD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryam, M.; Shamsudin, M. S.; Rusop, M.

    2017-09-01

    A new structure of carbon nanotube was produced from the Single furnace Aerosol-assisted Catalytic CVD (SFAACVD) method using Palm Oil (PO) as the precursor and Ferrocene (Fe) as the catalyst. A nephelium mutabile blume (rambutan)-like structure of CNTs was found from the black substance collected from the Alumina boat substrate placed inside the furnace. Temperature of furnace which was heated at 600 °C - 800 °C plays an important role in determining the formation of structure. The formation rambutan-like structure of CNTs was optimized at 700 °C and the samples collected were characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM) to obtain the surface morphologies. Raman Spectroscopy (RS) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) were then used to further study the Raman Spectra and purity of samples.

  4. Processing-structure-property relationships of carbon nanotube and nanoplatelet enabled piezoresistive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Sida

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess excellent piezoresistive performance, which is manifested by the significant electrical resistance change when subject to mechanical deformation. In comparison to individual CNTs, the CNT thin films, formed by a random assembly of individual tubes or bundles, show much lower piezoresistive sensitivity. Given the progress made to date in developing CNT ensemble based-piezoresistive sensors, the related piezoresistive mechanism(s) are still not well understood. The crucial step to obtain a better understanding of this issue is to study the effects of CNT structure in the dispersion on the piezoresistivity of CNT ensemble based-piezoresistive sensors. To reach this goal, my Ph.D. research first focuses on establishing the processing-structure-property relationship of SWCNT thin film piezoresistive sensors. The key accomplishment contains: 1) developing the combined preparative ultracentrifuge method (PUM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) method to quantitatively characterized SWCNT particle size in dispersions under various sonication conditions; 2) designing combined ultrasonication and microfluidization processing protocol for high throughput and large-scale production of high quality SWCNT dispersions; 3) fabricating varied SWCNT thin film piezoresistive sensors through spray coating technique and immersion-drying post-treatment; and 4) investigating the effect of microstructures of SWCNTs on piezoresistivity of SWCNT thin film sensors. This experimental methodology for quantitative and systematic investigation of the processing-structure-property relationships provides a means for the performance optimization of CNT ensemble based piezoresistive sensors. As a start to understand the piezoresistive mechanism, the second focus of my Ph.D. research is studying charge transport behaviors in SWCNT thin films. It was found that the temperature-dependent sheet resistance of SWCNT thin films could be explained by a 3D variable

  5. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  6. Synthesis of palladium nanoparticle modified reduced graphene oxide and multi-walled carbon nanotube hybrid structures for electrochemical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jie, E-mail: hujie@tyut.edu.cn [Micro and Nano System Research Center, Key Lab of Advanced Transducers and Intelligent Control System (Ministry of Education) & College of Information Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, 030024, Shanxi (China); Zhao, Zhenting; Zhang, Jun; Li, Gang; Li, Pengwei; Zhang, Wendong [Micro and Nano System Research Center, Key Lab of Advanced Transducers and Intelligent Control System (Ministry of Education) & College of Information Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, 030024, Shanxi (China); Lian, Kun, E-mail: liankun@tyut.edu.cn [Micro and Nano System Research Center, Key Lab of Advanced Transducers and Intelligent Control System (Ministry of Education) & College of Information Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, 030024, Shanxi (China); School of Nano-Science and Nano-Engineering, Suzhou & Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, LA, 70806 (United States)

    2017-02-28

    Graphical abstract: A sensitive hydrazine electrochemical sensor was fabricated by using palladium (Pd) nanoparticle functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) hybrid structures (Pd/rGO-MWCNTs). - Highlights: • rGO-MWCNTs hybrid structures and Pd nanoparticles are prepared using electrochemical methods. • rGO-MWCNTs hybrid films are used as supports and co-catalysts for Pd nanoparticles. • The Pd/rGO-MWCNTs hybrid structure based sensor shows an ultra-high sensitivity of 7.09 μA μM{sup −1} cm{sup −2} and a low detection limit of 0.15 μM. • The proposed electrochemical sensor exhibits excellent selectivity. - Abstract: In this work, palladium (Pd) nanoparticles functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) hybrid structures (Pd/rGO-MWCNTs) were successfully prepared by a combination of electrochemical reduction with electrodeposition method. The morphology, structure, and composition of the Pd/rGO-MWCNTs hybrid were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The as-synthesized hybrid structures were modified on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and further utilized for hydrazine sensing. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic, cyclic voltammetry and single-potential amperometry experiments were carried out on Pd/rGO-MWCNTs hybrid structures to investigate the interface properties and sensing performance. The measured results demonstrate that the fabricated Pd/rGO-MWCNTs/GCE sensor show a high sensitivity of 7.09 μA μM{sup −1} cm{sup −2} in a large concentration range of 1.0 to 1100 μM and a low detection limit of 0.15 μM. Moreover, the as-prepared sensor exhibits good selectivity and stability for the determination of hydrazine under interference conditions.

  7. Synthesis of palladium nanoparticle modified reduced graphene oxide and multi-walled carbon nanotube hybrid structures for electrochemical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Jie; Zhao, Zhenting; Zhang, Jun; Li, Gang; Li, Pengwei; Zhang, Wendong; Lian, Kun

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A sensitive hydrazine electrochemical sensor was fabricated by using palladium (Pd) nanoparticle functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) hybrid structures (Pd/rGO-MWCNTs). - Highlights: • rGO-MWCNTs hybrid structures and Pd nanoparticles are prepared using electrochemical methods. • rGO-MWCNTs hybrid films are used as supports and co-catalysts for Pd nanoparticles. • The Pd/rGO-MWCNTs hybrid structure based sensor shows an ultra-high sensitivity of 7.09 μA μM"−"1 cm"−"2 and a low detection limit of 0.15 μM. • The proposed electrochemical sensor exhibits excellent selectivity. - Abstract: In this work, palladium (Pd) nanoparticles functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) hybrid structures (Pd/rGO-MWCNTs) were successfully prepared by a combination of electrochemical reduction with electrodeposition method. The morphology, structure, and composition of the Pd/rGO-MWCNTs hybrid were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The as-synthesized hybrid structures were modified on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and further utilized for hydrazine sensing. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic, cyclic voltammetry and single-potential amperometry experiments were carried out on Pd/rGO-MWCNTs hybrid structures to investigate the interface properties and sensing performance. The measured results demonstrate that the fabricated Pd/rGO-MWCNTs/GCE sensor show a high sensitivity of 7.09 μA μM"−"1 cm"−"2 in a large concentration range of 1.0 to 1100 μM and a low detection limit of 0.15 μM. Moreover, the as-prepared sensor exhibits good selectivity and stability for the determination of hydrazine under interference conditions.

  8. Changes of the electronic structure of the atoms of nitrogen in nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes under the influence of pulsed ion radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korusenko, P.M., E-mail: korusenko@obisp.oscsbras.ru [Omsk Scientific Centre, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Karl Marx Avenue, 15, Omsk 644024 (Russian Federation); Bolotov, V.V.; Nesov, S.N.; Povoroznyuk, S.N. [Omsk Scientific Centre, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Karl Marx Avenue, 15, Omsk 644024 (Russian Federation); Khailov, I.P. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Ave. 2a, Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-01

    With the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) there have been investigated the changes of the chemical state of nitrogen atoms in the structure of nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CN{sub x}-MWCNTs) resulting from the impact of pulsed ion beam at various parameters of the beam (energy density, number of pulses). It has been established that irradiation with the pulsed ion beam leads to a reduction of the total amount of nitrogen in CN{sub x} nanotubes. It has been shown that a single pulse irradiation of ion beam at the energy densities of 0.5, 1, 1.5 J/cm{sup 2} leads to restructuring of the nitrogen from pyridinic and pyrrolic configuration to graphitic state. Complete removal of nitrogen (pyridinic, pyrrolic, graphitic) embedded in the structure of the walls of CN{sub x} nanotubes occurs at ten pulses and 1.5 J/cm{sup 2}.

  9. Comparison of structural health assessment capabilities in epoxy – carbon black and epoxy – carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Inam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for comparing structural health of different types of brittle epoxy nanocomposites filled with carbon nanostructured fillers is presented. Epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon black (CB and epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon nanotube (CNT nanocomposite bars were prepared by calendering and thermal curing. Nanocomposite bars were subjected to Vickers diamond indentation to produce sub-surface damage. Electrical conductivities were analysed by 4-point method to estimate the structural damage caused by indentation. For comprehensive comparison, fracture toughness and percolation threshold were analysed as well. Because of the systematically induced indentation damage, a sharp decrease of 89% was observed in the electrical conductivity of epoxy – CNT nanocomposite as compared to 25% in the electrical conductivity of epoxy – CB nanocomposite. CNTs impart superior damage sensing capability in brittle nanocomposite structures, in comparison to CB, due to their high aspect ratio (fibrous nature and high electrical conductivity.

  10. Variable electron beam diameter achieved by a titanium oxide/carbon nanotube hetero-structure suitable for nanolithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdi, Yaser; Barati, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    We report the fabrication of a titanium oxide/carbon nanotube based field emission device suitable for nanolithography and fabrication of transistors. The growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is performed on silicon substrates using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method. The vertically grown CNTs are encapsulated by titanium oxide (TiO 2 ) using an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition system. Field emission from the CNTs is realized by mechanical polishing of the prepared structure. Possible applications of such nanostructures as a lithography tool with variable electron beam diameter has been investigated. The obtained results show that a spot size of less than 30 nm can be obtained by applying the proper voltage on TiO 2 surrounding gate. Electrical measurements of the fabricated device confirm the capability of the structure for fabrication of field emission based field effect transistors. By a voltage applied between the gate and the cathode electrode, the emission current from CNTs shows a significant drop, indicating proper control of the gate on the emission current. (paper)

  11. Continuous carbon nanotube reinforced composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, L; Suhr, J; Pushparaj, V; Zhang, X; Ajayan, P M

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are considered short fibers, and polymer composites with nanotube fillers are always analogues of random, short fiber composites. The real structural carbon fiber composites, on the other hand, always contain carbon fiber reinforcements where fibers run continuously through the composite matrix. With the recent optimization in aligned nanotube growth, samples of nanotubes in macroscopic lengths have become available, and this allows the creation of composites that are similar to the continuous fiber composites with individual nanotubes running continuously through the composite body. This allows the proper utilization of the extreme high modulus and strength predicted for nanotubes in structural composites. Here, we fabricate such continuous nanotube polymer composites with continuous nanotube reinforcements and report that under compressive loadings, the nanotube composites can generate more than an order of magnitude improvement in the longitudinal modulus (up to 3,300%) as well as damping capability (up to 2,100%). It is also observed that composites with a random distribution of nanotubes of same length and similar filler fraction provide three times less effective reinforcement in composites.

  12. Structure and electronic properties of molybdenum monatomic wires encapsulated in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GarcIa-Fuente, A; Vega, A [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Atomica y Optica. Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain); GarcIa-Suarez, V M; Ferrer, J [Departamento de Fisica and CINN, Universidad de Oviedo, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2011-07-06

    Monatomic chains of molybdenum encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of different chiralities are investigated using density functional theory. We determine the optimal size of the CNT for encapsulating a single atomic wire, as well as the most stable atomic arrangement adopted by the wire. We also study the transport properties in the ballistic regime by computing the transmission coefficients and tracing them back to the electronic conduction channels of the wire and the host. We predict that CNTs of appropriate radii encapsulating a Mo wire have metallic behavior, even if both the nanotube and the wire are insulators. Therefore, encapsulation of Mo wires in CNTs is a way to create conductive quasi-one-dimensional hybrid nanostructures.

  13. Structure and Characterization of Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, F.; Morant, C.; Elizalde, E.; Roque-Malherbe, R.; Lopez, V.; Zamora, F.; Domingo, C.

    2010-01-01

    Arrays of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube bundles, SWCNTs, have been synthesized by simple alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition process, carried out at 800 degree C. The formed SWCNTs are organized in small groups perpendicularly aligned and attached to the substrate. These small bundles show a constant diameter of ca. 30 nm and are formed by the adhesion of no more than twenty individual SWCNTs perfectly aligned along their length.

  14. Influence of Fe nanoparticles diameters on the structure and electron emission studies of carbon nanotubes and multilayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Himani; Shukla, A.K.; Vankar, V.D.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report the effect of Fe film thickness on the growth, structure and electron emission characteristics of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and multilayer graphene deposited on Si substrate. It is observed that the number of graphitic shells in carbon nanostructures (CNs) varies with the thickness of the catalyst depending on the average size of nanoparticles. Further, the Fe nanoparticles do not catalyze beyond a particular size of nanoclusters leading to the formation of multilayer graphene structure, instead of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It is observed that the crystallinity of CNs enhances upon increasing the catalyst thickness. Multilayer graphene structures show improved crystallinity in comparison to CNTs as graphitic to defect mode intensity ratio (I D /I G ) decreases from 1.2 to 0.8. However, I 2D /I G value for multilayer graphene is found to be 1.1 confirming the presence of at least 10 layers of graphene in these samples. CNTs with smaller diameter show better electron emission properties with enhancement factor (γ C = 2.8 × 10 3 ) in comparison to multilayer graphene structure (γ C = 1.5 × 10 3 ). The better emission characteristics in CNTs are explained due to combination of electrons from edges as well as centers in comparison to the multilayer graphene. Highlights: ► Graphitic shells in CNTs and graphene depend on the size of Fe nanoparticles. ► The diameter of nanoparticles decides the morphology of CNTs and graphene. ► Multilayer graphene structures show improved crystallinity in comparison to CNTs. ► Multilayer graphene (MLG) has the γ C factor of 1.5 × 10 3 and CNTs has 2.8 × 10 3 . ► The nonlinearity in MLG may occur through change in work function.

  15. Investigation on the influence of pH on structure and photoelectrochemical properties of CdSe electrolytically deposited into TiO2 nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Jinbo; Shen, Qianqian; Yang, Fei; Liang, Wei; Liu, Xuguang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • There-dimensional CdSe-TiO 2 multijunction was fabricated by electrochemical method. • CdSe nanoparticles had a good bonding with the walls of TiO 2 nanotube. • pH value played an important role in the quality of CdSe-TiO 2 interfaces. - Abstract: In this work, we fabricated CdSe/TiO 2 nanotube arrays (NTAs) by electrochemical method. In electrodeposition, the pH value of the electrolyte played an important role in formation of CdSe nanoparticles. As the pH value decreased, more CdSe deposited on TiO 2 NTAs. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy characterization shows that the CdSe nanoparticles were uniformly deposited on and into TiO 2 nanotubes when the pH value was 3, and this structure fully utilized the three-dimensional (3D) space of TiO 2 nanotubes to form 3D multijunction heterostructures. According to the photoelectrochemical test, the CdSe/TiO 2 NTAs sample prepared at pH = 3 exhibited maximum photocurrent and open circuit potential. This is because that the deposited CdSe nanoparticles had better bond with the walls of TiO 2 nanotube than the samples deposited at other pH values, which facilitated the propagation and kinetic separation of photogenerated charges

  16. Preparation of Sb2S3 nanocrystals modified TiO2 dendritic structure with nanotubes for hybrid solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingpin; Wei, Yanan; Feng, Kangning; Hao, Yanzhong; Pei, Juan; Sun, Bao

    2018-06-01

    Array of TiO2 dendritic structure with nanotubes was constructed on transparent conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide glass (FTO) with titanium potassium oxalate as titanium source. Sb2S3 nanocrystals were successfully deposited on the TiO2 substrate via spin-coating method. Furthermore, TiO2/Sb2S3/P3HT/PEDOT:PSS composite film was prepared by successively spin-coating P3HT and PEDOT:PSS on TiO2/Sb2S3. It was demonstrated that the modification of TiO2 dendritic structure with Sb2S3 could enhance the light absorption in the visible region. The champion hybrid solar cell assembled by TiO2/Sb2S3/P3HT/PEDOT:PSS composite film achieved a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 1.56%.

  17. Modeling the Dispersibility of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Organic Solvents by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Hayriye; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of physico-chemical properties of carbon nanotubes, including behavior in organic solvents is very important for design, manufacturing and utilizing of their counterparts with improved properties. In the present study a quantitative structure-activity/property relationship (QSAR/QSPR) approach was applied to predict the dispersibility of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in various organic solvents. A number of additive descriptors and quantum-chemical descriptors were calculated and utilized to build QSAR models. The best predictability is shown by a 4-variable model. The model showed statistically good results (R2training = 0.797, Q2 = 0.665, R2test = 0.807), with high internal and external correlation coefficients. Presence of the X0Av descriptor and its negative term suggest that small size solvents have better SWCNTs solubility. Mass weighted descriptor ATS6m also indicates that heavier solvents (and small in size) most probably are better solvents for SWCNTs. The presence of the Dipole Z descriptor indicates that higher polarizability of the solvent molecule increases the solubility. The developed model and contributed descriptors can help to understand the mechanism of the dispersion process and predictorganic solvents that improve the dispersibility of SWNTs. PMID:28347035

  18. Modeling the Dispersibility of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Organic Solvents by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayriye Yilmaz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of physico-chemical properties of carbon nanotubes, including behavior in organic solvents is very important for design, manufacturing and utilizing of their counterparts with improved properties. In the present study a quantitative structure-activity/property relationship (QSAR/QSPR approach was applied to predict the dispersibility of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs in various organic solvents. A number of additive descriptors and quantum-chemical descriptors were calculated and utilized to build QSAR models. The best predictability is shown by a 4-variable model. The model showed statistically good results (R2training = 0.797, Q2 = 0.665, R2test = 0.807, with high internal and external correlation coefficients. Presence of the X0Av descriptor and its negative term suggest that small size solvents have better SWCNTs solubility. Mass weighted descriptor ATS6m also indicates that heavier solvents (and small in size most probably are better solvents for SWCNTs. The presence of the Dipole Z descriptor indicates that higher polarizability of the solvent molecule increases the solubility. The developed model and contributed descriptors can help to understand the mechanism of the dispersion process and predictorganic solvents that improve the dispersibility of SWNTs.

  19. The effect of Co content on the structure and the magnetic properties of Co{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x} nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qin [Department of Applied Physics, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300401 (China); Wang, Zhi-Jun [Hebei Chemical and Pharmaceutical Vocational Technology College, Shijiazhuang 050026 (China); Wang, Yong-Guo [Department of Public Foundation, Tianjin Youth Professional College, Tianjin 300350 (China); Sun, Hui-Yuan, E-mail: huiyuansun@126.com [College of Physics Science & Information Engineering, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Co{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x} (x=0–0.5) nanotube arrays with different component contents were prepared by Electrodeposition Method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement indicates that low Co content (x≤0.5) does not change their crystal structure. The direction of easy magnetization changes from being parallel with to being perpendicular to the direction of the nanotube axes, with Co content increasing from 0 to 0.5. This study suggests that the drastic change of magnetic anisotropy is attributed to the competition between the shape and magnetocrystalline anisotropies. - Highlights: • Co{sub x}Ni{sub 1–x}(x=0~0.5) nanotube arrays were prepared by a DC electrodeposition method. • The direction of easy magnetization changes with Co content increasing. • It suggests that the competition between shape and magnetocrystalline anisotropies.

  20. Structural profiling and biological performance of phospholipid-hyaluronan functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvash, Ram; Khatchatouriants, Artium; Solmesky, Leonardo J

    2013-01-01

    In spite of significant insolubility and toxicity, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) erupt into the biomedical research, and create an increasing interest in the field of nanomedicine. Single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are highly hydrophobic and have been shown to be toxic while systemically administrated. Thus...... an inflammatory response in macrophages as evidenced by the cytokine profiling and the use of image-based high-content analysis approach in contrast to non-modified CNTs. In addition, systemic administration of CNT-PL-HA into healthy C57BL/6 mice did not alter the total number of leukocytes nor increased liver...

  1. Carbon nanotube filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  2. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvetat, J.-P.; Bonard, J.-M.; Thomson, N. H.; Kulik, A. J.; Forró, L.; Benoit, W.; Zuppiroli, L.

    A variety of outstanding experimental results on the elucidation of the elastic properties of carbon nanotubes are fast appearing. These are based mainly on the techniques of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine the Young's moduli of single-wall nanotube bundles and multi-walled nanotubes, prepared by a number of methods. These results are confirming the theoretical predictions that carbon nanotubes have high strength plus extraordinary flexibility and resilience. As well as summarising the most notable achievements of theory and experiment in the last few years, this paper explains the properties of nanotubes in the wider context of materials science and highlights the contribution of our research group in this rapidly expanding field. A deeper understanding of the relationship between the structural order of the nanotubes and their mechanical properties will be necessary for the development of carbon-nanotube-based composites. Our research to date illustrates a qualitative relationship between the Young's modulus of a nanotube and the amount of disorder in the atomic structure of the walls. Other exciting results indicate that composites will benefit from the exceptional mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, but that the major outstanding problem of load transfer efficiency must be overcome before suitable engineering materials can be produced.

  3. In-situ TEM study on structural change and light emission of a multiwall carbon nanotube during Joule heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, K.; Asaka, K.; Nakahara, H.; Saito, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Structure changes of a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) during Joule heating were studied with simultaneous measurement of light emission spectra. The outer shells of the MWNT peeled off one by one because of excessive heating. All the peeled outer shells finally disappeared and inner shells whose tips were closed emerged, i.e., a new MWNT was formed. Each diameter of the shells comprising the MWNT decreased compared with those before the fracture. Light emission spectra during Joule heating of an MWNT were composed of both the blackbody radiation and characteristic peaks. The peaks in the light emission spectra shifted to higher energies in accordance with shrinkage of the inner shells. The energies of the peaks in the spectra corresponded to energy gaps between van Hove singularities calculated from the diameters of the shells, indicating that the peaks in the spectra are attributed to the interband electron transition in the MWNT.

  4. The part of acoustic phonons in the negative thermal expansion of the layered structures and nanotubes based on them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremenko, V.V.; Sirenko, V.A.; Dolbin, A.V.; Gospodarev, I.A.; Syrkin, E.S.; Feodos'ev, S.B.; Bondar', I.S.; Sirenko, A.F.; Minakova, K.A.

    2016-01-01

    A negative linear thermal expansion observed experimentally in a number of crystalline compounds with a complicated lattice and anisotropic interaction between atoms. The nature of negative linear thermal expansion along a number of directions is explained on the basis of calculations which were carried out at a microscopic level. We analyze anomalies in the temperature dependence of the coefficients of linear thermal expansion (the LTEC) along different directions: in layered crystals, formed as a monoatomic layers (graphite and carbon nanofilms) and multilayer ''sand-wiches'' (dichalcogenides of transition metals); in multilayer crystal structures such as high-temperature superconductors in which the anisotropy of the interatomic interaction is not saved in the long-range order; in carbon nanotubes. The results of theoretical calculations are compared with the data of x-ray, neutron diffraction and dilatometric measurements.

  5. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ming; Kang, Zhan; Huang, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials

  6. Nickel induced re-structuring of 2D graphene to 1D graphene nanotubes: Role of radical hydrogen in catalyst assisted growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Rahul; Titus, Elby

    2017-12-01

    Here, we demonstrate for the first time the structural evolution of 1D graphene nanotubes (GNTs) by the cutting of two dimensional (2D) graphene oxide (GO) sheet in reducing environment at ambient conditions in presence of Ni metal in acidic environment. We observed that in-situ generated radical hydrogen (Hrad) responsible for cutting of graphene sheets and re-structuring of 2D sheet structure to one 1D nanotubes. Structural evolution of GNTs was confirmed by using of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique. The current vs. voltage (I-V) characteristics of GNTs displayed room temperature (RT) negative differential resistance (NDR) effect which is typical in nanowires, suggested the applicability of nanomaterial for various kind of electronics applications such as memory devices and transistors fabrication.

  7. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Studies of Electrospun Poly(dimethylsiloxane)/Poly (methyl methacrylate)/Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, A. Douglas; Larios, Eduardo; Alamgir, Faisal M.; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel; Campo, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the near conduction band edge structure of electrospun mats of MWCNT-PDMS-PMMA by near edge X-Ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Effects of adding nanofillers of different sizes were addressed. Despite observed morphological variations and inhomogeneous carbon nanotube distribution, spun mats appeared homogeneous under NEXAFS analysis. Spectra revealed differences in emissions from glancing and normal spectra; which may evidence phase separation within the bulk of the micron-size fibers. Further, dichroic ratios show polymer chains did not align, even in the presence of nanofillers. Addition of nanofillers affected emissions in the C-H, C=O and C-C regimes, suggesting their involvement in interfacial matrix-carbon nanotube bonding. Spectral differences at glancing angles between pristine and composite mats suggest that geometric conformational configurations are taking place between polymeric chains and carbon nanotubes. These differences appear to be carbon nanotube-dimension dependent, and are promoted upon room temperature mixing and shear flow during electrospinning. CH-π bonding between polymer chains and graphitic walls, as well as H-bonds between impurities in the as-grown CNTs and polymer pendant groups are proposed bonding mechanisms promoting matrix conformation. PMID:24308286

  8. Design of Electrically Conductive Structural Composites by Modulating Aligned CVD-Grown Carbon Nanotube Length on Glass Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Delong; Fan, Benhui; Zhao, Hang; Lu, Xiaoxin; Yang, Minhao; Liu, Yu; Bai, Jinbo

    2017-01-25

    Function-integration in glass fiber (GF) reinforced polymer composites is highly desired for developing lightweight structures and devices with improved performance and structural health monitoring. In this study, homogeneously aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) shell was in situ grafted on GF by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). It was demonstrated that the CNT shell thickness and weight fraction can be modulated by controlling the CVD conditions. The obtained hierarchical CNTs-GF/epoxy composites show highly improved electrical conductivity and thermo-mechanical and flexural properties. The composite through-plane and in-plane electrical conductivities increase from a quasi-isolator value to ∼3.5 and 100 S/m, respectively, when the weight fraction of CNTs grafted on GF fabric varies from 0% to 7%, respectively. Meanwhile, the composite storage modulus and flexural modulus and strength improve as high as 12%, 21%, and 26%, respectively, with 100% retention of the glass transition temperature. The reinforcing mechanisms are investigated by analyzing the composite microstructure and the interfacial adhesion and wetting properties of CNTs-GF hybrids. Moreover, the specific damage-related resistance variation characteristics could be employed to in situ monitor the structural health state of the composites. The outstanding electrical and structural properties of the CNTs-GF composites were due to the specific interfacial and interphase structures created by homogeneously grafting aligned CNTs on each GF of the fabric.

  9. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ciric-Marjanovic, Gordana; Trchova, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2009-01-01

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C min -1 up to a maximum temperature of 800 deg. C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 μm, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 μm, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm -1 , increased to 0.7 S cm -1 upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  10. Conducting carbonized polyaniline nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentus, Slavko; Ciric-Marjanovic, Gordana [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11158 Belgrade (Serbia); Trchova, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Heyrovsky Square 2, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: gordana@ffh.bg.ac.rs

    2009-06-17

    Conducting nitrogen-containing carbon nanotubes were synthesized by the carbonization of self-assembled polyaniline nanotubes protonated with sulfuric acid. Carbonization was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C min{sup -1} up to a maximum temperature of 800 deg. C. The carbonized polyaniline nanotubes which have a typical outer diameter of 100-260 nm, with an inner diameter of 20-170 nm and a length extending from 0.5 to 0.8 {mu}m, accompanied with very thin nanotubes with outer diameters of 8-14 nm, inner diameters 3.0-4.5 nm and length extending from 0.3 to 1.0 {mu}m, were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Elemental analysis showed 9 wt% of nitrogen in the carbonized product. Conductivity of the nanotubular PANI precursor, amounting to 0.04 S cm{sup -1}, increased to 0.7 S cm{sup -1} upon carbonization. Molecular structure of carbonized polyaniline nanotubes has been analyzed by FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, and their paramagnetic characteristics were compared with the starting PANI nanotubes by EPR spectroscopy.

  11. Synthesis and electrochemical study of a hybrid structure based on PDMS-TEOS and titania nanotubes for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, António G B; Bastos, Alexandre C; Miranda Salvado, Isabel M; Galstyan, Vardan; Faglia, Guido; Sberveglieri, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Metallic implants and devices are widely used in the orthopedic and orthodontic clinical areas. However, several problems regarding their adhesion with the living tissues and inflammatory responses due to the release of metallic ions to the medium have been reported. The modification of the metallic surfaces and the use of biocompatible protective coatings are two approaches to solve such issues. In this study, in order to improve the adhesion properties and to increase the corrosion resistance of metallic Ti substrates we have obtained a hybrid structure based on TiO 2 nanotubular arrays and PDMS-TEOS films. TiO 2 nanotubes have been prepared with two different diameters by means of electrochemical anodization. PDMS-TEOS films have been prepared by the sol–gel method. The morphological and the elemental analysis of the structures have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and polarization curves have been performed during immersion of the samples in Kokubo’s simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C to study the effect of structure layers and tube diameter on the protective properties. The obtained results show that the modification of the surface structure of TiO 2 and the application of PDMS-TEOS film is a promising strategy for the development of implant materials. (paper)

  12. Electronic structure and optical properties of boron nitride nanotube bundles from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Somayeh

    2015-06-01

    The electronic and optical properties of bundled armchair and zigzag boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are investigated by using density functional theory. Owing to the inter-tube coupling, the dispersions along the tube axis and in the plane perpendicular to the tube axis of BNNT bundles are significantly varied, which are characterized by the decrease of band gap, the splitting of the doubly degenerated states, the expansions of valence and conduction bands. The calculated dielectric functions of the armchair and zigzag bundles are similar to that of the isolated tubes, except for the appearance of broadened peaks, small shifts of peak positions about 0.1 eV and increasing of peak intensities.

  13. Multiparameter structural optimization of single-walled carbon nanotube composites: toward record strength, stiffness, and toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Bong Sup; Zhu, Jian; Jan, Edward; Critchley, Kevin; Ho, Szushen; Podsiadlo, Paul; Sun, Kai; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2009-07-28

    Efficient coupling of mechanical properties of SWNTs with the matrix leading to the transfer of unique mechanical properties of SWNTs to the macroscopic composites is a tremendous challenge of today's materials science. The typical mechanical properties of known SWNT composites, such as strength, stiffness, and toughness, are assessed in an introductory survey where we focused on concrete numerical parameters characterizing mechanical properties. Obtaining ideal stress transfer will require fine optimization of nanotube-polymer interface. SWNT nanocomposites were made here by layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and the first example of optimization in respect to key parameters determining the connectivity at the graphene-polymer interface, namely, degree of SWNT oxidation and cross-linking chemistry, was demonstrated. The resulting SWNT-PVA composites demonstrated tensile strength (σ(ult)) = 504.5 ± 67.3 MPa, stiffness (E) = 15.6 ± 3.8 GPa, and toughness (K) = 121.2 ± 19.2 J/g with maximum values recorded at σ(ult) = 600.1 MPa, E = 20.6 GPa, and K = 152.1 J/g. This represents the strongest and stiffest nonfibrous SWNT composites made to date outperforming other bulk composites by 2-10 times. Its high performance is attributed to both high nanotube content and efficient stress transfer. The resulting LBL composite is also one of the toughest in this category of materials and exceeding the toughness of Kevlar by 3-fold. Our observation suggests that the strengthening and toughening mechanism originates from the synergistic combination of high degree of SWNT exfoliation, efficient SWNT-PVA binding, crack surface roughening, and fairly efficient distribution of local stress over the SWNT network. The need for a multiscale approach in designing SWNT composites is advocated.

  14. Thermally Stable and Electrically Conductive, Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube/Silicon Infiltrated Composite Structures for High-Temperature Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Qi Ming; Deng, Lei Min; Li, Da Wei; Zhou, Yun Shen; Golgir, Hossein Rabiee; Keramatnejad, Kamran; Fan, Li Sha; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean-Francois; Lu, Yong Feng

    2017-10-25

    Traditional ceramic-based, high-temperature electrode materials (e.g., lanthanum chromate) are severely limited due to their conditional electrical conductivity and poor stability under harsh circumstances. Advanced composite structures based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) and high-temperature ceramics are expected to address this grand challenge, in which ceramic serves as a shielding layer protecting the VACNTs from the oxidation and erosive environment, while the VACNTs work as a conductor. However, it is still a great challenge to fabricate VACNT/ceramic composite structures due to the limited diffusion of ceramics inside the VACNT arrays. In this work, we report on the controllable fabrication of infiltrated (and noninfiltrated) VACNT/silicon composite structures via thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) [and laser-assisted CVD]. In laser-assisted CVD, low-crystalline silicon (Si) was quickly deposited at the VACNT subsurfaces/surfaces followed by the formation of high-crystalline Si layers, thus resulting in noninfiltrated composite structures. Unlike laser-assisted CVD, thermal CVD activated the precursors inside and outside the VACNTs simultaneously, which realized uniform infiltrated VACNT/Si composite structures. The growth mechanisms for infiltrated and noninfiltrated VACNT/ceramic composites, which we attributed to the different temperature distributions and gas diffusion mechanism in VACNTs, were investigated. More importantly, the as-farbicated composite structures exhibited excellent multifunctional properties, such as excellent antioxidative ability (up to 1100 °C), high thermal stability (up to 1400 °C), good high velocity hot gas erosion resistance, and good electrical conductivity (∼8.95 Sm -1 at 823 K). The work presented here brings a simple, new approach to the fabrication of advanced composite structures for hot electrode applications.

  15. Optimization of Processing Condition of Nanocomposites According to the Structural Changes of Halloysite Nanotubes Under Impact Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Hae; Park, Soo-Jeong; Nakagaito, Antonio Norio

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, optimal dispersion conditions were developed to disperse nanocomposites containing halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) and unsaturated polyester (UP) resin using ultrasonic dispersion method. Due to the presence of a substantial amount of water in HNTs, their properties depend on the operating temperature when dispersing. It is, therefore, important to understand the structural changes of HNTs that occur when changing the operating temperature. HNTs heat-treated at various temperatures have different structures and mechanical/chemical properties. Therefore, in this research, HNTs were treated at two temperatures, 773.15 K and 973.15 K (500 °C and 700 °C), and the correlation between UP resin and heat-treated HNTs was studied in detail. The quantities of HNTs were 0.5 and 1 wt pct, for the 773.15 K and 973.15 K (500 °C and 700 °C) heat treatment temperatures, respectively. The contents of HNTs were restricted in order to demonstrate the aggregation phenomenon. The dispersion was carried out by ultrasonication. All structural changes including dispersion behavior were examined by TEM. The mechanical properties were assessed by impact tests. The results showed that the high impact strength of the nanocomposite containing 1 wt pct of 973.15 K (700 °C) heat-treated HNT was superior. In other words, it can be said that the rheological property of the matrix resin depended on the quantities of HNTs and the heat treatment temperature.

  16. Structural and photoluminescence characterization of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes coated with ZnO by magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouldhamadouche, N. [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel, Universite de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere BP 32229 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, BP 32 El Alla. 16111, Bab Ezzouaur (Algeria); Achour, A., E-mail: a_aminph@yahoo.fr [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel, Universite de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere BP 32229 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Musa, I.; Ait Aissa, K.; Massuyeau, F.; Jouan, P.Y. [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel, Universite de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere BP 32229 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Kechouane, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, BP 32 El Alla. 16111, Bab Ezzouaur (Algeria); Le Brizoual, L.; Faulques, E.; Barreau, N.; Djouadi, M.A. [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel, Universite de Nantes, CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere BP 32229 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France)

    2012-05-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures are very attractive in various optoelectronic applications such as light emitting devices. A fabrication process of these ZnO nanostructures which gives a good crystalline quality and being compatible with that of micro-fabrication has significant importance for practical application. In this work ZnO films with different thicknesses were deposited by RF-sputtering on vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) template in order to obtain ZnO nanorods. The obtained hybrid structures (ZnO/MWCNTs) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). Results show that the ZnO/MWCNTs have a nanorod structure like morphology with a good crystalline quality of the deposited ZnO on the MWCNTs. PL measurements reveal an enhancement of the band edge signal of ZnO/MWCNTs which is three times of magnitude higher compared to the ZnO film deposited on silicon. Moreover, the intensity enhancement varies as function of the ZnO thickness. Such hybrid structures are promising for optoelectronic application, such as blue-violet sources.

  17. Influence of viscosity of the medium on the disposition of carbon nanotubes anisotropic structures formation induced by electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovenko, O.S.; Matsuj, L.Yu.; Zhuravkov, O.V.; Vovchenko, L.D.

    2014-01-01

    To obtain carbon nanotubes (CNT)-polymer composites with anisotropic physical properties an electric field application can be used. This investigation considers factors of CNT anisotropic distribution formation induced by electric field and consideration is supported with experimental results where some factors were varied. In the article an influence of magnitude and type of electric field and time of processing by electric field on CNT anisotropic structures formation in polymer mediums of different viscosities (oil, epoxy resins) is investigated. The aim of this work was to examine the CNT structuration process induced by electric field in viscous mediums and to find out the most optimal conditions of preparation of polymer/carbon composite materials (CM) with specified distribution of carbon filler induced by electric field. Scoping on polymer/carbon CM structuration was conducted by optical microscopy method. It was found that the main factors during CNT network formation are the type and viscosity of polymer binder and applied electric field parameters. It was observed that for high viscous polymer CNT network formation is unfeasible even at high applied electric field strength. But also for low viscous medium at relatively low electric field strength the CNT network formation is complicated too. And it was seen from optical observation that a type of the polymer variation causes different response of network form under the same experimental conditions. These distinctions are considered in the article

  18. First-principles study of structural and work function properties for nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Xiji; Li, Detian; Cai, Jianqiu; Luo, Haijun; Dong, Changkun

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Substitutional nitrogen atom doping in capped (5, 5) SWNT is investigated. • Serious defects appear from breaks of C−N bonds with N contents of above 23.3 at.%. • Work function drops after N doping and may reach 4.1 eV. - Abstract: The structural and electronic properties of the capped (5, 5) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT), including the structural stability, the work function, and the charge transfer performance, are investigated for the substitutional nitrogen atom doping under different concentrations by first-principles density functional theory. The geometrical structure keeps almost intact with single or two N atom doping, while C−N bonds may break up with serious defects for N concentrations of 23.3 at.% and above. The SWNT remains metallic and the work function drops after doping due to the upward shift of Fermi level, leading to the increase of the electrical conductivity. N doping enhances the oxygen reduction activity stronger than N adsorption because of higher charge transfers.

  19. Adhered Supported Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Dale F.; Craft, Benjamin J.; Jaffe, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (NTs) in excess of 200 μm long are grown by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon vapors. The nanotubes grow continuously without the typical extinction due to catalyst encapsulation. A woven metal mesh supports the nanotubes creating a metal supported nanotube (MSNT) structure. The 140 μm wide mesh openings are completely filled by 70 nm diameter multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs). The MWNTs are straight, uniform and highly crystalline. Their wall thickness is about 10 nm (30 graphite layers). The adherent NTs are not removed from the support in a Scotch tape pull test. A 12.5 cm 2 capacitor made from two MSNT structures immersed in 1 M KCl has a capacitance of 0.35 F and an equivalent series resistance of 0.18 Ω. Water flows through the MSNT at a flow velocity of 1 cm/min with a pressure drop of 15 inches of water. With the support removed, the MWNTs naturally form a carbon nanocomposite (CNC) paper with a specific area of 80 m 2 /gm, a bulk density of 0.21 g/cm 3 , an open pore fraction of 0.81, and a resistivity of 0.16 Ω-cm

  20. Structural characterization and frictional properties of carbon nanotube/alumina composites prepared by precursor method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Go [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-707 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)], E-mail: gyamamoto@rift.mech.tohoku.ac.jp; Omori, Mamoru; Yokomizo, Kenji; Hashida, Toshiyuki [Fracture and Reliability Research Institute, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-707 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Adachi, Koshi [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2008-02-25

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites with MWCNTs content up to 10 mass% were prepared by precursor method. XRD analysis revealed that MWCNT/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites were successfully synthesized by the dehydration of aluminum hydroxide-MWCNTs mixture at 1500 deg. C in vacuum. The steady-state friction coefficient ({mu}) of the composites decreased with increasing up to 4 mass% MWCNT and stayed constant ({mu} = 0.33) with further addition of MWCNT, which value was substantially lower than that of MWCNT-free monolithic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ({mu} = 0.57). Microstructural observations showed that resultant friction behavior may be related to the smearing of transferred film over the contact area, which was expected to permit easy shear and then help to achieve a lubricating effect during sliding. However, fracture property tests have shown that no improvement of the fracture strength and fracture toughness of the composites was achieved by addition of MWCNTs. It may be mainly due to the agglomeration of MWCNTs and the weak interface between MWCNTs and the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix.

  1. Structural characterization and frictional properties of carbon nanotube/alumina composites prepared by precursor method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Go; Omori, Mamoru; Yokomizo, Kenji; Hashida, Toshiyuki; Adachi, Koshi

    2008-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/Al 2 O 3 composites with MWCNTs content up to 10 mass% were prepared by precursor method. XRD analysis revealed that MWCNT/Al 2 O 3 composites were successfully synthesized by the dehydration of aluminum hydroxide-MWCNTs mixture at 1500 deg. C in vacuum. The steady-state friction coefficient (μ) of the composites decreased with increasing up to 4 mass% MWCNT and stayed constant (μ = 0.33) with further addition of MWCNT, which value was substantially lower than that of MWCNT-free monolithic Al 2 O 3 (μ = 0.57). Microstructural observations showed that resultant friction behavior may be related to the smearing of transferred film over the contact area, which was expected to permit easy shear and then help to achieve a lubricating effect during sliding. However, fracture property tests have shown that no improvement of the fracture strength and fracture toughness of the composites was achieved by addition of MWCNTs. It may be mainly due to the agglomeration of MWCNTs and the weak interface between MWCNTs and the Al 2 O 3 matrix

  2. Transparent Conducting Films with Multilayered Structures Formed by Carbon Nanotubes and Reduced Graphene Oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jie Hun; Jang, Hyun Chul; Choi, Jung Mi; Hyeon, Jae Young; Sok, Jung Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The replacement for indium tin oxide (ITO) in electronic displays should have comparable optical transmittance and electrical conductivity while being easy to source and manufacture. However, novel materials such as single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and reduced graphene oxides (RGOs) are incapable of addressing these challenges. We demonstrate a simple method to fabricate good transparent conductive films (TCFs) by combining and leveraging the superior optical transparency of RGOs and the excellent electrical conductivity of SWCNTs. This method affords thin multilayers of SWCNTs and RGOs with excellent optical and electrical properties because these properties are correlated with spraying time and the amount of SWCNTs or RGOs. In general, transmittance is advantageous to RGO as conductance is to CNTs. With a view to finding good TCFs with reduced sheet resistance, but with little sacrifice of transmittance, it is natural to explore the combination of CNT and RGO. The sandwiched multilayer of SWCNTs and RGOs exhibited a low sheet resistance of 214.2 Ω/sq, which was comparable to that of SWCNTs, and a transmittance of 60% at a wavelength of 550 nm. To further reduce the sheet resistance and improve the transparency of the multilayer TCFs, Au doping was carried out. The doping, in combination with controlled spraying of the amount of SWCNTs and RGOs, led to multilayers with resistance/transmittance combinations of 141.3 Ω/sq and 70% and 371.5 Ω/sq and 83%. These properties meet the requisite criteria for an ITO replacement.

  3. Electrospun single-walled carbon nanotube/polyvinyl alcohol composite nanofibers: structure-property relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naebe, Minoo; Lin Tong; Wang Xungai; Staiger, Mark P; Dai Liming

    2008-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/PVA composite nanofibers have been produced by electrospinning. An apparent increase in the PVA crystallinity with a concomitant change in its main crystalline phase and a reduction in the crystalline domain size were observed in the SWNT/PVA composite nanofibers, indicating the occurrence of a SWNT-induced nucleation crystallization of the PVA phase. Both the pure PVA and SWNT/PVA composite nanofibers were subjected to the following post-electrospinning treatments: (i) soaking in methanol to increase the PVA crystallinity, and (ii) cross-linking with glutaric dialdehyde to control the PVA morphology. Effects of the PVA morphology on the tensile properties of the resultant electrospun nanofibers were examined. Dynamic mechanical thermal analyses of both pure PVA and SWNT/PVA composite electrospun nanofibers indicated that SWNT-polymer interaction facilitated the formation of crystalline domains, which can be further enhanced by soaking the nanofiber in methanol and/or cross-linking the polymer with glutaric dialdehyde

  4. Structural, thermal and electrical characterizations of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and polyaniline composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Kamal, E-mail: singhkamal204@gmail.com; Garg, Leena; Singh, Jaspal [Department of Applied Sciences, Chandigarh University, Gharuan, Mohali (India); Kumar, Sanjeev [Applied Sciences Department, PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Sharma, Amit L. [Central Scientific Instrumentation Organization, Sector 30, Chandigarh (India)

    2016-05-06

    The undoped and doped composite of MWNTs (Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes) with PANI (/Polyaniline) was prepared by chemical oxidative polymerization. The MWNTs/PANI composites have been characterized by using various techniques like Thermogravometric Analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer and Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and conductivity measurement by using two probe method. TGA results has shown that thermal stability followed the pattern undoped MWNTs/PANI composite < doped MWNTs/PANI composite. FE-SEM micrographs demonstrated the morphological changes on the surface of MWNTs as a result of composite formation. Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectra ascertained the formation of the composite. Study of electrical characteristics demonstrated that the doped MWNTs/PANI composite (1.2 × 10{sup 1} Scm{sup −1}) have better conductivity than the undoped MWNTs/PANI composite (10{sup −4} Scm{sup −1}). These CNTs based polymeric composites are of great importance in developing new nano-scale devices for future chemical, mechanical and electronic applications.

  5. Structural optimization and shear performances of the nanopins based on Y-junction carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhong-Qiang, E-mail: zhangzq@mail.ujs.edu.cn [Micro/Nano Science and Technology Center, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center of Photovoltaic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China); State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Faculty of Vehicle Engineering and Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhong, Jun [Micro/Nano Science and Technology Center, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Ye, Hong-Fei [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Faculty of Vehicle Engineering and Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Cheng, Guang-Gui [Micro/Nano Science and Technology Center, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Ding, Jian-Ning, E-mail: dingjn@ujs.edu.cn [Micro/Nano Science and Technology Center, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center of Photovoltaic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China)

    2017-01-01

    Utilizing the classical molecular dynamic, we have briefly conducted geometry optimization on several typical nanopins based on Y-junction carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and further investigated their shear performance. The service performance of the nanopin is not sensitive to the length of the inserting end, while as the height of the branch tube increases, the maximum unloading force increases firstly and then keeps relatively stable. The overlong inserting end and high branch tube can lead to the severe oscillation in unloading force due to the continuous morphology change. Moreover, results show that a small angle included in Y-junction CNTs can contribute to both of the fixity of the nanopin and instability of the uninstallation process. Further investigation indicates that the orientation of the branch tubes of the nanopin determines the maximum shear performance, while the radial stability of the CNTs plays an important role in the shear performance of the nanopin. And the microstructure of the Y-junction CNT occurred during the using process can also influence its service performance.

  6. Effect of plasma pretreatment on the structure and emission characteristics of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uh, Hyung Soo; Lee, Soo Myun; Choi, Seok Rim; Park, Sang Sik; Cho, Euo Sik; Lee, Jong Duk; Kwon, Sang Jik

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on Ni-coated TiN/Si substrates by using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition with a gas mixture of H 2 /CH 4 at a low temperature of 500 .deg. C. The effect of H 2 plasma pretreatment on the diameter of grown CNTs was investigated. We found that the average diameter of CNTs could be easily controlled by using the H 2 -plasma pretreatment time before CNTs growth and varied from 36 nm to 26 nm as the pretreatment time changed from 5 min to 15 min. However, any further increase in the pretreatment time gave rise to a rapid decrease in CNTs growth. After 25 min of the plasma pretreatment, scanning electron microscopy observation exhibited the destruction of the CNTs. The impact of the plasma pretreatment time on the emission behavior of CNTs was also investigated in a diode-type electron-emission configuration. The variation of the CNT diameter due to the plasma pretreatment caused a drastic change in emission properties. The turn-on voltages of CNT emitters varied from 3.5 V/μm to 9 V/μm, depending on the hydrogen-plasma pretreatment conditions. The close relationship between the electron-emission characteristics and the pretreatment time indicates that the pretreatment condition may be a key process parameter in CNTs growth for field-emission displays and should be optimized.

  7. Nano-structured variable capacitor based on P(VDF-TrFE) copolymer and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakbita, I.; El-Hami, K.

    2018-02-01

    A newly organic capacitor was conceived with a variable capacitance using the inverse piezoelectric effect. The device consists of two parallel plates of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), known for their large surface area, high sensitivity and high electric conductivity, separated by a thin film of a dielectric layer of Polyinylidene fluoride and trifluoroehtylene (P(VDF-TrFE)) promising material for piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties. The obtained architecture is the CNT/PVDF-TrFE/CNT capacitor device. In this study, an ultra-thin film of P(VDF-TrFE) (54/46) with thickness of 20 nm was elaborated on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by spin-coating. The morphology of the ultra-thin film and the mechanical behavior of CNT/P(VDF-TrFE)/CNT system were studied using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with a lock-in amplifier in contact mode. All changes in applied voltage induce a change in thin film thickness according to the inverse piezoelectric effect that affect, consequently the capacitance. The results showed that the ratio of capacitance change ΔC to initial capacitance C0 is ΔC/C0=5%. This value is sufficient to use P(VDF-TrFE) as variable organic capacitor.

  8. Special structures and properties of hydrogen nanowire confined in a single walled carbon nanotube at extreme high pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueyuan Xia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive ab initio molecular dynamics simulations indicate that hydrogen can be confined in single walled carbon nanotubes to form high density and high pressure H2 molecular lattice, which has peculiar shell and axial structures depending on the density or pressure. The band gap of the confined H2 lattice is sensitive to the pressure. Heating the system at 2000K, the H2 lattice is firstly melted to form H2 molecular liquid, and then some of the H2 molecules dissociate accompanied by drastic molecular and atomic reactions, which have essential effect on the electronic structure of the hydrogen system. The liquid hydrogen system at 2000K is found to be a particular mixed liquid, which consists of H2 molecules, H atoms, and H-H-H trimers. The dissociated H atoms and the trimers in the liquid contribute resonance electron states at the Fermi energy to change the material properties substantially. Rapidly cooling the system from 2000K to 0.01 K, the mixed liquid is frozen to form a mixed solid melt with a clear trend of band gap closure. It indicates that this solid melt may become a superconducting nanowire when it is further compressed.

  9. Large-Deformation Curling Actuators Based on Carbon Nanotube Composite: Advanced-Structure Design and Biomimetic Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luzhuo; Weng, Mingcen; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Lingling; Li, Jiaxin; Huang, Zhigao; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-12-22

    In recent years, electroactive polymers have been developed as actuator materials. As an important branch of electroactive polymers, electrothermal actuators (ETAs) demonstrate potential applications in the fields of artificial muscles, biomimetic devices, robotics, and so on. Large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation, and ultrafast fabrication are critical to the development of ETA. However, a simultaneous optimization of all of these advantages has not been realized yet. Practical biomimetic applications are also rare. In this work, we introduce an ultrafast approach to fabricate a curling actuator based on a newly designed carbon nanotube and polymer composite, which completely realizes all of the above required advantages. The actuator shows an ultralarge curling actuation with a curvature greater than 1.0 cm(-1) and bending angle larger than 360°, even curling into a tubular structure. The driving voltage is down to a low voltage of 5 V. The remarkable actuation is attributed not only to the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion but also to the mechanical property changes of materials during temperature change. We also construct an S-shape actuator to show the possibility of building advanced-structure actuators. A weightlifting walking robot is further designed that exhibits a fast-moving motion while lifting a sample heavier than itself, demonstrating promising biomimetic applications.

  10. Analysis of the mechanical behavior of single wall carbon nanotubes by a modified molecular structural mechanics model incorporating an advanced chemical force field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Oliver; Wallmersperger, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    The outstanding properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) keep attracting the attention of researchers from different fields. CNTs are promising candidates for applications e.g. in lightweight construction but also in electronics, medicine and many more. The basis for the realization of the manifold applications is a detailed knowledge of the material properties of the carbon nanotubes. In particular for applications in lightweight constructions or in composites, the knowledge of the mechanical behavior of the CNTs is of vital interest. Hence, a lot of effort is put into the experimental and theoretical determination of the mechanical material properties of CNTs. Due to their small size, special techniques have to be applied. In this research, a modified molecular structural mechanics model for the numerical determination of the mechanical behavior of carbon nanotubes is presented. It uses an advanced approach for the geometrical representation of the CNT structure while the covalent bonds in the CNTs are represented by beam elements. Furthermore, the model is specifically designed to overcome major drawbacks in existing molecular structural mechanics models. This includes energetic consistency with the underlying chemical force field. The model is developed further to enable the application of a more advanced chemical force field representation. The developed model is able to predict, inter alia, the lateral and radial stiffness properties of the CNTs. The results for the lateral stiffness are given and discussed in order to emphasize the progress made with the presented approach.

  11. Tunable synthesis of copper nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniukov, E; Yakimchuk, D; Kozlovsky, A; Shlimas, D; Zdorovets, M; Kadyrzhanov, K

    2016-01-01

    Simple method of tunable synthesis of copper nanotubes based on template synthesis was developed. A comprehensive study of the structural, morphological and electrical characteristics of the obtained nanostructures was carried out. Characterization of structural features was made by methods of scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry analysis. Evaluation of wall thickness is made by methods of gas permeability. Electrical conductivity of nanotubes was define in the study of their current-voltage characteristics. The possibility to control of copper nanotubes physical properties by variation of the deposition parameters was shown. (paper)

  12. All carbon nanotubes are not created equal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geohegan, David B.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Rouleau, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents the various factors that enter into consideration when choosing the source of carbon nanotubes for a specific application. Carbon nanotubes are giant molecules made of pure carbon. They have captured the imagination of the scientific community by the unique structure that provides superior physical, chemical, and electrical properties. However, a surprisingly wide disparity exists between the intrinsic properties determined under ideal conditions and the properties that carbon nanotubes exhibit in real world situations. The lack of uniformity in carbon nanotube properties is likely to be the main obstacle holding back the development of carbon nanotube applications. This tutorial addresses the nonuniformity of carbon nanotube properties from the synthesis standpoint. This synthesis-related nonuniformity is on top of the intrinsic chirality distribution that gives the ∼1:2 ratio of metallic to semiconducting nanotubes. From the standpoint of carbon bonding chemistry the variation in the quality and reproducibility of carbon nanotube materials is not unexpected. It is an intrinsic feature that is related to the metastability of carbon structures. The extent to which this effect is manifested in carbon nanotube formation is governed by the type and the kinetics of the carbon nanotube synthesis reaction. Addressing this variation is critical if nanotubes are to live up to the potential already demonstrated by their phenomenal physical properties.

  13. Triple layered core–shell structure with surface fluorinated ZnO-carbon nanotube composites and its electron emission properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.Y.; Chua, Daniel H.C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The effects of CF 4 plasma on ZnO-CNT core–shell structures were studied. ► ZnO was effective in protecting the aligned CNTs core for as long as 30 min of plasma etching. ► SEM showed the surface morphology was nearly similar between pristine, 2 min and 30 min plasma etched specimens. ► F was observed to displace O in ZnO. ► This is the first report of an ultra long plasma etch of fluorine onto ZnO surface. - Abstract: Core-shelled structures such as zinc oxide (ZnO) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) give rise to interesting material properties. In this work, a triple-layered core–shell–shell structure is presented where the effects of fluorine (F) incorporation on the outmost shell of the ZnO-CNT structure are studied. The samples prepared ranged from a short 2 min to a 30 min immersion in carbon tetraflouride (CF 4 ) plasma. In addition, its effects on the electron emission properties also studied and it is shown that the plasma immersions create thinner field emitters with sharp tiny wrinkles giving rise to more electron emission sites and higher enhancement factor. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements showed that F ions replace O in ZnO coatings during immersion process, thus increasing the electrical conductivity and shifts the Fermi level of ZnO upwards. Both physical and electronic effects further contribute to a lower threshold field.

  14. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Fe, Co, Ni monatomic nanochains encapsulated in armchair LiF nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nia B. Arghavani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal TM (TM = Fe, Co and Ni atomic chains wrapped in single walled LiF armchair nanotubes have been investigated by the first-principles calculations in the framework of the density functional theory. The generalized gradient approximation (GGA with Hubbard repulsion potential and without Hubbard repulsion was employed to describe the exchange-correlation potential. It is found that all these TM chains @LiFNTs systems have negative formation energy so they are stable and exothermic. Total density of states and partial densities of states analyses show that the spin polarization and the magnetic moment of TM chains @LiFNTs(n,n systems come mostly from the TM atom chains. All these nanocomposites are ferromagnetic (FM and spin splitting between spin up and down is observed. The high magnetic moment and spin polarization of the TM chains @LiFNT(n,n systems show that they can be used as magnetic nanostructures possessing potential current and future applications in permanent magnetism, magnetic recording, and spintronics.

  15. Two-dimensional plasmons in lateral carbon nanotube network structures and their effect on the terahertz radiation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryzhii, V.; Otsuji, T.; Ryzhii, M.; Leiman, V. G.; Fedorov, G.; Goltzman, G. N.; Titova, N.; Gayduchenko, I. A.; Coquillat, D.; But, D.; Knap, W.; Mitin, V.; Shur, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the carrier transport and plasmonic phenomena in the lateral carbon nanotube (CNT) networks forming the device channel with asymmetric electrodes. One electrode is the Ohmic contact to the CNT network and the other contact is the Schottky contact. These structures can serve as detectors of the terahertz (THz) radiation. We develop the device model for collective response of the lateral CNT networks which comprise a mixture of randomly oriented semiconductor CNTs (s-CNTs) and quasi-metal CNTs (m-CNTs). The proposed model includes the concept of the collective two-dimensional (2D) plasmons in relatively dense networks of randomly oriented CNTs (CNT “felt”) and predicts the detector responsivity spectral characteristics exhibiting sharp resonant peaks at the signal frequencies corresponding to the 2D plasmonic resonances. The detection mechanism is the rectification of the ac current due the nonlinearity of the Schottky contact current-voltage characteristics under the conditions of a strong enhancement of the potential drop at this contact associated with the plasmon excitation. The detector responsivity depends on the fractions of the s- and m-CNTs. The burning of the near-contact regions of the m-CNTs or destruction of these CNTs leads to a marked increase in the responsivity in agreement with our experimental data. The resonant THz detectors with sufficiently dense lateral CNT networks can compete and surpass other THz detectors using plasmonic effects at room temperatures.

  16. Interfacial effects in ZnO nanotubes/needle-structured graphitic diamond nanohybrid for detecting dissolved acetone at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiravan, Deepa; Huang, Bohr-Ran; Saravanan, Adhimoorthy; Yeh, Chien-Jui; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I.-Nan

    2017-12-01

    A high-performance ZnO nanotubes (ZNTs)/needle-structured graphitic diamond (NGD) nanohybrid material was prepared and observed the electrochemical sensing properties of liquid acetone in water. Initially, we synthesized NGD film using bias-enhanced growth (BEG) process. Afterwards, a well-etched ZNTs were spatially grown on the NGD film using simple hydrothermal method, and utilized as sensing material for assemble an electrochemical sensor (via EGFET configuration) operating at room temperature. The systematic investigations depict the ultra-high sensing properties attained from ZNTs grown on NGD film. The NGD film mostly have needle or wire shaped diamond grains, which contributes extremely high electrical conductivity. Furthermore, needle shaped diamond grains cover with multi-layer graphitic material generates conduction channels for ZNTs and leads to enhance the oxygen residuals and species. The material stability and conductivity of NGD as well the defects exist with oxygen vacancies in ZNTs offers superior sensing properties. Thus, the interesting combination of these wide band gap semiconductor materials exhibit high sensor response (89 mV/mL), high stability and long-term reliability (tested after 60 days).

  17. Development of carbon nanotube modified cement paste with microencapsulated phase-change material for structural-functional integrated application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongzhi; Yang, Shuqing; Memon, Shazim Ali

    2015-04-10

    Microencapsulated phase-change materials (MPCM) can be used to develop a structural-functional integrated cement paste having high heat storage efficiency and suitable mechanical strength. However, the incorporation of MPCM has been found to degrade the mechanical properties of cement based composites. Therefore, in this research, the effect of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the properties of MPCM cement paste was evaluated. Test results showed that the incorporation of CNTs in MPCM cement paste accelerated the cement hydration reaction. SEM micrograph showed that CNTs were tightly attached to the cement hydration products. At the age of 28 days, the percentage increase in flexural and compressive strength with different dosage of CNTs was found to be up to 41% and 5% respectively. The optimum dosage of CNTs incorporated in MPCM cement paste was found to be 0.5 wt %. From the thermal performance test, it was found that the cement paste panels incorporated with different percentages of MPCM reduced the temperature measured at the center of the room by up to 4.6 °C. Inverse relationship was found between maximum temperature measured at the center of the room and the dosage of MPCM.

  18. Effects of Amino-Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes on the Crystal Structure and Thermal Properties of Polyacrylonitrile Homopolymer Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Amino-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (amino-CNT/polyacrylonitrile (PAN microspheres with diameter of about 300–400 nm were prepared by in situ polymerization under aqueous solution. The morphology, crystal structure, and thermal properties of amino-CNTs on a PAN homopolymer were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry. The results showed that the amino-CNTs had a significant influence on the morphology of microspheres, and the PAN matrix were grafted onto the surface of amino-CNTs with interfacial bonding between them. The XRD studies showed that the crystal size of amino-CNT/PAN microspheres with lower crystallinity was bigger than in the control PAN homopolymer. The analysis of thermal properties indicated that the amino-CNT/PAN microspheres with lower glass transition temperature had a lower initial temperature and velocity of evolving heat during the exothermic processing as compared with the PAN homopolymer. These results suggested that the incorporation of amino-CNTs into the PAN homopolymer matrix was beneficial for controlling the heat released during the stabilization processing.

  19. Electronic structures and optical properties of GaN nanotubes with MgGa–ON co-doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Mao; Shi, Jun-jie; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Shuai; Bao, Zhi-qiang; Luo, Shao-jun; Zhou, Tie-Cheng; Zhu, Tian-cong; Li, Xiang; Li, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Both the electronic structures and the optical properties of single-walled zigzag GaN nanotubes (NTs) with Mg Ga –O N co-doping are investigated using first-principles calculations. We find that the Mg Ga –O N defect complex can exist stably in GaN NTs. The direct band gap width of the GaN NTs can be reduced by means of the Mg Ga –O N co-doping. The electrons of the valence band maximum (VBM) state are localized around the N atoms bonded with the Mg atom. The imaginary part ε 2 of the complex dielectric function of GaN NTs with Mg Ga –O N co-doping has a sharp peak closely related to the optical transitions between the VBM and conduction band minimum states. - Highlights: ► The Mg Ga –O N defect complex can exist stably in GaN NTs. ► The band gap of the GaN NTs can be reduced due to the Mg Ga –O N co-doping. ► The VBM states are localized around the N atoms bonded with the Mg atom. ► The ε 2 -plot has a peak related to the optical transition from the VBM to CBM state

  20. New Three-Dimensional Porous Electrode Concept: Vertically-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Directly Grown on Embroidered Copper Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Aguiló-Aguayo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available New three-dimensional (3D porous electrode concepts are required to overcome limitations in Li-ion batteries in terms of morphology (e.g., shapes, dimensions, mechanical stability (e.g., flexibility, high electroactive mass loadings, and electrochemical performance (e.g., low volumetric energy densities and rate capabilities. Here a new electrode concept is introduced based on the direct growth of vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs on embroidered Cu current collectors. The direct growth of VA-CNTs was achieved by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD, and there was no application of any post-treatment or cleaning procedure. The electrochemical behavior of the as-grown VA-CNTs was analyzed by charge/discharge cycles at different specific currents and with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS measurements. The results were compared with values found in the literature. The as-grown VA-CNTs exhibit higher specific capacities than graphite and pristine VA-CNTs found in the literature. This together with the possibilities that the Cu embroidered structures offer in terms of specific surface area, total surface area, and designs provide a breakthrough in new 3D electrode concepts.

  1. New Three-Dimensional Porous Electrode Concept: Vertically-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Directly Grown on Embroidered Copper Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiló-Aguayo, Noemí; Amade, Roger; Hussain, Shahzad; Bertran, Enric; Bechtold, Thomas

    2017-12-11

    New three-dimensional (3D) porous electrode concepts are required to overcome limitations in Li-ion batteries in terms of morphology (e.g., shapes, dimensions), mechanical stability (e.g., flexibility, high electroactive mass loadings), and electrochemical performance (e.g., low volumetric energy densities and rate capabilities). Here a new electrode concept is introduced based on the direct growth of vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs) on embroidered Cu current collectors. The direct growth of VA-CNTs was achieved by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and there was no application of any post-treatment or cleaning procedure. The electrochemical behavior of the as-grown VA-CNTs was analyzed by charge/discharge cycles at different specific currents and with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The results were compared with values found in the literature. The as-grown VA-CNTs exhibit higher specific capacities than graphite and pristine VA-CNTs found in the literature. This together with the possibilities that the Cu embroidered structures offer in terms of specific surface area, total surface area, and designs provide a breakthrough in new 3D electrode concepts.

  2. Enhanced electrochemical performance of sandwich-structured polyaniline-wrapped silicon oxide/carbon nanotubes for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Zou, Yongjin; Huang, Liyan; Yin, Hao; Xi, Chengqiao; Chen, Xin; Shentu, Hongwei; Li, Chao; Zhang, Jingjing; Lv, ChunJu; Fan, Meiqiang

    2018-06-01

    Sandwich-structured carbon nanotubes, silicon oxide, and polyaniline (hereafter denoted as CNTs/SiOx/PANI) were prepared by combining a sol-gel method, magnesiothermic reduction at 250 °C, and chemical oxidative polymerization. The CNTs, SiOx and PANI in the composite was 16 wt%, 51 wt% and 33 wt%, respectively. The CNTs/SiOx/PANI electrodes exhibited excellent cycle and high-rate performance as anodes in Li-ion batteries, including charge/discharge capacities of 1156/1178 mAh g-1 after 60 cycles at 0.2 A g-1 current density and 728/725 mAh g-1 at 8 A g-1 current density. The improvement was due to the synergy between CNTs and PANI. The SiOx scattered on the CNTs core and coated by PANI improved its conductivity and accommodated the volume change during repeated lithiation/delithiation cycles. This simple synthesis provided a scalable route for the large-scale production of CNTs/SiOx/PANI nanostructures, with various applications such as in Li-ion batteries.

  3. Two-dimensional plasmons in lateral carbon nanotube network structures and their effect on the terahertz radiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryzhii, V. [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Institute of Ultra High Frequency Semiconductor Electronics of RAS, Moscow 117105 (Russian Federation); Center for Photonics and Infrared Engineering, Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow 111005 (Russian Federation); Otsuji, T. [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ryzhii, M. [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu 965-8580 (Japan); Leiman, V. G. [Department of General Physics, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, 147100 (Russian Federation); Fedorov, G. [Department of General Physics, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, 147100 (Russian Federation); Physics Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Goltzman, G. N.; Titova, N. [Physics Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Gayduchenko, I. A. [Physics Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute,” Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Coquillat, D.; But, D.; Knap, W. [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR 5221, Universite Montpellier 2 and CNRS, F-34095, Montpellier (France); Mitin, V. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 1460-1920 (United States); Shur, M. S. [Departments of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering and Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    We consider the carrier transport and plasmonic phenomena in the lateral carbon nanotube (CNT) networks forming the device channel with asymmetric electrodes. One electrode is the Ohmic contact to the CNT network and the other contact is the Schottky contact. These structures can serve as detectors of the terahertz (THz) radiation. We develop the device model for collective response of the lateral CNT networks which comprise a mixture of randomly oriented semiconductor CNTs (s-CNTs) and quasi-metal CNTs (m-CNTs). The proposed model includes the concept of the collective two-dimensional (2D) plasmons in relatively dense networks of randomly oriented CNTs (CNT “felt”) and predicts the detector responsivity spectral characteristics exhibiting sharp resonant peaks at the signal frequencies corresponding to the 2D plasmonic resonances. The detection mechanism is the rectification of the ac current due the nonlinearity of the Schottky contact current-voltage characteristics under the conditions of a strong enhancement of the potential drop at this contact associated with the plasmon excitation. The detector responsivity depends on the fractions of the s- and m-CNTs. The burning of the near-contact regions of the m-CNTs or destruction of these CNTs leads to a marked increase in the responsivity in agreement with our experimental data. The resonant THz detectors with sufficiently dense lateral CNT networks can compete and surpass other THz detectors using plasmonic effects at room temperatures.

  4. Field emission from a composite structure consisting of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes and carbon nanocones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, C M; Chen, M Y; Hwang, J; Gan, J-Y; Kou, C S

    2006-01-01

    Vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWCNTs) have been fabricated on carbon nanocones (CNCs) in a gravity-assisted chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process. The CNCs with nanoscale Co particles at the top were first grown on the Co/Si(100) substrate biased at 350 V in a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition process. The CNCs typically are ∼200 nm in height, and their diameters are ∼100 nm near the bottom and ∼10 nm at the top. The nanoscale Co particles ∼10 nm in diameter act as catalysts which favour the growth of VA-SWCNTs out of CNCs at 850 0 C in the gravity-assisted CVD process. The average length and the growth time of VA-SWCNTs are ∼150 nm and 1.5 min, equivalent to a growth rate of ∼6 μm h -1 . The diameters of VA-SWCNTs are estimated to be 1.2-2.1 nm. When VA-SWCNTs are fabricated on CNCs, the turn-on voltage is reduced from 3.9 to 0.7 V μm -1 and the emission current density at the electric field of 5 V μm -1 is enhanced by a factor of more than 200. The composite VA-SWCNT/CNC structure is potentially an excellent field emitter. The emission stability of the VA-SWCNT/CNC field emitter is discussed

  5. The structural and electronic properties of amine-functionalized boron nitride nanotubes via ammonia plasmas: a density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Fenglei; Ji Yuemeng; Zhao Cunyuan; Ren Wei

    2009-01-01

    The reaction behavior of the chemical modification of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) with ammonia plasmas has been investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Unlike previously studied functionalization with NH 3 and amino functional groups, we found that NH 2 * radicals involved in the ammonia plasmas can be covalently incorporated to BNNTs through a strong single B-N bond. Subsequently, the H * radicals also involved in the ammonia plasmas would prefer to combine with the N atoms neighboring the NH 2 -functionalized B atoms. Our study revealed that this reaction behavior can be elucidated using the frontier orbital theory. The calculated band structures and density of states (DOS) indicate that this modification is an effective method to modulate the electronic properties of BNNTs. We have discussed various defects on the surface of BNNTs generated by collisions of N 2 + ions. For most defects considered, the reactivity of the functionalization of BNNTs with NH 2 * are enhanced. Our conclusions are independent of the chirality, and the diameter dependence of the reaction energies is presented.

  6. Thermoelectric-pyroelectric hybrid energy generation from thermopower waves in core-shell structured carbon nanotube-PZT nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Taehan; Hwang, Hayoung; Shin, Dongjoon; Seo, Byungseok; Choi, Wonjoon

    2017-02-10

    There is an urgent need to develop a suitable energy source owing to the rapid development of various innovative devices using micro-nanotechnology. The thermopower wave (TW), which produces a high specific power during the combustion of solid fuel inside micro-nanostructure materials, is a unique energy source for unusual platforms that cannot use conventional energy sources. Here, we report on the significant enhancement of hybrid energy generation of pyroelectrics and thermoelectrics from TWs in carbon nanotube (CNT)-PZT (lead zirconate titanate, P(Z 0.5 -T 0.5 )) composites for the first time. Conventional TWs use only charge carrier transport driven by the temperature gradient along the core materials to produce voltage. In this study, a core-shell structure of CNTs-PZTs was prepared to utilize both the temperature gradient along the core material (thermoelectrics) and the dynamic change in the temperature of the shell structure (pyroelectrics) induced by TWs. The dual mechanism of energy generation in CNT-PZT composites amplified the average peak and duration of the voltage up to 403 mV and 612 ms, respectively, by a factor of 2 and 60 times those for the composites without a PZT layer. Furthermore, dynamic voltage measurements and structural analysis in repetitive TWs confirmed that CNT-PZT composites maintain the original performance in multiple TWs, which improves the reusability of materials. The advanced TWs obtained by the application of a PZT layer as a pyroelectric material contributes to the extension of the usable energy portion as well as the development of TW-based operating devices.

  7. Defect complexes in carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of defect complexes on the stability, structural and electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes is investigated using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method implemented...

  8. Carbon Nanotubes and Modern Nanoagriculture

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2015-01-27

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have been prominent members of the nanomaterial family. Owing to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been proven to be a useful tool in the field of plant science. They were frequently perceived to bring about valuable biotechnological and agricultural applications that still remain beyond experimental realization. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated the ability of carbon nanotubes to traverse different plant cell barriers. These studies, also, assessed the toxicity and environmental impacts of these nanomaterials. The knowledge provided by these studies is of practical and fundamental importance for diverse applications including intracellular labeling and imaging, genetic transformation, and for enhancing our knowledge of plant cell biology. Although different types of nanoparticles have been found to activate physiological processes in plants, carbon nanotubes received particular interest. Following addition to germination medium, carbon nanotubes enhanced root growth and elongation of some plants such as onion, cucumber and rye-grass. They, also, modulated the expression of some genes that are essential for cell division and plant development. In addition, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were evidenced to penetrate thick seed coats, stimulate germination, and to enhance growth of young tomato seedlings. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes can penetrate deeply into the root system and further distribute into the leaves and the fruits. In recent studies, carbon nanotubes were reported to be chemically entrapped into the structure of plant tracheary elements. This should activate studies in the fields of plant defense and wood engineering. Although, all of these effects on plant physiology and plant developmental biology have not been fully understood, the valuable findings promises more research activity in the near future toward complete scientific understanding of

  9. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  10. Electronic structure and field emission properties of nitrogen doped graphene nano-flakes (GNFs:N) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs:N)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Sekhar C., E-mail: Raysc@unisa.ac.za [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Private Bag X6, Florida, 1710, Science Campus, Christiaan de Wet and Pioneer Avenue, Florida Park, Johannesburg (South Africa); Pong, W.F. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Papakonstantinou, P. [Nanotechnology and Integrated Bio-Engineering Centre, University of Ulster, Shore Road, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Highlights: • Nitrogen doped graphene nano-flakes (GNFs:N) and carbon nano-tubes (CNTs:N) are used to study the electronic/bonding structure along with their defects state. • The I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio obtained from Raman spectroscopy used for the study of the defects states of CNTs:N than GNFs:N. • The electron field emission result shows that the turn on electric field is lower in case of CNTs:N than GNFs:N. • All results are good agreement with XANES and the results obtained from Raman spectra. - Abstract: Substitution of hetero-atom doping is a promising route to modulate the outstanding material properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene for customized applications. Nitrogen-doping has been introduced to ensure tunable work-function, enhanced n-type carrier concentration, diminished surface energy, and manageable polarization. Along with the promising assessment of N-doping effects, research on the N-doped carbon based composite structures is emerging for the synergistic integration with various functional materials. Nitrogen undoped/doped graphene nano-flakes (GNFs/GNFs:N) and multiwall carbon nano-tubes (MWCNTs/MWCNTs:N) are used for comparative study of their electronic/bonding structure along with their defects state. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy shows that the GNFs:N produce mainly pyridine like structure; whereas MWCNTs:N shows graphitic nitrogen atoms are attached with the carbon lattice. The I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio obtained from Raman spectroscopy shows that the defects is higher in MWCNTs:N than GNFs:N. The electron field emission result shows that the turn on electric field is lower (higher electron emission current) in case of MWCNTs:N than GNFs:N and are good agreement with XANES and the results obtained from Raman spectra.

  11. Nanotubes based on monolayer blue phosphorus

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2016-07-08

    We demonstrate structural stability of monolayer zigzag and armchair blue phosphorus nanotubes by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational spectrum and electronic band structure are determined and analyzed as functions of the tube diameter and axial strain. The nanotubes are found to be semiconductors with a sensitive indirect band gap that allows flexible tuning.

  12. Gold(I)-Alkanethiolate Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yu Xin; Zeng, Hua Chun

    2009-01-01

    (Figure Presented) A solution approach to assembling Au(I) - alkanethiolates into nanotube structures at room temperature is presented, in which Au(I) cations and alkanethiolate ligands are coordinated into thin platelet forms that then evolve into an open tubular configuration (see figure). The organic-inorganic hybrid nature of the nanotubes, their ability to be modified, and their high stability make them of interest for practical applications. © 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  13. Gold(I)-Alkanethiolate Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yu Xin

    2009-12-28

    (Figure Presented) A solution approach to assembling Au(I) - alkanethiolates into nanotube structures at room temperature is presented, in which Au(I) cations and alkanethiolate ligands are coordinated into thin platelet forms that then evolve into an open tubular configuration (see figure). The organic-inorganic hybrid nature of the nanotubes, their ability to be modified, and their high stability make them of interest for practical applications. © 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  14. Impacts of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on nutrient removal from wastewater and bacterial community structure in activated sludge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reti Hai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increasing use of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs will inevitably lead to the exposure of wastewater treatment facilities. However, knowledge of the impacts of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal and bacterial community structure in the activated sludge process is sparse. AIMS: To investigate the effects of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal, and bacterial community structure in activated sludge. METHODS: Three triplicate sequencing batch reactors (SBR were exposed to wastewater which contained 0, 1, and 20 mg/L MWCNTs. MiSeq sequencing was used to investigate the bacterial community structures in activated sludge samples which were exposed to different concentrations of MWCNTs. RESULTS: Exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs had no acute (1 day impact on nutrient removal from wastewater. After long-term (180 days exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs, the average total nitrogen (TN removal efficiency was not significantly affected. TN removal efficiency decreased from 84.0% to 71.9% after long-term effects of 20 mg/L MWCNTs. After long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs, the total phosphorus removal efficiencies decreased from 96.8% to 52.3% and from 98.2% to 34.0% respectively. Further study revealed that long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs inhibited activities of ammonia monooxygenase and nitrite oxidoreductase. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs both inhibited activities of exopolyphosphatase and polyphosphate kinase. MiSeq sequencing data indicated that 20 mg/L MWCNTs significantly decreased the diversity of bacterial community in activated sludge. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs differentially decreased the abundance of nitrifying bacteria, especially ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The abundance of PAOs was decreased after long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs. The abundance of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs was increased after long-term exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs. CONCLUSION: MWCNTs have adverse effects on

  15. Associating biosensing properties with the morphological structure of multilayers containing carbon nanotubes on field-effect devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Jose R. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil); Institute of Nano- and Biotechnologies, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Juelich (Germany); Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-2), Research Centre Juelich (Germany); Baecker, Matthias; Poghossian, Arshak; Schoening, Michael J. [Institute of Nano- and Biotechnologies, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Juelich (Germany); Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-2), Research Centre Juelich (Germany); Zucolotto, Valtencir; Oliveira, Osvaldo N. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil)

    2010-04-15

    The control of molecular architecture provided by the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique has led to enhanced biosensors, in which advantageous features of distinct materials can be combined. Full optimization of biosensing performance, however, is only reached if the film morphology is suitable for the principle of detection of a specific biosensor. In this paper, we report a detailed morphology analysis of LbL films made with alternating layers of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers, which were then covered with a layer of penicillinase (PEN). An optimized performance to detect penicillin G was obtained with 6-bilayer SWNT/PAMAM LbL films deposited on p-Si-SiO{sub 2}-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} chips, used in biosensors based on a capacitive electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) and a light-addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS) structure, respectively. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images indicated that the LbL films were porous, with a large surface area due to interconnection of SWNT into PAMAM layers. This morphology was instrumental for the adsorption of a larger quantity of PEN, with the resulting LbL film being highly stable. The experiments to detect penicillin were performed with constant-capacitance (ConCap) and constant-current (CC) measurements for EIS and LAPS sensors, respectively, which revealed an enhanced detection signal and sensitivity of ca. 100 mV/decade for the field-effect sensors modified with the PAMAM/SWNT LbL film. It is concluded that controlling film morphology is essential for an enhanced performance of biosensors, not only in terms of sensitivity but also stability and response time. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. First principles study of electronic and structural properties of single walled zigzag boron nitride nanotubes doped with the elements of group IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, Ali; jalalinejad, Amir; Bagheri, Mosahhar; Amiri, Masoud

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, structural and electronic properties and stability of (10, 0) born nitride nanotube (BNNT) are considered within density functional theory by doping group IV elements of the periodic table. The HOMO-LUMO gap has been strongly modified and treated a dual manner by choosing B or N sites for dopant atoms. Formation energy calculation shows that B site doping is more stable than N site doping. Results also show that all dopants turn the pristine BNNT into a p-type semiconductor except for carbon-doped BNNT at B site.

  17. Functional materials based on carbon nanotubes: Carbon nanotube actuators and noncovalent carbon nanotube modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifield, Leonard S.

    Carbon nanotubes have attractive inherent properties that encourage the development of new functional materials and devices based on them. The use of single wall carbon nanotubes as electromechanical actuators takes advantage of the high mechanical strength, surface area and electrical conductivity intrinsic to these molecules. The work presented here investigates the mechanisms that have been discovered for actuation of carbon nanotube paper: electrostatic, quantum chemical charge injection, pneumatic and viscoelastic. A home-built apparatus for the measurement of actuation strain is developed and utilized in the investigation. An optical fiber switch, the first demonstrated macro-scale device based on the actuation of carbon nanotubes, is described and its performance evaluated. Also presented here is a new general process designed to modify the surface of carbon nanotubes in a non-covalent, non-destructive way. This method can be used to impart new functionalities to carbon nanotube samples for a variety of applications including sensing, solar energy conversion and chemical separation. The process described involves the achievement of large degrees of graphitic surface coverage with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through the use of supercritical fluids. These molecules are bifunctional agents that anchor a desired chemical group to the aromatic surface of the carbon nanotubes without adversely disrupting the conjugated backbone that gives rise the attractive electronic and physical properties of the nanotubes. Both the nanotube functionalization work and the actuator work presented here emphasize how an understanding and control of nanoscale structure and phenomena can be of vital importance in achieving desired performance for active materials. Opportunities for new devices with improved function over current state-of-the-art can be envisioned and anticipated based on this understanding and control.

  18. Noble-Metal Chalcogenide Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourdine Zibouche

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We explore the stability and the electronic properties of hypothetical noble-metal chalcogenide nanotubes PtS2, PtSe2, PdS2 and PdSe2 by means of density functional theory calculations. Our findings show that the strain energy decreases inverse quadratically with the tube diameter, as is typical for other nanotubes. Moreover, the strain energy is independent of the tube chirality and converges towards the same value for large diameters. The band-structure calculations show that all noble-metal chalcogenide nanotubes are indirect band gap semiconductors. The corresponding band gaps increase with the nanotube diameter rapidly approaching the respective pristine 2D monolayer limit.

  19. Sexithiophene Encapsulated in a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube: An In Situ Raman Spectroelectrochemical Study of a Peapod Structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav; Gorantla, S.; Gemming, T.; Dunsch, L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 38 (2010), s. 11753-11759 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC203/07/J067 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : doping * electrochemistry * carbon nanotubes Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 5.476, year: 2010

  20. Electrochemical Tuning of Electronic Structure of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: In-situ Raman and VIS-NIR Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavan, Ladislav; Rapta, P.; Dunsch, L.; Bronikowski, M. J.; Willis, P.; Smalley, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 44 (2001), s. 10764-10771 ISSN 1089-5647 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/99/1015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * Raman spectroscopy * spectroelectrochemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.379, year: 2001

  1. Fibrous hydroxyapatite-carbon nanotube composites by chemical vapor deposition : In situ fabrication, structural and morphological characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosma, Vassiliki; Tsoufis, Theodoros; Koliou, Theodora; Kazantzis, Antonios; Beltsios, Konstantinos; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.; Gournis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    Fibrous hydroxyapatite (HA)-carbon nanotube composites were synthesized by the catalytic decomposition of acetylene over Fe-Co bimetallic catalysts supported on the fibrous HA. Two forms of fibrous HA (distinct needle-like monocrystals and spherulitic aggregates of needles) were synthesized using a

  2. Effect of mixture ratios and nitrogen carrier gas flow rates on the morphology of carbon nanotube structures grown by CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malgas, GF

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by thermal Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) and investigates the effects of nitrogen carrier gas flow rates and mixture ratios on the morphology of CNTs on a silicon substrate by vaporizing...

  3. Structure carbon materials: clusters, nanotubes, ion-implant polymers and diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapchuk, N.M.; Odzhaev, V.B.; Poklonskij, N.A.; Sviridov, D.V.

    2009-01-01

    The paper summarizes the series of research works dealing with the physics of nanostructured carbon materials, which were awarded a Sevchenko Prize in 2008. The paper considers the mechanism of synthesis of 3D carbon nanospecies and their nanomechanics, magnetic properties of ion-implanted diamonds, as well as the regularities of formation of novel forms of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and metal-carbon nanocomposites via ion bombardment of polymers, as well as electronic, magnetic, and structural properties of ion-implanted polymers an their possible applications in micro- and nanoelectronics. (authors)

  4. Nanotube phonon waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2013-10-29

    Disclosed are methods and devices in which certain types of nanotubes (e.g., carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes conduct heat with high efficiency and are therefore useful in electronic-type devices.

  5. Nanotubes based on monolayer blue phosphorus

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñ oz, Enrique; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate structural stability of monolayer zigzag and armchair blue phosphorus nanotubes by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational spectrum and electronic band structure are determined and analyzed as functions of the tube

  6. Carbon Nano-Tube (CNT) Reinforced COPV

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reduce the structural mass of future aerospace vehicles through the development of ultra lightweight materials and structures through the use of: Carbon nanotube...

  7. A Review: Carbon Nanotube-Based Piezoresistive Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Obitayo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon nanotubes for piezoresistive strain sensors has acquired significant attention due to its unique electromechanical properties. In this comprehensive review paper, we discussed some important aspects of carbon nanotubes for strain sensing at both the nanoscale and macroscale. Carbon nanotubes undergo changes in their band structures when subjected to mechanical deformations. This phenomenon makes them applicable for strain sensing applications. This paper signifies the type of carbon nanotubes best suitable for piezoresistive strain sensors. The electrical resistivities of carbon nanotube thin film increase linearly with strain, making it an ideal material for a piezoresistive strain sensor. Carbon nanotube composite films, which are usually fabricated by mixing small amounts of single-walled or multiwalled carbon nanotubes with selected polymers, have shown promising characteristics of piezoresistive strain sensors. Studies also show that carbon nanotubes display a stable and predictable voltage response as a function of temperature.

  8. Electropolymerization of polyaniline on titanium oxide nanotubes for supercapacitor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujawar, Sarfraj H.; Ambade, Swapnil B.; Battumur, T.; Ambade, Rohan B.; Lee, Soo-Hyoung

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Polyaniline (PANI)-Titanium nanotube template (TNT) composite for supercapacitors. → The mechanism of the controlled growth of hollow open ended PANI nanotubes using a TNT template is studied. → A rare effort to electropolymerise PANI on TNTs resulting into an appreciable capacitance of 740 F g -1 . - Abstract: Vertically aligned polyaniline (PANI) nanotubes have great potential application in supercapacitor electrode material. In this paper we have investigated facile growth of PANI nanotubes on a titanium nanotube template (TNT) using electrochemical polymerization. The morphology of PANI nanostructures grown over TNT is strongly influenced by the scan rate in the electrochemical polymerization. The growth morphology of PANI nanotubes has been carefully analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The detailed growth mechanism of PANI nanotubes has been put forward. Specific capacitance value of 740 F g -1 was obtained for PANI nanotube structures (measured at charge-discharge rate of 3 A g -1 ).

  9. Structural and electronic properties of copper nanowires inside zigzag carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Ying-Ni [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian 710062, Shaanxi (China); Department of Medical Engineering and Technology, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830011, Xinjiang (China); Zhang, Jian-Min, E-mail: jianm_zhang@yahoo.com [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian 710062, Shaanxi (China); Wei, Xiu-Mei [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xian 710062, Shaanxi (China); Fan, Xiao-Xi [Department of Medical Engineering and Technology, Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi 830011, Xinjiang (China); Xu, Ke-Wei [College of Physics and Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Xian University of Arts and Science, Xian 710065, Shaanxi (China); Ji, Vincent [ICMMO/LEMHE, Université Paris-Sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2014-08-15

    We present a systematic study of the structural and electronic properties of Cu{sub N}@(n,0) (N=1, 2, 4 for n=6, 7, 8 and N=12, 16 for n=10) combined systems using the first-principle calculations. We find that CuNWs encapsulated inside the (6,0) CNTs prefer to form a single linear chain on the tube axis, while those in (7,0) and (8,0) CNTs tend to form a zigzag chain. The smaller formation energies of −2.265 eV for Cu{sub 12}@(10,0) combined system and −2.271 eV for Cu{sub 16}@(10,0) combined system indicate that these two systems are more stable than the other systems studied here, and more complex configurations of CuNWs are expected encapsulating into broader CNTs. Besides having high stability, the Cu{sub 16}@(10,0) combined system with quantum conductance of 3G{sub 0} is under the protection of the outer (10,0) CNT from oxidation, thus can be expected to have potential applications in building nanodevices. The asymmetry distribution of the down-spin and up-spin channels results in a net magnetic moment of 0.59μB for the Cu{sub 2}@(7,0) combined system. - Highlights: • A linear [zigzag] Cu chain is preferred inside the (6,0) [(7,0) and (8,0)] CNTs. • The highest stability and quantum conductance make Cu{sub 16}@(10,0) a potential application. • Among all Cu{sub N}@(n,0), only Cu{sub 2}@(7,0) has a net magnetic moment of 0.59μB.

  10. Macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) is a dynamic adhesive molecule that enhances uptake of carbon nanotubes by CHO-K1 Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Seishiro, E-mail: seishiro@nies.go.jp [Environmental Nanotoxicology Project, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Fujitani, Yuji; Furuyama, Akiko [Environmental Nanotoxicology Project, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Kanno, Sanae [Department of Legal Medicine, St. Marianna School of Medicine (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    The toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a highly promising nanomaterial, is similar to that of asbestos because both types of particles have a fibrous shape and are biopersistent. Here, we investigated the characteristics of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), a membrane receptor expressed on macrophages that recognizes environmental or unopsonized particles, and we assessed whether and how MARCO was involved in cellular uptake of multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs). MARCO-transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells took up polystyrene beads irrespective of the particle size (20 nm–1 μm). In the culture of MARCO-transfected CHO-K1 cells dendritic structures were observed on the bottom of culture dishes, and the edges of these dendritic structures were continually renewed as the cell body migrated along the dendritic structures. MWCNTs were first tethered to the dendritic structures and then taken up by the cell body. MWCNTs appeared to be taken up via membrane ruffling like macropinocytosis, rather than phagocytosis. The cytotoxic EC{sub 50} value of MWCNTs in MARCO-transfected CHO-K1 cells was calculated to be 6.1 μg/mL and transmission electron microscopic observation indicated that the toxicity of MWCNTs may be due to the incomplete inclusion of MWCNTs by the membrane structure. -- Highlights: ►Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were tethered to MARCO in vitro. ►CNTs were taken up rapidly into the cell body via MARCO by membrane ruffling. ►The incomplete inclusion of CNTs by membranes caused cytotoxicity.

  11. Growth and field emission properties of one-dimensional carbon composite structure consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes and nanocones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongxin; Feng, Peter X; Fonseca, Luis; Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir I; Weiner, Brad R

    2009-01-01

    A simple approach is demonstrated for quickly growing a large-area aligned carbon composite nanostructure consisting of vertically aligned nanotubes and nanocones by the catalyst-assisted pulsed laser deposition techniques. The pyrolytic graphite was used as carbon source. The carbon nanocones were first grown on the molybdenum substrate with Ni catalysts. The carbon nanotubes have a uniform shape and length, aligned vertically on carbon nanocones, and the average diameter is about 7 nm. The special carbon composite arrays exhibit excellent field emission behaviours. The long-term field emission current stability of the one-dimensioned carbon nanostructure has also been investigated. No obvious current density decay was observed after a 10-day continuous experiment, indicating the super stability of the sample as cathode material.

  12. Macroscopic Crosslinked Neat Carbon Nanotube Materials and CNT/Carbon Fiber Hybrid Composites: Supermolecular Structure and New Failure Mode Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    larger).48 Kim et al. studied the dispersion and alignment of CNTs in a gelatin film and the resulting DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for...with the specimen dimension of 5×1 cm2. The two ends of the sample were polished and electrodes were connected using silver paste for better...Highly Polarized Absorption and Photoluminescence of Stretch-Aligned Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Dispersed in Gelatin Films. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2005, 86

  13. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, Manfred; Bartsch, Karl; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Graff, Andreas; Täschner, Christine; Fink, Jörg

    2001-11-01

    The catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) is a very promising process with respect to large scale production of different kinds of carbon nanostructures. By modifying the deposition temperature, the catalyst material and the hydrocarbon nanofibers with herringbone structure, multi-walled nanotubes with tubular structure and single-walled nanotubes were deposited. Furthermore, layers of aligned multi-walled nanotubes could be obtained on oxidized silicon substrates coated with thin sputtered metal layers (Co, permalloy) as well as onto WC-Co hardmetals by using the microwave assisted plasma CVD process (MWCVD). The obtained carbon modifications were characterized by scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. The hydrogen storage capability of the nanofibers and nanotubes and the electron field emission of the nanotube layers was investigated.

  14. Theoretical properties of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palser, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are invariably terminated with hemi-fullerene caps. In order to investigate the effect of these caps on the electronic structure, a method is developed to enumerate every hemi-fullerene cap which is commensurate with a given nanotube body. This algorithm is then applied to nanotubes for which I + m ≤ 25. The results of this algorithm are then used to study the effects of caps with different symmetries on the electronic structure of metallic and semi-conducting nanotubes within the Hueckel model. It is found that caps can cause localised and resonance states, although the likelihood of localised states occurring in capped metallic nanotubes is shown to be small. In addition, caps induce a non-uniform charge distribution, in which negative charge tends to accumulate on pentagon vertices. The thesis ends by describing two new density matrix methods for performing linear-scaling electronic-structure calculations within the independent electron approximation. Example calculations demonstrate that these methods provide efficient and robust ways of performing linear-scaling calculations, either grand canonically (at a fixed chemical potential) or canonically (at a fixed electron count). (author)

  15. Effective enhancement of gas separation performance in mixed matrix membranes using core/shell structured multi-walled carbon nanotube/graphene oxide nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qingzhong; Pan, Xinglong; Li, Xiaofang; Zhang, Jianqiang; Guo, Qikai

    2017-02-01

    Novel core/shell structured multi-walled carbon nanotube/graphene oxide nanoribbons (MWCNT@GONRs) nanohybrids were successfully prepared using a modified chemical longitudinal unzipping method. Subsequently, the MWCNT@GONRs nanohybrids were used as fillers to enhance the gas separation performance of polyimide based mixed matrix membranes (MMMs). It is found that MMMs concurrently exhibited higher gas selectivity and higher gas permeability compared to pristine polyimide. The high gas selectivity could be attributed to the GONRs shell, which provided a selective barrier and large gas adsorbed area, while the high gas permeability resulted from the hollow structured MWCNTs core with smooth internal surface, which acted as a rapid transport channel. MWCNT@GONRs could be promising candidates to improve gas separation performance of MMMs due to the unique microstructures, ease of synthesis and low filling loading.

  16. Optical and Structural Properties of Multi-wall-carbon-nanotube-modified ZnO Synthesized at Varying Substrate Temperatures for Highly Efficient Light Sensing Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine Saasa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Structural, optical and light detection properties on carbon-nanotube-modified ZnO thin films grown at various temperatures from room to 1173 K are investigated. The optical band gap values calculated from reflectivity data show a hump at a critical temperature range of 873-1073 K. Similar trends in surface roughness as well as crystallite size of the films are observed. These changes have been attributed to structural change from wurzite hexagonal to cubic carbon modified ZnO as also validated by x-ray diffraction, RBS and PIXE of these layers. UV and visible light detection properties show similar trends. It is demonstrated that the present films can sense both UV and visible light to a maximum response efficiency of 66 % which is much higher than the last reported efficiency 10 %. This high response is given predominantly by cubic crystallite rather than the wurzite hexagonal composites.

  17. Growth, Structural and Optical Characterization of ZnO Nanotubes on Disposable-Flexible Paper Substrates by Low-Temperature Chemical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Soomro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of vertically aligned ZnO nanotubes (NTs on paper substrates by low-temperature hydrothermal method. The growth of ZnO NTs on the paper substrate is discussed; further, the structural and optical properties are investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and cathodoluminescence (CL, and it was found that the ZnO NTs on paper substrate fulfill the structural and optical properties of ZnO NTs grown on other conventional substrates. This will be more beneficial in future usage of ZnO NTs in different fields and applications. Particularly, this approach opens the ways in research and development for high volume manufacturing of low-cost, flexible optoelectronics devices on disposable paper substrates and can be used in the future miniaturization trends.

  18. Design of Pd/PANI/Pd sandwich-structured nanotube array catalysts with special shape effects and synergistic effects for ethanol electrooxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, An-Liang; Xu, Han; Feng, Jin-Xian; Ding, Liang-Xin; Tong, Ye-Xiang; Li, Gao-Ren

    2013-07-24

    Low cost, high activity, and long-term durability are the main requirements for commercializing fuel cell electrocatalysts. Despite tremendous efforts, developing non-Pt anode electrocatalysts with high activity and long-term durability at low cost remains a significant technical challenge. Here we report a new type of hybrid Pd/PANI/Pd sandwich-structured nanotube array (SNTA) to exploit shape effects and synergistic effects of Pd-PANI composites for the oxidation of small organic molecules for direct alcohol fuel cells. These synthesized Pd/PANI/Pd SNTAs exhibit significantly improved electrocatalytic activity and durability compared with Pd NTAs and commercial Pd/C catalysts. The unique SNTAs provide fast transport and short diffusion paths for electroactive species and high utilization rate of catalysts. Besides the merits of nanotube arrays, the improved electrocatalytic activity and durability are especially attributed to the special Pd/PANI/Pd sandwich-like nanostructures, which results in electron delocalization between Pd d orbitals and PANI π-conjugated ligands and in electron transfer from Pd to PANI.

  19. Co(OH)2/RGO/NiO sandwich-structured nanotube arrays with special surface and synergistic effects as high-performance positive electrodes for asymmetric supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Han; Zhang, Chi; Zhou, Wen; Li, Gao-Ren

    2015-10-28

    High power density, high energy density and excellent cycling stability are the main requirements for high-performance supercapacitors (SCs) that will be widely used for portable consumer electronics and hybrid electric vehicles. Here we investigate novel types of hybrid Co(OH)2/reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/NiO sandwich-structured nanotube arrays (SNTAs) as positive electrodes for asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). The synthesized Co(OH)2/RGO/NiO SNTAs exhibit a significantly improved specific capacity (∼1470 F g(-1) at 5 mV s(-1)) and excellent cycling stability with ∼98% Csp retention after 10 000 cycles because of the fast transport and short diffusion paths for electroactive species, the high utilization rate of electrode materials, and special synergistic effects among Co(OH)2, RGO, and NiO. The high-performance ASCs are assembled using Co(OH)2/RGO/NiO SNTAs as positive electrodes and active carbon (AC) as negative electrodes, and they exhibit a high energy density (115 Wh kg(-1)), a high power density (27.5 kW kg(-1)) and an excellent cycling stability (less 5% Csp loss after 10 000 cycles). This study shows an important breakthrough in the design and fabrication of multi-walled hybrid nanotube arrays as positive electrodes for ASCs.

  20. Polyaniline/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite with core-shell structures as a cathode material for rechargeable lithium-polymer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Pan [School of Marine Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Weihai 264209 (China); Han, Jia-Jun, E-mail: hanjiajunhitweihai@163.com [School of Marine Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Weihai 264209 (China); Jiang, Li-Feng [Dalian Chemical Institute of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116011 (China); Li, Zhao-Yu; Cheng, Jin-Ning [School of Marine Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Weihai 264209 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • The polyaniline multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite with core-shell structures was synthetized via in situ chemical oxidative polymerization, and the materials were characterized by physical and chemical methods. • The PANI/WMCNTs was synthetized via in situ chemical oxidative polymerization with core-shell structures. • The WMCNTs highly enhanced the conductivity of composites. • The comopsites were more conducive to the intercalation and deintercalation of anions and cations. • The much better performance as the cathode for lithium-ion cells was acquired for the composites. • The composites are low cost and eco-friendly which have a good prospect in future. - Abstract: The aniline was polymerized onto functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in order to obtain a cathode material with core-shell structures for lithium batteries. The structure and morphology of the samples were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The electrochemical properties of the composite were characterized by the cyclic voltammetry, the charge/discharge property, coulombic efficiency, and ac impedance spectroscopy in detail. At a constant current density of 0.2 C, the first specific discharge capacity of the reduced and oxidized PANI/WMCNTs were 181.8 mAh/g and 135.1 mAh/g separately, and the capacity retention rates were corresponding to 76.75% and 86.04% for 100 cycles with 99% coulombic efficiency. It was confirmed that the CNTs obviously enhanced the conductivity and electrochemical performance of polyaniline, and compared with the pure PANI, the reduced composite possessed a quite good performance for the cathode of lithium batteries.

  1. Sacrificial template method of fabricating a nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong [Berkeley, CA; He, Rongrui [Berkeley, CA; Goldberger, Joshua [Berkeley, CA; Fan, Rong [El Cerrito, CA; Wu, Yi-Ying [Albany, CA; Li, Deyu [Albany, CA; Majumdar, Arun [Orinda, CA

    2007-05-01

    Methods of fabricating uniform nanotubes are described in which nanotubes were synthesized as sheaths over nanowire templates, such as using a chemical vapor deposition process. For example, single-crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are utilized as templates over which gallium nitride (GaN) is epitaxially grown. The ZnO templates are then removed, such as by thermal reduction and evaporation. The completed single-crystalline GaN nanotubes preferably have inner diameters ranging from 30 nm to 200 nm, and wall thicknesses between 5 and 50 nm. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that the resultant nanotubes are single-crystalline with a wurtzite structure, and are oriented along the direction. The present invention exemplifies single-crystalline nanotubes of materials with a non-layered crystal structure. Similar "epitaxial-casting" approaches could be used to produce arrays and single-crystalline nanotubes of other solid materials and semiconductors. Furthermore, the fabrication of multi-sheath nanotubes are described as well as nanotubes having multiple longitudinal segments.

  2. Subchronic 13-week inhalation exposure of rats to multiwalled carbon nanotubes: toxic effects are determined by density of agglomerate structures, not fibrillar structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauluhn, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Wistar rats were nose-only exposed to multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, Baytubes) in a subchronic 13-week inhalation study. The focus of study was on respiratory tract and systemic toxicity, including analysis of MWCNT biokinetics in the lungs and lung-associated lymph nodes (LALNs). The time course and concentration dependence of pulmonary effects were examined by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and histopathology up to 6 months postexposure. Particular emphasis was directed to the comparative characterization of MWCNT structures prior to and after micronization and dry powder dispersion into inhalation chambers. These determinations were complemented by additional analyses in digested BAL cells. Animals were exposed on 6 h/day, 5 days per week for 13 consecutive weeks to 0, 0.1, 0.4, 1.5, and 6 mg/m(3). The subchronic exposure to respirable solid aerosols of MWCNT was tolerated without effects suggestive of systemic toxicity. Kinetic analyses demonstrated a markedly delayed clearance of MWCNT from lungs at overload conditions. Translocation into LALNs occurred at 1.5 and 6 mg/m(3) and required at least 13 weeks of study to become detectable. At these exposure levels, the lung and LALN weights were significantly increased. Sustained elevations in BAL polymorphonuclear neutrophils and soluble collagen occurred at these concentrations with borderline effects at 0.4 mg/m(3). Histopathology revealed principal exposure-related lesions at 0.4 mg/m(3) and above in the upper respiratory tract (goblet cell hyper- and/or metaplasia, eosinophilic globules, and focal turbinate remodeling) and the lower respiratory tract (inflammatory changes in the bronchioloalveolar region and increased interstitial collagen staining). Granulomatous changes and a time-dependent increase of a bronchioloalveolar hyperplasia occurred at 6 mg/m(3). All end points examined were unremarkable at 0.1 mg/m(3) (no-observed-adverse-effect-level). In summary, this study demonstrates that the induced

  3. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  4. Template-based fabrication of nanowire-nanotube hybrid arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zuxin; Liu Haidong; Schultz, Isabel; Wu Wenhao; Naugle, D G; Lyuksyutov, I

    2008-01-01

    The fabrication and structure characterization of ordered nanowire-nanotube hybrid arrays embedded in porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes are reported. Arrays of TiO 2 nanotubes were first deposited into the pores of AAO membranes by a sol-gel technique. Co nanowires were then electrochemically deposited into the TiO 2 nanotubes to form the nanowire-nanotube hybrid arrays. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy measurements showed a high nanowire filling factor and a clean interface between the Co nanowire and the TiO 2 nanotube. Application of these hybrids to the fabrication of ordered nanowire arrays with highly controllable geometric parameters is discussed

  5. A scalable route to prepare core–shell structured ZnO@PEDOT nanowires and PEDOT nanotubes and their properties as electrode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Fang, E-mail: 270220943@qq.com [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhang, Xianhong, E-mail: zxh_0507@126.com [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Yang, Le, E-mail: 13613513412@126.com [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Xu, Dehong, E-mail: dedehenry@qq.com [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Ma, Yuhong, E-mail: mayh@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Chen, Dong, E-mail: chendong@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Li, E-mail: lwang@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhao, Changwen, E-mail: zhaocw@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Yang, Wantai, E-mail: yangwt@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2016-05-01

    Highlights: • ZnO@PEDOT nanowires and PEDOT nanotubes synthesized by chemical oxidation polymerization. • By controlling the ratio of ZnO/EDOT, ZnO@PEDOT formed different structures. • The maximum specific capacitance of PEDOT can reach 101.34 F/g. - Abstract: A composite of a core–shell structured nanowires with ZnO as a core and conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) as a shell was prepared. At first, the hexagonal ZnO nanowires, with diameter of about 80–100 nm and length 4–5 μm, were fabricated by hydrothermal synthesis process. Then a thick layer of poly(trifluoroethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (PTFEMA-b-PSSNa) was grafted from the surface of ZnO nanowires via atom transfer free radical polymerization. At last, with the ZnO@PTFEMA-b-PSSNa as a template and the PSSNa chain as the counterion dopant, PEDOT was precipitated onto the surface of the template to form the composite of ZnO@PEDOT/PSSNa. With the evaluation of the EDOT polymerization, the thickness of the PEDOT layer increased steadily. However, as the ratio of EDOT/ZnO was greater than 1:2, the ZnO nanowires templates were dissolved at last and then PEDOT particles were produced due to increasing of the acidity during the oxidation polymerization of EDOT. In this case, the product was the mixture of the nanotubes and particles of PEDOT/PPSNa. The electrochemical capacitances of the composites with different structures were investigated with cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge–discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques with three-electrode cell configuration. The maximum specific capacitance of ZnO@PEDOT electrode can reach 101.34 F/g at 20 mV/s.

  6. Vertically aligned BCN nanotubes with high capacitance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyyamperumal, Eswaramoorthi; Wang, Shuangyin; Dai, Liming

    2012-06-26

    Using a chemical vapor deposition method, we have synthesized vertically aligned BCN nanotubes (VA-BCNs) on a Ni-Fe-coated SiO(2)/Si substrate from a melamine diborate precursor. The effects of pyrolysis conditions on the morphology and thermal property of grown nanotubes, as well as the nanostructure and composition of an individual BCN nanotube, were systematically studied. It was found that nitrogen atoms are bonded to carbons in both graphitic and pyridinic forms and that the resultant VA-BCNs grown at 1000 °C show the highest specific capacitance (321.0 F/g) with an excellent rate capability and high durability with respect to nonaligned BCN (167.3 F/g) and undoped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (117.3 F/g) due to synergetic effects arising from the combined co-doping of B and N in CNTs and the well-aligned nanotube structure.

  7. Ionizing Radiation Effects in Ni Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlimas, D.; Kozlovsky, A.; Shumskaya, A.; Kaniukov, E.; Ibragimova, M.; Zdorovets, M.; Kadyrzhanov, K.

    2017-01-01

    Polycrystalline nickel nanotubes with diameter of 380 nm and wall thickness 95 nm were synthesized by electrochemical method using PET track-etched membranes with thickness of 12 μm. A comprehensive study of the structural, morphological and electrical characteristics of Ni nanotubes irradiated with C+13 ions with energy 1.75 MeV/nucleon and fluence ranging from 109 to 5 × 1011 cm-2 was carried out. The ability of modification of structural parameters such as lattice parameter and the average size of crystallites and conductivity of Ni nanotubes by irradiation was shown.

  8. Janus cyclic peptide-polymer nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danial, Maarten; My-Nhi Tran, Carmen; Young, Philip G.; Perrier, Sébastien; Jolliffe, Katrina A.

    2013-11-01

    Self-assembled nanotubular structures have numerous potential applications but these are limited by a lack of control over size and functionality. Controlling these features at the molecular level may allow realization of the potential of such structures. Here we report a new generation of self-assembled cyclic peptide-polymer nanotubes with dual functionality in the form of either a Janus or mixed polymeric corona. A ‘relay’ synthetic strategy is used to prepare nanotubes with a demixing or mixing polymeric corona. Nanotube structure is assessed in solution using 1H-1H nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy NMR, and in bulk using differential scanning calorimetry. The Janus nanotubes form artificial pores in model phospholipid bilayers. These molecules provide a viable pathway for the development of intriguing nanotubular structures with dual functionality via a demixing or a mixing polymeric corona and may provide new avenues for the creation of synthetic transmembrane protein channel mimics.

  9. Structural and mechanical characterization of Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotube thin film on TiV alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarraf, M. [Center of Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, Department of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Zalnezhad, E., E-mail: erfan@um.edu.my [Center of Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, Department of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Bushroa, A.R., E-mail: bushroa@um.edu.my [Center of Advanced Manufacturing and Material Processing, Department of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Hamouda, A.M.S. [Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, College of Engineering, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713, Doha (Qatar); Baradaran, S.; Nasiri-Tabrizi, B.; Rafieerad, A.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

    2014-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • To construct Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotube on Ti–6Al–4V. • To investigate adhesion strength of coating to the substrate. • To evaluate the effect of plasma annealing on adhesion strength of coating. • To characterize the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotube coating on substrate by FESEM. - Abstract: In this study, the fabrication and characterization of Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotubular arrays on Ti–6Al–4V substrate were carried out. To this end, aluminum thin films were deposited as a first coating layer by direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering with the coating conditions of 300 W, 150 °C and 75 V substrate bias voltage. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotube array as a second layer was grown on the Al layer by electrochemical anodisation at the constant potential of 20 V within different time periods in an electrolyte solution. For annealing the coated substrates, plasma treatment (PT) technique was utilized under various conditions to get the best adhesion strength of coating to the substrate. To characterize the coating layers, micro scratch test, Vickers hardness and field emission of scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) were used. Results show that after the deposition of pure aluminum on the substrate the scratch length, load and failure point were 794.37 μm, 1100 mN and 411.43 μm, respectively. After PT, the best adhesion strength (2038 mN) was obtained at RF power of 60 W. With the increase of the RF power up to 80 W, a reduction in adhesion strength was observed (1525.22 mN). From the microstructural point of view, a homogenous porous structure with an average pore size of 40–60 nm was formed after the anodisation for 10–45 min. During PT, the porous structure was converted to dense alumina layer when the RF power rose from 40 to 80 W. This led to an increase in hardness value from 2.7 to 3.4 GPa. Based on the obtained data, the RF power of 60 W was the optimum condition for plasma treatment of Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3

  10. Hydrophilicity, pore structure and mechanical performance of CNT/PVDF materials affected by carboxyl contents in multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanxia; Jiang, Ce; Tian, Run; Li, Guangfen

    2018-01-01

    Poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes have been prepared by loading different type of MWCNTs-COOH as the dispersed phase via phase inversion method. The chemically functionalized MWCNTs with increasing carboxyl content were chosen for achieving a better dispersion in PVDF and altering the membrane hydrophilicity. The effect of the carboxyl content in MWCNTs on crystal structure, thermal behavior, membrane morphology, hydrophilicity, and water flux of blended membranes were investigated. Due to the addition of carbon nanotubes, various performances of the hybrid membrane had obvious changes. The most prominent was that thermal stability could be enhanced and the pore morphology was more preferable, also that the hydrophilicity were improved, further that water flux could be increased to some extent.

  11. Structure, apatite inducing ability, and corrosion behavior of chitosan/halloysite nanotube coatings prepared by electrophoretic deposition on titanium substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaei, A; Amadeh, A; Yari, M; Reza Afshar, M

    2016-02-01

    In this study chitosan/halloysite nanotube composite (CS/HNT) coatings were deposited by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) on titanium substrate. Using HNT particles were investigated as new substituents for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in chitosan matrix coatings. The ability of chitosan as a stabilizing, charging, and blending agent for HNT particles was exploited. Furthermore, the effects of pH, electrophoretic bath, and sonicating duration were studied on the deposition of suspensions containing HNT particles. Microstructure properties of coatings showed uniform distribution of HNT particles in chitosan matrix to form smooth nanocomposite coatings. The zeta potential results revealed that at pH around 3 there is an isoelectric point for HNT and it would have cathodic and anionic states at pH values less and more than 3, respectively. Therefore, CS/HNT composite deposits were produced in the pH range of 2.5 to 3. The apatite inducing ability of chitosan-HNT composite coating assigned that HNT particles were biocompatible because they formed carbonated hydroxyapatite particles on CS/HNT coating in corrected simulated body fluid (C-SBF). Finally, electrochemical corrosion characterizations determined that corrosion resistance in CS/HNT coating has been improved compared to bare titanium substrate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The correlation between structural properties, geometrical features, and photoactivity of freestanding TiO2 nanotubes in comparative degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol and methylene blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabzadeh Pasikhani, Javad; Gilani, Neda; Ebrahimian Pirbazari, Azadeh

    2018-02-01

    Freestanding TiO2 nanotubes (FSNTs) with various physical dimensions were fabricated by two-step anodization process with different voltages and anodization times. The detachment method employed in this study involved voltage reduction at the end of the second step and ultrasonic chemical treatment. The results demonstrated that this detachment method is a beneficial technique to create thin open-mouthed and closed-end FSNTs (with lengths of 6-14 μm). Moreover, the influences of anodization conditions on photocatalytic activity, structural properties and geometrical features of FSNTs in comparative degradation of two non-colored (2,4-dichlorophenol) and colored (methylene blue) pollutants were investigated. Findings revealed that the quantity of the photocatalyst utilized is an effective parameter and using the optimum weight (10 mg/100 ml of 2,4-dichlorophenol) could increase the efficiency of the process up to 21%. Further, the results demonstrated that if equal optimum weights of FSNTs are chosen, decreases in voltage and anodization time significantly influence the structural properties, geometrical features, and photodegradation efficiency. The enhancement achieved in the degradation of both 2,4-dichlorophenol and methylene blue using the nanotubes with the shortest diameter (54 nm) and length (6.5 μm), which possess the lowest porosity (0.5) and also the highest surface area (0.53 m2 g-1), nanotubes’ density (19 cm2 cm-2) and wall thickness to length ratio (2). In addition, the results obtained indicated that the degradation reactions follow first-order kinetics in the degradation of the both pollutants. The apparent degradation rate constant of methylene blue was approximately 1.2 times greater than of the 2,4-dichlorophenol due to the negative charge of the nanotubes’ surface and electrostatic adsorptions.

  13. Fabrication of coupled graphene–nanotube quantum devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engels, S; Weber, P; Terrés, B; Dauber, J; Volk, C; Wichmann, U; Stampfer, C; Meyer, C; Trellenkamp, S

    2013-01-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of all-carbon hybrid quantum devices based on graphene and single-walled carbon nanotubes. We discuss both carbon nanotube quantum dot devices with graphene charge detectors and nanotube quantum dots with graphene leads. The devices are fabricated by chemical vapor deposition growth of carbon nanotubes and subsequent structuring of mechanically exfoliated graphene. We study the detection of individual charging events in the carbon nanotube quantum dot by a nearby graphene nanoribbon and show that they lead to changes of up to 20% of the conductance maxima in the graphene nanoribbon, acting as a well performing charge detector. Moreover, we discuss an electrically coupled graphene–nanotube junction, which exhibits a tunneling barrier with tunneling rates in the low GHz regime. This allows us to observe Coulomb blockade on a carbon nanotube quantum dot with graphene source and drain leads. (paper)

  14. Carbon nanotubes: from nano test tube to nano-reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2011-12-27

    Confinement of molecules and atoms inside carbon nanotubes provides a powerful strategy for studying structures and chemical properties of individual molecules at the nanoscale. In this issue of ACS Nano, Allen et al. explore the nanotube as a template leading to the formation of unusual supramolecular and covalent structures. The potential of carbon nanotubes as reactors for synthesis on the nano- and macroscales is discussed in light of recent studies.

  15. Platinum-TM (TM = Fe, Co) alloy nanoparticles dispersed nitrogen doped (reduced graphene oxide-multiwalled carbon nanotube) hybrid structure cathode electrocatalysts for high performance PEMFC applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayan, B P; Ramaprabhu, S

    2013-06-07

    The efforts to push proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) for commercial applications are being undertaken globally. In PEMFC, the sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) at the cathode can be improved by the alloying of platinum with 3d-transition metals (TM = Fe, Co, etc.) and with nitrogen doping, and in the present work we have combined both of these aspects. We describe a facile method for the synthesis of a nitrogen doped (reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)) hybrid structure (N-(G-MWNTs)) by the uniform coating of a nitrogen containing polymer over the surface of the hybrid structure (positively surface charged rGO-negatively surface charged MWNTs) followed by the pyrolysis of these (rGO-MWNTs) hybrid structure-polymer composites. The N-(G-MWNTs) hybrid structure is used as a catalyst support for the dispersion of platinum (Pt), platinum-iron (Pt3Fe) and platinum-cobalt (Pt3Co) alloy nanoparticles. The PEMFC performances of Pt-TM alloy nanoparticle dispersed N-(G-MWNTs) hybrid structure electrocatalysts are 5.0 times higher than that of commercial Pt-C electrocatalysts along with very good stability under acidic environment conditions. This work demonstrates a considerable improvement in performance compared to existing cathode electrocatalysts being used in PEMFC and can be extended to the synthesis of metal, metal oxides or metal alloy nanoparticle decorated nitrogen doped carbon nanostructures for various electrochemical energy applications.

  16. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    planes to stable loops caused by annealing M Endo, B J Lee, Y A Kim, Y J Kim, H Muramatsu, T Yanagisawa, T Hayashi, M Terrones and M S Dresselhaus Energetics and electronic structure of C70-peapods and one-dimensional chains of C70 Susumu Okada, Minoru Otani and Atsushi Oshiyama Theoretical characterization of several models of nanoporous carbon F Valencia, A H Romero, E Hernández, M Terrones and H Terrones First-principles molecular dynamics study of the stretching frequencies of hydrogen molecules in carbon nanotubes Gabriel Canto, Pablo Ordejón, Cheng Hansong, Alan C Cooper and Guido P Pez The geometry and the radial breathing mode of carbon nanotubes: beyond the ideal behaviour Jeno Kürti, Viktor Zólyomi, Miklos Kertesz and Sun Guangyu Curved nanostructured materials Humberto Terrones and Mauricio Terrones A one-dimensional Ising model for C70 molecular ordering in C70-peapods Yutaka Maniwa, Hiromichi Kataura, Kazuyuki Matsuda and Yutaka Okabe Nanoengineering of carbon nanotubes for nanotools Yoshikazu Nakayama and Seiji Akita Narrow diameter double-wall carbon nanotubes: synthesis, electron microscopy and inelastic light scattering R R Bacsa, E Flahaut, Ch Laurent, A Peigney, S Aloni, P Puech and W S Bacsa Sensitivity of single multiwalled carbon nanotubes to the environment M Krüger, I Widmer, T Nussbaumer, M Buitelaar and C Schönenberger Characterizing carbon nanotube samples with resonance Raman scattering A Jorio, M A Pimenta, A G Souza Filho, R Saito, G Dresselhaus and M S Dresselhaus FTIR-luminescence mapping of dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes Sergei Lebedkin, Katharina Arnold, Frank Hennrich, Ralph Krupke, Burkhard Renker and Manfred M Kappes Structural properties of Haeckelite nanotubes Ph Lambin and L P Biró Structural changes in single-walled carbon nanotubes under non-hydrostatic pressures: x-ray and Raman studies Sukanta Karmakar, Surinder M Sharma, P V Teredesai, D V S Muthu, A Govindaraj, S K Sikka and A K Sood Novel properties of 0

  17. Co(OH)2/RGO/NiO sandwich-structured nanotube arrays with special surface and synergistic effects as high-performance positive electrodes for asymmetric supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Han; Zhang, Chi; Zhou, Wen; Li, Gao-Ren

    2015-10-01

    High power density, high energy density and excellent cycling stability are the main requirements for high-performance supercapacitors (SCs) that will be widely used for portable consumer electronics and hybrid electric vehicles. Here we investigate novel types of hybrid Co(OH)2/reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/NiO sandwich-structured nanotube arrays (SNTAs) as positive electrodes for asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). The synthesized Co(OH)2/RGO/NiO SNTAs exhibit a significantly improved specific capacity (~1470 F g-1 at 5 mV s-1) and excellent cycling stability with ~98% Csp retention after 10 000 cycles because of the fast transport and short diffusion paths for electroactive species, the high utilization rate of electrode materials, and special synergistic effects among Co(OH)2, RGO, and NiO. The high-performance ASCs are assembled using Co(OH)2/RGO/NiO SNTAs as positive electrodes and active carbon (AC) as negative electrodes, and they exhibit a high energy density (115 Wh kg-1), a high power density (27.5 kW kg-1) and an excellent cycling stability (less 5% Csp loss after 10 000 cycles). This study shows an important breakthrough in the design and fabrication of multi-walled hybrid nanotube arrays as positive electrodes for ASCs.High power density, high energy density and excellent cycling stability are the main requirements for high-performance supercapacitors (SCs) that will be widely used for portable consumer electronics and hybrid electric vehicles. Here we investigate novel types of hybrid Co(OH)2/reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/NiO sandwich-structured nanotube arrays (SNTAs) as positive electrodes for asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). The synthesized Co(OH)2/RGO/NiO SNTAs exhibit a significantly improved specific capacity (~1470 F g-1 at 5 mV s-1) and excellent cycling stability with ~98% Csp retention after 10 000 cycles because of the fast transport and short diffusion paths for electroactive species, the high utilization rate of electrode materials, and

  18. Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Individual Carbon Nanotube Breakdown Caused by Joule Heating in Air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Gudnason, S.B.; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier

    2006-01-01

    We present repeated structural and electrical measurements on individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes, alternating between electrical measurements under ambient conditions and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The multiwalled carbon nanotubes made by chemical vapor deposition were manipulated...

  19. Performance enhancement of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells by dual-layered membrane electrode assembly structures with carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dong-Won; Kim, Jun-Ho; Kim, Se-Hoon; Kim, Jun-Bom; Oh, Eun-Suok

    2013-05-01

    The effect of dual-layered membrane electrode assemblies (d-MEAs) on the performance of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was investigated using the following characterization techniques: single cell performance test, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and cyclic voltammetry (CV). It has been shown that the PEMFC with d-MEAs has better cell performance than that with typical mono-layered MEAs (m-MEAs). In particular, the d-MEA whose inner layer is composed of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) showed the best fuel cell performance. This is due to the fact that the d-MEAs with MWCNTs have the highest electrochemical surface area and the lowest activation polarization, as observed from the CV and EIS test.

  20. Processing and characterization of halloysite nanotubes filled polypropylene nanocomposites based on a masterbatch route: effect of halloysites treatment on structural and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Halloysites/polypropylene nanocomposites with different nanotubes contents were prepared by diluting a masterbatch containing 30 wt.% halloysites with polypropylene (PP. Unmodified (HNTs and quaternary ammonium salt treated (QM-HNTs halloysite nanotubes were used. Both degree of crystallinity and crystallization temperature increase upon addition of halloysites into PP, thus indicating a potential nucleation effect induced by the nanotubes. An homogeneous distribution and dispersion of nanotubes was observed throughout the PP matrix, with a slightly better dispersion in the case of modified QM-HNTs compared to unmodified HNTs. Mechanical tests in tension, bending and notched impact demonstrated that strength and modulus of the nanocomposites significantly increase with addition of halloysites without significant loss of ductility. An halloysite content of 6 wt.% appears as an optimum. Modified halloysites (QM-HNTs lead to globally better performances due to strong interfacial interaction between the polymer matrix and the nanotubes.

  1. Structure and dye-sensitized solar cell application of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays fabricated by the anodic oxidation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ok, Seon-Yeong; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Kim, Ki-Won [School of Material Science and Engineering, ERI and i-cube center, Gyeongsang National University, 900 Gazwadong, Jinju, Gyeongnam 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Kwang-Sun, E-mail: kkcho66@gnu.ac.k [Department of Chemistry, University of Ulsan, Ulsan, 680-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-01

    Well-ordered TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays were fabricated by the potentiostatic anodic oxidation method using pure Ti foil as a working electrode and ethylene glycol solution as an electrolyte with the small addition of NH{sub 4}F and H{sub 2}O. The influence of anodization temperature and time on the morphology and formation of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays was examined. The TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays were applied as a photoelectrode to dye-sensitized solar cells. Regardless of anodizing temperature and time, the average diameter and wall thickness of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays show a similar value, whereas the length increases with decreasing reaction temperature. The conversion efficiency is very low, which is due to a morphology breaking of the TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays in the manufacturing process of a photoelectrode.

  2. Structure and dye-sensitized solar cell application of TiO2 nanotube arrays fabricated by the anodic oxidation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Seon-Yeong; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Kim, Ki-Won; Ryu, Kwang-Sun

    2010-05-01

    Well-ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays were fabricated by the potentiostatic anodic oxidation method using pure Ti foil as a working electrode and ethylene glycol solution as an electrolyte with the small addition of NH4F and H2O. The influence of anodization temperature and time on the morphology and formation of TiO2 nanotube arrays was examined. The TiO2 nanotube arrays were applied as a photoelectrode to dye-sensitized solar cells. Regardless of anodizing temperature and time, the average diameter and wall thickness of TiO2 nanotube arrays show a similar value, whereas the length increases with decreasing reaction temperature. The conversion efficiency is very low, which is due to a morphology breaking of the TiO2 nanotube arrays in the manufacturing process of a photoelectrode.

  3. An Experimental Study on Static and Dynamic Strain Sensitivity of Embeddable Smart Concrete Sensors Doped with Carbon Nanotubes for SHM of Large Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meoni, Andrea; D'Alessandro, Antonella; Downey, Austin; García-Macías, Enrique; Rallini, Marco; Materazzi, A Luigi; Torre, Luigi; Laflamme, Simon; Castro-Triguero, Rafael; Ubertini, Filippo

    2018-03-09

    The availability of new self-sensing cement-based strain sensors allows the development of dense sensor networks for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of reinforced concrete structures. These sensors are fabricated by doping cement-matrix mterials with conductive fillers, such as Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs), and can be embedded into structural elements made of reinforced concrete prior to casting. The strain sensing principle is based on the multifunctional composites outputting a measurable change in their electrical properties when subjected to a deformation. Previous work by the authors was devoted to material fabrication, modeling and applications in SHM. In this paper, we investigate the behavior of several sensors fabricated with and without aggregates and with different MWCNT contents. The strain sensitivity of the sensors, in terms of fractional change in electrical resistivity for unit strain, as well as their linearity are investigated through experimental testing under both quasi-static and sine-sweep dynamic uni-axial compressive loadings. Moreover, the responses of the sensors when subjected to destructive compressive tests are evaluated. Overall, the presented results contribute to improving the scientific knowledge on the behavior of smart concrete sensors and to furthering their understanding for SHM applications.

  4. In-situ synthetize multi-walled carbon nanotubes@MnO2 nanoflake core-shell structured materials for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huajun; Wang, Jiaoxia; Jia, Yi; Ma, Chun'an

    2012-10-01

    A new type of core-shell structured material consisting of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and manganese dioxide (MnO2) nanoflake is synthesized using an in-situ co-precipitation method. By scanning electron microscopy and transition electron microscope, it is confirmed that the core-shell nanostructure is formed by the uniform incorporation of birnessite-type MnO2 nanoflake growth round the surface of the activated-MWCNTs. That core-shell structured material electrode presents excellent electrochemical capacitance properties with the specific capacitance reaching 380 F g-1 at the current density of 5 A g-1 in 0.5 M Na2SO4 electrolyte. In addition, the electrode also exhibits good performance (the power density: 11.28 kW kg-1 at 5 A g-1) and long-term cycling stability (retaining 82.7% of its initial capacitance after 3500 cycles at 5 A g-1). It mainly attributes to MWCNTs not only providing considerable specific surface area for high mass loading of MnO2 nanoflakes to ensure effective utilization of MnO2 nanoflake, but also offering an electron pathway to improve electrical conductivity of the electrode materials. It is clearly indicated that such core-shell structured materials including MWCNTs and MnO2 nanoflake may find important applications for supercapacitors.

  5. Atomic Layer-Deposited Molybdenum Oxide/Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Electrodes: The Influence of Crystal Structure on Lithium-Ion Capacitor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Simon; Zeiger, Marco; Quade, Antje; Kruth, Angela; Presser, Volker

    2018-05-25

    Merging of supercapacitors and batteries promises the creation of electrochemical energy storage devices that combine high specific energy, power, and cycling stability. For that purpose, lithium-ion capacitors (LICs) that store energy by lithiation reactions at the negative electrode and double-layer formation at the positive electrode are currently investigated. In this study, we explore the suitability of molybdenum oxide as a negative electrode material in LICs for the first time. Molybdenum oxide-carbon nanotube hybrid materials were synthesized via atomic layer deposition, and different crystal structures and morphologies were obtained by post-deposition annealing. These model materials are first structurally characterized and electrochemically evaluated in half-cells. Benchmarking in LIC full-cells revealed the influences of crystal structure, half-cell capacity, and rate handling on the actual device level performance metrics. The energy efficiency, specific energy, and power are mainly influenced by the overpotential and kinetics of the lithiation reaction during charging. Optimized LIC cells show a maximum specific energy of about 70 W·h·kg -1 and a high specific power of 4 kW·kg -1 at 34 W·h·kg -1 . The longevity of the LIC cells is drastically increased without significantly reducing the energy by preventing a deep cell discharge, hindering the negative electrode from crossing its anodic potential limit.

  6. An Experimental Study on Static and Dynamic Strain Sensitivity of Embeddable Smart Concrete Sensors Doped with Carbon Nanotubes for SHM of Large Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Meoni

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The availability of new self-sensing cement-based strain sensors allows the development of dense sensor networks for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM of reinforced concrete structures. These sensors are fabricated by doping cement-matrix mterials with conductive fillers, such as Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs, and can be embedded into structural elements made of reinforced concrete prior to casting. The strain sensing principle is based on the multifunctional composites outputting a measurable change in their electrical properties when subjected to a deformation. Previous work by the authors was devoted to material fabrication, modeling and applications in SHM. In this paper, we investigate the behavior of several sensors fabricated with and without aggregates and with different MWCNT contents. The strain sensitivity of the sensors, in terms of fractional change in electrical resistivity for unit strain, as well as their linearity are investigated through experimental testing under both quasi-static and sine-sweep dynamic uni-axial compressive loadings. Moreover, the responses of the sensors when subjected to destructive compressive tests are evaluated. Overall, the presented results contribute to improving the scientific knowledge on the behavior of smart concrete sensors and to furthering their understanding for SHM applications.

  7. Nanotubes and nanowires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    junction nanotubes by the pyrolysis of appropriate organic precursors. ... By making use of carbon nanotubes, nanowires of metals, metal ..... The use of activated carbon in place of ..... required for the complete removal of the carbon template.

  8. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  9. Self-organized TiO2 nanotubes grown on Ti substrates with different crystallographic preferential orientations: Local structure of TiO2 nanotubes vs. photo-electrochemical response

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krbal, M.; Sopha, H.; Pohl, D.; Beneš, L.; Damm, C.; Rellinghaus, B.; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Bezdička, Petr; Šubrt, Jan; Macák, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 264, FEB (2018), s. 393-399 ISSN 0013-4686 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Anatase * Anodization * Photo-current * Stoichiometry * TiO nanotubes 2 Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 4.798, year: 2016

  10. 3 D Network-Structured Crumpled Graphene/Carbon Nanotube/Polyaniline Composites for Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Eun H; Jang, Hee D; Chang, Hankwon; Kim, Sun K; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Lee, Chong M

    2017-05-22

    Crumpled graphene (CGR) is considered a promising supercapacitor material to achieve high power and energy density because it could overcome the disadvantages of 2 D GR sheets such as aggregation during the electrode fabrication process, reduction of the available surface area, and limitation of the electron and ion transport. Even though CGR shows good results, carbon materials are limited in terms of their capacitance performance. Here, we report highly enhanced supercapacitor materials by fabricating a 3 D composite containing CGR, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and polyaniline (PANI). The CNTs increased the basal spacing and bridged the defects for electron transfer between the GR sheets in CGR. PANI can enhance the rate of conduction of electrons and offer high pseudocapacitance originating from its redox reactions. The synergistic effect of the CNTs and PANI may also result in a higher electrochemical capacitance and better stability than each individual component as electrode materials for supercapacitors in a two-electrode system. More importantly, the performance of the supercapacitors can be further enhanced by employing 2 D GR as the binder for the composite electrodes, resulting in specific capacitance of 456 F g -1 , rate capability of 89 %, and cyclic stability of 97 % after 1000 cycles. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Photoluminescence quenching, structures, and photovoltaic properties of ZnO nanostructures decorated plasma grown single walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aïssa, Brahim, E-mail: brahim.aissa@mpbc.ca [University of Quebec, Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS-EMT (Canada); Nedil, Mourad [Telebec Wireless Underground Communication Laboratory, UQAT (Canada); Belaidi, Abdelhak; Isaifan, Rima J. [Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar Foundation, Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (Qatar); Bentouaf, Ali [University Hassiba Ben Bouali, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Algeria); Fauteux, Christian; Therriault, Daniel [École Polytechnique de Montréal, Laboratory for Multiscale Mechanics (LM2), Mechanical Engineering Department (Canada)

    2017-05-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures were successfully grown directly on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) template through the CO{sub 2} laser-induced chemical liquid deposition (LCLD) process. Photoluminescence (PL) of the deposited ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites exhibits, at room temperature, a narrow near UV band located at 390 nm with no emission bands in the visible region, indicating a high degree of crystalline quality of the ZnO nanostructures. Moreover, when the relative SWCNT loads are varied within the composites, the PL intensity and the diffused optical reflectance diminish in comparison with those of ZnO alone, owing to the transfer of photo-excited electrons from ZnO to the SWCNT, and the enhancement of the optical absorbance, respectively. Finally, these ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites are integrated into a heterojunction photovoltaic-based device, using PEDOT:PSS on ITO/glass substrate. The devices show an evident p–n junction behavior in the dark, and a clear I–V curve shift downward when illuminated with an open-circuit voltage of 1.1 V, a short circuit current density of 14.05 μA cm{sup −2}, and a fill factor of ∼35%. These results indicate that these composites fabricated via LCLD process could be promising for optoelectronic and energy-harvesting devices.

  12. Chitosan-58S bioactive glass nanocomposite coatings on TiO2 nanotube: Structural and biological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, H.; Ghasemi, Z.; Kharaziha, M.; Karimzadeh, F.; Alihosseini, F.

    2018-05-01

    Bacterial infection and insignificant osseointegration have been recognized as the main reasons of the failures of titanium based implants. The aim of this study was to apply titanium oxide nanotube (TNT) array on titanium using electrochemical anodization process as a more appropriate substrate for chitosan and chitosan-58S bioactive glass (BG) (58S-BG-Chitosan) nanocomposite coatings covered TNTs (TNT/Chiosan, TNT/58S-BG-Chitosan, respectively) through a conventional dip-coating process. Results showed that a TNT layer with average inner diameter of 82 ± 19 nm and wall's thickness of 23 ± 9 nm was developed on titanium surface using electrochemical anodization process. Roughness and contact angle measurement showed that TNT with Ra = 449 nm had highest roughness and hydrophilicity which then reduced to 86 nm and 143 nm for TNT/Chitosan and TNT/58S-BG-Chitosan, respectively. In vitro bioactivity evaluation in simulated buffer fluid (SBF) solution and antibacterial activity assay predicted that TNT/58S-BG-Chitosan was superior in bone like apatite formation and antibacterial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria compared to Ti, TNT and TNT/Chitosan samples, respectively. Results revealed the noticeable MG63 cell attachment and proliferation on TNT/58S-BG-Chitosan coating compared to those of uncoated TNTs. These results confirmed the positive effect of using TNT substrate for natural polymer coating on improved bioactivity of implant.

  13. A core–shell structured nanocomposite of NiO with carbon nanotubes as positive electrode material of high capacitance for supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Z.B.; Yu, F.; You, T.; Zhu, L.; Zhang, L.; Wu, Y.P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A core–shell structured NiO@CNTs nanocomposite is synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. • The CNTs core effectively improves the capacitance, rate and cycling performance of NiO. • A supercapacitor is assembled when activated carbon is used as the negative electrode. • The supercapacitor presents an energy density up to 52.6 Wh kg"−"1. - Abstract: A nanocomposite of carbon nanotubes coated with nickel oxide was prepared by a simple hydrothermal method. The structure, morphology and electrochemical performance of the nanocomposite were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, electrochemical tests including cyclic voltammogram, galvanostatic charge–discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, respectively. It presents the highest specific capacitance of 1844 F g"−"1 at 1 A g"−"1 and 1145 F g"−"1 at current density of 10 A g"−"1 with 88.9% (at 1 A g"−"1) capacitance retention after 1000 cycles. The specific capacitance of the nanocomposite is almost double of that of the virginal NiO (972 F g"−"1 at 1 A g"−"1). Its cycling behavior is also very good. When combined with activated carbon as the negative electrode, the energy density can be up to 52.6 Wh kg"−"1. Such good electrochemical behavior indicates that the nanocomposite is a promising electrode material for supercapacitors.

  14. Review on properties, dispersion and toxicology of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, K.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the most intensely studied nano structures because of their unique properties. There are two types of carbon nanotubes CNTs, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), prepared by chemical-vapour deposition (CVD), plasma enhanced chemical-vapour deposition, thermal chemical vapour deposition, Vapour phase growth, Arc discharge and Lasser ablation. Both single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) possess high mechanical and electrical conductivity, ultra-light weight, high aspect ratio and have excellent chemical and thermal stabilities. They also possess semi- and metallic-conductive properties depending upon their chirality. This review focuses on progress toward functionalization (not only dispersed nano tube but also dramatically improve their solubility), preparation and purification, composites and the toxicity of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The functional groups attached to carbon nanotubes (CNTs) should react with polymers and improve the mechanical properties of the nano composites. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has significant application in pharmaceutical field such as drug delivery and nano medicine, but the available literature also suggests that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may have unusual toxicity and have more adverse effects than the same mass of nano size carbon and quartz. (author)

  15. Conformational changes of fibrinogen in dispersed carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park SJ

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sung Jean Park,1 Dongwoo Khang21College of Pharmacy, Gachon University, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon, South Korea; 2School of Nano and Advanced Materials Science Engineering and Center for PRC and RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, South KoreaAbstract: The conformational changes of plasma protein structures in response to carbon nanotubes are critical for determining the nanotoxicity and blood coagulation effects of carbon nanotubes. In this study, we identified that the functional intensity of carboxyl groups on carbon nanotubes, which correspond to the water dispersity or hydrophilicity of carbon nanotubes, can induce conformational changes in the fibrinogen domains. Also, elevation of carbon nanotube density can alter the secondary structures (ie, helices and beta sheets of fibrinogen. Furthermore, fibrinogen that had been in contact with the nanoparticle material demonstrated a different pattern of heat denaturation compared with free fibrinogen as a result of a variation in hydrophilicity and concentration of carbon nanotubes. Considering the importance of interactions between carbon nanotubes and plasma proteins in the drug delivery system, this study elucidated the correlation between nanoscale physiochemical material properties of carbon nanotubes and associated structural changes in fibrinogen.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, fibrinogen, nanotoxicity, conformational change, denaturation

  16. Hybrid biocomposites based on titania nanotubes and a hydroxyapatite coating deposited by RF-magnetron sputtering: Surface topography, structure, and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernozem, Roman V.; Surmeneva, Maria A.; Krause, Bärbel; Baumbach, Tilo; Ignatov, Viktor P.; Tyurin, Alexander I.; Loza, Kateryna; Epple, Matthias; Surmenev, Roman A.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, biocomposites based on porous titanium oxide structures and a calcium phosphate (CaP) or hydroxyapatite (HA) coating are described and prepared. Nanotubes (NTs) with different pore dimensions were processed using anodic oxidation of Ti substrates in a NH4F-containing electrolyte solution at anodization voltages of 30 and 60 V with a DC power supply. The external diameters of the nanotubes prepared at 30 V and 60 V were 53 ± 10 and 98 ± 16 nm, respectively. RF-magnetron sputtering of the HA target in a single deposition run was performed to prepare a coating on the surface of TiO2 NTs prepared at 30 and 60 V. The thickness of the CaP coating deposited on the mirror-polished Si substrate in the same deposition run with TiO2 NTs was determined by optical ellipsometry (SE) 95 ± 5 nm. Uncoated and CaP-coated NTs were annealed at 500 °C in air. Afterwards, the presence of TiO2 (anatase) was observed. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nanoindentation results revealed the influence that the NT dimensions had on the CaP coating deposition process. The tubular surfaces of the NTs were completely coated with the HA coating when prepared at 30 V, and no homogeneous CaP coating was observed when prepared at 60 V. The XRD patterns show peaks assigned to crystalline HA only for the coated TiO2 NTs prepared at 30 V. High-resolution XPS spectra show binding energies (BE) of Ca 2p, P 2p and O 1s core-levels corresponding to HA and amorphous calcium phosphate on TiO2 NTs prepared at 30 V and 60 V, respectively. Fabrication of TiO2 NTs results in a significant decrease to the elastic modulus and nanohardness compared to the Ti substrate. The porous structure of the NTs causes an increase in the elastic strain to failure of the coating (H/E) and the parameter used to describe the resistance of the material to plastic deformation (H3/E2) at the nanoscale level compared to the Ti substrate. Furthermore

  17. The unexpected stability of multiwall nanotubes under high pressure and shear deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashkin, E. Y.; Pankov, A. M.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Mordkovich, V. Z.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Karaeva, A. R.; Popov, M. Y.; Sorokin, P. B.; Blank, V. D.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of multiwall carbon nanotubes under a high pressure (up to 55 GPa) combined with shear deformation was studied by experimental and theoretical methods. The unexpectedly high stability of the nanotubes' structure under high stresses was observed. After the pressure was released, we observed that the nanotubes had restored their shapes. Atomistic simulations show that the hydrostatic and shear stresses affect the nanotubes' structure in a different way. It was found that the shear stress load in the multiwall nanotubes' outer walls can induce their connection and formation of an amorphized sp"3-hybridized region but internal core keeps the tubular structure.

  18. The unexpected stability of multiwall nanotubes under high pressure and shear deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashkin, E. Y.; Pankov, A. M.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Mordkovich, V. Z. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutsky Lane, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation); Perezhogin, I. A. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Karaeva, A. R. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Popov, M. Y.; Sorokin, P. B.; Blank, V. D. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutsky Lane, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISiS, 4 Leninskiy Prospekt, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-22

    The behavior of multiwall carbon nanotubes under a high pressure (up to 55 GPa) combined with shear deformation was studied by experimental and theoretical methods. The unexpectedly high stability of the nanotubes' structure under high stresses was observed. After the pressure was released, we observed that the nanotubes had restored their shapes. Atomistic simulations show that the hydrostatic and shear stresses affect the nanotubes' structure in a different way. It was found that the shear stress load in the multiwall nanotubes' outer walls can induce their connection and formation of an amorphized sp{sup 3}-hybridized region but internal core keeps the tubular structure.

  19. Study on photocatalysis of TiO2 nanotubes prepared by methanol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Titanate nanotubes were synthesized in methanol–water volume ratios of 10:90, 20:80 and 30:70 which still .... atmospheric pressure. .... pore volume of the largest titania nanotubes were observed ... affect phase structure and microstructure of titanate nanotubes .... Left inset in figure 7 is an enlarged picture of a tube wall.

  20. Nitrogen in highly crystalline carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducati, C; Koziol, K; Stavrinadis, A; Friedrichs, S; Windle, A H; Midgley, P A

    2006-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with an unprecedented degree of internal order were synthesised by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) adding a nitrogen-containing compound to the hydrocarbon feedstock. Ferrocene was used as the metal catalyst precursor. The remarkable crystallinity of these nanotubes lies both in the isochirality and in the crystallographic register of their walls, as demonstrated by electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy experiments. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that the walls of the nanotubes consist of truncated stacked cones, instead of perfect cylinders, with a range of apex angles that appears to be related to the nitrogen concentration in the synthesis process. The structure of armchair, zigzag and chiral nanotubes is modelled and discussed in terms of density of topological defects, providing an interesting comparison with our microscopy experiments. A growth mechanism based on the interplay of base- and tip-growth is proposed to account for our experimental observations

  1. Liquid crystalline order of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi; Ahlawat, Aditya; Mulkern, Brian; Doyle, Robert; Mongeau, Jennifer; Ogilvie, Alex

    2007-03-01

    Topological defects formed during phase transitions in liquid crystals provide a direct proof of the standard Cosmological model and are direct links to the Early Universe. On the other hand in Nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes can be manipulated and oriented directly by changing the liquid crystalline state of the nanotubes, in combination with organic liquid crystals. Currently there are no nano-assemblers, which makes the liquid crystal state of the nanotubes, one of the few ways of controlling them. We show the design of a fast and efficient polarized light ellipsometric system (a new modification of previous optical systems) that can provide fast quantitative real time measurements in two dimensions of the formation of topological defects in liquid crystals during phase transitions in lab settings. Our aim is to provide fundamental information about the formation of optically anisotropic structures in liquid crystals and the orientation of carbon nanotubes in electric field.

  2. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core-shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the ‘confined effect’ and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties.

  3. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core–shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the 'confined effect' and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties.

  4. The Mossbauer spectra of carbon nanotubes synthesize using ferrite catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haiyan; Lin Jiapeng; Peng Zuxiong; Zeng Guoxun; Pang Jinshan; Chen Yiming

    2009-01-01

    The ferrite powder with honeycombed structure obtained by chemical combustion was used as catalyst to synthesize multi-walled carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition. The magnetic components and characters of the the carbon nanotubes synthesized were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mossbauer spectra and vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM). The ferric components of the carbon nanotubes samples can be identified by Mossbauer spectra. The Mossbauer spectra of carbon nanotubes sample after purification contains two ferromagnetic sextet components corresponding to α-Fe species and Fe 3 C (cementite) species. While the Mossbauer spectra of the carbon nanotubes sample before purification contains three ferromagnetic sextet components corresponding to α-Fe species, Fe 3 C species and γ-Fe 2 O 3 . The saturation magnetization intensity Ms of carbon nanotubes sample after purification is decreased from 46.61 to 2.94 emu/g, but the coercive force increasd and reached 328Oe.

  5. Electrophoretic deposition and field emission properties of patterned carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Haifeng; Song Hang; Li Zhiming; Yuan Guang; Jin Yixin

    2005-01-01

    Patterned carbon nanotubes on silicon substrates were obtained using electrophoretic method. The carbon nanotubes migrated towards the patterned silicon electrode in the electrophoresis suspension under the applied voltage. The carbon nanotubes arrays adhered well on the silicon substrates. The surface images of carbon nanotubes were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The field emission properties of the patterned carbon nanotubes were tested in a diode structure under a vacuum pressure below 5 x 10 -4 Pa. The measured emission area was about 1.0 mm 2 . The emission current density up to 30 mA/cm 2 at an electric field of 8 V/μm has been obtained. The deposition of patterned carbon nanotubes by electrophoresis is an alternative method to prepare field emission arrays

  6. Hierarchically structured Ni(3)S(2)/carbon nanotube composites as high performance cathode materials for asymmetric supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chao-Shuan; Chien, Pei-Yi; Lin, Jeng-Yu; Chou, Shu-Wei; Wu, Wen-Kai; Li, Ping-Hsuan; Wu, Kuan-Yi; Lin, Tsung-Wu

    2013-11-27

    The Ni3S2 nanoparticles with the diameters ranging from 10 to 80 nm are grown on the backbone of conductive multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using a glucose-assisted hydrothermal method. It is found that the Ni3S2 nanoparticles deposited on MWCNTs disassemble into smaller components after the composite electrode is activated by the consecutive cyclic voltammetry scan in a 2 M KOH solution. Therefore, the active surface area of the Ni3S2 nanoparticles is increased, which further enhances the capacitive performance of the composite electrode. Because the synergistic effect of the Ni3S2 nanoparticles and MWCNTs on the capacitive performance of the composite electrode is pronounced, the composite electrode shows a high specific capacitance of 800 F/g and great cycling stability at a current density of 3.2 A/g. To examine the capacitive performance of the composite electrode in a full-cell configuration, an asymmetric supercapacitor device was fabricated by using the composite of Ni3S2 and MWCNTs as the cathode and activated carbon as the anode. The fabricated device can be operated reversibly between 0 and 1.6 V, and obtain a high specific capacitance of 55.8 F/g at 1 A/g, which delivers a maximum energy density of 19.8 Wh/kg at a power density of 798 W/kg. Furthermore, the asymmetric supercapacitor shows great stability based on the fact that the device retains 90% of its initial capacitance after a consecutive 5000 cycles of galvanostatic charge-discharge performed at a current density of 4 A/g.

  7. Performance improvement induced by asymmetric Y2O3-coated device structure to carbon-nanotube-film based photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fanglin; Xu, Haitao; Huang, Huixin; Ma, Ze; Wang, Sheng; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2017-11-01

    Film-based semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) photodetectors are promising candidates for industrial applications. However, unintentional doping from the environment such as water/oxygen (H2O/O2) redox, polymers, etc. changes the doping level of the CNT film. Here, we evaluate the performance of film-based barrier-free bipolar diodes (BFBDs), which are basically semiconducting CNT films asymmetrically contacted by perfect n-type ohmic contact (scandium, Sc) and p-type ohmic contact (palladium, Pd) at the two ends of the diode. We show that normal BFBD devices have large variances of forward current, reverse current, and photocurrent for different doping levels of the channel. We propose an asymmetric Y2O3-coated BFBD device in which the channel is covered by a layer of an Y2O3 film and an overlap between the Sc electrode and the Y2O3 film is designed. The Y2O3 film provides p-type doping to the channel. The overlap section increases the length of the base of the pn junction, and the diffusion current of holes is suppressed. In this way, the rectifier factors (current ratio when voltages are at +0.5 V and -0.5 V) of the asymmetric Y2O3-coated BFBD devices are around two orders of magnitude larger and the photocurrent generation is more stable compared to that of normal devices. Our results provide a way to conquer the influence of unintentional doping from the environment and suppress reverse current in pn diodes. This is beneficial to applications of CNT-based photodetectors and of importance for inspiring methods to improve the performances of devices based on other low dimensional materials.

  8. On Certain Topological Indices of Boron Triangular Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Adnan; Ahmad, Safyan; Gao, Wei

    2017-08-01

    The topological index gives information about the whole structure of a chemical graph, especially degree-based topological indices that are very useful. Boron triangular nanotubes are now replacing usual carbon nanotubes due to their excellent properties. We have computed general Randić (Rα), first Zagreb (M1) and second Zagreb (M2), atom-bond connectivity (ABC), and geometric-arithmetic (GA) indices of boron triangular nanotubes. Also, we have computed the fourth version of atom-bond connectivity (ABC4) and the fifth version of geometric-arithmetic (GA5) indices of boron triangular nanotubes.

  9. On certain topological indices of boron triangular nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslam, Adnan [Univ. of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Natural Sciences and Humanities; Ahmad, Safyan [GC Univ. Lahore (Pakistan). Abdus Salam School of Mathematical Sciences; Gao, Wei [Yunnan Normal Univ., Kunming (China). School of Information Science and Technology

    2017-11-01

    The topological index gives information about the whole structure of a chemical graph, especially degree-based topological indices that are very useful. Boron triangular nanotubes are now replacing usual carbon nanotubes due to their excellent properties. We have computed general Randic (R{sub a}), first Zagreb (M{sub 1}) and second Zagreb (M{sub 2}), atom-bond connectivity (ABC), and geometric-arithmetic (GA) indices of boron triangular nanotubes. Also, we have computed the fourth version of atom-bond connectivity (ABC{sub 4}) and the fifth version of geometric-arithmetic (GA{sub 5}) indices of boron triangular nanotubes.

  10. Characterization of Reinforced Structural Composites with Carbon Nanotubes Grown Directly on the Fibers/Fabrics Using the PopTube Approach

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An ideal candidate to accomplish the reinforcement of the matrix and interphase zone of FRPs is carbon nanotubes (CNTs), because of their superior mechanical...

  11. Effectively Improved Field Emission Properties of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes/Graphenes Composite Field Emitter by Covering on the Si Pyramidal Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Leifeng; Yu, Hua; Zhong, Jiasong

    2015-01-01

    The composite nanostructure emitter of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphenes was deposited on pyramidal silicon substrate by the simple larger scale electrophoretic deposition process. The field emission (FE) properties of the composite/pyramidal Si device were greatly improved compared...

  12. Simple design for DNA nanotubes from a minimal set of unmodified strands: rapid, room-temperature assembly and readily tunable structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Graham D; Hariri, Amani A; Carneiro, Karina M M; Lau, Kai L; Cosa, Gonzalo; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2013-04-23

    DNA nanotubes have great potential as nanoscale scaffolds for the organization of materials and the templation of nanowires and as drug delivery vehicles. Current methods for making DNA nanotubes either rely on a tile-based step-growth polymerization mechanism or use a large number of component strands and long annealing times. Step-growth polymerization gives little control over length, is sensitive to stoichiometry, and is slow to generate long products. Here, we present a design strategy for DNA nanotubes that uses an alternative, more controlled growth mechanism, while using just five unmodified component strands and a long enzymatically produced backbone. These tubes form rapidly at room temperature and have numerous, orthogonal sites available for the programmable incorporation of arrays of cargo along their length. As a proof-of-concept, cyanine dyes were organized into two distinct patterns by inclusion into these DNA nanotubes.

  13. A highly order-structured membrane electrode assembly with vertically aligned carbon nanotubes for ultra-low Pt loading PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Zhi Qun; Lim, San Hua; Poh, Chee Kok; Lin, Jianyi [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences, 1 Pesek Road, Jurong Island, Singapore 627833 (Singapore); Tang, Zhe; Chua, Daniel [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Xia, Zetao [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Luo, Zhiqiang; Shen, Zexiang [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637371 Singapore (Singapore); Shen, Pei Kang [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, and Key Laboratory of Low-carbon Chemistry and Energy Conservation of Guangdong Province, School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Feng, Yuan Ping [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2011-11-15

    A simple method was developed to prepare ultra-low Pt loading membrane electrode assembly (MEA) using vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) as highly ordered catalyst support for PEM fuel cells application. In the method, VACNTs were directly grown on the cheap household aluminum foil by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), using Fe/Co bimetallic catalyst. By depositing a Pt thin layer on VACNTs/Al and subsequent hot pressing, Pt/VACNTs can be 100% transferred from Al foil onto polymer electrolyte membrane for the fabrication of MEA. The whole transfer process does not need any chemical removal and destroy membrane. The PEM fuel cell with the MEA fabricated using this method showed an excellent performance with ultra-low Pt loading down to 35 {mu}g cm{sup -2} which was comparable to that of the commercial Pt catalyst on carbon powder with 400 {mu}g cm{sup -2}. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we identified that it is possible to substantially reduce the Pt loading one order by application of order-structured electrode based on VACNTs as Pt catalysts support, compared with the traditional random electrode at a comparable performance through experimental and mathematical methods. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Effect of doping on electronic properties of double-walled carbon and boron nitride hetero-nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majidi, R.; Ghafoori Tabrizi, K.; Jalili, S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of boron nitride (BN) doping on electronic properties of armchair double-walled carbon and hetero-nanotubes is studied using ab initio molecular dynamics method. The armchair double-walled hetero-nanotubes are predicted to be semiconductor and their electronic structures depend strongly on the electronic properties of the single-walled carbon nanotube. It is found that electronic structures of BN-doped double-walled hetero-nanotubes are intermediate between those of double-walled boron nitride nanotubes and double-walled carbon and boron nitride hetero-nanotubes. Increasing the amount of doping leads to a stronger intertube interaction and also increases the energy gap.

  15. Effect of doping on electronic properties of double-walled carbon and boron nitride hetero-nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majidi, R. [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghafoori Tabrizi, K., E-mail: K-TABRIZI@sbu.ac.i [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalili, S. [Department of Chemistry, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran 16315-1618 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-11-01

    The effect of boron nitride (BN) doping on electronic properties of armchair double-walled carbon and hetero-nanotubes is studied using ab initio molecular dynamics method. The armchair double-walled hetero-nanotubes are predicted to be semiconductor and their electronic structures depend strongly on the electronic properties of the single-walled carbon nanotube. It is found that electronic structures of BN-doped double-walled hetero-nanotubes are intermediate between those of double-walled boron nitride nanotubes and double-walled carbon and boron nitride hetero-nanotubes. Increasing the amount of doping leads to a stronger intertube interaction and also increases the energy gap.

  16. On the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-based composites: modelling and characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Thostenson, E T

    2003-01-01

    The exceptional mechanical and physical properties observed for carbon nanotubes has stimulated the development of nanotube-based composite materials, but critical challenges exist before we can exploit these extraordinary nanoscale properties in a macroscopic composite. At the nanoscale, the structure of the carbon nanotube strongly influences the overall properties of the composite. The focus of this research is to develop a fundamental understanding of the structure/size influence of carbon nanotubes on the elastic properties of nanotube-based composites. Towards this end, the nanoscale structure and elastic properties of a model composite system of aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a polystyrene matrix were characterized, and a micromechanical approach for modelling of short fibre composites was modified to account for the structure of the nanotube reinforcement to predict the elastic modulus of the nanocomposite as a function of the constituent properties, reinforcement geometry and nanot...

  17. Radionuclides incorporation in activated natural nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jose Parra

    2016-01-01

    Natural palygorskite nanotubes show suitable physical and chemical properties and characteristics to be use as potential nanosorbent and immobilization matrix for the concentration and solidification of radionuclides present in nuclear wastes. In the development process of materials with sorption properties for the incorporation and subsequent immobilization of radionuclides, the most important steps are related with the generation of active sites simultaneously to the increase of the specific surface area and suitable heat treatment to producing the structural folding. This study evaluated the determining parameters and conditions for the activation process of the natural palygorskite nanotubes aiming at the sorption of radionuclides in the nanotubes structure and subsequent evaluation of the parameters involve in the structural folding by heat treatments. The optimized results about the maximum sorption capacity of nickel in activated natural nanotubes show that these structures are apt and suitable for incorporation of radionuclides similar to nickel. By this study is verified that the optimization of the acid activation process is fundamental to improve the sorption capacities for specifics radionuclides by activated natural nanotubes. Acid activation condition optimized maintaining structural integrity was able to remove around 33.3 wt.% of magnesium cations, equivalent to 6.30·10 -4 g·mol -1 , increasing in 42.8% the specific surface area and incorporating the same molar concentration of nickel present in the liquid radioactive waste at 80 min. (author)

  18. Dynamic response of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes subjected to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Page 1 ... 1. Introduction. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are like carbon nanotubes. (CNTs) in structure in which carbon atoms are replaced by alternate boron and nitrogen atoms. Thus, BNNTs demon- ... istic analyser for intermediate landing situation of inserted mass.15 Also, a macroscopic continuum simulation is sug-.

  19. A Computational Experiment on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott; Lonie, David C.; Chen, Jiechen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed and employed in an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Computations were carried out to determine the electronic structure, radial breathing modes, and the influence of the nanotube's diameter on the…

  20. A Carbon Nanotube Cable for a Space Elevator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes are discussed in connection with the possibility to use them for the construction of a space elevator. From the fundamental information about the structure of a carbon nanotube and the chemical bond between carbon atoms, Young's modulus and the ultimate tensile strength are…

  1. Energy transfer from natural photosynthetic complexes to single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiwatowski, Kamil [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Dużyńska, Anna; Świniarski, Michał [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Szalkowski, Marcin [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Zdrojek, Mariusz; Judek, Jarosław [Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Mackowski, Sebastian, E-mail: mackowski@fizyka.umk.pl [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Wroclaw Research Center EIT+, Stablowicka 147, Wroclaw (Poland); Kaminska, Izabela [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Grudziadzka 5, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2016-02-15

    Combination of fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy results indicates that single-walled carbon nanotubes are extremely efficient quenchers of fluorescence emission associated with chlorophylls embedded in a natural photosynthetic complex, peridinin-chlorophyll-protein. When deposited on a network of the carbon nanotubes forming a thin film, the emission of the photosynthetic complexes diminishes almost completely. This strong reduction of fluorescence intensity is accompanied with dramatic shortening of the fluorescence lifetime. Concluding, such thin films of carbon nanotubes can be extremely efficient energy acceptors in structures involving biologically functional complexes. - Highlights: • Fluorescence imaging of carbon nanotube - based hybrid structure. • Observation of efficient energy transfer from chlorophylls to carbon nanotubes.

  2. Sub-nanometer-resolution imaging of peptide nanotubes in water using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugihara, Tomoki; Hayashi, Itsuho; Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Kimura, Kenjiro, E-mail: kimura@gold.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Tamura, Atsuo [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► Peptide nanotubes were aligned on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface. ► We visualized sub-nanometer-scale structure on peptide nanotube surface in water. ► We observed hydration structure at a peptide nanotube/water interface. - Abstract: Peptide nanotubes are self-assembled fibrous materials composed of cyclic polypeptides. Recently, various aspects of peptide nanotubes have been studied, in particular the utility of different methods for making peptide nanotubes with diverse designed functions. In order to investigate the relationship between formation, function and stability, it is essential to analyze the precise structure of peptide nanotubes. Atomic-scale surface imaging in liquids was recently achieved using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy with improved force sensing. Here we provide a precise surface structural analysis of peptide nanotubes in water without crystallizing them obtained by imaging the nanotubes at the sub-nanometer scale in water. In addition, the local hydration structure around the peptide nanotubes was observed at the nanotube/water interface.

  3. A core–shell structured nanocomposite of NiO with carbon nanotubes as positive electrode material of high capacitance for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Z.B., E-mail: zbwen@jxnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi Normal University, Nanchang 330022 (China); Yu, F. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi Normal University, Nanchang 330022 (China); College of Energy, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816, Jiangsu Province (China); New Energy and Material Laboratory (NEML), Department of Chemistry & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Material, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); You, T.; Zhu, L. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi Normal University, Nanchang 330022 (China); Zhang, L., E-mail: lzhang@jxnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi Normal University, Nanchang 330022 (China); Wu, Y.P., E-mail: wuyp@fudan.edu.cn [College of Energy, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816, Jiangsu Province (China); New Energy and Material Laboratory (NEML), Department of Chemistry & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Material, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • A core–shell structured NiO@CNTs nanocomposite is synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. • The CNTs core effectively improves the capacitance, rate and cycling performance of NiO. • A supercapacitor is assembled when activated carbon is used as the negative electrode. • The supercapacitor presents an energy density up to 52.6 Wh kg{sup −1}. - Abstract: A nanocomposite of carbon nanotubes coated with nickel oxide was prepared by a simple hydrothermal method. The structure, morphology and electrochemical performance of the nanocomposite were investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, electrochemical tests including cyclic voltammogram, galvanostatic charge–discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, respectively. It presents the highest specific capacitance of 1844 F g{sup −1} at 1 A g{sup −1} and 1145 F g{sup −1} at current density of 10 A g{sup −1} with 88.9% (at 1 A g{sup −1}) capacitance retention after 1000 cycles. The specific capacitance of the nanocomposite is almost double of that of the virginal NiO (972 F g{sup −1} at 1 A g{sup −1}). Its cycling behavior is also very good. When combined with activated carbon as the negative electrode, the energy density can be up to 52.6 Wh kg{sup −1}. Such good electrochemical behavior indicates that the nanocomposite is a promising electrode material for supercapacitors.

  4. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  5. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  6. Purification of carbon nanotubes via selective heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John A.; Wilson, William L.; Jin, Sung Hun; Dunham, Simon N.; Xie, Xu; Islam, Ahmad; Du, Frank; Huang, Yonggang; Song, Jizhou

    2017-11-21

    The present invention provides methods for purifying a layer of carbon nanotubes comprising providing a precursor layer of substantially aligned carbon nanotubes supported by a substrate, wherein the precursor layer comprises a mixture of first carbon nanotubes and second carbon nanotubes; selectively heating the first carbon nanotubes; and separating the first carbon nanotubes from the second carbon nanotubes, thereby generating a purified layer of carbon nanotubes. Devices benefiting from enhanced electrical properties enabled by the purified layer of carbon nanotubes are also described.

  7. Rotational actuator of motor based on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Fennimore, Adam M.; Yuzvinsky, Thomas D.

    2008-11-18

    A rotational actuator/motor based on rotation of a carbon nanotube is disclosed. The carbon nanotube is provided with a rotor plate attached to an outer wall, which moves relative to an inner wall of the nanotube. After deposit of a nanotube on a silicon chip substrate, the entire structure may be fabricated by lithography using selected techniques adapted from silicon manufacturing technology. The structures to be fabricated may comprise a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT), two in plane stators S1, S2 and a gate stator S3 buried beneath the substrate surface. The MWNT is suspended between two anchor pads and comprises a rotator attached to an outer wall and arranged to move in response to electromagnetic inputs. The substrate is etched away to allow the rotor to freely rotate. Rotation may be either in a reciprocal or fully rotatable manner.

  8. Probing the influence of the center atom coordination structure in iron phthalocyanine multi-walled carbon nanotube-based oxygen reduction reaction catalysts by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yingxiang; Li, Zhipan; Xia, Dingguo; Zheng, Lirong; Liao, Yi; Li, Kai; Zuo, Xia

    2015-09-01

    Three different pentacoordinate iron phthalocyanine (FePc) electrocatalysts with an axial ligand (pyridyl group, Py) anchored to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are prepared by a microwave method as high performance composite electrocatalysts (FePc-Py/MWCNTs) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). For comparison, tetracoordinate FePc electrocatalysts without an axial ligand anchored to MWCNTs (FePc/MWCNTs) are assembled in the same way. Ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis), Raman spectroscopy (RS), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) are used to characterize the obtained electrocatalysts. The electrocatalytic activity of the samples is measured by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), and the onset potential of all of the FePc-Py/MWCNTs electrocatalysts is found to be more positive than that of their FePc/MWCNTs counterparts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy are employed to elucidate the relationship between molecular structure and electrocatalytic activity. XPS indicates that higher concentrations of Fe3+ and pyridine-type nitrogen play critical roles in determining the electrocatalytic ORR activity of the samples. XAFS spectroscopy reveals that the FePc-Py/MWCNTs electrocatalysts have a coordination geometry around Fe that is closer to the square pyramidal structure, a higher concentration of Fe3+, and a smaller phthalocyanine ring radius compared with those of FePc/MWCNTs.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Templated Microfabrication of Porous Silicon-Carbon Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun; Jensen, David; Dadson, Andrew; Vail, Michael; Linford, Matthew; Vanfleet, Richard; Davis, Robert

    2010-10-01

    Carbon nanotube templated microfabrication (CNT-M) of porous materials is demonstrated. Partial chemical infiltration of three dimensional carbon nanotube structures with silicon resulted in a mechanically robust material, precisely structured from the 10 nm scale to the 100 micron scale. Nanoscale dimensions are determined by the diameter and spacing of the resulting silicon/carbon nanotubes while the microscale dimensions are controlled by lithographic patterning of the CNT growth catalyst. We demonstrate the utility of this hierarchical structuring approach by using CNT-M to fabricate thin layer chromatography (TLC) separations media with precise microscale channels for fluid flow control and nanoscale porosity for high analyte capacity.

  10. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  11. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.; Cachim, P.B.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.

    2014-04-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Theory of nanotube faraday cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxana Margine, Elena; Nisoli, Cristiano; Kolmogorov, Aleksey; Crespi, Vincent H.

    2003-03-01

    Charge transfer between dopants and double-wall carbon nanotubes is examined theoretically. We model the system as a triple cylindrical capacitor with the dopants forming a shell around the outer wall of the nanotube. The total energy of the system contains three terms: the band structure energies of the inner and outer tube, calculated in a tight-binding model with rigid bands, and the electrostatic energy of the tri-layer distribution. Even for metallic inner and outer tube walls, wherein the diameter dependence of the bandgap does not favor the outer wall, nearly all of the dopant charge resides on the outer layer, a nanometer-scale Faraday cage. The calculated charge distribution is in agreement with recent experimental measurements.

  14. Methods Reduce Cost, Enhance Quality of Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    For all the challenges posed by the microgravity conditions of space, weight is actually one of the more significant problems NASA faces in the development of the next generation of U.S. space vehicles. For the Agency s Constellation Program, engineers at NASA centers are designing and testing new vessels as safe, practical, and cost-effective means of space travel following the eventual retirement of the space shuttle. Program components like the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, intended to carry astronauts to the International Space Station and the Moon, must be designed to specific weight requirements to manage fuel consumption and match launch rocket capabilities; Orion s gross liftoff weight target is about 63,789 pounds. Future space vehicles will require even greater attention to lightweight construction to help conserve fuel for long-range missions to Mars and beyond. In order to reduce spacecraft weight without sacrificing structural integrity, NASA is pursuing the development of materials that promise to revolutionize not only spacecraft construction, but also a host of potential applications on Earth. Single-walled carbon nanotubes are one material of particular interest. These tubular, single-layer carbon molecules - 100,000 of them braided together would be no thicker than a human hair - display a range of remarkable characteristics. Possessing greater tensile strength than steel at a fraction of the weight, the nanotubes are efficient heat conductors with metallic or semiconductor electrical properties depending on their diameter and chirality (the pattern of each nanotube s hexagonal lattice structure). All of these properties make the nanotubes an appealing material for spacecraft construction, with the potential for nanotube composites to reduce spacecraft weight by 50 percent or more. The nanotubes may also feature in a number of other space exploration applications, including life support, energy storage, and sensor technologies. NASA s various

  15. Electrical device fabrication from nanotube formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Nolan Walker; Kittrell, W. Carter; Kim, Myung Jong; Schmidt, Howard K.

    2013-03-12

    A method for forming nanotube electrical devices, arrays of nanotube electrical devices, and device structures and arrays of device structures formed by the methods. Various methods of the present invention allow creation of semiconducting and/or conducting devices from readily grown SWNT carpets rather than requiring the preparation of a patterned growth channel and takes advantage of the self-controlling nature of these carpet heights to ensure a known and controlled channel length for reliable electronic properties as compared to the prior methods.

  16. Tunable Bandgap and Optical Properties of Black Phosphorene Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Black phosphorus (BP, a new two-dimensional material, has been the focus of scientists’ attention. BP nanotubes have potential in the field of optoelectronics due to their low-dimensional effects. In this work, the bending strain energy, electronic structure, and optical properties of BP nanotubes were investigated by using the first-principles method based on density functional theory. The results show that these properties are closely related to the rolling direction and radius of the BP nanotube. All the calculated BP nanotube properties show direct bandgaps, and the BP nanotubes with the same rolling direction express a monotone increasing trend in the value of bandgap with a decrease in radius, which is a stacking effect of the compression strain on the inner atoms and the tension strain on the outer atoms. The bending strain energy of the zigzag phosphorene nanotubes (zPNTs is higher than that of armchair phosphorene nanotubes (aPNT with the same radius of curvature due to the anisotropy of the BP’s structure. The imaginary part of the dielectric function, the absorption range, reflectivity, and the imaginary part of the refractive index of aPNTs have a wider range than those of zPNTs, with higher values overall. As a result, tunable BP nanotubes are suitable for optoelectronic devices, such as lasers and diodes, which function in the infrared and ultra-violet regions, and for solar cells and photocatalysis.

  17. Cytocompatibility and uptake of halloysite clay nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergaro, Viviana; Abdullayev, Elshad; Lvov, Yuri M; Zeitoun, Andre; Cingolani, Roberto; Rinaldi, Ross; Leporatti, Stefano

    2010-03-08

    Halloysite is aluminosilicate clay with hollow tubular structure of 50 nm external diameter and 15 nm diameter lumen. Halloysite biocompatibility study is important for its potential applications in polymer composites, bone implants, controlled drug delivery, and for protective coating (e.g., anticorrosion or antimolding). Halloysite nanotubes were added to different cell cultures for toxicity tests. Its fluorescence functionalization by aminopropyltriethosilane (APTES) and with fluorescently labeled polyelectrolyte layers allowed following halloysite uptake by the cells with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Quantitative Trypan blue and MTT measurements performed with two neoplastic cell lines model systems as a function of the nanotubes concentration and incubation time indicate that halloysite exhibits a high level of biocompatibility and very low cytotoxicity, rendering it a good candidate for household materials and medicine. A combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging techniques have been employed to elucidate the structure of halloysite nanotubes.

  18. Electropolymerization of Ni–LD metallopolymers on gold nanoparticles enriched multi-walled carbon nanotubes as nano-structure electrocatalyst for efficient voltammetric sertraline detection in human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoja, Yalda; Rafati, Amir Abbas; Ghodsi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrodepositionof gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) on MWCNTs/GCE by potentiostatic double-pulse technique. • Cyclicvoltammetric method was used for electropolymerization of nano-structure Ni–LD on Au NPs/MWCNTs/GCE surface. • Synergisticeffect between Au NPs and MWCNTs in the modified GCE provided a larger surface area to allow more Ni(II)–LD complex electropolymerized onmodified electrode surface. • The modified electrode exhibited good reproducibility, sensitivity, stability, selectivity and lower limit of detection toward sertraline oxidation. - Abstract: In the following study attempts were made to present a novel and sensitive strategy for sensing and determining sertraline. To reach the goal of the study therefore, nano-structured Ni(II)–LD (LD: levodopa) film was electropolymerized on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) which was modified by gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) enriched multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in alkaline solution. Double-pulse electrochemical technique was applied for electrodeposition of Au NPs on MWCNTs which were immobilized on glassy carbon electrode surface. In the next step, the prepared Au NPs/MWCNT/GCE was modified with Ni (II)–LD film by using cyclic voltammetry technique. Structure of Ni (II)–LD/Au NPs/MWCNT/GCE was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Furthermore, the electrochemical behavior of Ni (II)–LD/Au NPs/MWCNTs composite and oxidation of sertraline in alkaline solutions was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV). It was found that the prepared Ni(II)–LD/Au NPs/MWCNTs nanocomposite, due to its unique properties, reveals high electrocatalytic activity towards oxidation of sertraline. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used for determining sertraline in the range of 0.05–5.5 μM with a good sensitivity (16.128 μA/μM) and a low detection limit of 95 nM (for S/N = 3). Finally, the developed

  19. Stability characteristics and structural properties of single- and double-walled boron-nitride nanotubes under physical adsorption of Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in aqueous environment using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, R.; Ajori, S.; Ameri, A.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Structural properties and stability characteristics of single- and double-walled boron-nitride nanotubes functionalized with Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in aqueous environment are investigated employing molecular dynamics simulations. - Highlights: • Structural and buckling analysis of boron-nitride nanotubes under physical adsorption of Flavin mononucleotide (FMN). • Gyration radius increases linearly as the weight percentage of FMN increases. • Presence of water molecules results in more expansion of FMN around BNNTs. • Critical buckling force of functionalized BNNTs is higher than that of pure BNNTs. • The critical strain of functionalized BNNTs is found to be lower than that of pure ones. - Abstract: The non-cytotoxic properties of Boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and the ability of stable interaction with biomolecules make them so promising for biological applications. In this research, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the structural properties and stability characteristics of single- and double-walled BNNTs under physical adsorption of Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in vacuum and aqueous environments. According to the simulation results, gyration radius increases by rising the weight percentage of FMN. Also, the results demonstrate that critical buckling force of functionalized BNNTs increases in vacuum. Moreover, it is observed that by increasing the weight percentage of FMN, critical force of functionalized BNNTs rises. By contrast, critical strain reduces by functionalization of BNNTs in vacuum. Considering the aqueous environment, it is observed that gyration radius and critical buckling force of functionalized BNNTs increase more considerably than those of functionalized BNNTs in vacuum, whereas the critical strains approximately remain unchanged.

  20. Local gate control in carbon nanotube quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biercuk, Michael Jordan

    This thesis presents transport measurements of carbon nanotube electronic devices operated in the quantum regime. Nanotubes are contacted by source and drain electrodes, and multiple lithographically-patterned electrostatic gates are aligned to each device. Transport measurements of device conductance or current as a function of local gate voltages reveal that local gates couple primarily to the proximal section of the nanotube, hence providing spatially localized control over carrier density along the nanotube length. Further, using several different techniques we are able to produce local depletion regions along the length of a tube. This phenomenon is explored in detail for different contact metals to the nanotube. We utilize local gating techniques to study multiple quantum dots in carbon nanotubes produced both by naturally occurring defects, and by the controlled application of voltages to depletion gates. We study double quantum dots in detail, where transport measurements reveal honeycomb charge stability diagrams. We extract values of energy-level spacings, capacitances, and interaction energies for this system, and demonstrate independent control over all relevant tunneling rates. We report rf-reflectometry measurements of gate-defined carbon nanotube quantum dots with integrated charge sensors. Aluminum rf-SETs are electrostatically coupled to carbon nanotube devices and detect single electron charging phenomena in the Coulomb blockade regime. Simultaneous correlated measurements of single electron charging are made using reflected rf power from the nanotube itself and from the rf-SET on microsecond time scales. We map charge stability diagrams for the nanotube quantum dot via charge sensing, observing Coulomb charging diamonds beyond the first order. Conductance measurements of carbon nanotubes containing gated local depletion regions exhibit plateaus as a function of gate voltage, spaced by approximately 1e2/h, the quantum of conductance for a single

  1. Effect of Steam-Treatment Time on the Length and Structure of Single-Walled and Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kierkowicz, M.; Pach, E.; Santidrian, Ana; Tobias-Rossell, E.; Kalbáč, Martin; Ballesteros, B.; Tobias, G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2016), s. 108-116 E-ISSN 2199-692X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1301 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * Raman spectroelectrochemistry * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.937, year: 2016

  2. Halloysite clay nanotubes for resveratrol delivery to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergaro, Viviana; Lvov, Yuri M; Leporatti, Stefano

    2012-09-01

    Halloysite is natural aluminosilicate clay with hollow tubular structure which allows loading with low soluble drugs using their saturated solutions in organic solvents. Resveratrol, a polyphenol known for having antioxidant and antineoplastic properties, is loaded inside these clay nanotubes lumens. Release time of 48 h is demonstrated. Spectroscopic and ζ-potential measurements are used to study the drug loading/release and for monitoring the nanotube layer-by-layer (LbL) coating with polyelectrolytes for further release control. Resveratrol-loaded clay nanotubes are added to breast cell cultures for toxicity tests. Halloysite functionalization with LbL polyelectrolyte multilayers remarkably decrease nanotube self-toxicity. MTT measurements performed with a neoplastic cell lines model system (MCF-7) as function of the resveratrol-loaded nanotubes concentration and incubation time indicate that drug-loaded halloysite strongly increase of cytotoxicity leading to cell apoptosis. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Buckling of Carbon Nanotubes: A State of the Art Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    The nonlinear mechanical response of carbon nanotubes, referred to as their “buckling" behavior, is a major topic in the nanotube research community. Buckling means a deformation process in which a large strain beyond a threshold causes an abrupt change in the strain energy vs. deformation profile. Thus far, much effort has been devoted to analysis of the buckling of nanotubes under various loading conditions: compression, bending, torsion, and their certain combinations. Such extensive studies have been motivated by (i) the structural resilience of nanotubes against buckling and (ii) the substantial influence of buckling on their physical properties. In this contribution, I review the dramatic progress in nanotube buckling research during the past few years. PMID:28817032

  4. Chemical Tuning of Adsorption Properties of Titanate Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia V. Grigorieva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A conventional hydrothermal method widely used for the preparation of titania-based nanotubes still generates many unsolved questions. One of them is definitely connected with the influence of a posthydrothermal treatment of titania nanotubes on their micromorphology, structure, and adsorption characteristics. Here, it was analyzed systematically by a group of methods including nitrogen adsorption and temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia and carbon dioxide. It is proved that adsorption characteristics and the surface state of titania nanotubes correlate with a sodium content, since sodium ions act as Lewis acid sites and shield Ti4+ acid sites of the nanotubes. To obey a balance between chemical and heat treatments of the nanotubes to design their functional properties has been suggested.

  5. Fabrication of Titania Nanotubes for Gas Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzilal, A. A.; Muti, M. N.; John, O. D.

    2010-03-01

    Detection of hydrogen is needed for industrial process control and medical applications where presence of hydrogen indicates different type of health problems. Titanium dioxide nanotube structure is chosen as an active component in the gas sensor because of its highly sensitive electrical resistance to hydrogen over a wide range of concentrations. The objective of the work is to fabricate good quality titania nanotubes suitable for hydrogen sensing applications. The fabrication method used is anodizing method. The anodizing parameters namely the voltage, time duration, concentration of hydrofluoric acid in water, separation between the electrodes and the ambient temperature are varied accordingly to find the optimum anodizing conditions for production of good quality titania nanotubes. The highly ordered porous titania nanotubes produced by this method are in tabular shape and have good uniformity and alignment over large areas. From the investigation done, certain set of anodizing parameters have been found to produce good quality titania nanotubes with diameter ranges from 47 nm to 94 nm.

  6. Thermal oxidation induced degradation of carbon fiber reinforced composites and carbon nanotube sheet enhanced fiber/matrix interface for high temperature aerospace structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Mohammad Hamidul

    Recent increase in the use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite, especially for high temperature applications in aerospace primary and secondary structures along with wind energy and automotive industries, have generated new challenges to predict its failure mechanisms and service life. This dissertation reports the experimental study of a unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced bismaleimide (BMI) composites (CFRC), an excellent candidate for high temperature aerospace components, undergoing thermal oxidation at 260 °C in air for over 3000 hours. The key focus of the work is to investigate the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber BMI composite subjected to thermal aging in three key aspects - first, studying its bulk flexural properties (in macro scale), second, characterizing the crack propagation along the fiber direction, representing the interfacial bonding strength between fiber and matrix (in micro scale), and third, introducing nano-structured materials to modify the interface (in nano scale) between the carbon fiber and BMI resin and mechanical characterization to study its influence on mitigating the aging effect. Under the first category, weight loss and flexural properties have been monitored as the oxidation propagates through the fiber/matrix interface. Dynamic mechanical analysis and micro-computed tomography analysis have been performed to analyze the aging effects. In the second category, the long-term effects of thermal oxidation on the delamination (between the composite plies) and debonding (between fiber and matrix) type fracture toughness have been characterized by preparing two distinct types of double cantilever beam specimens. Digital image correlation has been used to determine the deformation field and strain distribution around the crack propagation path. Finally the resin system and the fiber/matrix interface have been modified using nanomaterials to mitigate the degradations caused by oxidation. Nanoclay modified

  7. BxCyNz Nanotube Development and Characterization

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) exhibit great promise for primary structure as well as thermal and radiation protection for future space exploration missions. They...

  8. Phonon spectra, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of WS2 nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evarestov, Robert A; Bandura, Andrei V; Porsev, Vitaly V; Kovalenko, Alexey V

    2017-11-15

    Hybrid density functional theory calculations are performed for the first time on the phonon dispersion and thermodynamic properties of WS 2 -based single-wall nanotubes. Symmetry analysis is presented for phonon modes in nanotubes using the standard (crystallographic) factorization for line groups. Symmetry and the number of infra-red and Raman active modes in achiral WS 2 nanotubes are given for armchair and zigzag chiralities. It is demonstrated that a number of infrared and Raman active modes is independent on the nanotube diameter. The zone-folding approach is applied to find out an impact of curvature on electron and phonon band structure of nanotubes rolled up from the monolayer. Phonon frequencies obtained both for layers and nanotubes are used to compute the thermal contributions to their thermodynamic functions. The temperature dependences of energy, entropy, and heat capacity of nanotubes are estimated with respect to those of the monolayer. The role of phonons in the stability estimation of nanotubes is discussed based on Helmholtz free energy calculations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Study of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes as an implant application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazan, Roshasnorlyza, E-mail: roshasnorlyza@nm.gov.my; Sreekantan, Srimala [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300, Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Mydin, Rabiatul Basria S. M. N.; Mat, Ishak [Advanced Medical and Dental Institute, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 13200, Kepala Batas, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Abdullah, Yusof [Materials Technology Group, Industrial Technology Division, Nuclear Malaysia Agency, Bangi, 43000, Kajang, Selangor. Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Vertically aligned TiO{sub 2} nanotubes have become the primary candidates for implant materials that can provide direct control of cell behaviors. In this work, 65 nm inner diameters of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were successfully prepared by anodization method. The interaction of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) in term of cell adhesion and cell morphology on bare titanium and TiO{sub 2} nanotubes is reported. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis proved interaction of BMSC on TiO{sub 2} nanotubes structure was better than flat titanium (Ti) surface. Also, significant cell adhesion on TiO{sub 2} nanotubes surface during in vitro study revealed that BMSC prone to attach on TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. From the result, it can be conclude that TiO{sub 2} nanotubes are biocompatible to biological environment and become a new generation for advanced implant materials.

  10. Dependence of the electrical properties of defective single-walled carbon nanotubes on the vacancy density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yu-Pin; Tien Li-Gan; Tsai Chuen-Horng; Lee Ming-Hsien; Li Feng-Yin

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between the electric properties and the vacancy density in single-walled carbon nanotubes has been investigated from first principles as well as the dependence of the influencing range of a vacancy in the nanotube on the nanotube chirality. Compared with the long-range interaction of the vacancies in a single-walled carbon nanotube with non-zero chiral angle, a much shorter interaction was found between vacancies in a zigzag single-walled carbon nanotube. In this study, we investigated the bandstructure fluctuations caused by the nanotube strain, which depends on both the vacancy density and the tube chirality. These theoretical results provide new insight to understand the relationship between the local deformation of a defective single-walled carbon nanotube and its measurable electronic properties. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  11. Study of TiO2 nanotubes as an implant application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazan, Roshasnorlyza; Sreekantan, Srimala; Mydin, Rabiatul Basria S. M. N.; Mat, Ishak; Abdullah, Yusof

    2016-01-01

    Vertically aligned TiO 2 nanotubes have become the primary candidates for implant materials that can provide direct control of cell behaviors. In this work, 65 nm inner diameters of TiO 2 nanotubes were successfully prepared by anodization method. The interaction of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) in term of cell adhesion and cell morphology on bare titanium and TiO 2 nanotubes is reported. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis proved interaction of BMSC on TiO 2 nanotubes structure was better than flat titanium (Ti) surface. Also, significant cell adhesion on TiO 2 nanotubes surface during in vitro study revealed that BMSC prone to attach on TiO 2 nanotubes. From the result, it can be conclude that TiO 2 nanotubes are biocompatible to biological environment and become a new generation for advanced implant materials

  12. Carbon nanotubes: Sensor properties. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Zaporotskova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent publications dealing with dealing with the fabrication of gas and electrochemical biosensors based on carbon nanotubes have been reviewed. Experimental and theoretical data on the working principles of nanotubes have been presented. The main regularities of the structure, energy parameters and sensor properties of modified semiconducting systems on the basis of cabon nanotubes have been studied by analyzing the mechanisms of nanotubule interaction with functional groups (including carboxyl and amino groups, metallic nanoparticles and polymers leading to the formation of chemically active sensors. The possibility of using boundary modified nanotubes for the identification of metals has been discussed. Simulation results have been reported for the interaction of nanotubes boundary modified by –СООН and –NH2 groups with atoms and ions of potassium, sodium and lithium. The simulation has been carried out using the molecular cluster model and the MNDO and DFT calculation methods. Sensors fabricated using this technology will find wide application for the detection of metallic atoms and their ions included in salts and alkali.

  13. Packing C60 in Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, W.; Aloni, S.; Han, Wei-Qiang; Cumings, John; Zettl, A.

    2003-04-01

    We have created insulated C60 nanowire by packing C60 molecules into the interior of insulating boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). For small-diameter BNNTs, the wire consists of a linear chain of C60 molecules. With increasing BNNT inner diameter, unusual C60 stacking configurations are obtained (including helical, hollow core, and incommensurate) that are unknown for bulk or thin-film forms of C60. C60 in BNNTs thus presents a model system for studying the properties of dimensionally constrained ``silo'' crystal structures. For the linear-chain case, we have fused the C60 molecules to form a single-walled carbon nanotube inside the insulating BNNT.

  14. Topological phase diagram of superconducting carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milz, Lars; Marganska-Lyzniak, Magdalena; Grifoni, Milena [Institut I - Theoretische Physik Universitaet Regensburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The topological superconducting phase diagram of superconducting carbon nanotubes is discussed. Under the assumption of a short-ranged pairing potential, there are two spin-singlet states: an s-wave and an exotic p + ip-wave that are possible because of the special structure of the honeycomb lattice. The consequences for the possible presence of Majorana edge states in carbon nanotubes are addressed. In particular, regions in the magnetic field-chemical potential plane possibly hosting localized Majorana modes are discussed.

  15. Nanotubes from Partially Hydrolysed α-Lactalbumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Xiaolu

    on the hydrolysis pattern. Increasing calcium level enhanced the effect of pH on self-assembly process, whereas the low level of a-La concentration (10 gL-1) was shown to limit the self-assembly. By tuning the rate of hydrolysis or self-assembly, via altering these three factors, one can control the formation of a......-La nanotubes and gels. In addition, by using small and wide angle X-ray scattering techniques, the structure of the a- La derived nanotubes was characterized. The results showed that the nanotubes formed under most of the conditions have a similar size with an outer diameter of 19 nm, inner diameter of 6.6 nm...

  16. High frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Abukari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on theoretical analysis of high frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes. Using the kinetic equation with constant relaxation time, an analytical expression for the complex conductivity is obtained. The real part of the complex conductivity is initially negative at zero frequency and become more negative with increasing frequency, until it reaches a resonance minimum at ω ∼ ωB for metallic zigzag CNs and ω < ωB for armchair CNs. This resonance enhancement is indicative for terahertz gain without the formation of current instabilities induced by negative dc conductivity. We noted that due to the high density of states of conduction electrons in metallic zigzag carbon nanotubes and the specific dispersion law inherent in hexagonal crystalline structure result in a uniquely high frequency conductivity than the corresponding values for metallic armchair carbon nanotubes. We suggest that this phenomenon can be used to suppress current instabilities that are normally associated with a negative dc differential conductivity.

  17. Preparation of FeS2 nanotube arrays based on layer-by-layer assembly and their photoelectrochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Mudan; Xue, Dongpeng; Qin, Haiying; Zhang, Lei; Ling, Guoping; Liu, Jiabin; Fang, Youtong; Meng, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Amorphous Fe 2 O 3 nanotube arrays are prepared via layer-by-layer assembly. • Pyrite FeS 2 nanotube arrays are obtained by sulfurizing Fe 2 O 3 nanotube arrays. • Various electrochemical properties are characterized. • A comparison between FeS 2 nanotube and nanoparticle films is conducted. • Nanotube arrays show enhanced corrosion resistance and photoresponse. - Abstract: Well-aligned one-dimensional iron pyrite FeS 2 nanotube arrays have been fabricated via layer-by-layer assembly technique on ZnO nanorod arrays in combination with subsequent sulfurization. The as-prepared products were confirmed to be pure phase pyrite FeS 2 with Fe/S ratio approaching 1/2. Typical nanotube structure was observed for the FeS 2 with average outer diameter of 150 ± 20 nm and wall thickness of 50 ± 5 nm. Comparisons of photoelectrochemical properties between FeS 2 nanotubes and FeS 2 nanoparticles were conducted. Tafel polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy indicate that FeS 2 nanotubes possess high corrosion resistance and electrochemical stability. The J–V curves show that the photocurrent at 1.0 V for FeS 2 nanotubes is more than five times larger than that of FeS 2 nanoparticles, indicating enhanced photoresponse and rapid charge transfer performances of 1-D nanotube structure. The enhanced photoelectrochemical properties mainly benefit from the unique architecture features of nanotube array structure.

  18. Flow-through lipid nanotube arrays for structure-function studies of membrane proteins by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Gor'kov, Peter L; Cross, Timothy A; Alaouie, Ali M; Smirnov, Alex I

    2006-10-15

    A novel method for studying membrane proteins in a native lipid bilayer environment by solid-state NMR spectroscopy is described and tested. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with flow-through 175 nm wide and 60-mum-long nanopores were employed to form macroscopically aligned peptide-containing lipid bilayers that are fluid and highly hydrated. We demonstrate that the surfaces of both leaflets of such bilayers are fully accessible to aqueous solutes. Thus, high hydration levels as well as pH and desirable ion and/or drug concentrations could be easily maintained and modified as desired in a series of experiments with the same sample. The method allows for membrane protein NMR experiments in a broad pH range that could be extended to as low as 1 and as high as 12 units for a period of up to a few hours and temperatures as high as 70 degrees C without losing the lipid alignment or bilayers from the nanopores. We demonstrate the utility of this method by a solid-state 19.6 T (17)O NMR study of reversible binding effects of mono- and divalent ions on the chemical shift properties of the Leu(10) carbonyl oxygen of transmembrane pore-forming peptide gramicidin A (gA). We further compare the (17)O shifts induced by binding metal ions to the binding of protons in the pH range from 1 to 12 and find a significant difference. This unexpected result points to a difference in mechanisms for ion and proton conduction by the gA pore. We believe that a large number of solid-state NMR-based studies, including structure-function, drug screening, proton exchange, pH, and other titration experiments, will benefit significantly from the method described here.

  19. Nanotube resonator devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  20. M-Polynomials and Topological Indices of Titania Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mobeen Munir

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Titania is one of the most comprehensively studied nanostructures due to their widespread applications in the production of catalytic, gas sensing, and corrosion-resistant materials. M-polynomial of nanotubes has been vastly investigated, as it produces many degree-based topological indices, which are numerical parameters capturing structural and chemical properties. These indices are used in the development of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs in which the biological activity and other properties of molecules, such as boiling point, stability, strain energy, etc., are correlated with their structure. In this report, we provide M-polynomials of single-walled titania (SW TiO2 nanotubes and recover important topological degree-based indices to theoretically judge these nanotubes. We also plot surfaces associated to single-walled titania (SW TiO2 nanotubes.

  1. Load transfer issues in the tensile and compressive behavior of multiwall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, G.A.; Namilae, S.; Chandra, N.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are considered to be ultra strong and stiff reinforcements for structural composite applications. The load transfer between the inner and outer nanotubes in multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) has to be clearly understood to realize their potential in not only composites, but also other applications such as nano-springs and nano-bearings. In this paper, we study the load transfer between the walls of multiwall nanotubes both in tension and compression using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that very minimal load is transferred to the inner nanotube during tension. The load transfer in compression of capped nanotubes is much greater than that in tension. In the case of uncapped nanotubes, the inner nanotube is deformed in bending, only after the outer nanotube is extensively deformed by buckling. It is found that the presence of a few interstitial atoms between the walls of multiwall nanotube can improve the stiffness and enhance the load transfer to the inner nanotubes both in tension and compression

  2. In silico assembly and nanomechanical characterization of carbon nanotube buckypaper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranford, Steven W; Buehler, Markus J

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotube sheets or films, also known as 'buckypaper', have been proposed for use in actuating, structural and filtration systems, based in part on their unique and robust mechanical properties. Computational modeling of such a fibrous nanostructure is hindered by both the random arrangement of the constituent elements as well as the time- and length-scales accessible to atomistic level molecular dynamics modeling. Here we present a novel in silico assembly procedure based on a coarse-grain model of carbon nanotubes, used to attain a representative mesoscopic buckypaper model that circumvents the need for probabilistic approaches. By variation in assembly parameters, including the initial nanotube density and ratio of nanotube type (single- and double-walled), the porosity of the resulting buckypaper can be varied threefold, from approximately 0.3 to 0.9. Further, through simulation of nanoindentation, the Young's modulus is shown to be tunable through manipulation of nanotube type and density over a range of approximately 0.2-3.1 GPa, in good agreement with experimental findings of the modulus of assembled carbon nanotube films. In addition to carbon nanotubes, the coarse-grain model and assembly process can be adapted for other fibrous nanostructures such as electrospun polymeric composites, high performance nonwoven ballistic materials, or fibrous protein aggregates, facilitating the development and characterization of novel nanomaterials and composites as well as the analysis of biological materials such as protein fiber films and bulk structures.

  3. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes in Biotechnology and Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekyarova, Elena; Ni, Yingchun; Malarkey, Erik B.; Montana, Vedrana; McWilliams, Jared L.; Haddon, Robert C.; Parpura, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Due to their electrical, chemical, mechanical and thermal properties, carbon nanotubes are one of the most promising materials for the electronics, computer and aerospace industries. Here, we discuss their properties in the context of future applications in biotechnology and biomedicine. The purification and chemical modification of carbon nanotubes with organic, polymeric and biological molecules are discussed. Additionally we review their uses in biosensors, assembly of structures and devices, scanning probe microscopy and as substrates for neuronal growth. We note that additional toxicity studies of carbon nanotubes are necessary so that exposure guidelines and safety regulations can be established in a timely manner. PMID:19763242

  4. Transparent conducting oxide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivov, Yahya; Singh, Vivek; Ding, Yuchen; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-09-01

    Thin film or porous membranes made of hollow, transparent, conducting oxide (TCO) nanotubes, with high chemical stability, functionalized surfaces and large surface areas, can provide an excellent platform for a wide variety of nanostructured photovoltaic, photodetector, photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic devices. While large-bandgap oxide semiconductors offer transparency for incident light (below their nominal bandgap), their low carrier concentration and poor conductivity makes them unsuitable for charge conduction. Moreover, materials with high conductivity have nominally low bandgaps and hence poor light transmittance. Here, we demonstrate thin films and membranes made from TiO2 nanotubes heavily-doped with shallow Niobium (Nb) donors (up to 10%, without phase segregation), using a modified electrochemical anodization process, to fabricate transparent conducting hollow nanotubes. Temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics revealed that TiO2 TCO nanotubes, doped with 10% Nb, show metal-like behavior with resistivity decreasing from 6.5 × 10-4 Ωcm at T = 300 K (compared to 6.5 × 10-1 Ωcm for nominally undoped nanotubes) to 2.2 × 10-4 Ωcm at T = 20 K. Optical properties, studied by reflectance measurements, showed light transmittance up to 90%, within wavelength range 400 nm-1000 nm. Nb doping also improves the field emission properties of TCO nanotubes demonstrating an order of magnitude increase in field-emitter current, compared to undoped samples.

  5. The effects of nanostructures on the mechanical and tribological properties of TiO2 nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeoungchin; Park, Jeongwon

    2018-04-01

    TiO2 nanotubes were prepared by anodization on Ti substrates with a diameter variation of 30-100 nm, and the structure of the nanotubes were studied using x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, which confirmed the structure changes from the anatase phase to the rutile phase of TiO2 at a diameter below 50 nm. The tribological behaviors of TiO2 nanotubes were investigated with different diameters. The effectiveness of the rutile phase and the diameter size enhanced the frictional performance of TiO2 nanotubes.

  6. The determination of temperature stability of silver nanotubes by the molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, O.; Soldatenko, S.; Soldatenko, O.

    2018-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation using the embedded-atom method is applied to study thermal stability of silver nanotubes and its coefficient of linear thermal expansion. The correspondence of face centered cubic structure potential for this task is tested. Three types of nanotubes are modelled: scrolled from graphene-like plane, scrolled from plane with cubic structure and cut from cylinder. It is established that only the last two of them are stable. The last one describes in details. There is critical temperature when free ends of the nanotube close but the interior surface retains. At higher temperatures, the interior surface collapses and the nanotube is unstable.

  7. Nanomechanical cutting of boron nitride nanotubes by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Meng; Chen, Xiaoming; Ke, Changhong; Park, Cheol; Fay, Catharine C; Pugno, Nicola M

    2013-01-01

    The length of nanotubes is a critical structural parameter for the design and manufacture of nanotube-based material systems and devices. High-precision length control of nanotubes by means of mechanical cutting using a scriber has not materialized due to the lack of the knowledge of the appropriate cutting conditions and the tube failure mechanism. In this paper, we present a quantitative nanomechanical study of the cutting of individual boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes. In our nanotube cutting measurements, a nanotube standing still on a flat substrate was laterally scribed by an AFM tip. The tip–tube collision force deformed the tube, and eventually fractured the tube at the collision site by increasing the cutting load. The mechanical response of nanotubes during the tip–tube collision process and the roles of the scribing velocity and the frictional interaction on the tip–tube collision contact in cutting nanotubes were quantitatively investigated by cutting double-walled BNNTs of 2.26–4.28 nm in outer diameter. The fracture strength of BNNTs was also quantified based on the measured collision forces and their structural configurations using contact mechanics theories. Our analysis reports fracture strengths of 9.1–15.5 GPa for the tested BNNTs. The nanomechanical study presented in this paper demonstrates that the AFM-based nanomechanical cutting technique not only enables effective control of the length of nanotubes with high precision, but is also promising as a new nanomechanical testing technique for characterizing the mechanical properties of tubular nanostructures. (paper)

  8. Double-walled ZrO{sub 2} nanotube array. Preparation and enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Chaorui; Hu, Shengliang; Chang, Qing; Wang, Yanzhong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan (China); Yang, Jinlong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2017-11-15

    This work demonstrates the formation of self-ordered double-walled ZrO{sub 2} nanotube array via electrochemical anodization in glycerol-based electrolyte. Compared with its counterpart of single-walled ZrO{sub 2} nanotube array, the tube wall of double-walled ZrO{sub 2} nanotube split into outer and inner layers for the decomposition of glycerol during anodization process. Moreover, the double-walled structure showed its advantage of achieving improved utilization of light and higher specific surface area of nanotube array. Due to the unique double-walled structure, the double-walled ZrO{sub 2} nanotube array exhibited better photocatalytic activity than the single-walled ZrO{sub 2} nanotube array. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. The in vitro biomineralization and cytocompatibility of polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Penghua; Wang Jinqing; Wang Lin; Liu Bin; Lei Ziqiang; Yang Shengrong

    2011-01-01

    In this work, polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes were firstly prepared by a simple and feasible route. Then, for comparison, the in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility of the carbon nanotubes and the polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes were assessed by immersion study in simulated body fluids and 3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide test using osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1), respectively. As a result, it has been demonstrated that the introduction of polydopamine coating can greatly enhance the bioactivity and promote cell proliferation of the carbon nanotubes. The improvement of bioactive behavior is attributed to the good combination of catecholamines structure of the polydopamine and the structural advantages of carbon nanotubes as a framework material. It is anticipated that the polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes would find potential applications in bone tissue engineering and other biomedical areas.

  10. The in vitro biomineralization and cytocompatibility of polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Penghua [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Tianshui Middle Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Wang Jinqing, E-mail: jqwang@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Tianshui Middle Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang Lin; Liu Bin [School of Stomatology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Lei Ziqiang [Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Yang Shengrong, E-mail: sryang@lzb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Tianshui Middle Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials of Gansu Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)

    2011-03-15

    In this work, polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes were firstly prepared by a simple and feasible route. Then, for comparison, the in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility of the carbon nanotubes and the polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes were assessed by immersion study in simulated body fluids and 3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide test using osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1), respectively. As a result, it has been demonstrated that the introduction of polydopamine coating can greatly enhance the bioactivity and promote cell proliferation of the carbon nanotubes. The improvement of bioactive behavior is attributed to the good combination of catecholamines structure of the polydopamine and the structural advantages of carbon nanotubes as a framework material. It is anticipated that the polydopamine coated carbon nanotubes would find potential applications in bone tissue engineering and other biomedical areas.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} magnetic nanotubes, nanorods and nanowires. Formation of magnetic structured elastomers by magnetic field-induced alignment of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonel, P. Soledad [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Instituto de Química Física de Materiales, Ambiente y Energía (INQUIMAE) (Argentina); Oliveira, Cristiano L. P. [Universidade de São Paulo, Grupo de Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Física (Brazil); Jorge, Guillermo A. [Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, Instituto de Ciencias (Argentina); Perez, Oscar E. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Industrias, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (Argentina); Leyva, A. Gabriela, E-mail: leyva@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Grupo de Materia Condensada, Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología (Argentina); Negri, R. Martín, E-mail: rmn@qi.fcen.uba.ar [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Instituto de Química Física de Materiales, Ambiente y Energía (INQUIMAE) (Argentina)

    2015-07-15

    Magnetic CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanotubes, nanorods and nanowires were synthesized by the template method. The materials are highly crystalline and formed by compactly packed ceramic particles whose equivalent size diameter depends on the nanostructure type. Nanotubes and nanorods present the remarkable characteristic of having very large coercive fields (1000–1100 Oe) in comparison with nanoparticles of the same crystallite size (400 Oe) while keeping similar saturation magnetization (53–55 emu/g). Nanorods were used as filler material in polydimethylsiloxane elastomer composites, which were structured by curing in the presence of uniform magnetic field, H{sub curing}. In that way the nanorods agglomerate in the cured elastomer, forming needles-like structures (pseudo-chains) oriented in the direction of H{sub curing}. SEM analysis show that pseudo-chains are formed by bunches of nanorods oriented in that direction. At the considered filler concentration (1 % w/w), the structured elastomers conserve the magnetic properties of the fillers, that is, high coercive fields without observing magnetic anisotropy. The elastomer composites present strong elastic anisotropy, with compression constants about ten times larger in the direction parallel to the pseudo-chains than in the perpendicular direction, as determined by compression stress–strain curves. That anisotropic factor is about three-four times higher than that observed when using spherical CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles or elongated Ni nanochains. Hence, the use of morphological anisotropic structures (nanorods) results in composites with enhanced elastic anisotropy. It is also remarkable that the large elastic anisotropy was obtained at lower filler concentration compared with the above-mentioned systems (1 % w/w vs. 5–10 % w/w)

  12. Synthesis and characterization of CoFe2O4 magnetic nanotubes, nanorods and nanowires. Formation of magnetic structured elastomers by magnetic field-induced alignment of CoFe2O4 nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonel, P. Soledad; Oliveira, Cristiano L. P.; Jorge, Guillermo A.; Perez, Oscar E.; Leyva, A. Gabriela; Negri, R. Martín

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic CoFe 2 O 4 nanotubes, nanorods and nanowires were synthesized by the template method. The materials are highly crystalline and formed by compactly packed ceramic particles whose equivalent size diameter depends on the nanostructure type. Nanotubes and nanorods present the remarkable characteristic of having very large coercive fields (1000–1100 Oe) in comparison with nanoparticles of the same crystallite size (400 Oe) while keeping similar saturation magnetization (53–55 emu/g). Nanorods were used as filler material in polydimethylsiloxane elastomer composites, which were structured by curing in the presence of uniform magnetic field, H curing . In that way the nanorods agglomerate in the cured elastomer, forming needles-like structures (pseudo-chains) oriented in the direction of H curing . SEM analysis show that pseudo-chains are formed by bunches of nanorods oriented in that direction. At the considered filler concentration (1 % w/w), the structured elastomers conserve the magnetic properties of the fillers, that is, high coercive fields without observing magnetic anisotropy. The elastomer composites present strong elastic anisotropy, with compression constants about ten times larger in the direction parallel to the pseudo-chains than in the perpendicular direction, as determined by compression stress–strain curves. That anisotropic factor is about three-four times higher than that observed when using spherical CoFe 2 O 4 nanoparticles or elongated Ni nanochains. Hence, the use of morphological anisotropic structures (nanorods) results in composites with enhanced elastic anisotropy. It is also remarkable that the large elastic anisotropy was obtained at lower filler concentration compared with the above-mentioned systems (1 % w/w vs. 5–10 % w/w)

  13. First-principles modeling of hafnia-based nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evarestov, Robert A; Bandura, Andrei V; Porsev, Vitaly V; Kovalenko, Alexey V

    2017-09-15

    Hybrid density functional theory calculations were performed for the first time on structure, stability, phonon frequencies, and thermodynamic functions of hafnia-based single-wall nanotubes. The nanotubes were rolled up from the thin free layers of cubic and tetragonal phases of HfO 2 . It was shown that the most stable HfO 2 single-wall nanotubes can be obtained from hexagonal (111) layer of the cubic phase. Phonon frequencies have been calculated for different HfO 2 nanolayers and nanotubes to prove the local stability and to find the thermal contributions to their thermodynamic functions. The role of phonons in stability of nanotubes seems to be negligible for the internal energy and noticeable for the Helmholtz free energy. Zone folding approach has been applied to estimate the connection between phonon modes of the layer and nanotubes and to approximate the nanotube thermodynamic properties. It is found that the zone-folding approximation is sufficiently accurate for heat capacity, but less accurate for entropy. The comparison has been done between the properties of TiO 2 , ZrO 2 , and HfO 2 . © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Inherent-opening-controlled pattern formation in carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xiao; Zhou, Jijie J; Sansom, Elijah; Gharib, Morteza; Haur, Sow Chorng

    2007-01-01

    We have introduced inherent openings into densely packed carbon nanotube arrays to study self-organized pattern formation when the arrays undergo a wetting-dewetting treatment from nanotube tips. These inherent openings, made of circular or elongated hollows in nanotube mats, serve as dewetting centres, from where liquid recedes from. As the dewetting centres initiate dry zones and the dry zones expand, surrounding nanotubes are pulled away from the dewetting centres by liquid surface tension. Among short nanotubes, the self-organized patterns are consistent with the shape of the inherent openings, i.e. slender openings lead to elongated trench-like structures, and circular holes result in relatively round nest-like arrangements. Nanotubes in a relatively high mat are more connected, like in an elastic body, than those in a short mat. Small cracks often initialize themselves in a relatively high mat, along two or more adjacent round openings; each of the cracks evolves into a trench as liquid dries up. Self-organized pattern control with inherent openings needs to initiate the dewetting process above the nanotube tips. If there is no liquid on top, inherent openings barely enlarge themselves after the wetting-dewetting treatment

  15. Filled carbon nanotubes in biomedical imaging and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martincic, Markus; Tobias, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been advocated as promising candidates in the biomedical field in the areas of diagnosis and therapy. In terms of drug delivery, the use of carbon nanotubes can overcome some limitations of 'free' drugs by improving the formulation of poorly water-soluble drugs, allowing targeted delivery and even enabling the co-delivery of two or more drugs for combination therapy. Two different approaches are currently being explored for the delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents by carbon nanotubes, namely attachment of the payload to the external sidewalls or encapsulation into the inner cavities. Although less explored, the latter confers additional stability to the chosen diagnostic or therapeutic agents, and leaves the backbone structure of the nanotubes available for its functionalization with dispersing and targeting moieties. Several drug delivery systems and diagnostic agents have been developed in the last years employing the inner tubular cavities of carbon nanotubes. The research discussed in this review focuses on the use of carbon nanotubes that contain in their interior drug molecules and diagnosis-related compounds. The approaches employed for the development of such nanoscale vehicles along with targeting and releasing strategies are discussed. The encapsulation of both biomedical contrast agents and drugs inside carbon nanotubes is further expanding the possibilities to allow an early diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

  16. Surface functionalization of aluminosilicate nanotubes with organic molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ma

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface functionalization of inorganic nanostructures is an effective approach for enriching the potential applications of existing nanomaterials. Inorganic nanotubes attract great research interest due to their one-dimensional structure and reactive surfaces. In this review paper, recent developments in surface functionalization of an aluminosilicate nanotube, “imogolite”, are introduced. The functionalization processes are based on the robust affinity between phosphate groups of organic molecules and the aluminol (AlOH surface of imogolite nanotubes. An aqueous modification process employing a water soluble ammonium salt of alkyl phosphate led to chemisorption of molecules on imogolite at the nanotube level. Polymer-chain-grafted imogolite nanotubes were prepared through surface-initiated polymerization. In addition, the assembly of conjugated molecules, 2-(5’’-hexyl-2,2’:5’,2’’-terthiophen-5-ylethylphosphonic acid (HT3P and 2-(5’’-hexyl-2,2’:5’,2’’-terthiophen-5-ylethylphosphonic acid 1,1-dioxide (HT3OP, on the imogolite nanotube surface was achieved by introducing a phosphonic acid group to the corresponding molecules. The optical and photophysical properties of these conjugated-molecule-decorated imogolite nanotubes were characterized. Moreover, poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT chains were further hybridized with HT3P modified imogolite to form a nanofiber hybrid.

  17. Passive Mode Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-20

    Acoustical transducer arrays can reflect a sound signal in reverse to the sender which can be used for echo location devices. [0008] In Jiang...States Patent No. 8,494,187) a sound wave generator is disclosed which includes a carbon nanotube structure and an insulating reinforcement structure... acoustic device that includes an electrode layer and a sound wave generator. The sound wave generator is disposed on a surface of the electrode

  18. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or

  19. Sensors based on carbon nanotube field-effect transistors and molecular recognition approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Cid Salavert, Cristina Carlota

    2009-01-01

    The general objective of this thesis is to develop chemical sensors whose sensing capacities are based on the principle of molecular recognition and where the transduction is carried out by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT).The sensing device used is the carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET). The new structure of the CNTFET allows nanotubes to be integrated at the surface of the devices, thus exploiting SWCNTs' sensitivity to changes in their environment. The functionalization...

  20. Optical properties of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gugang

    This thesis addresses the optical properties of novel carbon filamentary nanomaterials: single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs), and SWNTs with interior C60 molecules ("peapods"). Optical reflectance spectra of bundled SWNTs are discussed in terms of their electronic energy band structure. An Effective Medium Model for a composite material was found to provide a reasonable description of the spectra. Furthermore, we have learned from optical absorption studies of DWNTs and C60-peapods that the host tube and the encapsulant interact weakly; small shifts in interband absorption structure were observed. Resonant Raman scattering studies on SWNTs synthesized via the HiPCO process show that the "zone-folding" approximation for phonons and electrons works reasonably well, even for small diameter (d effect, rather than the vdW interaction. Finally, we studied the chemical doping of DWNTs, where the dopant (Br anions) is chemically bound to the outside of the outer tube. The doped DWNT system is a model for a cylindrical molecular capacitor. We found experimentally that 90% of the positive charge resides on the outer tube, so that most of electric field on the inner tube is screened, i.e., we have observed a molecular Faraday cage effect. A self-consistent theoretical model in the tight-binding approximation with a classical electrostatic energy term is in good agreement with our experimental results.

  1. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes and nanotube forests on copper catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruszka, Bartosz; Terzyk, Artur P; Wiśniewski, Marek; Gauden, Piotr A; Szybowicz, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    The growth of carbon nanotubes on bulk copper is studied. We show for the first time, that super growth chemical vapor deposition method can be successfully applied for preparation of nanotubes on copper catalyst, and the presence of hydrogen is necessary. Next, different methods of copper surface activation are studied, to improve catalyst efficiency. Among them, applied for the first time for copper catalyst in nanotubes synthesis, sulfuric acid activation is the most promising. Among tested samples the surface modified for 10 min is the most active, causing the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube forests. Obtained results have potential importance in application of nanotubes and copper in electronic chips and nanodevices. (paper)

  2. Formation mechanism of TiO2 nanotubes and their applications in photoelectrochemical water splitting and supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Hou, Junbo; Lu, Kathy

    2013-05-14

    Structural observations of the transition of TiO2 nanopores into nanotubes by increasing the OH(-) concentration in the electrolyte challenge the validity of existing formation mechanisms of anodic TiO2 nanotubes. In this study, dehydration of titanium hydroxide in the cell wall is proposed as the mechanism that leads to the separation of neighboring nanotubes. Based on this understanding, bamboo-type TiO2 nanotubes with large surface area and excellent interconnectivity are achieved by cycling high and low applied potentials. After thermal treatment in a H2 atmosphere, the bamboo-type TiO2 nanotubes show large photoelectrochemical water splitting efficiency and supercapacitors performace.

  3. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy characterization and microwave absorption of iron-filled carbon-nitrogen nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Che Renchao; Liang Chongyun; Shi Honglong; Zhou Xingui; Yang Xinan

    2007-01-01

    Iron-filled carbon-nitrogen (Fe/CN x ) nanotubes and iron-filled carbon (Fe/C) nanotubes were synthesized at 900 deg. C through a pyrolysis reaction of ferrocene/acetonitrile and ferrocene/xylene, respectively. The differences of structure and composition between the Fe/CN x nanotubes and Fe/C nanotubes were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). It was found that the morphology of Fe/CN x nanotubes is more corrugated than that of the Fe/C nanotubes due to the incorporation of nitrogen. By comparing the Fe L 2,3 electron energy-loss spectra of Fe/CN x nanotubes to those of the Fe/C nanotubes, the electron states at the interface between Fe and the tubular wall of both Fe/CN x nanotubes and Fe/C nanotubes were investigated. At the boundary between Fe and the wall of a CN x nanotube, the additional electrons contributed from the doped 'pyridinic-like' nitrogen might transfer to the empty 3d orbital of the encapsulated iron, therefore leading to an intensity suppression of the iron L 2,3 edge and an intensity enhancement of the carbon K edge. However, such an effect could not be found in Fe/C nanotubes. Microwave absorption properties of both Fe/CN x and Fe/C nanocomposites at 2-18 GHz band were studied

  4. In situ polyphenyl derivatisation and the effect of thermal decomposition of adsorbed and chemisorbed polyphenyls on the structure of multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gergely, Andras, E-mail: doohan11@chemres.hu [Department of Surface Modification and Nanostructures, Institute of Nanochemistry and Catalysis, Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67, Budapest 1025 (Hungary); Ujszaszy, Kalman [Mass Spectrometry Department, Institute of Structural Chemistry, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67, Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest 1025 (Hungary); Peltz, Csaba [EGIS Pharmaceuticals PLC, Kereszturi ut 30-38, Budapest 1106 (Hungary); Kiraly, Peter; Tarkanyi, Gabor [NMR Spectroscopy Department, Institute of Structural Chemistry, Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67, Budapest 1025 (Hungary); Mihaly, Judith [Department of Biological Nanochemistry, Institute of Nanochemistry and Catalysis, Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67, Budapest 1025 (Hungary); Kalman, Erika [Department of Surface Modification and Nanostructures, Institute of Nanochemistry and Catalysis, Chemical Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Pusztaszeri ut 59-67, Budapest 1025 (Hungary)

    2011-05-01

    This study presents the exploitation of an alternative reaction route of deamination of arylamines to perform in situ derivatisation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with polyphenyl (PPh) species of various masses. As a result of consecutive derivatisation, high conversion of PPh grafting of the MWCNTs was realised with the collateral outgrowth of physical modification with adsorbed additional PPhs. Applied derivatisation process exceeds the monolayer coverage related superficial saturation limitations in the overall grafting yield of the nanotubes. Thus, a linear relationship was recognized between the overall quantities of chemisorbed PPhs composed of D{sub 5}-phenylene oligomers and the applied excess of diazonium activated reagents, corresponding to {sup 2}H MAS NMR spectroscopy results. According to mass spectrometry (MS) investigations, uniform thermal decomposition of the chemisorbed PPhs modified MWCNTs was found besides the more intense and altered decomposition characteristic-featured adsorbate-chemisorbate PPhs contained MWCNTs during sequential pyrolysis under inert atmosphere. This is attributed to the pyrolysis provoked isomerisation, decomposition and the formation of adsorbed and chemisorbed PPh moieties. As a result, a mediated and an even more pronounced degradation in the order of graphitic lattice of the MWCNTs were evidenced in the adsorbate-chemisorbate and the chemisorbate PPhs contained samples by FT-Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. {sup 2}H MAS NMR supplied results of relevant amount of deuterium in the chemisorbate PPh contained sample without traces of aromatic related MS detected volatile products, these allow us to conclude about a thermally stable derivatisation that is interpreted as an endohedral modification of the nanotubes.

  5. Theoretical study on the combined systems of peanut-shaped carbon nanotubes encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Guo; Huang, Yuanhe

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The combined systems of peanut-shaped carbon nanotubes encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated. ► The band structures and related electronic properties are calculated by using crystal orbital method. ► The carrier mobility and mean free path are evaluated under the deformation potential theory. -- Abstract: The combined systems of peanut-shaped carbon nanotubes encapsulated in both semiconducting and metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated by using self-consistent field crystal orbital method based on the density functional theory. The investigation indicates that the interaction between the two constituents is mainly contributed by the π orbitals. The encapsulation does not change the semiconducting or metallic nature of the single-walled carbon nanotubes, but significantly changes the band dispersion and decreases the frontier band width of the metallic one. The carrier mobility and mean free path of the metallic single-walled carbon nanotube increase greatly after the encapsulation. The calculated mobilities have the order of 10 3 cm 2 V −1 s −1 for both of the semiconducting and metallic double-walled carbon nanotubes.

  6. Freestanding bucky paper with high strength from multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhonglai; Xu, Ju; O'Byrne, Justin P.; Chen, Lan; Wang, Kaixue; Morris, Michael A.; Holmes, Justin D.

    2012-01-01

    Bucky papers have been investigated by some research groups, however, due to different qualities of carbon nanotubes used, various results of strength and electronic properties were reported in the literatures. In this article, the effects of carbon nanotubes synthesized over different catalysts on the qualities of bucky papers were systemically investigated. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes were synthesized over a series of MgO supported catalysts with different weight ratios of Mo and Co. As the ratios of Mo/Co in the catalysts were increased from 0 to 3, the yields of carbon nanotubes were enhanced from 7 wt% to 400 wt%. However, the yield enhancement of carbon nanotubes was achieved at the expense of higher proportion of structural defects within carbon nanotubes, which has been proved by Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetry analysis. It was demonstrated that the tensile strength of bucky paper composed of numerous MCNTs bundles strongly depends on the structure of carbon nanotubes used. By optimizing reaction conditions, a bucky paper with high strain up to 15.36 MPa and electrical conductivity of 61.17 S cm −1 was obtained by Supercritical Fluid (SCF) drying technique. -- Highlights: ► Multi-wall carbon nanotube bucky paper. ► Structural defects of carbon nanotubes. ► CoMo catalyst. ► Tensile strength of bucky paper.

  7. Biomarker analysis of liver cells exposed to surfactant-wrapped and oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have great potential in industrial, consumer, and mechanical applications, based partly on their unique structural, optical and electronic...

  8. On the continuum mechanics approach for the analysis of single walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, M. S.; Czekanski, A.

    2016-04-01

    Today carbon nanotubes have found various applications in structural, thermal and almost every field of engineering. Carbon nanotubes provide great strength, stiffness resilience properties. Evaluating the structural behavior of nanoscale materials is an important task. In order to understand the materialistic behavior of nanotubes, atomistic models provide a basis for continuum mechanics modelling. Although the properties of bulk materials are consistent with the size and depends mainly on the material but the properties when we are in Nano-range, continuously change with the size. Such models start from the modelling of interatomic interaction. Modelling and simulation has advantage of cost saving when compared with the experiments. So in this project our aim is to use a continuum mechanics model of carbon nanotubes from atomistic perspective and analyses some structural behaviors of nanotubes. It is generally recognized that mechanical properties of nanotubes are dependent upon their structural details. The properties of nanotubes vary with the varying with the interatomic distance, angular orientation, radius of the tube and many such parameters. Based on such models one can analyses the variation of young's modulus, strength, deformation behavior, vibration behavior and thermal behavior. In this study some of the structural behaviors of the nanotubes are analyzed with the help of continuum mechanics models. Using the properties derived from the molecular mechanics model a Finite Element Analysis of carbon nanotubes is performed and results are verified. This study provides the insight on continuum mechanics modelling of nanotubes and hence the scope to study the effect of various parameters on some structural behavior of nanotubes.

  9. Transport properties of hydrogen passivated silicon nanotubes and silicon nanotube field effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2017-01-24

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of silicon nanotubes attached to metallic electrodes from first principles, using density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. The influence of the surface termination is studied as well as the dependence of the transport characteristics on the chirality, diameter, and length. Strong electronic coupling between nanotubes and electrodes is found to be a general feature that results in low contact resistance. The conductance in the tunneling regime is discussed in terms of the complex band structure. Silicon nanotube field effect transistors are simulated by applying a uniform potential gate. Our results demonstrate very high values of transconductance, outperforming the best commercial silicon field effect transistors, combined with low values of sub-threshold swing.

  10. Intrinsic Chirality Origination in Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Neal; Chen, Gugang; P Rajukumar, Lakshmy; Chou, Nam Hawn; Koh, Ai Leen; Sinclair, Robert; Maruyama, Shigeo; Terrones, Mauricio; Harutyunyan, Avetik R

    2017-10-24

    Elucidating the origin of carbon nanotube chirality is key for realizing their untapped potential. Currently, prevalent theories suggest that catalyst structure originates chirality via an epitaxial relationship. Here we studied chirality abundances of carbon nanotubes grown on floating liquid Ga droplets, which excludes the influence of catalyst features, and compared them with abundances grown on solid Ru nanoparticles. Results of growth on liquid droplets bolsters the intrinsic preference of carbon nuclei toward certain chiralities. Specifically, the abundance of the (11,1)/χ = 4.31° tube can reach up to 95% relative to (9,4)/χ = 17.48°, although they have exactly the same diameter, (9.156 Å). However, the comparative abundances for the pair, (19,3)/χ = 7.2° and (17,6)/χ = 14.5°, with bigger diameter, (16.405 Å), fluctuate depending on synthesis temperature. The abundances of the same pairs of tubes grown on floating solid polyhedral Ru nanoparticles show completely different trends. Analysis of abundances in relation to nucleation probability, represented by a product of the Zeldovich factor and the deviation interval of a growing nuclei from equilibrium critical size, explain the findings. We suggest that the chirality in the nanotube in general is a result of interplay between intrinsic preference of carbon cluster and induction by catalyst structure. This finding can help to build the comprehensive theory of nanotube growth and offers a prospect for chirality-preferential synthesis of carbon nanotubes by the exploitation of liquid catalyst droplets.

  11. Long synthetic nanotubes from calix[4]arenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organo, Voltaire G; Sgarlata, Valentina; Firouzbakht, Farhood; Rudkevich, Dmitry M

    2007-01-01

    We report the synthesis and encapsulation properties of long (up to 5 nm) molecular nanotubes 1-4, which are based on calix[4]arenes and can be filled with multiple nitrosonium (NO(+)) ions upon reaction with NO(2)/N(2)O(4) gases. These are among the largest nanoscale molecular containers prepared to date and can entrap up to five guests. The structure and properties of tubular complexes 1(NO(+))(2)-4(NO(+))(5) were studied by UV/Vis, FTIR, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy in solution, and also by molecular modeling. Entrapment of NO(+) in 1(NO(+))(2)-4(NO(+))(5) is reversible, and addition of [18]crown-6 quickly recovers starting tubes 1-4. The FTIR and titration data revealed enhanced binding of NO(+) in longer tubes, which may be due to cooperativity. The described nanotubes may serve as materials for storing and converting NO(x) and also offer a promise to further develop supramolecular chemistry of molecular containers. These findings also open wider perspectives towards applications of synthetic nanotubes as alternatives to carbon nanotubes.

  12. Encapsulation of cisplatin as an anti-cancer drug into boron-nitride and carbon nanotubes: Molecular simulation and free energy calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roosta, Sara [Molecular Simulation Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science & Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid, E-mail: hashemianzadeh@iust.ac.ir [Molecular Simulation Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science & Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ketabi, Sepideh, E-mail: sepidehketabi@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, East Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-01

    Encapsulation of cisplatin anticancer drug into the single walled (10, 0) carbon nanotube and (10, 0) boron-nitride nanotube was investigated by quantum mechanical calculations and Monte Carlo Simulation in aqueous solution. Solvation free energies and complexation free energies of the cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube complexes was determined as well as radial distribution functions of entitled compounds. Solvation free energies of cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube were − 4.128 kcal mol{sup −1} and − 2457.124 kcal mol{sup −1} respectively. The results showed that cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube was more soluble species in water. In addition electrostatic contribution of the interaction of boron- nitride nanotube complex and solvent was − 281.937 kcal mol{sup −1} which really more than Van der Waals and so the electrostatic interactions play a distinctive role in the solvation free energies of boron- nitride nanotube compounds. On the other hand electrostatic part of the interaction of carbon nanotube complex and solvent were almost the same as Van der Waals contribution. Complexation free energies were also computed to study the stability of related structures and the free energies were negative (− 374.082 and − 245.766 kcal mol{sup −1}) which confirmed encapsulation of drug into abovementioned nanotubes. However, boron-nitride nanotubes were more appropriate for encapsulation due to their larger solubility in aqueous solution. - Highlights: • Solubility of cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube is larger than cisplatin@ carbon nanotube. • Boron- nitride nanotube complexes have larger electrostatic contribution in solvation free energy. • Complexation free energies confirm encapsulation of drug into the nanotubes in aqueous solution. • Boron- nitride nanotubes are appropriate drug delivery systems compared with carbon nanotubes.

  13. Encapsulation of cisplatin as an anti-cancer drug into boron-nitride and carbon nanotubes: Molecular simulation and free energy calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roosta, Sara; Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid; Ketabi, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    Encapsulation of cisplatin anticancer drug into the single walled (10, 0) carbon nanotube and (10, 0) boron-nitride nanotube was investigated by quantum mechanical calculations and Monte Carlo Simulation in aqueous solution. Solvation free energies and complexation free energies of the cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube complexes was determined as well as radial distribution functions of entitled compounds. Solvation free energies of cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube were − 4.128 kcal mol"−"1 and − 2457.124 kcal mol"−"1 respectively. The results showed that cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube was more soluble species in water. In addition electrostatic contribution of the interaction of boron- nitride nanotube complex and solvent was − 281.937 kcal mol"−"1 which really more than Van der Waals and so the electrostatic interactions play a distinctive role in the solvation free energies of boron- nitride nanotube compounds. On the other hand electrostatic part of the interaction of carbon nanotube complex and solvent were almost the same as Van der Waals contribution. Complexation free energies were also computed to study the stability of related structures and the free energies were negative (− 374.082 and − 245.766 kcal mol"−"1) which confirmed encapsulation of drug into abovementioned nanotubes. However, boron-nitride nanotubes were more appropriate for encapsulation due to their larger solubility in aqueous solution. - Highlights: • Solubility of cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube is larger than cisplatin@ carbon nanotube. • Boron- nitride nanotube complexes have larger electrostatic contribution in solvation free energy. • Complexation free energies confirm encapsulation of drug into the nanotubes in aqueous solution. • Boron- nitride nanotubes are appropriate drug delivery systems compared with carbon nanotubes.

  14. Soldering of Nanotubes onto Microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Mølhave, Kristian; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina

    2003-01-01

    Suspended bridges of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes were fabricated inside a scanning electron microscope by soldering the nanotube onto microelectrodes with highly conducting gold-carbon material. By the decomposition of organometallic vapor with the electron beam, metal-containing sold...... bonds were consistently found to be mechanically stronger than the carbon nanotubes.......Suspended bridges of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes were fabricated inside a scanning electron microscope by soldering the nanotube onto microelectrodes with highly conducting gold-carbon material. By the decomposition of organometallic vapor with the electron beam, metal-containing solder...... bonds were formed at the intersection of the nanotube and the electrodes. Current-voltage curves indicated metallic conduction of the nanotubes, with resistances in the range of 9-29 kOmega. Bridges made entirely of the soldering material exhibited resistances on the order of 100 Omega, and the solder...

  15. Growth, Structure, and Photocatalytic Properties of Hierarchical V2O5–TiO2 Nanotube Arrays Obtained from the One-step Anodic Oxidation of Ti–V Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María C. Nevárez-Martínez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available V2O5-TiO2 mixed oxide nanotube (NT layers were successfully prepared via the one-step anodization of Ti-V alloys. The obtained samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, UV-Vis absorption, photoluminescence spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, X-ray diffraction (DRX, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The effect of the applied voltage (30–50 V, vanadium content (5–15 wt % in the alloy, and water content (2–10 vol % in an ethylene glycol-based electrolyte was studied systematically to determine their influence on the morphology, and for the first-time, on the photocatalytic properties of these nanomaterials. The morphology of the samples varied from sponge-like to highly-organized nanotubular structures. The vanadium content in the alloy was found to have the highest influence on the morphology and the sample with the lowest vanadium content (5 wt % exhibited the best auto-alignment and self-organization (length = 1 μm, diameter = 86 nm and wall thickness = 11 nm. Additionally, a probable growth mechanism of V2O5-TiO2 nanotubes (NTs over the Ti-V alloys was presented. Toluene, in the gas phase, was effectively removed through photodegradation under visible light (LEDs, λmax = 465 nm in the presence of the modified TiO2 nanostructures. The highest degradation value was 35% after 60 min of irradiation. V2O5 species were ascribed as the main structures responsible for the generation of photoactive e− and h+ under Vis light and a possible excitation mechanism was proposed.

  16. High frequency electromechanical memory cells based on telescoping carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, A M; Lozovik, Y E; Kulish, A S; Bichoutskaia, E

    2010-07-01

    A new method to increase the operational frequency of electromechanical memory cells based on the telescoping motion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes through the selection of the form of the switching voltage pulse is proposed. The relative motion of the walls of carbon nanotubes can be controlled through the shape of the interwall interaction energy surface. This allows the use of the memory cells in nonvolatile or volatile regime, depending on the structure of carbon nanotube. Simulations based on ab initio and semi-empirical calculations of the interwall interaction energies are used to estimate the switching voltage and the operational frequency of volatile cells with the electrodes made of carbon nanotubes. The lifetime of nonvolatile memory cells is also predicted.

  17. Aligned carbon nanotubes. Physics, concepts, fabrication and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lan, Yucheng [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Wang, Yang [South China Normal Univ. Guangzhou (China). Inst. for Advanced Materials

    2013-07-01

    This book gives a survey of the physics and fabrication of carbon nanotubes and their applications in optics, electronics, chemistry and biotechnology. It focuses on the structural characterization of various carbon nanotubes, fabrication of vertically or parallel aligned carbon nanotubes on substrates or in composites, physical properties for their alignment, and applications of aligned carbon nanotubes in field emission, optical antennas, light transmission, solar cells, chemical devices, bio-devices, and many others. Major fabrication methods are illustrated in detail, particularly the most widely used PECVD growth technique on which various device integration schemes are based, followed by applications such as electrical interconnects, nanodiodes, optical antennas, and nanocoax solar cells, whereas current limitations and challenges are also be discussed to lay the foundation for future developments.

  18. Carbon nanotube based pressure sensor for flexible electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Hye-Mi; Sim, Jin Woo; Kwon, Jinhyeong; Yun, Jongju; Baik, Seunghyun; Chang, Won Seok

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The electromechanical change of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Fabrication of CNT field-effect transistor on flexible substrate. • CNT based FET integrated active pressure sensor. • The integrated device yields an increase in the source-drain current under pressure. - Abstract: A pressure sensor was developed based on an arrangement of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) supported by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The VACNTs embedded in the PDMS matrix were structurally flexible and provided repeated sensing operation due to the high elasticities of both the polymer and the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance increased in the presence of a loading pressure, which compressed the material and induced contact between neighboring CNTs, thereby producing a dense current path and better CNT/metal contacts. To achieve flexible functional electronics, VACNTs based pressure sensor was integrated with field-effect transistor, which is fabricated using sprayed semiconducting carbon nanotubes on plastic substrate

  19. Carbon nanotube based pressure sensor for flexible electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Hye-Mi [Department of Nano Mechanics, Nanomechanical Systems Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Sim, Jin Woo [Advanced Nano Technology Ltd., Seoul 132-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Jinhyeong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Jongju; Baik, Seunghyun [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Department of Energy Science and School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Won Seok, E-mail: paul@kimm.re.kr [Department of Nano Mechanics, Nanomechanical Systems Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The electromechanical change of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Fabrication of CNT field-effect transistor on flexible substrate. • CNT based FET integrated active pressure sensor. • The integrated device yields an increase in the source-drain current under pressure. - Abstract: A pressure sensor was developed based on an arrangement of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) supported by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The VACNTs embedded in the PDMS matrix were structurally flexible and provided repeated sensing operation due to the high elasticities of both the polymer and the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance increased in the presence of a loading pressure, which compressed the material and induced contact between neighboring CNTs, thereby producing a dense current path and better CNT/metal contacts. To achieve flexible functional electronics, VACNTs based pressure sensor was integrated with field-effect transistor, which is fabricated using sprayed semiconducting carbon nanotubes on plastic substrate.

  20. Synthesis of cadmium chalcogenide nanotubes at room temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Jun

    2012-10-01

    Cadmium chalcogenide (CdE, E=S, Se, Te) polycrystalline nanotubes have been synthesized from precursor of CdS/cadmium thiolate complex at room temperature. The precursor was hydrothermally synthesized at 180 °C using thioglycolic acid (TGA) and cadmium acetate as starting materials. The transformation from the rod-like precursor of CdS/cadmium thiolate complex to CdS, CdSe and CdTe nanotubes were performed under constant stirring at room temperature in aqueous solution containing S 2-, Se 2- and Te 2-, respectively. The nanotube diameter can be controlled from 150 to 400 nm related to the dimension of templates. The XRD patterns show the cadmium chalcogenide nanotubes all corresponding to face-centered cubic structure. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Synthesis of cadmium chalcogenide nanotubes at room temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Jun; Qian, Yitai

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium chalcogenide (CdE, E=S, Se, Te) polycrystalline nanotubes have been synthesized from precursor of CdS/cadmium thiolate complex at room temperature. The precursor was hydrothermally synthesized at 180 °C using thioglycolic acid (TGA) and cadmium acetate as starting materials. The transformation from the rod-like precursor of CdS/cadmium thiolate complex to CdS, CdSe and CdTe nanotubes were performed under constant stirring at room temperature in aqueous solution containing S 2-, Se 2- and Te 2-, respectively. The nanotube diameter can be controlled from 150 to 400 nm related to the dimension of templates. The XRD patterns show the cadmium chalcogenide nanotubes all corresponding to face-centered cubic structure. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nitrogen controlled iron catalyst phase during carbon nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Bernhard C., E-mail: bernhard.bayer@univie.ac.at [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Baehtz, Carsten [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Kidambi, Piran R.; Weatherup, Robert S.; Caneva, Sabina; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Hofmann, Stephan [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Mangler, Clemens; Kotakoski, Jani; Meyer, Jannik C. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Goddard, Caroline J. L. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-06

    Close control over the active catalyst phase and hence carbon nanotube structure remains challenging in catalytic chemical vapor deposition since multiple competing active catalyst phases typically co-exist under realistic synthesis conditions. Here, using in-situ X-ray diffractometry, we show that the phase of supported iron catalyst particles can be reliably controlled via the addition of NH{sub 3} during nanotube synthesis. Unlike polydisperse catalyst phase mixtures during H{sub 2} diluted nanotube growth, nitrogen addition controllably leads to phase-pure γ-Fe during pre-treatment and to phase-pure Fe{sub 3}C during growth. We rationalize these findings in the context of ternary Fe-C-N phase diagram calculations and, thus, highlight the use of pre-treatment- and add-gases as a key parameter towards controlled carbon nanotube growth.

  3. Manufacturing of Porous Ceramic Preforms Based on Halloysite Nanotubes (Hnts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kujawa M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the influence of manufacturing conditions on the structure and properties of porous halloysite preforms, which during pressure infiltration were soaked with a liquid alloy to obtain a metal matrix composite reinforced by ceramic, and also to find innovative possibilities for the application of mineral nanotubes obtained from halloysite. The method of manufacturing porous ceramic preforms (based on halloysite nanotubes as semi-finished products that are applicable to modern infiltrated metal matrix composites was shown. The ceramic preforms were manufactured by sintering of halloysite nanotubes (HNT, Natural Nano Company (USA, with the addition of pores and canals forming agent in the form of carbon fibres (Sigrafil C10 M250 UNS SGL Group, the Carbon Company. The resulting porous ceramic skeletons, suggest innovative application capabilities mineral nanotubes obtained from halloysite.

  4. Electroluminescence from single-wall carbon nanotube network transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, E; Aguirre, C M; Marty, L; St-Antoine, B C; Meunier, F; Desjardins, P; Ménard, D; Martel, R

    2008-08-01

    The electroluminescence (EL) properties from single-wall carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors (NNFETs) and small bundle carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNFETs) are studied using spectroscopy and imaging in the near-infrared (NIR). At room temperature, NNFETs produce broad (approximately 180 meV) and structured NIR spectra, while they are narrower (approximately 80 meV) for CNFETs. EL emission from NNFETs is located in the vicinity of the minority carrier injecting contact (drain) and the spectrum of the emission is red shifted with respect to the corresponding absorption spectrum. A phenomenological model based on a Fermi-Dirac distribution of carriers in the nanotube network reproduces the spectral features observed. This work supports bipolar (electron-hole) current recombination as the main mechanism of emission and highlights the drastic influence of carrier distribution on the optoelectronic properties of carbon nanotube films.

  5. Responsive Block Copolymer and Gold Nanoparticle Hybrid Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sehoon; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Young, Seth; Tsukruk, Vladimir

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the facile fabrication of responsive polymer and metal nanoparticle composite nanotube structures. The nanotubes are comprised of responsive block copolymer, polystyrene-block-poly (2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP), and gold nanoparticles. PS-b-P2VP nanotubes were fabricated using porous alumina template and in situ reduction of the gold nanoparticles in P2VP domains. Owing to the pH sensitive nature of P2VP (anionic polymer with a pKa of 3.8), the nanotubes exhibit a dramatic change in topology in response to the changes in the external pH. Furthermore, the gold nanoparticles in the responsive block exhibit a reversible aggregation, causing a reversible change in optical properties such as absorption.

  6. LDRD final report : energy conversion using chromophore-functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, Andrew L.; Zifer, Thomas; Zhou, Xinjian; Leonard, Francois Leonard; Wong, Bryan Matthew; Kane, Alexander; Katzenmeyer, Aaron Michael; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2010-09-01

    With the goal of studying the conversion of optical energy to electrical energy at the nanoscale, we developed and tested devices based on single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with azobenzene chromophores, where the chromophores serve as photoabsorbers and the nanotube as the electronic read-out. By synthesizing chromophores with specific absorption windows in the visible spectrum and anchoring them to the nanotube surface, we demonstrated the controlled detection of visible light of low intensity in narrow ranges of wavelengths. Our measurements suggested that upon photoabsorption, the chromophores isomerize to give a large change in dipole moment, changing the electrostatic environment of the nanotube. All-electron ab initio calculations were used to study the chromophore-nanotube hybrids, and show that the chromophores bind strongly to the nanotubes without disturbing the electronic structure of either species. Calculated values of the dipole moments supported the notion of dipole changes as the optical detection mechanism.

  7. Synthesis of highly ordered TiO2 nanotube in malonic acid solution by anodization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won Hee; Park, Chan Jin; Kwon, Hyuk Sang

    2008-10-01

    We synthesized TiO2 nanotube array by anodizing in a solution of malonic acid (HOOCCH2COOH) and NH4F, and analyzed the morphology of the nanotube using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphology of TiO2 nanotube was largely affected by anodizing time, anodizing voltage, and malonic acid concentration. With increasing the anodizing voltage from 5 V to 20 V, the diameter of TiO2 nanotube was increased from about 20 nm to 110 nm and its length from about 10 nm to 700 nm. In addition, the length of TiO2 nanotube was increased with increasing anodizing time up to 6 h at 20 V. We obtained the longest and the most highly ordered nanotube structure when anodizing Ti in a solution of 0.5 wt% NH4F and 1 M malonic acid at 20 V for 6 h.

  8. NMR strategies to study the local magnetic properties of carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy; Kim, Younghyun; Bouhrara, Mohamed; Saih, Youssef; Wå gberg, Thomas; Luzzi, David E.; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The local magnetic properties of the one dimensional inner space of the nanotubes are investigated using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of encapsulated fullerene molecules inside single walled carbon nanotubes. Isotope engineering and magnetically purified nanotubes have been advantageously used on our study to discriminate between the different diamagnetic and paramagnetic shifts of the resonances. Ring currents originating from the π electrons circulating on the nanotube, are found to actively screen the applied magnetic field by -36.9 ppm. Defects and holes in the nanotube walls cancel this screening locally. What is interesting, that at high magnetic fields, the modifications of the NMR resonances of the molecules from free to encapsulated can be exploited to determine some structural characteristics of the surrounding nanotubes, never observed experimentally. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. NMR strategies to study the local magnetic properties of carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2012-02-01

    The local magnetic properties of the one dimensional inner space of the nanotubes are investigated using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of encapsulated fullerene molecules inside single walled carbon nanotubes. Isotope engineering and magnetically purified nanotubes have been advantageously used on our study to discriminate between the different diamagnetic and paramagnetic shifts of the resonances. Ring currents originating from the π electrons circulating on the nanotube, are found to actively screen the applied magnetic field by -36.9 ppm. Defects and holes in the nanotube walls cancel this screening locally. What is interesting, that at high magnetic fields, the modifications of the NMR resonances of the molecules from free to encapsulated can be exploited to determine some structural characteristics of the surrounding nanotubes, never observed experimentally. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of surface modification of halloysite nanotubes on their dispersion in epoxy matrix: Mesoscopic DPD simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, P.; Markina, A.; Ivanov, V.

    2016-06-01

    The problems of constructing of a meso-scale model of composites based on polymers and aluminosilicate nanotubes for prediction of the filler's spatial distribution at early stages of material formation have been considered. As a test system for the polymer matrix, the mixture of 3,4-epoxycyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate as epoxy resin monomers and 4-methylhexahydrophthalic anhydride as curing agent has been used. It is shown that the structure of a mixture of uncured epoxy resin and nanotubes is (mainly) determined by the surface functionalization of nanotubes. The results indicate that only nanotubes with maximum functionalization can preserve a uniform distribution in space.

  11. Adsorption of cyanogen chloride on the surface of boron nitride nanotubes for CNCl sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movlarooy, Tayebeh; Fadradi, Mahboobeh Amiri

    2018-05-01

    The adsorption of CNCl gas, on the surface of boron nitride nanotubes in pure form, as well as doped with Al and Ga, based on the density functional theory (DFT) has been studied. The electron and structural properties of pristine and doped nanotubes have been investigated. By calculating the adsorption energy, the most stable positions and the equilibrium distance are obtained, and charge transferred and electronic properties have been calculated. The most stable molecule adsorption position for pure nanotube is obtained at the center of the hexagon and for doped nanotube above the impurity atom from N side.

  12. High pressure synthesis of amorphous TiO2 nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanjun Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous TiO2 nanotubes with diameters of 8-10 nm and length of several nanometers were synthesized by high pressure treatment of anatase TiO2 nanotubes. The structural phase transitions of anatase TiO2 nanotubes were investigated by using in-situ high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD method. The starting anatase structure is stable up to ∼20GPa, and transforms into a high-density amorphous (HDA form at higher pressure. Pressure-modified high- to low-density transition was observed in the amorphous form upon decompression. The pressure-induced amorphization and polyamorphism are in good agreement with the previous results in ultrafine TiO2 nanoparticles and nanoribbons. The relationship between the LDA form and α-PbO2 phase was revealed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM study. In addition, the bulk modulus (B0 = 158 GPa of the anatase TiO2 nanotubes is smaller than those of the corresponding bulks and nanoparticles (180-240 GPa. We suggest that the unique open-ended nanotube morphology and nanosize play important roles in the high pressure phase transition of TiO2 nanotubes.

  13. Synthesis of stable TiO2 nanotubes: effect of hydrothermal treatment, acid washing and annealing temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Zavala, Miguel Ángel; Lozano Morales, Samuel Alejandro; Ávila-Santos, Manuel

    2017-11-01

    Effect of hydrothermal treatment, acid washing and annealing temperature on the structure and morphology of TiO 2 nanotubes during the formation process was assessed. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis were conducted to describe the formation and characterization of the structure and morphology of nanotubes. Hydrothermal treatment of TiO 2 precursor nanoparticles and acid washing are fundamental to form and define the nanotubes structure. Hydrothermal treatment causes a change in the crystallinity of the precursor nanoparticles from anatase phase to a monoclinic phase, which characterizes the TiO 2 nanosheets structure. The acid washing promotes the formation of high purity nanotubes due to Na + is exchanged from the titanate structure to the hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. The annealing temperature affects the dimensions, structure and the morphology of the nanotubes. Annealing temperatures in the range of 400 °C and 600 °C are optimum to maintain a highly stable tubular morphology of nanotubes. Additionally, nanotubes conserve the physicochemical properties of the precursor Degussa P25 nanoparticles. Temperatures greater than 600 °C alter the morphology of nanotubes from tubular to an irregular structure of nanoparticles, which are bigger than those of the precursor material, i.e., the crystallinity turn from anatase phase to rutile phase inducing the collapse of the nanotubes.

  14. Double-walled silicon nanotubes: an ab initio investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Matheus P.

    2018-02-01

    The synthesis of silicon nanotubes realized in the last decade demonstrates multi-walled tubular structures consisting of Si atoms in {{sp}}2 and the {{sp}}3 hybridizations. However, most of the theoretical models were elaborated taking as the starting point {{sp}}2 structures analogous to carbon nanotubes. These structures are unfavorable due to the natural tendency of the Si atoms to undergo {{sp}}3. In this work, through ab initio simulations based on density functional theory, we investigated double-walled silicon nanotubes proposing layered tubes possessing most of the Si atoms in an {{sp}}3 hybridization, and with few {{sp}}2 atoms localized at the outer wall. The lowest-energy structures have metallic behavior. Furthermore, the possibility to tune the band structure with the application of a strain was demonstrated, inducing a metal-semiconductor transition. Thus, the behavior of silicon nanotubes differs significantly from carbon nanotubes, and the main source of the differences is the distortions in the lattice associated with the tendency of Si to make four chemical bonds.

  15. Rebar graphene from functionalized boron nitride nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yilun; Peng, Zhiwei; Larios, Eduardo; Wang, Gunuk; Lin, Jian; Yan, Zheng; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Tour, James M

    2015-01-27

    The synthesis of rebar graphene on Cu substrates is described using functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) that were annealed or subjected to chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene. Characterization shows that the BNNTs partially unzip and form a reinforcing bar (rebar) network within the graphene layer that enhances the mechanical strength through covalent bonds. The rebar graphene is transferrable to other substrates without polymer assistance. The optical transmittance and conductivity of the hybrid rebar graphene film was tested, and a field effect transistor was fabricated to explore its electrical properties. This method of synthesizing 2D hybrid graphene/BN structures should enable the hybridization of various 1D nanotube and 2D layered structures with enhanced mechanical properties.

  16. Developing polymer composite materials: carbon nanotubes or graphene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuemei; Sun, Hao; Li, Houpu; Peng, Huisheng

    2013-10-04

    The formation of composite materials represents an efficient route to improve the performances of polymers and expand their application scopes. Due to the unique structure and remarkable mechanical, electrical, thermal, optical and catalytic properties, carbon nanotube and graphene have been mostly studied as a second phase to produce high performance polymer composites. Although carbon nanotube and graphene share some advantages in both structure and property, they are also different in many aspects including synthesis of composite material, control in composite structure and interaction with polymer molecule. The resulting composite materials are distinguished in property to meet different applications. This review article mainly describes the preparation, structure, property and application of the two families of composite materials with an emphasis on the difference between them. Some general and effective strategies are summarized for the development of polymer composite materials based on carbon nanotube and graphene. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Transparent Electrodes with Nanotubes and Graphene for Printed Optoelectronic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Słoma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here on printed electroluminescent structures containing transparent electrodes made of carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets. Screen-printing and spray-coating techniques were employed. Electrodes and structures were examined towards optical parameters using spectrophotometer and irradiation meter. Electromechanical properties of transparent electrodes are exterminated with cyclical bending test. Accelerated aging process was conducted according to EN 62137 standard for reliability tests of electronics. We observed significant negative influence of mechanical bending on sheet resistivity of ITO, while resistivity of nanotube and graphene based electrodes remained stable. Aging process has also negative influence on ITO based structures resulting in delamination of printed layers, while those based on carbon nanomaterials remained intact. We observe negligible changes in irradiation for structures with carbon nanotube electrodes after accelerated aging process. Such materials demonstrate a high application potential in general purpose electroluminescent devices.

  18. XANES study on the electronic states of carbon nanotube and related materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, M [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Shimada, H [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Matsubayashi, H [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Yumura, M [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Uchida, K [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Oshima, S [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Kuriki, Y [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Yoshimura, Y [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Sato, T [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan); Nishijima, A [National Inst. of Mater. and Chem. Res., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    The C K-edge XANES spectra of carbon nanotubes and two fullerenes are presented . The XANES of the nanotubes is quite different from those of fullerenes, but analogous to that of HOPG. The difference in the 1s{yields}{pi}{sup *} transition is discussed in conjunction with the structural features. ((orig.)).

  19. Study of the Reactivity of Ni Nanotubes in Media with Different pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkabay, G.; Kozlovskiy, A. L.; Ibragimova, M. A.; Shlimas, D. I.; Zdorovets, M. V.; Borgekov, D. B.; Tikhonov, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    Nickel nanotubes have been synthesized by electrochemical deposition, and their reactivity in aggressive media has been investigated. Kinetic curves of the variation in the atomic ratio between Ni and O in the nanotube crystal structure as a function of the medium acidity are built.

  20. Computational investigation of the electronic and structural properties of CN radical on the pristine and Al-doped (6, 0) BN nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltani, Alireza; Moradi, Ali Varasteh; Bahari, Mahsa; Masoodi, Anis; Shojaee, Shamim

    2013-01-01

    We have performed first-principle calculations to investigate the adsorption behavior of the CN radical (CåN) on the external surface of H-capped Al-doped (6, 0) zigzag single-walled BN nanotubes (BNNT). We calculated the bond length, gap energies, dipole moments, and electronic properties of the · CN on the exterior surface of SWBNNT. Binding energy corresponding to the most stable configuration of CN radical on Al N -doped BNNT is found to be −471.73 kJ mol −1 . The calculated density of states (DOS) reveals that there is a significant orbital hybridization between · CN and Al-doping species in the adsorption process being evidence of an exothermic process. The results indicate that BNNT could be a suitable sensor

  1. A glassy carbon electrode modified with a multiwalled carbon nanotube-reduced graphene oxide nanoribbon core-shell structure for electrochemical sensing of p-dihydroxybenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Gangbing; Yi, Yinhui; Liu, Zhenjiang; Sun, Jianfan; Wu, Xiangyang; Zou, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) were covered with reduced graphene oxide nanoribbons (rGONR) to give a material with a core-shell heterostructure of the type MWCNT-rGONR. It was obtained by (a) longitudinal partial unzipping of MWCNT to form MWCNT-GONR, and (b) subsequent chemical reduction with hydrazine to give MWCNT-rGONR. The MWCNT-rGONR heterostructure was used to modify a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to obtain an electrochemical sensor for p-dihydroxybenzene (DHB). The synergistic effects of the MWCNT and the rGONR results in a distinctly improved redox current towards DHB compared to a bare GCE, an MWCNT/GCE, and an MWCNT-GONR/GCE. At the working voltage range from −1 00 to 400 mV, it displays a linear response to DHB in the 80 to 3000 nM concentration range with a 20 nM detection limit. (author)

  2. Computational investigation of the electronic and structural properties of CN radical on the pristine and Al-doped (6, 0) BN nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, Alireza, E-mail: alireza.soltani46@yahoo.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Gorgan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradi, Ali Varasteh [Department of Chemistry, Gorgan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahari, Mahsa [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Gorgan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Masoodi, Anis [Department of Chemistry, Gorgan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shojaee, Shamim [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Gorgan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    We have performed first-principle calculations to investigate the adsorption behavior of the CN radical (CåN) on the external surface of H-capped Al-doped (6, 0) zigzag single-walled BN nanotubes (BNNT). We calculated the bond length, gap energies, dipole moments, and electronic properties of the {sup ·}CN on the exterior surface of SWBNNT. Binding energy corresponding to the most stable configuration of CN radical on Al{sub N}-doped BNNT is found to be −471.73 kJ mol{sup −1}. The calculated density of states (DOS) reveals that there is a significant orbital hybridization between {sup ·}CN and Al-doping species in the adsorption process being evidence of an exothermic process. The results indicate that BNNT could be a suitable sensor.

  3. Iron oxide nanotubes synthesized via template-based electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jin-Hee; Min, Seong-Gi; Malkinski, Leszek; Wiley, John B.

    2014-04-01

    Considerable effort has been invested in the development of synthetic methods for the preparation iron oxide nanostructures for applications in nanotechnology. While a variety of structures have been reported, only a few studies have focused on iron oxide nanotubes. Here, we present details on the synthesis and characterization of iron oxide nanotubes along with a proposed mechanism for FeOOH tube formation. The FeOOH nanotubes, fabricated via a template-based electrodeposition method, are found to exhibit a unique inner-surface. Heat treatment of these tubes under oxidizing or reducing atmospheres can produce either hematite (α-Fe2O3) or magnetite (Fe3O4) structures, respectively. Hematite nanotubes are composed of small nanoparticles less than 20 nm in diameter and the magnetization curves and FC-ZFC curves show superparamagnetic properties without the Morin transition. In the case of magnetite nanotubes, which consist of slightly larger nanoparticles, magnetization curves show ferromagnetism with weak coercivity at room temperature, while FC-ZFC curves exhibit the Verwey transition at 125 K.Considerable effort has been invested in the development of synthetic methods for the preparation iron oxide nanostructures for applications in nanotechnology. While a variety of structures have been reported, only a few studies have focused on iron oxide nanotubes. Here, we present details on the synthesis and characterization of iron oxide nanotubes along with a proposed mechanism for FeOOH tube formation. The FeOOH nanotubes, fabricated via a template-based electrodeposition method, are found to exhibit a unique inner-surface. Heat treatment of these tubes under oxidizing or reducing atmospheres can produce either hematite (α-Fe2O3) or magnetite (Fe3O4) structures, respectively. Hematite nanotubes are composed of small nanoparticles less than 20 nm in diameter and the magnetization curves and FC-ZFC curves show superparamagnetic properties without the Morin transition

  4. Dissipation in graphene and nanotube resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoánez, C.; Guinea, F.; Castro Neto, A. H.

    2007-09-01

    Different damping mechanisms in graphene nanoresonators are studied: charges in the substrate, ohmic losses in the substrate and the graphene sheet, breaking and healing of surface bonds (Velcro effect), two level systems, attachment losses, and thermoelastic losses. We find that, for realistic structures and contrary to semiconductor resonators, dissipation is dominated by ohmic losses in the graphene layer and metallic gate. An extension of this study to carbon nanotube-based resonators is presented.

  5. Dissipation in graphene and nanotube resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Seoanez, C.; Guinea, F.; Neto, A. H. Castro

    2007-01-01

    Different damping mechanisms in graphene nanoresonators are studied: charges in the substrate, ohmic losses in the substrate and the graphene sheet, breaking and healing of surface bonds (Velcro effect), two level systems, attachment losses, and thermoelastic losses. We find that, for realistic structures and contrary to semiconductor resonators, dissipation is dominated by ohmic losses in the graphene layer and metallic gate. An extension of this study to carbon nanotube-based resonators is ...

  6. Field electron emission from branched nanotubes film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Baoqing; Tian Shikai; Yang Zhonghai

    2005-01-01

    We describe the preparation and analyses of films composed of branched carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNTs were grown on a Ni catalyst film using chemical vapor deposition from a gas containing acetylene. From scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analyses, the branched structure of the CNTs was determined; the field emission characteristics in a vacuum chamber indicated a lower turn on field for branched CNTs than normal CNTs

  7. Aqueous solution dispersement of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are dispersed in an aqueous buffer solution consisting of at least 50 weight percent water and a remainder weight percent that includes a buffer material. The buffer material has a molecular structure defined by a first end, a second end, and a middle disposed between the first and second ends. The first end is a cyclic ring with nitrogen and oxygen heteroatomes, the middle is a hydrophobic alkyl chain, and the second end is a charged group.

  8. Intrinsic Stability of the Smallest Possible Silver Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autreto, P. A. S.; Lagos, M. J.; Sato, F.; Bettini, J.; Rocha, A. R.; Rodrigues, V.; Ugarte, D.; Galvao, D. S.

    2011-02-01

    Recently, Lagos et al. [Nature Nanotech. 4, 149 (2009)1748-338710.1038/nnano.2008.414] reported the discovery of the smallest possible Ag nanotube with a square cross section. Ab initio density functional theory calculations strongly support that the stability of these hollow structures is structurally intrinsic and not the result of contamination by light atoms. We also report the first experimental observation of the theoretically predicted corrugation of the hollow structure. Quantum conductance calculations predict a unique signature of 3.6G0 for this new family of nanotubes.

  9. Molecular dynamics study of Ar flow and He flow inside carbon nanotube junction as a molecular nozzle and diffuser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itsuo Hanasaki, Akihiro Nakatani and Hiroshi Kitagawa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A carbon nanotube junction consists of two connected nanotubes with different diameters. It has been extensively investigated as a molecular electronic device since carbon nanotubes can be metallic and semiconductive, depending on their structure. However, a carbon nanotube junction can also be viewed as a nanoscale nozzle andv diffuser. Here, we focus on the nanotube junction from the perspective of an intersection between machine, material and device. We have conducted a molecular dynamics simulation of the molecular flow inside a modeled (12,12–(8,8 nanotube junction. A strong gravitational field and a periodic boundary condition are applied in the flow direction. We investigated dense-Ar flows and dense-He flows while controlling the temperature of the nanotube junction. The results show that Ar atoms tend to be near to the wall and the density of the Ar is higher in the wide (12,12 nanotube than in the narrow (8,8 nanotube, while it is lower in the wide tube when no flow occurs. The streaming velocities of both the Ar and the He are higher in the narrow nanotube than in the wide nanotube, but the velocity of the Ar is higher than the velocity of the He and the temperature of the flowing Ar is higher than the temperature of the He when the same magnitude of gravitational field is applied.

  10. Application of carbon nanotubes flexible strain sensor in smart textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong CHENG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Smart textiles have not only the necessary functions of daily wear, but also the intelligence. The focus of the current textile materials research is the selection of flexible material. For flexible materials, carbon material is one of the ideal materials for preparing flexible strain gauges. The application of flexible strain sensor prepared by carbon nanotubes as a flexible material in smart textiles is the research content. The research status of carbon nanotubes flexible strain sensor is introduced from the aspects of the structure, properties and application. The characteristics and functions of flexible strain gages prepared with carbon nanotube fibers and carbon nanotube films as flexible materials are discussed in terms of selection, preparation method, performance test and application. At the same time, the advantages and disadvantages of the flexible strain sensor of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from the aspects of preparation difficulty, production cost and practical application effect. High sensitivity with high strain will be a key research direction for carbon nanotube flexible strain sensors.

  11. Tunable functionality and toxicity studies of titanium dioxide nanotube layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feschet-Chassot, E.; Raspal, V.; Sibaud, Y.; Awitor, O.K.; Bonnemoy, F.; Bonnet, J.L.; Bohatier, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have developed a simple process to fabricate scalable titanium dioxide nanotube layers which show a tunable functionality. The titanium dioxide nanotube layers were prepared by electrochemical anodization of Ti foil in 0.4 wt.% hydrofluoric acid solution. The nanotube layers structure and morphology were characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The surface topography and wettability were studied according to the anodization time. The sample synthesized displayed a higher contact angle while the current density reached a local minimum. Beyond this point, the contact angles decreased with anodization time. Photo-degradation of acid orange 7 in aqueous solution was used as a probe to assess the photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide nanotube layers under UV irradiation. We obtained better photocatalytic activity for the sample fabricated at higher current density. Finally we used the Ciliated Protozoan T. pyriformis, an alternative cell model used for in vitro toxicity studies, to predict the toxicity of titanium dioxide nanotube layers in a biological system. We did not observe any characteristic effect in the presence of the titanium dioxide nanotube layers on two physiological parameters related to this organism, non-specific esterases activity and population growth rate.

  12. Y2O3:Yb/Er nanotubes: Layer-by-layer assembly on carbon-nanotube templates and their upconversion luminescence properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Weishi; Shen, Jianfeng; Wan, Lei; Chang, Yu; Ye, Mingxin

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Well-shaped Y 2 O 3 :Yb/Er nanotubes have been successfully synthesized on a large scale via layer-by-layer assembly on carbon nanotubes templates followed by a subsequent heat treatment process. The as-prepared Y 2 O 3 :Yb/Er nanotubes show a strong red emission corresponding to the 4 F 9/2 – 4 I 15/2 transition of the Er 3+ ions under excitation at 980 nm. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Well-shaped Y 2 O 3 :Yb/Er nanotubes have been successfully synthesized. ► CNTs were used as templates for Y 2 O 3 :Yb/Er nanotubes. ► LBL assembly and calcination were used for preparation of Y 2 O 3 :Yb/Er nanotubes. ► The as-prepared Y 2 O 3 :Yb/Er nanotubes show a strong red emission. -- Abstract: Well-shaped Y 2 O 3 :Yb/Er nanotubes have been successfully synthesized on a large scale via layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) templates followed by a subsequent heat treatment process. The crystal structure, element analysis, morphology and upconversion luminescence properties were characterized. XRD results demonstrate that the diffraction peaks of the samples calcinated at 800 °C or above can be indexed to the pure cubic phase of Y 2 O 3 . SEM images indicate that a large quantity of uniform and rough nanotubes with diameters of about 30–60 nm can be observed. The as-prepared Y 2 O 3 :Yb/Er nanotubes show a strong red emission corresponding to the 4 F 9/2 – 4 I 15/2 transition of the Er 3+ ions under excitation at 980 nm, which have potential applications in such fields as nanoscale devices, molecular catalysts, nanobiotechnology, photonics and optoelectronics.

  13. Advanced ceramics reinforced with carbon nanotubes for ballistic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couto, Carlos Alberto de Oliveira; Passador, Fabio Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The carbon nanotubes have excellent mechanical properties, the elastic modulus is around 1TPa, next to the diamond and the mechanical strength is 10 to 100 times higher than steel, moreover they are self-lubricating, which facilitates the ceramic composites compression process. The insertion of carbon nanotubes tends to improve the fracture toughness of ceramic composites, but is necessary to obtain a good dispersion in the ceramic matrix. The objective of this work is to develop a tough and tenacious ceramics for ballistic application, using structural ceramics of alumina and tetragonal zirconia and evaluate the influence of the addition of carbon nanotubes (multilayer) on the mechanical properties of the composite. The carbon nanotubes were functionalized with carboxylic groups by nitric acid oxidation reaction. To ensure a homogeneous distribution of the carbon nanotubes in the matrix of alumina/zirconia, surfactants were used: sodium dodecyl sulphate + gum arabic in the amount of 50% by mass of carbon nanotubes. Ceramic powders were prepared with pure alumina and alumina + 20% by mass of tetragonal zirconia/yttria, with and without addition of carbon nanotubes at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.5% by mass. The samples were uniaxially and isostatically pressed at 300 MPa and sintered in a conventional oven at 1500 °C for two hours and a heating rate of 5 °C/min, aimed at commercial application. The morphology of ceramic powders were characterized by SEM and XRD. The mechanical properties of the sintered samples were evaluated by flexural bending at three points, Vickers microhardness and fracture toughness by single edge-notched beam (SENB). The use of carbon nanotubes in the ceramic composite caused a decrease in hardness and an increase in fracture toughness, with great potential for ballistic applications. (author)

  14. Advanced ceramics reinforced with carbon nanotubes for ballistic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto, Carlos Alberto de Oliveira; Passador, Fabio Roberto, E-mail: carlos.couto.sjc@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: The carbon nanotubes have excellent mechanical properties, the elastic modulus is around 1TPa, next to the diamond and the mechanical strength is 10 to 100 times higher than steel, moreover they are self-lubricating, which facilitates the ceramic composites compression process. The insertion of carbon nanotubes tends to improve the fracture toughness of ceramic composites, but is necessary to obtain a good dispersion in the ceramic matrix. The objective of this work is to develop a tough and tenacious ceramics for ballistic application, using structural ceramics of alumina and tetragonal zirconia and evaluate the influence of the addition of carbon nanotubes (multilayer) on the mechanical properties of the composite. The carbon nanotubes were functionalized with carboxylic groups by nitric acid oxidation reaction. To ensure a homogeneous distribution of the carbon nanotubes in the matrix of alumina/zirconia, surfactants were used: sodium dodecyl sulphate + gum arabic in the amount of 50% by mass of carbon nanotubes. Ceramic powders were prepared with pure alumina and alumina + 20% by mass of tetragonal zirconia/yttria, with and without addition of carbon nanotubes at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.5% by mass. The samples were uniaxially and isostatically pressed at 300 MPa and sintered in a conventional oven at 1500 °C for two hours and a heating rate of 5 °C/min, aimed at commercial application. The morphology of ceramic powders were characterized by SEM and XRD. The mechanical properties of the sintered samples were evaluated by flexural bending at three points, Vickers microhardness and fracture toughness by single edge-notched beam (SENB). The use of carbon nanotubes in the ceramic composite caused a decrease in hardness and an increase in fracture toughness, with great potential for ballistic applications. (author)

  15. Hall Measurements on Carbon Nanotube Paper Modified With Electroless Deposited Platinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwuoha Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanotube paper, sometimes referred to as bucky paper, is a random arrangement of carbon nanotubes meshed into a single robust structure, which can be manipulated with relative ease. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were used to make the nanotube paper, and were subsequently modified with platinum using an electroless deposition method based on substrate enhanced electroless deposition. This involves the use of a sacrificial metal substrate that undergoes electro-dissolution while the platinum metal deposits out of solution onto the nanotube paper via a galvanic displacement reaction. The samples were characterized using SEM/EDS, and Hall-effect measurements. The SEM/EDS analysis clearly revealed deposits of platinum (Pt distributed over the nanotube paper surface, and the qualitative elemental analysis revealed co-deposition of other elements from the metal substrates used. When stainless steel was used as sacrificial metal a large degree of Pt contamination with various other metals was observed. Whereas when pure sacrificial metals were used bimetallic Pt clusters resulted. The co-deposition of a bimetallic system upon carbon nanotubes was a function of the metal type and the time of exposure. Hall-effect measurements revealed some interesting fluctuations in sheet carrier density and the dominant carrier switched from N- to P-type when Pt was deposited onto the nanotube paper. Perspectives on the use of the nanotube paper as a replacement to traditional carbon cloth in water electrolysis systems are also discussed.

  16. Nanotube formation and morphology change of Ti alloys containing Hf for dental materials use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Kang; Choe, Han-Cheol; Ko, Yeong-Mu; Brantley, William A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, Ti-Hf (10, 20, 30 and 40 wt.%) alloys were prepared by arc melting, and subjected to heat treatment for 24 h at 1000 o C in an argon atmosphere. Formation of surface nanotubes was achieved by anodizing a Ti-Hf alloy in 1.0 M H 3 PO 4 electrolytes with small amounts of NaF at room temperature. Microstructures of the alloys and nanotube morphology were examined by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The homogenized Ti-Hf alloys had a needle-like microstructure of α phase, and nanotubes formed on Ti-xHf alloys had the anatase phase after treatment that promoted crystallization. Uniform nanotubes formed for Hf contents up to 20 wt.%. Irregular nanotubes formed on the Ti-30Hf and Ti-40Hf alloys. The structure of the irregular layers on the Ti-30Hf and Ti-40Hf alloys had nanotubes of two sizes. Increasing the Hf content in Ti led to the formation of nanotubes with more narrow size. The pores in the nanotubes typically had a diameter ranging from 80-120 nm and a length of approximately 1.7 μm. It is concluded that nanotube morphology on Ti-Hf alloys can controlled by varying the amount of Hf.

  17. Synthesis of ultra-long cadmium telluride nanotubes via combinational chemical transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kee-Ryung; Cho, Hong-Baek; Choa, Yong-Ho, E-mail: choa15@hanyang.ac.kr

    2017-03-01

    Synthesis of high-throughput cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanotubes with an ultra-long aspect ratio is presented via a combination process concept combined with electrospinning, electrodeposition, and cationic exchange reaction. Ultra-long sacrificial silver (Ag) nanofibers were synthesized by electrospinning involving two-step calcination, and were then electrodeposited to create silver telluride nanotubes. These nanotubes underwent cationic exchange reaction in cadmium nitrate tetrahydrate solution with the aid of a ligand, tributylphosphine (TBP). Analysis showed that ultra-long pure zinc blende CdTe nanotubes were obtained with controlled dimension and uniform morphology. The thermodynamic driving force induced by the coordination of methanol solvent and TBP attributed to overcome the kinetic barrier between Ag{sub 2}Te and CdTe nanotubes, facilitating the synthesis of CdTe nanotubes. This synthetic process involving a topotactic reaction route paves a way for high-throughput extended synthesis of new chalcogenide hollow nanotubes for application in photodetectors and solar cells. - Highlights: • High throughput synthetic route of hollow CdTe nanotubes with ultra-long aspect ratio. • Chemical combination of electrospinning, electrodeposition & cation exchange reaction. • Pure zinc blende CdTe by controlled dimension & structural variation of Ag nanofibers. • Potential for the high throughput synthesis of new exotic chalcogenide nanotubes.

  18. Tuning porosity and radial mechanical properties of DNA origami nanotubes via crossover design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhipeng; Kawai, Kentaro; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Tabata, Osamu

    2017-06-01

    DNA origami nanotubes are utilized as structural platforms for the fabrication of various micro/nanosystems for drug delivery, optical or biological sensing, and even nanoscale robots. Their radial structural and mechanical properties, which play a crucial role in the effective use of micro/nanosystems, have not been fully studied. In particular, the effects of crossovers, which are basic structures for rationally assembling double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) helices into a nanotube configuration, have not yet been characterized experimentally. To investigate the effects of crossovers on the porosity and the radial mechanical properties of DNA origami nanotubes, we fabricated a DNA origami nanotube with varied crossover designs along the nanotube axis. The radial geometry of the DNA origami nanotube is experimentally characterized by both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Moreover, the radial mechanical properties of the DNA origami nanotube including the radial modulus are directly measured by force-distance-based AFM. These measurements reveal that the porosity and the radial modulus of DNA origami nanotubes can be tuned by adjusting the crossover design, which enables the optimal design and construction of DNA origami nanostructures for various applications.

  19. Current state and perspectives for organo-halide perovskite solar cells. Part 1. Crystal structures and thin film formation, morphology, processing, degradation, stability improvement by carbon nanotubes. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigmat Ashurov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental problems of the modern state of the studies of organic–inorganic organo-halide perovskites (OHP as basis for high efficiency thin film solar cells are discussed. Perovskite varieties and background properties are introduced. The chronology of development of the studies in this direction has been presented – structural aspects of these OHP perovskites, from early 2D to recent 3D MAPbI3 perovskites and important technological aspects of smooth thin film structure creation by various techniques, such as solvent engineering, spin- and dip - coating, vacuum deposition, cation exchange approach, nanoimprinting (particularly, a many-sided role of polymers. The most important theoretical problems such as electronic structure of lattice, impurity and defect states in pure and mixed perovskites, suppressed electron-hole recombination, extra-long lifetimes, and diffusion lengths are analyzed. Degradation effects associated with moisture and photo irradiation, as well as degradation of metallic electrodes to OHP solar cells have been considered. The application of carbon nanostructures: carbon nanotubes (CNT and graphene as stable semitransparent charge collectors to OHP perovskites is demonstrated on the example of original results of authors.

  20. InAs/Si Hetero-Junction Nanotube Tunnel Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Hanna, Amir; Fahad, Hossain M.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Hetero-structure tunnel junctions in non-planar gate-all-around nanowire (GAA NW) tunnel FETs (TFETs) have shown significant enhancement in ‘ON’ state tunnel current over their all-silicon counterpart. Here we show the unique concept of nanotube TFET in a hetero-structure configuration that is capable of much higher drive