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Sample records for nanotube isotope-superlattice structures

  1. Interaction of multiwalled carbon nanotube produces structural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) has been found to produce structural changes in Calf Thymus-DNA (CT-DNA). The interaction or binding of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was investigated in order to discover if it brings about any significant changes of the DNA double helix using CD spectra ...

  2. Carbon Nanotube Infused Launch Vehicle Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For the past 5 years Orbital ATK has been investing in, prototyping, and testing carbon nanotube infused composite structures to evaluate their impact on launch...

  3. Nanotube structures, methods of making nanotube structures, and methods of accessing intracellular space

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDersarl, Jules J.; Xu, Alexander M.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Tayebi, Noureddine

    2016-02-23

    In accordance with the purpose(s) of the present disclosure, as embodied and broadly described herein, embodiments of the present disclosure, in one aspect, relate to methods of making a structure including nanotubes, a structure including nanotubes, methods of delivering a fluid to a cell, methods of removing a fluid to a cell, methods of accessing intracellular space, and the like.

  4. Identification of Complex Carbon Nanotube Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A variety of complex carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been observed experimentally. These include sharp bends, branches, tori, and helices. They are believed to be formed by using topological defects such as pentagons and heptagons to connect different CNT. The effects of type, number, and arrangement (separation and orientation) of defects on atomic structures and energetics of complex CNT are investigated using topology, quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations. Energetically stable models are derived for identification of observed complex CNT structures.

  5. Structures of water molecular nanotube induced by axial tensile strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H. [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structures and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China)], E-mail: lihuilmy@hotmail.com; Zhang, X.Q. [Physics Department, Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China); Liew, K.M. [Department of Building and Constructions, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Liu, X.F. [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structures and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China)

    2008-10-06

    Five well-ordered nano-ice structures embedded in carbon nanotubes are obtained in this study. These five nano-ice phases all exhibit single walled tubular morphologies, including the pentagon, hexagon ice nanotubes whose structures are quite different from bulk ice. Our simulation results indicate that water molecules tend to rearrange into surface ring structures to reduce the number of free OH groups. The structural behavior of these ice nanotubes inside CNTs subject to axial stress is also investigated. The ice nanotubes tend to be drawn to ice nanorings or ice nanospring during the mechanical stretching. The distribution function exhibits typical order-to-disorder transition of the water network confined in carbon nanotube during the stretching. By analysis, we suggest that it is unlikely that additional water molecules will enter the tubes because of the increased volume available if the tubes are stretched at contact with a water reservoir.

  6. Structure comparison of nanotubes produced by different processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, P.; Miklosi, J.; Poczik, P.; Papp, K.; Palinkas, G.; Kalman, E. [IC CRC HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Konya, Z.; Kiricsi, I. [University of Szeged (Hungary)

    2001-04-01

    Several methods used for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes have been developed in the last decade. The preparation techniques used, and their associated parameters, have an ultimate effect on the structure of the resulting nanotubes. Consequently, it is of great interest to compare the structure of carbon nanotubes synthesized by different techniques. We investigated a range of nanotubes of different origin by scanning probe microscopy (TM-AFM), and by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). Three different types of nanotubes have been investigated: commercial SWNT and MWNT, MWNT (synthesized using a CCVD process) and its SiO{sub 2} coated variant, and nanostructures produced using an electrochemical method. A preparative technique is described and different tube parameters are measured. The quality of coated MWNT-s is investigated and nano-structured rings are revealed in samples obtained by electrolysis of molten salts on graphite electrodes. (orig.)

  7. Electrical conductivity of metal–carbon nanotube structures: Effect of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. The electrical properties of asymmetric metal–carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been studied using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method with Atomistix tool kit. The models with asymmetric metal contacts and carbon nanotube bear resemblance to experimental set-ups.

  8. Electrical conductivity of metal–carbon nanotube structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electrical properties of asymmetric metal–carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been studied using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method with Atomistix tool kit. The models with asymmetric metal contacts and carbon nanotube bear resemblance to experimental set-ups. The study ...

  9. Electrical conductivity of metal–carbon nanotube structures: Effect of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electrical properties of asymmetric metal–carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been studied using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method with Atomistix tool kit. The models with asymmetric metal contacts and carbon nanotube bear resemblance to experimental set-ups. The study ...

  10. Structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Oyama, A B; Silva-Molina, R A; Ruíz-García, J; Gámez-Corrales, R; Guirado-López, R A

    2014-11-07

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to analyze the structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OH-MWCNT). Our MWCNTs have average diameters of ~2 nm, lengths of approximately 100-300 nm, and a hydroxyl surface coverage θ~0.1. When deposited on the air/water interface the OH-MWCNTs are partially soluble and the floating units interact and link with each other forming extended foam-like carbon networks. Surface pressure-area isotherms of the nanotube films are performed using the Langmuir balance method at different equilibration times. The films are transferred into a mica substrate and atomic force microscopy images show that the foam like structure is preserved and reveals fine details of their microstructure. Density functional theory calculations performed on model hydroxylated carbon nanotubes show that low energy atomic configurations are found when the OH groups form molecular islands on the nanotube's surface. This patchy behavior for the OH species is expected to produce nanotubes having reduced wettabilities, in line with experimental observations. OH doping yields nanotubes having small HOMO-LUMO energy gaps and generates a nanotube → OH direction for the charge transfer leading to the existence of more hole carriers in the structures. Our synthesized OH-MWCNTs might have promising applications.

  11. Thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube cross-bar structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, William J; Keblinski, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    We use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) to compute the thermal conductivity (κ) of orthogonally ordered cross-bar structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Such structures exhibit extremely low thermal conductivity in the range of 0.02-0.07 W m -1 K -1 . These values are five orders of magnitude smaller than the axial thermal conductivity of individual carbon nanotubes, and are comparable to the thermal conductivity of still air.

  12. Structural properties of carbon nanotubes derived from 13C NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E.

    2011-10-10

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on how structural properties of carbon nanotubes can be derived from 13C NMR investigations. Magic angle spinning solid state NMR experiments have been performed on single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range from 0.7 to 100 nm and with number of walls from 1 to 90. We provide models on how diameter and the number of nanotube walls influence NMR linewidth and line position. Both models are supported by theoretical calculations. Increasing the diameter D, from the smallest investigated nanotube, which in our study corresponds to the inner nanotube of a double-walled tube to the largest studied diameter, corresponding to large multiwalled nanotubes, leads to a 23.5 ppm diamagnetic shift of the isotropic NMR line position δ. We show that the isotropic line follows the relation δ = 18.3/D + 102.5 ppm, where D is the diameter of the tube and NMR line position δ is relative to tetramethylsilane. The relation asymptotically tends to approach the line position expected in graphene. A characteristic broadening of the line shape is observed with the increasing number of walls. This feature can be rationalized by an isotropic shift distribution originating from different diamagnetic shielding of the encapsulated nanotubes together with a heterogeneity of the samples. Based on our results, NMR is shown to be a nondestructive spectroscopic method that can be used as a complementary method to, for example, transmission electron microscopy to obtain structural information for carbon nanotubes, especially bulk samples.

  13. Electronic structure of carbon-boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanginés-Mendoza, Raúl; Martinez, Edgar

    2013-03-01

    Structures of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes (CNTs, BNNTs) are quite similar, conversely, electronic properties are radically different from each other. Carbon nanotubes, whose electronic properties can be either metallic or semiconducting depending on their chiral structure, boron nitride nanotubes are always semiconductors with bandgaps over 4 eV. We have looked to hybrid systems, to predict a new kind of nanostructures with novel electronic properties. In this way, we explore the electronic properties of C-BN nanotubes. In particular, we studied the electronic structure of armchair C-BN nanotubes. The calculations were performed using the pseudopotential LCAO method with a Generalized Gradient Approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional. The band structure of most of these systems have semiconductor character with an indirect gap smaller than its analogous BNNTs. In addition, the most prominent feature of these systems is the existence of flat bands both at the valence band top and at the conduction band minimum. Such flat bands results in sharp and narrow peaks on the total density of states. The behavior of these flat bands mainly indicates that electrons are largely localized. Thus, a detailed analysis on the electronic band structure shows that hybridization between those orbitals on the interfaces is responsible to exhibit localization effects on the hybrid systems.This research was supported by Conacyt under Grant No. 133022.

  14. Preparation of arrays of long carbon nanotubes using catalyst structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Arendt, Paul; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Xiefie

    2016-03-22

    A structure for preparing an substantially aligned array of carbon nanotubes include a substrate having a first side and a second side, a buffer layer on the first side of the substrate, a catalyst on the buffer layer, and a plurality of channels through the structure for allowing a gaseous carbon source to enter the substrate at the second side and flow through the structure to the catalyst. After preparing the array, a fiber of carbon nanotubes may be spun from the array. Prior to spinning, the array can be immersed in a polymer solution. After spinning, the polymer can be cured.

  15. Electronic Structure and Properties of Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical framework based on Huckel tight-binding model has been formulated to analyze the electronic structure of carbon nanotubes under uniform deformation. The model successfully quantifies the dispersion relation, density of states and bandgap change of nanotubes under uniform stretching, compression, torsion and bending. Our analysis shows that the shifting of the Fermi point away from the Brillouin zone vertices is the key reason for these changes. As a result of this shifting, the electronic structure of deformed carbon nanotubes varies dramatically depending on their chirality and deformation mode. Treating the Fermi point as a function of strain and tube chirality, the analytical solution preserves the concise form of undeformed carbon nanotubes. It predicts the shifting, merging and splitting of the Van Hove singularities in the density of states and the zigzag pattern of bandgap change under strains. Four orbital tight-binding simulations of carbon nanotubes under uniform stretching, compression, torsion and bending have been performed to verify the analytical solution. Extension to more complex systems are being performed to relate this analytical solution to the spectroscopic characterization, device performance and proposed quantum structures induced by the deformation. The limitations of this model will also be discussed.

  16. Carbon Nanotube-Containing Structures, Methods Of Making, And Processes Using Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Chin, Ya-Huei; Gao, Yufei; Aardahl, Christopher L.; Stewart, Terri L.

    2004-11-30

    Carbon nanotube structures are disclosed in which nanotubes are disposed over a porous support such as a foam, felt, mesh, or membrane. Techniques of making these structures are also disclosed. In some of these techniques, a support is pretreated with a templated surfactant composition to assist with the formation of a nanotube layer.

  17. Carbon nanotube on Si(001): structural and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellana, W.; Fazzio, A.; Miwa, R.W.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The promising nanoscale technology based on carbon nanotubes has attracted much attention due to the unique electronic, chemical and mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) provide an ideal atomically uniform one dimensional (1D) conductors, having a strong electronic confinement around its circumference, which can be retained up to room temperature[1]. This interesting property may lead one to consider SWCNs as 1D conductors for the development of nanoscale electronic devices. In this work the structural and electronic properties of the contact between a metallic (6,6) SWCN adsorbed on a silicon (001) surface are studied from first-principles total-energy calculations. We consider two adsorption sites for the tube on the Si(001) surface: on the top of the Si-dimer rows and on the surface 'trench' between two consecutive dimer rows. Our results show a chemical bond between the nanotube and Si(001) when the tube is located along the 'trench', which corresponds to the only bound structure. We find a binding energy per tube length of 0.21 eV/angstrom. We also verified that the binding energy depends on the rotation of the tube. Typically, a rotation of 15 deg can reduce the binding energy up to 0.07 eV/angstrom. Our calculated electronic properties indicate that the most stable structure shows a subband associated to the tube/surface bond that cross the Fermi level. This result indicates an enhanced metallic behavior along the tube/surface contact characterizing a 1D quantum wire. The charge transfer between the Si surface and the tube is also discussed. [1] Z. Yao, C. Dekker, and P. Avouris in Carbon Nanotubes, M. S. Dresselhaus, G. Dresselhaus, and P. Avouris Eds., (Springer, Berlin 2001), p. 147. (author)

  18. Structure factors of carbon nanotubes on the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wenkai; Luo, Xujun; Ma, Pengfei; Zhai, Xian; Fan, Taotao; Li, Xiaotuo

    2018-03-01

    The structure factors of carbon nanotubes such as the dispersion, morphology and size have effects on the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube/epoxy composites (kc). However, the behavior how these structure factors affect the kc has still not been fully understood. To seek the answer, three-dimensional computational models containing various dispersion of bending single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are developed using the finite element method. A conjecture is proposed based on these models that the dispersion and the number of the overlapping heat-affected zones (OHAZs) of heat conduction networks play an important role on the kc. To prove the conjecture, a feature parameter-a dispersion coefficient is proposed to quantify the dispersion uniformity. The kc is calculated in models with different dispersion coefficients. The results show that the kc increases with the dispersion coefficient. The effects of the morphology and the size of SWCNTs on the kc could also be explained using this conjecture. SWCNTs with a larger length efficiency and diameter are found to be beneficial to a higher kc. Because a larger length efficiency increases the number of OHAZs and a larger diameter SWCNT has a wider heat-affected zone which also increases the number of OHAZs.

  19. Nanohashtag structures based on carbon nanotubes and molecular linkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Connor W.; Rybolt, Thomas R.

    2018-03-01

    Molecular mechanics was used to study the noncovalent interactions between single-walled carbon nanotubes and molecular linkers. Groups of nanotubes have the tendency to form tight, parallel bundles (||||). Molecular linkers were introduced into our models to stabilize nanostructures with carbon nanotubes held in perpendicular orientations. Molecular mechanics makes it possible to estimate the strength of noncovalent interactions holding these structures together and to calculate the overall binding energy of the structures. A set of linkers were designed and built around a 1,3,5,7-cyclooctatetraene tether with two corannulene containing pincers that extend in opposite directions from the central cyclooctatetraene portion. Each pincer consists of a pairs of "arms." These molecular linkers were modified so that the "hand" portions of each pair of "arms" could close together to grab and hold two carbon nanotubes in a perpendicular arrangement. To illustrate the possibility of more complicated and open perpendicular CNTs structures, our primary goal was to create a model of a nanohashtag (#) CNT conformation that is more stable than any parallel CNT arrangements with bound linker molecules forming clumps of CNTs and linkers in non-hashtag arrangements. This goal was achieved using a molecular linker (C280H96) that utilizes van der Waals interactions to two perpendicular oriented CNTs. Hydrogen bonding was then added between linker molecules to augment the stability of the hashtag structure. In the hashtag structure with hydrogen bonding, four (5,5) CNTs of length 4.46 nm (18 rings) and four linkers (C276H92N8O8) stabilized the hashtag so that the average binding energy per pincer was 118 kcal/mol.

  20. Structural deformation and intertube conductance of crossed carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Mazzoni, Mario S.C.; Choi, Hyoung J.; Ihm, Jisoon; Louie, Steven G.

    2000-01-01

    We present a first-principles study of the structure and quantum electronic conductance of junctions consisting of two crossed (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes. The structures are determined by constrained minimization of total energy at a given force between the two tubes, simulating the effects of substrate-tube attraction or an applied force. We find that the intertube contact distance is very sensitive to the applied force in the range of 0-10 nN. The intertube conductance is sizable for realistic deformation expected from substrate interaction. The results explain the recent transport data on crossed nanotubes and show that these systems may be potentially useful as electromechanical devices

  1. Structural Deformation and Intertube Conductance of Crossed Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Young-Gui; Mazzoni, Mario S. C.; Choi, Hyoung Joon; Ihm, Jisoon; Louie, Steven G.

    2001-01-01

    We present a first-principles study of the structure and quantum electronic conductance of junctions consisting of two crossed (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes. The structures are determined by constrained minimization of total energy at a given force between the two tubes, simulating the effects of substrate-tube attraction or an applied force. We find that the intertube contact distance is very sensitive to the applied force in the range of 0--10nN. The intertube conductance is sizable for realistic deformation expected from substrate interaction. The results explain the recent transport data on crossed nanotubes and show that these systems may be potentially useful as electromechanical devices

  2. Synthesis and structural determination of twisted MoS2 nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, P.; Schabes-Retchkiman, P.; Ascencio, J.A.; Mendoza, D.; Perez-Alvarez, M.; Espinosa, A.; Reza-SanGerman, C.; Camacho-Bragado, G.A.; Jose-Yacaman, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the present work we report the synthesis of MoS 2 nanotubes with diameters greater than 10 nm using a template method. The length and properties of these nanotubes are a direct result of the preparation method. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to study the structure of these highly curved entities. Molecular dynamics simulations of MoS 2 nanotubes reveal that one of the stable forms of the nanotubes is a twisted one. The twisting of the nanotubes produces a characteristic contrast in the images, which is also studied using simulation methods. The analysis of the local contrast close to the perpendicular orientation shows geometrical arrays of dots in domain-like structures, which are demonstrated to be a product of the atomic overlapping of irregular curvatures in the nanotubes. The configuration of some of the experimentally obtained nanotubes is demonstrated to be twisted with a behavior suggesting partial plasticity. (orig.)

  3. Sorting carbon nanotubes by electronic structure using density differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Michael S; Green, Alexander A; Hulvat, James F; Stupp, Samuel I; Hersam, Mark C

    2006-10-01

    The heterogeneity of as-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) precludes their widespread application in electronics, optics and sensing. We report on the sorting of carbon nanotubes by diameter, bandgap and electronic type using structure-discriminating surfactants to engineer subtle differences in their buoyant densities. Using the scalable technique of density-gradient ultracentrifugation, we have isolated narrow distributions of SWNTs in which >97% are within a 0.02-nm-diameter range. Furthermore, using competing mixtures of surfactants, we have produced bulk quantities of SWNTs of predominantly a single electronic type. These materials were used to fabricate thin-film electrical devices of networked SWNTs characterized by either metallic or semiconducting behaviour.

  4. Qualitative Mapping of Structural Different Polypeptide Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Jensen, Jason; Castillo, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    Biological self-assembled structures are receiving increasing focus within micro- and nanotechnology, for example, as sensing devices, due to the fact that they are cheap to produce and easy to functionalize. Therefore, methods for the characterization of these structures are much needed. In this...

  5. Relationships among the structural topology, bond strength, and mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Tsou, Nien-Ti; Kang, Dun-Yen

    2015-10-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs) using a multiscale computational method and then conducted a comparison with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By comparing the potential energy estimated from molecular and macroscopic material mechanics, we were able to model the chemical bonds as beam elements for the nanoscale continuum modeling. This method allowed for simulated mechanical tests (tensile, bending, and torsion) with minimum computational resources for deducing their Young's modulus and shear modulus. The proposed approach also enabled the creation of hypothetical nanotubes to elucidate the relative contributions of bond strength and nanotube structural topology to overall nanotube mechanical strength. Our results indicated that it is the structural topology rather than bond strength that dominates the mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Finally, we investigated the relationship between the structural topology and the mechanical properties by analyzing the von Mises stress distribution in the nanotubes. The proposed methodology proved effective in rationalizing differences in the mechanical properties of AlSiNTs and SWCNTs. Furthermore, this approach could be applied to the exploration of new high-strength nanotube materials.

  6. Atomic and electronic structures of carbon nanotube covalent connecting with graphene by oxygen molecular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianwei; Wei, Qiang; Ma, Zengwei; Zeng, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Based on density functional theories, we have investigated the nanostructure in which boron and nitrogen co-doped carbon nanotube (CNT)/graphene (GR) were connected by an oxygen molecular. The geometry structure and electronic properties of the system were calculated carefully. The band structures indicate that the impurity state of oxygen transfer the semiconducting co-doped carbon nanotube/graphene into a semimetallic composite material. The results show that the connection can be achieved with energy release under a wider range of distance between the nanotube and graphene. It indicates that the connection between the nanotube and the graphene might be a self-assemble process.

  7. Structural and electronic properties of ZnO nanotubes from density functional calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Hu; Zhang, R Q; Zhang Xiaohong; Rosa, A L; Frauenheim, Th

    2007-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of armchair and zigzag ZnO nanotubes were studied using density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. It was found that the strain energy required for rolling a ZnO graphitic sheet into a tube is lower than those for BN and GaN nanotubes. Both the armchair and zigzag ZnO nanotubes were found to be direct gap semiconductors with the gaps decreasing with the diameter increase

  8. Structural characterization of carbon nanotubes via the vibrational density of states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pool, Albert J.; Jain, Sandeep K.; Barkema, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    The electrical and chemical properties of carbon nanotubes vary significantly with different chirality and diameter, making the experimental determination of these structural properties important. Here, we show that the vibrational density of states (VDOS) contains information on the structure of

  9. Towards Multifunctional Characteristics of Embedded Structures With Carbon Nanotube Yarns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Corey D.; Gates, Thomas S.; Kahng, Seun K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents recent results on research of achieving multifunctional structures utilizing Carbon Nanotube (CNT) yarns. The investigation centers on creating composite structures with CNT yarns to simultaneously achieve increases in mechanical strength and the ability to sense strain. The CNT yarns used in our experiments are of the single-ply and two-ply variety with the single-ply yarns having diameters on the order of 10-20 m. The yarns are embedded in silicon rubber and polyurethane test specimens. Mechanical tests show an increase in modulus of elasticity, with an additional weight increase of far less than one-percent. Sensing characteristics of the yarns are investigated on stainless steel test beams in an electrical bridge configuration, and are observed to have a strain sensitivity of 0.7mV/V/1000 micro-strain. Also reported are measurements of the average strain distribution along the direction of the CNT yarns on square silicon rubber membranes.

  10. The electronic fine structure of 4-nitrophenyl functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Amit K; Coleman, Karl S; Dhanak, Vinod R

    2009-01-01

    Controlling the electronic structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is of great importance to various CNT based applications. Herein the electronic fine structure of single-walled carbon nanotube films modified with 4-nitrophenyl groups, produced following reaction with 4-nitrobenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate, was investigated for the first time. Various techniques such as x-ray and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy, and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure studies were used to explore the electronic structure, and the results were compared with the measured electrical resistances. A reduction in number of the π electronic states in the valence band consistent with the increased resistance of the functionalized nanotube films was observed.

  11. Catalytic chemical vapor deposition and structural analysis of MoS2 nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Mengting; Zhang, Meiqi; Yanase, Takashi; Uehara, Fumiya; Nagahama, Taro; Shimada, Toshihiro

    2018-03-01

    MoS2 nanotubes were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using six-horned octahedral FeO nanoparticles and gasified MoO3 and sulfur. The morphology and structure of the nanotubes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), showing that the nanotubes had a hollow structure. The hexagonal lattice of MoS2 was aligned parallel to the direction of the nanotubes. The catalytic activities of the Fe films and nanoparticles of Fe2O3, NiO, and Cu2O for the growth of MoS2 nanotubes were investigated. FeO was found to be the most effective catalyst tested.

  12. Exploring advantages of diverse carbon nanotube forests with tailored structures synthesized by supergrowth from engineered catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Futaba, Don N; Yasuda, Satoshi; Akoshima, Megumi; Yamada, Takeo; Hata, Kenji

    2009-01-27

    We explored advantages of diverse carbon nanotube forests with tailored structures synthesized by water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth (supergrowth) from engineered catalysts. By controlling the catalyst film thickness, we synthesized carbon nanotube (CNT) forests composed from nanotubes with different size and wall number. With extensive characterizations, many interesting dependencies among CNT forest structures and their properties, which were unknown previously, were found. For example, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) showed superior electronic conductivity while single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) showed superior thermal diffusivity, and sparse MWNTs achieved lower threshold voltage for field emission than dense SWNTs. These interesting trends highlight the complexity in designing and choosing the optimum CNT forest for use in applications.

  13. High Efficiency Flexible Battery Based on Graphene-carbon Nanotube Hybrid Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-26

    nanotube field emitter structure on three- dimensional micro-channeled copper , Appl. Phys. Lett. (2012) 1 7. Carbon Nanostructures in Lithium Ion...Electrochemical performance of the 3D MWCNTs-graphene-PET as a flexible LIB anode structure. (a) Initial galvanostatic charge and discharge profiles of 3D...grown on copper We present a novel binder-free multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) structure as anode in Li- ion batteries. The interface-controlled

  14. Carbon based nanostructures: diamond clusters structured with nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Shenderova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Feasibility of designing composites from carbon nanotubes and nanodiamond clusters is discussed based on atomistic simulations. Depending on nanotube size and morphology, some types of open nanotubes can be chemically connected with different facets of diamond clusters. The geometrical relation between different types of nanotubes and different diamond facets for construction of mechanically stable composites with all bonds saturated is summarized. Potential applications of the suggested nanostructures are briefly discussed based on the calculations of their electronic properties using environment dependent self-consistent tight-binding approach.

  15. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundes Fakher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs, metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS and thin film transistor (TFT structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance–voltage (C–V for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors. Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses, the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  16. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakher, Sundes; Nejm, Razan; Ayesh, Ahmad; Al-Ghaferi, Amal; Zeze, Dagou; Mabrook, Mohammed

    2016-09-02

    The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs), metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) and thin film transistor (TFT) structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance-voltage (C-V) for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors). Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses), the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  17. Carbon Nanotube-Based Structural Health Monitoring Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, Russell; Jordan, Jeffrey; Oglesby, Donald; Watkins, Anthony; Patry, JoAnne; Smits, Jan; Williams, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based sensors for structural health monitoring (SHM) can be embedded in structures of all geometries to monitor conditions both inside and at the surface of the structure to continuously sense changes. These CNTs can be manipulated into specific orientations to create small, powerful, and flexible sensors. One of the sensors is a highly flexible sensor for crack growth detection and strain field mapping that features a very dense and highly ordered array of single-walled CNTs. CNT structural health sensors can be mass-produced, are inexpensive, can be packaged in small sizes (0.5 micron(sup 2)), require less power than electronic or piezoelectric transducers, and produce less waste heat per square centimeter than electronic or piezoelectric transducers. Chemically functionalized lithographic patterns are used to deposit and align the CNTs onto metallic electrodes. This method consistently produces aligned CNTs in the defined locations. Using photo- and electron-beam lithography, simple Cr/Au thin-film circuits are patterned onto oxidized silicon substrates. The samples are then re-patterned with a CNT-attracting, self-assembled monolayer of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) to delineate the desired CNT locations between electrodes. During the deposition of the solution-suspended single- wall CNTs, the application of an electric field to the metallic contacts causes alignment of the CNTs along the field direction. This innovation is a prime candidate for smart skin technologies with applications ranging from military, to aerospace, to private industry.

  18. Understanding the mechanism of nanotube synthesis for controlled production of specific (n,m) structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resasco, Daniel E.

    2010-02-11

    This report shows the extensive research on the mechanism responsible for the formation of single walled carbon nanotubes in order to get control over their structural parameters (diameter and chirality). Catalyst formulations, pre-treatment conditions, and reaction conditions are described in detail as well as mechanisms to produce nanotubes structures of specific arrays (vertical forest, nanotube pillars). Applications of SWNT in different fields are also described in this report. In relation to this project five students have graduated (3 PhD and 2 MS) and 35 papers have been published.

  19. Structure and photocatalysis activity of silver doped titanium oxide nanotubes array for degradation of pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Arfaj, E. A.

    2013-10-01

    Semiconductor titanium oxide showed a wonderful performance as a photocatalysis for environmental remediation. Owing to high stability and promising physicochemical properties, titanium oxide nanostructures are used in various applications such as wastewater treatment, antimicrobial and air purification. In the present study, titanium oxide nanotubes and silver doped titanium oxide nanotubes were synthesized via anodic oxidation method. The morphology and composition structure were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results depicted that nanotubes possess anatase phase with average tube diameter of 65 nm and 230 ± 12 nm in length. The band gap of the un-doped and silver doped titanium dioxide nanotubes was determined using UV-Vis. spectrophotometer. The results showed that the band gap of titanium dioxide nanotubes is decreased when doped with silver ions. The photocatalysis activity of un-doped and silver doped TiO2 nanotubes were evaluated in terms of degradation of phenol in the presence of ultra violet irradiation. It was found that silver doped TiO2 nanotubes exhibited much higher photocatalysis activity than un-doped TiO2 nanotubes.

  20. Finite element modeling of nanotube structures linear and non-linear models

    CERN Document Server

    Awang, Mokhtar; Muhammad, Ibrahim Dauda

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a new approach to modeling carbon structures such as graphene and carbon nanotubes using finite element methods, and addresses the latest advances in numerical studies for these materials. Based on the available findings, the book develops an effective finite element approach for modeling the structure and the deformation of grapheme-based materials. Further, modeling processing for single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is demonstrated in detail.

  1. Geometry, electronic structures and optical properties of phosphorus nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Tao; Hashmi, Arqum; Hong, Jisang

    2015-01-01

    Using a first principles approach, we investigated the geometry, electronic structures, and optical properties of phosphorus nanotubes (PNTs). Two possible 1D configurations, the so-called α-PNTs and β-PNTs, are proposed, which are structurally related to blue and black phosphorus monolayers, respectively. Hereby, we predict that both armchair and zigzag geometries can be synthesized in α-PNTs, but the zigzag form of β-PNT is highly unfavorable because of large strain and conformation energies. The band gap of α-PNTs is expected to be ∼2.67 eV, and this is insensitive to the chirality when the tube’s inner diameter is larger than 1.3 nm, while the armchair β-PNTs have a much smaller band gap. Interestingly, we find nearly flat band structures in the zigzag α-PNT system. This may indicate that an excited particle–hole pair has a huge effective mass. We also find asymmetric optical properties with respect to the polarization direction. The armchair α-PNT for parallel polarization shows a large refractive index of 2.6 near the ultraviolet wavelength, and also we find that the refractive index can be even smaller than 1 in certain frequency ranges. The zigzag tubes show very weak reflectivity for parallel polarization, while the armchair tube displays high reflectivity. (paper)

  2. Facile and template-free method toward chemical synthesis of polyaniline film/nanotube structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Pei [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Pennsylvania 15261; Zhu, Yisi [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Lab, Lemont Illinois 60439; Torres, Jorge [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Pennsylvania 15261; Lee, Seung Hee [Department of BIN Fusion Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-786 Korea; Yun, Minhee [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Pennsylvania 15261

    2017-09-05

    A facile and template-free method is reported to synthesize a new thin film structure: polyaniline (PANI) film/nanotubes (F/N) structure. The PANI F/N is a 100-nm thick PANI film embedded with PANI nanotubes. This well-controlled method requires no surfactant or organic acid as well as relatively low concentration of reagents. Synthesis condition studies reveal that aniline oligomers with certain structures are responsible for guiding the growth of the nanotubes. Electrical characterization also indicates that the PANI F/N possesses similar field-effect transistor characteristics to bare PANI film. With its 20% increased surface-area-to-volume (S/V) ratio contributed by surface embedded nanotubes and the excellent p-type semiconducting characteristic, PANI F/N shows clear superiority compared with bare PANI film. Such advantages guarantee the PANI F/N a promising future toward the development of ultra-high sensitivity and low-cost biosensors.

  3. Carbon Nanotubes Advanced Topics in the Synthesis, Structure, Properties and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jorio, Ado; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2008-01-01

    The carbon nanotubes field has evolved substantially since the publication of the bestseller "Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis, Structure, Properties and Applications". The present volume builds on the generic aspects of the aforementioned book, which emphasizes the fundamentals, with the new volume emphasizing areas that have grown rapidly since the first volume, guiding future directions where research is needed and highlighting applications. The volume also includes an emphasis on areas like graphene, other carbon-like and other tube-like materials because these fields are likely to affect and influence developments in nanotubes in the next 5 years.

  4. Inorganic nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenne, Reshef; Rao, C N R

    2004-10-15

    Following the discovery of carbon fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, it was hypothesized that nanoparticles of inorganic compounds with layered (two-dimensional) structure, such as MoS(2), will not be stable against folding and form nanotubes and fullerene-like structures: IF. The synthesis of numerous other inorganic nanotubes has been reported in recent years. Various techniques for the synthesis of inorganic nanotubes, including high-temperature reactions and strategies based on 'chemie douce' (soft chemistry, i.e. low-temperature) processes, are described. First-principle, density functional theory based calculations are able to provide substantial information on the structure and properties of such nanotubes. Various properties of inorganic nanotubes, including mechanical, electronic and optical properties, are described in brief. Some potential applications of the nanotubes in tribology, protection against impact, (photo)catalysis, batteries, etc., are discussed.

  5. X-ray irradiation-induced structural changes on Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardi, N.; Jurewicz, I.; King, A. K.; Alkhorayef, M. A.; Bradley, D.; Dalton, A. B.

    2017-11-01

    Dosimetry devices based on Carbon Nanotubes are a promising new technology. In particular using devices based on single wall Carbon Nanotubes may offer a tissue equivalent response with the possibility for device miniaturisation, high scale manufacturing and low cost. An important precursor to device fabrication requires a quantitative study of the effects of X-ray radiation on the physical and chemical properties of the individual nanotubes. In this study, we concentrate on the effects of relatively low doses, 20 cGy and 45 cGy , respectively. We use a range of characterization techniques including scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to quantify the effects of the radiation dose on inherent properties of the nanotubes. Specifically we find that the radiation exposure results in a reduction in the sp2 nature of the nanotube bond structure. Moreover, our analysis indicates that the exposure results in nanotubes that have an increased defect density which ultimately effects the electrical properties of the nanotubes.

  6. Computational Spectroscopy of Structured Carbon Nanotube Interfaces for Biochemical Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    pushbroom system (SmacM) and a snapshot system (MacSim). Iso -lated growth of nanoscale carbon nanotube (CNT) islands has been accomplished as well as...and a snapshot system (MacSim). Iso - lated growth of nanoscale carbon nanotube (CNT) islands has been accomplished as well as growth via a Pt...of view of single bead, g. For the adaptation of TwIST for image segmentation, prior information in the form of a norma - lized spectral database, W

  7. Structural Modification in Carbon Nanotubes by Boron Incorporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handuja Sangeeta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have synthesized boron-incorporated carbon nanotubes (CNTs by decomposition of ferrocene and xylene in a thermal chemical vapor deposition set up using boric acid as the boron source. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy studies of the synthesized CNT samples showed that there was deterioration in crystallinity and improvement in alignment of the CNTs as the boron content in precursor solution increased from 0% to 15%. Raman analysis of these samples showed a shift of ~7 cm−1in wave number to higher side and broadening of the G band with increasing boron concentration along with an increase in intensity of the G band. Furthermore, there was an increase in the intensity of the D band along with a decrease in its wave number position with increase in boron content. We speculate that these structural modifications in the morphology and microstructure of CNTs might be due to the charge transfer from boron to the graphite matrix, resulting in shortening of the carbon–carbon bonds.

  8. Wireless and embedded carbon nanotube networks for damage detection in concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saafi, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Concrete structures undergo an uncontrollable damage process manifesting in the form of cracks due to the coupling of fatigue loading and environmental effects. In order to achieve long-term durability and performance, continuous health monitoring systems are needed to make critical decisions regarding operation, maintenance and repairs. Recent advances in nanostructured materials such as carbon nanotubes have opened the door for new smart and advanced sensing materials that could effectively be used in health monitoring of structures where wireless and real time sensing could provide information on damage development. In this paper, carbon nanotube networks were embedded into a cement matrix to develop an in situ wireless and embedded sensor for damage detection in concrete structures. By wirelessly measuring the change in the electrical resistance of the carbon nanotube networks, the progress of damage can be detected and monitored. As a proof of concept, wireless cement-carbon nanotube sensors were embedded into concrete beams and subjected to monotonic and cyclic loading to evaluate the effect of damage on their response. Experimental results showed that the wireless response of the embedded nanotube sensors changes due to the formation of cracks during loading. In addition, the nanotube sensors were able to detect the initiation of damage at an early stage of loading.

  9. Effect of ionizing radiation on structural and conductive properties of copper nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdorovets, M. V.; Borgekov, D. B.; Kenzhina, I. E.; Kozlovskiy, A. L.

    2018-01-01

    The use of electron radiation is an effective tool for stimulating a controlled modification of structural and conductive properties of nanomaterials in modern materials science. The paper presents the results of studies of the influence of various types of radiation on structural and conductive properties of copper nanotubes obtained by electrochemical synthesis in pores of templates based on polyethylene terephthalate. Such methods as SEM, X-ray diffraction and EDS show that irradiation with a stream of high-energy electrons with doses of 50-250 kGy makes it possible to modify the crystal structure of nanotubes, increasing their conductivity and decreasing the resistance of nanostructures without destroying the structure.

  10. The effect of functionalization on structure and electrical conductivity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Cher Hon; Cervini, Raoul; Clarke, Stephen R.; Markovic, Milena Ginic; Matisons, Janis G.; Hawkins, Stephen C.; Huynh, Chi P.; Simon, George P.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are of interest in many areas of nanotechnology and used in a number of novel applications. However effective dispersion remains a problem and one solution is to functionalize the nanotubes. Any functionalization that is undertaken must preferably not influence other key properties such as strength and electrical conductivity. In this work, multi-walled CNTs are functionalized for comparison, using a range of oxidative techniques, including thermal treatment, acid reflux, and dry UV-ozonolysis. The effects of these treatments on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and their electrical properties were characterized using a range of surface and compositional techniques. The electrical conductivity of MWCNTs was found to increase with functionalization in all cases, and dry UV-ozonolysis was shown to be the treatment technique which best increased conductivity, whilst at the same time maintaining the structural integrity of the nanotubes, even though the level of modification was less than by the other treatment methods.

  11. Carbon Nanotube-based Sensor and Method for Continually Sensing Changes in a Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeffry D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A sensor has a plurality of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conductors operatively positioned on a substrate. The conductors are arranged side-by-side, such as in a substantially parallel relationship to one another. At least one pair of spaced-apart electrodes is coupled to opposing ends of the conductors. A portion of each of the conductors spanning between each pair of electrodes comprises a plurality of carbon nanotubes arranged end-to-end and substantially aligned along an axis. Because a direct correlation exists between resistance of a carbon nanotube and carbon nanotube strain, changes experienced by the portion of the structure to which the sensor is coupled induce a change in electrical properties of the conductors.

  12. Nanotube junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  13. CVD Growth of Carbon Nanotubes: Structure, Catalyst, and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit extraordinary mechanical and unique electronic properties and hence have been receiving much attention in recent years for their potential in nanoelectronics, field emission devices, scanning probes, high strength composites and many more applications. Catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbon feedstock with the aid of supported transition metal catalysts - also known as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) - has become popular to produce single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs, MWNTs) and multiwalled nanofibers (MWNFs). The ability to grow CNTs on patterned substrates and in vertically aligned arrays, and the simplicity of the process, has made CVD growth of CNTs an attractive approach.

  14. Theoretical study of the structural and electronic properties of novel stanene-based buckled nanotubes and their adsorption behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Amirali; Sardroodi, Jaber Jahanbin; Ebrahimzadeh, Alireza Rastkar; Yaghoobi, Mina

    2018-03-01

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to investigate the geometrical, electronic and adsorption properties of stanene based nanotubes in order to fully exploit the gas sensing capability of these nanotubes. The strain energy, structural parameters and electronic properties of stanene-based nanotubes with armchair and zigzag chirality with various diameters were examined in detail. The results show that, these nanotubes have a buckled structure, in which the tin atoms were arranged in chair-like honeycomb configuration. Calculated strain energy for considered nanotubes are relatively small compared to some other nanotubes pointed to flexibility of stanene mono layer. It was found that the strain energies for (4, 0), (5, 0) and (6, 0) nanotubes have negative values, indicating their stability with respect to stanene nanosheet. The band structure calculations reveal that the armchair nanotubes are semiconductors with two maximums with nearly same energies in valence band. However, the zigzag ones show both conductor and semiconductor behaviors by direct band gap in ᴦ point. Also the spatial distribution of molecular orbitals in valence band maximums and conduction band minimums were presented and discussed. Moreover, the adsorption behaviors of (6, 6) and (8, 8) nanotubes as chemical O3 detection device were investigated in detail. We found that O3 molecule dissociates into O2 over the considered nanotubes, being an effective strategy to help in the reduction of the concentration of these harmful pollutants in the environment. The results also suggest that O3 dissociation over the (6, 6) nanotube is more favorable in energy than that on the (8, 8) nanotube. The results present a great potential of stanene based nanotube for application as a highly sensitive ozone gas sensor.

  15. Density-functional tight-binding investigation of the structure, stability and material properties of nickel hydroxide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Soran; Mosey, Nicholas J.

    2018-01-01

    Nickel hydroxide is a material composed of two-dimensional layers that can be rolled up to form cylindrical nanotubes belonging to a class of inorganic metal hydroxide nanotubes that are candidates for applications in catalysis, energy storage, and microelectronics. The stabilities and other properties of this class of inorganic nanotubes have not yet been investigated in detail. The present study uses self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding calculations to examine the stabilities, mechanical properties, and electronic properties of nickel hydroxide nanotubes along with the energetics associated with the adsorption of water by these systems. The tight-binding model was parametrized for this system based on the results of first-principles calculations. The stabilities of the nanotubes were examined by calculating strain energies and performing molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that single-walled nickel hydroxide nanotubes are stable at room temperature, which is consistent with experimental investigations. The nanotubes possess size-dependent mechanical properties that are similar in magnitude to those of other inorganic nanotubes. The electronic properties of the nanotubes were also found to be size-dependent and small nickel oxyhydroxide nanotubes are predicted to be semiconductors. Despite this size-dependence, both the mechanical and electronic properties were found to be almost independent of the helical structure of the nanotubes. The calculations also show that water molecules have higher adsorption energies when binding to the interior of the nickel hydroxide nanotubes when compared to adsorption in nanotubes formed from other two-dimensional materials such as graphene. The increased adsorption energy is due to the hydrophilic nature of nickel hydroxide. Due to the broad applications of nickel hydroxide, the nanotubes investigated here are also expected to be used in catalysis, electronics, and clean energy production.

  16. Electronic structures of an (8, 0) boron nitride/carbon nanotube heterojunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Hongxia; Zhang Heming; Song Jiuxu [Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Wide Band-Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China); Zhang Zhiyong, E-mail: liuhongxia_xidian@126.co [Information Science and Technology Institution, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China)

    2010-01-15

    The electronic structure of the heterojunction is the foundation of the study on its working mechanism. Models of the heterojunctions formed by an (8, 0) boron nitride nanotube and an (8, 0) carbon nanotube with C-B or C-N interface have been established. The structures of the above heterojunctions were optimized with first-principle calculations based on density functional theory. The rearrangements of the heterojunctions concentrate mainly on their interfaces. The highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the heterojunctions distribute in the carbon nanotube section. As the band offsets of the above heterojunctions are achieved with the average bond energy method, the band structure is plotted. (semiconductor materials)

  17. Preparation and structure of TiO2 nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlova, Ewa; Lapčíková, Monika; Šlouf, Miroslav; Kužel, R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2006), s. 156-157 ISSN 1211-5894. [Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Colloquium. 22.06.2006-24.06.2006, Grenoble] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/04/0688 Keywords : nanotubes * X-ray diffraction * electron microscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry http://www. xray .cz/ms/default.htm

  18. Monitoring structural defects and crystallinity of carbon nanotubes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were first reported by Iijima [1] in 1991, there has been tremendous development in the field of materials science and technology. CNTs possess extremely remarkable electrical, mechanical and thermal properties having the potential for a variety of applications [2–7]. The synthesis of high- ...

  19. Monitoring structural defects and crystallinity of carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report the influence of catalyst formulation and reaction temperature on the formation of carbon nanotube (CNT) thin films by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method. Thin films of CNTs were grown on Fe–Mo/Al2O3-coated silicon wafer by thermal decomposition of methane at different temperatures ranging from ...

  20. Doping Induced Structural Stability and Electronic Properties of GaN Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the effect of manganese doping on the structural stability and electronic band gap of chiral (2, 1, armchair (3, 3, and zigzag ((6, 0 and (10, 0 single walled GaN nanotube by using density functional theory based Atomistix Toolkit (ATK Virtual NanoLab (VNL. The structural stability has been analyzed in terms of minimum ground state total energy, binding, and formation energy. As an effect of Mn doping (1–4 atoms, all the GaN nanotubes taken into consideration show semiconducting to metallic transition first and after certain level of Mn doping changes its trend.

  1. Structural and electrical properties of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube/epoxy composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantayat, S.; Rout, D.; Swain, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotube on the structure and electrical properties of composites was investigated. Samples based on epoxy resin with different weight percentage of MWCNTs were prepared and characterized. The interaction between MWCNT & epoxy resin was noticed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The structure of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube (f-MWCNT) reinforced epoxy composite was studied by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The dispersion of f-MWCNT in epoxy resin was evidenced by high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Electrical properties of epoxy/f-MWCNT nanocomposites were measured & the result indicated that the conductivity increased with increasing concentration of f-MWCNTs.

  2. Structural and optical characteristics of GaN/ZnO coaxial nanotube heterostructure arrays for light-emitting device applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Young Joon; Jeon, Jong-Myeong; Kim, Miyoung; Jeon, Seong-Ran; Ho Park, Kyung; Yi, Gyu-Chul

    2009-01-01

    We report on the structural and optical characteristics of position-controlled GaN/ZnO coaxial nanotube heterostructure and GaN/In x Ga 1-x N coaxial nanotube quantum structure arrays for light-emitting diode (LED) applications. The GaN/ZnO nanotube heterostructures were fabricated by growing a GaN layer on the entire surface of position-controlled ZnO nanotube arrays using low-pressure metal-organic vapour-phase epitaxy. As determined by transmission-electron microscopy (TEM), an abrupt and coherent interface between the core ZnO and the GaN overlayer was observed. The optical characteristics of heteroepitaxial GaN/ZnO nanotube heterostructures were also investigated using cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. This position-controlled growth of high-quality single crystalline GaN/ZnO coaxial nanotube heterostructures allowed the fabrication of artificial arrays of high-quality GaN-based coaxial quantum structures by the heteroepitaxial growth of GaN/In x Ga 1-x N multiple quantum wells along the circumference of the GaN/ZnO nanotubes. The optical and structural characteristics of the position-controlled GaN/In x Ga 1-x N coaxial nanotube quantum structures were investigated by using CL spectroscopy and TEM analysis, respectively. The green LED microarrays were successfully fabricated by the controlled heteroepitaxial coaxial coatings of GaN/In x Ga 1-x N coaxial nanotube quantum structures and the outermost Mg-doped p-type GaN layer onto the GaN/ZnO coaxial nanotube heterostructures, presumably implying that the position-controlled growth of high-quality GaN/ZnO coaxial nanotube heterostructure arrays provides a general and rational route of integrating vertical nanodevices for nanoscale electronics and optoelectronics.

  3. Conformational analysis and electronic structure of chiral carbon and carbon nitride nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Geraldo de Faria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Geometry and electronic structure of chiral carbon and carbon nitride (CNx nanotubes were investigated through quantum chemical methods. Finite nanotubes with diameters ranging from 5 to 10 Å and containing up to 500 atoms were considered. CNx structures were built through random substitution of carbon atoms by nitrogen. The molecules were fully optimized by semi-empirical quantum chemical method (PM3. Our results show that the energy associated with nitrogen incorporation depends strongly upon the tube helicity and diameter. The doping of nanotubes with nitrogen contributes to reduce the stress caused by the small diameter of the studied systems. Density of States (DOS results for pure carbon and CNx nanostructures, obtained through DFT and Hartree-Fock calculations, were analyzed. The introduction of nitrogen in the tube produce states in the gap region which characterizes the metallic behavior, as expected for these systems after N-doping.

  4. Carbon nanotube-based sensor and method for detection of crack growth in a structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Kite, Marlen T. (Inventor); Moore, Thomas C. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony N. (Inventor); Williams, Phillip A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A sensor has a plurality of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conductors operatively positioned on a substrate. The conductors are arranged side-by-side, such as in a substantially parallel relationship to one another. At least one pair of spaced-apart electrodes is coupled to opposing ends of the conductors. A portion of each of the conductors spanning between each pair of electrodes comprises a plurality of carbon nanotubes arranged end-to-end and substantially aligned along an axis. Because a direct correlation exists between the resistance of a carbon nanotube and its strain, changes experienced by the portion of the structure to which the sensor is coupled induce a corresponding change in the electrical properties of the conductors, thereby enabling detection of crack growth in the structure.

  5. Study of irradiation effect of Xe+22 and Kr+14 ions on structural properties of Zn nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdorovets, M. V.; Kadyrzhanov, D. B.; Kenzhina, I. E.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kozlovskiy, A. L.

    2018-03-01

    The paper presents the results of synthesis and directed modification of structural properties of Zn nanotubes by irradiating with heavy ions. The nanotubes were obtained by electrochemical deposition in pores of template polymer matrices. It was established using SEM, XRD and EDS methods where irradiation with Xe+22 and Kr+14 ions makes it possible to modify the crystal structure of nanotubes. As a result of irradiation with Xe+22 ions, partial destruction of nanotubes is observed, which indicates an increase in the number of defects in the structure and a decrease in strength properties. Change in the crystal structure parameters is observed when irradiation with Kr+14 ions with fluence below 5  ×  1011 ion cm‑2. That indicates the possibility of using Kr+14 ions for directional modification of nanostructures, while irradiation with Xe+22 ions leads to amorphization and destruction of nanotubes.

  6. Influence of the structural properties on the pseudocritical magnetic behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar-Enriquez, C.D. [PCM Computational Applications, Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Sede Manizales, A.A. 127 Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [PCM Computational Applications, Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Sede Manizales, A.A. 127 Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo, J. [Grupo de Magnetismo y Simulacion Gplus, Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, A.A. 1226 Medellin (Colombia)

    2012-04-15

    In this work we address the influence of the crystalline structure, concretely when the system under study is formed by square or hexagonal unit cells, upon the magnetic properties and pseudocritical behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes. We focus not only on the effect of the geometrical shape of the unit cell but also on their dimensions. The model employed is based on the Monte Carlo method, the Metropolis dynamics and a nearest neighbors classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Magnetization per magnetic site, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and magnetic energy were computed. These properties were computed varying the system size, unit cell dimension and temperature. The dependence of the nearest neighbor exchange integral on the nanotubes geometrical characteristics is also discussed. Results revealed a strong influence of the system topology on the magnetic properties caused by the difference in the coordination number between square and hexagonal unit cell. Moreover, the nanotubes diameter influence on magnetic properties is only observed at very low values, when the distance between atoms is less than it, presented by the 2D sheet. On the other hand, it was concluded that the surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties, contrary to the case of other nano-systems as thin films and nanoparticles among others. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit cell geometry has strong influence on the magnetic properties in ferromagnetic nanotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nanotube diameter increase produces a decrease of interaction between nearest neighbor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Hierarchical Structured TiO2 Nanotubes and Their Photocatalytic Performance on Methyl Orange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical structured TiO2 nanotubes were prepared by mechanical ball milling of highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays grown by electrochemical anodization of titanium foil. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, specific surface area analysis, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, photocurrent measurement, photoluminescence spectra, electrochemical impedance spectra, and photocatalytic degradation test were applied to characterize the nanocomposites. Surface area increased as the milling time extended. After 5 h ball milling, TiO2 hierarchical nanotubes exhibited a corn-like shape and exhibited enhanced photoelectrochemical activity in comparison to commercial P25. The superior photocatalytic activity is suggested to be due to the combined advantages of high surface area of nanoparticles and rapid electron transfer as well as collection of the nanotubes in the hierarchical structure. The hierarchical structured TiO2 nanotubes could be applied into flexible applications on solar cells, sensors, and other photoelectrochemical devices.

  8. Electronic structure of carbon nanotube systems measured with scanning tunneling microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornbaker, Daniel Jay

    Carbon fullerenes are unusually structured molecules with robust mechanical and electronic properties. Their versatility is astounding; envisioned applications range from field emission displays to impregnated metal composites, battery storage media, and nanoelectronic devices. The combination of simple constituency, diverse behavior, and ease of fabrication makes these materials a cornerstone topic in current research. This thesis details scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments investigating how carbon nanotube fullerenes interact with and couple to their local environment. Scanning tunneling microscopy continues to be a key method for characterizing fullerenes, particularly in regards to their electronic properties. The atomic scale nature of this technique makes it uniquely suited for observing individual molecules and determining correlations between locally measured electronic properties and the particular environment of the molecule. The primary subject of this study is single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which were observed under various perturbative influences resulting in measurable changes in the electronic structure. Additionally, fullerene heterostructures formed by the encapsulation of C60 molecules within the hollow interiors of SWNTs were characterized for the first time with STM. These novel macromolecules (dubbed "peapods") demonstrate the potential for custom engineering the properties of fullerene materials. Measurements indicate that the properties of individual nanotubes depend sensitively on local interactions. In particular, pronounced changes in electronic behavior are observed in nanotubes exhibiting mechanical distortion, interacting with extrinsic materials (including other nanotubes), and possessing intrinsic defects in the atomic lattice. In fullerene peapods, while no discernable change in the atomic ordering of the encapsulating nanotubes was evident, the presence of interior C60 molecules has a dramatic effect on the

  9. Design of titania nanotube structures by focused laser beam direct writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enachi, Mihai; Stevens-Kalceff, Marion A.; Sarua, Andrei; Ursaki, Veaceslav; Tiginyanu, Ion

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we report on electrochemical fabrication of titania films consisting of nanotubes (NTs) and their treatment by focused laser beam. The results of sample characterization by optical and scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence imaging, and Raman scattering scanning spectroscopy are compared to those inherent to specimens subjected to thermal treatment in a furnace. The obtained data demonstrate possibilities for controlling crystallographic structure of TiO 2 NTs by focused laser beam direct writing. These findings open new prospects for the design and fabrication of spatial architectures based on titania nanotubes

  10. Structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced epoxy resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggs, Kelvin; Wang, Xiao-Qian

    2010-03-01

    Nanocomposites of cured epoxy resin reinforced by single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibit a plethora of interesting behaviors at the molecular level. We have employed a combination of force-field-based molecular mechanics and first-principles calculations to study the corresponding binding and charge-transfer behavior. The simulation study of various nanotube species and curing agent configurations provides insight into the optimal structures in lieu of interfacial stability. An analysis of charge distributions of the epoxy functionalized semiconducting and metallic tubes reveals distinct level hybridizations. The implications of these results for understanding dispersion mechanism and future nano reinforced composite developments are discussed.

  11. Si/Ge hetero-structure nanotube tunnel field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, A. N.; Hussain, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the physics of conventional channel material (silicon/germanium hetero-structure) based transistor topology mainly core/shell (inner/outer) gated nanotube vs. gate-all-around nanowire architecture for tunnel field effect transistor application. We show that nanotube topology can result in higher performance through higher normalized current when compared to nanowire architecture at Vdd = 1 V due to the availability of larger tunneling cross section and lower Shockley-Reed-Hall recombination. Both architectures are able to achieve sub 60 mV/dec performance for more than five orders of magnitude of drain current. This enables the nanotube configuration achieving performance same as the nanowire architecture even when Vdd is scaled down to 0.5 V.

  12. Effects of surface functionalization on the electronic and structural properties of carbon nanotubes: A computational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, M. S.; Pascoini, A. L.; Knupp, W. G.; Camps, I.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have important electronic, mechanical and optical properties. These features may be different when comparing a pristine nanotube with other presenting its surface functionalized. These changes can be explored in areas of research and application, such as construction of nanodevices that act as sensors and filters. Following this idea, in the current work, we present the results from a systematic study of CNT's surface functionalized with hydroxyl and carboxyl groups. Using the entropy as selection criterion, we filtered a library of 10k stochastically generated complexes for each functional concentration (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25%). The structurally related parameters (root-mean-square deviation, entropy, and volume/area) have a monotonic relationship with functionalization concentration. Differently, the electronic parameters (frontier molecular orbital energies, electronic gap, molecular hardness, and electrophilicity index) present and oscillatory behavior. For a set of concentrations, the nanotubes present spin polarized properties that can be used in spintronics.

  13. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of structural and electronic properties of silicon carbide nanotube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradian, Rostam; Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad

    2008-01-01

    By using ab initio density functional theory the structural and electronic properties of isolated and bundled (8,0) and (6,6) silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) are investigated. Our results show that for such small diameter nanotubes the inter-tube interaction causes a very small radial deformation, while band splitting and reduction of the semiconducting energy band gap are significant. We compared the equilibrium interaction energy and inter-tube separation distance of (8,0) SiCNT bundle with (10,0) carbon nanotube (CNT) bundle where they have the same radius. We found that there is a larger inter-tube separation and weaker inter-tube interaction in the (8,0) SiCNT bundle with respect to (10,0) CNT bundle, although they have the same radius

  14. Si/Ge hetero-structure nanotube tunnel field effect transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Hanna, A. N.

    2015-01-07

    We discuss the physics of conventional channel material (silicon/germanium hetero-structure) based transistor topology mainly core/shell (inner/outer) gated nanotube vs. gate-all-around nanowire architecture for tunnel field effect transistor application. We show that nanotube topology can result in higher performance through higher normalized current when compared to nanowire architecture at Vdd-=-1-V due to the availability of larger tunneling cross section and lower Shockley-Reed-Hall recombination. Both architectures are able to achieve sub 60-mV/dec performance for more than five orders of magnitude of drain current. This enables the nanotube configuration achieving performance same as the nanowire architecture even when Vdd is scaled down to 0.5-V.

  15. Tuning Electronic Structures of BN and C Double-Wall Hetero-Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueran Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available First principle calculations based on density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation were carried out to investigate the energetic and electronic properties of carbon and boron nitride double-wall hetero-nanotubes (C/BN-DWHNTs with different chirality and size, including an armchair (n, n carbon nanotube (CNT enclosed in (m, m boron nitride nanotube (BNNT and a zigzag (n, 0 CNT enclosed in (m, 0 BNNT. The electronic structure of these DWHNTs under a transverse electric field was also investigated. The ability to tune the band gap with changing the intertube distance (di and imposing an external electric field (F of zigzag DWHNTs provides the possibility for future electronic and electrooptic nanodevice applications.

  16. Structure and electronic properties of native and defected gallium nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradian, Rostam; Azadi, Sam; Farahani, S. Vasheghani

    2008-01-01

    Structure and electronic properties of GaN nanotubes (GaNNTs) are investigated by using ab initio density functional theory. By full optimization, the optimized structures (bond-lengths and angles between them) of zigzag GaNNTs (n,0) and armchair GaNNTs (n,n) (4 B magnetization and makes a polarized structure. We have shown that in polarized GaNNT a flat band near the Fermi energy splits to occupied spin up and unoccupied spin down levels

  17. Carbon nanotube-based structural health monitoring for fiber reinforced composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Liu, Kan; Mardirossian, Aris; Heider, Dirk; Thostenson, Erik

    2017-04-01

    In fiber reinforced composite materials, the modes of damage accumulation, ranging from microlevel to macro-level (matrix cracks development, fiber breakage, fiber-matrix de-bonding, delamination, etc.), are complex and hard to be detected through conventional non-destructive evaluation methods. Therefore, in order to assure the outstanding structural performance and high durability of the composites, there has been an urgent need for the design and fabrication smart composites with self-damage sensing capabilities. In recent years, the macroscopic forms of carbon nanotube materials have been maturely investigated, which provides the opportunity for structural health monitoring based on the carbon nanotubes that are integrated in the inter-laminar areas of advanced fiber composites. Here in this research, advanced fiber composites embedded with laminated carbon nanotube layers are manufactured for damage detection due to the relevant spatial electrical property changes once damage occurs. The mechanical-electrical coupling response is recorded and analyzed during impact test. The design and manufacturing of integrating the carbon nanotubes intensely affect the detecting sensitivity and repeatability of the integrated multifunctional sensors. The ultimate goal of the reported work is to develop a novel structural health monitoring method with the capability of reporting information on the damage state in a real-time way.

  18. Radio Frequency Plasma Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) for Structural Applications: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Stephen J.; Alexa, Joel A.; Jensen, Brian J.; Thomsen, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    It is evident that nanotubes, such as carbon, boron nitride and even silicon, offer great potential for many aerospace applications. The opportunity exists to harness the extremely high strength and stiffness exhibited by high-purity, low-defect nanotubes in structural materials. Even though the technology associated with carbon nanotube (CNT) development is mature, the mechanical property benefits have yet to be fully realized. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) offer similar structural benefits, but exhibit superior chemical and thermal stability. A broader range of potential structural applications results, particularly as reinforcing agents for metal- and ceramic- based composites. However, synthesis of BNNTs is more challenging than CNTs mainly because of the higher processing temperatures required, and mass production techniques have yet to emerge. A promising technique is radio frequency plasma spray (RFPS), which is an inductively coupled, very high temperature process. The lack of electrodes and the self- contained, inert gas environment lend themselves to an ultraclean product. It is the aim of this White Paper to survey the state of the art with regard to nano-material production by analyzing the pros and cons of existing methods. The intention is to combine the best concepts and apply the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) RFPS facility to reliably synthesize large quantities of consistent, high-purity BNNTs.

  19. A theoretical and experimental study on manipulating the structure and properties of carbon nanotubes using substitutional dopants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumpter, Bobby G.; Huang, Jingsong; Meunier, Vincent; Romo-Herrera, Jose M.; Cruz-Silva, Eduardo; Terrones, Humberto; Terrones, Mauricio

    We examine the possibility of controlling nanotube growth and simultaneously manipulating the nanotube properties by adding elements in minute amounts (such as nitrogen, phosphorous, and sulfur) that are different from carbon and the metal catalyst during the growth process. This procedure is shown to be capable of producing bamboo-type morphologies, heterodoped carbon nanotubes, and Y-junctions. This also represents a critical step toward tailoring properties and controlling nanotube architectures, thus promoting the development of novel materials with unusual electronic applications. The underlying formation mechanisms that lead to the observed structures and morphologies are elucidated using wide-ranging electronic structure calculations that reveal the fundamentally different nature of nitrogen, phosphorous, and sulfur during carbon nanotube growth.

  20. Relation between flow enhancement factor and structure for core-softened fluids inside nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, José Rafael; Diehl, Alexandre; Barbosa, Marcia C

    2013-06-13

    The relationship between enhancement flow and structure of core-softened fluids confined inside nanotubes has been studied using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. The fluid was modeled with different types of attractive and purely repulsive two length scale potentials. Such potentials reproduce in bulk the anomalous behavior observed for liquid water. The dual control volume grand canonical molecular dynamics method was employed to create a pressure gradient between two reservoirs connected by a nanotube. We show how the nanotube radius affects the flow enhancement factor for each one of the interaction potentials. The connection between structural and dynamical properties of the confined fluid is discussed, and we show how attractive and purely repulsive fluids exhibit distinct behaviors. A continuum to subcontinuum flow transition was found for small nanotube radius. The behavior obtained for the core-softened fluids is similar to what was recently observed in all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for classical models of water and also in experimental studies. Our results are explained in the framework of the two length scale potentials.

  1. Nanoscale fluid-structure interaction: flow resistance and energy transfer between water and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Ma, Ming; Jin, Kai; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Shen, Luming; Zheng, Quanshui; Xu, Zhiping

    2011-10-01

    We investigate here water flow passing a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT), through analysis based on combined atomistic and continuum mechanics simulations. The relation between drag coefficient C(D) and Reynolds number Re is obtained for a wide range of flow speed u from 5 to 600 m/s. The results suggest that Stokes law for creep flow works well for small Reynolds numbers up to 0.1 (u ≈ 100 m/s), and indicates a linear dependence between drag force and flow velocity. Significant deviation is observed at elevated Re values, which is discussed by considering the interfacial slippage, reduction of viscosity due to friction-induced local heating, and flow-induced structural vibration. We find that interfacial slippage has a limited contribution to the reduction of the resistance, and excitations of low-frequency vibration modes in the carbon nanotube play an important role in energy transfer between water and carbon nanotubes, especially at high flow speeds where drastic enhancement of the carbon nanotube vibration is observed. The results reported here reveal nanoscale fluid-structure interacting mechanisms, and lay the ground for rational design of nanofluidics and nanoelectromechanical devices operating in a fluidic environment.

  2. Friction and adhesion of hierarchical carbon nanotube structures for biomimetic dry adhesives: multiscale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihao; Jiang, Haodan; Xia, Zhenhai; Gao, Xiaosheng

    2010-09-01

    With unique hierarchical fibrillar structures on their feet, gecko lizards can walk on vertical walls or even ceilings. Recent experiments have shown that strong binding along the shear direction and easy lifting in the normal direction can be achieved by forming unidirectional carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed tips similar to gecko's feet. In this study, a multiscale modeling approach was developed to analyze friction and adhesion behaviors of this hierarchical fibrillar system. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube array with laterally distributed segments at the end was simulated by coarse grained molecular dynamics. The effects of the laterally distributed segments on friction and adhesion strengths were analyzed, and further adopted as cohesive laws used in finite element analysis at device scale. The results show that the laterally distributed segments play an essential role in achieving high force anisotropy between normal and shear directions in the adhesives. Finite element analysis reveals a new friction-enhanced adhesion mechanism of the carbon nanotube array, which also exists in gecko adhesive system. The multiscale modeling provides an approach to bridge the microlevel structures of the carbon nanotube array with its macrolevel adhesive behaviors, and the predictions from this modeling give an insight into the mechanisms of gecko-mimicking dry adhesives.

  3. Structure, Morphology and Properties of Carbon Nanotube Containing Polymeric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingyu; Kodjie, Steve; Li, Christopher

    2006-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered an ideal reinforcing fillers in polymer nanocomposites because of their high aspect ratio, nanosize diameter, very low density and excellent physical properties (such as extremely high mechanical strength, high electrical and thermal conductivity),. However, in order to achieve homogeneous dispersion of CNTs without damaging their extraordinary properties, non-covalent functionalization is an essential step. Our study of functionalization of CNTs via controlled polymer crystallization method has resulted in the formation of ``nano hybrid shish-kebab'' (NHSK), which is CNT periodically decorated with polymer lamellar crystals. By tuning the experimental parameters such as concentration of polymer and crystallization temperature, hybrid polymer spherulite with CNT inside was achieved. This can be considered as CNT reinforced composite with ideally controlled CNT dispersion. Both Nylon 6, 6 and PE were used as the matrix materials. Excellent dispersion of CNTs in polymer matrix was achieved and the nanocomposites showed improved thermal stability.

  4. Controlling Structural Characteristics of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT) by Tailoring Catalyst Composition and Synthesis Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resasco, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    This report shows the extensive research on the mechanism responsible for the formation of single walled carbon nanotubes in order to get control over their structural parameters (diameter and chirality). Catalyst formulations, pre-treatment conditions, and reaction conditions are described in detail as well as mechanisms to produce nanotubes structures of specific arrays (vertical forest, nanotube pillars). Applications of SWNT in different fields are also described in this report. In relation to this project five students have graduated (3 PhD and 2 MS) and 35 papers have been published.

  5. Multi-wall effects on the thermal transport properties of nanotube structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Tomoyuki; Kawai, Hiroki; Jono, Ryota; Yamashita, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the role of inter-layer interactions in multi-walled carbon nanotubes is one of the challenges in the design of potential materials because of their large impact on the physical properties of carbon nanotubes. We focused on the thermal properties of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs), which are promising materials due to their high durability and thermal efficiency. We investigated the thermal conductance of DWCNTs by using the nonequilibrium Green’s function method, and found that the quadratic temperature dependence of the thermal conductance at low temperatures consisted of three regions with different tendencies. Based on analysis of the transmission coefficients and the distribution of the normal modes, the three nonuniform regions were attributed to the energy shifts of the normal modes at the low-energy region. We examined the mechanism of these energy shifts using the coupled vibration model with the parameters from our simulations, and elucidated the multi-wall effects on the thermal transport properties of the nanotube structures. The effects we found demonstrated the significance of tailoring thermal properties to obtain the desired applications. (papers)

  6. STRUCTURAL MODIFICATION OF NEW FORMATIONS IN CEMENT MATRIX USING CARBON NANOTUBE DISPERSIONS AND NANOSILICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Khroustalev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex nanodispersed systems with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and nanodispersed silica have a significant impact on the processes of hydration, hardening and strength gain of construction composites predetermining their durability. While using a scanning electron microscope with an attachment for X-ray microanalysis and a device for infrared spectral analysis investigations have shown that the main effect of the cement matrix modification in the case of adding complex nanodispersed systems is provided by direct influence of hydration processes with subsequent crystallization of new formations. It has been noted that while adding carbon nanotube dispersion and nanosized silica a binding matrix is structured in the form of an extremely dense shell from crystalline hydrate new formations on the surface of solid phases that provides strong binding matrix in cement concrete. The addition effect of carbon nanotubes has been analyzed and quantitatively assessed through an investigation for every case of one sample with nanotubes and one sample without them with the help of a nanoindenter and scanning electron microscope. It is necessary to solve rather complicated challenging task in order to assess quantitatively the addition effect of CNT on material characteristics at a micromechanical level. At the same time it is possible to investigate surface of a concrete sample with one-micron resolution. In this case it is necessary to prepare samples for nanoindentation with exclusion of all CNT defectable effects that have been shown by a SEM. So in this case more adequate method for assessment must be a picoindenter , which combines a test method for nanoindentation with an optical SEM potential. Such equipment is in the stage of in-situ testing process at the Vienna University of Technology. The investigation is based on the fact that the main modification effect of mineral binding matrix while using incorporated complex nanodispersed systems and

  7. Local Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes in Silicon Microsystems: The Effect of Temperature Distribution on Growth Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut E. Aasmundtveit

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Local synthesis and direct integration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs into microsystems is a promising method for producing CNT-based devices in a single step, low-cost, and wafer-level, CMOS/MEMS-compatible process. In this report, the structure of the locally grown CNTs are studied by transmission imaging in scanning electron microscopy—S(TEM. The characterization is performed directly on the microsystem, without any post-synthesis processing required. The results show an effect of temperature on the structure of CNTs: high temperature favors thin and regular structures, whereas low temperature favors “bamboo-like” structures.

  8. Structure and properties of carbon nanotubes/sol-gel nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pokrass, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are promising filler materials owing to their exceptional mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties. Since their discovery in 1991, a major effort has been made in developing CNT-polymer nanocomposites, whereas CNT/ceramic based nanocomposites, in particularly, CNT/silica nanocomposites, have been very little studied. This thesis focuses on preparation and characterization of novel CNT/silica nanocomposite glasses synthesized by the Sol-Gel technology. A comprehensive analysis of their morphological, optical, and electrical properties was conducted, and analyzed according to existing theoretical models. The nanocomposites hosting matrix is a hybrid organic/inorganic glass prepared by the Fast-Sol-Gel (FSG) route. Using specific conditions in the FSG procedure, the resultant glasses are nonporous, exhibiting no contraction upon drying. Their analogous Classical-Sol-Gel (CSG) glasses, however, are porous, and do exhibit contraction upon drying. The FSG glasses are relatively new materials, and their physical and optical properties were only meagerly studied. In our present work we have conducted a comprehensive experimental research on some previously ignored characteristics such as: UV-vis-IR optical absorption and transmission, and the organic content effect on the refraction index n, density ρ, thermal expansion coefficient β, and thermo-optic coefficient dn/dT. We found that organic residues within the glass decrease the refractive index, density, and thermo-optic coefficient. The thermal expansion coefficient, however, increases with the organic content. A negative linear dependence of the thermo-optic coefficient on the thermal expansion coefficient was obtained. CNT/FSG nanocomposites were prepared by using a solution mixing method, while CNT/CSG nanocomposites were prepared by means of an in situ polymerization technique. Nanocomposites based on FSG hybrid glasses were characterized for their nonlinear optical and

  9. Nanohairs and nanotubes: Efficient structural elements for gecko-inspired artificial dry adhesives

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Hoon Eui

    2009-08-01

    An overview of the recent progress in the development of gecko-inspired synthetic dry adhesives is presented, with particular emphasis on two major structural elements of nanohairs and nanotubes. With the advance of nanofabrication techniques, recently developed dry adhesives made of nanohairs and nanotubes show excellent adhesion strength, smart directional adhesion as well as rough surface adaptability by better mimicking gecko foot hairs. After a brief description of the requirements for high-performance artificial dry adhesives, a variety of synthetic adhesives are described based on materials and structural features of the gecko-inspired nanostructures. In addition, current challenges and future directions towards an optimized synthetic dry adhesive are presented. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of C3+ ion irradiation on structural, electrical and magnetic properties of Ni nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlimas, D. I.; Kozlovskiy, A. L.; Zdorovets, M. V.; Kadyrzhanov, K. K.; Uglov, V. V.; Kenzhina, I. E.; Shumskaya, E. E.; Kaniukov, E. Y.

    2018-03-01

    Ion irradiation is an attractive method for obtaining nanostructures that can be used under extreme conditions. Also, it is possible to control the technological process that allows obtaining nanomaterials with new properties at ion irradiation. In this paper, we study the effect of irradiation with 28 MeV C3+ ions and fluences up to 5 × 1011 cm-2 on the structure and properties of template-synthesized nickel nanotubes with a length of 12 μm, with diameters of 400 nm, and a wall thickness of 100 nm. It is demonstrated that the main factor influencing the degradation of nanostructures under irradiation in PET template is the processes of mixing the material of nanostructures with the surrounding polymer. The influence of irradiation with various fluences on the crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties of nickel nanotubes is studied.

  11. Periodic density functional theory study of structural and electronic properties of single-walled zinc oxide and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marana, Naiara L. [Modeling and Molecular Simulations Group, São Paulo State University, UNESP, 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil); Albuquerque, Anderson R. [Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Sertão Pernambucano, 56400-000 Floresta, PE (Brazil); La Porta, Felipe A. [Chemistry Department, Federal Technological University of Paraná, 86036-370 Londrina, PR (Brazil); Longo, Elson [São Paulo State University, Chemistry Institute, UNESP, 14801-907 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Sambrano, Julio R. [Modeling and Molecular Simulations Group, São Paulo State University, UNESP, 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    Periodic density functional theory calculations with the B3LYP hybrid functional and all-electron Gaussian basis set were performed to simulate the structural and electronic properties as well as the strain and formation energies of single-walled ZnO nanotubes (SWZnONTs) and Carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different chiralities as functions of their diameters. For all SWZnONTs, the band gap, strain energy, and formation energy converge to ~4.5 eV, 0.0 eV/atom, and 0.40 eV/atom, respectively. This result suggests that the nanotubes are formed more easily from the surface than from the bulk. For SWCNTs, the strain energy is always positive, while the formation energy is negative for armchair and zigzag nanotubes, therefore suggesting that these types of nanotubes can be preferentially formed from the bulk. The electronic properties of SWCNTs depend on the chirality; all armchair nanotubes are metallic, while zigzag and chiral nanotubes can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on the n and m vectors. - Graphical abstract: DFT/B3LYP were performed to simulate the structural and electronic properties as well as the strain and formation energies of SWZnONTs and SWCNTs with different chiralities as functions of their diameters. - Highlights: • The energies of SWZnONTs converge for chirality with diameters up 20 Å. • SWCNTs electronic properties depend on the chirality. • The properties of SWZnONTs are very similar to those of monolayer surface.

  12. Process, Structure, and Properties of Electrospun Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Nanocomposite Yarns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir M. Uddin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are dispersed into polyacrylonitrile polymer solution and then assembled into continuous nanocomposite yarns through the drum-tape co-electrospinning process to facilitate the translation of CNT properties to higher order structures. We explore the dispersion of CNTs in a polymer matrix, the process of obtaining continuous yarn through electrospinning, and the surface morphology and mechanical properties of the nanocomposite yarn.

  13. Structural, elastic and electronic Properties of isotropic cubic crystals of carbon and silicon nanotubes : Density functional based tight binding calculations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Ivanovskii

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomic models of cubic crystals (CC of carbon and graphene-like Si nanotubes are offered and their structural, cohesive, elastic and electronic properties are predicted by means of the DFTB method. Our main findings are that the isotropic crystals of carbon nanotubes adopt a very high elastic modulus B and low compressibility β, namely B = 650 GPa, β = 0.0015 1/GPa. In addition, these crystals preserve the initial conductivity type of their “building blocks”, i.e. isolated carbon and Si nanotubes. This feature may be important for design of materials with the selected conductivity type.

  14. A Structural Model for a Self-Assembled Nanotube Provides Insight into Its Exciton Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The design and synthesis of functional self-assembled nanostructures is frequently an empirical process fraught with critical knowledge gaps about atomic-level structure in these noncovalent systems. Here, we report a structural model for a semiconductor nanotube formed via the self-assembly of naphthalenediimide-lysine (NDI-Lys) building blocks determined using experimental 13C–13C and 13C–15N distance restraints from solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance supplemented by electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction data. The structural model reveals a two-dimensional-crystal-like architecture of stacked monolayer rings each containing ∼50 NDI-Lys molecules, with significant π-stacking interactions occurring both within the confines of the ring and along the long axis of the tube. Excited-state delocalization and energy transfer are simulated for the nanotube based on time-dependent density functional theory and an incoherent hopping model. Remarkably, these calculations reveal efficient energy migration from the excitonic bright state, which is in agreement with the rapid energy transfer within NDI-Lys nanotubes observed previously using fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:26120375

  15. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes with tunable structure and high yield produced by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Yong; Ionescu, Mihnea Ioan; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2011-06-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (CN x) were prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis from mixtures of imidazole and acetonitrile. Imidazole, as an additive, was used to control the structure and nitrogen doping in CN x by adjusting its concentration in the mixtures. Scanning electron microscopy observation showed that the addition of imidazole increased the nanotube growth rate and yield, while decreased the nanotube diameter. Transmission electron microscopy study indicated that the addition of imidazole promoted the formation of a dense bamboo-like structure in CN x. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that the nitrogen content varied from 3.2 to 5.2 at.% in CN x obtained with different imidazole concentrations. Raman spectra study showed that the intensity ratio of D to G bands gradually increased, while that of 2D to G bands decreased, due to increasing imidazole concentration. The yield of CN x made from mixtures of imidazole and acetonitrile can reach 192 mg in 24 min, which is 15 times that of CN x prepared from only acetonitrile. The aligned CN x, with controlled nitrogen doping, tunable structure and high yield, may find applications in developing non-noble catalysts and novel catalyst supports for fuel cells.

  16. Thermal annealing of carbon nanotubes reveals a toxicological impact of the structural defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figarol, Agathe; Pourchez, Jérémie; Boudard, Delphine; Forest, Valérie; Berhanu, Sarah; Tulliani, Jean-Marc; Lecompte, Jean-Pierre; Cottier, Michèle; Bernache-Assollant, Didier; Grosseau, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The biological response to pristine and annealed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was assessed on murine macrophages (RAW 264.7). First, the physicochemical features of the as-produced MWCNT and annealed at 2125 °C for 1 h were fully characterized. A decrease in structural defects, hydrophobicity and catalytic impurities was detected after annealing. Thereafter, their impact on cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and pro-inflammatory response was investigated at concentrations ranging from 15 to 120 µg mL-1. No effect of the 2125 °C treatment was detected on the cytotoxicity. In contrast, the annealed carbon nanotubes showed a significant increase of the pro-inflammatory response. We assumed that this behavior was due to the reduction in structural defects that may modify the layer of adsorbed biomolecules. Surprisingly, the purification of metallic catalysts did not have any significant impact on the oxidative stress. We suggested that the structural improvements from the 2125 °C treatment can decrease the carbon nanotube scavenging capacity and thus allow a higher free radical release which may counterbalance the decrease of oxidative stress due to a lower content of metallic impurities.

  17. Structural and electrical characterization of bamboo-shaped C-N nanotubes-poly ethylene oxide (PEO) composite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Ram Manohar, E-mail: rmanohar28@yahoo.co.in; Dobal, Pramod S. [VSSD College, Department of Physics (India)

    2012-10-15

    We have prepared bamboo-shaped C-N nanotubes-polyethylene oxide (PEO) composite films by solution cast technique and investigated their structural/microstructural and electrical properties and developed a correlation between them. The formation of clean compartmentalized bamboo-shaped C-N nanotubes was confirmed by TEM. SEM investigations revealed a homogeneous dispersion of nanotubes in PEO matrix. Enhanced electrical conductivity was observed for the C-N nanotubes-PEO composites than bare PEO. The conductivity measurements on the C-N nanotubes-PEO composite films with {approx}20 wt % concentration of C-N nanotubes showed an increase of eight orders ({approx}7.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} to 6.2 S cm{sup -1}) of magnitude in conductivity from bare PEO film. Raman spectra showed the stress-free nature of the composites and established the bonding of nanotubes with PEO, which resulted in the variation of Raman parameters. The Raman data of composites corroborate the findings of variation in electrical conductivity.

  18. Enhancement of Carbon Nanotube Particle Distribution in PPS/PEEK/Carbon Nanotube Ternary Composites with Sausage-Like Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Cao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterial particles were selectively distributed in an incompatible and high-melting-temperature polymer blend interface, or in a particular phase, to obtain conductive composites. The composite products revealed poor morphology stability and mechanical performance due to processing several times. Poly(phenylene sulfide (PPS and poly(ether ether ketone (PEEK polymers with large differences of processing temperatures were selected as blend components to obtain a compatible blend. PPS/PEEK/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT ternary nanocomposites were prepared using a controlled melt blending process. The composite samples with similar sausage-like structures of PEEK, as a dispersed phase, promote MWCNT to maximize concentration distribution in the PPS continuous phase. As a result, the theoretical percolation threshold of the composite reduced to 0.347 wt %. Moreover, the conductivity of the composite remained stable even after processing several times. CNTs revealed a particular effect when distributed selectively in this kind of system: it can enhance the dispersion of phases and also provide conductivity to the blend at small CNT contents, which can provide more useful ideas for the development of high-melting-temperature and antistatic or conductive plastic materials.

  19. Structural and surface modifications of carbon nanotubes when submitted to high temperature annealing treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillejos, E. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, ICP-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Bachiller-Baeza, B. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, ICP-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada UNED/ICP-CSIC Group for Molecular Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts, Madrid (Spain); Perez-Cadenas, M.; Gallegos-Suarez, E. [Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica y Tecnica, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez-Ramos, I. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, ICP-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Unidad Asociada UNED/ICP-CSIC Group for Molecular Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts, Madrid (Spain); Guerrero-Ruiz, A. [Unidad Asociada UNED/ICP-CSIC Group for Molecular Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts, Madrid (Spain); Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica y Tecnica, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Tamargo-Martinez, K., E-mail: katia@incar.csic.es [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, INCAR-CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain); Martinez-Alonso, A.; Tascon, J.M.D. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, INCAR-CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), pristine and heat-treated at 2873 K, were comparatively characterized using HRTEM, SEM, nitrogen adsorption, Raman spectroscopy and immersion calorimetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Annealing at 2873 K produced removal of amorphous phases, ordering of graphene layers and structural changes inside the cylindrical mesopores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immersion enthalpies in organic liquids indicated the existence of specific {pi}-{pi} electronic interactions between aromatic molecules and the surface of heat-treated MWCNTs. - Abstract: Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized using a chemical vapour deposition procedure using acetylene as source of carbon, iron pentacarbonyl as catalyst and an inert carrier gas. An aliquot of these MWCNTs was heat-treated at 2873 K under inert atmosphere (Ar). The two carbon nanotube samples where characterized using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption at 77 K, Raman spectroscopy, and immersion calorimetry in toluene, methanol and methylcyclohexane. HRTEM images confirmed that high-temperature treatment removed amorphous carbon, the graphene layers being better graphitized, and also some structural changes inside the cylindrical mesopores took place. Immersion enthalpies in toluene, in which molecules are present as aromatic functions, indicated the existence of specific {pi}-{pi} electronic interactions between such molecules and the surface of heat-treated MWCNTs.

  20. First-principles investigation on structural and electronic properties of antimonene nanoribbons and nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, V.; Chandiramouli, R.

    2018-03-01

    The electronic properties of antimonene nanotubes and nanoribbons hydrogenated along the zigzag and armchair borders are investigated with the help of density functional theory (DFT) method. The structural stability of antimonene nanostructures is confirmed with the formation energy. The electronic properties of hydrogenated zigzag and armchair antimonene nanostructures are studied in terms of highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) & lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap and density of states (DOS) spectrum. Moreover, due to the influence of buckled orientation, hydrogen passivation and width of antimonene nanostructures, the HOMO-LUMO gap widens in the range of 0.15-0.41 eV. The findings of the present study confirm that the electronic properties of antimonene nanostructures can be tailored with the influence of width, orientation of the edges, passivation with hydrogen and morphology of antimonene nanostructures (nanoribbons, nanotubes), which can be used as chemical sensor and for spintronic devices.

  1. Solid-state structures of peapod bearings composed of finite single-wall carbon nanotube and fullerene molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Sota; Yamasaki, Takashi; Isobe, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-10

    A supramolecular combination of carbon nanotube and fullerene, so-called a peapod, has attracted much interest, not solely because of its physical properties but also for its unique assembled structures of carbonaceous entities. However, the detailed structural information available was not sufficient for in-depth understanding of its structural chemistry or for exploratory research inspired by novel physical phenomena, mainly because of the severely inhomogeneous nature of currently available carbon nanotubes. We herein report solid-state structures of a molecular peapod. This structure, solved with a belt-persistent finite carbon nanotube molecule at the atomic level by synchrotron X-ray diffraction, revealed the presence of a smooth, inflection-free Hirshfeld surface inside the tube, and the smoothness permitted dynamic motion of the C60 guest molecule even in the solid state. This precise structural information may inspire the molecular design of carbonaceous machines assembled purely through van der Waals contacts between two neutral molecules.

  2. Meshing Highly Regular Structures: The Case of Super Carbon Nanotubes of Arbitrary Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Schröppel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesh generation is an important step in many numerical methods. We present the “Hierarchical Graph Meshing” (HGM method as a novel approach to mesh generation, based on algebraic graph theory. The HGM method can be used to systematically construct configurations exhibiting multiple hierarchies and complex symmetry characteristics. The hierarchical description of structures provided by the HGM method can be exploited to increase the efficiency of multiscale and multigrid methods. In this paper, the HGM method is employed for the systematic construction of super carbon nanotubes of arbitrary order, which present a pertinent example of structurally and geometrically complex, yet highly regular, structures. The HGM algorithm is computationally efficient and exhibits good scaling characteristics. In particular, it scales linearly for super carbon nanotube structures and is working much faster than geometry-based methods employing neighborhood search algorithms. Its modular character makes it conducive to automatization. For the generation of a mesh, the information about the geometry of the structure in a given configuration is added in a way that relates geometric symmetries to structural symmetries. The intrinsically hierarchic description of the resulting mesh greatly reduces the effort of determining mesh hierarchies for multigrid and multiscale applications and helps to exploit symmetry-related methods in the mechanical analysis of complex structures.

  3. Multifunctional Material Structures Based on Laser-Etched Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Emplit

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available High-power electronics in the transportation and aerospace sectors need size and weight reduction. Multifunctional and multistructured materials are currently being developed to couple electromagnetic (EM and thermal properties, i.e., shielding against electromagnetic impulsions, and thermal management across the thermal interface material (TIM. In this work, we investigate laser-machined patterned carbon nanotube (CNT micro-brushes as an alternative to metallic structures for driving simultaneously EM and heat propagation. The thermal and electromagnetic response of the CNT array is expected to be sensitive to the micro-structured pattern etched in the CNT brush.

  4. Effect of magnetic field on carbon nanotubes and graphene structure synthesized at low pressure via arc discharge process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslan, M. S.; Chaudary, K. T.; Haider, Z.; Zin, A. F. M.; Ali, J.

    2017-03-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have attracted vast attention due to the rising demand for various nanotechnology applications. The possibility of preparing multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and graphene on large scale are demonstrated using direct current arc discharge with transverse magnetic field effect at low ambient pressure. In this work, we study, the effect of external transverse magnetic effect on structural perfection of graphene and multi-walled carbon nanotube. High quality carbon-nanotube were synthesized by arc discharge plasma in Hydrogen ambient at pressure 1 mbar in presence of external transverse magnetic field. The synthesized nanomaterials were characterized by electron microscopy, XRD and Raman Spectroscopy. A significant increase in the quantity and quality of carbon nanotube and graphene in the presence of transverse magnetic field during arc discharge process.

  5. Structure, stability, and motion of dislocations in double-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai-Wang; Li, Zhong-Qiu; Wu, Jian; Peng, Xiang-Yang; Tan, Xin-Jun; Sun, Li-Zhong; Zhong, Jian-Xin

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a novel double-wall carbon nanotube (DWCNT) with both edge and screw dislocations is studied by using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The differences between two adjacent tubule indexes of armchair and zigzag nanotubes are determined to be 5 and 9, respectively, by taking into account the symmetry, integrality, and thermal stability of the composite structures. It is found that melting first occurs near the dislocations, and the melting temperatures of the dislocated armchair and zigzag DWCNTs are around 2600 K—2700 K. At the pre-melting temperatures, the shrink of the dislocation loop, which is comprised of edge and screw dislocations, implies that the composite dislocation in DWCNTs has self-healing ability. The dislocated DWCNTs first fracture at the edge dislocations, which induces the entire break in axial tensile test. The dislocated DWCNTs have a smaller fracture strength compared to the perfect DWCNTs. Our results not only match with the dislocation glide of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in experiments, but also can free from the electron beam radiation under experimental conditions observed by the high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), which is deemed to cause the motion of dislocation loop.

  6. Free-standing carbon nanotube composite sensing skin for distributed strain sensing in structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Andrew R.; Minegishi, Kaede; Kurata, Masahiro; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2014-04-01

    The technical challenges of managing the health of critical infrastructure systems necessitate greater structural sensing capabilities. Among these needs is the ability for quantitative, spatial damage detection on critical structural components. Advances in material science have now opened the door for novel and cost-effective spatial sensing solutions specially tailored for damage detection in structures. However, challenges remain before spatial damage detection can be realized. Some of the technical challenges include sensor installations and extensive signal processing requirements. This work addresses these challenges by developing a patterned carbon nanotube composite thin film sensor whose pattern has been optimized for measuring the spatial distribution of strain. The carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposite sensing material is fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate using a layer-by-layer deposition process. The thin film sensors are then patterned into sensing elements using optical lithography processes common to microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies. The sensor array is designed as a series of sensing elements with varying width to provide insight on the limitations of such patterning and implications of pattern geometry on sensing signals. Once fabrication is complete, the substrate and attached sensor are epoxy bonded to a poly vinyl composite (PVC) bar that is then tested with a uniaxial, cyclic load pattern and mechanical response is characterized. The fabrication processes are then utilized on a larger-scale to develop and instrument a component-specific sensing skin in order to observe the strain distribution on the web of a steel beam. The instrumented beam is part of a larger steel beam-column connection with a concrete slab in composite action. The beam-column subassembly is laterally loaded and strain trends in the web are observed using the carbon nanotube composite sensing skin. The results are discussed in the context of

  7. Carbon Nanotube Enhanced Aerospace Composite Materials A New Generation of Multifunctional Hybrid Structural Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Kostopoulos, V

    2013-01-01

    The well documented increase in the use of high performance composites as structural materials in aerospace components is continuously raising the demands in terms of dynamic performance, structural integrity, reliable life monitoring systems and adaptive actuating abilities. Current technologies address the above issues separately; material property tailoring and custom design practices aim to the enhancement of dynamic and damage tolerance characteristics, whereas life monitoring and actuation is performed with embedded sensors that may be detrimental to the structural integrity of the component. This publication explores the unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) as an additive in the matrix of Fibre Reinforced Plastics (FRP), for producing structural composites with improved mechanical performance as well as sensing/actuating capabilities. The successful combination of the CNT properties and existing sensing actuating technologies leads to the realization of a multifunctional FRP structure. The curre...

  8. Recent progress on the structure separation of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiaming; Yang, Dehua; Zeng, Xiang; Zhou, Naigen; Liu, Huaping

    2017-11-01

    The mass production of single-structure, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with identical properties is critical for their basic research and technical applications in the fields of electronics, optics and optoelectronics. Great efforts have been made to control the structures of SWCNTs since their discovery. Recently, the structure separation of SWCNTs has been making great progress. Various solution-sorting methods have been developed to achieve not only the separation of metallic and semiconducting species, but also the sorting of distinct (n, m) single-chirality species and even their enantiomers. This progress would dramatically accelerate the application of SWCNTs in the next-generation electronic devices. Here, we review the recent progress in the structure sorting of SWCNTs and outline the challenges and prospects of the structure separation of SWCNTs.

  9. Electronic and structural properties of ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes by density functional theory calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Shih-Jye; Lin, Ken-Huang; Li, Jia-Yun; Ju, Shin-Pon

    2014-01-01

    The simulated annealing basin-hopping method incorporating the penalty function was used to predict the lowest-energy structures for ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes of different sizes. These predicted structures indicate that tungsten one-dimensional structures at this small scale do not possess B.C.C. configuration as in bulk tungsten material. In order to analyze the relationship between multi-shell geometries and electronic transfer, the electronic and structural properties of tungsten wires and tubes including partial density of state and band structures which were determined and analyzed by quantum chemistry calculations. In addition, in order to understand the application feasibility of these nanowires and tubes on nano-devices such as field emitters or chemical catalysts, the electronic stability of these ultrathin tungsten nanowires was also investigated by density functional theory calculations.

  10. Carbon nanotubes randomly decorated with gold clusters: from nano2hybrid atomic structures to gas sensing prototypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlier, J-C; Zanolli, Z; Arnaud, L; Avilov, I V; Felten, A; Pireaux, J-J; Delgado, M; Demoisson, F; Reniers, F; Espinosa, E H; Ionescu, R; Leghrib, R; Llobet, E; Ewels, C P; Suarez-Martinez, I; Guillot, J; Mansour, A; Migeon, H-N; Watson, G E

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube surfaces, activated and randomly decorated with metal nanoclusters, have been studied in uniquely combined theoretical and experimental approaches as prototypes for molecular recognition. The key concept is to shape metallic clusters that donate or accept a fractional charge upon adsorption of a target molecule, and modify the electron transport in the nanotube. The present work focuses on a simple system, carbon nanotubes with gold clusters. The nature of the gold-nanotube interaction is studied using first-principles techniques. The numerical simulations predict the binding and diffusion energies of gold atoms at the tube surface, including realistic atomic models for defects potentially present at the nanotube surface. The atomic structure of the gold nanoclusters and their effect on the intrinsic electronic quantum transport properties of the nanotube are also predicted. Experimentally, multi-wall CNTs are decorated with gold clusters using (1) vacuum evaporation, after activation with an RF oxygen plasma and (2) colloid solution injected into an RF atmospheric plasma; the hybrid systems are accurately characterized using XPS and TEM techniques. The response of gas sensors based on these nano 2 hybrids is quantified for the detection of toxic species like NO 2 , CO, C 2 H 5 OH and C 2 H 4 .

  11. Carbon nanotubes randomly decorated with gold clusters: from nano{sup 2}hybrid atomic structures to gas sensing prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlier, J-C; Zanolli, Z [Unite de Physico-Chimie et de Physique des Materiaux (PCPM), European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility (ETSF), Universite Catholique de Louvain, Place Croix du Sud 1, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Arnaud, L; Avilov, I V; Felten, A; Pireaux, J-J [Centre de Recherche en Physique de la Matiere et du Rayonnement (PMR-LISE), Facultes Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, 61 Rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Delgado, M [Sensotran, s.l., Avenida Remolar 31, E-08820 El Prat de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Demoisson, F; Reniers, F [Service de Chimie Analytique et Chimie des Interfaces (CHANI), Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Faculte des Sciences, CP255, Boulevard du Triomphe 2, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Espinosa, E H; Ionescu, R; Leghrib, R; Llobet, E [Department of Electronic Engineering, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Avenida Paisos Catalans 26, E-43007 Tarragona (Spain); Ewels, C P; Suarez-Martinez, I [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Universite de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssiniere-BP 32229, F-44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Guillot, J; Mansour, A; Migeon, H-N [Departement Science et Analyse des Materiaux, Centre de Recherche Public-Gabriel Lippmann, rue du Brill 41, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Watson, G E, E-mail: jean-jacques.pireaux@fundp.ac.b [Vega Science Trust, Unit 118, Science Park SQ, Brighton, BN1 9SB (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-16

    Carbon nanotube surfaces, activated and randomly decorated with metal nanoclusters, have been studied in uniquely combined theoretical and experimental approaches as prototypes for molecular recognition. The key concept is to shape metallic clusters that donate or accept a fractional charge upon adsorption of a target molecule, and modify the electron transport in the nanotube. The present work focuses on a simple system, carbon nanotubes with gold clusters. The nature of the gold-nanotube interaction is studied using first-principles techniques. The numerical simulations predict the binding and diffusion energies of gold atoms at the tube surface, including realistic atomic models for defects potentially present at the nanotube surface. The atomic structure of the gold nanoclusters and their effect on the intrinsic electronic quantum transport properties of the nanotube are also predicted. Experimentally, multi-wall CNTs are decorated with gold clusters using (1) vacuum evaporation, after activation with an RF oxygen plasma and (2) colloid solution injected into an RF atmospheric plasma; the hybrid systems are accurately characterized using XPS and TEM techniques. The response of gas sensors based on these nano{sup 2}hybrids is quantified for the detection of toxic species like NO{sub 2}, CO, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}.

  12. Structural, electronic and mechanical properties of inner surface modified imogolite nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Chagas Da Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The electronic, structural and mechanical properties of the modified imogolites have been investigated using self consistent charge-density functional-tight binding method with a posteriori treatment of the dispersion interaction (SCC-DFTB-D. The zigzag (12,0 imogolite has been used as the initial structure for the calculations. The functionalization of the interior (12,0 imogolite nanotubes by organosilanes and by heat treatment leading to the dehydroxylation of the silanols were investigated. The reaction of the silanols with the trimethylmethoxysilanes is favored and the arrangement of the different substitutions that leads to the most symmetrical structures are preferred. The Young moduli and band gaps are slightly decreased. However, the dehydroxylation of the silanol groups in the inner surface of the imogolite leads to the increase of the Young moduli and a drastic decrease of the band gap of about 4.4 eV. It has been shown that the degree of the dehydroxylation can be controlled by heat treatment and tune the band gap, eventually, leading to a semiconductor material with well defined nanotube structure.

  13. The effective modulus of super carbon nanotubes predicted by molecular structure mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Qiu, Xinming; Yang, Fan; Wang, Xi-Shu; Yin, Yajun

    2008-06-04

    A super carbon nanotube (ST) is a kind of hierarchical structure constructed from carbon nanotubes (named as CNT arm tubes). With the detailed construction of a Y-junction considered, the effective mechanical properties of ST structures are studied by the molecular structure mechanics (MSM) method. The Young's modulus and shear modulus of STs are found to depend mainly on the aspect ratio of CNT arm tubes instead of the chirality of the ST. A scale law is adopted to express the relation between the effective modulus (Young's modulus or shear modulus) and the aspect ratio of the CNT arm tubes. The Poisson's ratio of the ST is affected by both the aspect ratio of the CNT arm tubes and the chirality of the ST. The deformation of the ST comes from both the bending and the stretching of the CNT arm tubes. The Y-junction acts as an reinforcement phase to make the bending and stretching couple together and induce large linearity in ST structures.

  14. Mechanically and chemically robust sandwich-structured C@Si@C nanotube array Li-ion battery anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinyun; Li, Nan; Goodman, Matthew D; Zhang, Hui Gang; Epstein, Eric S; Huang, Bo; Pan, Zeng; Kim, Jinwoo; Choi, Jun Hee; Huang, Xingjiu; Liu, Jinhuai; Hsia, K Jimmy; Dillon, Shen J; Braun, Paul V

    2015-02-24

    Stability and high energy densities are essential qualities for emerging battery electrodes. Because of its high specific capacity, silicon has been considered a promising anode candidate. However, the several-fold volume changes during lithiation and delithiation leads to fractures and continuous formation of an unstable solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer, resulting in rapid capacity decay. Here, we present a carbon-silicon-carbon (C@Si@C) nanotube sandwich structure that addresses the mechanical and chemical stability issues commonly associated with Si anodes. The C@Si@C nanotube array exhibits a capacity of ∼2200 mAh g(-1) (∼750 mAh cm(-3)), which significantly exceeds that of a commercial graphite anode, and a nearly constant Coulombic efficiency of ∼98% over 60 cycles. In addition, the C@Si@C nanotube array gives much better capacity and structure stability compared to the Si nanotubes without carbon coatings, the ZnO@C@Si@C nanorods, a Si thin film on Ni foam, and C@Si and Si@C nanotubes. In situ SEM during cycling shows that the tubes expand both inward and outward upon lithiation, as well as elongate, and then revert back to their initial size and shape after delithiation, suggesting stability during volume changes. The mechanical modeling indicates the overall plastic strain in a nanotube is much less than in a nanorod, which may significantly reduce low-cycle fatigue. The sandwich-structured nanotube design is quite general, and may serve as a guide for many emerging anode and cathode systems.

  15. Structural transformation of MoO3 nanobelts into MoS2 nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deepak, Francis Leonard; Mayoral, Alvaro; Yacaman, Miguel Jose

    2009-01-01

    The structural transformation of MoO 3 nanobelts into MoS 2 nanotubes using a simple sulfur source has been reported. This transformation has been extensively investigated using electron microscopic and spectroscopic techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron diffraction (ED), and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDAX and TEM-EDX). The method described in this report will serve as a generic route for the transformation of other oxide nanostructures into the chalcogenide nanostructures. (orig.)

  16. Physical, Physicochemical, Mechanical, and Structural Characterization of Films Based on Gelatin/Glycerol and Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Israel Sifuentes-Nieves; Rodolfo Rendón-Villalobos; Antonio Jiménez-Aparicio; Brenda Hildeliza Camacho-Díaz; Gustavo Fidel Gutiérrez López; Javier Solorza-Feria

    2015-01-01

    A new method to prepare glycerol/gelatin based films, by doping the film with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), was proposed. SDS was used to disperse CNTs in gelatin/glycerol films as follows: gelatin/glycerol (GG) incubated with equal concentrations of CNT and SDS; GG with 0.001% w/w CNT/SDS; GG with 0.002% CNT/SDS and GG with 0.004% CNT/SDS. Diffractograms of CNT/SDS /glycerol films showed an amorphous structure, being consistent with thermograms involving temperatu...

  17. Atom by atom: HRTEM insights into inorganic nanotubes and fullerene-like structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar Sadan, Maya; Houben, Lothar; Enyashin, Andrey N; Seifert, Gotthard; Tenne, Reshef

    2008-10-14

    The characterization of nanostructures down to the atomic scale is essential to understand some physical properties. Such a characterization is possible today using direct imaging methods such as aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), when iteratively backed by advanced modeling produced by theoretical structure calculations and image calculations. Aberration-corrected HRTEM is therefore extremely useful for investigating low-dimensional structures, such as inorganic fullerene-like particles and inorganic nanotubes. The atomic arrangement in these nanostructures can lead to new insights into the growth mechanism or physical properties, where imminent commercial applications are unfolding. This article will focus on two structures that are symmetric and reproducible. The first structure that will be dealt with is the smallest stable symmetric closed-cage structure in the inorganic system, a MoS(2) nanooctahedron. It is investigated by means of aberration-corrected microscopy which allowed validating the suggested DFTB-MD model. It will be shown that structures diverging from the energetically most stable structures are present in the laser ablated soot and that the alignment of the different shells is parallel, unlike the bulk material where the alignment is antiparallel. These findings correspond well with the high-energy synthetic route and they provide more insight into the growth mechanism. The second structure studied is WS(2) nanotubes, which have already been shown to have a unique structure with very desirable mechanical properties. The joint HRTEM study combined with modeling reveals new information regarding the chirality of the different shells and provides a better understanding of their growth mechanism.

  18. Study of the tunnelling initiated leakage current through the carbon nanotube embedded gate oxide in metal oxide semiconductor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Gargi; Sarkar, C K; Lu, X B; Dai, J Y

    2008-01-01

    The tunnelling currents through the gate dielectric partly embedded with semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure have been investigated. The application of the gate voltage to such an MOS device results in the band bending at the interface of the partly embedded oxide dielectric and the surface of the silicon, initiating tunnelling through the gate oxide responsible for the gate leakage current whenever the thickness of the oxide is scaled. A model for silicon MOS structures, where carbon nanotubes are confined in a narrow layer embedded in the gate dielectric, is proposed to investigate the direct and the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunnelling currents of such systems. The idea of embedding such elements in the gate oxide is to assess the possibility for charge storage for memory device applications. Comparing the FN tunnelling onset voltage between the pure gate oxide and the gate oxide embedded with carbon nanotubes, it is found that the onset voltage decreases with the introduction of the nanotubes. The direct tunnelling current has also been studied at very low gate bias, for the thin oxide MOS structure which plays an important role in scaling down the MOS transistors. The FN tunnelling current has also been studied with varying nanotube diameter

  19. Study of the tunnelling initiated leakage current through the carbon nanotube embedded gate oxide in metal oxide semiconductor structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Gargi; Sarkar, C K; Lu, X B; Dai, J Y

    2008-06-25

    The tunnelling currents through the gate dielectric partly embedded with semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure have been investigated. The application of the gate voltage to such an MOS device results in the band bending at the interface of the partly embedded oxide dielectric and the surface of the silicon, initiating tunnelling through the gate oxide responsible for the gate leakage current whenever the thickness of the oxide is scaled. A model for silicon MOS structures, where carbon nanotubes are confined in a narrow layer embedded in the gate dielectric, is proposed to investigate the direct and the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunnelling currents of such systems. The idea of embedding such elements in the gate oxide is to assess the possibility for charge storage for memory device applications. Comparing the FN tunnelling onset voltage between the pure gate oxide and the gate oxide embedded with carbon nanotubes, it is found that the onset voltage decreases with the introduction of the nanotubes. The direct tunnelling current has also been studied at very low gate bias, for the thin oxide MOS structure which plays an important role in scaling down the MOS transistors. The FN tunnelling current has also been studied with varying nanotube diameter.

  20. Electronic structure of carbon doped boron nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, Mousumi Upadhyay; Waghmare, Umesh V

    2008-08-01

    We determine atomic and electronic structures of arm-chair and zigzag boron nitride nanotubes (BN-NTs) of different diameters using first-principles pseudopotential-based density functional theory calculations. We find that the structure of BN-NTs in bundled form is slightly different from that of the isolated BN-NTs, reflecting on the inter-tube interactions. Effects of carbon doping on the electronic structure of (5,5) and (5,0) BN-NTs are determined: carbon substitution either at B-site, being energetically very stable, or at N-site can yield magnetically polarized semiconducting state, whereas carbon substitution at neighbouring B and N sites yields a non-magnetic insulating structure.

  1. The structure of carbon nanotubes formed of graphene layers L4-8, L5-7, L3-12, L4-6-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapovalova, K. E.; Belenkov, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    We geometrically calculate the optimized structure of nanotubes based on the graphene layers, using the method of molecular mechanics MM+. It was found that only the nanotubes, based on the graphene layers L4-8, L5-7, L3-12, L4-6-12, have a cylindrical form. Calculations of the sublimation energy, carried out using the semi-empirical quantum-mechanic method PM3, show that energy increases with the increase of nanotube diameters.

  2. Robust Superhydrophobic Carbon Nanotube Film with Lotus Leaf Mimetic Multiscale Hierarchical Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengwei; Zhao, Tianyi; Bian, Ruixin; Wang, Guangyan; Liu, Huan

    2017-12-26

    Superhydrophobic carbon nanotube (CNT) films have demonstrated many fascinating performances in versatile applications, especially for those involving solid/liquid interfacial processes, because of their ability to affect the material/energy transfer at interfaces. Thus, developing superhydrophobic CNTs has attracted extensive research interests in the past decades, and it could be achieved either by surface coating of low-free energy materials or by constructing micro/nanohierarchical structures via various complicated processes. So far, developing a simple approach to fabricate stable superhydrophobic CNTs remains a challenge because the capillary force induced coalescence frequently happens when interacting with liquid. Herein, drawing inspirations from the lotus leaf, we proposed a simple one-step chemical vapor deposition approach with programmable controlled gas flow to directly fabricate a CNT film with rather stable superhydrophobicity, which can effectively prevent even small water droplets from permeating into the film. The robust superhydrophobicity was attributable to typical lotus-leaf-like micro/nanoscale hierarchical surface structures of the CNT film, where many microscale clusters composed of entangled nanotubes randomly protrude out of the under-layer aligned nanotubes. Consequently, dual-scale air pockets were trapped within each microscale CNT cluster and between, which could largely reduce the liquid/solid interface, leading to a Cassie state. Moreover, the superhydrophobicity of the CNT film showed excellent durability after long time exposure to air and even to corrosive liquids with a wide range of pH values. We envision that the approach developed is advantageous for versatile physicochemical interfacial processes, such as drag reduction, electrochemical catalysis, anti-icing, and biosensors.

  3. Role of structural defects in the ultraviolet luminescence of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierret, Aurélie; Nong, Hanond; Fossard, Frédéric; Loiseau, Annick, E-mail: annick.loiseau@onera.fr [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures (LEM), ONERA-CNRS, BP 72, 92322 Châtillon cedex (France); Attal-Trétout, Brigitte [DMPH, ONERA, Chemin de la Hunière et des Joncherettes, BP 80100, 91123 Palaiseau (France); Xue, Yanming; Golberg, Dmitri [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Barjon, Julien, E-mail: julien.barjon@uvsq.fr [Groupe d' Etude de la Matière Condensée, University of Versailles St-Quentin and CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78000 Versailles (France)

    2015-12-21

    BN nanotubes (BNNTs) are structurally similar to their carbon counterparts, though much less investigated. New synthesis methods have been recently reported, enabling the production of industrial quantities and stimulating the search of new applications for the BNNTs. In this paper, we investigate the luminescence of multiwall BNNTs. By performing cathodoluminescence experiments on single tubes at 10 K, we show that the tube luminescence is highly heterogeneous (i) from tube to tube and (ii) spatially along a single tube. By combining cathodoluminescence measurements with a nanometer excitation and transmission electron microscopy on the same tube, we correlate luminescence and structural features. We conclude that the near-band-edge luminescence of BNNTs (≈5.4 eV) is related to the presence of extended structural defects, such as dislocations or ruptures in the wall stacking.

  4. Preparation and Application of Conductive Textile Coatings Filled with Honeycomb Structured Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Govaert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical conductive textile coatings with variable amounts of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are presented. Formulations of textile coatings were prepared with up to 15 wt % of CNT, based on the solid weight of the binder. The binders are water based polyacrylate dispersions. The CNTs were mixed into the binder dispersion starting from a commercially available aqueous CNT dispersion that is compatible with the binder dispersion. Coating formulations with variable CNT concentrations were applied on polyester and cotton woven and knitted fabrics by different textile coating techniques: direct coating, transfer coating, and screen printing. The coatings showed increasing electrical conductivity with increasing CNT concentration. The coatings can be regarded to be electrically conductive (sheet resistivity<103 Ohm/sq starting at 3 wt% CNT. The degree of dispersion of the carbon nanotubes particles inside the coating was visualized by scanning electron microscopy. The CNT particles form honeycomb structured networks in the coatings, proving a high degree of dispersion. This honeycomb structure of CNT particles is forming a conductive network in the coating leading to low resistivity values.

  5. Carbon nanotube induced structural and physical property transitions of syndiotactic polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrasi, Giuliana; Romeo, Valentina; Sannino, Diana; Sarno, Maria; Ciambelli, Paolo; Vittoria, Vittoria; De Vivo, Biagio; Tucci, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we have studied the effect of increasing carbon multi-walled nanotube (CNT) concentration in composites of syndiotactic polypropylene (sPP) having the same crystalline form but different morphologies. The attention was focused on the form I of sPP with different degrees of perfection (in terms of percentages of chains in helical conformation, crystal dimensions and crystallinity) obtained using two different quenching temperatures from the melt, i.e. 25 and 100 deg. C. We observed a decreasing effect of the crystallization temperature on increasing the nanotube content up to the samples with 10% of CNT, that show a very similar structural organization independent of the undercooling. Only the amorphous phase turns out more relaxed in the samples crystallized at the highest temperature. Either the thermal or the mechanical properties are improved on increasing the CNT content in both series of samples. The electrical conductivity increases in a similar manner in both series of samples and between 1 and 3 wt% it shows a sizable step of about eight orders of magnitude, a phenomenon that can be regarded as the onset of a percolating structure for which charge transport may take place

  6. The impact of core-shell nanotube structures on fracture in ceramic nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xin; Yang, Yingchao; Lou, Jun; Sheldon, Brian W.

    2017-01-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be used to create ceramic nanocomposites with improved fracture toughness. In the present work, atomic layer deposition (ALD) was employed to deposit thin oxide layers on MWCNTs. These core-shell structures were then used to create nanocomposites by using a polymer derived ceramic (PDC) to produce the matrix. Variations in both the initial MWCNT structure and the oxide layers led to substantial differences in fiber-pullout behavior. Single tube pullout tests also showed that the oxide coatings led to stronger bonding with the ceramic matrix. With high defect density MWCNTs, this led to shorter pull-out lengths which is consistent with the conventional understanding of fracture in ceramic matrix composites. However, with low defect density MWCNTs longer pullout lengths were observed with the oxide layers. To interpret the different trends that were observed, we believe that the ALD coatings should not be viewed simply as a means of altering the interfacial properties. Instead, the coated MWCNTs should be viewed as more complex core-shell fibers where both interface and internal properties can be controlled with the ALD layers. - Graphical abstract: Fracture properties of core-shell nanotubes reinforced ceramic nanocomposites.

  7. Diamond/diamond-like carbon coated nanotube structures for efficient electron field emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijevic, Steven (Inventor); Withers, James C. (Inventor); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a nanotube coated with diamond or diamond-like carbon, a field emitter cathode comprising same, and a field emitter comprising the cathode. It is also directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from a field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes by coating the nanotube with diamond or diamond-like carbon. In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from an electron field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes, which method comprises coating the nanotubes with diamond or diamond-like carbon.

  8. Symmetry and Non-empirical Calculations of Structure and Properties of Single- and Double-Wall SrTiO3 Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evarestov, R. A.; Bandura, A. V.

    A large-scale first-principles simulation of the structure and stability of SrTiO3 single- and double-wall nanotubes with different chiralities has been performed for the first time using the periodic PBE0 LCAO method. The initial structures of nanotubes have been obtained by rolling up slabs consisting of two and four alternating (001) SrO and TiO2 planes. In the majority of the considered cases the inner or outer TiO2 shells of 4-layer nanotubes undergo a considerable reconstruction due to shrinkage or stretching of interatomic distances. Double-wall nanotubes constructed from 2-layer single-wall nanotubes with the intertube distance less than 4.5-5.0 Å merge to stable polyhedron-shaped tubular objects consisting of blocks with a distorted cubic perovskite structure.

  9. Dynamic Self-Stiffening and Structural Evolutions of Polyacrylonitrile/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinhui; Zhou, Pucha; An, Feng; Liu, Yaodong; Lu, Chunxiang

    2017-02-15

    The self-stiffening under external dynamic strain has been observed for some artificial materials, especially for nanocomposites. However, few systematic studies have been carried out on their structural evolutions, and the effect of the types of nanofillers was unclear. In this study, we used a semicrystalline polymer, polyacrylonitrile (PAN), and various types of carbon nanomaterials including C 60 , carbon nanotube (CNT), and graphene oxide (GO). An external uniaxial dynamic strain at small amplitude of 0.2% was applied on the prepared nanocomposite films. It was observed that PAN/CNT exhibited significant self-stiffening behavior, whereas PAN/GO showed no response. Systematic characterizations were performed to determine the structural evolutions of PAN/CNT film during dynamic strain testing, and it was found that the external dynamic strain not only induced the crystallization of PAN chains but also aligned CNT along the strain direction.

  10. STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITE MATERIAL BASED ON GYPSUM BINDER AND CARBON NANOTUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHUMAK Anastasia Gennadievna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to carry out a number of studies in the area of nanomodi­fication of gypsum binder matrix and to investigate the influence of multilayer carbon nanotubes on the structure, physical and mechanical properties of obtained compos­ites. The study of the gypsum binders structure formation mechanisms with the use of nanoadditives makes it possible to control the production processes of gypsum materi­als and articles with the given set of properties. The main tasks of the binder nanomodification are: even distribution of carbon nanostructures over the whole volume of material and provision of stability for the nanodimensional modifier during production process of the construction composite.

  11. Chemical Structure of TiO2 Nanotube Photocatalysts Promoted by Copper and Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Yu Liao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs promoted by copper (5% (Cu-TNT and iron (5% (Fe-TNT were prepared for visible-light photocatalysis. By X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES spectroscopy, it is found that the enhanced photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB on Cu-TNT and Fe-TNT is associated with the predominant surface photoactive sites A2 ((Ti=OO4. By extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS spectroscopy, the dispersed copper and iron also cause increases in the Ti–O and Ti–(O–Ti bond distances by 0.01-0.02 and 0.04-0.05 Å, respectively. The decreased Ti–O bonding energy may lead to an increase of photoexcited electron transport. The copper- or-iron promoted TNT can thus enhance photocatalytic degradation of MB under the visible-light radiation.

  12. From random coil polymers to helical structures induced by carbon nanotubes and supramolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai-Wei; Wu, Yu-Rong; Jeong, Kwang-Un; Kuo, Shiao-Wei

    2013-10-01

    A simple method is reported for the preparation of double-helical structures through a series of achiral random and block copolymers poly(styrene-co-4-vinylbenzyl triazolylmethyl methylthymine) (PS-co-PVBT) with various T units on the side chains through click reactions of poly(styrene-co-4-vinylbenzyl azide) (PS-co-PVBN(3)) with propargyl thymine (PT) and also the synthesis of the A-appended pyrene derivative (A-Py) through click chemistry. This double-helical structure is observed from achiral random-coil polystyrene (PS) main chains, stabilized through the combination of multiple A-T hydrogen bonds, and π-π stacking between pyrene units and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Hybrid Carbon Fibers/Carbon Nanotubes Structures for Next Generation Polymeric Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Al-Haik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pitch-based carbon fibers are commonly used to produce polymeric carbon fiber structural composites. Several investigations have reported different methods for dispersing and subsequently aligning carbon nanotubes (CNTs as a filler to reinforce polymer matrix. The significant difficulty in dispersing CNTs suggested the controlled-growth of CNTs on surfaces where they are needed. Here we compare between two techniques for depositing the catalyst iron used toward growing CNTs on pitch-based carbon fiber surfaces. Electrochemical deposition of iron using pulse voltametry is compared to DC magnetron iron sputtering. Carbon nanostructures growth was performed using a thermal CVD system. Characterization for comparison between both techniques was compared via SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy analysis. It is shown that while both techniques were successful to grow CNTs on the carbon fiber surfaces, iron sputtering technique was capable of producing more uniform distribution of iron catalyst and thus multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs compared to MWCNTs grown using the electrochemical deposition of iron.

  14. Structure and tensile properties of polypropylene/carbon nanotubes composites prepared by melt extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanhui; Zuo, Jicheng; Qin, Jie; Li, Chengwu

    2014-09-01

    Polypropylene/carbon nanotubes (PP/CNTs) nancomposites were prepared with a single screw extruder by adding maleic anhydride-grafted poplypropylene (PP-g-MAH) as compatibilizer to polypropylene (PP) with different amounts of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the range of 0.1-0.7 wt.%. Structure and morphology of the prepared samples were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), polarizing light microscopy (PLM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that PP spherulites decreased in size when CNTs were introduced into the polymer. Mechanical properties of the samples were also studied. Tensile tests showed that with increasing amount of CNTs the strain at break decreased whereas the Young's modulus was improved of 16.41 % to 36.05 % and tensile strength of 36.67 % to 64.70 % compared to pristine PP. The SEM microphotographs showed that majority of the CNTs were dispersed individually and oriented along the shear flow direction.

  15. Strain sensitivity of carbon nanotube cement-based composites for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Antonella; Ubertini, Filippo; Laflamme, Simon; Rallini, Marco; Materazzi, Annibale L.; Kenny, Josè M.

    2016-04-01

    Cement-based smart sensors appear particularly suitable for monitoring applications, due to their self-sensing abilities, their ease of use, and their numerous possible field applications. The addition of conductive carbon nanofillers into a cementitious matrix provides the material with piezoresistive characteristics and enhanced sensitivity to mechanical alterations. The strain-sensing ability is achieved by correlating the variation of external loads or deformations with the variation of specific electrical parameters, such as the electrical resistance. Among conductive nanofillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown promise for the fabrication of self-monitoring composites. However, some issues related to the filler dispersion and the mix design of cementitious nanoadded materials need to be further investigated. For instance, a small difference in the added quantity of a specific nanofiller in a cement-matrix composite can substantially change the quality of the dispersion and the strain sensitivity of the resulting material. The present research focuses on the strain sensitivity of concrete, mortar and cement paste sensors fabricated with different amounts of carbon nanotube inclusions. The aim of the work is to investigate the quality of dispersion of the CNTs in the aqueous solutions, the physical properties of the fresh mixtures, the electromechanical properties of the hardened materials, and the sensing properties of the obtained transducers. Results show that cement-based sensors with CNT inclusions, if properly implemented, can be favorably applied to structural health monitoring.

  16. Altering F-Actin Structure of C17.2 Cells using Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magers, Jay; Gillette, Nathan L. D.; Rotkin, Slava V.; Jedlicka, Sabrina; Pirbhai, Massooma; Lehigh Univesity Collaboration; Susquehanna University Collaboration

    Advancements in nanotechnology have become fundamental to the delivery of drugs to treat various diseases. One such advancement is that of carbon nanotubes and their possible implications on drug delivery. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have great potential in the biomedical field as a means to deliver materials such as drugs and genes into the human body due to their size and chemistry. However, the effects of the nanotubes on cells they interact with are still unknown. Previous studies have shown that a low dosage of SWCNTs can affect differentiation of C17.2 neural stem cells. In this experiment, we investigate how the tubes affect the structure of the cells. Specifically, we determined the impact on the cell by examining the actin filament length, protrusions along the edge of the cells, and actin distribution. Presenter/Author 1.

  17. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zobelli, A

    2007-10-15

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  18. Carbon nanotube embedded PVDF membranes: Effect of solvent composition on the structural morphology for membrane distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapunda, Edgar C.; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Msagati, Titus A. M.

    2017-08-01

    Rapid population increase, growth in industrial and agricultural sectors and global climate change have added significant pressure on conventional freshwater resources. Tapping freshwater from non-conventional water sources such as desalination and wastewater recycling is considered as sustainable alternative to the fundamental challenges of water scarcity. However, affordable and sustainable technologies need to be applied for the communities to benefit from the treatment of non-conventional water source. Membrane distillation is a potential desalination technology which can be used sustainably for this purpose. In this work multi-walled carbon nanotube embedded polyvinylidene fluoride membranes for application in membrane distillation desalination were prepared via non-solvent induced phase separation method. The casting solution was prepared using mixed solvents (N, N-dimethylacetamide and triethyl phosphate) at varying ratios to study the effect of solvent composition on membrane morphological structures. Membrane morphological features were studied using a number of techniques including scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, SAXSpace tensile strength analysis, membrane thickness, porosity and contact angle measurements. It was revealed that membrane hydrophobicity, thickness, tensile strength and surface roughness were increasing as the composition of N, N-dimethylacetamide in the solvent was increasing with maximum values obtained between 40 and 60% N, N-dimethylacetamide. Internal morphological structures were changing from cellular structures to short finger-like and sponge-like pores and finally to large macro void type of pores when the amount of N, N-dimethylacetamide in the solvent was changed from low to high respectively. Multi-walled carbon nanotube embedded polyvinylidene fluoride membranes of desired morphological structures and physical properties can be synthesized by regulating the composition of solvents used to prepare the

  19. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zobelli, A.

    2007-10-01

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  20. Nanotube cathodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  1. Nanotube cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  2. Multistep structural transition of hydrogen trititanate nanotubes into TiO2-B nanotubes: a comparison study between nanostructured and bulk materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgado, Edisson Jr; Jardim, P M; Marinkovic, Bojan A; Rizzo, Fernando C; Abreu, Marco A S de; Zotin, Jose L; Araujo, Antonio S

    2007-01-01

    H-trititanate nanotubes obtained by alkali hydrothermal treatment of TiO 2 followed by proton exchange were compared to their bulk H 2 Ti 3 O 7 counterpart with respect to their thermally induced structural transformation paths. As-synthesized and heat-treated samples were characterized by XRD, TEM/SAED, DSC and spectroscopy techniques, indicating that H 2 Ti 3 O 7 nanotubes showed the same sequence of structural transformations as their bulk counterpart obtained by conventional solid state reaction. Nanostructured H 2 Ti 3 O 7 converts into TiO 2 (B) via multistep transformation without losing its nanotubular morphology. The transformation occurs between 120 and 400 deg. C through topotactic mechanisms with the intermediate formation of nanostructured H 2 Ti 6 O 13 and H 2 Ti 12 O 25 , which are more condensed layered titanates eventually rearranging to TiO 2 (B). Our results suggest that the intermediate tunnel structure H 2 Ti 12 O 25 is the final layered intermediate phase, on which TiO 2 (B) nucleates and grows. The conversion of nanostructured TiO 2 (B) into anatase is completed at a much lower temperature than its bulk counterpart and is accompanied by loss of the nanotubular morphology

  3. Multistep structural transition of hydrogen trititanate nanotubes into TiO2-B nanotubes: a comparison study between nanostructured and bulk materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Edisson; Jardim, P M; Marinkovic, Bojan A; Rizzo, Fernando C; de Abreu, Marco A S; Zotin, José L; Araújo, Antonio S

    2007-12-12

    H-trititanate nanotubes obtained by alkali hydrothermal treatment of TiO(2) followed by proton exchange were compared to their bulk H(2)Ti(3)O(7) counterpart with respect to their thermally induced structural transformation paths. As-synthesized and heat-treated samples were characterized by XRD, TEM/SAED, DSC and spectroscopy techniques, indicating that H(2)Ti(3)O(7) nanotubes showed the same sequence of structural transformations as their bulk counterpart obtained by conventional solid state reaction. Nanostructured H(2)Ti(3)O(7) converts into TiO(2)(B) via multistep transformation without losing its nanotubular morphology. The transformation occurs between 120 and 400 degrees C through topotactic mechanisms with the intermediate formation of nanostructured H(2)Ti(6)O(13) and H(2)Ti(12)O(25), which are more condensed layered titanates eventually rearranging to TiO(2)(B). Our results suggest that the intermediate tunnel structure H(2)Ti(12)O(25) is the final layered intermediate phase, on which TiO(2)(B) nucleates and grows. The conversion of nanostructured TiO(2)(B) into anatase is completed at a much lower temperature than its bulk counterpart and is accompanied by loss of the nanotubular morphology.

  4. Multistep structural transition of hydrogen trititanate nanotubes into TiO2-B nanotubes: a comparison study between nanostructured and bulk materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Edisson, Jr.; Jardim, P. M.; Marinkovic, Bojan A.; Rizzo, Fernando C.; de Abreu, Marco A. S.; Zotin, José L.; Araújo, Antonio S.

    2007-12-01

    H-trititanate nanotubes obtained by alkali hydrothermal treatment of TiO2 followed by proton exchange were compared to their bulk H2Ti3O7 counterpart with respect to their thermally induced structural transformation paths. As-synthesized and heat-treated samples were characterized by XRD, TEM/SAED, DSC and spectroscopy techniques, indicating that H2Ti3O7 nanotubes showed the same sequence of structural transformations as their bulk counterpart obtained by conventional solid state reaction. Nanostructured H2Ti3O7 converts into TiO2(B) via multistep transformation without losing its nanotubular morphology. The transformation occurs between 120 and 400 °C through topotactic mechanisms with the intermediate formation of nanostructured H2Ti6O13 and H2Ti12O25, which are more condensed layered titanates eventually rearranging to TiO2(B). Our results suggest that the intermediate tunnel structure H2Ti12O25 is the final layered intermediate phase, on which TiO2(B) nucleates and grows. The conversion of nanostructured TiO2(B) into anatase is completed at a much lower temperature than its bulk counterpart and is accompanied by loss of the nanotubular morphology.

  5. Multistep structural transition of hydrogen trititanate nanotubes into TiO{sub 2}-B nanotubes: a comparison study between nanostructured and bulk materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgado, Edisson Jr [PETROBRAS S.A./CENPES, Research and Development Centre, Avenida Horacio Macedo, 950, Cidade Universitaria, Quadra 7, 21941-598 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Jardim, P M [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Pontifical Catholic University, CP 38008, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Marinkovic, Bojan A [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Pontifical Catholic University, CP 38008, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Rizzo, Fernando C [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Pontifical Catholic University, CP 38008, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Abreu, Marco A S de [PETROBRAS S.A./CENPES, Research and Development Centre, Avenida Horacio Macedo, 950, Cidade Universitaria, Quadra 7, 21941-598 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Zotin, Jose L [PETROBRAS S.A./CENPES, Research and Development Centre, Avenida Horacio Macedo, 950, Cidade Universitaria, Quadra 7, 21941-598 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil); Araujo, Antonio S [Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, CP 1662, 59078-970 Natal-RN (Brazil)

    2007-12-12

    H-trititanate nanotubes obtained by alkali hydrothermal treatment of TiO{sub 2} followed by proton exchange were compared to their bulk H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} counterpart with respect to their thermally induced structural transformation paths. As-synthesized and heat-treated samples were characterized by XRD, TEM/SAED, DSC and spectroscopy techniques, indicating that H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} nanotubes showed the same sequence of structural transformations as their bulk counterpart obtained by conventional solid state reaction. Nanostructured H{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} converts into TiO{sub 2}(B) via multistep transformation without losing its nanotubular morphology. The transformation occurs between 120 and 400 deg. C through topotactic mechanisms with the intermediate formation of nanostructured H{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13} and H{sub 2}Ti{sub 12}O{sub 25}, which are more condensed layered titanates eventually rearranging to TiO{sub 2}(B). Our results suggest that the intermediate tunnel structure H{sub 2}Ti{sub 12}O{sub 25} is the final layered intermediate phase, on which TiO{sub 2}(B) nucleates and grows. The conversion of nanostructured TiO{sub 2}(B) into anatase is completed at a much lower temperature than its bulk counterpart and is accompanied by loss of the nanotubular morphology.

  6. Energy gaps, electronic structures, and x-ray spectroscopies of finite semiconductor single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bin; Jiang, Jun; Wu, ZiYu; Luo, Yi

    2008-02-28

    We report hybrid density functional theory calculations for electronic structures of hydrogen-terminated finite single-walled carbon nanotubes (6,5) and (8,3) up to 100 nm in length. Gap states that are mainly arisen from the hydrogen-terminated edges have been found in (8,3) tubes, but their contributions to the density of states become invisible when the tube is longer than 10 nm. The electronic structures of (6,5) and (8,3) tubes are found to be converged around 20 nm. The calculated band-gap energies of 100 nm long nanotubes are in good agreement with experimental results. The valence band structures of (6,5), (8,3), as well as (5,5) tubes are also investigated by means of ultraviolet photoelectron spectra (UPS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and the resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra theoretically. The UPS, XES and RIXS spectra become converged already at 10 nm. The length-dependent oscillation behavior is found in the RIXS spectra of (5,5) tubes, indicating that the RIXS spectra may be used to determine the size and length of metallic nanotubes. Furthermore, the chiral dependence observed in the simulated RIXS spectra suggests that RIXS spectra could be a useful technique for the determination of chirality of carbon nanotubes.

  7. Effect of laser radiation on multi-wall carbon nanotubes: study of shell structure and immobilization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyoergy, Enikoe, E-mail: egyorgy@icmab.es; Perez del Pino, Angel [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (ICMAB-CSIC) (Spain); Roqueta, Jaume; Ballesteros, Belen [Centro de Investigaciones en Nanociencia y Nanotecnologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CIN2-CSIC) (Spain); Cabana, Laura; Tobias, Gerard [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (ICMAB-CSIC) (Spain)

    2013-08-15

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with diameters between 10 and 15 nm were transferred and immobilized onto SiO{sub 2} glass substrates by ultraviolet matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (UV-MAPLE). Toluene was chosen as solvent material for the preparation of the composite MAPLE targets. An UV KrF* ({lambda} = 248 nm, {tau}{sub FWHM} {approx_equal} 25 ns, {nu} = 10 Hz) excimer laser source was used for the irradiation experiments. The effects of incident laser fluence on the structure of the laser transferred MWCNTs was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The surface morphology of the laser processed MWCNTs was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy in acoustic (dynamic) configuration. Network-like structures constituted by individual nanotubes and nanotube bundles were created onto solid substrates. Changes in the nanotubes' shell structure can be induced through the tuning of the laser fluence value incident onto the composite MAPLE targets.

  8. Use of ion-assisted techniques for determining the structure of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renz, Renata P.; Vargas, André L.M.; Hübler, Roberto, E-mail: hubler@pucrs.br

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, several researchers have reported obtaining titanium dioxide nanotubes presenting a variety of advanced and functional properties for high-performance applications, e.g., for solar and fuel cells, gas sensor, self-cleaning and biomedical devices. Electrochemical oxidation of titanium has been widely used as a method for fabrication of self-organized titanium oxide nanotubes (TiO{sub 2} NTs), since it is a simple and inexpensive process, which allows a great control over the size and configuration of the formed structure. Normally, the morphological and structural characterizations are based on images from scanning or transmission electron microscopy. The use of characterization techniques assisted by energetic ion beams, such as RBS or MEIS, can simultaneously evaluate the composition and structural properties of the nanotubes. In this work, titanium oxide nanotubes were obtained by electrochemical oxidation of commercially pure titanium via constant-voltage experiments varying the growth time and the potential applied in order to access the formation dynamics of the NTs, including inner and outer diameters as function of the length, and the formation of the end lace type porous layer. The characterizations made by RBS were compared by analysis of top and cross-sectional FEG-SEM images demonstrating a good compromise between them.

  9. Structural, electronic and optical properties of armchair silicon nanotube of chirality (6,6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandel, Surjeet Kumar, E-mail: skchandel2@yahoo.in [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla-171005, India and Department of Physics, Govt. P. G. College, Bilaspur-174001, Himachal Pradesh (India); Kumar, Arun [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla-171005, India and Department of Physics, Govt. College, Banjar-175123, Himachal Pradesh (India); Ahluwalia, P. K.; Sharma, Raman [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla-171005 (India)

    2014-04-24

    First principle calculations based on density functional theory have been used to study the structural, electronic and optical properties of infinite armchair (6,6) silicon nanotube. The cohesive energy of the studied SiNT has been found to be 4.45 eV/atom in comparison to cohesive energy 5.22 eV/atom of its bulk counterpart. Contrary to some published results in literature, the SiNT with (6,6) chirality does not appear to have zero band gap semiconductor since it shows band gap of 0.18 eV. Also the absorption egde of SiNT shifts towards the lower energy as compared to bulk and lies in the infrared region, as a consequence of decrease in dimensionality.

  10. Enhancement of minority carrier injection in ambipolar carbon nanotube transistors using double-gate structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bongjun; Liang, Kelly; Dodabalapur, Ananth, E-mail: ananth.dodabalapur@engr.utexas.edu [Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Geier, Michael L.; Hersam, Mark C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2016-07-11

    We show that double-gate ambipolar thin-film transistors can be operated to enhance minority carrier injection. The two gate potentials need to be significantly different for enhanced injection to be observed. This enhancement is highly beneficial in devices such as light-emitting transistors where balanced electron and hole injections lead to optimal performance. With ambipolar single-walled carbon nanotube semiconductors, we demonstrate that higher ambipolar currents are attained at lower source-drain voltages, which is desired for portable electronic applications, by employing double-gate structures. In addition, when the two gates are held at the same potential, the expected advantages of the double-gate transistors such as enhanced on-current are also observed.

  11. Structural instability of carbon nanotubes embedded in viscoelastic medium and subjected to distributed tangential load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazemilari, Mohammad Ali; Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Fazelzadeh, S. Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model is used to predict the static and dynamic structural instability of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) subjected to a distributed tangential compressive load. The CNT is considered to be embedded in a Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic medium. Equation of motion and boundary conditions are obtained using the extended Hamilton's principle and the extended Galerkin's method is applied in order to transform the resulting equations into a general eigenvalue problem. The derived equations are validated by comparing the results achieved from the new derivations with existing solutions in literature. Effects of several experimentally interesting boundary conditions are considered on the stability characteristics of the CNT. Moreover, the influences of small scale parameter and material properties of the surrounding viscoelastic medium on the stability boundaries are examined.

  12. An analytical study on electronic transport of typical nanotubes with square structure network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Rabani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the electronic conductance of two typical single-wall nanotubes with square lattice by using Green’s function method in tight-binding approximation. Then the effect of various factors such as presence of symmetrical bond defects, the distance between two defects and the nanotube hopping energies was studied on the system electronic conductance. The square and rhombic nanotubes showed metallic and insulator/semiconductor behaviors, respectively.

  13. Radio Frequency Plasma Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) for Structural Applications. Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Stephen J.; Alexa, Joel A.; Jensen, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are more thermally and chemically compatible with metal- and ceramic-matrix composites than carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The lack of an abundant supply of defect-free, high-aspect-ratio BNNTs has hindered development as reinforcing agents in structural materials. Recent activities at the National Research Council - Canada (NRC-C) and the University of California - Berkeley (UC-B) have resulted in bulk synthesis of few-walled, small diameter BNNTs. Both processes employ induction plasma technology to create boron vapor and highly reactive nitrogen species at temperatures in excess of 8000 K. Subsequent recombination under controlled cooling conditions results in the formation of BNNTs at a rate of 20 g/hr and 35 g/hr, respectively. The end product tends to consist of tangled masses of fibril-, sheet-, and cotton candy-like materials, which accumulate within the processing equipment. The radio frequency plasma spray (RFPS) facility at NASA Langley (LaRC), developed for metallic materials deposition, has been re-tooled for in-situ synthesis of BNNTs. The NRC-C and UC-B facilities comprise a 60 kW RF torch, a reactor with a stove pipe geometry, and a filtration system. In contrast, the LaRC facility has a 100 kW torch mounted atop an expansive reaction chamber coupled with a cyclone separator. The intent is to take advantage of both the extra power and the equipment configuration to simultaneously produce and gather BNNTs in a macroscopic form amenable to structural material applications.

  14. Hierarchical structures of carbon nanotubes and arrays of chromium-capped silicon nanopillars: formation and electrical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Stefan; Joshi, Ravi K; Noyong, Michael; Timper, Jan; Schneider, Jörg J; Simon, Ulrich

    2012-09-10

    The formation of stochastically oriented carbon-nanotube networks on top of an array of free-standing chromium-capped silicon nanopillars is reported. The combination of nanosphere lithography and chemical vapor deposition enables the construction of nanostructures that exhibit a hierarchical sequence of structural sizes. Metallic chromium serves as an etching mask for Si-pillar formation and as a nucleation site for the formation of carbon nanotubes through the chemical vapor deposition of ethene, ethanol, and methane, respectively, thereby bridging individual pillars from top to top. Iron and cobalt were applied onto the chromium caps as catalysts for CNT growth and the influence of different carbon sources and different gas-flow rates were investigated. The carbon nanotubes were structurally characterized and their DC electrical properties were studied by in situ local- and ex situ macroscopic measurements, both of which reveal their semiconductor properties. This process demonstrates how carbon nanotubes can be integrated into Si-based semiconductors and, thus, this process may be used to form high-surface-area sensors or new porous catalyst supports with enhanced gas-permeation properties. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Effect of temperature on growth and structure of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W. Z.; Wen, J. G.; Ren, Z. F.

    The effect of temperature on growth and structure of carbon nanotubes (NTs) using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been investigated. Iron embedded silica was used to grow NTs in large quantity at various temperatures from 600 to 1050 °C with gas pressure fixed at 0.6 and 760 Torr, respectively. The growth and structure of the NTs are strongly affected by the temperature. At low gas pressure, the NTs are completely hollow at low temperature and bamboo-like structure at high temperature. While at high gas pressure, all the NTs are bamboo-like structure regardless of temperature. The diameter of NTs increases significantly with temperature. At low gas pressure the diameter gets bigger by mainly increasing the number of graphene layers of the wall of NTs, whereas at high gas pressure the diameter gets bigger by increasing both the number of graphene layers of the wall and the inner diameter of the NTs. This result indicates that the growth temperature is crucial in synthesizing NTs with different structures. The findings here are important for realizing controlled growth of NTs for their applications in different fields.

  16. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes and graphene composite structures for energy and catalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Jun; Maiti, Uday Narayan; Lee, Ju Min; Lim, Joonwon; Han, Tae Hee; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2014-07-04

    Substitutional heteroatom doping is a promising route to modulate the outstanding material properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene for customized applications. Recently, (nitrogen-) N-doping has been introduced to ensure tunable work-function, enhanced n-type carrier concentration, diminished surface energy, and manageable polarization. Along with the promising assessment of N-doping effects, research on the N-doped carbon based composite structures is emerging for the synergistic integration with various functional materials. This invited feature article reviews the current research progress, emerging trends, and opening opportunities in N-doped carbon based composite structures. Underlying basic principles are introduced for the effective modulation of material properties of graphitic carbons by N-doping. Composite structures of N-doped graphitic carbons with various functional materials, including (i) polymers, (ii) transition metals, (iii) metal oxides, nitrides, sulphides, and (iv) semiconducting quantum dots are highlighted. Practical benefits of the synergistic composite structures are investigated in energy and catalytic applications, such as organic photovoltaics, photo/electro-catalysts, lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors, with a particular emphasis on the optimized interfacial structures and properties.

  17. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part I: Micro-structural characterization and geometric modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei

    2014-01-01

    A computational strategy to predict the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites is proposed in this two-part paper. In Part I, the micro-structural characteristics of these nano-composites are discerned. These characteristics include networks/agglomerations of carbon nanotubes and thick polymer interphase regions between the nanotubes and the surrounding matrix. An algorithm is presented to construct three-dimensional geometric models with large amounts of randomly dispersed and aggregated nanotubes. The effects of the distribution of the nanotubes and the thickness of the interphase regions on the concentration of the interphase regions are demonstrated with numerical results. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Solvent Controlled Structural Transition of KI4K Self-Assemblies: from Nanotubes to Nanofibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yurong; Deng, Li; Wang, Jiqian; Xu, Hai; Lu, Jian R

    2015-12-01

    The structural modulation of peptide and protein assemblies under well-controlled conditions is of both fundamental and practical significance. In spite of extensive studies, it remains hugely challenging to tune the self-assembled nanostructures in a controllable manner because the self-assembly processes are dictated by various noncovalent interactions and their interplay. We report here how to manipulate the self-assembly of a designed, symmetric amphiphilic peptide (KI4K) via the solvent-controlled structural transition. Structural transition processes were carefully followed by the combination of transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), circular dichroism (CD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results show that the introduction of acetonitrile into water significantly affected the hydrophobic interactions among hydrophobic side chains while imposing little impact on the β-sheet hydrogen bonding between peptide backbones. A structural transition occurred from nanotubes to helical/twisted ribbons and then to thin fibrils with the addition of acetonitrile due to the reduced hydrophobic interactions and the consequent weakening of the lateral stacking between KI4K β-sheets. The increased intermolecular electrostatic repulsions among lysine side chain amino groups had little effect on the lateral stacking of KI4K β-sheets due to the molecular symmetry. Complementary molecular dynamic (MD) simulations also indicated the solvation of acetonitrile molecules into the hydrophobic domains weakening the coherence between the neighboring sheets.

  19. The electronic structure and ferromagnetism of TM (TM=V, Cr, and Mn)-doped BN(5, 5) nanotube: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, K.H.; Zheng, G.; Chen, G.; Wan, M.; Ji, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    We study the electronic structure and ferromagnetism of V-, Cr-, and Mn-doped single-wall BN(5, 5) nanotube by using polarized spin calculations within first principles. The optimized structures show that the transition-metal atoms move outwards and the calculated electronic properties demonstrate that the isolated V-, Cr-, and Mn-doped BN(5, 5) nanotubes show half-metallicity. The total ferromagnetic moments are 2μ B , 3.02μ B , and 3.98μ B for V-, Cr-, and Mn-doped BN(5, 5), respectively. The study suggests that such transition-metal (TM)-doped nanotubes may be useful in spintronics and nanomagnets

  20. NMR study of local diamagnetic properties of carbon structures with multiwalled nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, E.G.; Omel'yanovsky, O.E.; Prudkovsky, V.S.; Sadakov, A.V.; Tsebro, V.I.

    2009-01-01

    The reasons for the high diamagnetic susceptibility of carbon columns, which are covered with a nanotube mesh, from the interior part of cathode deposits have been studied by means of NMR. A comparative study is made of the 13 C NMR spectra and the magnetic susceptibility of carbon columns before and after ultrasonic processing as well as of finely dispersed material, obtained as a result of such processing, enriched with multilayer nanotubes. The strong diamagnetism of the carbon columns is apparently associated with a quite dense conglomerate of graphite particles, nanotubes, and multilayer polyhedral particles present in their core and not with the surface mesh of multilayer nanotubes. To make a more accurate determination of the character of the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of multilayer carbon nanotubes, the form of the 13 C NMR spectra of samples enriched with multilayer nanotubes, where the nanotubes are either not oriented or only partially oriented, is analyzed. It is shown that the diamagnetic susceptibility of multilayer carbon nanotubes is highest when the magnetic field is oriented perpendicular to their axis

  1. Effect of Urea on the Shape and Structure of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamin, M. R.; Abdulkhair, Babiker Y.; Taha, Kamal K.

    2018-01-01

    Coiled multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared on Fe, Co, and Ni metal oxides supported on α-Al2O3 using urea as fuel and catalyst surface modifying agent by catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD). The shape of the nanotubes was influenced by the addition of urea, where coiled and uncoiled tubes were obtained in the presence and absence of urea, respectively. The MWCNTs were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nitrogen adsorption analysis. The coiling/uncoiling of the nanotubes was visualized from the SEM and TEM images of the prepared specimens. The XRD data showed the characteristic peaks of the nanotubes. BET analysis of the coiled tubes revealed 85.57 m2 g-1 surface area with a pore diameter 102.2-110.8 Å. A mechanism for the nanotubes coiling is suggested.

  2. Multi-walled carbon nanotube structural instability with/without metal nanoparticles under electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imran; Huang, Shengli; Wu, Chenxu

    2017-12-01

    The structural transformation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) under electron beam (e-beam) irradiation at room temperature is studied, with respect to a novel passivation effect due to gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). MWCNT structural evolution induced by energetic e-beam irradiation leads to faster shrinkage, as revealed via in situ transmission electron microscopy, while MWCNT surface modification with Au NPs (Au-MWCNT) slows down the shrinkage by impeding the structural evolution process for a prolonged time under the same irradiation conditions. The new relationship between MWCNT and Au-MWCNT shrinking radii and irradiation time illustrates that the MWCNT shrinkage rate is faster than either theoretical predictions or the same process in Au-MWCNTs. As compared with the outer surface energy (positive curvature), the inner surface energy (negative curvature) of the MWCNT contributes more to the athermal evaporation of tube wall atoms, leading to structural instability and shrinkage under e-beam irradiation. Conversely, Au NPs possess only outer surface energy (positive curvature) compared with the MWCNT. Their presence on MWCNT surfaces retards the dynamics of MWCNT structural evolution by slowing down the evaporation process of carbon atoms, thus restricting Au-MWCNT shrinkage. Au NP interaction and growth evolves athermally on MWCNT surfaces, exhibits increase in their size, and indicates the association of this mechanism with the coalescence induced by e-beam activated electronic excitations. Despite their growth, Au NPs show extreme structural stability, and remain crystalline under prolonged irradiation. It is proposed that the surface energy of MWCNTs and Au NPs, together with e-beam activated soft modes or lattice instability effects, predominantly govern all the above varieties of structural evolution.

  3. Fabrication, morphological, structural and magnetic properties of electrodeposited Fe{sub 3}Pt nanowires and nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, U. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Adeela, N. [Centre for High Energy Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Li, Wenjing; Irfan, M.; Javed, K.; Riaz, S. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Han, X.F., E-mail: xfhan@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Highly ordered Fe{sub 3}Pt nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) embedded in anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template have been fabricated by dc electrodeposition method. Response of heat treatment on structural and magnetic properties of the samples has been studied with and without the presence of magnetic field (1 T). X-Ray Diffraction analysis shows chemically ordered L1{sub 2} face centered cubic (FCC) as the dominant phase for Fe{sub 3}Pt NWs and heat treatment improves crystallinity with retained its phase. Whereas, Fe{sub 3}Pt NTs show amorphous behavior with and without magnetic field annealing. Furthermore, magnetic properties of the samples have been investigated by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Magnetic parameters of Fe{sub 3}Pt including magnetic coercivity, saturation magnetization, squareness and shape of MH-loops have been investigated as a result of simple and MF annealing. - Highlights: • Fe{sub 3}Pt NWs and NTs embedded into anodic alumina templates have been synthesized by dc electrodeposition method. • Structural analysis (XRD) confirmed the formation of fcc structure. • Magnetic properties have been measured as a function of simple and magnetic field annealing.

  4. Structure and composition of single Pt–Ru electrocatalyst nanoparticles supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraguay-Delgado, Francisco; Malac, Marek; Alonso-Nuñez, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Individual Pt-Ru nanoparticles (NPs) supported on multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) synthesized by microemulsion method were characterized by nano beam diffraction (NBD) and high resolution imaging in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Comparing the TEM images and NBD to simulations provided insight into particle composition, structure and morphology in three dimensions. In particular, the NBD allowed us to detect various components of the individual NPs that would be difficult to observe otherwise. We find that the NPs contain four different components: Pt–RuO 2 , Pt–Ru, RuO 2 and metallic Pt. Often an individual NP is composed of more than one component. The most frequently encountered external morphology is close to a spherical shape and ∼3.7 nm in diameter. The collective properties of NPs’ assemblies were studied by thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis and x-ray diffraction. The results allowed us to gain some insight into the relation of the NPs’ structure and composition with their catalytic performance, and revealed the presence of components not detectable by bulk methods. The electrocatalytic properties were evaluated by CO stripping, methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction. Bulk characterization methods miss many properties and structures present in the sample due to low volume fraction and due to overlap of reflections. Single NPs should be analyzed to obtain reliable indication of sample composition. (paper)

  5. Adsorption of ofloxacin and norfloxacin on carbon nanotubes: hydrophobicity- and structure-controlled process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hongbo; Pan, Bo; Wu, Min; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Di; Xing, Baoshan

    2012-09-30

    Adsorption of antibiotics on solid particles is a key process controlling their fate in the subsurface. This study compared the adsorption of ofloxacin and norfloxacin (NOR) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to evaluate the role of structural and hydrophobic properties in regulating their adsorption. A significant relationship was observed between single-point adsorption coefficients (K(d)) and specific surface area (highly hydrophobic), but not between K(d)s and oxygen content. This result suggested that site-specific adsorption was not important but hydrophobic effect may have an important contribution to OFL and NOR adsorption on CNTs. However, normalizing the adsorption coefficients by OFL and NOR solubilities enlarged their adsorption difference indicating that hydrophobicity was not the only factor controlling the difference between OFL and NOR adsorption on CNTs. Their chemical structures show that both chemicals could interact with CNTs through an electron-donor-acceptor mechanism. This mechanism was correlated with the different adsorption of OFL and NOR on functionalized CNTs (namely hydroxylized, carboxylized, and graphitized CNTs). This study revealed that OFL and NOR adsorption was controlled by their both structural- and hydrophobic-properties. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Multi-walled carbon nanotube dispersion by the adsorbed humic acids with different chemical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Pan, Bo; Cook, Robert L; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-01-01

    Dissolved humic acid (disHA) is effective for suspending carbon nanotubes (CNTs), but the suspending mechanism is still unclear. This study used bleached and hydrolyzed humic acids as suspending agents to investigate effects of chemical structures on CNTs suspension. The adsorption of aromatic moieties enriched disHA to CNTs was lower than aliphatic components-enriched disHA, but the former was better at suspending CNTs. These findings led to the development of a model, in which disHA with aromatic structures results in stable suspension of CNTs due to stronger steric hindrance. Because of their flexible structures, aliphatic components-enriched disHA molecules easily conformed to CNTs leading to higher adsorption to CNTs but weaker steric hindrance between CNTs. Therefore, the bridging and less suspension of CNTs was observed. This study emphasizes that suspending CNTs by disHA is not only controlled by the adsorbed amount of disHA, but also the chemical nature of disHA.

  7. Fabrication de structures tridimensionnelles de nanocomposites polymeres charges de nanotubes de carbone a simple paroi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge Lebel, Louis

    There is currently a worldwide effort for advances in micro and nanotechnologies due to their high potential for technological applications in fields such as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), organic electronics and structural microstructures for aerospace. In these applications, carbon nanotube/polymer nanocomposites represent interesting material options compared to conventional resins for their enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. However, several significant scientific and technological challenges must first be overcome in order to rapidly and cost-effectively fabricate nanocomposite-based microdevices. Fabrication techniques have emerged for fabricating one- of two-dimensional (1D/2D) nanocomposite structures but few techniques are available for three-dimensional (3D) nanocomposite structures. The overall objective of this thesis is the development of a manufacturing technique allowing the fabrication of 3D structures of single-walled carbon nanotube (C-SWNT)/polymer nanocomposite. This thesis reports the development of a direct-write fabrication technique that greatly extends the fabrication space for 3D carbon nanotube/polymer nanocomposite structures. The UV-assisted direct-write (UV-DW) technique employs the robotically-controlled micro-extrusion of a nanocomposite filament combined with a UV exposure that follows the extrusion point. Upon curing, the increased rigidity of the extruded filament enables the creation of multi-directional shapes along the trajectory of the extrusion point. The C-SWNT material is produced by laser ablation of a graphite target and purified using a nitric acid reflux. The as-grown and purified material is characterized under transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The purification procedure successfully graphed carboxylic groups on the surface of the C-SWNTs, shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. An incorporation procedure in the polymer is developed involving a non

  8. Electronic structure of helically coiled carbon nanotubes: product Relation between the phason lines and energy band features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagi, K.; Tamura, R.; Tsukada, M.; Itoh, S.; Ihara, S.

    1996-01-01

    Recently carbon nanotubes with coiled structures (carbon helix) were found and have attracted much attention. The electronic structures of two families of such helices, whose structures are proposed by two of the present authors (Ihara and Itoh), are calculated using a tight-binding method based on development maps. It is shown that the various band structures are classified by parameters characterizing the geometry of helices based on the concept of open-quote open-quote phason line.close-quote close-quote Semimetallic character, which could not be manifested in straight tubes, is found in only one of those families

  9. New understanding of photocatalytic properties of zigzag and armchair g-C3N4 nanotubes from electronic structures and carrier effective mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianjun; Cheng, Bei

    2018-02-01

    Low-dimensional g-C3N4 nanostructures own distinct electronic structure and remarkable photocatalytic properties, hence their wide application in the photocatalysis field. However, the correlations of structures and photoinduced carrier migrations with the photocatalytic properties of g-C3N4 nanostructures remain unclear. In this study, the geometrical and electronic structures and the photocatalytic properties of zigzag (n, 0) and armchair (n, n) g-C3N4 nanotubes (n = 6, 9, 12) were systematically investigated using hybrid DFT. Results indicated that the differences in geometrical structures of g-C3N4 nanotubes changed the band gaps and effective mass of carriers. Accordingly, the photocatalytic properties of g-C3N4 nanotubes also changed. Notably, the change trends of band gaps and the effective mass of the electrons and holes were the opposite for zigzag (n, 0) and armchair (n, n) g-C3N4 nanotubes. The absolute band edge potential of (n, 0) and (n, n) g-C3N4 nanotubes can split water for hydrogen production. These theoretical results revealed the correlations of structures and carrier effective mass with the photocatalytic properties of g-C3N4 nanotubes, and provided significant guidance for designing low-dimensional g-C3N4 nanostructures.

  10. Predicting adsorption of aromatic compounds by carbon nanotubes based on quantitative structure property relationship principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Akhoondi, Reza; Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Ahmadi, Farhad

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) models were developed to predict the adsorption of aromatic compounds by carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Five descriptors chosen by combining self-organizing map and stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) techniques were used to connect the structure of the studied chemicals with their adsorption descriptor (K∞) using linear and nonlinear modeling techniques. Correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.99 and root-mean square error (RMSE) of 0.29 for multilayered perceptron neural network (MLP-NN) model are signs of the superiority of the developed nonlinear model over MLR model with R2 of 0.93 and RMSE of 0.36. The results of cross-validation test showed the reliability of MLP-NN to predict the K∞ values for the aromatic contaminants. Molar volume and hydrogen bond accepting ability were found to be the factors much influencing the adsorption of the compounds. The developed QSPR, as a neural network based model, could be used to predict the adsorption of organic compounds by CNTs.

  11. A structural mechanics study of single-walled carbon nanotubes generalized from atomistic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Cao, Guoxin

    2006-02-28

    A new structural mechanics model is developed to closely duplicate the atomic configuration and behaviours of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The SWCNTs are effectively represented by a space frame, where primary and secondary beams are used to bridge the nearest and next-nearest carbon atoms, to mimic energies associated with bond stretching and angle variation, respectively. The elastic properties of the frame components are generalized from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based on an accurate ab initio force field, and numerical analyses of tension, bending, and torsion are carried out on nine different SWCNTs. The space-frame model also closely duplicates the buckling behaviours of SWCNTs in torsion and bending. In addition, by repeating the same process with continuum shell and beam models, new elastic and section parameters are fitted from the MD benchmark experiments. As an application, all three models are employed to study the thermal vibration behaviours of SWCNTs, and excellent agreements with MD analyses are found. The present analysis is a systematic structural mechanics attempt to fit SWCNT properties for several basic deformation modes and applicable to a variety of SWCNTs. The continuum models and fitted parameters may be used to effectively simulate the overall deformation behaviours of SWCNTs at much larger length- and timescales than pure MD analysis.

  12. Comparison of Electronic Structure and Magnetic Properties of Few Layer Graphene and Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekhar Chandra Ray

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study has been made for the non-catalyst based few layer graphene (FLG and Fe-catalyst based multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. Magnetic and electronic properties of FLG and MWCNTs were studied using magnetic M-H hysteresis loops and synchrotron radiation based X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy measurements. Structural defects and electronic and bonding properties of FLG/MWCNTs have been studied using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS. The work functions of FLG and MWCNTs are 4.01 eV and 3.79 eV, respectively, obtained from UPS (He-I spectra. UPS (He-II results suggest that the density of states (DOS of MWCNTs is higher than FLG and is consistent with Raman spectroscopy result that shows the defect of MWCNTs is higher than FLG. The magnetic coercivity (Hc of the MWCNTs (~750 Oe is higher than FLG (~85 Oe which could be used for various technological magnetic applications.

  13. Controlled Synthesis of Ultralong Carbon Nanotubes with Perfect Structures and Extraordinary Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rufan; Zhang, Yingying; Wei, Fei

    2017-02-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have drawn intensive research interest in the past 25 years due to their excellent properties and wide applications. Ultralong CNTs refers to the horizontally aligned CNT arrays which are usually grown on flat substrates, parallel with each other with large intertube distances. They usually have perfect structures, excellent properties, and lengths up to centimeters, even decimeters. Ultralong CNTs are promising candidates as building blocks for transparent displays, nanoelectronics, superstrong tethers, aeronautics and aerospace materials, etc. The controlled synthesis of ultralong CNTs with perfect structures is the key to fully exploit the extraordinary properties of CNTs. CNTs are typical one-dimensional single-crystal nanomaterials. It has always been a great challenge how to grow macroscale single-crystals with no defects. Thus, the synthesis of ultralong CNTs with no defect is of significant importance from both fundamental and industrial aspects. In this Account, we focus on our progress on the controlled synthesis of ultralong CNTs with perfect structures and excellent properties. A deep understanding of the CNT growth mechanism is the first step for the controlled synthesis of ultralong CNTs with high quality. We first introduce the growth mechanism for ultralong CNTs and the main factor affecting their structures. We then discuss the strategies to control the defects in the as-grown ultralong CNTs. With these approaches, ultralong high-quality CNTs with different structures can be obtained. By completely eliminating the factors which may induce defects in the CNT walls, ultralong CNTs with perfect structures can be obtained. Their chiral indices keep unchanged for several centimeters long along the axial direction of the CNTs. The defect-free structures render the ultralong CNTs with excellent electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. The as-grown ultralong CNTs exhibit superhigh mechanical strength (>100 GPa) and their

  14. Colloidal stability of suspended and agglomerate structures of settled carbon nanotubes in different aqueous matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwyzer, Irène; Kaegi, Ralf; Sigg, Laura; Nowack, Bernd

    2013-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are often processed in suspended form and therefore a release of CNT-suspensions into the aquatic environment is plausible. In this study, the behaviour of two physico-chemically very different CNT types in the presence of varying, environmentally relevant calcium-containing media was investigated, including the long-term colloidal stability and the sedimentary structures of settled CNTs. Calcium induced CNT flocculation, however, the stability of the CNTs in the medium did not monotonously decrease with increasing calcium concentration. At intermediate calcium concentrations (0.5-1.5 mM Ca) pre-dispersed CNTs were stabilized in humic acid medium to similar, temporarily even to higher degree than in the absence of calcium. Between pH 5 and 8 only at the highest pH an influence on CNT stability was observed by either promoting flocculation or stabilisation depending on the CNT type. Humic acid stabilized CNTs much better than fulvic acid. Generally, the colloidal stability of the long, thick CNTs with higher surface oxygen content was less affected by the media composition. An investigation of the settled CNT material using analytical electron microscopy revealed the presence of spheroidal, bundle-like and net like CNT-agglomerate structures. Calcium possibly acted as bridging agent linking CNTs in a network like manner, temporarily increasing the CNT concentrations stabilized in the supernatants due to the low density of these structures. With increasing settling time the CNTs formed a fluffy sediment layer at the bottom of the reaction vessels. Bundle-like CNT agglomerates were also observed within that layer of settled CNTs, possibly caused by calcium neutralizing the surface charges. Furthermore, the CNT suspensions contained spheroidal CNT agglomerates, most likely residues from the original dry powder that were not disaggregated. The analysis of settled CNT material is a novelty and illustrates CNT agglomerate structures possibly

  15. Adsorption of ofloxacin and norfloxacin on carbon nanotubes: Hydrophobicity- and structure-controlled process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Hongbo [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, Yunnan 650093 (China); Pan, Bo, E-mail: panbocai@gmail.com [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, Yunnan 650093 (China); Wu, Min; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Di [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, Yunnan 650093 (China); Xing, Baoshan [Department of Plant, Soil and Insect Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2012-09-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A significant relationship between K{sub d} and SSA for both OFL and NOR on CNTs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No relationship was observed between K{sub d}s and oxygen content of CNTs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Normalizing K{sub d}s by solubilites enlarged OFL and NOR sorption difference. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OFL and NOR sorption was controlled by their structural- and hydrophobic-properties. - Abstract: Adsorption of antibiotics on solid particles is a key process controlling their fate in the subsurface. This study compared the adsorption of ofloxacin and norfloxacin (NOR) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to evaluate the role of structural and hydrophobic properties in regulating their adsorption. A significant relationship was observed between single-point adsorption coefficients (K{sub d}) and specific surface area (highly hydrophobic), but not between K{sub d}s and oxygen content. This result suggested that site-specific adsorption was not important but hydrophobic effect may have an important contribution to OFL and NOR adsorption on CNTs. However, normalizing the adsorption coefficients by OFL and NOR solubilities enlarged their adsorption difference indicating that hydrophobicity was not the only factor controlling the difference between OFL and NOR adsorption on CNTs. Their chemical structures show that both chemicals could interact with CNTs through an electron-donor-acceptor mechanism. This mechanism was correlated with the different adsorption of OFL and NOR on functionalized CNTs (namely hydroxylized, carboxylized, and graphitized CNTs). This study revealed that OFL and NOR adsorption was controlled by their both structural- and hydrophobic-properties.

  16. Differentiation of chemical reaction activity of various carbon nanotubes using redox potential: Classification by physical and chemical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruoka, Shuji; Matsumoto, Hidetoshi; Castranova, Vincent; Porter, Dale W; Yanagisawa, Takashi; Saito, Naoto; Kobayashi, Shinsuke; Endo, Morinobu

    2015-12-01

    The present study systematically examined the kinetics of a hydroxyl radical scavenging reaction of various carbon nanotubes (CNTs) including double-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs and MWCNTs), and carbon nano peapods (AuCl 3 @DWCNT). The theoretical model that we recently proposed based on the redox potential of CNTs was used to analyze the experimental results. The reaction kinetics for DWCNTs and thin MWCNTs agreed well with the theoretical model and was consistent with each other. On the other hand, thin and thick MWCNTs behaved differently, which was consistent with the theory. Additionally, surface morphology of CNTs substantially influenced the reaction kinetics, while the doped particles in the center hollow parts of CNTs (AuCl 3 @DWCNT) shifted the redox potential in a different direction. These findings make it possible to predict the chemical and biological reactivity of CNTs based on the structural and chemical nature and their influence on the redox potential.

  17. One ring (or two) to hold them all – on the structure and function of protein nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelucci, Francesco; Bellelli, Andrea; Ardini, Matteo; Ippoliti, Rodolfo; Saccoccia, Fulvio; Morea, Veronica

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the structural determinants relevant to the formation of supramolecular assemblies of homo-oligomeric proteins is a traditional and central scope of structural biology. The knowledge thus gained is crucial both to infer their physiological function and to exploit their architecture for bionanomaterials design. Protein nanotubes made by one-dimensional arrays of homo-oligomers can be generated by either a commutative mechanism, yielding an 'open' structure (e.g. actin), or a noncommutative mechanism, whereby the final structure is formed by hierarchical self-assembly of intermediate 'closed' structures. Examples of the latter process are poorly described and the rules by which they assemble have not been unequivocally defined. We have collected and investigated examples of homo-oligomeric circular arrangements that form one-dimensional filaments of stacked rings by the noncommutative mechanism in vivo and in vitro. Based on their quaternary structure, circular arrangements of protein subunits can be subdivided into two groups that we term Rings of Dimers (e.g. peroxiredoxin and stable protein 1) and Dimers of Rings (e.g. thermosome/rosettasome), depending on the sub-structures that can be identified within the assembly (and, in some cases, populated in solution under selected experimental conditions). Structural analysis allowed us to identify the determinants by which ring-like molecular chaperones form filamentous-like assemblies and to formulate a novel hypothesis by which nanotube assembly, molecular chaperone activity and macromolecular crowding may be interconnected. © 2015 FEBS.

  18. Hierarchically structured graphene-carbon nanotube-cobalt hybrid electrocatalyst for seawater battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Park, Sul Ki; Nakhanivej, Puritut; Kim, Youngsik; Hwang, Soo Min; Park, Ho Seok

    2017-12-01

    The design of cost-effective and highly active catalysts is a critical challenge. Inspired by the strong points of stability and conductivity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), high catalytic activity of Co nanoparticles, and rapid ion diffusion and large accessible area of three-dimensional (3D) graphene, we demonstrate a novel strategy to construct a hierarchical hybrid structure consisting of Co/CoOx nanoparticles-incorporated CNT branches onto the 3D reduced graphene oxide (rGO) architecture. The surface-modified 3D rGO by steam activation process has a large surface area and abundant defect sites, which serve as active sites to uniformly grow Co/CoOx nanoparticles. Furthermore, the CNTs preserve their performance stably by encapsulating Co nanoparticles, while the uniformly decorated Co/CoOx nanoparticles exhibit superior electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen evolution/reduction reaction due to highly exposed active sites. Employing the hybrid particle electrocatalyst, the seawater battery operates stably at 0.01 mA cm-2 during 50 cycles, owing to the good electrocatalytic ability.

  19. Tensile Characterization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Helical Structural Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhon, Young I; Kim, Chulki; Seo, Minah; Cho, Woon Jo; Lee, Seok; Jhon, Young Min

    2016-02-04

    Recently, evidence was presented that certain single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess helical defective traces, exhibiting distinct cleaved lines, yet their mechanical characterization remains a challenge. On the basis of the spiral growth model of SWNTs, here we present atomic details of helical defects and investigate how the tensile behaviors of SWNTs change with their presence using molecular dynamics simulations. SWNTs have exhibited substantially lower tensile strength and strain than theoretical results obtained from a seamless tubular structure, whose physical origin cannot be explained either by any known SWNT defects so far. We find that this long-lasting puzzle could be explained by assuming helical defects in SWNTs, exhibiting excellent agreement with experimental observation. The mechanism of this tensile process is elucidated by analyzing atomic stress distribution and evolution, and the effects of the chirality and diameter of SWNTs on this phenomenon are examined based on linear elastic fracture mechanics. This work contributes significantly to our understanding of the growth mechanism, defect hierarchies, and mechanical properties of SWNTs.

  20. High performance natural rubber composites with a hierarchical reinforcement structure of carbon nanotube modified natural fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzounis, Lazaros; Debnath, Subhas; Rooj, Sandip; Fischer, Dieter; Mäder, Edith; Das, Amit; Stamm, Manfred; Heinrich, Gert

    2014-01-01

    A simple and facile method for depositing multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) onto the surface of naturally occurring short jute fibers (JFs) is reported. Hierarchical multi-scale structures were formed with CNT-networks uniformly distributed and fully covering the JFs (JF–CNT), as depicted by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. The impact of these hybrid fillers on the mechanical properties of a natural rubber (NR) matrix was systematically investigated. Pristine JFs were cut initially to an average length of 2.0 mm and exposed to an alkali treatment (a-JFs) to remove impurities existing in the raw jute. MWCNTs were treated under mild acidic conditions to generate carboxylic acid moieties. Afterward, MWCNTs were dispersed in an aqueous media and short a-JFs were allowed to react with them. Raman spectroscopy confirmed the chemical interaction between CNTs and JFs. The JF–CNT exposed quite hydrophobic behavior as revealed by the water contact angle measurements, improving the wettability of the non-polar NR. Consequently, the composite interfacial adhesion strength was significantly enhanced while a micro-scale “mechanical interlocking” mechanism was observed from the interphase-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. SEM analysis of the composite fracture surfaces demonstrated the interfacial strength of NR/a-JF and NR/JF–CNT composites, at different fiber loadings. It can be presumed that the CNT-coating effectively compatibillized the composite structure acting as a macromolecular coupling agent. A detailed analysis of stress-strain and dynamic mechanical spectra confirmed the high mechanical performance of the hierarchical composites, consisting mainly of materials arising from natural resources. - Highlights: • Natural rubber (NR) composites reinforced with CNT-modified short jute fibers. • MWCNTs deposited to the surface of jute fibers via non-covalent interactions. • Hierarchical reinforcement structure with

  1. Temperature driven structural-memory-effects in carbon nanotubes filled with Fe3C nano crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Filippo S.; Zhang, Xiaotian; Corrias, Anna

    2018-02-01

    We report the observation of novel temperature-driven structural-memory-effects in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled with Fe3C nano-crystals. These structural-transitions were measured by means of temperature (T) dependent x-ray diffraction (XRD) in the T-range from 298 K to 12 K. A clear reversible 2θ-shift in the 002-peak of the graphitic-CNTs-walls is found with the decrease of the temperature. As determined by Rietveld refinement, such 2θ-shift translates in a not previously reported decrease in the value of the CNT graphitic c-axis with the decrease of the temperature (from 298 K to 12 K). Also, a clear reversible 2θ-shift in the 031 and 131 diffraction-peaks of Fe3C is observed within the same T-range. Rietveld refinements confirm the existence of such memory-effect and also reveal a gradual decrease of the 010-axis of Fe3C with the decrease of the temperature. These observations imply that the observed structural-memory-effect is a characteristic of CNTs when Fe3C is the encapsulated ferromagnet. The generality of such memory-effects was further confirmed by additional measurements performed on other types of CNTs characterized by continuous Fe3C-filling. XRD measurements in the T-range from 298 K to 673 K revealed also an unusual reversible decrease of the Fe3C-peak intensities with the increase of the temperature. These observations can have important implications on the magnetic data recording applications of these nanostructures by helping in better understanding the unusual temperature-dependent magnetic instabilities of iron-based nano-crystals which have been recently reported in literature.

  2. Embedded Aligned Carbon Nanotube Sheets for Strain and Damage sensing in Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Karim Aly Abdelomoaty Elsayed

    The world demand for fiber reinforced composite materials has been steadily increasing because of the widespread adoption of this class of material in many markets. The automotive, aerospace, marine and energy sectors account for a large percentage of this grow. Outstanding fatigue performance, high specific stiffness and strength, and low density are among the most important properties that fiber reinforced polymer composites offer. Furthermore, their properties can be tailored to meet the specific needs of the final applications. However, this class of material is composed of multiple layers of inhomogeneous and anisotropic constituents, i.e. fibers and matrix. Therefore, this laminated nature make the composite material prone to intrinsic damage including interfacial debonding and delamination and their strength and failure are dependent on the fiber architecture and direction of the applied stresses. Consequently, it is of prime importance to monitor the health of these structures. New and improved methods for early detection of damage and structural health monitoring of composite materials may allow for enhanced reliability, lifetime and performance while minimizing maintenance time during a composite part's service life. Over the last few decades different non-destructive methods and materials have been investigated for use as strain sensors. Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), they have attracted much research interest due to their superior electrical, thermal and mechanical properties as well as their high aspect ratio. In this context, CNTs have been used in the recent years to enable sensing capabilities. In this dissertation, the usage of CNTs for performing strain and damage sensing in composites is evaluated. This was enabled by embedding aligned sheets of two millimeters long, interconnected CNTs into laminated structures that were then subjected to different forms of mechanical loading. The localization of the CNT sheets inside the host

  3. Scalable synthesis of hierarchically structured carbon nanotube-graphene fibres for capacitive energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dingshan; Goh, Kunli; Wang, Hong; Wei, Li; Jiang, Wenchao; Zhang, Qiang; Dai, Liming; Chen, Yuan

    2014-07-01

    Micro-supercapacitors are promising energy storage devices that can complement or even replace batteries in miniaturized portable electronics and microelectromechanical systems. Their main limitation, however, is the low volumetric energy density when compared with batteries. Here, we describe a hierarchically structured carbon microfibre made of an interconnected network of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes with interposed nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide sheets. The nanomaterials form mesoporous structures of large specific surface area (396 m(2) g(-1)) and high electrical conductivity (102 S cm(-1)). We develop a scalable method to continuously produce the fibres using a silica capillary column functioning as a hydrothermal microreactor. The resultant fibres show a specific volumetric capacity as high as 305 F cm(-3) in sulphuric acid (measured at 73.5 mA cm(-3) in a three-electrode cell) or 300 F cm(-3) in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/H(3)PO(4) electrolyte (measured at 26.7 mA cm(-3) in a two-electrode cell). A full micro-supercapacitor with PVA/H(3)PO(4) gel electrolyte, free from binder, current collector and separator, has a volumetric energy density of ∼6.3 mWh cm(-3) (a value comparable to that of 4 V-500 µAh thin-film lithium batteries) while maintaining a power density more than two orders of magnitude higher than that of batteries, as well as a long cycle life. To demonstrate that our fibre-based, all-solid-state micro-supercapacitors can be easily integrated into miniaturized flexible devices, we use them to power an ultraviolet photodetector and a light-emitting diode.

  4. The structure and the photocatalytic activity of titania based nanotube and nanofiber coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, A., E-mail: aradtke@umk.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, ul. Gagarina 7, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Piszczek, P.; Topolski, A.; Lewandowska, Ż. [Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, ul. Gagarina 7, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Talik, E. [A. Chełkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, ul. Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Andersen, I. Hald; Nielsen, L. Pleth [Tribology Centre, Danish Technological Institute, Kongsvang Allé 29, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Heikkilä, M.; Leskelä, M. [Centre of Excellence, Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, University of Helsinki, A.I. Virtasen aukio 1, FI-00014 (Finland)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The photoactivity of TNT and TNF has been quantified by two different methods. • The influence of the TNT and TNF structure on their photoactivity was studied. • The photoactivity comparison of TNT and TNF was carried out. • TNF coatings show higher photoactivity in comparison to TNT. - Abstract: The photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} based nanotube (TNT) and nanofiber (TNF) coatings has been investigated, in correlation to their structure, morphology, specific surface area, acidity and the amount of surface H{sub 2}O molecules and −OH groups. Characterization of these materials was carried out using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT). The photocatalytic activity has been quantified by two different methods, based on the photodegradation of methylene blue (the pattern of water-soluble organic pollutant) and acetone (the pattern of volatile organic pollutant), respectively. Results of our investigations revealed that TNF coatings were significantly more active in case of both photodegradation processes in air and water, as compared to TNT, even if the specific surface area of TNF films was smaller than the adequate surface area of TNT. The microstructure of produced materials, the amount of adsorbed −OH groups and H{sub 2}O molecules located on the surface of materials, and the acidity of the surface, were the main factors which affect their photoactivity. Photocatalytic properties of tubular and porous TiO{sub 2}-based materials are the resultant of the compilation of individual factors impact and any of them cannot be neglected.

  5. Adsorption and desorption of Cd(II) onto titanate nanotubes and efficient regeneration of tubular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ting; Liu, Wen; Xu, Nan; Ni, Jinren

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Satisfactory reuse of TNTs due to easy regeneration of tubular structures. ► TNTs regeneration using only 2% of NaOH needed for virgin TNTs preparation. ► Excellent regeneration attributed to steady TNTs skeleton and complex form of TNTs-OCd + OH − onto adsorbed TNTs. -- Abstract: Efficient regeneration of desorbed titanate nanotubes (TNTs) was investigated with cycled Cd(II) adsorption and desorption processes. After desorption of Cd (II) from TNTs using 0.1 M HNO 3 , regeneration could be simply achieved with only 0.2 M NaOH at ambient temperature, i.e. 2% of the NaOH needed for virgin TNTs preparation at 130 °C. The regenerated TNTs displayed similar adsorption capacity of Cd(II) even after six recycles, while significant reduction could be detected for desorbed TNTs without regeneration. The virgin TNTs, absorbed TNTs, desorbed TNTs and regenerated TNTs were systematically characterized. As results, the ion-exchange mechanism with Na + in TNTs was convinced with obvious change of -TiO(ONa) 2 by FTIR spectroscopy. The easy recovery of the damaged tubular structures proved by TEM and XRD was ascribed to asymmetric distribution of H + and Na + on the surface side and interlayer region of TNTs. More importantly, the cost-effective regeneration was found possibly related to complex form of TNTs-OCd + OH − onto the adsorbed TNTs, which was identified with help of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and further indicated due to high relevance to an unexpected mole ratio of 1:1 between exchanged Na + and absorbed Cd(II)

  6. Structural and electronic properties of alkali-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemes, Norbert Marcel

    In this thesis, we study the properties of alkali doped single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). SWNT are crystallized into ropes, which display the one-dimensional electronic properties of the constituent nanotubes. Using x-ray diffraction, we show that the alkali atoms invade the channels in the triangular rope lattice and determine the structure of the doped ropes. We show that the diffraction profile of the doped SWNT is best described by a model where the alkali ions surround each tube in an ordered fashion by dilating the channels. Alkali doped SWNT exhibit colors similar to alkali doped graphite (GIC). We study their electronic structure with IR reflectivity; the alkali dopants donate their valence electron to the SWNT host, so the free carrier concentration increases, shifting the Drude-edge into the visible spectral range. This is accompanied by a large shift of the Fermi-level, so the characteristic transitions between the 1D van Hove singularities of the undoped SWNT diminish. The presence of the alkali ions around the SWNT breaks the translational symmetry and increases coupling between parallel tubes within ropes. We find that the momentum relaxation time shortens as the ropes become more three dimensional. We also find that alkali disorder contributes to the scattering. In p-type, HNO3 doped SWNT, the charge transfer is smaller; only the first subband of the semiconducting tubes gets depleted, shown by the disappearance of the first van Hove transition. This indicates a Fermi-level shift of ˜0.3 eV. The reflectivity has structure at low energy, which moves the Drude-peak to a sharp, intense peak at 0.1 eV in the optical conductivity, reminiscent of quasi-1D TTF-TCNQ. The DC conductivity also increases ˜80-fold during doping. The low temperature divergence of undoped SWNT disappears in alkali doped SWNT. However, we find that oxygen can modulate the low-T divergence. After outgassing, the divergence becomes ˜10 times stronger. We interpret the low

  7. The effect of fibronectin on structural and biological properties of single walled carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farokhi, Mehdi [National cell bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Atyabi, Fatemeh [Department of Pharmaceutical Nanoechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omidvar, Ramin [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali, E-mail: mashokrgozar@pasteur.ac.ir [National cell bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghizadeh, Majid, E-mail: sadeghma@modares.ac.ir [Department Genetics, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the cytocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotube by loading fibronectin. • Enhancing the hydrophilicity and nanosurface roughness of single walled carbon nanotube after loading fibronectin. • Fibronectin makes the surface properties of single walled carbon nanotube more suitable for cell proliferation and growth. - Abstract: Despite the attractive properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), cytoxicity and hydrophobicity are two main considerable features which limit their application in biomedical fields. It was well established that treating CNTs with extracellular matrix components could reduce these unfavourable characteristics. In an attempt to address these issues, fibronectin (FN) with different concentrations was loaded on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) substrate. Scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angles and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were preformed in order to characterize FN loaded SWCNTs substrates. According to XPS and AFM results, FN could interact with SWCNTs and for this, the hydrophilicity of SWCNTs was improved. Additionally, SWCNT modified with FN showed less cytotoxicity compared with neat SWCNT. Finally, FN was shown to act as an interesting extracellular component for enhancing the biological properties of SWCNT.

  8. The effect of fibronectin on structural and biological properties of single walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottaghitalab, Fatemeh; Farokhi, Mehdi; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Omidvar, Ramin; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Increasing the cytocompatibility of single walled carbon nanotube by loading fibronectin. • Enhancing the hydrophilicity and nanosurface roughness of single walled carbon nanotube after loading fibronectin. • Fibronectin makes the surface properties of single walled carbon nanotube more suitable for cell proliferation and growth. - Abstract: Despite the attractive properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), cytoxicity and hydrophobicity are two main considerable features which limit their application in biomedical fields. It was well established that treating CNTs with extracellular matrix components could reduce these unfavourable characteristics. In an attempt to address these issues, fibronectin (FN) with different concentrations was loaded on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) substrate. Scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angles and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were preformed in order to characterize FN loaded SWCNTs substrates. According to XPS and AFM results, FN could interact with SWCNTs and for this, the hydrophilicity of SWCNTs was improved. Additionally, SWCNT modified with FN showed less cytotoxicity compared with neat SWCNT. Finally, FN was shown to act as an interesting extracellular component for enhancing the biological properties of SWCNT

  9. Structures with high number density of carbon nanotubes and 3-dimensional distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheng (Inventor); Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A composite is described having a three dimensional distribution of carbon nanotubes. The critical aspect of such composites is a nonwoven network of randomly oriented fibers connected at their junctions to afford macropores in the spaces between the fibers. A variety of fibers may be employed, including metallic fibers, and especially nickel fibers. The composite has quite desirable properties for cold field electron emission applications, such as a relatively low turn-on electric field, high electric field enhancement factors, and high current densities. The composites of this invention also show favorable properties for other an electrode applications. Several methods, which also have general application in carbon nanotube production, of preparing these composites are described and employ a liquid feedstock of oxyhydrocarbons as carbon nanotube precursors.

  10. Fully integrated carbon nanotube composite thin film strain sensors on flexible substrates for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, A. R.; Lynch, J. P.; Kurata, M.; Law, K. H.

    2017-09-01

    Multifunctional thin film materials have opened many opportunities for novel sensing strategies for structural health monitoring. While past work has established methods of optimizing multifunctional materials to exhibit sensing properties, comparatively less work has focused on their integration into fully functional sensing systems capable of being deployed in the field. This study focuses on the advancement of a scalable fabrication process for the integration of multifunctional thin films into a fully integrated sensing system. This is achieved through the development of an optimized fabrication process that can create a broad range of sensing systems using multifunctional materials. A layer-by-layer deposited multifunctional composite consisting of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) in a polyvinyl alcohol and polysodium-4-styrene sulfonate matrix are incorporated with a lithography process to produce a fully integrated sensing system deposited on a flexible substrate. To illustrate the process, a strain sensing platform consisting of a patterned SWNT-composite thin film as a strain-sensitive element within an amplified Wheatstone bridge sensing circuit is presented. Strain sensing is selected because it presents many of the design and processing challenges that are core to patterning multifunctional thin film materials into sensing systems. Strain sensors fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate are experimentally tested under cyclic loading using standard four-point bending coupons and a partial-scale steel frame assembly under lateral loading. The study reveals the material process is highly repeatable to produce fully integrated strain sensors with linearity and sensitivity exceeding 0.99 and 5 {{V}}/{ε }, respectively. The thin film strain sensors are robust and are capable of high strain measurements beyond 3000 μ {ε }.

  11. The influence of carbon nanotubes on enzyme activity and structure: investigation of different immobilization procedures through enzyme kinetics and circular dichroism studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cang-Rong, Jason Teng; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2009-01-01

    In the last decade, many environmental organizations have devoted their efforts to identifying renewable biosystems, which could provide sustainable fuels and thus enhance energy security. Amidst the myriad of possibilities, some biofuels make use of different types of waste biomasses, and enzymes are often employed to hydrolyze these biomasses and produce sugars that will be subsequently converted into ethanol. In this project, we aimed to bridge nanotechnology and biofuel production: here we report on the activity and structure of the enzyme amyloglucosidase (AMG), physically adsorbed or covalently immobilized onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). In fact, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) present several properties that render them ideal support systems, without the diffusion limitations displayed by porous material and with the advantage of being further functionalizable at their surface. Chemical ligation was achieved both on oxidized nanotubes (via carbodiimide chemistry), as well as on amino-functionalized nanotubes (via periodate-oxidized AMG). Results showed that AMG retained a certain percentage of its specific activity for all enzyme-carbon nanotubes complexes prepared, with the physically adsorbed samples displaying better catalytic efficiency than the covalently immobilized samples. Analysis of the enzyme's structure through circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy revealed significant structural changes in all samples, the degree of change being consistent with the activity profiles. This study proves that AMG interacts differently with carbon nanotubes depending on the method employed. Due to the higher activity reported by the enzyme physically adsorbed onto CNTs, these samples demonstrated a vast potential for further development. At the same time, the possibility of inducing magnetic properties into CNTs offers the opportunity to easily separate them from the original solution. Hence, substances to which they

  12. Role of acoustic phonons in the negative thermal expansion of layered structures and nanotubes based on them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremenko, V. V.; Sirenko, A. F.; Sirenko, V. A.; Dolbin, A. V.; Gospodarev, I. A.; Syrkin, E. S.; Feodosyev, S. B.; Bondar, I. S.; Minakova, K. A.

    2016-05-01

    Calculations on a microscopic level are used to explain the experimentally observed negative linear thermal expansion along some directions in a number of crystalline compounds with complicated lattices and anisotropic interactions between atoms. Anomalies in the temperature dependence of the coefficient of linear thermal expansion are analyzed in layered crystals made up of monatomic layers (graphite and graphene nanofilms) and multilayer "sandwiches" (transition metal dichalcogenides), in multilayered crystal structures such as high-temperature superconductors where the anisotropy of the interatomic interactions is not conserved in the long-range order, and in graphene nanotubes. The theoretical calculations are compared with data from x-ray, neutron diffraction, and dilatometric measurements.

  13. The effect of different atmospheres on structural changes of titanate nanotubes during heating

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Václavů, T.; Rudajevová, A.; Václavů, M.; Daniš, S.; Popelková, Daniela; Kužel, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 128, č. 2 (2017), s. 779-785 ISSN 1388-6150 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : titanate nanotubes * X-ray diffraction * thermal analysis Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 1.953, year: 2016

  14. Poly(ethylene oxide) Crystallization in Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Based Nanocomposites: Kinetics and Structural Consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T Chatterjee; A Lorenzo; R Krishnamoorti

    2011-12-31

    The overall isothermal crystallization behavior of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) in single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based nanocomposites is studied with a focus on growth kinetics and morphological evolution of PEO using differential scanning calorimetry and in-situ small angle x-ray scattering measurements respectively. The characteristic time for crystallization of PEO increases due to the presence of lithium dodecyl sulfate (LDS) stabilized carbon nanotubes. Further, analysis of crystallization data using the Lauritzen-Hoffman regime theory of crystal growth shows the PEO chains stiffen in presence of LDS with an increased energy barrier associated with the nucleation and crystal growth, and the nanotubes further act as a barrier to chain transport or enhance the efficacy of the LDS action. The energy penalty and diffusional barrier to chain transport in the nanocomposites disrupt the crystalline PEO helical conformation. This destabilization leads to preferential growth of local nuclei resulting in formation of thinner crystal lamellae and suggests that the crystallization kinetics is strongly affected by the nucleation and crystal growth events. This study is particularly interesting considering the suppression of the PEO crystallinity in presence of small fraction of Lithium ion based surfactant and carbon nanotubes.

  15. Selective Wrapping and Supramolecular Structures of Polyfluorene-Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Jia; Loi, Maria Antonietta; Figueiredo de Carvalho, Elton Jose; dos Santos, Maria Cristina

    We report on the photophysical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) suspensions In toluene solutions of poly[9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl](PFO). Steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy in the near-infrared and visible spectral regions are used to study the

  16. Effects of multi-wall carbon nanotubes on structural and mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-22

    Sep 22, 2017 ... Abstract. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)/chitosan electrospun scaffold was recently prepared for cartilage tissue engineering purpose. The drawback of this scaffold was its low mechanical properties. This study was carried out to see if addition of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) to PHB/chitosan ...

  17. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günay, E. [Gazi University, Mechanical Engineering Department, 06570, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-04-21

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  18. Structure and magnetic response of a residual metal catalyst in highly purified single walled carbon nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pacáková Bittová, Barbara; Kalbáč, Martin; Kubíčková, Simona; Mantlíková, Alice; Mangold, S.; Vejpravová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 16 (2013), s. 5992-6000 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/1677 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * purification * nanoparticles * magnetic property measurements Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 4.198, year: 2013

  19. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günay, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  20. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Günay, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  1. Structural and Chemical Analysis of Gadolinium Halides Encapsulated within WS 2 Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Anumol, E A

    2016-05-18

    The hollow cavities of nanotubes could serve as templates for the growth of size- and shape-confined functional nanostructures, giving rise to novel materials and properties. In this work, considering their potential application as MRI contrast agents, gadolinium halides are encapsulated within the hollow cavities of inorganic nanotubes of WS2 by capillary filling to obtain GdX3@WS2 nanotubes (where X = Cl, Br or I and @ means encapsulated in). Aberration corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and spectroscopy is employed to understand the morphology and composition of the GdI3@WS2 nanotubes. The three dimensional morphology is studied with STEM tomography but understanding the compositional information is a non-trivial matter due to the presence of multiple high atomic number elements. Therefore, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) tomography was employed revealing the three dimensional chemical composition. Molecular dynamics simulations of the filling procedure shed light into the mechanics behind the formation of the confined gadolinium halide crystals. The quasi-1D system employed here serves as an example of a TEM-based chemical nanotomography method that could be extended to other materials, including beam-sensitive soft materials.

  2. Structure and flow behavior of dilute dispersions of carbon nanotubes in polyacrylonitrile–dimethylsulfoxide solution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karpushkin, E.; Gvozdik, N.; Klimenko, M.; Filippov, Sergey K.; Angelov, Borislav; Bessonov, I.; Sergeyev, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 294, č. 7 (2016), s. 1187-1195 ISSN 0303-402X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC15-10527J Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * alignment * aggregation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.723, year: 2016

  3. Characterization of nephelium mutabile blume-like structure of carbon nanotubes prepared from palm oil by CVD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryam, M.; Shamsudin, M. S.; Rusop, M.

    2017-09-01

    A new structure of carbon nanotube was produced from the Single furnace Aerosol-assisted Catalytic CVD (SFAACVD) method using Palm Oil (PO) as the precursor and Ferrocene (Fe) as the catalyst. A nephelium mutabile blume (rambutan)-like structure of CNTs was found from the black substance collected from the Alumina boat substrate placed inside the furnace. Temperature of furnace which was heated at 600 °C - 800 °C plays an important role in determining the formation of structure. The formation rambutan-like structure of CNTs was optimized at 700 °C and the samples collected were characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM) to obtain the surface morphologies. Raman Spectroscopy (RS) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) were then used to further study the Raman Spectra and purity of samples.

  4. Rational design of coaxial structured carbon nanotube-manganese oxide (CNT-MnO2) for energy storage application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunkhe, Rahul R; Ahn, Heejoon; Kim, Jung Ho; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2015-05-22

    Recently, there has been great research interest in the development of composites (core-shell structures) of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with metal oxides for improved electrochemical energy storage, photonics, electronics, catalysis, etc. Currently, the synthetic strategies for metal oxides/hydroxides are well established, but the development of core-shell structures by robust, cost-effective chemical methods is still a challenge. The main drawbacks for obtaining such electrodes are the very complex synthesis methods which ultimately result in high production costs. Alternatively, the solution based method offers the advantages of simple and cost effective synthesis, as well as being easy to scale up. Here, we report on the development of multi-walled carbon nanotube-manganese oxide (CNT-MnO2) core-shell structures. These samples were directly utilized for asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) applications, where the CNT-MnO2 composite was used as the positive electrode and ZIF-8 (zeolitic imidazolate framework, ZIF) derived nanoporous carbon was used as the negative electrode. This unconventional ASC shows a high energy density of 20.44 W h kg(-1) and high power density of 16 kW kg(-1). The results demonstrate that these are efficient electrodes for supercapacitor application.

  5. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  6. Synthesis of palladium nanoparticle modified reduced graphene oxide and multi-walled carbon nanotube hybrid structures for electrochemical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jie, E-mail: hujie@tyut.edu.cn [Micro and Nano System Research Center, Key Lab of Advanced Transducers and Intelligent Control System (Ministry of Education) & College of Information Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, 030024, Shanxi (China); Zhao, Zhenting; Zhang, Jun; Li, Gang; Li, Pengwei; Zhang, Wendong [Micro and Nano System Research Center, Key Lab of Advanced Transducers and Intelligent Control System (Ministry of Education) & College of Information Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, 030024, Shanxi (China); Lian, Kun, E-mail: liankun@tyut.edu.cn [Micro and Nano System Research Center, Key Lab of Advanced Transducers and Intelligent Control System (Ministry of Education) & College of Information Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan, 030024, Shanxi (China); School of Nano-Science and Nano-Engineering, Suzhou & Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, LA, 70806 (United States)

    2017-02-28

    Graphical abstract: A sensitive hydrazine electrochemical sensor was fabricated by using palladium (Pd) nanoparticle functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) hybrid structures (Pd/rGO-MWCNTs). - Highlights: • rGO-MWCNTs hybrid structures and Pd nanoparticles are prepared using electrochemical methods. • rGO-MWCNTs hybrid films are used as supports and co-catalysts for Pd nanoparticles. • The Pd/rGO-MWCNTs hybrid structure based sensor shows an ultra-high sensitivity of 7.09 μA μM{sup −1} cm{sup −2} and a low detection limit of 0.15 μM. • The proposed electrochemical sensor exhibits excellent selectivity. - Abstract: In this work, palladium (Pd) nanoparticles functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) hybrid structures (Pd/rGO-MWCNTs) were successfully prepared by a combination of electrochemical reduction with electrodeposition method. The morphology, structure, and composition of the Pd/rGO-MWCNTs hybrid were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The as-synthesized hybrid structures were modified on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and further utilized for hydrazine sensing. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic, cyclic voltammetry and single-potential amperometry experiments were carried out on Pd/rGO-MWCNTs hybrid structures to investigate the interface properties and sensing performance. The measured results demonstrate that the fabricated Pd/rGO-MWCNTs/GCE sensor show a high sensitivity of 7.09 μA μM{sup −1} cm{sup −2} in a large concentration range of 1.0 to 1100 μM and a low detection limit of 0.15 μM. Moreover, the as-prepared sensor exhibits good selectivity and stability for the determination of hydrazine under interference conditions.

  7. Changes of the electronic structure of the atoms of nitrogen in nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes under the influence of pulsed ion radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korusenko, P.M., E-mail: korusenko@obisp.oscsbras.ru [Omsk Scientific Centre, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Karl Marx Avenue, 15, Omsk 644024 (Russian Federation); Bolotov, V.V.; Nesov, S.N.; Povoroznyuk, S.N. [Omsk Scientific Centre, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Karl Marx Avenue, 15, Omsk 644024 (Russian Federation); Khailov, I.P. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Ave. 2a, Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-01

    With the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) there have been investigated the changes of the chemical state of nitrogen atoms in the structure of nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CN{sub x}-MWCNTs) resulting from the impact of pulsed ion beam at various parameters of the beam (energy density, number of pulses). It has been established that irradiation with the pulsed ion beam leads to a reduction of the total amount of nitrogen in CN{sub x} nanotubes. It has been shown that a single pulse irradiation of ion beam at the energy densities of 0.5, 1, 1.5 J/cm{sup 2} leads to restructuring of the nitrogen from pyridinic and pyrrolic configuration to graphitic state. Complete removal of nitrogen (pyridinic, pyrrolic, graphitic) embedded in the structure of the walls of CN{sub x} nanotubes occurs at ten pulses and 1.5 J/cm{sup 2}.

  8. Continuous carbon nanotube reinforced composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, L; Suhr, J; Pushparaj, V; Zhang, X; Ajayan, P M

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are considered short fibers, and polymer composites with nanotube fillers are always analogues of random, short fiber composites. The real structural carbon fiber composites, on the other hand, always contain carbon fiber reinforcements where fibers run continuously through the composite matrix. With the recent optimization in aligned nanotube growth, samples of nanotubes in macroscopic lengths have become available, and this allows the creation of composites that are similar to the continuous fiber composites with individual nanotubes running continuously through the composite body. This allows the proper utilization of the extreme high modulus and strength predicted for nanotubes in structural composites. Here, we fabricate such continuous nanotube polymer composites with continuous nanotube reinforcements and report that under compressive loadings, the nanotube composites can generate more than an order of magnitude improvement in the longitudinal modulus (up to 3,300%) as well as damping capability (up to 2,100%). It is also observed that composites with a random distribution of nanotubes of same length and similar filler fraction provide three times less effective reinforcement in composites.

  9. Comparison of structural health assessment capabilities in epoxy – carbon black and epoxy – carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Inam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for comparing structural health of different types of brittle epoxy nanocomposites filled with carbon nanostructured fillers is presented. Epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon black (CB and epoxy – 0.2 vol% carbon nanotube (CNT nanocomposite bars were prepared by calendering and thermal curing. Nanocomposite bars were subjected to Vickers diamond indentation to produce sub-surface damage. Electrical conductivities were analysed by 4-point method to estimate the structural damage caused by indentation. For comprehensive comparison, fracture toughness and percolation threshold were analysed as well. Because of the systematically induced indentation damage, a sharp decrease of 89% was observed in the electrical conductivity of epoxy – CNT nanocomposite as compared to 25% in the electrical conductivity of epoxy – CB nanocomposite. CNTs impart superior damage sensing capability in brittle nanocomposite structures, in comparison to CB, due to their high aspect ratio (fibrous nature and high electrical conductivity.

  10. Structure and Characterization of Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, F.; Morant, C.; Elizalde, E.; Roque-Malherbe, R.; Lopez, V.; Zamora, F.; Domingo, C.

    2010-01-01

    Arrays of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube bundles, SWCNTs, have been synthesized by simple alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition process, carried out at 800 degree C. The formed SWCNTs are organized in small groups perpendicularly aligned and attached to the substrate. These small bundles show a constant diameter of ca. 30 nm and are formed by the adhesion of no more than twenty individual SWCNTs perfectly aligned along their length.

  11. Defective boron nitride nanotubes: mechanical properties, electronic structures and failure behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Ding, Ning; Zhao, Xian; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2018-03-01

    Due to their excellent physical and chemical characteristics, boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are regarded as a complementary addition to carbon nanotubes. Pioneer studies have demonstrated that defects in carbon nanotubes are considered tools for tuning the physical properties of these materials. In the present work, investigation on the mechanical and electronic properties of pristine and defective BNNTs was performed using the density functional theory method. The analysis on the intrinsic strength, stiffness, and failure critical strain of different types of BNNTs was conducted systematically. The computing results showed that the intrinsic strength of BNNTs decreased linearly with the increased Stone–Wales (SW) defect density around the axis. The SW defect density along the axis played a minor role on the changing of mechanical properties of BNNTs. The BNNT with a B vacancy expressed higher intrinsic strength than that of the N vacancy model. The final failure of the pristine BNNTs was due to the fracture of the Type1 bonds under the mechanical strain. Defects like SW or vacancy are served as the initial break site of BNNTs. Applying strain or creating defects are both effective methods for reducing the band gap of BNNTs.

  12. Structure-Processing-Property Interrelationships of Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofiber, Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube and Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube - Polypropylene Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Vinod Karumathil

    This dissertation describes the first use of a design of experiments approach to investigate the interrelationships between structure, processing, and properties of melt extruded polypropylene (PP) carbon nanomaterial composites. The effect of nanomaterial structure was evaluated by exploring the incorporation of vapor grown carbon nanofibers (VGCFs), or pristine or functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs or C12SWNTs) in polypropylene, while the effect of processing was investigated by studying the influence of melt extrusion temperature, speed, and time. The nanomaterials and PP were combined by an initial mixing method prior to melt extrusion. The nanocomposite properties were characterized by a combination of morphological, rheological, and thermal methods. Preliminary investigations into the effects of the initial mixing method revealed that the distribution of nanomaterials obtained after the mixing had a considerable influence on the properties of the final melt extruded nanocomposite. Dry mixing (DM) resulted in minimal adhesion between nanomaterials and PP during initial mixing; the majority of nanomaterials descended to the bottom. Hot coagulation (HC) mixing resulted in extremely high degrees of interaction between the nanomaterials and PP chains. Rotary evaporation (RE) mixing resulted in nanomaterial distribution uniformity between that obtained from DM and HC. Employing design of experiments to investigate the effects of structure and processing conditions on melt extruded PP nanocomposite properties revealed several interesting effects. The effect of processing conditions varied depending on the degree of nanomaterial distribution in PP attained prior to melt processing. Increasing melt extrusion temperature increased the decomposition temperature (Td) of PP/C12SWNT obtained from HC mixing but decreased T d of PP/C12SWNT obtained from RE mixing. Higher melt extrusion screw speed, on the other hand, significantly improved the nanocomposite

  13. Investigation on the influence of pH on structure and photoelectrochemical properties of CdSe electrolytically deposited into TiO2 nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Jinbo; Shen, Qianqian; Yang, Fei; Liang, Wei; Liu, Xuguang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • There-dimensional CdSe-TiO 2 multijunction was fabricated by electrochemical method. • CdSe nanoparticles had a good bonding with the walls of TiO 2 nanotube. • pH value played an important role in the quality of CdSe-TiO 2 interfaces. - Abstract: In this work, we fabricated CdSe/TiO 2 nanotube arrays (NTAs) by electrochemical method. In electrodeposition, the pH value of the electrolyte played an important role in formation of CdSe nanoparticles. As the pH value decreased, more CdSe deposited on TiO 2 NTAs. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy characterization shows that the CdSe nanoparticles were uniformly deposited on and into TiO 2 nanotubes when the pH value was 3, and this structure fully utilized the three-dimensional (3D) space of TiO 2 nanotubes to form 3D multijunction heterostructures. According to the photoelectrochemical test, the CdSe/TiO 2 NTAs sample prepared at pH = 3 exhibited maximum photocurrent and open circuit potential. This is because that the deposited CdSe nanoparticles had better bond with the walls of TiO 2 nanotube than the samples deposited at other pH values, which facilitated the propagation and kinetic separation of photogenerated charges

  14. Modeling the Dispersibility of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Organic Solvents by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Hayriye; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of physico-chemical properties of carbon nanotubes, including behavior in organic solvents is very important for design, manufacturing and utilizing of their counterparts with improved properties. In the present study a quantitative structure-activity/property relationship (QSAR/QSPR) approach was applied to predict the dispersibility of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in various organic solvents. A number of additive descriptors and quantum-chemical descriptors were calculated and utilized to build QSAR models. The best predictability is shown by a 4-variable model. The model showed statistically good results (R2training = 0.797, Q2 = 0.665, R2test = 0.807), with high internal and external correlation coefficients. Presence of the X0Av descriptor and its negative term suggest that small size solvents have better SWCNTs solubility. Mass weighted descriptor ATS6m also indicates that heavier solvents (and small in size) most probably are better solvents for SWCNTs. The presence of the Dipole Z descriptor indicates that higher polarizability of the solvent molecule increases the solubility. The developed model and contributed descriptors can help to understand the mechanism of the dispersion process and predictorganic solvents that improve the dispersibility of SWNTs. PMID:28347035

  15. Modeling the Dispersibility of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Organic Solvents by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayriye Yilmaz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of physico-chemical properties of carbon nanotubes, including behavior in organic solvents is very important for design, manufacturing and utilizing of their counterparts with improved properties. In the present study a quantitative structure-activity/property relationship (QSAR/QSPR approach was applied to predict the dispersibility of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs in various organic solvents. A number of additive descriptors and quantum-chemical descriptors were calculated and utilized to build QSAR models. The best predictability is shown by a 4-variable model. The model showed statistically good results (R2training = 0.797, Q2 = 0.665, R2test = 0.807, with high internal and external correlation coefficients. Presence of the X0Av descriptor and its negative term suggest that small size solvents have better SWCNTs solubility. Mass weighted descriptor ATS6m also indicates that heavier solvents (and small in size most probably are better solvents for SWCNTs. The presence of the Dipole Z descriptor indicates that higher polarizability of the solvent molecule increases the solubility. The developed model and contributed descriptors can help to understand the mechanism of the dispersion process and predictorganic solvents that improve the dispersibility of SWNTs.

  16. The structure and optical properties of regio-regular poly(3-hexylthiophene) and carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Han-Dong; Zheng, Fei; Xu, Wei-Long; Yuan, Wei-Hao; Zhu, Meng-Qi; Hao, Xiao-Tao

    2014-12-01

    The introduction of small amounts of carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes into regio-regular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) can vary the structure and optical properties of the polymer. The microstructure of the composite film was analysed by various techniques including x-ray diffraction, ultraviolet-visible optical absorption, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. It is shown that the presence of carbon nanotubes can improve the crystallinity and increase the conjugation length of P3HT in the films. Furthermore, an obvious photoluminescence quenching is observed in the P3HT/CNTs composite films, suggesting the possibility of photoinduced electron transfer between P3HT and carbon nanotubes due to the π-π interaction of these two components. These results are important for applications in bulk heterojunction solar cells and organic photo-detectors.

  17. The effect of Co content on the structure and the magnetic properties of Co{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x} nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qin [Department of Applied Physics, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300401 (China); Wang, Zhi-Jun [Hebei Chemical and Pharmaceutical Vocational Technology College, Shijiazhuang 050026 (China); Wang, Yong-Guo [Department of Public Foundation, Tianjin Youth Professional College, Tianjin 300350 (China); Sun, Hui-Yuan, E-mail: huiyuansun@126.com [College of Physics Science & Information Engineering, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang 050024 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Co{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x} (x=0–0.5) nanotube arrays with different component contents were prepared by Electrodeposition Method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement indicates that low Co content (x≤0.5) does not change their crystal structure. The direction of easy magnetization changes from being parallel with to being perpendicular to the direction of the nanotube axes, with Co content increasing from 0 to 0.5. This study suggests that the drastic change of magnetic anisotropy is attributed to the competition between the shape and magnetocrystalline anisotropies. - Highlights: • Co{sub x}Ni{sub 1–x}(x=0~0.5) nanotube arrays were prepared by a DC electrodeposition method. • The direction of easy magnetization changes with Co content increasing. • It suggests that the competition between shape and magnetocrystalline anisotropies.

  18. Effects of Atomic-Scale Structure on the Fracture Properties of Amorphous Carbon - Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    The fracture of carbon materials is a complex process, the understanding of which is critical to the development of next generation high performance materials. While quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are the most accurate way to model fracture, the fracture behavior of many carbon-based composite engineering materials, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) composites, is a multi-scale process that occurs on time and length scales beyond the practical limitations of QM methods. The Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) is capable of predicting mechanical properties involving strong deformation, bond breaking and bond formation in the classical molecular dynamics framework. This has been achieved by adding to the potential energy function a bond-order term that varies continuously with distance. The use of an empirical bond order potential, such as ReaxFF, enables the simulation of failure in molecular systems that are several orders of magnitude larger than would be possible in QM techniques. In this work, the fracture behavior of an amorphous carbon (AC) matrix reinforced with CNTs was modeled using molecular dynamics with the ReaxFF reactive forcefield. Care was taken to select the appropriate simulation parameters, which can be different from those required when using traditional fixed-bond force fields. The effect of CNT arrangement was investigated with three systems: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. For each arrangement, covalent bonds are added between the CNTs and AC, with crosslink fractions ranging from 0-25% of the interfacial CNT atoms. The SWNT and MWNT array systems represent ideal cases with evenly spaced CNTs; the SWNT bundle system represents a more realistic case because, in practice, van der Waals interactions lead to the agglomeration of CNTs into bundles. The simulation results will serve as guidance in setting experimental processing conditions to optimize the mechanical properties of CNT

  19. Carbon nanotube-nanocup hybrid structures for high power supercapacitor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Myung Gwan; Leela Mohana Reddy, Arava; Cole, Daniel P; Rivera, Monica; Vento, Joseph A; Nam, Jaewook; Jung, Hyun Young; Kim, Young Lae; Narayanan, Narayanan T; Hashim, Daniel P; Galande, Charudatta; Jung, Yung Joon; Bundy, Mark; Karna, Shashi; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Vajtai, Robert

    2012-11-14

    Here, we design and develop high-power electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) using carbon-based three dimensional (3-D) hybrid nanostructured electrodes. 3-D hybrid nanostructured electrodes consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on highly porous carbon nanocups (CNCs) were synthesized by a combination of anodization and chemical vapor deposition techniques. A 3-D electrode-based supercapacitor showed enhanced areal capacitance by accommodating more charges in a given footprint area than that of a conventional CNC-based device.

  20. Structural profiling and biological performance of phospholipid-hyaluronan functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvash, Ram; Khatchatouriants, Artium; Solmesky, Leonardo J

    2013-01-01

    In spite of significant insolubility and toxicity, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) erupt into the biomedical research, and create an increasing interest in the field of nanomedicine. Single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are highly hydrophobic and have been shown to be toxic while systemically administrated. Thus...... an inflammatory response in macrophages as evidenced by the cytokine profiling and the use of image-based high-content analysis approach in contrast to non-modified CNTs. In addition, systemic administration of CNT-PL-HA into healthy C57BL/6 mice did not alter the total number of leukocytes nor increased liver...

  1. Structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes purified and cut using polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Yudasaka, M.; Koshio, A.; Jabs, C.; Ichihashi, T.; Iijima, S.

    2002-01-01

    Following on from our previous report that a monochlorobenzene solution of polymethylmethacrylate is useful for purifying and cutting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and thinning SWNT bundles, we show in this report that polymer and residual amorphous carbon can be removed by burning in oxygen gas. The SWNTs thus obtained had many holes (giving them a worm-eaten look) and were thermally unstable. Such severe damage caused by oxidation is unusual for SWNTs; we think that they were chemically damaged during ultrasonication in the monochlorobenzene solution of polymethylmethacrylate.

  2. Effect of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes on Electrical and Structural Properties of Polyaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraja, M.; Mahesh, H. M.; Manjanna, J.; Rajanna, K.; Kurian, M. Z.; Lokesh, S. V.

    2012-07-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) and PANI/CNT (multiwall carbon nanotubes, CNT) composites were prepared using an oxidative chemical polymerization method with ammonium persulfate and dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid as the oxidizing agent and surfactant, respectively. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy spectra illustrate the presence of PANI in the composite and show that some interaction exists between PANI and CNT. Embedding of CNT in the PANI matrix is confirmed by scanning electron micrography. Conductivity of the PANI/CNT composites was higher than that of pure PANI, and the maximum conductivity obtained was 4.44 S/cm at 20 wt.% CNT.

  3. Fine Structure of the Low-Frequency Raman Phonon Bands of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, M. N.; Litvinchuk, A. P.; Arepalli, S.; Nikolaev, P.; Scott, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    The Raman spectra of singled-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) produced by laser and are process were studied between 5 and 500 kappa. The line width vs. temperature dependence of the low-frequency Raman bands between 150 and 200/ cm deviates from that expected for phonon decay through phonon-phonon scattering mechanism. The experimental results and their analysis provided convincing evidence that each of the low-frequency Raman lines is a superposition of several narrower Raman lines corresponding to tubes of nearly the same diameter. The application of Raman spectroscopy to probe the distribution of SWNT by both diameter and chirality is discussed.

  4. Methods of Attaching or Grafting Carbon Nanotubes to Silicon Surfaces and Composite Structures Derived Therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Chen, Bo (Inventor); Flatt, Austen K. (Inventor); Stewart, Michael P. (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Maya, Francisco (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of attaching or grafting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to silicon surfaces. In some embodiments, such attaching or grafting occurs via functional groups on either or both of the CNTs and silicon surface. In some embodiments, the methods of the present invention include: (1) reacting a silicon surface with a functionalizing agent (such as oligo(phenylene ethynylene)) to form a functionalized silicon surface; (2) dispersing a quantity of CNTs in a solvent to form dispersed CNTs; and (3) reacting the functionalized silicon surface with the dispersed CNTs. The present invention is also directed to the novel compositions produced by such methods.

  5. Role of pH controlled DNA secondary structures in the reversible dispersion/precipitation and separation of metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Basudeb; Samanta, Suman K; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-04-07

    Single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) oligomers (dA20, d[(C3TA2)3C3] or dT20) are able to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in water at pH 7 through non-covalent wrapping on the nanotube surface. At lower pH, an alteration of the DNA secondary structure leads to precipitation of the SWNTs from the dispersion. The structural change of dA20 takes place from the single-stranded to the A-motif form at pH 3.5 while in case of d[(C3TA2)3C3] the change occurs from the single-stranded to the i-motif form at pH 5. Due to this structural change, the DNA is no longer able to bind the nanotube and hence the SWNT precipitates from its well-dispersed state. However, this could be reversed on restoring the pH to 7, where the DNA again relaxes in the single-stranded form. In this way the dispersion and precipitation process could be repeated over and over again. Variable temperature UV-Vis-NIR and CD spectroscopy studies showed that the DNA-SWNT complexes were thermally stable even at ∼90 °C at pH 7. Broadband NIR laser (1064 nm) irradiation also demonstrated the stability of the DNA-SWNT complex against local heating introduced through excitation of the carbon nanotubes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed the formation of a stable DNA-SWNT complex at pH 7 and also the generation of DNA secondary structures (A/i-motif) upon acidification. The interactions of ss-DNA with SWNTs cause debundling of the nanotubes from its assembly. Selective affinity of the semiconducting SWNTs towards DNA than the metallic ones enables separation of the two as evident from spectroscopic as well as electrical conductivity studies.

  6. Structural Asymmetry-Facilitated Tunability of Spin Distribution in the (10, 0) Carbon Nanotube Induced by Charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Gao, Yang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Xu, Dexuan; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2017-07-01

    Constructing the asymmetric electronic structure of low-dimensional carbon nanomaterials is significant for application of molecular devices, such as magnetic switches. In this work, we use density functional theory to investigate the asymmetric spin distribution in a typical (10, 0) carbon nanotube by capping one end with a fullerene hemisphere and saturating the dangling bonds with hydrogen atoms at the other end. Calculated results indicate that this geometry obviously modified the distribution of spin density along the tube axis, and the electrons present were antiferromagnetically coupled at both ends. Specifically, the change in magnetic order at the end of the cap can be changed with either the increase or decrease of the charge. In addition, the analysis of electron density difference shows that charge induces gain or loss of electrons not only at the open end, but also at the cap end. These findings provide a strategy for controlling spin distribution for nanoscale functional molecular devices through a simple charge adjustment.

  7. The part of acoustic phonons in the negative thermal expansion of the layered structures and nanotubes based on them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eremenko, V.V.; Sirenko, V.A.; Dolbin, A.V.; Gospodarev, I.A.; Syrkin, E.S.; Feodos'ev, S.B.; Bondar', I.S.; Sirenko, A.F.; Minakova, K.A.

    2016-01-01

    A negative linear thermal expansion observed experimentally in a number of crystalline compounds with a complicated lattice and anisotropic interaction between atoms. The nature of negative linear thermal expansion along a number of directions is explained on the basis of calculations which were carried out at a microscopic level. We analyze anomalies in the temperature dependence of the coefficients of linear thermal expansion (the LTEC) along different directions: in layered crystals, formed as a monoatomic layers (graphite and carbon nanofilms) and multilayer ''sand-wiches'' (dichalcogenides of transition metals); in multilayer crystal structures such as high-temperature superconductors in which the anisotropy of the interatomic interaction is not saved in the long-range order; in carbon nanotubes. The results of theoretical calculations are compared with the data of x-ray, neutron diffraction and dilatometric measurements.

  8. In-situ TEM study on structural change and light emission of a multiwall carbon nanotube during Joule heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, K.; Asaka, K.; Nakahara, H.; Saito, Y.

    2018-01-01

    Structure changes of a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) during Joule heating were studied with simultaneous measurement of light emission spectra. The outer shells of the MWNT peeled off one by one because of excessive heating. All the peeled outer shells finally disappeared and inner shells whose tips were closed emerged, i.e., a new MWNT was formed. Each diameter of the shells comprising the MWNT decreased compared with those before the fracture. Light emission spectra during Joule heating of an MWNT were composed of both the blackbody radiation and characteristic peaks. The peaks in the light emission spectra shifted to higher energies in accordance with shrinkage of the inner shells. The energies of the peaks in the spectra corresponded to energy gaps between van Hove singularities calculated from the diameters of the shells, indicating that the peaks in the spectra are attributed to the interband electron transition in the MWNT.

  9. Powder metallurgy routes toward aluminum boron nitride nanotube composites, their morphologies, structures and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Maho [Nanotube Unit, World Premier International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050005 (Japan); Meng, Fanqiang [Research Center for Strategic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Firestein, Konstantin [Laboratory of Inorganic Nanomaterials, National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Leninsky pr. 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Tsuchiya, Koichi [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050005 (Japan); Research Center for Strategic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Golberg, Dmitri, E-mail: GOLBERG.Dmitri@nims.go.jp [Nanotube Unit, World Premier International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050044 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050005 (Japan)

    2014-05-01

    Aluminum/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) composites with up to 5 wt% (i.e., 9.7 vol%) nanotube fractions were prepared via spark plasma sintering (SPS) and high-pressure torsion (HPT) methods. Various microscopy techniques, X-ray diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed the integration of the two phases into decently dense and compact composites. No other phases, like Al borides or nitrides, formed in the Al–BNNTs macrocomposites of the two series. The BNNTs were found to be preferentially located along Al grain boundaries in SPS samples (grain size was 10–20 μm) creating micro-discontinuities and pores which were found to be detrimental for the sample hardness, whereas in HPT samples, the tubes were rather evenly distributed within a fine-grained Al matrix (grain size of several hundred nm). Therefore, the hardness of HPT samples was drastically increased with increasing BNNTs content in Al pellets. The value for Al–BNNT 3.0 wt% sample was more than doubled (190 MPa) compared to a pure Al–HPT compact (90 MPa). And the room temperature ultimate tensile strength of Al–BNNTs HPT samples containing 3.0 wt% BNNT (∼300 MPa) became ∼1.5 times larger than that of a BNNT-free HPT–Al compact (∼200 MPa)

  10. Structural CNT Composites. Part I; Developing a Carbon Nanotube Filament Winder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauti, Godfrey; Kim, Jae-Woo; Wincheski, Russell A.; Antczak, Andrew; Campero, Jamie C.; Luong, Hoa H.; Shanahan, Michelle H.; Stelter, Christopher J.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based materials promise advances in the production of high strength and multifunctional components for aerospace and other applications. Specifically, in tension dominated applications, the latest CNT based filaments are yielding composite properties comparable to or exceeding composites from more established fibers such as Kevlar and carbon fiber. However, for the properties of these materials to be fully realized at the component level, suitable manufacturing processes have to be developed. These materials handle differently from conventional fibers, with different wetting characteristics and behavior under load. The limited availability of bulk forms also requires that the equipment be scaled down accordingly to tailor the process development approach to material availability. Here, the development of hardware and software for filament winding of carbon nanotube based tapes and yarns is described. This hardware features precision guidance of the CNT material and control of the winding tension over a wide range in an open architecture that allows for effective process control and troubleshooting during winding. Use of the filament winder to develop CNT based Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) shall also be discussed.

  11. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption with 3D silicon nanotube-network and film-network structures: Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ming; Kang, Zhan; Huang, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is clean, sustainable, and renewable, thus is viewed as promising energy carrier. However, its industrial utilization is greatly hampered by the lack of effective hydrogen storage and release method. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were viewed as one of the potential hydrogen containers, but it has been proved that pure CNTs cannot attain the desired target capacity of hydrogen storage. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the material-driven and structure-driven hydrogen adsorption of 3D silicon networks and propose a deformation-driven hydrogen desorption approach based on molecular simulations. Two types of 3D nanostructures, silicon nanotube-network (Si-NN) and silicon film-network (Si-FN), are first investigated in terms of hydrogen adsorption and desorption capacity with grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. It is revealed that the hydrogen storage capacity is determined by the lithium doping ratio and geometrical parameters, and the maximum hydrogen uptake can be achieved by a 3D nanostructure with optimal configuration and doping ratio obtained through design optimization technique. For hydrogen desorption, a mechanical-deformation-driven-hydrogen-release approach is proposed. Compared with temperature/pressure change-induced hydrogen desorption method, the proposed approach is so effective that nearly complete hydrogen desorption can be achieved by Si-FN nanostructures under sufficient compression but without structural failure observed. The approach is also reversible since the mechanical deformation in Si-FN nanostructures can be elastically recovered, which suggests a good reusability. This study may shed light on the mechanism of hydrogen adsorption and desorption and thus provide useful guidance toward engineering design of microstructural hydrogen (or other gas) adsorption materials

  12. Nickel induced re-structuring of 2D graphene to 1D graphene nanotubes: Role of radical hydrogen in catalyst assisted growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Rahul; Titus, Elby

    2017-12-01

    Here, we demonstrate for the first time the structural evolution of 1D graphene nanotubes (GNTs) by the cutting of two dimensional (2D) graphene oxide (GO) sheet in reducing environment at ambient conditions in presence of Ni metal in acidic environment. We observed that in-situ generated radical hydrogen (Hrad) responsible for cutting of graphene sheets and re-structuring of 2D sheet structure to one 1D nanotubes. Structural evolution of GNTs was confirmed by using of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique. The current vs. voltage (I-V) characteristics of GNTs displayed room temperature (RT) negative differential resistance (NDR) effect which is typical in nanowires, suggested the applicability of nanomaterial for various kind of electronics applications such as memory devices and transistors fabrication.

  13. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Studies of Electrospun Poly(dimethylsiloxane)/Poly (methyl methacrylate)/Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, A. Douglas; Larios, Eduardo; Alamgir, Faisal M.; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel; Campo, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the near conduction band edge structure of electrospun mats of MWCNT-PDMS-PMMA by near edge X-Ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Effects of adding nanofillers of different sizes were addressed. Despite observed morphological variations and inhomogeneous carbon nanotube distribution, spun mats appeared homogeneous under NEXAFS analysis. Spectra revealed differences in emissions from glancing and normal spectra; which may evidence phase separation within the bulk of the micron-size fibers. Further, dichroic ratios show polymer chains did not align, even in the presence of nanofillers. Addition of nanofillers affected emissions in the C-H, C=O and C-C regimes, suggesting their involvement in interfacial matrix-carbon nanotube bonding. Spectral differences at glancing angles between pristine and composite mats suggest that geometric conformational configurations are taking place between polymeric chains and carbon nanotubes. These differences appear to be carbon nanotube-dimension dependent, and are promoted upon room temperature mixing and shear flow during electrospinning. CH-π bonding between polymer chains and graphitic walls, as well as H-bonds between impurities in the as-grown CNTs and polymer pendant groups are proposed bonding mechanisms promoting matrix conformation. PMID:24308286

  14. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  15. Design of Electrically Conductive Structural Composites by Modulating Aligned CVD-Grown Carbon Nanotube Length on Glass Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Delong; Fan, Benhui; Zhao, Hang; Lu, Xiaoxin; Yang, Minhao; Liu, Yu; Bai, Jinbo

    2017-01-25

    Function-integration in glass fiber (GF) reinforced polymer composites is highly desired for developing lightweight structures and devices with improved performance and structural health monitoring. In this study, homogeneously aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) shell was in situ grafted on GF by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). It was demonstrated that the CNT shell thickness and weight fraction can be modulated by controlling the CVD conditions. The obtained hierarchical CNTs-GF/epoxy composites show highly improved electrical conductivity and thermo-mechanical and flexural properties. The composite through-plane and in-plane electrical conductivities increase from a quasi-isolator value to ∼3.5 and 100 S/m, respectively, when the weight fraction of CNTs grafted on GF fabric varies from 0% to 7%, respectively. Meanwhile, the composite storage modulus and flexural modulus and strength improve as high as 12%, 21%, and 26%, respectively, with 100% retention of the glass transition temperature. The reinforcing mechanisms are investigated by analyzing the composite microstructure and the interfacial adhesion and wetting properties of CNTs-GF hybrids. Moreover, the specific damage-related resistance variation characteristics could be employed to in situ monitor the structural health state of the composites. The outstanding electrical and structural properties of the CNTs-GF composites were due to the specific interfacial and interphase structures created by homogeneously grafting aligned CNTs on each GF of the fabric.

  16. Fractal structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes in biologically relevant conditions: role of chirality vs. media conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Iftheker A; Aich, Nirupam; Afrooz, A R M Nabiul; Flora, Joseph R V; Schierz, P Ariette; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Saleh, Navid B

    2013-11-01

    Aggregate structure of covalently functionalized chiral specific semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was systematically studied employing static light scattering (SLS). Fractal dimensions (Df) of two specific chirality SWNTs-SG65 and SG76 with (6, 5) and (7, 6) chiral enrichments-were measured under four biological exposure media conditions, namely: Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM), Minimum Essential Medium (MEM), Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 medium, and 0.9% saline solution. The SWNTs exhibited chiral dependence on Df with SG65 showing more fractal or loosely bound aggregate structures, i.e., lower Df values (range of 2.24±0.03 to 2.64±0.05), compared to the SG76 sample (range of 2.58±0.13 to 2.90±0.08). All the Df values reported are highly reproducible, measured from multiple SLS runs and estimated with 'random block-effects' statistical analysis that yielded all p values to be fractal aggregates. Moreover, presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), used to mimic the in vitro cell culture condition, reduced the Df values, i.e., created more fractal structures. Steric hindrance to aggregation was identified as the key mechanism for creating the fractal structures. Also, increase in FBS concentration from 1% to 10% resulted in increasingly lower Df values. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Thermally Stable and Electrically Conductive, Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube/Silicon Infiltrated Composite Structures for High-Temperature Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Qi Ming; Deng, Lei Min; Li, Da Wei; Zhou, Yun Shen; Golgir, Hossein Rabiee; Keramatnejad, Kamran; Fan, Li Sha; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean-Francois; Lu, Yong Feng

    2017-10-25

    Traditional ceramic-based, high-temperature electrode materials (e.g., lanthanum chromate) are severely limited due to their conditional electrical conductivity and poor stability under harsh circumstances. Advanced composite structures based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) and high-temperature ceramics are expected to address this grand challenge, in which ceramic serves as a shielding layer protecting the VACNTs from the oxidation and erosive environment, while the VACNTs work as a conductor. However, it is still a great challenge to fabricate VACNT/ceramic composite structures due to the limited diffusion of ceramics inside the VACNT arrays. In this work, we report on the controllable fabrication of infiltrated (and noninfiltrated) VACNT/silicon composite structures via thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) [and laser-assisted CVD]. In laser-assisted CVD, low-crystalline silicon (Si) was quickly deposited at the VACNT subsurfaces/surfaces followed by the formation of high-crystalline Si layers, thus resulting in noninfiltrated composite structures. Unlike laser-assisted CVD, thermal CVD activated the precursors inside and outside the VACNTs simultaneously, which realized uniform infiltrated VACNT/Si composite structures. The growth mechanisms for infiltrated and noninfiltrated VACNT/ceramic composites, which we attributed to the different temperature distributions and gas diffusion mechanism in VACNTs, were investigated. More importantly, the as-farbicated composite structures exhibited excellent multifunctional properties, such as excellent antioxidative ability (up to 1100 °C), high thermal stability (up to 1400 °C), good high velocity hot gas erosion resistance, and good electrical conductivity (∼8.95 Sm -1 at 823 K). The work presented here brings a simple, new approach to the fabrication of advanced composite structures for hot electrode applications.

  18. Optimization of Processing Condition of Nanocomposites According to the Structural Changes of Halloysite Nanotubes Under Impact Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Hae; Park, Soo-Jeong; Nakagaito, Antonio Norio

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, optimal dispersion conditions were developed to disperse nanocomposites containing halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) and unsaturated polyester (UP) resin using ultrasonic dispersion method. Due to the presence of a substantial amount of water in HNTs, their properties depend on the operating temperature when dispersing. It is, therefore, important to understand the structural changes of HNTs that occur when changing the operating temperature. HNTs heat-treated at various temperatures have different structures and mechanical/chemical properties. Therefore, in this research, HNTs were treated at two temperatures, 773.15 K and 973.15 K (500 °C and 700 °C), and the correlation between UP resin and heat-treated HNTs was studied in detail. The quantities of HNTs were 0.5 and 1 wt pct, for the 773.15 K and 973.15 K (500 °C and 700 °C) heat treatment temperatures, respectively. The contents of HNTs were restricted in order to demonstrate the aggregation phenomenon. The dispersion was carried out by ultrasonication. All structural changes including dispersion behavior were examined by TEM. The mechanical properties were assessed by impact tests. The results showed that the high impact strength of the nanocomposite containing 1 wt pct of 973.15 K (700 °C) heat-treated HNT was superior. In other words, it can be said that the rheological property of the matrix resin depended on the quantities of HNTs and the heat treatment temperature.

  19. First-principles study of structural and work function properties for nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Xiji; Li, Detian; Cai, Jianqiu; Luo, Haijun; Dong, Changkun

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Substitutional nitrogen atom doping in capped (5, 5) SWNT is investigated. • Serious defects appear from breaks of C−N bonds with N contents of above 23.3 at.%. • Work function drops after N doping and may reach 4.1 eV. - Abstract: The structural and electronic properties of the capped (5, 5) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT), including the structural stability, the work function, and the charge transfer performance, are investigated for the substitutional nitrogen atom doping under different concentrations by first-principles density functional theory. The geometrical structure keeps almost intact with single or two N atom doping, while C−N bonds may break up with serious defects for N concentrations of 23.3 at.% and above. The SWNT remains metallic and the work function drops after doping due to the upward shift of Fermi level, leading to the increase of the electrical conductivity. N doping enhances the oxygen reduction activity stronger than N adsorption because of higher charge transfers.

  20. Adhered Supported Carbon Nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Dale F.; Craft, Benjamin J.; Jaffe, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (NTs) in excess of 200 μm long are grown by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon vapors. The nanotubes grow continuously without the typical extinction due to catalyst encapsulation. A woven metal mesh supports the nanotubes creating a metal supported nanotube (MSNT) structure. The 140 μm wide mesh openings are completely filled by 70 nm diameter multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs). The MWNTs are straight, uniform and highly crystalline. Their wall thickness is about 10 nm (30 graphite layers). The adherent NTs are not removed from the support in a Scotch tape pull test. A 12.5 cm 2 capacitor made from two MSNT structures immersed in 1 M KCl has a capacitance of 0.35 F and an equivalent series resistance of 0.18 Ω. Water flows through the MSNT at a flow velocity of 1 cm/min with a pressure drop of 15 inches of water. With the support removed, the MWNTs naturally form a carbon nanocomposite (CNC) paper with a specific area of 80 m 2 /gm, a bulk density of 0.21 g/cm 3 , an open pore fraction of 0.81, and a resistivity of 0.16 Ω-cm

  1. Tunable synthesis of copper nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniukov, E; Yakimchuk, D; Kozlovsky, A; Shlimas, D; Zdorovets, M; Kadyrzhanov, K

    2016-01-01

    Simple method of tunable synthesis of copper nanotubes based on template synthesis was developed. A comprehensive study of the structural, morphological and electrical characteristics of the obtained nanostructures was carried out. Characterization of structural features was made by methods of scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry analysis. Evaluation of wall thickness is made by methods of gas permeability. Electrical conductivity of nanotubes was define in the study of their current-voltage characteristics. The possibility to control of copper nanotubes physical properties by variation of the deposition parameters was shown. (paper)

  2. All carbon nanotubes are not created equal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geohegan, David B.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Rouleau, Christopher M.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents the various factors that enter into consideration when choosing the source of carbon nanotubes for a specific application. Carbon nanotubes are giant molecules made of pure carbon. They have captured the imagination of the scientific community by the unique structure that provides superior physical, chemical, and electrical properties. However, a surprisingly wide disparity exists between the intrinsic properties determined under ideal conditions and the properties that carbon nanotubes exhibit in real world situations. The lack of uniformity in carbon nanotube properties is likely to be the main obstacle holding back the development of carbon nanotube applications. This tutorial addresses the nonuniformity of carbon nanotube properties from the synthesis standpoint. This synthesis-related nonuniformity is on top of the intrinsic chirality distribution that gives the ∼1:2 ratio of metallic to semiconducting nanotubes. From the standpoint of carbon bonding chemistry the variation in the quality and reproducibility of carbon nanotube materials is not unexpected. It is an intrinsic feature that is related to the metastability of carbon structures. The extent to which this effect is manifested in carbon nanotube formation is governed by the type and the kinetics of the carbon nanotube synthesis reaction. Addressing this variation is critical if nanotubes are to live up to the potential already demonstrated by their phenomenal physical properties.

  3. Nano-structured variable capacitor based on P(VDF-TrFE) copolymer and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakbita, I.; El-Hami, K.

    2018-02-01

    A newly organic capacitor was conceived with a variable capacitance using the inverse piezoelectric effect. The device consists of two parallel plates of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), known for their large surface area, high sensitivity and high electric conductivity, separated by a thin film of a dielectric layer of Polyinylidene fluoride and trifluoroehtylene (P(VDF-TrFE)) promising material for piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties. The obtained architecture is the CNT/PVDF-TrFE/CNT capacitor device. In this study, an ultra-thin film of P(VDF-TrFE) (54/46) with thickness of 20 nm was elaborated on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by spin-coating. The morphology of the ultra-thin film and the mechanical behavior of CNT/P(VDF-TrFE)/CNT system were studied using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) combined with a lock-in amplifier in contact mode. All changes in applied voltage induce a change in thin film thickness according to the inverse piezoelectric effect that affect, consequently the capacitance. The results showed that the ratio of capacitance change ΔC to initial capacitance C0 is ΔC/C0=5%. This value is sufficient to use P(VDF-TrFE) as variable organic capacitor.

  4. Electrospun single-walled carbon nanotube/polyvinyl alcohol composite nanofibers: structure-property relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naebe, Minoo; Lin Tong; Wang Xungai; Staiger, Mark P; Dai Liming

    2008-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/PVA composite nanofibers have been produced by electrospinning. An apparent increase in the PVA crystallinity with a concomitant change in its main crystalline phase and a reduction in the crystalline domain size were observed in the SWNT/PVA composite nanofibers, indicating the occurrence of a SWNT-induced nucleation crystallization of the PVA phase. Both the pure PVA and SWNT/PVA composite nanofibers were subjected to the following post-electrospinning treatments: (i) soaking in methanol to increase the PVA crystallinity, and (ii) cross-linking with glutaric dialdehyde to control the PVA morphology. Effects of the PVA morphology on the tensile properties of the resultant electrospun nanofibers were examined. Dynamic mechanical thermal analyses of both pure PVA and SWNT/PVA composite electrospun nanofibers indicated that SWNT-polymer interaction facilitated the formation of crystalline domains, which can be further enhanced by soaking the nanofiber in methanol and/or cross-linking the polymer with glutaric dialdehyde

  5. Structural, thermal and electrical characterizations of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and polyaniline composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Kamal, E-mail: singhkamal204@gmail.com; Garg, Leena; Singh, Jaspal [Department of Applied Sciences, Chandigarh University, Gharuan, Mohali (India); Kumar, Sanjeev [Applied Sciences Department, PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Sharma, Amit L. [Central Scientific Instrumentation Organization, Sector 30, Chandigarh (India)

    2016-05-06

    The undoped and doped composite of MWNTs (Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes) with PANI (/Polyaniline) was prepared by chemical oxidative polymerization. The MWNTs/PANI composites have been characterized by using various techniques like Thermogravometric Analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer and Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and conductivity measurement by using two probe method. TGA results has shown that thermal stability followed the pattern undoped MWNTs/PANI composite < doped MWNTs/PANI composite. FE-SEM micrographs demonstrated the morphological changes on the surface of MWNTs as a result of composite formation. Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectra ascertained the formation of the composite. Study of electrical characteristics demonstrated that the doped MWNTs/PANI composite (1.2 × 10{sup 1} Scm{sup −1}) have better conductivity than the undoped MWNTs/PANI composite (10{sup −4} Scm{sup −1}). These CNTs based polymeric composites are of great importance in developing new nano-scale devices for future chemical, mechanical and electronic applications.

  6. Structural optimization and shear performances of the nanopins based on Y-junction carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhong-Qiang, E-mail: zhangzq@mail.ujs.edu.cn [Micro/Nano Science and Technology Center, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center of Photovoltaic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China); State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Faculty of Vehicle Engineering and Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhong, Jun [Micro/Nano Science and Technology Center, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Ye, Hong-Fei [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Faculty of Vehicle Engineering and Mechanics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Cheng, Guang-Gui [Micro/Nano Science and Technology Center, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Ding, Jian-Ning, E-mail: dingjn@ujs.edu.cn [Micro/Nano Science and Technology Center, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center of Photovoltaic Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, Jiangsu (China)

    2017-01-01

    Utilizing the classical molecular dynamic, we have briefly conducted geometry optimization on several typical nanopins based on Y-junction carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and further investigated their shear performance. The service performance of the nanopin is not sensitive to the length of the inserting end, while as the height of the branch tube increases, the maximum unloading force increases firstly and then keeps relatively stable. The overlong inserting end and high branch tube can lead to the severe oscillation in unloading force due to the continuous morphology change. Moreover, results show that a small angle included in Y-junction CNTs can contribute to both of the fixity of the nanopin and instability of the uninstallation process. Further investigation indicates that the orientation of the branch tubes of the nanopin determines the maximum shear performance, while the radial stability of the CNTs plays an important role in the shear performance of the nanopin. And the microstructure of the Y-junction CNT occurred during the using process can also influence its service performance.

  7. "Chemical-pain sensor" based on nanovesicle-carbon nanotube hybrid structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hye Jun; An, Jeong Mi; Park, Juhun; Moon, Seok Jun; Hong, Seunghun

    2013-11-15

    We developed a "chemical-pain sensor" that could recognize chemical pain stimuli such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin just like mammalian chemical pain sensory systems. Here, we first prepared nanovesicles containing rat pain sensory receptor, rat transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (rTRPV1), which is activated by noxious heat and capsaicin. And the nanovesicles were immobilized on a single-walled carbon nanotube-based field effect transistor. The chemical-pain sensor could selectively detect chemical pain stimuli with a high sensitivity of a 1 pM detection limit. It also responded to different chemical pain stimuli in a manner similar as to that of mammalian chemical pain sensory systems. This sensor platform can be utilized for various practical applications such as food screening tools and artificial somesthetic sensors. Moreover, TRP families have been suggested as potential drug targets related to nerve and circulation disorders. Thus, the capability of monitoring TRP responses using our sensor platforms should provide a powerful means for the development of new drugs as well as the basic research about nerve and circulation systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic nanotubes for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic nanotubes hold the potential for neuroscience applications because of their capability to deliver chemicals or biomolecules and the feasibility of controlling the orientation or movement of these magnetic nanotubes by an external magnetic field thus facilitating directed growth of neurites. Therefore, we sought to investigate the effects of laminin treated magnetic nanotubes and external alternating magnetic fields on the growth of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in cell culture. Magnetic nanotubes were synthesized by a hydrothermal method and characterized to confirm their hollow structure, the hematite and maghemite phases, and the magnetic properties. DRG neurons were cultured in the presence of magnetic nanotubes under alternating magnetic fields. Electron microscopy showed a close interaction between magnetic nanotubes and the growing neurites Phase contrast microscopy revealed live growing neurons suggesting that the combination of the presence of magnetic nanotubes and the alternating magnetic field were tolerated by DRG neurons. The synergistic effect, from both laminin treated magnetic nanotubes and the applied magnetic fields on survival, growth and electrical activity of the DRG neurons are currently being investigated.

  9. Special structures and properties of hydrogen nanowire confined in a single walled carbon nanotube at extreme high pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueyuan Xia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Extensive ab initio molecular dynamics simulations indicate that hydrogen can be confined in single walled carbon nanotubes to form high density and high pressure H2 molecular lattice, which has peculiar shell and axial structures depending on the density or pressure. The band gap of the confined H2 lattice is sensitive to the pressure. Heating the system at 2000K, the H2 lattice is firstly melted to form H2 molecular liquid, and then some of the H2 molecules dissociate accompanied by drastic molecular and atomic reactions, which have essential effect on the electronic structure of the hydrogen system. The liquid hydrogen system at 2000K is found to be a particular mixed liquid, which consists of H2 molecules, H atoms, and H-H-H trimers. The dissociated H atoms and the trimers in the liquid contribute resonance electron states at the Fermi energy to change the material properties substantially. Rapidly cooling the system from 2000K to 0.01 K, the mixed liquid is frozen to form a mixed solid melt with a clear trend of band gap closure. It indicates that this solid melt may become a superconducting nanowire when it is further compressed.

  10. Sexithiophene encapsulated in a single-walled carbon nanotube: an in situ Raman spectroelectrochemical study of a peapod structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbáč, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav; Gorantla, Sandeep; Gemming, Thomas; Dunsch, Lothar

    2010-10-11

    The interaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and α-sexithiophene (6T) was studied by Raman spectroscopy and by in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry. The encapsulation of 6T in SWCNT and its interaction causes a bleaching of its photoluminescence, and also small shifts of its Raman bands. The Raman features of the SWCNT with embedded 6T (6T-peapods) change in both intensity and frequency compared to those of pristine SWCNT, which is a consequence of a change of the resonant condition. Electrochemical doping demonstrated that the electrode potential applied to the SWCNT wall causes changes in the embedded 6T. The effects of electrochemical charging on the Raman features of pristine SWCNT and 6T@SWCNT were compared. It is shown that the interaction of SWCNT with 6T also changes the electronic structure of SWCNT in its charged state. This change of electronic structure is demonstrated both for semiconducting and metallic tubes. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Large-Deformation Curling Actuators Based on Carbon Nanotube Composite: Advanced-Structure Design and Biomimetic Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luzhuo; Weng, Mingcen; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Lingling; Li, Jiaxin; Huang, Zhigao; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-12-22

    In recent years, electroactive polymers have been developed as actuator materials. As an important branch of electroactive polymers, electrothermal actuators (ETAs) demonstrate potential applications in the fields of artificial muscles, biomimetic devices, robotics, and so on. Large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation, and ultrafast fabrication are critical to the development of ETA. However, a simultaneous optimization of all of these advantages has not been realized yet. Practical biomimetic applications are also rare. In this work, we introduce an ultrafast approach to fabricate a curling actuator based on a newly designed carbon nanotube and polymer composite, which completely realizes all of the above required advantages. The actuator shows an ultralarge curling actuation with a curvature greater than 1.0 cm(-1) and bending angle larger than 360°, even curling into a tubular structure. The driving voltage is down to a low voltage of 5 V. The remarkable actuation is attributed not only to the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion but also to the mechanical property changes of materials during temperature change. We also construct an S-shape actuator to show the possibility of building advanced-structure actuators. A weightlifting walking robot is further designed that exhibits a fast-moving motion while lifting a sample heavier than itself, demonstrating promising biomimetic applications.

  12. New catalyst supports prepared by surface modification of graphene- and carbon nanotube structures with nitrogen containing carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eun-Jin; Hempelmann, Rolf; Nica, Valentin; Radev, Ivan; Natter, Harald

    2017-02-01

    We present a new and facile method for preparation of nitrogen containing carbon coatings (NCC) on the surface of graphene- and carbon nanotubes (CNT), which has an increased electronic conductivity. The modified carbon system can be used as catalyst support for electrocatalytic applications, especially for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). The surface modification is performed by impregnating carbon structures with a nitrogen containing ionic liquid (IL) with a defined C:N ratio, followed by a thermal treatment under ambient conditions. We investigate the influence of the main experimental parameters (IL amount, temperature, substrate morphology) on the formation of the NCC. Additionally, the structure and the chemical composition of the resulting products are analyzed by electron microscopic techniques (SEM, TEM), energy disperse X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and hot extraction analysis. The modified surface has a nitrogen content of 29 wt% which decreases strongly at temperatures above 600 °C. The new catalyst supports are used for the preparation of PEMFC anodes which are characterized by polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Compared to unmodified graphene and CNT samples the electronic conductivity of the modified systems is increased by a factor of 2 and shows improved mass transport properties.

  13. Effects of Carbon Nanotubes/Graphene Nanoplatelets Hybrid Systems on the Structure and Properties of Polyetherimide-Based Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Abbasi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Foams based on polyetherimide (PEI with carbon nanotubes (CNT and PEI with graphene nanoplatelets (GnP combined with CNT were prepared by water vapor induced phase separation. Prior to foaming, variable amounts of only CNT (0.1–2.0 wt % or a combination of GnP (0.0–2.0 wt % and CNT (0.0–2.0 wt % for a total amount of CNT-GnP of 2.0 wt %, were dispersed in a solvent using high power sonication, added to the PEI solution, and intensively mixed. While the addition of increasingly higher amounts of only CNT led to foams with more heterogeneous cellular structures, the incorporation of GnP resulted in foams with finer and more homogeneous cellular structures. GnP in combination with CNT effectively enhanced the thermal stability of foams by delaying thermal decomposition and mechanically-reinforced PEI. The addition of 1.0 wt % GnP in combination with 1.0 wt % CNT resulted in foams with extremely high electrical conductivity, which was related to the formation of an optimum conductive network by physical contact between GnP layers and CNT, enabling their use in electrostatic discharge (ESD and electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding applications. The experimental electrical conductivity values of foams containing only CNT fitted well to a percolative conduction model, with a percolation threshold of 0.06 vol % (0.1 wt % CNT.

  14. Carbon fiber/Co9S8 nanotube arrays hybrid structures for flexible quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenxi; Chen, Chang; Ye, Meidan; Lv, Miaoqiang; Lin, Changjian

    2014-04-07

    Recently, hybrid carbon materials and inorganic nanocrystals have received an intensive amount of attention and have opened up an exciting new field in the design and fabrication of high-performance catalysts. Here we present a novel kind of hybrid counter electrode (CE) consisting of a carbon fiber (CF) and Co9S8 nanotube arrays (NTs) for fiber-shaped flexible quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). The growth mechanisms of Co(CO3)0.35Cl0.20(OH)1.10 nanowire arrays (NWs) on the CFs were discussed, and the catalytic activity of the CF, Pt and Co9S8/CF hybrid structure (Co9S8@CF) were elucidated systematically as well. An absolute energy conversion efficiency of 3.79% has been demonstrated under 100 mW cm(-2) AM 1.5 illumination by using Co9S8@CF as a CE. This work not only demonstrates an innovative approach for growing cobalt sulfide NTs on flexible substrates that can be applied in flexible devices for energy harvesting and storage, but also provides a kind of hybrid structure and high-efficiency CE for QDSSCs.

  15. Triple layered core–shell structure with surface fluorinated ZnO-carbon nanotube composites and its electron emission properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.Y.; Chua, Daniel H.C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The effects of CF 4 plasma on ZnO-CNT core–shell structures were studied. ► ZnO was effective in protecting the aligned CNTs core for as long as 30 min of plasma etching. ► SEM showed the surface morphology was nearly similar between pristine, 2 min and 30 min plasma etched specimens. ► F was observed to displace O in ZnO. ► This is the first report of an ultra long plasma etch of fluorine onto ZnO surface. - Abstract: Core-shelled structures such as zinc oxide (ZnO) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) give rise to interesting material properties. In this work, a triple-layered core–shell–shell structure is presented where the effects of fluorine (F) incorporation on the outmost shell of the ZnO-CNT structure are studied. The samples prepared ranged from a short 2 min to a 30 min immersion in carbon tetraflouride (CF 4 ) plasma. In addition, its effects on the electron emission properties also studied and it is shown that the plasma immersions create thinner field emitters with sharp tiny wrinkles giving rise to more electron emission sites and higher enhancement factor. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements showed that F ions replace O in ZnO coatings during immersion process, thus increasing the electrical conductivity and shifts the Fermi level of ZnO upwards. Both physical and electronic effects further contribute to a lower threshold field.

  16. Multi-Scale Modeling of the Structural and Vibrational Behavior of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polymeric Nanocomposite Plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doagou Rad, Saeed; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Islam, Aminul

    2017-01-01

    Polymeric nanocomposites reinforced with carbon nanotubes are being considered as alternatives in many industrial applications. However, the mechanical behavior of the industrially produced nanocomposites is yet to be fully understood. In this study, Polyamide 6,6-based nanocomposites reinforced...... with different contents of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were manufactured using an injection moulding process. A multi-scale approach was followed to numerically model the mechanical behavior of the nanostructured materials. In order to find the stiffness matrix of the carbon nanotubes, different...... loading scenarios were conducted on the tubes using molecular dynamics simulations (LAMMPS). The derived properties of the carbon nanotubes from the atomistic simulations were included in a Benveniste Mori-Tanaka based micromechanical model allowing us to acquire the elastic mechanical properties...

  17. Synthesis, structural, and field electron emission properties of quasi-aligned carbon nanotubes from gutter oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suriani, A.B.; Dalila, A.R.; Mohamed, A.; Soga, T.; Tanemura, M.

    2015-01-01

    Quasi-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been successfully synthesised from the simple pyrolysis of gutter oil as starting material and ferrocene as a catalyst. The synthesis process was performed at synthesis and vaporisation temperatures of 800 and 250 °C, respectively, in a thermal chemical vapour deposition furnace. The CNTs synthesised using gutter oil have an overall diameter of about 30–50 nm, length of 30 μm, I D /I G ratio of 0.66, and purity of 81%, comparable to those obtained using conventional carbon sources. A field electron emission study of the CNTs exhibited a low turn-on and threshold field of 1.94 and 2.94 V μm −1 , which corresponded to current densities of 100 μA cm −2 and 1.0 mA cm −2 , respectively which indicate that the CNTs synthesised are suitable candidates for use as field electron emitters. The synthesised CNTs from gutter oil also open up potential mass production applications in energy storage devices. This study demonstrates that gutter oil, a low-cost and readily available resource, can be used as an inexpensive carbon source for the mass production of CNTs. - Highlights: • Gutter oil was used as starting material to synthesise CNTs by TCVD method. • CNTs of good quality (I D /I G  ∼ 0.66 and purity ∼ 81%) were successfully produced. • The synthesised CNTs show a potential for field electron emission application.

  18. Probing astrocytes with carbon nanotubes and assessing their effects on astrocytic structural and functional properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottipati, Manoj K.

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes, chemically-functionalized with polyethylene glycol (SWCNT-PEG) have been shown to modulate the morphology and proliferation characteristics of astrocytes in culture, when applied to the cells as colloidal solutes or as films upon which the cells can attach and grow. These changes were associated with a change in the immunoreactivity of the astrocyte-specific protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP); the solutes and films caused an increase and a decrease in GFAP levels, respectively. To assess if these morpho-functional changes induced by the SWCNT-PEG modalities are dependent on GFAP or if the changes in GFAP levels are independent events, I used astrocytes isolated from GFAP knockout mice and found that selected changes induced by the SWCNT-PEG modalities are mediated by GFAP, namely the changes in perimeter, shape and cell death for colloidal solutes and the rate of proliferation for films. Since the loss GFAP has been shown to hamper the trafficking of glutamate transporters to the surface of astrocytes, which plays a vital role in the uptake of extracellular glutamate and maintaining homeostasis in the brain and spinal cord, in a subsequent study, I assessed if the SWCNT-PEG solute causes any change in the glutamate uptake characteristics of astrocytes. Using a radioactive glutamate uptake assay and immunolabeling, I found that SWCNT-PEG solute causes an increase in the uptake of glutamate from the extracellular space along with an increase in the immunoreactivity of the glutamate transporter, L-glutamate L-aspartate transporter (GLAST), on their cell surface, a likely consequence of the increase in GFAP levels induced by the SWCNT-PEG solute. These results imply that SWCNT-PEG could potentially be used as a viable candidate in neural prosthesis applications to prevent glutamate excitotoxicity, a pathological process observed in brain and spinal cord injuries, and alleviate the death toll of neurons surrounding the injury

  19. Effect of Synthesis Temperature on the Growth Iron-Filled Carbon Nanotubes as Evidenced by Structural, Micro-Raman, and Thermogravimetric Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Shamsudin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tubular structure and well dense of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs were formulated using two-stage catalytic chemical vapor deposition apparatus. In this experiment, aligned CNT was synthesized in the range of 700–900°C temperatures with increment rate of 50°C per sample. The aligned CNT properties were investigated via field emission scanning electron microscope, micro-Raman spectrometer and thermogravimetric analyzer. The experimental results showed that aligned CNT properties were highly dependent on synthesis temperature changes. The optimum temperature of higher crystallinity was observed at 800°C synthesis temperature. However, the highest yield of nanotubes (~99.99% was obtained at 900°C synthesis temperature. Aligned CNT orientation was in a parallel form and packed together in orderly manner. The behaviors of aligned CNT will be discussed in detail in this paper.

  20. Carbon Nanotubes and Modern Nanoagriculture

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2015-01-27

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have been prominent members of the nanomaterial family. Owing to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been proven to be a useful tool in the field of plant science. They were frequently perceived to bring about valuable biotechnological and agricultural applications that still remain beyond experimental realization. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated the ability of carbon nanotubes to traverse different plant cell barriers. These studies, also, assessed the toxicity and environmental impacts of these nanomaterials. The knowledge provided by these studies is of practical and fundamental importance for diverse applications including intracellular labeling and imaging, genetic transformation, and for enhancing our knowledge of plant cell biology. Although different types of nanoparticles have been found to activate physiological processes in plants, carbon nanotubes received particular interest. Following addition to germination medium, carbon nanotubes enhanced root growth and elongation of some plants such as onion, cucumber and rye-grass. They, also, modulated the expression of some genes that are essential for cell division and plant development. In addition, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were evidenced to penetrate thick seed coats, stimulate germination, and to enhance growth of young tomato seedlings. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes can penetrate deeply into the root system and further distribute into the leaves and the fruits. In recent studies, carbon nanotubes were reported to be chemically entrapped into the structure of plant tracheary elements. This should activate studies in the fields of plant defense and wood engineering. Although, all of these effects on plant physiology and plant developmental biology have not been fully understood, the valuable findings promises more research activity in the near future toward complete scientific understanding of

  1. Interfacial effects in ZnO nanotubes/needle-structured graphitic diamond nanohybrid for detecting dissolved acetone at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiravan, Deepa; Huang, Bohr-Ran; Saravanan, Adhimoorthy; Yeh, Chien-Jui; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I.-Nan

    2017-12-01

    A high-performance ZnO nanotubes (ZNTs)/needle-structured graphitic diamond (NGD) nanohybrid material was prepared and observed the electrochemical sensing properties of liquid acetone in water. Initially, we synthesized NGD film using bias-enhanced growth (BEG) process. Afterwards, a well-etched ZNTs were spatially grown on the NGD film using simple hydrothermal method, and utilized as sensing material for assemble an electrochemical sensor (via EGFET configuration) operating at room temperature. The systematic investigations depict the ultra-high sensing properties attained from ZNTs grown on NGD film. The NGD film mostly have needle or wire shaped diamond grains, which contributes extremely high electrical conductivity. Furthermore, needle shaped diamond grains cover with multi-layer graphitic material generates conduction channels for ZNTs and leads to enhance the oxygen residuals and species. The material stability and conductivity of NGD as well the defects exist with oxygen vacancies in ZNTs offers superior sensing properties. Thus, the interesting combination of these wide band gap semiconductor materials exhibit high sensor response (89 mV/mL), high stability and long-term reliability (tested after 60 days).

  2. Effects of Amino-Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes on the Crystal Structure and Thermal Properties of Polyacrylonitrile Homopolymer Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Zhang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Amino-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (amino-CNT/polyacrylonitrile (PAN microspheres with diameter of about 300–400 nm were prepared by in situ polymerization under aqueous solution. The morphology, crystal structure, and thermal properties of amino-CNTs on a PAN homopolymer were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry. The results showed that the amino-CNTs had a significant influence on the morphology of microspheres, and the PAN matrix were grafted onto the surface of amino-CNTs with interfacial bonding between them. The XRD studies showed that the crystal size of amino-CNT/PAN microspheres with lower crystallinity was bigger than in the control PAN homopolymer. The analysis of thermal properties indicated that the amino-CNT/PAN microspheres with lower glass transition temperature had a lower initial temperature and velocity of evolving heat during the exothermic processing as compared with the PAN homopolymer. These results suggested that the incorporation of amino-CNTs into the PAN homopolymer matrix was beneficial for controlling the heat released during the stabilization processing.

  3. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Fe, Co, Ni monatomic nanochains encapsulated in armchair LiF nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nia B. Arghavani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of transition metal TM (TM = Fe, Co and Ni atomic chains wrapped in single walled LiF armchair nanotubes have been investigated by the first-principles calculations in the framework of the density functional theory. The generalized gradient approximation (GGA with Hubbard repulsion potential and without Hubbard repulsion was employed to describe the exchange-correlation potential. It is found that all these TM chains @LiFNTs systems have negative formation energy so they are stable and exothermic. Total density of states and partial densities of states analyses show that the spin polarization and the magnetic moment of TM chains @LiFNTs(n,n systems come mostly from the TM atom chains. All these nanocomposites are ferromagnetic (FM and spin splitting between spin up and down is observed. The high magnetic moment and spin polarization of the TM chains @LiFNT(n,n systems show that they can be used as magnetic nanostructures possessing potential current and future applications in permanent magnetism, magnetic recording, and spintronics.

  4. Highly selective and active CO2 reduction electrocatalysts based on cobalt phthalocyanine/carbon nanotube hybrid structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Wu, Zishan; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Liewu; Li, Yanyan; Xu, Haomin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Yu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Zisheng; Liang, Yongye; Wang, Hailiang

    2017-03-01

    Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide with renewable energy is a sustainable way of producing carbon-neutral fuels. However, developing active, selective and stable electrocatalysts is challenging and entails material structure design and tailoring across a range of length scales. Here we report a cobalt-phthalocyanine-based high-performance carbon dioxide reduction electrocatalyst material developed with a combined nanoscale and molecular approach. On the nanoscale, cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) molecules are uniformly anchored on carbon nanotubes to afford substantially increased current density, improved selectivity for carbon monoxide, and enhanced durability. On the molecular level, the catalytic performance is further enhanced by introducing cyano groups to the CoPc molecule. The resulting hybrid catalyst exhibits >95% Faradaic efficiency for carbon monoxide production in a wide potential range and extraordinary catalytic activity with a current density of 15.0 mA cm-2 and a turnover frequency of 4.1 s-1 at the overpotential of 0.52 V in a near-neutral aqueous solution.

  5. Highly selective and active CO2 reduction electrocatalysts based on cobalt phthalocyanine/carbon nanotube hybrid structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Wu, Zishan; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Liewu; Li, Yanyan; Xu, Haomin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Yu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Zisheng; Liang, Yongye; Wang, Hailiang

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide with renewable energy is a sustainable way of producing carbon-neutral fuels. However, developing active, selective and stable electrocatalysts is challenging and entails material structure design and tailoring across a range of length scales. Here we report a cobalt-phthalocyanine-based high-performance carbon dioxide reduction electrocatalyst material developed with a combined nanoscale and molecular approach. On the nanoscale, cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) molecules are uniformly anchored on carbon nanotubes to afford substantially increased current density, improved selectivity for carbon monoxide, and enhanced durability. On the molecular level, the catalytic performance is further enhanced by introducing cyano groups to the CoPc molecule. The resulting hybrid catalyst exhibits >95% Faradaic efficiency for carbon monoxide production in a wide potential range and extraordinary catalytic activity with a current density of 15.0 mA cm−2 and a turnover frequency of 4.1 s−1 at the overpotential of 0.52 V in a near-neutral aqueous solution. PMID:28272403

  6. High-Throughput Processes and Structural Characterization of Single-Nanotube Based Devices for 3D Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, A. B.; Megerian, K. G.; Baron, R. L.; Jennings, A. T.; Jang, D.; Greer, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed manufacturable approaches to form single, vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, where the tubes are centered precisely, and placed within a few hundred nm of 1-1.5 micron deep trenches. These wafer-scale approaches were enabled by chemically amplified resists and inductively coupled Cryo-etchers to form the 3D nanoscale architectures. The tube growth was performed using dc plasmaenhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and the materials used for the pre-fabricated 3D architectures were chemically and structurally compatible with the high temperature (700 C) PECVD synthesis of our tubes, in an ammonia and acetylene ambient. The TEM analysis of our tubes revealed graphitic basal planes inclined to the central or fiber axis, with cone angles up to 30 deg. for the particular growth conditions used. In addition, bending tests performed using a custom nanoindentor, suggest that the tubes are well adhered to the Si substrate. Tube characteristics were also engineered to some extent, by adjusting growth parameters, such as Ni catalyst thickness, pressure and plasma power during growth.

  7. Synthesis, structural analysis and in situ transmission electron microscopy mechanical tests on individual aluminum matrix/boron nitride nanotube nanohybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Maho; Tang, Dai-Ming; Zhi Chunyi; Bando, Yoshio; Shtansky, Dmitry; Golberg, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotube (BNNT)/aluminum matrix composite nanohybrids were fabricated through magnetron sputtering of Al onto dispersed multiwalled BNNTs with average external diameters of 40–50 nm. Aluminum phase coating tightly wrapped the BNNTs after the deposition. The coating thickness in the range of 5–200 nm was controlled by changing sputtering time. Using imaging techniques and electron diffraction analysis in a transmission electron microscope, the Al phase was found to create nanocrystalline shields around individual BNNTs. The chemical states of the hybrid nanomaterials during the initial stages of sputtering were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Direct in situ bending and tensile tests on individual BNNT–Al nanocomposites were carried out by using a dedicated transmission electron microscope-atomic force microscope holder. In parallel, high-resolution TEM images and video recordings were taken for the analysis of deformation kinetics and fracture mechanisms. The nanohybrids with a suitably thick aluminum coating (∼40 nm) withstood at least nine times higher stresses compared to a pure non-armed Al metal. This pioneering work opens up a prospective pathway for making ultralight and superstrong “dream” structural materials for future automotive and aerospace applications.

  8. Field emission from a composite structure consisting of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes and carbon nanocones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, C M; Chen, M Y; Hwang, J; Gan, J-Y; Kou, C S

    2006-01-01

    Vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWCNTs) have been fabricated on carbon nanocones (CNCs) in a gravity-assisted chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process. The CNCs with nanoscale Co particles at the top were first grown on the Co/Si(100) substrate biased at 350 V in a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition process. The CNCs typically are ∼200 nm in height, and their diameters are ∼100 nm near the bottom and ∼10 nm at the top. The nanoscale Co particles ∼10 nm in diameter act as catalysts which favour the growth of VA-SWCNTs out of CNCs at 850 0 C in the gravity-assisted CVD process. The average length and the growth time of VA-SWCNTs are ∼150 nm and 1.5 min, equivalent to a growth rate of ∼6 μm h -1 . The diameters of VA-SWCNTs are estimated to be 1.2-2.1 nm. When VA-SWCNTs are fabricated on CNCs, the turn-on voltage is reduced from 3.9 to 0.7 V μm -1 and the emission current density at the electric field of 5 V μm -1 is enhanced by a factor of more than 200. The composite VA-SWCNT/CNC structure is potentially an excellent field emitter. The emission stability of the VA-SWCNT/CNC field emitter is discussed

  9. Development of carbon nanotube modified cement paste with microencapsulated phase-change material for structural-functional integrated application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongzhi; Yang, Shuqing; Memon, Shazim Ali

    2015-04-10

    Microencapsulated phase-change materials (MPCM) can be used to develop a structural-functional integrated cement paste having high heat storage efficiency and suitable mechanical strength. However, the incorporation of MPCM has been found to degrade the mechanical properties of cement based composites. Therefore, in this research, the effect of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the properties of MPCM cement paste was evaluated. Test results showed that the incorporation of CNTs in MPCM cement paste accelerated the cement hydration reaction. SEM micrograph showed that CNTs were tightly attached to the cement hydration products. At the age of 28 days, the percentage increase in flexural and compressive strength with different dosage of CNTs was found to be up to 41% and 5% respectively. The optimum dosage of CNTs incorporated in MPCM cement paste was found to be 0.5 wt %. From the thermal performance test, it was found that the cement paste panels incorporated with different percentages of MPCM reduced the temperature measured at the center of the room by up to 4.6 °C. Inverse relationship was found between maximum temperature measured at the center of the room and the dosage of MPCM.

  10. Two-dimensional plasmons in lateral carbon nanotube network structures and their effect on the terahertz radiation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryzhii, V. [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Institute of Ultra High Frequency Semiconductor Electronics of RAS, Moscow 117105 (Russian Federation); Center for Photonics and Infrared Engineering, Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow 111005 (Russian Federation); Otsuji, T. [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ryzhii, M. [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Aizu, Aizu-Wakamatsu 965-8580 (Japan); Leiman, V. G. [Department of General Physics, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, 147100 (Russian Federation); Fedorov, G. [Department of General Physics, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, 147100 (Russian Federation); Physics Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Goltzman, G. N.; Titova, N. [Physics Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Gayduchenko, I. A. [Physics Department, Moscow State Pedagogical University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute,” Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Coquillat, D.; But, D.; Knap, W. [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR 5221, Universite Montpellier 2 and CNRS, F-34095, Montpellier (France); Mitin, V. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 1460-1920 (United States); Shur, M. S. [Departments of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering and Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2016-07-28

    We consider the carrier transport and plasmonic phenomena in the lateral carbon nanotube (CNT) networks forming the device channel with asymmetric electrodes. One electrode is the Ohmic contact to the CNT network and the other contact is the Schottky contact. These structures can serve as detectors of the terahertz (THz) radiation. We develop the device model for collective response of the lateral CNT networks which comprise a mixture of randomly oriented semiconductor CNTs (s-CNTs) and quasi-metal CNTs (m-CNTs). The proposed model includes the concept of the collective two-dimensional (2D) plasmons in relatively dense networks of randomly oriented CNTs (CNT “felt”) and predicts the detector responsivity spectral characteristics exhibiting sharp resonant peaks at the signal frequencies corresponding to the 2D plasmonic resonances. The detection mechanism is the rectification of the ac current due the nonlinearity of the Schottky contact current-voltage characteristics under the conditions of a strong enhancement of the potential drop at this contact associated with the plasmon excitation. The detector responsivity depends on the fractions of the s- and m-CNTs. The burning of the near-contact regions of the m-CNTs or destruction of these CNTs leads to a marked increase in the responsivity in agreement with our experimental data. The resonant THz detectors with sufficiently dense lateral CNT networks can compete and surpass other THz detectors using plasmonic effects at room temperatures.

  11. New Three-Dimensional Porous Electrode Concept: Vertically-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Directly Grown on Embroidered Copper Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Aguiló-Aguayo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available New three-dimensional (3D porous electrode concepts are required to overcome limitations in Li-ion batteries in terms of morphology (e.g., shapes, dimensions, mechanical stability (e.g., flexibility, high electroactive mass loadings, and electrochemical performance (e.g., low volumetric energy densities and rate capabilities. Here a new electrode concept is introduced based on the direct growth of vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs on embroidered Cu current collectors. The direct growth of VA-CNTs was achieved by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD, and there was no application of any post-treatment or cleaning procedure. The electrochemical behavior of the as-grown VA-CNTs was analyzed by charge/discharge cycles at different specific currents and with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS measurements. The results were compared with values found in the literature. The as-grown VA-CNTs exhibit higher specific capacities than graphite and pristine VA-CNTs found in the literature. This together with the possibilities that the Cu embroidered structures offer in terms of specific surface area, total surface area, and designs provide a breakthrough in new 3D electrode concepts.

  12. Highly selective and active CO2reduction electrocatalysts based on cobalt phthalocyanine/carbon nanotube hybrid structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Wu, Zishan; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Liewu; Li, Yanyan; Xu, Haomin; Li, Xiaoxiao; Yu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Zisheng; Liang, Yongye; Wang, Hailiang

    2017-03-08

    Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide with renewable energy is a sustainable way of producing carbon-neutral fuels. However, developing active, selective and stable electrocatalysts is challenging and entails material structure design and tailoring across a range of length scales. Here we report a cobalt-phthalocyanine-based high-performance carbon dioxide reduction electrocatalyst material developed with a combined nanoscale and molecular approach. On the nanoscale, cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) molecules are uniformly anchored on carbon nanotubes to afford substantially increased current density, improved selectivity for carbon monoxide, and enhanced durability. On the molecular level, the catalytic performance is further enhanced by introducing cyano groups to the CoPc molecule. The resulting hybrid catalyst exhibits >95% Faradaic efficiency for carbon monoxide production in a wide potential range and extraordinary catalytic activity with a current density of 15.0 mA cm -2 and a turnover frequency of 4.1 s -1 at the overpotential of 0.52 V in a near-neutral aqueous solution.

  13. Applications of Nanotubes in Electronic and Nanomechanical Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tomanek, David

    2002-01-01

    ... as their potential for energy storage. Our research helps to better understand nanotube properties in case of chemically and structurally modified nanotubes consisting of carbon and boron nitride, including multi-wall systems and peapods...

  14. Defect complexes in carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashapa, MG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of defect complexes on the stability, structural and electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes is investigated using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method implemented...

  15. Nanotubes based on monolayer blue phosphorus

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2016-07-08

    We demonstrate structural stability of monolayer zigzag and armchair blue phosphorus nanotubes by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational spectrum and electronic band structure are determined and analyzed as functions of the tube diameter and axial strain. The nanotubes are found to be semiconductors with a sensitive indirect band gap that allows flexible tuning.

  16. Gold(I)-Alkanethiolate Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yu Xin

    2009-12-28

    (Figure Presented) A solution approach to assembling Au(I) - alkanethiolates into nanotube structures at room temperature is presented, in which Au(I) cations and alkanethiolate ligands are coordinated into thin platelet forms that then evolve into an open tubular configuration (see figure). The organic-inorganic hybrid nature of the nanotubes, their ability to be modified, and their high stability make them of interest for practical applications. © 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  17. Size effects on the structural, electronic, and optical properties of (5,0) finite-length carbon nanotube: An ab-initio electronic structure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarighi Ahmadpour, Mahdi; Rostamnejadi, Ali [Electroceram Research Center, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Shahin Shahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemifar, S. Javad [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-07-07

    We use density functional computations to study the zero temperature structural, electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of (5,0) finite carbon nanotubes (FCNT), with length in the range of 4–44 Å. It is found that the structural and electronic properties of (5,0) FCNTs, in the ground state, converge at a length of about 30 Å, while the excited state properties exhibit long-range edge effects. We discuss that curvature effects enhance energy gap of FCNTs, in contrast to the known trend in the periodic limit. It is seen that compensation of curvature effects in two special small sizes may give rise to spontaneous magnetization. The obtained cohesive energies provide some insights into the effects of environment on the growth of FCNTs. The second-order difference of the total energies reveals an important magic size of about 15 Å. The optical and dynamical magnetic responses of the FCNTs to polarized electromagnetic pulses are studied by time dependent density functional theory. The results show that the static and dynamic magnetic properties mainly come from the edge carbon atoms. The optical absorption properties are described in terms of local field effects and characterized by Casida linear response method.

  18. Theoretical study of structural and electronic properties of poly(vinyl chloride nanotube inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assad Kareen Edaan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The structural and electronic properties of inclusion or interconnection between NT and PVC were studied by quantum semiepirical approximation method using (PM3 self-consistent ?eld molecular orbital method. The total structural energy, HOMO level energy, LUMO level energy, band gap?(E?_g ?=E?_HOMO-E_LUMO, and dipole moment of the compounds were calculated. Increasing the distance between NT and PVC led to decline the total energy difference which led to better interconnection between NT and PVC and vice versa when the distant is decreased. Therefore the more stable compound is f. The best electronic energies were obtained at the structures 3c and 3b in the first distance respectively. The dipole moments for all structures have the following trend: b> d > c > e > f > a> g.

  19. Comparison of structure and yield of multiwall carbon nanotubes produced by the CVD technique and a water assisted method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, Malti; Lal, C.; Srivastava, Ritu; Kamalasanan, M.N.; Tanwar, L.S.

    2010-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and a water assisted method. Both methods produced MWNTs, which were characterized by SEM, TEM and Raman studies. It was observed that as far as quality is concerned, MWNTs produced by water assisted method are superior as the method does not employ any metal catalyst. However, as far as yield is concerned, CVD is a better method. Multiwall carbon nanotubes produced by water assisted method suffer from the drawback of low yield but have an advantage of production of multiwall carbon nanotubes without using any metal catalyst, at ambient pressure, in an environment friendly manner and using a simple and cost-effective apparatus.

  20. Impacts of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on Nutrient Removal from Wastewater and Bacterial Community Structure in Activated Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Reti; Wang, Yulin; Wang, Xiaohui; Du, Zhize; Li, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing use of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) will inevitably lead to the exposure of wastewater treatment facilities. However, knowledge of the impacts of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal and bacterial community structure in the activated sludge process is sparse. Aims To investigate the effects of MWCNTs on wastewater nutrient removal, and bacterial community structure in activated sludge. Methods Three triplicate sequencing batch reactors (SBR) were exposed to wastewater which contained 0, 1, and 20 mg/L MWCNTs. MiSeq sequencing was used to investigate the bacterial community structures in activated sludge samples which were exposed to different concentrations of MWCNTs. Results Exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs had no acute (1 day) impact on nutrient removal from wastewater. After long-term (180 days) exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs, the average total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency was not significantly affected. TN removal efficiency decreased from 84.0% to 71.9% after long-term effects of 20 mg/L MWCNTs. After long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs, the total phosphorus removal efficiencies decreased from 96.8% to 52.3% and from 98.2% to 34.0% respectively. Further study revealed that long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs inhibited activities of ammonia monooxygenase and nitrite oxidoreductase. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs both inhibited activities of exopolyphosphatase and polyphosphate kinase. MiSeq sequencing data indicated that 20 mg/L MWCNTs significantly decreased the diversity of bacterial community in activated sludge. Long-term exposure to 1 and 20 mg/L MWCNTs differentially decreased the abundance of nitrifying bacteria, especially ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. The abundance of PAOs was decreased after long-term exposure to 20 mg/L MWCNTs. The abundance of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) was increased after long-term exposure to 1 mg/L MWCNTs. Conclusion MWCNTs have adverse effects on biological

  1. Structure and catalytic activities of ferrous centers confined on the interface between carbon nanotubes and humic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dongqi; Yin, Jun-Jie; Chen, Hanqing; Gao, Xingfa; Zhang, Jing; Ibrahim, Kurash; Chai, Zhifang; Feng, Weiyue; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    Preparation of heterogeneous catalysts with active ferrous centers is of great significance for industrial and environmental catalytic processes. Nanostructured carbon materials (NCM), which possess free-flowing π electrons, can coordinate with transition metals, provide a confinement environment for catalysis, and act as potential supports or ligands to construct analogous complexes. However, designing such catalysts using NCM is still seldom studied to date. Herein, we synthesized a sandwich structured ternary complex via the coordination of Fe-loaded humic acid (HA) with C&z.dbd;C bonds in the aromatic rings of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in which the O/N-Fe-C interface configuration provides the confinement environment for the ferrous sites. The experimental and theoretical results revealed octahedrally/tetrahedrally coordinated geometry at Fe centers, and the strong hybridization between CNT C π* and Fe 3d orbitals induces discretization of the atomic charges on aromatic rings of CNTs, which facilitates O2 adsorption and electron transfer from carbon to O2, which enhances O2 activation. The O2 activation by the novel HA/Fe-CNT complex can be applied in the oxidative degradation of phenol red (PR) and bisphenol A (BPA) in aqueous media.Preparation of heterogeneous catalysts with active ferrous centers is of great significance for industrial and environmental catalytic processes. Nanostructured carbon materials (NCM), which possess free-flowing π electrons, can coordinate with transition metals, provide a confinement environment for catalysis, and act as potential supports or ligands to construct analogous complexes. However, designing such catalysts using NCM is still seldom studied to date. Herein, we synthesized a sandwich structured ternary complex via the coordination of Fe-loaded humic acid (HA) with C&z.dbd;C bonds in the aromatic rings of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), in which the O/N-Fe-C interface configuration provides the confinement environment for the

  2. Influence of Pyrazine Ring Doping on the 15N and 11B NMR and Electronic Structure Parameters in Zigzag Boron Nitride Nanotube: A DFT Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sattar Arshadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Density functional theory (DFT calculations have been performed to investigate the properties of the electronic structures of pyrazine-doped boron nitride nanotubes (PD-BNNTs. The structural forms were firstly optimized and then nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR parameters have been calculated on the optimized structures. The chemical shielding isotropic ( and chemical shielding anisotropic ( parameters were calculated at the sites of 11B and 15N nuclei in structural forms of BNNT including the perfect (a model and PD-BNNTs (b, (c, and (d models. The results indicated that the changes are most significant for those nuclei placed in the nearest neighborhood of the pyrazine-doped ring. The changes of the electronic sites of the N atoms are also more significant than those of the B atoms. The difference of LUMO-HOMO gap for the perfect model was larger than the PD-BNNTs models. Also the atomic charge distribution of N and B atoms has been determined in nanotubes by natural bond orbital (NBO analysis. All calculations were performed by the B3LYP method and 6-311G** basis set using Gaussian 98 package of program.

  3. Noble-Metal Chalcogenide Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourdine Zibouche

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We explore the stability and the electronic properties of hypothetical noble-metal chalcogenide nanotubes PtS2, PtSe2, PdS2 and PdSe2 by means of density functional theory calculations. Our findings show that the strain energy decreases inverse quadratically with the tube diameter, as is typical for other nanotubes. Moreover, the strain energy is independent of the tube chirality and converges towards the same value for large diameters. The band-structure calculations show that all noble-metal chalcogenide nanotubes are indirect band gap semiconductors. The corresponding band gaps increase with the nanotube diameter rapidly approaching the respective pristine 2D monolayer limit.

  4. Mechanics of Carbon Nanotubes and their Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chenyu; Cho, K. J.; Srivastava, Deepak; Tang, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Contents include the folloving: carbon nanotube (CNT): structures, application of carbon nanotubes, simulation method, Elastic properties of carbon nanotubes, yield strain of CNT, yielding under tensile stress, yielding: strain-rate and temperature dependence, yield strain under tension, yielding at realistic conditions, nano fibers, polymer CNT composite, force field, density dependency on temperature, diffusion coefficients, young modulus, and conclusions.

  5. Synthesis of single wall carbon nanotubes from a lamellar type ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    These nanotubes are applicable to store more hydrogen. Keywords. AlPO4-L; single wall carbon nanotubes. 1. Introduction. Carbon nanotubes (Iijima 1991) are nano-scale structures formed by self assembly. They possess excellent chemical and physical properties (Rodney and Donald 1995; Chen et al 1998) that make ...

  6. Dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotube devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria

    The purpose of this project has been to assemble single-walled carbon nanotubes on electrodes at the tip of a biocompatible cantilever and use these for chemical species sensing in air and liquid, for example in order to measure the local activity from ion channels in the cell membrane....... The electrical resistance of carbon nanotubes has been shown to be extremely sensitive to gas molecules. Dielectrophoresis is a method capable of quickly attracting nanotubes on microelectrodes by using an electric field, thus enabling nanotube integration in microsystems. Dielectrophoresis offers also...... the potential of distinguishing between nanotubes of different electrical properties, which is very important for the optimisation of the properties of the carbon nanotube sensors. Various cantilever and planar structures were designed, fabricated and tested both with multi-walled and single-walled carbon...

  7. A MEMS Infrared Thermopile Fabricated from Silicon-On-Insulator with Phononic Crystal Structures and Carbon Nanotube Absorption Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kory Forrest

    The goal of this project was to examine the possibility of creating a novel thermal infrared detector based on silicon CMOS technology that has been enhanced by the latest nano-engineering discoveries. Silicon typically is not thought as an efficient thermoelectric material. However recent advancements in nanotechnology have improved the potential for a highly sensitive infrared detector based on nano-structured silicon. The thermal conductivity of silicon has been shown to be reduced from 150 W/mK down to 60 W/mK just by decreasing the scale of the silicon from bulk down to the sub-micron scale. Further reduction of the thermal conductivity has been shown by patterning silicon with a phonon crystal structure which has been reported to have thermal conductivities down to 10 W/mK. The phonon crystal structure consists of a 2D array of holes that are etched into the silicon. The size and pitch of the holes are on the order of the mean free path of the phonons in silicon which is approximately 200-500nm. This particular device had 200nm holes on a 400nm pitch. The Seebeck coefficient of silicon can also be enhanced by the reduction of the material from the bulk to sub-micron scale and with degenerate level doping. The combination of decreased thermal conductivity and increased Seebeck coefficient allow silicon to be a promising material for thermoelectric infrared detectors. The highly doped silicon is desired to reduce the electrical resistance of the device. The low electrical resistance is required to reduce the Johnson noise of the device which is the dominant noise source for most thermal detectors. This project designed a MEMS thermopile using a silicon-on-insulator substrate, and a CMOS compatible process. The basic thermopile consists of a silicon dioxide membrane with phononic crystal patterned silicon thermocouples around the edges of the membrane. Vertical aligned, multi-walled, carbon nanotubes were used as the infrared absorption layer. A MEMS

  8. Effects of multi-wall carbon nanotubes on structural and mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-22

    Sep 22, 2017 ... The scaffolds provide not only a basic structure for cell growth and tissue formation, but also to determine how to transport the materials [4]. Synthetic and natural biomaterials which are used for scaffold fabrication, is chosen based on their biocompatibility, biodegradability and mechanical properties [5].

  9. Effects of multi-wall carbon nanotubes on structural and mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The solution components entity authenticity was approved by FTIR. The porosity assessment was illustrated by a porous structure with 81–83% porosity.Water contact angle (WCA) test showed the decrease in contact angle with the increase in MWNTs. Mechanical property results showed the strength of about 4–10 MPa for ...

  10. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  11. Coulomb drag in multiwall armchair carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, A.M.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the transresistivity rho(21) between two concentric armchair nanotubes in a diffusive multiwall carbon nanotube as a function of temperature T and Fermi level epsilon(F). We approximate the tight-binding band structure by two crossing bands with a linear dispersion near the Fermi...... surface. The cylindrical geometry of the nanotubes and the different parities of the Bloch states are accounted for in the evaluation of the effective Coulomb interaction between charges in the concentric nanotubes. We find a broad peak in rho(21) as a function of temperature at roughly T similar to 0.4T...

  12. Carbon nanotube heat-exchange systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-11-11

    A carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) and method for producing the same. One embodiment of the carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) comprises a microchannel structure (24) having an inlet end (30) and an outlet end (32), the inlet end (30) providing a cooling fluid into the microchannel structure (24) and the outlet end (32) discharging the cooling fluid from the microchannel structure (24). At least one flow path (28) is defined in the microchannel structure (24), fluidically connecting the inlet end (30) to the outlet end (32) of the microchannel structure (24). A carbon nanotube structure (26) is provided in thermal contact with the microchannel structure (24), the carbon nanotube structure (26) receiving heat from the cooling fluid in the microchannel structure (24) and dissipating the heat into an external medium (19).

  13. Effectively Improved Field Emission Properties of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes/Graphenes Composite Field Emitter by Covering on the Si Pyramidal Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Leifeng; Yu, Hua; Zhong, Jiasong

    2015-01-01

    The composite nanostructure emitter of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphenes was deposited on pyramidal silicon substrate by the simple larger scale electrophoretic deposition process. The field emission (FE) properties of the composite/pyramidal Si device were greatly improved compared...... with that of the composite/plain Si. The low turn-ON electric field, the low threshold electric field, and the larger enhancement factor were obtained using the pyramidal structure. The better FE performances of the composite/pyramidal Si were a combined effect of the field enhancement from the composite emitter...

  14. First principles study of electronic and structural properties of single walled zigzag boron nitride nanotubes doped with the elements of group IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, Ali; jalalinejad, Amir; Bagheri, Mosahhar; Amiri, Masoud

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, structural and electronic properties and stability of (10, 0) born nitride nanotube (BNNT) are considered within density functional theory by doping group IV elements of the periodic table. The HOMO-LUMO gap has been strongly modified and treated a dual manner by choosing B or N sites for dopant atoms. Formation energy calculation shows that B site doping is more stable than N site doping. Results also show that all dopants turn the pristine BNNT into a p-type semiconductor except for carbon-doped BNNT at B site.

  15. An evaluation of the impact of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on soil microbial community structure and functional diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) triggers the need for an assessment of their effects on organisms in the environment. Soil microbial communities play a significant role in soil organic matter dynamics and nutrient cycling. This study evaluated the impacts of multi-walled carbon nan...

  16. Sexithiophene Encapsulated in a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube: An In Situ Raman Spectroelectrochemical Study of a Peapod Structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav; Gorantla, S.; Gemming, T.; Dunsch, L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 38 (2010), s. 11753-11759 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC203/07/J067 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : doping * electrochemistry * carbon nanotube s Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 5.476, year: 2010

  17. Effect of mixture ratios and nitrogen carrier gas flow rates on the morphology of carbon nanotube structures grown by CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malgas, GF

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by thermal Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) and investigates the effects of nitrogen carrier gas flow rates and mixture ratios on the morphology of CNTs on a silicon substrate by vaporizing...

  18. Nanotube phonon waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2013-10-29

    Disclosed are methods and devices in which certain types of nanotubes (e.g., carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes conduct heat with high efficiency and are therefore useful in electronic-type devices.

  19. Carbon Nano-Tube (CNT) Reinforced COPV

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reduce the structural mass of future aerospace vehicles through the development of ultra lightweight materials and structures through the use of: Carbon nanotube...

  20. Nanotube News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Smaller, faster computers, bullet-proof t-shirts, and itty-bitty robots--such are the promises of nanotechnology and the cylinder-shaped collection of carbon molecules known as nanotubes. But for these exciting ideas to become realities, scientists must understand how these miracle molecules perform under all sorts of conditions. This brief…

  1. Nanomechanics of Individual Carbon Nanotubes from Pyrolytically Grown Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruiping; Wang, Zhong L.; Bai, Zhigang; de Heer, Walter A.; Dai, Liming; Gao, Mei

    2000-07-01

    The bending modulus of individual carbon nanotubes from aligned arrays grown by pyrolysis was measured by in situ electromechanical resonance in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The bending modulus of nanotubes with point defects was ~30 GPa and that of nanotubes with volume defect was 2-3 GPa. The time-decay constant of nanotube resonance in a vacuum of 10-4 Torr was ~85 μs. A femtogram nanobalance was demonstrated based on nanotube resonance; it has the potential for measuring the mass of chain-structured large molecules. The in situ TEM provides a powerful approach towards nanomechanics of fiberlike nanomaterials with well-characterized defect structures.

  2. A Review: Carbon Nanotube-Based Piezoresistive Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waris Obitayo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of carbon nanotubes for piezoresistive strain sensors has acquired significant attention due to its unique electromechanical properties. In this comprehensive review paper, we discussed some important aspects of carbon nanotubes for strain sensing at both the nanoscale and macroscale. Carbon nanotubes undergo changes in their band structures when subjected to mechanical deformations. This phenomenon makes them applicable for strain sensing applications. This paper signifies the type of carbon nanotubes best suitable for piezoresistive strain sensors. The electrical resistivities of carbon nanotube thin film increase linearly with strain, making it an ideal material for a piezoresistive strain sensor. Carbon nanotube composite films, which are usually fabricated by mixing small amounts of single-walled or multiwalled carbon nanotubes with selected polymers, have shown promising characteristics of piezoresistive strain sensors. Studies also show that carbon nanotubes display a stable and predictable voltage response as a function of temperature.

  3. Structures, Energetics, and Electronic Properties of Layered Materials and Nanotubes of Cadmium Chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jia [ORNL; Huang, Jingsong [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Kent, Paul R [ORNL; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio [ORNL; Smith, Sean C [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The attractive optoelectronic properties of conducting polymers depend sensitively upon intra- and inter-polymer chain interactions, and therefore new methods to manipulate these interactions are continually being pursued. Here, we report a study of the isotopic effects of deuterium substitution on the structure, morphology, and optoelectronic properties of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene)s (P3HT) with an approach that combines the synthesis of deuterated materials, optoelectronic properties measurements, theoretical simulation, and neutron scattering. Selective substitutions of deuterium on the backbone or side-chains of P3HT result in distinct optoelectronic responses in P3HT/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) photovoltaics. Specifically, the weak non-covalent intermolecular interactions induced by the main-chain deuteration are shown to change the film crystallinity and morphology of P3HT/PCBM blends, and consequently reduce the short circuit current. However, decreased electronic coupling, the formation of a charge transfer state, and increased electron-phonon coupling resulting from side chain deuteration are shown to induce a remarkable reduction in open circuit voltage.

  4. The importance of carbon nanotube wire density, structural uniformity, and purity for fabricating homogeneous carbon nanotube–copper wire composites by copper electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Rajyashree; Yamada, Takeo; Hata, Kenji; Sekiguchi, Atsuko

    2018-04-01

    We present the influence of density, structural regularity, and purity of carbon nanotube wires (CNTWs) used as Cu electrodeposition templates on fabricating homogeneous high-electrical performance CNT–Cu wires lighter than Cu. We show that low-density CNTWs (wires) with regular macro- and microstructures and high CNT content (>90 wt %) are essential for making homogeneous CNT–Cu wires. These homogeneous CNT–Cu wires show a continuous Cu matrix with evenly mixed nanotubes of high volume fractions (∼45 vol %) throughout the wire-length. Consequently, the composite wires show densities ∼5.1 g/cm3 (33% lower than Cu) and electrical conductivities ∼6.1 × 104 S/cm (>100 × CNTW conductivity). However, composite wires from templates with higher densities or structural inconsistencies are non-uniform with discontinuous Cu matrices and poor CNT/Cu mixing. These non-uniform CNT–Cu wires show conductivities 2–6 times lower than the homogeneous composite wires.

  5. Macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) is a dynamic adhesive molecule that enhances uptake of carbon nanotubes by CHO-K1 Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Seishiro, E-mail: seishiro@nies.go.jp [Environmental Nanotoxicology Project, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Fujitani, Yuji; Furuyama, Akiko [Environmental Nanotoxicology Project, RCER, National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Kanno, Sanae [Department of Legal Medicine, St. Marianna School of Medicine (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    The toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a highly promising nanomaterial, is similar to that of asbestos because both types of particles have a fibrous shape and are biopersistent. Here, we investigated the characteristics of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), a membrane receptor expressed on macrophages that recognizes environmental or unopsonized particles, and we assessed whether and how MARCO was involved in cellular uptake of multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs). MARCO-transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells took up polystyrene beads irrespective of the particle size (20 nm–1 μm). In the culture of MARCO-transfected CHO-K1 cells dendritic structures were observed on the bottom of culture dishes, and the edges of these dendritic structures were continually renewed as the cell body migrated along the dendritic structures. MWCNTs were first tethered to the dendritic structures and then taken up by the cell body. MWCNTs appeared to be taken up via membrane ruffling like macropinocytosis, rather than phagocytosis. The cytotoxic EC{sub 50} value of MWCNTs in MARCO-transfected CHO-K1 cells was calculated to be 6.1 μg/mL and transmission electron microscopic observation indicated that the toxicity of MWCNTs may be due to the incomplete inclusion of MWCNTs by the membrane structure. -- Highlights: ►Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were tethered to MARCO in vitro. ►CNTs were taken up rapidly into the cell body via MARCO by membrane ruffling. ►The incomplete inclusion of CNTs by membranes caused cytotoxicity.

  6. The formation mechanism of chiral carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Liren; Lu, Junzhe; Zhu, Hengjiang

    2018-02-01

    The nuclei and the formation mechanism of chiral carbon nanotubes, namely, single-, double-, and triple-walled carbon nanotubes are simulated by the first principle density functional theory. The formation mechanism from nuclei to corresponding infinitely long carbon nanotubes occurs spirally and via absorbing carbon atoms layer by layer. Carbon atoms at the open end are metastable state compared with ones in the tube wall or the closed end, which indicate the growth point of chiral carbon nanotubes is located at the open end. Growth of outer layer tubular clusters takes precedence over the inner layer in the process of forming multi-walled nuclear structures. Because of the ratio of carbon atoms at the open end to all carbon atoms decreases, the stability of the tubular clusters increases with their length. The infinitely long carbon nanotubes are obtained by executing periodic boundary conditions depend on corresponding nuclear structures.

  7. Theoretical properties of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palser, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are invariably terminated with hemi-fullerene caps. In order to investigate the effect of these caps on the electronic structure, a method is developed to enumerate every hemi-fullerene cap which is commensurate with a given nanotube body. This algorithm is then applied to nanotubes for which I + m ≤ 25. The results of this algorithm are then used to study the effects of caps with different symmetries on the electronic structure of metallic and semi-conducting nanotubes within the Hueckel model. It is found that caps can cause localised and resonance states, although the likelihood of localised states occurring in capped metallic nanotubes is shown to be small. In addition, caps induce a non-uniform charge distribution, in which negative charge tends to accumulate on pentagon vertices. The thesis ends by describing two new density matrix methods for performing linear-scaling electronic-structure calculations within the independent electron approximation. Example calculations demonstrate that these methods provide efficient and robust ways of performing linear-scaling calculations, either grand canonically (at a fixed chemical potential) or canonically (at a fixed electron count). (author)

  8. Macroscopic Crosslinked Neat Carbon Nanotube Materials and CNT/Carbon Fiber Hybrid Composites: Supermolecular Structure and New Failure Mode Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    plain weave fabric with an areal density of 190 g/m2 was purchased from Textile Products, Inc. (Anahiem, USA). A single layer of carbon fabric was...with the specimen dimension of 5×1 cm2. The two ends of the sample were polished and electrodes were connected using silver paste for better...Packed Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Application as Super-Capacitor Electrodes . Nat. Mater. 2006, 5 (12), 987–994. (60) Hermans, P. H

  9. Effects of the chemical structure of polyfluorene on selective extraction of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumaru, Takahiro; Toshimitsu, Fumiyuki; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2014-06-07

    The selective recognition/extraction of semiconducting (sem)- and metallic (met)-single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is still a great challenge in the science and technology of carbon nanotubes because their selective synthesis is still difficult. Poly(9,9-dioctyl-fluorene-2,7-diyl) (2C8-PF) and its derivatives are widely used polymers in carbon nanotube science and technology since they only extract sem-SWNTs from the mixture of sem-/met-SWNTs, while the separation mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we focus on the alkyl chain number on the polyfluorenes (PFs) to understand the mechanism for selective recognition. Here we describe the synthesis of mono-octyl moiety-carrying polyfluorene (poly(9-octyl-9H-fluorene-2,7-diyl), C8H-PF), and characterized its selective SWNT recognition/extraction ability, and found that the C8H-PF solubilized sem-SWNTs with a diameter of 0.9-1.1 nm, whose behavior is similar to that of 2C8-PF. In addition, C8H-PF selectively extracted sem-SWNTs with larger diameters (average diameter = 1.4 nm), whose behavior is different from that of 2C8-PF. Molecular mechanics simulations were carried out to understand such specific solubilization behavior. This study provides an insight into the design and synthesis of PF-based polymers and copolymers that exhibit efficient selective sem-SWNT recognition/extraction ability and their applications.

  10. Single crystalline wurtzite ZnO/zinc blende ZnS coaxial heterojunctions and hollow zinc blende ZnS nanotubes: synthesis, structural characterization and optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xing; Willinger, Marc-Georg; Fan, Hua; Xie, Zai-lai; Wang, Lei; Klein-Hoffmann, Achim; Girgsdies, Frank; Lee, Chun-Sing; Meng, Xiang-Min

    2014-08-07

    Synthesis of ZnO/ZnS heterostructures under thermodynamic conditions generally results in the wurtzite (WZ) structure of the ZnS component because its WZ phase is thermodynamically more stable than its zinc blende (ZB) phase. In this report, we demonstrate for the first time the preparation of ZnO/ZnS coaxial nanocables composed of single crystalline ZB structured ZnS epitaxially grown on WZ ZnO via a two-step thermal evaporation method. The deposition temperature is believed to play a crucial role in determining the crystalline phase of ZnS. Through a systematic structural analysis, the ZnO core and the ZnS shell are found to have an orientation relationship of (0002)ZnO(WZ)//(002)ZnS(ZB) and [01-10]ZnO(WZ)//[2-20]ZnS(ZB). Observation of the coaxial nanocables in cross-section reveals the formation of voids between the ZnO core and the ZnS shell during the coating process, which is probably associated with the nanoscale Kirkendall effect known to result in porosity. Furthermore, by immersing the ZnO/ZnS nanocable heterojunctions in an acetic acid solution to etch away the inner ZnO cores, single crystalline ZnS nanotubes orientated along the [001] direction of the ZB structure were also achieved for the first time. Finally, optical properties of the hollow ZnS tubes were investigated and discussed in detail. We believe that our study could provide some insights into the controlled fabrication of one dimensional (1D) semiconductors with desired morphology, structure and composition at the nanoscale, and the synthesized WZ ZnO/ZB ZnS nanocables as well as ZB ZnS nanotubes could be ideal candidates for the study of optoelectronics based on II-VI semiconductors.

  11. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  12. Growth, Structural and Optical Characterization of ZnO Nanotubes on Disposable-Flexible Paper Substrates by Low-Temperature Chemical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Soomro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of vertically aligned ZnO nanotubes (NTs on paper substrates by low-temperature hydrothermal method. The growth of ZnO NTs on the paper substrate is discussed; further, the structural and optical properties are investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and cathodoluminescence (CL, and it was found that the ZnO NTs on paper substrate fulfill the structural and optical properties of ZnO NTs grown on other conventional substrates. This will be more beneficial in future usage of ZnO NTs in different fields and applications. Particularly, this approach opens the ways in research and development for high volume manufacturing of low-cost, flexible optoelectronics devices on disposable paper substrates and can be used in the future miniaturization trends.

  13. Effective enhancement of gas separation performance in mixed matrix membranes using core/shell structured multi-walled carbon nanotube/graphene oxide nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qingzhong; Pan, Xinglong; Li, Xiaofang; Zhang, Jianqiang; Guo, Qikai

    2017-02-01

    Novel core/shell structured multi-walled carbon nanotube/graphene oxide nanoribbons (MWCNT@GONRs) nanohybrids were successfully prepared using a modified chemical longitudinal unzipping method. Subsequently, the MWCNT@GONRs nanohybrids were used as fillers to enhance the gas separation performance of polyimide based mixed matrix membranes (MMMs). It is found that MMMs concurrently exhibited higher gas selectivity and higher gas permeability compared to pristine polyimide. The high gas selectivity could be attributed to the GONRs shell, which provided a selective barrier and large gas adsorbed area, while the high gas permeability resulted from the hollow structured MWCNTs core with smooth internal surface, which acted as a rapid transport channel. MWCNT@GONRs could be promising candidates to improve gas separation performance of MMMs due to the unique microstructures, ease of synthesis and low filling loading.

  14. Optical and Structural Properties of Multi-wall-carbon-nanotube-modified ZnO Synthesized at Varying Substrate Temperatures for Highly Efficient Light Sensing Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine Saasa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Structural, optical and light detection properties on carbon-nanotube-modified ZnO thin films grown at various temperatures from room to 1173 K are investigated. The optical band gap values calculated from reflectivity data show a hump at a critical temperature range of 873-1073 K. Similar trends in surface roughness as well as crystallite size of the films are observed. These changes have been attributed to structural change from wurzite hexagonal to cubic carbon modified ZnO as also validated by x-ray diffraction, RBS and PIXE of these layers. UV and visible light detection properties show similar trends. It is demonstrated that the present films can sense both UV and visible light to a maximum response efficiency of 66 % which is much higher than the last reported efficiency 10 %. This high response is given predominantly by cubic crystallite rather than the wurzite hexagonal composites.

  15. Structure and electronic properties of the nanopeapods—One dimensional C60O polymer encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Weiye; Li Xinqian; Bai Hongcun; Zhu Ying; Huang Yuanhe

    2012-01-01

    The structure–property relationship of the nanopeapods—one dimensional (1D) C 60 O polymer encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)—is studied by means of the self-consistent field crystal orbital method. The calculations show that the nearest distance between the two constituents is within Van der Waals interaction scope in the most stable two peapods. The SWCNT sizes affect not only the stability but also the electronic structures of the peapods. The peapods with larger tube diameters keep the semiconductive and metallic properties of the corresponding pristine SWCNTs. These combination systems are stiffer than the corresponding SWCNTs due to larger Young's moduli. The magnitude order of the calculated mobility of charge carriers is in the range of 10 2 –10 5 cm 2 V −1 s −1 for the peapods, indicating that the combined systems may be good high-mobility electronic materials. - Graphical abstract: Formation of the novel peapod—1D C 60 O polymer encapsulated inside single-walled carbon nanotube. Highlights: ► Several novel peapods encapsulating one dimensional C 60 O polymers are constructed. ► Interwall distance of the two most stable peapods is in the Van der Waals scope. ► All peapods studied are stiffer than the corresponding SWCNTs. ► These peapods have high mobilies—in the order of 10 2 –10 5 cm 2 V −1 s −1 .

  16. Polyaniline/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite with core-shell structures as a cathode material for rechargeable lithium-polymer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Pan [School of Marine Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Weihai 264209 (China); Han, Jia-Jun, E-mail: hanjiajunhitweihai@163.com [School of Marine Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Weihai 264209 (China); Jiang, Li-Feng [Dalian Chemical Institute of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116011 (China); Li, Zhao-Yu; Cheng, Jin-Ning [School of Marine Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Weihai 264209 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • The polyaniline multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite with core-shell structures was synthetized via in situ chemical oxidative polymerization, and the materials were characterized by physical and chemical methods. • The PANI/WMCNTs was synthetized via in situ chemical oxidative polymerization with core-shell structures. • The WMCNTs highly enhanced the conductivity of composites. • The comopsites were more conducive to the intercalation and deintercalation of anions and cations. • The much better performance as the cathode for lithium-ion cells was acquired for the composites. • The composites are low cost and eco-friendly which have a good prospect in future. - Abstract: The aniline was polymerized onto functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in order to obtain a cathode material with core-shell structures for lithium batteries. The structure and morphology of the samples were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The electrochemical properties of the composite were characterized by the cyclic voltammetry, the charge/discharge property, coulombic efficiency, and ac impedance spectroscopy in detail. At a constant current density of 0.2 C, the first specific discharge capacity of the reduced and oxidized PANI/WMCNTs were 181.8 mAh/g and 135.1 mAh/g separately, and the capacity retention rates were corresponding to 76.75% and 86.04% for 100 cycles with 99% coulombic efficiency. It was confirmed that the CNTs obviously enhanced the conductivity and electrochemical performance of polyaniline, and compared with the pure PANI, the reduced composite possessed a quite good performance for the cathode of lithium batteries.

  17. Subchronic 13-week inhalation exposure of rats to multiwalled carbon nanotubes: toxic effects are determined by density of agglomerate structures, not fibrillar structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauluhn, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Wistar rats were nose-only exposed to multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT, Baytubes) in a subchronic 13-week inhalation study. The focus of study was on respiratory tract and systemic toxicity, including analysis of MWCNT biokinetics in the lungs and lung-associated lymph nodes (LALNs). The time course and concentration dependence of pulmonary effects were examined by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and histopathology up to 6 months postexposure. Particular emphasis was directed to the comparative characterization of MWCNT structures prior to and after micronization and dry powder dispersion into inhalation chambers. These determinations were complemented by additional analyses in digested BAL cells. Animals were exposed on 6 h/day, 5 days per week for 13 consecutive weeks to 0, 0.1, 0.4, 1.5, and 6 mg/m(3). The subchronic exposure to respirable solid aerosols of MWCNT was tolerated without effects suggestive of systemic toxicity. Kinetic analyses demonstrated a markedly delayed clearance of MWCNT from lungs at overload conditions. Translocation into LALNs occurred at 1.5 and 6 mg/m(3) and required at least 13 weeks of study to become detectable. At these exposure levels, the lung and LALN weights were significantly increased. Sustained elevations in BAL polymorphonuclear neutrophils and soluble collagen occurred at these concentrations with borderline effects at 0.4 mg/m(3). Histopathology revealed principal exposure-related lesions at 0.4 mg/m(3) and above in the upper respiratory tract (goblet cell hyper- and/or metaplasia, eosinophilic globules, and focal turbinate remodeling) and the lower respiratory tract (inflammatory changes in the bronchioloalveolar region and increased interstitial collagen staining). Granulomatous changes and a time-dependent increase of a bronchioloalveolar hyperplasia occurred at 6 mg/m(3). All end points examined were unremarkable at 0.1 mg/m(3) (no-observed-adverse-effect-level). In summary, this study demonstrates that the induced

  18. Continuum modeling of boron nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, J; Wu, J; Hwang, K C; Huang, Y

    2008-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes display unique properties and have many potential applications. A finite-deformation shell theory is developed for boron nitride nanotubes directly from the interatomic potential to account for the effect of bending and curvature. Its constitutive relation accounts for the nonlinear, multi-body atomistic interactions, and therefore can model the important effect of tube chirality and radius. The theory is then used to determine whether a single-wall boron nitride nanotube can be modeled as a linear elastic isotropic shell. Instabilities of boron nitride nanotubes under different loadings (e.g., tension, compression, and torsion) are also studied. It is shown that the tension instability of boron nitride nanotubes is material instability, while the compression and torsion instabilities are structural instabilities.

  19. Ionizing Radiation Effects in Ni Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlimas, D.; Kozlovsky, A.; Shumskaya, A.; Kaniukov, E.; Ibragimova, M.; Zdorovets, M.; Kadyrzhanov, K.

    2017-01-01

    Polycrystalline nickel nanotubes with diameter of 380 nm and wall thickness 95 nm were synthesized by electrochemical method using PET track-etched membranes with thickness of 12 μm. A comprehensive study of the structural, morphological and electrical characteristics of Ni nanotubes irradiated with C+13 ions with energy 1.75 MeV/nucleon and fluence ranging from 109 to 5 × 1011 cm-2 was carried out. The ability of modification of structural parameters such as lattice parameter and the average size of crystallites and conductivity of Ni nanotubes by irradiation was shown.

  20. A scalable route to prepare core–shell structured ZnO@PEDOT nanowires and PEDOT nanotubes and their properties as electrode materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Fang; Zhang, Xianhong; Yang, Le; Xu, Dehong; Ma, Yuhong; Chen, Dong; Wang, Li; Zhao, Changwen; Yang, Wantai

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • ZnO@PEDOT nanowires and PEDOT nanotubes synthesized by chemical oxidation polymerization. • By controlling the ratio of ZnO/EDOT, ZnO@PEDOT formed different structures. • The maximum specific capacitance of PEDOT can reach 101.34 F/g. - Abstract: A composite of a core–shell structured nanowires with ZnO as a core and conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) as a shell was prepared. At first, the hexagonal ZnO nanowires, with diameter of about 80–100 nm and length 4–5 μm, were fabricated by hydrothermal synthesis process. Then a thick layer of poly(trifluoroethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (PTFEMA-b-PSSNa) was grafted from the surface of ZnO nanowires via atom transfer free radical polymerization. At last, with the ZnO@PTFEMA-b-PSSNa as a template and the PSSNa chain as the counterion dopant, PEDOT was precipitated onto the surface of the template to form the composite of ZnO@PEDOT/PSSNa. With the evaluation of the EDOT polymerization, the thickness of the PEDOT layer increased steadily. However, as the ratio of EDOT/ZnO was greater than 1:2, the ZnO nanowires templates were dissolved at last and then PEDOT particles were produced due to increasing of the acidity during the oxidation polymerization of EDOT. In this case, the product was the mixture of the nanotubes and particles of PEDOT/PPSNa. The electrochemical capacitances of the composites with different structures were investigated with cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge–discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques with three-electrode cell configuration. The maximum specific capacitance of ZnO@PEDOT electrode can reach 101.34 F/g at 20 mV/s.

  1. A scalable route to prepare core–shell structured ZnO@PEDOT nanowires and PEDOT nanotubes and their properties as electrode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Fang, E-mail: 270220943@qq.com [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhang, Xianhong, E-mail: zxh_0507@126.com [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Yang, Le, E-mail: 13613513412@126.com [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Xu, Dehong, E-mail: dedehenry@qq.com [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Ma, Yuhong, E-mail: mayh@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Chen, Dong, E-mail: chendong@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Li, E-mail: lwang@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhao, Changwen, E-mail: zhaocw@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Yang, Wantai, E-mail: yangwt@mail.buct.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Carbon Fiber and Functional Polymers, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2016-05-01

    Highlights: • ZnO@PEDOT nanowires and PEDOT nanotubes synthesized by chemical oxidation polymerization. • By controlling the ratio of ZnO/EDOT, ZnO@PEDOT formed different structures. • The maximum specific capacitance of PEDOT can reach 101.34 F/g. - Abstract: A composite of a core–shell structured nanowires with ZnO as a core and conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) as a shell was prepared. At first, the hexagonal ZnO nanowires, with diameter of about 80–100 nm and length 4–5 μm, were fabricated by hydrothermal synthesis process. Then a thick layer of poly(trifluoroethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (PTFEMA-b-PSSNa) was grafted from the surface of ZnO nanowires via atom transfer free radical polymerization. At last, with the ZnO@PTFEMA-b-PSSNa as a template and the PSSNa chain as the counterion dopant, PEDOT was precipitated onto the surface of the template to form the composite of ZnO@PEDOT/PSSNa. With the evaluation of the EDOT polymerization, the thickness of the PEDOT layer increased steadily. However, as the ratio of EDOT/ZnO was greater than 1:2, the ZnO nanowires templates were dissolved at last and then PEDOT particles were produced due to increasing of the acidity during the oxidation polymerization of EDOT. In this case, the product was the mixture of the nanotubes and particles of PEDOT/PPSNa. The electrochemical capacitances of the composites with different structures were investigated with cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge–discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques with three-electrode cell configuration. The maximum specific capacitance of ZnO@PEDOT electrode can reach 101.34 F/g at 20 mV/s.

  2. Facile synthesis and magnetic study of Ni@polyamide 66 coaxial nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaoru, E-mail: lixiaoruqdu@126.com; Yang, Chao; Han, Ping; Zhao, Qingpei; Song, Guojun, E-mail: songguojunqdu@126.com

    2016-12-01

    Ni@polyamide 66 (PA66) core/shell coaxial double-layer nanotube arrays have been prepared in the nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide templates (AAO). The shell of PA66 nanotubes were formed first and then served as templates to deposit Ni nanotubes used as the core. The morphology, structures of the obtained arrays were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The formation of this unique coaxial nanotube structure was confirmed by SEM and TEM images and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We further explored the magnetic properties of the obtained coaxial nanotube arrays with vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and found that Ni@PA66 coaxial nanotubes exhibited higher remanence ratio than that of Ni nanotubes. These Ni@PA66 coaxial nanotubes are promising to be used as templates to fill in other materials. - Highlights: • Ni@PA66 coaxial nanotubes are prepared successfully with PA66 nanotubes obtained first and then Ni nanotubes were deposited in PA66 nanotubes. • The magnetic property of Ni@PA66 coaxial nanotubes is better than that of Ni nanotubes. • Ni@PA66 coaxial nanotubes can be used as templates to fill in other materials.

  3. Preparation of array of long carbon nanotubes and fibers therefrom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arendt, Paul N.; DePaula, Ramond F.; Zhu, Yuntian T.; Usov, Igor O.

    2015-11-19

    An array of carbon nanotubes is prepared by exposing a catalyst structure to a carbon nanotube precursor. Embodiment catalyst structures include one or more trenches, channels, or a combination of trenches and channels. A system for preparing the array includes a heated surface for heating the catalyst structure and a cooling portion that cools gas above the catalyst structure. The system heats the catalyst structure so that the interaction between the precursor and the catalyst structure results in the formation of an array of carbon nanotubes on the catalyst structure, and cools the gas near the catalyst structure and also cools any carbon nanotubes that form on the catalyst structure to prevent or at least minimize the formation of amorphous carbon. Arrays thus formed may be used for spinning fibers of carbon nanotubes.

  4. Janus cyclic peptide-polymer nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danial, Maarten; My-Nhi Tran, Carmen; Young, Philip G.; Perrier, Sébastien; Jolliffe, Katrina A.

    2013-11-01

    Self-assembled nanotubular structures have numerous potential applications but these are limited by a lack of control over size and functionality. Controlling these features at the molecular level may allow realization of the potential of such structures. Here we report a new generation of self-assembled cyclic peptide-polymer nanotubes with dual functionality in the form of either a Janus or mixed polymeric corona. A ‘relay’ synthetic strategy is used to prepare nanotubes with a demixing or mixing polymeric corona. Nanotube structure is assessed in solution using 1H-1H nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy NMR, and in bulk using differential scanning calorimetry. The Janus nanotubes form artificial pores in model phospholipid bilayers. These molecules provide a viable pathway for the development of intriguing nanotubular structures with dual functionality via a demixing or a mixing polymeric corona and may provide new avenues for the creation of synthetic transmembrane protein channel mimics.

  5. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  6. One-step fabrication of single-crystalline ZnS nanotubes with a novel hollow structure and large surface area for photodetector devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qinwei; Meng, Xianquan; Xiong, Ke; Qiu, Yunlei; Lin, Weihua

    2017-03-01

    ZnS nanotubes (NTs) were successfully prepared via a one-step thermal evaporation process without using any templates. The resulting NTs were single crystalline and structurally uniform. Based on experimental analysis, a tube-growth vapor-liquid-solid process was proposed as the growth mechanism of ZnS NTs. A metal-semiconductor-metal full-nanostructured ultraviolet (UV) photodetector with ZnS NTs as the active layer, and Ag nanowires of low resistivity and high transmissivity as electrodes, was fabricated and characterized. The ZnS NT-based device displayed a high I on/I off ratio of up to ˜1.56 × 105 with a high response to UV incident light at low operation voltage. This work is a meaningful exploration for preparing other one-dimensional semiconductor NTs, and developing a high-performance and power-saving UV sensor.

  7. Hydrophilicity, pore structure and mechanical performance of CNT/PVDF materials affected by carboxyl contents in multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanxia; Jiang, Ce; Tian, Run; Li, Guangfen

    2018-01-01

    Poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes have been prepared by loading different type of MWCNTs-COOH as the dispersed phase via phase inversion method. The chemically functionalized MWCNTs with increasing carboxyl content were chosen for achieving a better dispersion in PVDF and altering the membrane hydrophilicity. The effect of the carboxyl content in MWCNTs on crystal structure, thermal behavior, membrane morphology, hydrophilicity, and water flux of blended membranes were investigated. Due to the addition of carbon nanotubes, various performances of the hybrid membrane had obvious changes. The most prominent was that thermal stability could be enhanced and the pore morphology was more preferable, also that the hydrophilicity were improved, further that water flux could be increased to some extent.

  8. Carbon nanotubes: from nano test tube to nano-reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2011-12-27

    Confinement of molecules and atoms inside carbon nanotubes provides a powerful strategy for studying structures and chemical properties of individual molecules at the nanoscale. In this issue of ACS Nano, Allen et al. explore the nanotube as a template leading to the formation of unusual supramolecular and covalent structures. The potential of carbon nanotubes as reactors for synthesis on the nano- and macroscales is discussed in light of recent studies.

  9. Estimated molecular structure of a carbon nanotube molecular heater based on binding properties to a target protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Minoru; Yamazaki, Jun

    2015-12-18

    Carbon nanotubes exhibit strong absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR) region and are considered as potent candidates for hyperthermic therapy because they generate significant amounts of heat upon excitation with NIR light. We prepared a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/IgG complex to use as a "smart molecular heater" for hyperthermic therapy. The aim of the present study was to assess the binding efficiency of DNA-functionalized SWNT/IgG complexes to a target protein. 3 types of complexes with different lengths of spacer arm chain (13.5, 29, and 56 Å) linked to biotinylated IgG were prepared, and we evaluated the effect of the spacer arm length on the specificity, affinity, and capacity of binding to a target protein. Complexes with longer spacer lengths showed increased binding affinity to a target protein. This could be due to a reduction in steric hindrance by increasing the segmental flexibility of the spacer arm. The results of this study suggested that DNA-functionalized SWNT/IgG complexes could act as a heating nano-device for hyperthermic cancer therapy, and the complexes can bind various types of tumor by modifiying the specific antibody.

  10. The correlation between structural properties, geometrical features, and photoactivity of freestanding TiO2 nanotubes in comparative degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol and methylene blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabzadeh Pasikhani, Javad; Gilani, Neda; Ebrahimian Pirbazari, Azadeh

    2018-02-01

    Freestanding TiO2 nanotubes (FSNTs) with various physical dimensions were fabricated by two-step anodization process with different voltages and anodization times. The detachment method employed in this study involved voltage reduction at the end of the second step and ultrasonic chemical treatment. The results demonstrated that this detachment method is a beneficial technique to create thin open-mouthed and closed-end FSNTs (with lengths of 6–14 μm). Moreover, the influences of anodization conditions on photocatalytic activity, structural properties and geometrical features of FSNTs in comparative degradation of two non-colored (2,4-dichlorophenol) and colored (methylene blue) pollutants were investigated. Findings revealed that the quantity of the photocatalyst utilized is an effective parameter and using the optimum weight (10 mg/100 ml of 2,4-dichlorophenol) could increase the efficiency of the process up to 21%. Further, the results demonstrated that if equal optimum weights of FSNTs are chosen, decreases in voltage and anodization time significantly influence the structural properties, geometrical features, and photodegradation efficiency. The enhancement achieved in the degradation of both 2,4-dichlorophenol and methylene blue using the nanotubes with the shortest diameter (54 nm) and length (6.5 μm), which possess the lowest porosity (0.5) and also the highest surface area (0.53 m2 g‑1), nanotubes’ density (19 cm2 cm‑2) and wall thickness to length ratio (2). In addition, the results obtained indicated that the degradation reactions follow first-order kinetics in the degradation of the both pollutants. The apparent degradation rate constant of methylene blue was approximately 1.2 times greater than of the 2,4-dichlorophenol due to the negative charge of the nanotubes’ surface and electrostatic adsorptions.

  11. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    planes to stable loops caused by annealing M Endo, B J Lee, Y A Kim, Y J Kim, H Muramatsu, T Yanagisawa, T Hayashi, M Terrones and M S Dresselhaus Energetics and electronic structure of C70-peapods and one-dimensional chains of C70 Susumu Okada, Minoru Otani and Atsushi Oshiyama Theoretical characterization of several models of nanoporous carbon F Valencia, A H Romero, E Hernández, M Terrones and H Terrones First-principles molecular dynamics study of the stretching frequencies of hydrogen molecules in carbon nanotubes Gabriel Canto, Pablo Ordejón, Cheng Hansong, Alan C Cooper and Guido P Pez The geometry and the radial breathing mode of carbon nanotubes: beyond the ideal behaviour Jeno Kürti, Viktor Zólyomi, Miklos Kertesz and Sun Guangyu Curved nanostructured materials Humberto Terrones and Mauricio Terrones A one-dimensional Ising model for C70 molecular ordering in C70-peapods Yutaka Maniwa, Hiromichi Kataura, Kazuyuki Matsuda and Yutaka Okabe Nanoengineering of carbon nanotubes for nanotools Yoshikazu Nakayama and Seiji Akita Narrow diameter double-wall carbon nanotubes: synthesis, electron microscopy and inelastic light scattering R R Bacsa, E Flahaut, Ch Laurent, A Peigney, S Aloni, P Puech and W S Bacsa Sensitivity of single multiwalled carbon nanotubes to the environment M Krüger, I Widmer, T Nussbaumer, M Buitelaar and C Schönenberger Characterizing carbon nanotube samples with resonance Raman scattering A Jorio, M A Pimenta, A G Souza Filho, R Saito, G Dresselhaus and M S Dresselhaus FTIR-luminescence mapping of dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes Sergei Lebedkin, Katharina Arnold, Frank Hennrich, Ralph Krupke, Burkhard Renker and Manfred M Kappes Structural properties of Haeckelite nanotubes Ph Lambin and L P Biró Structural changes in single-walled carbon nanotubes under non-hydrostatic pressures: x-ray and Raman studies Sukanta Karmakar, Surinder M Sharma, P V Teredesai, D V S Muthu, A Govindaraj, S K Sikka and A K Sood Novel properties of 0

  12. Platinum-TM (TM = Fe, Co) alloy nanoparticles dispersed nitrogen doped (reduced graphene oxide-multiwalled carbon nanotube) hybrid structure cathode electrocatalysts for high performance PEMFC applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayan, B P; Ramaprabhu, S

    2013-06-07

    The efforts to push proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) for commercial applications are being undertaken globally. In PEMFC, the sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) at the cathode can be improved by the alloying of platinum with 3d-transition metals (TM = Fe, Co, etc.) and with nitrogen doping, and in the present work we have combined both of these aspects. We describe a facile method for the synthesis of a nitrogen doped (reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)) hybrid structure (N-(G-MWNTs)) by the uniform coating of a nitrogen containing polymer over the surface of the hybrid structure (positively surface charged rGO-negatively surface charged MWNTs) followed by the pyrolysis of these (rGO-MWNTs) hybrid structure-polymer composites. The N-(G-MWNTs) hybrid structure is used as a catalyst support for the dispersion of platinum (Pt), platinum-iron (Pt3Fe) and platinum-cobalt (Pt3Co) alloy nanoparticles. The PEMFC performances of Pt-TM alloy nanoparticle dispersed N-(G-MWNTs) hybrid structure electrocatalysts are 5.0 times higher than that of commercial Pt-C electrocatalysts along with very good stability under acidic environment conditions. This work demonstrates a considerable improvement in performance compared to existing cathode electrocatalysts being used in PEMFC and can be extended to the synthesis of metal, metal oxides or metal alloy nanoparticle decorated nitrogen doped carbon nanostructures for various electrochemical energy applications.

  13. Hierarchical MoS2 tubular structures internally wired by carbon nanotubes as a highly stable anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu Ming; Yu, Xin Yao; Li, Zhen; Paik, Ungyu; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2016-07-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a typical two-dimensional material, is a promising anode material for lithium-ion batteries because it has three times the theoretical capacity of graphite. The main challenges associated with MoS2 anodes are the structural degradation and the low rate capability caused by the low intrinsic electric conductivity and large strain upon cycling. Here, we design hierarchical MoS2 tubular structures internally wired by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to tackle these problems. These porous MoS2 tubular structures are constructed from building blocks of ultrathin nanosheets, which are believed to benefit the electrochemical reactions. Benefiting from the unique structural and compositional characteristics, these CNT-wired MoS2 tubular structures deliver a very high specific capacity of ~1320 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 0.1 A g(-1), exceptional rate capability, and an ultralong cycle life of up to 1000 cycles. This work may inspire new ideas for constructing high-performance electrodes for electrochemical energy storage.

  14. Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Individual Carbon Nanotube Breakdown Caused by Joule Heating in Air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Gudnason, S.B.; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier

    2006-01-01

    We present repeated structural and electrical measurements on individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes, alternating between electrical measurements under ambient conditions and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The multiwalled carbon nanotubes made by chemical vapor deposition were manipulated...

  15. A composite CdS thin film/TiO2 nanotube structure by ultrafast successive electrochemical deposition toward photovoltaic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Han; Liu, Hong; Shen, Wenzhong

    2014-01-01

    Fabricating functional compounds on substrates with complicated morphology has been an important topic in material science and technology, which remains a challenging issue to simultaneously achieve a high growth rate for a complex nanostructure with simple controlling factors. Here, we present a novel simple and successive method based on chemical reactions in an open reaction system manipulated by an electric field. A uniform CdS/TiO2 composite tubular structure has been fabricated in highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays in a very short time period (~90 s) under room temperature (RT). The content of CdS in the resultant and its crystalline structure was tuned by the form and magnitude of external voltage. The as-formed structure has shown a quite broad and bulk-like light absorption spectrum with the absorption of photon energy even below that of the bulk CdS. The as-fabricated-sensitized solar cell based on this composite structure has achieved an efficiency of 1.43% without any chemical doping or co-sensitizing, 210% higher than quantum dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) under a similar condition. Hopefully, this method can also easily grow nanostructures based on a wide range of compound materials for energy science and electronic technologies, especially for fast-deploying devices.

  16. Performance enhancement of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells by dual-layered membrane electrode assembly structures with carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dong-Won; Kim, Jun-Ho; Kim, Se-Hoon; Kim, Jun-Bom; Oh, Eun-Suok

    2013-05-01

    The effect of dual-layered membrane electrode assemblies (d-MEAs) on the performance of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was investigated using the following characterization techniques: single cell performance test, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and cyclic voltammetry (CV). It has been shown that the PEMFC with d-MEAs has better cell performance than that with typical mono-layered MEAs (m-MEAs). In particular, the d-MEA whose inner layer is composed of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) showed the best fuel cell performance. This is due to the fact that the d-MEAs with MWCNTs have the highest electrochemical surface area and the lowest activation polarization, as observed from the CV and EIS test.

  17. Electrical-field-induced structural change and charge transfer of lanthanide-salophen complexes assembled on carbon nanotube field effect transistor devices.

    OpenAIRE

    Magadur , Gurvan; Bouanis , Fatima Zara; Norman , Evgeny; Guillot , Regis; Lauret , Jean Sebastien; Huc , Vincent; Cojocaru , Costel Sorin; Mallah , Talal

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The application of a negative gate voltage on a carbon nanotube field effect transistor decorated by a binuclear Tb(III) complex leads to the generation of a negatively charged mononuclear one, presenting an electron density transfer to the nanotube and ambipolar behaviour.

  18. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  19. Nature and strength of bonding in a crystal of semiconducting nanotubes: van der Waals density functional calculations and analytical results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleis, Jesper; Schröder, Elsebeth; Hyldgaard, Per

    2008-01-01

    for the nanotube-crystal binding energy can be approximated by a sum of nanotube-pair interactions when these are calculated in vdW-DR This observation suggests a framework for an efficient implementation of quantum-physical modeling of the carbon nanotube bundling in more general nanotube bundles, including...... nanotube yarn and rope structures.......The dispersive interaction between nanotubes is investigated through ab initio theory calculations and in an analytical approximation. A van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) [M. Dion et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004)] is used to determine and compare the binding of a pair of nanotubes...

  20. Processing and characterization of halloysite nanotubes filled polypropylene nanocomposites based on a masterbatch route: effect of halloysites treatment on structural and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Halloysites/polypropylene nanocomposites with different nanotubes contents were prepared by diluting a masterbatch containing 30 wt.% halloysites with polypropylene (PP. Unmodified (HNTs and quaternary ammonium salt treated (QM-HNTs halloysite nanotubes were used. Both degree of crystallinity and crystallization temperature increase upon addition of halloysites into PP, thus indicating a potential nucleation effect induced by the nanotubes. An homogeneous distribution and dispersion of nanotubes was observed throughout the PP matrix, with a slightly better dispersion in the case of modified QM-HNTs compared to unmodified HNTs. Mechanical tests in tension, bending and notched impact demonstrated that strength and modulus of the nanocomposites significantly increase with addition of halloysites without significant loss of ductility. An halloysite content of 6 wt.% appears as an optimum. Modified halloysites (QM-HNTs lead to globally better performances due to strong interfacial interaction between the polymer matrix and the nanotubes.

  1. An Experimental Study on Static and Dynamic Strain Sensitivity of Embeddable Smart Concrete Sensors Doped with Carbon Nanotubes for SHM of Large Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Meoni

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The availability of new self-sensing cement-based strain sensors allows the development of dense sensor networks for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM of reinforced concrete structures. These sensors are fabricated by doping cement-matrix mterials with conductive fillers, such as Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs, and can be embedded into structural elements made of reinforced concrete prior to casting. The strain sensing principle is based on the multifunctional composites outputting a measurable change in their electrical properties when subjected to a deformation. Previous work by the authors was devoted to material fabrication, modeling and applications in SHM. In this paper, we investigate the behavior of several sensors fabricated with and without aggregates and with different MWCNT contents. The strain sensitivity of the sensors, in terms of fractional change in electrical resistivity for unit strain, as well as their linearity are investigated through experimental testing under both quasi-static and sine-sweep dynamic uni-axial compressive loadings. Moreover, the responses of the sensors when subjected to destructive compressive tests are evaluated. Overall, the presented results contribute to improving the scientific knowledge on the behavior of smart concrete sensors and to furthering their understanding for SHM applications.

  2. An Experimental Study on Static and Dynamic Strain Sensitivity of Embeddable Smart Concrete Sensors Doped with Carbon Nanotubes for SHM of Large Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meoni, Andrea; D'Alessandro, Antonella; Downey, Austin; García-Macías, Enrique; Rallini, Marco; Materazzi, A Luigi; Torre, Luigi; Laflamme, Simon; Castro-Triguero, Rafael; Ubertini, Filippo

    2018-03-09

    The availability of new self-sensing cement-based strain sensors allows the development of dense sensor networks for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of reinforced concrete structures. These sensors are fabricated by doping cement-matrix mterials with conductive fillers, such as Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs), and can be embedded into structural elements made of reinforced concrete prior to casting. The strain sensing principle is based on the multifunctional composites outputting a measurable change in their electrical properties when subjected to a deformation. Previous work by the authors was devoted to material fabrication, modeling and applications in SHM. In this paper, we investigate the behavior of several sensors fabricated with and without aggregates and with different MWCNT contents. The strain sensitivity of the sensors, in terms of fractional change in electrical resistivity for unit strain, as well as their linearity are investigated through experimental testing under both quasi-static and sine-sweep dynamic uni-axial compressive loadings. Moreover, the responses of the sensors when subjected to destructive compressive tests are evaluated. Overall, the presented results contribute to improving the scientific knowledge on the behavior of smart concrete sensors and to furthering their understanding for SHM applications.

  3. Effect of semiconductor polymer backbone structures and side-chain parameters on the facile separation of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from as-synthesized mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dennis T.; Chung, Jong Won; Park, Geonhee; Kim, Yun-Tae; Lee, Chang Young; Cho, Yeonchoo; Yoo, Pil J.; Han, Jae-Hee; Shin, Hyeon-Jin; Kim, Woo-Jae

    2018-01-01

    Semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) show promise as core materials for next-generation solar cells and nanoelectronic devices. However, most commercial SWNT production methods generate mixtures of metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs) and semiconducting SWNT (sc-SWNTs). Therefore, sc-SWNTs must be separated from their original mixtures before use. In this study, we investigated a polymer-based, noncovalent sc-SWNT separation approach, which is simple to perform and does not disrupt the electrical properties of the SWNTs, thus improving the performance of the corresponding sc-SWNT-based applications. By systematically investigating the effect that different structural features of the semiconductor polymer have on the separation of sc-SWNTs, we discovered that the length and configuration of the alkyl side chains and the rigidity of the backbone structure exert significant effects on the efficiency of sc-SWNT separation. We also found that electron transfer between the semiconductor polymers and sc-SWNTs is strongly affected by their energy-level alignment, which can be tailored by controlling the donor-acceptor configuration in the polymer backbone structures. Among the polymers investigated, the highly planar P8T2Z-C12 semiconductor polymer showed the best sc-SWNT separation efficiency and unprecedentedly strong electronic interaction with the sc-SWNTs, which is important for improving their performance in applications.

  4. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small

  5. Attophysics of Thermal Phenomena in Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlowski, Miroslaw; Marciak-Kozlowska, Janina

    2005-01-01

    In this paper heat transport in carbon nanotubes is investigated. When the dimension of the structure is of the order of the de Broglie wave length transport phenomena must be analysed by quantum mechanics. In this paper we derived the Dirac type thermal equation .The solution of the equation for the temperature fields for electrons can either be damped or can oscillate depending on the dynamics of the scattering. Key words: Carbon nanotubes, ultrashort laser pulses, Dirac thermal equation, t...

  6. Strain-modified RKKY interaction in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorman, P. D.; Duffy, J. M.; Power, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    For low-dimensionalmetallic structures, such as nanotubes, the exchange coupling between localized magnetic dopants is predicted to decay slowly with separation. The long-range character of this interaction plays a significant role in determining the magnetic order of the system. It has previously...... nanotubes, allowing an interplay between mechanical and magnetic properties in future spintronic devices. We also examine the dimensional relationship between graphene and nanotubes with regards to the decay rate of the RKKY interaction....

  7. Self-organized TiO2 nanotubes grown on Ti substrates with different crystallographic preferential orientations: Local structure of TiO2 nanotubes vs. photo-electrochemical response

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krbal, M.; Sopha, H.; Pohl, D.; Beneš, L.; Damm, C.; Rellinghaus, B.; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Bezdička, Petr; Šubrt, Jan; Macák, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 264, FEB (2018), s. 393-399 ISSN 0013-4686 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Anatase * Anodization * Photo-current * Stoichiometry * TiO nanotubes 2 Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 4.798, year: 2016

  8. Conformational changes of fibrinogen in dispersed carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park SJ

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sung Jean Park,1 Dongwoo Khang21College of Pharmacy, Gachon University, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon, South Korea; 2School of Nano and Advanced Materials Science Engineering and Center for PRC and RIGET, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, South KoreaAbstract: The conformational changes of plasma protein structures in response to carbon nanotubes are critical for determining the nanotoxicity and blood coagulation effects of carbon nanotubes. In this study, we identified that the functional intensity of carboxyl groups on carbon nanotubes, which correspond to the water dispersity or hydrophilicity of carbon nanotubes, can induce conformational changes in the fibrinogen domains. Also, elevation of carbon nanotube density can alter the secondary structures (ie, helices and beta sheets of fibrinogen. Furthermore, fibrinogen that had been in contact with the nanoparticle material demonstrated a different pattern of heat denaturation compared with free fibrinogen as a result of a variation in hydrophilicity and concentration of carbon nanotubes. Considering the importance of interactions between carbon nanotubes and plasma proteins in the drug delivery system, this study elucidated the correlation between nanoscale physiochemical material properties of carbon nanotubes and associated structural changes in fibrinogen.Keywords: carbon nanotubes, fibrinogen, nanotoxicity, conformational change, denaturation

  9. 3 D Network-Structured Crumpled Graphene/Carbon Nanotube/Polyaniline Composites for Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Eun H; Jang, Hee D; Chang, Hankwon; Kim, Sun K; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Lee, Chong M

    2017-05-22

    Crumpled graphene (CGR) is considered a promising supercapacitor material to achieve high power and energy density because it could overcome the disadvantages of 2 D GR sheets such as aggregation during the electrode fabrication process, reduction of the available surface area, and limitation of the electron and ion transport. Even though CGR shows good results, carbon materials are limited in terms of their capacitance performance. Here, we report highly enhanced supercapacitor materials by fabricating a 3 D composite containing CGR, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and polyaniline (PANI). The CNTs increased the basal spacing and bridged the defects for electron transfer between the GR sheets in CGR. PANI can enhance the rate of conduction of electrons and offer high pseudocapacitance originating from its redox reactions. The synergistic effect of the CNTs and PANI may also result in a higher electrochemical capacitance and better stability than each individual component as electrode materials for supercapacitors in a two-electrode system. More importantly, the performance of the supercapacitors can be further enhanced by employing 2 D GR as the binder for the composite electrodes, resulting in specific capacitance of 456 F g -1 , rate capability of 89 %, and cyclic stability of 97 % after 1000 cycles. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Photoluminescence quenching, structures, and photovoltaic properties of ZnO nanostructures decorated plasma grown single walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aïssa, Brahim, E-mail: brahim.aissa@mpbc.ca [University of Quebec, Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS-EMT (Canada); Nedil, Mourad [Telebec Wireless Underground Communication Laboratory, UQAT (Canada); Belaidi, Abdelhak; Isaifan, Rima J. [Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar Foundation, Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute (Qatar); Bentouaf, Ali [University Hassiba Ben Bouali, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Algeria); Fauteux, Christian; Therriault, Daniel [École Polytechnique de Montréal, Laboratory for Multiscale Mechanics (LM2), Mechanical Engineering Department (Canada)

    2017-05-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures were successfully grown directly on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) template through the CO{sub 2} laser-induced chemical liquid deposition (LCLD) process. Photoluminescence (PL) of the deposited ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites exhibits, at room temperature, a narrow near UV band located at 390 nm with no emission bands in the visible region, indicating a high degree of crystalline quality of the ZnO nanostructures. Moreover, when the relative SWCNT loads are varied within the composites, the PL intensity and the diffused optical reflectance diminish in comparison with those of ZnO alone, owing to the transfer of photo-excited electrons from ZnO to the SWCNT, and the enhancement of the optical absorbance, respectively. Finally, these ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites are integrated into a heterojunction photovoltaic-based device, using PEDOT:PSS on ITO/glass substrate. The devices show an evident p–n junction behavior in the dark, and a clear I–V curve shift downward when illuminated with an open-circuit voltage of 1.1 V, a short circuit current density of 14.05 μA cm{sup −2}, and a fill factor of ∼35%. These results indicate that these composites fabricated via LCLD process could be promising for optoelectronic and energy-harvesting devices.

  11. Photoluminescence quenching, structures, and photovoltaic properties of ZnO nanostructures decorated plasma grown single walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aïssa, Brahim; Nedil, Mourad; Belaidi, Abdelhak; Isaifan, Rima J.; Bentouaf, Ali; Fauteux, Christian; Therriault, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures were successfully grown directly on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) template through the CO2 laser-induced chemical liquid deposition (LCLD) process. Photoluminescence (PL) of the deposited ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites exhibits, at room temperature, a narrow near UV band located at 390 nm with no emission bands in the visible region, indicating a high degree of crystalline quality of the ZnO nanostructures. Moreover, when the relative SWCNT loads are varied within the composites, the PL intensity and the diffused optical reflectance diminish in comparison with those of ZnO alone, owing to the transfer of photo-excited electrons from ZnO to the SWCNT, and the enhancement of the optical absorbance, respectively. Finally, these ZnO/SWCNT hybrid composites are integrated into a heterojunction photovoltaic-based device, using PEDOT:PSS on ITO/glass substrate. The devices show an evident p-n junction behavior in the dark, and a clear I- V curve shift downward when illuminated with an open-circuit voltage of 1.1 V, a short circuit current density of 14.05 μA cm-2, and a fill factor of ˜35%. These results indicate that these composites fabricated via LCLD process could be promising for optoelectronic and energy-harvesting devices.

  12. Chitosan-58S bioactive glass nanocomposite coatings on TiO2 nanotube: Structural and biological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, H.; Ghasemi, Z.; Kharaziha, M.; Karimzadeh, F.; Alihosseini, F.

    2018-05-01

    Bacterial infection and insignificant osseointegration have been recognized as the main reasons of the failures of titanium based implants. The aim of this study was to apply titanium oxide nanotube (TNT) array on titanium using electrochemical anodization process as a more appropriate substrate for chitosan and chitosan-58S bioactive glass (BG) (58S-BG-Chitosan) nanocomposite coatings covered TNTs (TNT/Chiosan, TNT/58S-BG-Chitosan, respectively) through a conventional dip-coating process. Results showed that a TNT layer with average inner diameter of 82 ± 19 nm and wall's thickness of 23 ± 9 nm was developed on titanium surface using electrochemical anodization process. Roughness and contact angle measurement showed that TNT with Ra = 449 nm had highest roughness and hydrophilicity which then reduced to 86 nm and 143 nm for TNT/Chitosan and TNT/58S-BG-Chitosan, respectively. In vitro bioactivity evaluation in simulated buffer fluid (SBF) solution and antibacterial activity assay predicted that TNT/58S-BG-Chitosan was superior in bone like apatite formation and antibacterial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria compared to Ti, TNT and TNT/Chitosan samples, respectively. Results revealed the noticeable MG63 cell attachment and proliferation on TNT/58S-BG-Chitosan coating compared to those of uncoated TNTs. These results confirmed the positive effect of using TNT substrate for natural polymer coating on improved bioactivity of implant.

  13. Achieving polydimethylsiloxane/carbon nanotube (PDMS/CNT) composites with extremely low dielectric loss and adjustable dielectric constant by sandwich structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Benhui; Liu, Yu; He, Delong; Bai, Jinbo

    2018-01-01

    Sandwich-structured composites of polydimethylsiloxane/carbon nanotube (PDMS/CNT) bulk between two neat PDMS thin films with different thicknesses are prepared by the spin-coating method. Taking advantage of CNT's percolation behavior, the composite keeps relatively high dielectric constant (ɛ' = 40) at a low frequency (at 100 Hz). Meanwhile, due to the existence of PDMS isolated out-layers which limits the conductivity of the composite, the composite maintains an extremely low dielectric loss (tan δ = 0.01) (at 100 Hz). Moreover, the same matrix of the out-layer and bulk can achieve excellent interfacial adhesion, and the thickness of the coating layer can be controlled by a multi-cycle way. Then, based on the experimental results, the calculation combining the percolation theory and core-shell model is used to analyze the thickness effect of the coating layer on ɛ'. The obtained relationship between the ɛ' of the composite and the thickness of the coating layer can help to optimize the sandwich structure in order to obtain the adjustable ɛ' and the extremely low tan δ.

  14. The unexpected stability of multiwall nanotubes under high pressure and shear deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashkin, E. Y.; Pankov, A. M.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Mordkovich, V. Z. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutsky Lane, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation); Perezhogin, I. A. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Karaeva, A. R. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Popov, M. Y.; Sorokin, P. B.; Blank, V. D. [Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials, 7a Centralnaya Street, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, 9 Institutsky Lane, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology MISiS, 4 Leninskiy Prospekt, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-22

    The behavior of multiwall carbon nanotubes under a high pressure (up to 55 GPa) combined with shear deformation was studied by experimental and theoretical methods. The unexpectedly high stability of the nanotubes' structure under high stresses was observed. After the pressure was released, we observed that the nanotubes had restored their shapes. Atomistic simulations show that the hydrostatic and shear stresses affect the nanotubes' structure in a different way. It was found that the shear stress load in the multiwall nanotubes' outer walls can induce their connection and formation of an amorphized sp{sup 3}-hybridized region but internal core keeps the tubular structure.

  15. Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques for Development and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Based Superstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Kim, Jae-Woo; Sauti, Godfrey; Wainwright, Elliot; Williams, Phillip; Siochi, Emile J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, multiple commercial vendors have developed capability for the production of large-scale quantities of high-quality carbon nanotube sheets and yarns. While the materials have found use in electrical shielding applications, development of structural systems composed of a high volume fraction of carbon nanotubes is still lacking. A recent NASA program seeks to address this by prototyping a structural nanotube composite with strength-toweight ratio exceeding current state-of-the-art carbon fiber composites. Commercially available carbon nanotube sheets, tapes, and yarns are being processed into high volume fraction carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites. Nondestructive evaluation techniques have been applied throughout this development effort for material characterization and process control. This paper will report on the progress of these efforts, including magnetic characterization of residual catalyst content, Raman scattering characterization of nanotube diameter, defect ratio, and nanotube strain, and polarized Raman scattering for characterization of nanotube alignment.

  16. Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Meador, Michael A.; Hull, David R.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Willis, Peter; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have created a great deal of excitement in the Materials Science community because of their outstanding mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. Use of carbon nanotubes as reinforcements for polymers could lead to a new class of composite materials with properties, durability, and performance far exceeding that of conventional fiber reinforced composites. Organized arrays of carbon nanotubes, e.g., nanotube monolayers, could find applications as thermal management materials, light emitting devices, and sensor arrays. Carbon nanotubes could also be used as templates upon which nanotubes from other materials could be constructed. Successful use of carbon nanotubes in any of these potential applications requires the ability to control the interactions of nanotubes with each other and with other materials, e.g., a polymer matrix. One approach to achieving this control is to attach certain chemical groups to the ends and/or side-walls of the nanotubes. The nature of these chemical groups can be varied to achieve the desired result, such as better adhesion between the nanotubes and a polymer. Under a joint program between NASA Glenn, Clark Atlanta University, and Rice University researchers are working on developing a chemistry "tool-kit" that will enable the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a variety of chemical groups. Recent results of this effort will be discussed.

  17. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haibing [Houston, TX; Zettl, Alexander K [Kensington, TX

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  18. Hybrid biocomposites based on titania nanotubes and a hydroxyapatite coating deposited by RF-magnetron sputtering: Surface topography, structure, and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernozem, Roman V.; Surmeneva, Maria A.; Krause, Bärbel; Baumbach, Tilo; Ignatov, Viktor P.; Tyurin, Alexander I.; Loza, Kateryna; Epple, Matthias; Surmenev, Roman A.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, biocomposites based on porous titanium oxide structures and a calcium phosphate (CaP) or hydroxyapatite (HA) coating are described and prepared. Nanotubes (NTs) with different pore dimensions were processed using anodic oxidation of Ti substrates in a NH4F-containing electrolyte solution at anodization voltages of 30 and 60 V with a DC power supply. The external diameters of the nanotubes prepared at 30 V and 60 V were 53 ± 10 and 98 ± 16 nm, respectively. RF-magnetron sputtering of the HA target in a single deposition run was performed to prepare a coating on the surface of TiO2 NTs prepared at 30 and 60 V. The thickness of the CaP coating deposited on the mirror-polished Si substrate in the same deposition run with TiO2 NTs was determined by optical ellipsometry (SE) 95 ± 5 nm. Uncoated and CaP-coated NTs were annealed at 500 °C in air. Afterwards, the presence of TiO2 (anatase) was observed. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nanoindentation results revealed the influence that the NT dimensions had on the CaP coating deposition process. The tubular surfaces of the NTs were completely coated with the HA coating when prepared at 30 V, and no homogeneous CaP coating was observed when prepared at 60 V. The XRD patterns show peaks assigned to crystalline HA only for the coated TiO2 NTs prepared at 30 V. High-resolution XPS spectra show binding energies (BE) of Ca 2p, P 2p and O 1s core-levels corresponding to HA and amorphous calcium phosphate on TiO2 NTs prepared at 30 V and 60 V, respectively. Fabrication of TiO2 NTs results in a significant decrease to the elastic modulus and nanohardness compared to the Ti substrate. The porous structure of the NTs causes an increase in the elastic strain to failure of the coating (H/E) and the parameter used to describe the resistance of the material to plastic deformation (H3/E2) at the nanoscale level compared to the Ti substrate. Furthermore

  19. General hypothesis and shell model for the synthesis of semiconductor nanotubes, including carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, S. Noor

    2010-09-01

    Semiconductor nanotubes, including carbon nanotubes, have vast potential for new technology development. The fundamental physics and growth kinetics of these nanotubes are still obscured. Various models developed to elucidate the growth suffer from limited applicability. An in-depth investigation of the fundamentals of nanotube growth has, therefore, been carried out. For this investigation, various features of nanotube growth, and the role of the foreign element catalytic agent (FECA) in this growth, have been considered. Observed growth anomalies have been analyzed. Based on this analysis, a new shell model and a general hypothesis have been proposed for the growth. The essential element of the shell model is the seed generated from segregation during growth. The seed structure has been defined, and the formation of droplet from this seed has been described. A modified definition of the droplet exhibiting adhesive properties has also been presented. Various characteristics of the droplet, required for alignment and organization of atoms into tubular forms, have been discussed. Employing the shell model, plausible scenarios for the formation of carbon nanotubes, and the variation in the characteristics of these carbon nanotubes have been articulated. The experimental evidences, for example, for the formation of shell around a core, dipole characteristics of the seed, and the existence of nanopores in the seed, have been presented. They appear to justify the validity of the proposed model. The diversities of nanotube characteristics, fundamentals underlying the creation of bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes, and the impurity generation on the surface of carbon nanotubes have been elucidated. The catalytic action of FECA on growth has been quantified. The applicability of the proposed model to the nanotube growth by a variety of mechanisms has been elaborated. These mechanisms include the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, the oxide-assisted growth mechanism, the self

  20. Nitrogen in highly crystalline carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducati, C; Koziol, K; Stavrinadis, A; Friedrichs, S; Windle, A H; Midgley, P A

    2006-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with an unprecedented degree of internal order were synthesised by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) adding a nitrogen-containing compound to the hydrocarbon feedstock. Ferrocene was used as the metal catalyst precursor. The remarkable crystallinity of these nanotubes lies both in the isochirality and in the crystallographic register of their walls, as demonstrated by electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy experiments. High resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis shows that the walls of the nanotubes consist of truncated stacked cones, instead of perfect cylinders, with a range of apex angles that appears to be related to the nitrogen concentration in the synthesis process. The structure of armchair, zigzag and chiral nanotubes is modelled and discussed in terms of density of topological defects, providing an interesting comparison with our microscopy experiments. A growth mechanism based on the interplay of base- and tip-growth is proposed to account for our experimental observations

  1. Liquid crystalline order of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi; Ahlawat, Aditya; Mulkern, Brian; Doyle, Robert; Mongeau, Jennifer; Ogilvie, Alex

    2007-03-01

    Topological defects formed during phase transitions in liquid crystals provide a direct proof of the standard Cosmological model and are direct links to the Early Universe. On the other hand in Nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes can be manipulated and oriented directly by changing the liquid crystalline state of the nanotubes, in combination with organic liquid crystals. Currently there are no nano-assemblers, which makes the liquid crystal state of the nanotubes, one of the few ways of controlling them. We show the design of a fast and efficient polarized light ellipsometric system (a new modification of previous optical systems) that can provide fast quantitative real time measurements in two dimensions of the formation of topological defects in liquid crystals during phase transitions in lab settings. Our aim is to provide fundamental information about the formation of optically anisotropic structures in liquid crystals and the orientation of carbon nanotubes in electric field.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Tower-Based Supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A supercapacitor system, including (i) first and second, spaced apart planar collectors, (ii) first and second arrays of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) towers or single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) towers, serving as electrodes, that extend between the first and second collectors where the nanotube towers are grown directly on the collector surfaces without deposition of a catalyst and without deposition of a binder material on the collector surfaces, and (iii) a porous separator module having a transverse area that is substantially the same as the transverse area of at least one electrode, where (iv) at least one nanotube tower is functionalized to permit or encourage the tower to behave as a hydrophilic structure, with increased surface wettability.

  3. On certain topological indices of boron triangular nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslam, Adnan [Univ. of Engineering and Technology, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Natural Sciences and Humanities; Ahmad, Safyan [GC Univ. Lahore (Pakistan). Abdus Salam School of Mathematical Sciences; Gao, Wei [Yunnan Normal Univ., Kunming (China). School of Information Science and Technology

    2017-11-01

    The topological index gives information about the whole structure of a chemical graph, especially degree-based topological indices that are very useful. Boron triangular nanotubes are now replacing usual carbon nanotubes due to their excellent properties. We have computed general Randic (R{sub a}), first Zagreb (M{sub 1}) and second Zagreb (M{sub 2}), atom-bond connectivity (ABC), and geometric-arithmetic (GA) indices of boron triangular nanotubes. Also, we have computed the fourth version of atom-bond connectivity (ABC{sub 4}) and the fifth version of geometric-arithmetic (GA{sub 5}) indices of boron triangular nanotubes.

  4. Carbon nanotubes: Synthesis, characterization, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deck, Christian Peter

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess exceptional material properties, making them desirable for use in a variety of applications. In this work, CNTs were grown using two distinct catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) procedures, floating catalyst CVD and thermal CVD, which differed in the method of catalyst introduction. Reaction conditions were optimized to synthesize nanotubes with desired characteristics, and the effects of varying growth parameters were studied. These parameters included gas composition, temperature, reaction duration, and catalyst and substrate material. The CNT products were then examined using several approaches. For each CVD method, nanotube growth rates were determined and the formation and termination mechanisms were investigated. The effects of reaction parameters on nanotube diameters and morphology were also explored to identify means of controlling these important properties. In addition to investigating the effects of different growth parameters, the material properties of nanotubes were also studied. The floating catalyst CVD method produced thick mats of nanotubes, and the mechanical response of these samples was examined using in-situ compression and tension testing. These results indicated that mat structure is composed of discontinuous nanotubes, and a time-dependent response was also observed. In addition, the electrical resistance of bulk CNT samples was found to increase for tubes grown with higher catalyst concentrations and with bamboo morphologies. The properties of nanotubes synthesized using thermal CVD were also examined. Mechanical testing was performed using the same in-situ compression approach developed for floating catalyst CVD samples. A second characterization method was devised, where an optical approach was used to measure the deflection of patterned nanotubes exposed to an applied fluid flow. This response was also simulated, and comparisons with the experimental data were used to determine the flexural

  5. Nanostructural evolution of one-dimensional BaTiO3 structures by hydrothermal conversion of vertically aligned TiO2 nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Tabares, J. A.; Bejtka, K.; Lamberti, A.; Garino, N.; Bianco, S.; Quaglio, M.; Pirri, C. F.; Chiodoni, A.

    2016-03-01

    The use of TiO2 nanotube (NT) arrays as templates for hydrothermal conversion of one-dimensional barium titanate (BaTiO3) structures is considered a promising synthesis approach, even though the formation mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Herein we report a nanostructural study by means of XRD and (HR)TEM of high aspect ratio TiO2-NTs hydrothermally converted into BaTiO3. The nanostructure shows two different and well-defined regions: at the top the conversion involves complete dissolution of NTs and subsequent precipitation of BaTiO3 crystals by homogeneous nucleation, followed by the growth of dendritic structures by aggregation and oriented attachment mechanisms. Instead, at the bottom, the low liquid/solid ratio, due to the limited amount of Ba solution that infiltrates the NTs, leads to the rapid crystallization of such a solution into BaTiO3, thus allowing the NTs to act as a template for the formation of highly oriented one-dimensional nanostructures. The in-depth analysis of the structural transformations that take place during the formation of the rod-like arrays of BaTiO3 could help elucidate the conversion mechanism, thus paving the way for the optimization of the synthesis process in view of new applications in energy harvesting devices, where easy and low temperature processing, controlled composition, morphology and functional properties are required.The use of TiO2 nanotube (NT) arrays as templates for hydrothermal conversion of one-dimensional barium titanate (BaTiO3) structures is considered a promising synthesis approach, even though the formation mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Herein we report a nanostructural study by means of XRD and (HR)TEM of high aspect ratio TiO2-NTs hydrothermally converted into BaTiO3. The nanostructure shows two different and well-defined regions: at the top the conversion involves complete dissolution of NTs and subsequent precipitation of BaTiO3 crystals by homogeneous nucleation, followed by the

  6. Characterization of Reinforced Structural Composites with Carbon Nanotubes Grown Directly on the Fibers/Fabrics Using the PopTube Approach

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An ideal candidate to accomplish the reinforcement of the matrix and interphase zone of FRPs is carbon nanotubes (CNTs), because of their superior mechanical...

  7. Performance improvement induced by asymmetric Y2O3-coated device structure to carbon-nanotube-film based photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fanglin; Xu, Haitao; Huang, Huixin; Ma, Ze; Wang, Sheng; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2017-11-01

    Film-based semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) photodetectors are promising candidates for industrial applications. However, unintentional doping from the environment such as water/oxygen (H2O/O2) redox, polymers, etc. changes the doping level of the CNT film. Here, we evaluate the performance of film-based barrier-free bipolar diodes (BFBDs), which are basically semiconducting CNT films asymmetrically contacted by perfect n-type ohmic contact (scandium, Sc) and p-type ohmic contact (palladium, Pd) at the two ends of the diode. We show that normal BFBD devices have large variances of forward current, reverse current, and photocurrent for different doping levels of the channel. We propose an asymmetric Y2O3-coated BFBD device in which the channel is covered by a layer of an Y2O3 film and an overlap between the Sc electrode and the Y2O3 film is designed. The Y2O3 film provides p-type doping to the channel. The overlap section increases the length of the base of the pn junction, and the diffusion current of holes is suppressed. In this way, the rectifier factors (current ratio when voltages are at +0.5 V and -0.5 V) of the asymmetric Y2O3-coated BFBD devices are around two orders of magnitude larger and the photocurrent generation is more stable compared to that of normal devices. Our results provide a way to conquer the influence of unintentional doping from the environment and suppress reverse current in pn diodes. This is beneficial to applications of CNT-based photodetectors and of importance for inspiring methods to improve the performances of devices based on other low dimensional materials.

  8. Radionuclides incorporation in activated natural nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Jose Parra

    2016-01-01

    Natural palygorskite nanotubes show suitable physical and chemical properties and characteristics to be use as potential nanosorbent and immobilization matrix for the concentration and solidification of radionuclides present in nuclear wastes. In the development process of materials with sorption properties for the incorporation and subsequent immobilization of radionuclides, the most important steps are related with the generation of active sites simultaneously to the increase of the specific surface area and suitable heat treatment to producing the structural folding. This study evaluated the determining parameters and conditions for the activation process of the natural palygorskite nanotubes aiming at the sorption of radionuclides in the nanotubes structure and subsequent evaluation of the parameters involve in the structural folding by heat treatments. The optimized results about the maximum sorption capacity of nickel in activated natural nanotubes show that these structures are apt and suitable for incorporation of radionuclides similar to nickel. By this study is verified that the optimization of the acid activation process is fundamental to improve the sorption capacities for specifics radionuclides by activated natural nanotubes. Acid activation condition optimized maintaining structural integrity was able to remove around 33.3 wt.% of magnesium cations, equivalent to 6.30·10 -4 g·mol -1 , increasing in 42.8% the specific surface area and incorporating the same molar concentration of nickel present in the liquid radioactive waste at 80 min. (author)

  9. Structure regulation of silica nanotubes and their adsorption behaviors for heavy metal ions: pH effect, kinetics, isotherms and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Du, Mingliang; Zhu, Han; Bao, Shiyong; Yang, Tingting; Zou, Meiling

    2015-04-09

    Silica nanotubes (SNTs) with controlled nanotubular structure were synthesized via an electrospinning and calcination process. In this regard, SNTs were found to be ideal adsorbents for Pb(II) removal with a higher adsorption capacity, and surface modification of the SNTs by sym-diphenylcarbazide (SD-SNTs) markedly enhanced the adsorption ability due to the chelating interaction between imino groups and Pb(II). The pH effect, kinetics, isotherms and adsorption mechanism of SNTs and SD-SNTs on Pb(II) adsorption were investigated and discussed detailedly. The adsorption capacity for Pb(II) removal was found to be significantly improved with the decrease of pH value. The Langmuir adsorption model agreed well with the experimental data. As for kinetic study, the adsorption onto SNTs and SD-SNTs could be fitted to pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model, respectively. In addition, the as-prepared SNTs and SD-SNTs also exhibit high adsorption ability for Cd(II) and Co(II). The experimental results demonstrate that the SNTs and SD-SNTs are potential adsorbents and can be used effectively for the treatment of heavy-metal-ions-containing wastewater. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Self-Assembly of Polyethylene Glycol-Grafted Carbon Nanotube/Sulfur Composite with Nest-like Structure for High-Performance Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Han; Sun, Liping; Wang, Gengchao

    2016-03-09

    The novel polyethylene glycol-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotube/sulfur (PEG-CNT/S) composite cathodes with nest-like structure are fabricated through a facile combination process of liquid phase deposition and self-assembly, which consist of the active material core of sulfur particle and the conductive shell of PEG-CNT network. The unique architecture not only provides a short and rapid charge transfer pathway to improve the reaction kinetics but also alleviates the volume expansion of sulfur during lithiation and minimizes the diffusion of intermediate polysulfides. Such an encouraging electrochemical environment ensures the excellent rate capability and high cycle stability. As a result, the as-prepared PEG-CNT/S composite with sulfur content of 75.9 wt % delivers an initial discharge capacity of 1191 and 897 mAh g(-1) after 200 cycles at 0.2 C with an average Coulombic efficiency of 99.5%. Even at a high rate of 2 C, an appreciable capacity of 723 mAh g(-1) can still be obtained.

  11. Growth of three dimensional flower-like molybdenum disulfide hierarchical structures on graphene/carbon nanotube network: An advanced heterostructure for energy storage devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingappan, Niranjanmurthi; Van, Ngoc Huynh; Lee, Suok; Kang, Dae Joon

    2015-04-01

    We report the design and synthesis of three dimensional flower-like molybdenum disulphide (f-MoS2) hierarchical structures, on reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotube (o-MWCNT) backbone (f-MoS2/RGO/o-MWCNT), through one-pot hydrothermal method. Control experiments reveal that the homogenously distributed o-MWCNTs on RGO play an essential role for the formation of such morphology. As an anode for lithium ion batteries, the f-MoS2/RGO/o-MWCNT hybrid delivers a high reversible capacity of 1275 mAh g-1 at the current density of 100 mA g-1, superior rate capability and excellent long cycle life, with capacity retention of 93% after 100 cycles. The outstanding electrochemical performance can be attributed to the large surface area, short diffusion length and continuous electron transport pathway, as a consequence of the intimate contact between f-MoS2, graphene, and o-MWCNTs.

  12. Coupling of mechanical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho, Dahiyana; Benitez, Laura; Seminario, Jorge M

    2013-12-01

    Because of the potential importance of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in renewable energy and other fields, molecular orbital ab initio calculations are used to study the relation between mechanical and electronic properties of such structures. We estimate a modulus of elasticity of 1.3 TPa and find out that the mechanism of CNT structure deformation is dependent on their chirality. Armchair and chiral nanotubes have ductile deformation fracture while zigzag have both ductile and brittle; on the other hand armchair nanotubes fracture and form two caps while chiral nanotubes adopt a helical-structure conformation. In addition, the energy gap between occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals increases when nanotubes are under plastic deformation. This strong coupling between mechanical and electrical properties can be used to tune CNT mechanically to specific electronic bandgaps, affecting directly their electromagnetic absorption properties.

  13. Differentiating Left- and Right-Handed Carbon Nanotubes by DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Geyou; Streit, Jason K; Fagan, Jeffrey A; Zheng, Ming

    2016-12-28

    New structural characteristics emerge when solid-state crystals are constructed in lower dimensions. This is exemplified by single-wall carbon nanotubes, which exhibit a degree of freedom in handedness and a multitude of helicities that give rise to three distinct types of electronic structures: metals, quasi-metals, and semiconductors. Here we report the use of intrinsically chiral single-stranded DNA to achieve simultaneous handedness and helicity control for all three types of nanotubes. We apply polymer aqueous two-phase systems to select special DNA-wrapped carbon nanotubes, each of which we argue must have an ordered DNA structure that binds to a nanotube of defined handedness and helicity and resembles a well-folded biomacromolecule with innate stereoselectivity. We have screened over 300 short single-stranded DNA sequences with palindrome symmetry, leading to the selection of more than 20 distinct carbon nanotube structures that have defined helicity and handedness and cover the entire chiral angle range and all three electronic types. The mechanism of handedness selection is illustrated by a DNA sequence that adopts two distinct folds on a pair of (6,5) nanotube enantiomers, rendering them large differences in fluorescence intensity and chemical reactivity. This result establishes a first example of functionally distinguishable left- and right-handed carbon nanotubes. Taken together, our work demonstrates highly efficient enantiomer differentiation by DNA and offers a first comprehensive solution to achieve simultaneous handedness and helicity control for all three electronic types of carbon nanotubes.

  14. A Computational Experiment on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott; Lonie, David C.; Chen, Jiechen; Zurek, Eva

    2013-01-01

    A computational experiment that investigates single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed and employed in an upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory course. Computations were carried out to determine the electronic structure, radial breathing modes, and the influence of the nanotube's diameter on the…

  15. Preparation of CN x /Carbon Nanotube Intramolecular Junctions by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preparation of CN x /Carbon Nanotube Intramolecular Junctions by Switching Gas Sources in Continuous Chemical Vapour Deposition. ... nanotubes were observed, and such different structures at both sides of the junctions indicated some interesting properties and offered potential applications for future nanodevices.

  16. Electronic, thermal and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dresselhaus, M S; Dresselhaus, G; Charlier, J C; Hernández, E

    2004-10-15

    A review of the electronic, thermal and mechanical properties of nanotubes is presented, with particular reference to properties that differ from those of the bulk counterparts and to potential applications that might result from the special structure and properties of nanotubes. Both experimental and theoretical aspects of these topics are reviewed.

  17. A Carbon Nanotube Cable for a Space Elevator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes are discussed in connection with the possibility to use them for the construction of a space elevator. From the fundamental information about the structure of a carbon nanotube and the chemical bond between carbon atoms, Young's modulus and the ultimate tensile strength are…

  18. Production and Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes and Nanotube-Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Pavel; Arepalli, Sivaram; Holmes, William; Gorelik, Olga; Files, Brad; Scott, Carl; Santos, Beatrice; Mayeaux, Brian; Victor, Joe

    1999-01-01

    The Nobel Prize winning discovery of the Buckuball (C60) in 1985 at Rice University by a group including Dr. Richard Smalley led to the whole new class of carbon allotropes including fullerenes and nanotubes. Especially interesting from many viewpoints are single-walled carbon nanotubes, which structurally are like a single graphitic sheet wrapped around a cylinder and capped at the ends. This cylinders have diameter as small as 0.5 - 2 nm (1/100,000th the diameter of a human hair) and are as long as 0.1 - 1 mm. Nanotubes are really individual molecules and believed to be defect-free, leading to high tensile strength despite their low density. Additionally, these fibers exhibit electrical conductivity as high as copper, thermal conductivity as high as diamond, strength 100 times higher than steel at one-sixth the weight, and high strain to failure. Thus it is believed that developments in the field of nanotechnology will lead to stronger and lighter composite materials for next generation spacecraft. Lack of a bulk method of production is the primary reason nanotubes are not used widely today. Toward this goal JSC nanotube team is exploring three distinct production techniques: laser ablation, arc discharge and chemical vapor deposition (CVD, in collaboration with Rice University). In laser ablation technique high-power laser impinges on the piece of carbon containing small amount of catalyst, and nanotubes self-assemble from the resulting carbon vapor. In arc generator similar vapor is created in arc discharge between carbon electrodes with catalyst. In CVD method nanotubes grow at much lower temperature on small catalyst particles from carbon-containing feedstock gas (methane or carbon monoxide). As of now, laser ablation produces cleanest material, but mass yield is rather small. Arc discharge produces grams of material, but purity is low. CVD technique is still in baby steps, but preliminary results look promising, as well as perspective of scaling the process

  19. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  1. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  2. Iron assisted growth of copper-tipped multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Z. R.; Szwarcman, D.; Lereah, Y.; Markovich, G.; Hanein, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes incorporating copper are highly sought after for nanoelectronic applications. Indeed, several recent studies have demonstrated the production of copper-tipped nanotubes using the chemical vapor deposition method. Here we present the growth and detailed characterization of such copper-tipped nanotubes. The nanotubes grown were of a 'bamboo-like' structure, consisting of stacked cups of graphene, and were produced by chemical vapor deposition employing iron and copper nanoparticles as a catalyst and metal source respectively. Transmission electron microscopy and electron holography analysis of the tips of these nanotubes revealed a small crystalline iron particle on the inner side of the copper tip, with the nanotube structure encapsulating the iron. This form of growth may allow the formation of similar structures with various other metal-tipped carbon nanotubes to be manufactured.

  3. A scalable route to prepare core-shell structured ZnO@PEDOT nanowires and PEDOT nanotubes and their properties as electrode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Zhang, Xianhong; Yang, Le; Xu, Dehong; Ma, Yuhong; Chen, Dong; Wang, Li; Zhao, Changwen; Yang, Wantai

    2016-05-01

    A composite of a core-shell structured nanowires with ZnO as a core and conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) as a shell was prepared. At first, the hexagonal ZnO nanowires, with diameter of about 80-100 nm and length 4-5 μm, were fabricated by hydrothermal synthesis process. Then a thick layer of poly(trifluoroethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (PTFEMA-b-PSSNa) was grafted from the surface of ZnO nanowires via atom transfer free radical polymerization. At last, with the ZnO@PTFEMA-b-PSSNa as a template and the PSSNa chain as the counterion dopant, PEDOT was precipitated onto the surface of the template to form the composite of ZnO@PEDOT/PSSNa. With the evaluation of the EDOT polymerization, the thickness of the PEDOT layer increased steadily. However, as the ratio of EDOT/ZnO was greater than 1:2, the ZnO nanowires templates were dissolved at last and then PEDOT particles were produced due to increasing of the acidity during the oxidation polymerization of EDOT. In this case, the product was the mixture of the nanotubes and particles of PEDOT/PPSNa. The electrochemical capacitances of the composites with different structures were investigated with cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques with three-electrode cell configuration. The maximum specific capacitance of ZnO@PEDOT electrode can reach 101.34 F/g at 20 mV/s.

  4. Purification of carbon nanotubes via selective heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, John A.; Wilson, William L.; Jin, Sung Hun; Dunham, Simon N.; Xie, Xu; Islam, Ahmad; Du, Frank; Huang, Yonggang; Song, Jizhou

    2017-11-21

    The present invention provides methods for purifying a layer of carbon nanotubes comprising providing a precursor layer of substantially aligned carbon nanotubes supported by a substrate, wherein the precursor layer comprises a mixture of first carbon nanotubes and second carbon nanotubes; selectively heating the first carbon nanotubes; and separating the first carbon nanotubes from the second carbon nanotubes, thereby generating a purified layer of carbon nanotubes. Devices benefiting from enhanced electrical properties enabled by the purified layer of carbon nanotubes are also described.

  5. Rotational actuator of motor based on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Fennimore, Adam M.; Yuzvinsky, Thomas D.

    2008-11-18

    A rotational actuator/motor based on rotation of a carbon nanotube is disclosed. The carbon nanotube is provided with a rotor plate attached to an outer wall, which moves relative to an inner wall of the nanotube. After deposit of a nanotube on a silicon chip substrate, the entire structure may be fabricated by lithography using selected techniques adapted from silicon manufacturing technology. The structures to be fabricated may comprise a multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT), two in plane stators S1, S2 and a gate stator S3 buried beneath the substrate surface. The MWNT is suspended between two anchor pads and comprises a rotator attached to an outer wall and arranged to move in response to electromagnetic inputs. The substrate is etched away to allow the rotor to freely rotate. Rotation may be either in a reciprocal or fully rotatable manner.

  6. On the elastic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes/poly(ethylene oxide) nanocomposites using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhi, S; Alizadeh, Y; Ansari, R

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the physical and mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes/poly(ethylene oxide) nanocomposites. The effects of nanotube atomic structure, diameter, and volume fraction on the polymer density distribution, polymer atom distribution, stress-strain curves of nanocomposites and Young's, and shear moduli of single-walled carbon nanotubes/poly(ethylene oxide) nanocomposites are explored. It is shown that the density of polymer, surrounding the nanotube surface, has a peak near the nanotube surface. However, increasing distance leads to dropping it to the value near the density of pure polymer. It is seen that for armchair nanotubes, the average polymer atoms distances from the single-walled carbon nanotubes are larger than the polymer atom distance from zigzag nanotubes. It further is shown that zigzag nanotubes are better candidates to reinforce poly (ethylene oxide) than their armchair counterparts.

  7. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.

    2014-04-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Methods Reduce Cost, Enhance Quality of Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    For all the challenges posed by the microgravity conditions of space, weight is actually one of the more significant problems NASA faces in the development of the next generation of U.S. space vehicles. For the Agency s Constellation Program, engineers at NASA centers are designing and testing new vessels as safe, practical, and cost-effective means of space travel following the eventual retirement of the space shuttle. Program components like the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, intended to carry astronauts to the International Space Station and the Moon, must be designed to specific weight requirements to manage fuel consumption and match launch rocket capabilities; Orion s gross liftoff weight target is about 63,789 pounds. Future space vehicles will require even greater attention to lightweight construction to help conserve fuel for long-range missions to Mars and beyond. In order to reduce spacecraft weight without sacrificing structural integrity, NASA is pursuing the development of materials that promise to revolutionize not only spacecraft construction, but also a host of potential applications on Earth. Single-walled carbon nanotubes are one material of particular interest. These tubular, single-layer carbon molecules - 100,000 of them braided together would be no thicker than a human hair - display a range of remarkable characteristics. Possessing greater tensile strength than steel at a fraction of the weight, the nanotubes are efficient heat conductors with metallic or semiconductor electrical properties depending on their diameter and chirality (the pattern of each nanotube s hexagonal lattice structure). All of these properties make the nanotubes an appealing material for spacecraft construction, with the potential for nanotube composites to reduce spacecraft weight by 50 percent or more. The nanotubes may also feature in a number of other space exploration applications, including life support, energy storage, and sensor technologies. NASA s various

  9. Quenching of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Fluorescence by Dissolved Oxygen Reveals Selective Single-Stranded DNA Affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Bachilo, Sergei M; Weisman, R Bruce

    2017-05-04

    The selective interactions between short oligomers of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and specific structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes have been exploited in powerful methods for nanotube sorting. We report here that nanotubes coated with ssDNA also display selective interactions through the selective quenching of nanotube fluorescence by dissolved oxygen. In aqueous solutions equilibrated under 1 atm of O 2 , emission intensity from semiconducting nanotubes is reduced by between 9 and 40%, varying with the combination of ssDNA sequence and nanotube structure. This quenching reverses promptly and completely on the removal of dissolved O 2 and may be due to physisorption on nanotube surfaces. Fluorescence quenching offers a simple, nondestructive approach for studying the structure-selective interactions of ssDNA with single-walled carbon nanotubes and identifying recognition sequences.

  10. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio Stein Moura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  11. Electrical device fabrication from nanotube formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Nolan Walker; Kittrell, W. Carter; Kim, Myung Jong; Schmidt, Howard K.

    2013-03-12

    A method for forming nanotube electrical devices, arrays of nanotube electrical devices, and device structures and arrays of device structures formed by the methods. Various methods of the present invention allow creation of semiconducting and/or conducting devices from readily grown SWNT carpets rather than requiring the preparation of a patterned growth channel and takes advantage of the self-controlling nature of these carpet heights to ensure a known and controlled channel length for reliable electronic properties as compared to the prior methods.

  12. Chiral graphene nanoribbon inside a carbon nanotube: ab initio study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Irina V; Popov, Andrey M; Knizhnik, Andrey A; Khlobystov, Andrei N; Potapkin, Boris V

    2012-08-07

    The dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) is applied for investigation of structure and electronic properties of a sulfur-terminated graphene nanoribbon (S-GNR) encapsulated in a carbon nanotube. Two mechanisms of accommodation of the GNR in the carbon nanotube, distortion of the nanotube cross-section into an elliptic shape accompanied by bending of the GNR and transformation of the GNR to a helical conformation, are analyzed. Three types of elastic distortions of the nanotube and encapsulated GNR are revealed depending on the ratio of the diameter of the nanotube cavity to the GNR width. Helical states of the GNR are shown to be stabilized by the van der Waals attraction of sulfur atoms at neighbouring edges of adjacent turns of the GNR. The results of calculations are correlated with the experimental observations for the S-GNR synthesized recently inside the carbon nanotube. The hybrid DFT calculations of band structures of zigzag GNRs terminated with different atoms demonstrate that as opposed to O- and H-GNRs, the S-GNR is metallic even when deformed inside carbon nanotubes. Possible applications of GNRs encapsulated in carbon nanotubes are discussed.

  13. Tunable Bandgap and Optical Properties of Black Phosphorene Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunmei Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Black phosphorus (BP, a new two-dimensional material, has been the focus of scientists’ attention. BP nanotubes have potential in the field of optoelectronics due to their low-dimensional effects. In this work, the bending strain energy, electronic structure, and optical properties of BP nanotubes were investigated by using the first-principles method based on density functional theory. The results show that these properties are closely related to the rolling direction and radius of the BP nanotube. All the calculated BP nanotube properties show direct bandgaps, and the BP nanotubes with the same rolling direction express a monotone increasing trend in the value of bandgap with a decrease in radius, which is a stacking effect of the compression strain on the inner atoms and the tension strain on the outer atoms. The bending strain energy of the zigzag phosphorene nanotubes (zPNTs is higher than that of armchair phosphorene nanotubes (aPNT with the same radius of curvature due to the anisotropy of the BP’s structure. The imaginary part of the dielectric function, the absorption range, reflectivity, and the imaginary part of the refractive index of aPNTs have a wider range than those of zPNTs, with higher values overall. As a result, tunable BP nanotubes are suitable for optoelectronic devices, such as lasers and diodes, which function in the infrared and ultra-violet regions, and for solar cells and photocatalysis.

  14. Synthesis and optical properties of ZnO and carbon nanotube based coaxial heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. S.; Lee, S.-M.; Scholz, R.; Knez, M.; Gösele, U.; Fallert, J.; Kalt, H.; Zacharias, M.

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes and ZnO based functional coaxial heterostructured nanotubes have been fabricated by using atomic layer deposition. An irregular structured shell composed of ZnO nanocrystals was deposited on pristine nanotubes, while a highly defined ZnO shell was deposited on the tubes after its functionalization with Al2O3. Photoluminescence measurements of the ZnO shell on Al2O3/nanotube show a broad green band emission, whereas the shell grown on the bare nanotube shows a band shifted to the orange spectral range.

  15. Modeling the self-assembly of lipids and nanotubes in solution: forming vesicles and bicelles with transmembrane nanotube channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Nayhouse, Michael J; Little, Steven R; Balazs, Anna C

    2011-06-28

    Via dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), we simulate the self-assembly of end-functionalized, amphiphilic nanotubes and lipids in a hydrophilic solvent. Each nanotube encompasses a hydrophobic stalk and two hydrophilic ends, which are functionalized with end-tethered chains. With a relatively low number of the nanotubes in solution, the components self-assemble into stable lipid-nanotube vesicles. As the number of nanotubes is increased, the system exhibits a vesicle-to-bicelle transition, resulting in stable hybrid bicelle. Moreover, our results reveal that the nanotubes cluster into distinct tripod-like structures within the vesicles and aggregate into a ring-like assembly within the bicelles. For both the vesicles and bicelles, the nanotubes assume trans-membrane orientations, with the tethered hairs extending into the surrounding solution or the encapsulated fluid. Thus, the hairs provide a means of regulating the transport of species through the self-assembled structures. Our findings provide guidelines for creating nanotube clusters with distinctive morphologies that might be difficult to achieve through more conventional means. The results also yield design rules for creating synthetic cell-like objects or microreactors that can exhibit biomimetic functionality.

  16. Nanotubes and nanowires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    nanotubes are likely to be useful as nanochips since they exhibit diode properties at the junction. By making use of carbon nanotubes, nanowires of metals, metal oxides and GaN have been obtained. Both the oxide and GaN nanowires are single crystalline. Gold nanowires exhibit plasmon bands varying markedly with.

  17. Solid State Non-powder Process for Boron Nitride Nanotube Metal Matrix Composite, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) provide potential for advanced lightweight high stiffness structures that are critical for...

  18. Buckling of Carbon Nanotubes: A State of the Art Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    The nonlinear mechanical response of carbon nanotubes, referred to as their “buckling" behavior, is a major topic in the nanotube research community. Buckling means a deformation process in which a large strain beyond a threshold causes an abrupt change in the strain energy vs. deformation profile. Thus far, much effort has been devoted to analysis of the buckling of nanotubes under various loading conditions: compression, bending, torsion, and their certain combinations. Such extensive studies have been motivated by (i) the structural resilience of nanotubes against buckling and (ii) the substantial influence of buckling on their physical properties. In this contribution, I review the dramatic progress in nanotube buckling research during the past few years. PMID:28817032

  19. Synthesis of single walled carbon nanotubes by dual laser vaporization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moodley, MK

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available ., Fujita M., Dresselhaus G. and Dresselhaus M.S. (1992). Electronic structure of graphene tubules based C60. Phys. Rev B. 46, 1804–1811. 5. Ajayan P.M, Stephan O., Colliex C. and Trauth D. (1994). Aligned carbon nanotube arrays formed by cutting a... and nanoropes. Phys. Rev. Lett. 79(7), 1297–1300. 8. Harris P.J.F. (1999). Carbon Nanotubes and Related Structures. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. 9. Dresselhaus M.S., Dresselhaus G. and Avouris Ph. (eds) (2000). Carbon Nanotubes: Synthesis...

  20. Effect of Steam-Treatment Time on the Length and Structure of Single-Walled and Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kierkowicz, M.; Pach, E.; Santidrian, Ana; Tobias-Rossell, E.; Kalbáč, Martin; Ballesteros, B.; Tobias, G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2016), s. 108-116 E-ISSN 2199-692X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LL1301 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * Raman spectroelectrochemistry * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.937, year: 2016

  1. Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cummings, FR

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Owing entirely to their structure, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess some of the most remarkable chemical and physical properties. More specifically, they exhibit exceptional strength and toughness, chemical inertness, magnetism, and electrical...

  2. Integrally Gated Carbon Nanotube-on-Post Field Emitter Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hsu, David S. Y; Shaw, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (cNT) are excellent field emitters on account of their chemical, structural, and electronic properties, which afford important aspects of robustness that have been lacking in the conventional metal...

  3. BxCyNz Nanotube Development and Characterization

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) exhibit great promise for primary structure as well as thermal and radiation protection for future space exploration missions. They...

  4. Carbon nanotubes: Sensor properties. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Zaporotskova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent publications dealing with dealing with the fabrication of gas and electrochemical biosensors based on carbon nanotubes have been reviewed. Experimental and theoretical data on the working principles of nanotubes have been presented. The main regularities of the structure, energy parameters and sensor properties of modified semiconducting systems on the basis of cabon nanotubes have been studied by analyzing the mechanisms of nanotubule interaction with functional groups (including carboxyl and amino groups, metallic nanoparticles and polymers leading to the formation of chemically active sensors. The possibility of using boundary modified nanotubes for the identification of metals has been discussed. Simulation results have been reported for the interaction of nanotubes boundary modified by –СООН and –NH2 groups with atoms and ions of potassium, sodium and lithium. The simulation has been carried out using the molecular cluster model and the MNDO and DFT calculation methods. Sensors fabricated using this technology will find wide application for the detection of metallic atoms and their ions included in salts and alkali.

  5. Mesoscale mechanics of twisting carbon nanotube yarns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaeifar, Reza; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-03-12

    Fabricating continuous macroscopic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns with mechanical properties close to individual CNTs remains a major challenge. Spinning CNT fibers and ribbons for enhancing the weak interactions between the nanotubes is a simple and efficient method for fabricating high-strength and tough continuous yarns. Here we investigate the mesoscale mechanics of twisting CNT yarns using full atomistic and coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations, considering concurrent mechanisms at multiple length-scales. To investigate the mechanical response of such a complex structure without losing insights into the molecular mechanism, we applied a multiscale strategy. The full atomistic results are used for training a coarse grained model for studying larger systems consisting of several CNTs. The mesoscopic model parameters are updated as a function of the twist angle, based on the full atomistic results, in order to incorporate the atomistic scale deformation mechanisms in larger scale simulations. By bridging across two length scales, our model is capable of accurately predicting the mechanical behavior of twisted yarns while the atomistic level deformations in individual nanotubes are integrated into the model by updating the parameters. Our results focused on studying a bundle of close packed nanotubes provide novel mechanistic insights into the spinning of CNTs. Our simulations reveal how twisting a bundle of CNTs improves the shear interaction between the nanotubes up to a certain level due to increasing the interaction surface. Furthermore, twisting the bundle weakens the intertube interactions due to excessive deformation in the cross sections of individual CNTs in the bundle.

  6. Pyrolytically grown arrays of highly aligned BxCyNz nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Wei-Qiang; Cumings, John; Zettl, Alex

    2001-01-01

    A pyrolysis route has been used to synthesize arrays of highly aligned B x C y N z nanotubes in bulk. The structure and composition of the product were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The length and diameter of the nanotubes are quite uniform in a large area of the reaction zone. The sizes of the aligned B x C y N z nanotubes from the whole reaction zone are 10--30 μm in length and 20--140 nm in diameter. The x/z ratio of B x C y N z nanotubes for most nanotubes is about 1:1. The x/y ratio of B x C y N z nanotubes is up to 0.6. Within one nanotube, the x/y ratio is usually heterogeneous. The growth mechanism is also discussed

  7. Study of TiO2 nanotubes as an implant application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazan, Roshasnorlyza; Sreekantan, Srimala; Mydin, Rabiatul Basria S. M. N.; Mat, Ishak; Abdullah, Yusof

    2016-01-01

    Vertically aligned TiO 2 nanotubes have become the primary candidates for implant materials that can provide direct control of cell behaviors. In this work, 65 nm inner diameters of TiO 2 nanotubes were successfully prepared by anodization method. The interaction of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) in term of cell adhesion and cell morphology on bare titanium and TiO 2 nanotubes is reported. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis proved interaction of BMSC on TiO 2 nanotubes structure was better than flat titanium (Ti) surface. Also, significant cell adhesion on TiO 2 nanotubes surface during in vitro study revealed that BMSC prone to attach on TiO 2 nanotubes. From the result, it can be conclude that TiO 2 nanotubes are biocompatible to biological environment and become a new generation for advanced implant materials

  8. Microscopic and Spectroscopic Investigation of Poly(3-hexylthiophene Interaction with Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio De Crescenzi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The inclusion of carbon nanotubes in polymer matrix has been proposed to enhance the polymer’s physical and electrical properties. In this study, microscopic and spectroscopic techniques are used to investigate the interaction between poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT and nanotubes and the reciprocal modification of physical properties. The presence of P3HT-covered nanotubes dispersed in the polymer matrix has been observed by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Then, the modification of P3HT optical properties due to nanotube inclusion has been evidenced with spectroscopic techniques like absorption and Raman spectroscopy. The study is completed with detailed nanoscale analysis by scanning probe techniques. The ordered self assembly of polymer adhering on the nanotube is unveiled by showing an example of helical wrapping of P3HT. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy study provides information on the electronic structure of nanotube-polymer assembly, revealing the charge transfer from P3HT to the nanotube.

  9. Study of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes as an implant application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazan, Roshasnorlyza, E-mail: roshasnorlyza@nm.gov.my; Sreekantan, Srimala [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300, Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Mydin, Rabiatul Basria S. M. N.; Mat, Ishak [Advanced Medical and Dental Institute, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 13200, Kepala Batas, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Abdullah, Yusof [Materials Technology Group, Industrial Technology Division, Nuclear Malaysia Agency, Bangi, 43000, Kajang, Selangor. Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Vertically aligned TiO{sub 2} nanotubes have become the primary candidates for implant materials that can provide direct control of cell behaviors. In this work, 65 nm inner diameters of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were successfully prepared by anodization method. The interaction of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) in term of cell adhesion and cell morphology on bare titanium and TiO{sub 2} nanotubes is reported. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis proved interaction of BMSC on TiO{sub 2} nanotubes structure was better than flat titanium (Ti) surface. Also, significant cell adhesion on TiO{sub 2} nanotubes surface during in vitro study revealed that BMSC prone to attach on TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. From the result, it can be conclude that TiO{sub 2} nanotubes are biocompatible to biological environment and become a new generation for advanced implant materials.

  10. Applicability of the Continuum-Shell Theories to the Mechanics of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harik, V. M.; Gates, T. S.; Nemeth, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    Validity of the assumptions relating the applicability of continuum shell theories to the global mechanical behavior of carbon nanotubes is examined. The present study focuses on providing a basis that can be used to qualitatively assess the appropriateness of continuum-shell models for nanotubes. To address the effect of nanotube structure on their deformation, all nanotube geometries are divided into four major classes that require distinct models. Criteria for the applicability of continuum models are presented. The key parameters that control the buckling strains and deformation modes of these classes of nanotubes are determined. In an analogy with continuum mechanics, mechanical laws of geometric similitude are presented. A parametric map is constructed for a variety of nanotube geometries as a guide for the applicability of different models. The continuum assumptions made in representing a nanotube as a homogeneous thin shell are analyzed to identify possible limitations of applying shell theories and using their bifurcation-buckling equations at the nano-scale.

  11. Study of TiO2 nanotubes as an implant application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazan, Roshasnorlyza; Sreekantan, Srimala; Mydin, Rabiatul Basria S. M. N.; Abdullah, Yusof; Mat, Ishak

    2016-01-01

    Vertically aligned TiO2 nanotubes have become the primary candidates for implant materials that can provide direct control of cell behaviors. In this work, 65 nm inner diameters of TiO2 nanotubes were successfully prepared by anodization method. The interaction of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) in term of cell adhesion and cell morphology on bare titanium and TiO2 nanotubes is reported. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis proved interaction of BMSC on TiO2 nanotubes structure was better than flat titanium (Ti) surface. Also, significant cell adhesion on TiO2 nanotubes surface during in vitro study revealed that BMSC prone to attach on TiO2 nanotubes. From the result, it can be conclude that TiO2 nanotubes are biocompatible to biological environment and become a new generation for advanced implant materials.

  12. High frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Abukari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on theoretical analysis of high frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes. Using the kinetic equation with constant relaxation time, an analytical expression for the complex conductivity is obtained. The real part of the complex conductivity is initially negative at zero frequency and become more negative with increasing frequency, until it reaches a resonance minimum at ω ∼ ωB for metallic zigzag CNs and ω < ωB for armchair CNs. This resonance enhancement is indicative for terahertz gain without the formation of current instabilities induced by negative dc conductivity. We noted that due to the high density of states of conduction electrons in metallic zigzag carbon nanotubes and the specific dispersion law inherent in hexagonal crystalline structure result in a uniquely high frequency conductivity than the corresponding values for metallic armchair carbon nanotubes. We suggest that this phenomenon can be used to suppress current instabilities that are normally associated with a negative dc differential conductivity.

  13. Nanotube Dispersions Made With Charged Surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuper, Cynthia; Kuzma, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Dispersions (including monodispersions) of nanotubes in water at relatively high concentrations have been formulated as prototypes of reagents for use in making fibers, films, and membranes based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Other than water, the ingredients of a dispersion of this type include one or more charged surfactant(s) and carbon nanotubes derived from the HiPco(TradeMark) (or equivalent) process. Among reagents known to be made from HiPco(TradeMark)(or equivalent) SWNTs, these are the most concentrated and are expected to be usable in processing of bulk structures and materials. Test data indicate that small bundles of SWNTs and single SWNTs at concentrations up to 1.1 weight percent have been present in water plus surfactant. This development is expected to contribute to the growth of an industry based on applied carbon nanotechnology. There are expected to be commercial applications in aerospace, avionics, sporting goods, automotive products, biotechnology, and medicine.

  14. A Raman Study of Titanate Nanotubes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    The nano titania produced by the electrochemical and template methods, gave amorphous titania while titania nanotubes produced by 'soft' chemical processes gave materials with good crystallinity. Initially it was believed that the tubular material had the anatase structure.13,14,16,21 Indeed XRD and Raman studies.

  15. Spatially resolved spectroscopy on carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are small cylindrical molecules with a typical diameter of 1 nm and lengths of up to micrometers. These intriguing molecules exhibit, depending on the exact atomic structure, either semiconducting or metallic behavior. This makes them ideal candidates for possible future molecular

  16. Preparation of FeS2 nanotube arrays based on layer-by-layer assembly and their photoelectrochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Mudan; Xue, Dongpeng; Qin, Haiying; Zhang, Lei; Ling, Guoping; Liu, Jiabin; Fang, Youtong; Meng, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Amorphous Fe 2 O 3 nanotube arrays are prepared via layer-by-layer assembly. • Pyrite FeS 2 nanotube arrays are obtained by sulfurizing Fe 2 O 3 nanotube arrays. • Various electrochemical properties are characterized. • A comparison between FeS 2 nanotube and nanoparticle films is conducted. • Nanotube arrays show enhanced corrosion resistance and photoresponse. - Abstract: Well-aligned one-dimensional iron pyrite FeS 2 nanotube arrays have been fabricated via layer-by-layer assembly technique on ZnO nanorod arrays in combination with subsequent sulfurization. The as-prepared products were confirmed to be pure phase pyrite FeS 2 with Fe/S ratio approaching 1/2. Typical nanotube structure was observed for the FeS 2 with average outer diameter of 150 ± 20 nm and wall thickness of 50 ± 5 nm. Comparisons of photoelectrochemical properties between FeS 2 nanotubes and FeS 2 nanoparticles were conducted. Tafel polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy indicate that FeS 2 nanotubes possess high corrosion resistance and electrochemical stability. The J–V curves show that the photocurrent at 1.0 V for FeS 2 nanotubes is more than five times larger than that of FeS 2 nanoparticles, indicating enhanced photoresponse and rapid charge transfer performances of 1-D nanotube structure. The enhanced photoelectrochemical properties mainly benefit from the unique architecture features of nanotube array structure.

  17. Nanotube resonator devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  18. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Girit, Caglar O; Mickelson, William E; Zettl, Alexander K; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-05

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  19. Flow-through lipid nanotube arrays for structure-function studies of membrane proteins by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmenev, Eduard Y; Gor'kov, Peter L; Cross, Timothy A; Alaouie, Ali M; Smirnov, Alex I

    2006-10-15

    A novel method for studying membrane proteins in a native lipid bilayer environment by solid-state NMR spectroscopy is described and tested. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with flow-through 175 nm wide and 60-mum-long nanopores were employed to form macroscopically aligned peptide-containing lipid bilayers that are fluid and highly hydrated. We demonstrate that the surfaces of both leaflets of such bilayers are fully accessible to aqueous solutes. Thus, high hydration levels as well as pH and desirable ion and/or drug concentrations could be easily maintained and modified as desired in a series of experiments with the same sample. The method allows for membrane protein NMR experiments in a broad pH range that could be extended to as low as 1 and as high as 12 units for a period of up to a few hours and temperatures as high as 70 degrees C without losing the lipid alignment or bilayers from the nanopores. We demonstrate the utility of this method by a solid-state 19.6 T (17)O NMR study of reversible binding effects of mono- and divalent ions on the chemical shift properties of the Leu(10) carbonyl oxygen of transmembrane pore-forming peptide gramicidin A (gA). We further compare the (17)O shifts induced by binding metal ions to the binding of protons in the pH range from 1 to 12 and find a significant difference. This unexpected result points to a difference in mechanisms for ion and proton conduction by the gA pore. We believe that a large number of solid-state NMR-based studies, including structure-function, drug screening, proton exchange, pH, and other titration experiments, will benefit significantly from the method described here.

  20. In silico assembly and nanomechanical characterization of carbon nanotube buckypaper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranford, Steven W; Buehler, Markus J

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotube sheets or films, also known as 'buckypaper', have been proposed for use in actuating, structural and filtration systems, based in part on their unique and robust mechanical properties. Computational modeling of such a fibrous nanostructure is hindered by both the random arrangement of the constituent elements as well as the time- and length-scales accessible to atomistic level molecular dynamics modeling. Here we present a novel in silico assembly procedure based on a coarse-grain model of carbon nanotubes, used to attain a representative mesoscopic buckypaper model that circumvents the need for probabilistic approaches. By variation in assembly parameters, including the initial nanotube density and ratio of nanotube type (single- and double-walled), the porosity of the resulting buckypaper can be varied threefold, from approximately 0.3 to 0.9. Further, through simulation of nanoindentation, the Young's modulus is shown to be tunable through manipulation of nanotube type and density over a range of approximately 0.2-3.1 GPa, in good agreement with experimental findings of the modulus of assembled carbon nanotube films. In addition to carbon nanotubes, the coarse-grain model and assembly process can be adapted for other fibrous nanostructures such as electrospun polymeric composites, high performance nonwoven ballistic materials, or fibrous protein aggregates, facilitating the development and characterization of novel nanomaterials and composites as well as the analysis of biological materials such as protein fiber films and bulk structures.

  1. Properties of Y-Shaped PFO-DBT Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Saipul Fakir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immersion of template into solution is used to synthesize the Y-shaped poly[2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene-alt-4,7-bis(thiophen-2-ylbenzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole] (PFO-DBT nanotubes. Solution annealing and different aging times (1, 24, and 72 hours are conducted to synthesize the Y-shaped PFO-DBT nanotubes and the effects on the morphological, structural, and optical properties of Y-shaped PFO-DBT nanotubes are investigated. The dense, aligned, and elongated Y-shaped PFO-DBT nanotubes have been successfully fabricated by aging the PFO-DBT solution for 72 hours. Enhanced light absorption with less light scattering can be exhibited from the elongated Y-shaped PFO-DBT nanotubes. Partial and complete infiltration is governed by 1 hour and 72 hours of aging time, respectively. Preformed nanofibres are initiated by the process of annealing and aging of PFO-DBT solution. During the aging process, PFO-DBT nanofibres are formed to coat the pores’ wall and replicated the Y-branched nanopores for the production of Y-shaped PFO-DBT nanotubes. The effects of solution annealing and aging process are essential for the improvement on the morphological, structural, and optical properties of Y-shaped PFO-DBT nanotubes.

  2. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  3. Paraconductivity in Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Livanov, D. V.; Varlamov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    We report the calculation of paraconductivity in carbon nanotubes above the superconducting transition temperature. The complex behavior of paraconductivity depending upon the tube radius, temperature and magnetic field strength is analyzed. The results are qualitatively compared with recent experimental observations in carbon nanotubes of an inherent transition to the superconducting state and pronounced thermodynamic fluctuations above $T_{c}$. The application of our results to single-wall ...

  4. 3d Transition Metals and Oxides within Carbon Nanotubes by Co-Pyrolysis of Metallocene & Camphor: High Filling Efficiency and Self-Organized Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kapoor, Aakanksha; Singh, Nitesh; Dey, Arka Bikash; Nigam, A. K.; Bajpai, Ashna

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that a single zone furnace with a modified synthesis chamber design is sufficient to obtain metal (Fe, Co or Ni) filled carbon nanotubes (CNT) with high filling efficiency and controlled morphology. Samples are formed by pyrolysis of metallocenes, a synthesis technique that otherwise requires a dual zone furnace. Respective metallocene in all three cases are sublimed in powder form, a crucial factor for obtaining high filling efficiency. While Fe@CNT is routinely produced using...

  5. Carbon Nanotube Electron Emitter for X-ray Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Su Kang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The carbon nanotube field emitter array was grown on silicon substrate through a resist-assisted patterning (RAP process. The shape of the carbon nanotube array is elliptical with 2.0 × 0.5 mm2 for an isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The field emission properties with triode electrodes show a gate turn-on field of 3 V/µm at an anode emission current of 0.1 mA. The author demonstrated the X-ray source with triode electrode structure utilizing the carbon nanotube emitter, and the transmitted X-ray image was of high resolution.

  6. The effects of nanostructures on the mechanical and tribological properties of TiO2 nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeoungchin; Park, Jeongwon

    2018-04-01

    TiO2 nanotubes were prepared by anodization on Ti substrates with a diameter variation of 30–100 nm, and the structure of the nanotubes were studied using x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, which confirmed the structure changes from the anatase phase to the rutile phase of TiO2 at a diameter below 50 nm. The tribological behaviors of TiO2 nanotubes were investigated with different diameters. The effectiveness of the rutile phase and the diameter size enhanced the frictional performance of TiO2 nanotubes.

  7. Nanotube Production Devices Expand Research Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    In order for the Hubble Space Telescope to take incredible, never-seen-before shots of celestial bodies and then send them back to Earth, the spacecraft needs power. While in orbit, Hubble cannot plug into an electrical outlet or stop at a store for some batteries. One of the ways NASA supplies power aboard a spacecraft is by harnessing energy from the most powerful entity in the solar system: the Sun. Since the 1960s, photovoltaic technology, or technology that converts sunlight into electricity, has been instrumental in the exploration of space. To build upon existing photovoltaic technology, NASA s Glenn Research Center has worked on a variety of innovative designs and materials to incorporate into photovoltaic cells, the building blocks of solar power systems. One of these materials is the carbon nanotube - a tiny structure about 50,000 times finer than the average human hair, with notably high electrical and thermal conductivity and an extreme amount of mechanical strength. Such properties give carbon nanotubes great potential to enhance the reliability of power generation and storage devices in space and on Earth. Dennis J. Flood, the branch chief of the photovoltaic division at Glenn in the 1990s, was looking into using carbon nanotubes to improve the efficiency of solar cells when he ran into a major roadblock - high-quality carbon nanotubes were not readily available. To address this problem, one of the chemists in Flood s group came up with a process and system for growing them. A senior chemist at Glenn, Aloysius F. Hepp, devised an injection chemical vapor deposition process using a specific organometallic catalyst in a two-zone furnace. Hepp's group found the unique process produced high-quality carbon nanotubes with less than 5 percent metal impurity. In addition, the process was more efficient than existing techniques, as it eliminated pre-patterning of the substrate used for growing the nanotubes, a timely and cost-prohibitive step.

  8. Double-walled ZrO{sub 2} nanotube array. Preparation and enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Chaorui; Hu, Shengliang; Chang, Qing; Wang, Yanzhong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan (China); Yang, Jinlong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2017-11-15

    This work demonstrates the formation of self-ordered double-walled ZrO{sub 2} nanotube array via electrochemical anodization in glycerol-based electrolyte. Compared with its counterpart of single-walled ZrO{sub 2} nanotube array, the tube wall of double-walled ZrO{sub 2} nanotube split into outer and inner layers for the decomposition of glycerol during anodization process. Moreover, the double-walled structure showed its advantage of achieving improved utilization of light and higher specific surface area of nanotube array. Due to the unique double-walled structure, the double-walled ZrO{sub 2} nanotube array exhibited better photocatalytic activity than the single-walled ZrO{sub 2} nanotube array. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Surface functionalization of aluminosilicate nanotubes with organic molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ma

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface functionalization of inorganic nanostructures is an effective approach for enriching the potential applications of existing nanomaterials. Inorganic nanotubes attract great research interest due to their one-dimensional structure and reactive surfaces. In this review paper, recent developments in surface functionalization of an aluminosilicate nanotube, “imogolite”, are introduced. The functionalization processes are based on the robust affinity between phosphate groups of organic molecules and the aluminol (AlOH surface of imogolite nanotubes. An aqueous modification process employing a water soluble ammonium salt of alkyl phosphate led to chemisorption of molecules on imogolite at the nanotube level. Polymer-chain-grafted imogolite nanotubes were prepared through surface-initiated polymerization. In addition, the assembly of conjugated molecules, 2-(5’’-hexyl-2,2’:5’,2’’-terthiophen-5-ylethylphosphonic acid (HT3P and 2-(5’’-hexyl-2,2’:5’,2’’-terthiophen-5-ylethylphosphonic acid 1,1-dioxide (HT3OP, on the imogolite nanotube surface was achieved by introducing a phosphonic acid group to the corresponding molecules. The optical and photophysical properties of these conjugated-molecule-decorated imogolite nanotubes were characterized. Moreover, poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT chains were further hybridized with HT3P modified imogolite to form a nanofiber hybrid.

  10. Inherent-opening-controlled pattern formation in carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xiao; Zhou, Jijie J; Sansom, Elijah; Gharib, Morteza; Haur, Sow Chorng

    2007-01-01

    We have introduced inherent openings into densely packed carbon nanotube arrays to study self-organized pattern formation when the arrays undergo a wetting-dewetting treatment from nanotube tips. These inherent openings, made of circular or elongated hollows in nanotube mats, serve as dewetting centres, from where liquid recedes from. As the dewetting centres initiate dry zones and the dry zones expand, surrounding nanotubes are pulled away from the dewetting centres by liquid surface tension. Among short nanotubes, the self-organized patterns are consistent with the shape of the inherent openings, i.e. slender openings lead to elongated trench-like structures, and circular holes result in relatively round nest-like arrangements. Nanotubes in a relatively high mat are more connected, like in an elastic body, than those in a short mat. Small cracks often initialize themselves in a relatively high mat, along two or more adjacent round openings; each of the cracks evolves into a trench as liquid dries up. Self-organized pattern control with inherent openings needs to initiate the dewetting process above the nanotube tips. If there is no liquid on top, inherent openings barely enlarge themselves after the wetting-dewetting treatment

  11. Magnetocaloric effect at cryogenic temperature in gadolinium oxide nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Rima, E-mail: rima.paul@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Paramanik, Tapas; Das, Kalipada [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sen, Pintu [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Satpati, B.; Das, I. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2016-11-01

    We have synthesized fascinating nano-structure of Gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) using controlled template-assisted electrochemical deposition technique which showed interesting anisotropic magnetic behavior. The nanotubes of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} with average diameter 200 nm, length 10 µm and wall thickness 20 nm are constituted of nanoclusters with average diameter 7.5 nm. The tubes are aligned and are almost uniform throughout their length. Detailed magnetic measurements of aligned Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotubes have been performed for both parallel and perpendicular magnetic field orientations with respect to the axis of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotube array. Significant differences in magnetization values have been observed between the parallel and perpendicular orientations. Experimental results indicate the superparamagnetic nature of the nanomaterial. Large magnetocaloric effect, associated with the sharp change in magnetization of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotubes, has been observed in the cryogenic temperature regime that shows anisotropic behavior. - Highlights: • Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotubes of diameter ~200 nm synthesized through electrochemical technique. • The nanotubes are superparamagnetic in nature. • At cryogenic temperature, the nanotubes exhibit large magnetocaloric anisotropic effect.

  12. Filled carbon nanotubes in biomedical imaging and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martincic, Markus; Tobias, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been advocated as promising candidates in the biomedical field in the areas of diagnosis and therapy. In terms of drug delivery, the use of carbon nanotubes can overcome some limitations of 'free' drugs by improving the formulation of poorly water-soluble drugs, allowing targeted delivery and even enabling the co-delivery of two or more drugs for combination therapy. Two different approaches are currently being explored for the delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents by carbon nanotubes, namely attachment of the payload to the external sidewalls or encapsulation into the inner cavities. Although less explored, the latter confers additional stability to the chosen diagnostic or therapeutic agents, and leaves the backbone structure of the nanotubes available for its functionalization with dispersing and targeting moieties. Several drug delivery systems and diagnostic agents have been developed in the last years employing the inner tubular cavities of carbon nanotubes. The research discussed in this review focuses on the use of carbon nanotubes that contain in their interior drug molecules and diagnosis-related compounds. The approaches employed for the development of such nanoscale vehicles along with targeting and releasing strategies are discussed. The encapsulation of both biomedical contrast agents and drugs inside carbon nanotubes is further expanding the possibilities to allow an early diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Thermophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300009 1 of 8 A CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube thermophone. (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004...amplitude of the resulting sound waves. [0006] Recently, there has been development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable

  14. Carbon nanotube junctions and devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, H.W.Ch.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis Postma presents transport experiments performed on individual single-wall carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are molecules entirely made of carbon atoms. The electronic properties are determined by the exact symmetry of the nanotube lattice, resulting in either metallic or

  15. Synthesis and characterization of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} magnetic nanotubes, nanorods and nanowires. Formation of magnetic structured elastomers by magnetic field-induced alignment of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonel, P. Soledad [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Instituto de Química Física de Materiales, Ambiente y Energía (INQUIMAE) (Argentina); Oliveira, Cristiano L. P. [Universidade de São Paulo, Grupo de Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Física (Brazil); Jorge, Guillermo A. [Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, Instituto de Ciencias (Argentina); Perez, Oscar E. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Industrias, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (Argentina); Leyva, A. Gabriela, E-mail: leyva@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Grupo de Materia Condensada, Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología (Argentina); Negri, R. Martín, E-mail: rmn@qi.fcen.uba.ar [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Instituto de Química Física de Materiales, Ambiente y Energía (INQUIMAE) (Argentina)

    2015-07-15

    Magnetic CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanotubes, nanorods and nanowires were synthesized by the template method. The materials are highly crystalline and formed by compactly packed ceramic particles whose equivalent size diameter depends on the nanostructure type. Nanotubes and nanorods present the remarkable characteristic of having very large coercive fields (1000–1100 Oe) in comparison with nanoparticles of the same crystallite size (400 Oe) while keeping similar saturation magnetization (53–55 emu/g). Nanorods were used as filler material in polydimethylsiloxane elastomer composites, which were structured by curing in the presence of uniform magnetic field, H{sub curing}. In that way the nanorods agglomerate in the cured elastomer, forming needles-like structures (pseudo-chains) oriented in the direction of H{sub curing}. SEM analysis show that pseudo-chains are formed by bunches of nanorods oriented in that direction. At the considered filler concentration (1 % w/w), the structured elastomers conserve the magnetic properties of the fillers, that is, high coercive fields without observing magnetic anisotropy. The elastomer composites present strong elastic anisotropy, with compression constants about ten times larger in the direction parallel to the pseudo-chains than in the perpendicular direction, as determined by compression stress–strain curves. That anisotropic factor is about three-four times higher than that observed when using spherical CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles or elongated Ni nanochains. Hence, the use of morphological anisotropic structures (nanorods) results in composites with enhanced elastic anisotropy. It is also remarkable that the large elastic anisotropy was obtained at lower filler concentration compared with the above-mentioned systems (1 % w/w vs. 5–10 % w/w)

  16. Tuning the Electrical Conductivity of Nanotube-Encapsulated Metallocene Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Suárez, Víctor M.; Ferrer, Jaime; Lambert, Colin J.

    2006-03-01

    We analyze a new family of carbon nanotube-based molecular wires, formed by encapsulating metallocene molecules inside the nanotubes. Our simulations, which are based on a combination of nonequilibrium Green function techniques and density functional theory, indicate that these wires can be engineered to exhibit desirable magnetotransport effects for use in spintronics devices. The proposed structures should also be resilient to room-temperature fluctuations, and are expected to have a high yield.

  17. Shot Noise Thermometry for Thermal Characterization of Templated Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Sayer, Robert A; Kim, Sunkook; Franklin, Aaron D; Mohammadi, Saeed; Fisher, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) thermometer that operates on the principles of electrical shot noise is reported. Shot noise thermometry is a self-calibrating measurement technique that relates statistical fluctuations in dc current across a device to temperature. A structure consisting of vertical, top, and bottom-contacted single-walled carbon nanotubes in a porous anodic alumina template was fabricated and used to measure shot noise. Frequencies between 60 and 100 kHz were observed to preclude sig...

  18. Polymer Composite Using Aligned Carbon Nanotubes for Efficient Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    nanomaterials and composites. 2.6 Electron Diffraction (ED)- IPICYT. This technique is a powerful tool for determining the fine structure of doped and...USING ULTRASONIC SPRAY PYROLYSIS Production of CNx nanotube arrays on SiOx substrates and functionalized nanotbes with EtOH by pyrolysing...experiments and characterization. Summer courses on Nanotubes and Thermal Transport in Nanomaterials and Nanocomposites. Workshop in San Luis

  19. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Photovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiadis, Harry; Haldar, Pradeep; Landi, Brian J.; Denno, Patrick L.; DiLeo, Roberta A.; VanDerveer, William; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be envisioned as an individual graphene sheet rolled into a seamless cylinder (single-walled, SWNT), or concentric sheets as in the case of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) (1). The role-up vector will determine the hexagonal arrangement and "chirality" of the graphene sheet, which will establish the nanotube to be metallic or semiconducting. The optoelectronic properties will depend directly on this chiral angle and the diameter of the SWNT, with semiconductor types exhibiting a band gap energy (2). Characteristic of MWNTs are the concentric graphene layers spaced 0.34 nm apart, with diameters from 10-200 nm and lengths up to hundreds of microns (2). In the case of SWNTs, the diameters range from 0.4 - 2 nm and lengths have been reported up to 1.5 cm (3). SWNTs have the distinguishable property of "bundling" together due to van der Waal's attractions to form "ropes." A comparison of these different structural types is shown in Figure 1. The use of SWNTS in space photovoltaic (PV) applications is attractive for a variety of reasons. Carbon nanotubes as a class of materials exhibit unprecedented optical, electrical, mechanical properties, with the added benefit of being nanoscale in size which fosters ideal interaction in nanomaterial-based devices like polymeric solar cells. The optical bandgap of semiconducting SWNTs can be varied from approx. 0.4 - 1.5 eV, with this property being inversely proportional to the nanotube diameter. Recent work at GE Global Research has shown where a single nanotube device can behave as an "ideal" pn diode (5). The SWNT was bridged over a SiO2 channel between Mo contacts and exhibited an ideality factor of 1, based on a fit of the current-voltage data using the diode equation. The measured PV efficiency under a 0.8 eV monochromatic illumination showed a power conversion efficiency of 0.2 %. However, the projected efficiency of these junctions is estimated to be > 5 %, especially when one considers the

  20. Effects of synthesis methods of vanadium oxide nanotubes on the inter layer distances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghabozorg, H. R.; Mousavi, R.; Asckari, S.; Aghabozorg, H.

    2007-01-01

    Vanadium oxide nanotubes were synthesized via two methods: (1) Adding a template to vanadium oxide gels, (2) Grinding mixture of a template and vanadium oxide by using a ball mill. Influence of preparation method on structure of vanadium oxide nanotubes has been investigated. Vanadium oxide nanotubes has been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques

  1. Formation mechanism of TiO2 nanotubes and their applications in photoelectrochemical water splitting and supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Hou, Junbo; Lu, Kathy

    2013-05-14

    Structural observations of the transition of TiO2 nanopores into nanotubes by increasing the OH(-) concentration in the electrolyte challenge the validity of existing formation mechanisms of anodic TiO2 nanotubes. In this study, dehydration of titanium hydroxide in the cell wall is proposed as the mechanism that leads to the separation of neighboring nanotubes. Based on this understanding, bamboo-type TiO2 nanotubes with large surface area and excellent interconnectivity are achieved by cycling high and low applied potentials. After thermal treatment in a H2 atmosphere, the bamboo-type TiO2 nanotubes show large photoelectrochemical water splitting efficiency and supercapacitors performace.

  2. Selective Surface Charge Sign Reversal on Metallic Carbon Nanotubes for Facile Ultrahigh Purity Nanotube Sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Nguyen, Tuan Dat; Cao, Qing; Wang, Yilei; Tan, Marcus Y C; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2016-03-22

    Semiconducting (semi-) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) must be purified of their metallic (met-) counterparts for most applications including nanoelectronics, solar cells, chemical sensors, and artificial skins. Previous bulk sorting techniques are based on subtle contrasts between properties of different nanotube/dispersing agent complexes. We report here a method which directly exploits the nanotube band structure differences. For the heterogeneous redox reaction of SWNTs with oxygen/water couple, the aqueous pH can be tuned so that the redox kinetics is determined by the availability of nanotube electrons only at/near the Fermi level, as predicted quantitatively by the Marcus-Gerischer (MG) theory. Consequently, met-SWNTs oxidize much faster than semi-SWNTs and only met-SWNTs selectively reverse the sign of their measured surface zeta potential from negative to positive at the optimized acidic pH when suspended with nonionic surfactants. By passing the redox-reacted nanotubes through anionic hydrogel beads, we isolate semi-SWNTs to record high electrically verified purity above 99.94% ± 0.04%. This facile charge sign reversal (CSR)-based sorting technique is robust and can sort SWNTs with a broad diameter range.

  3. In situ, controlled and reproducible attachment of carbon nanotubes onto conductive AFM tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jianxun [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Chinese Academy of Science Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafty, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, No. 11, Bei yi tiao, Zhong Guan Cun, Beijing 100190 (China); Shingaya, Yoshitaka [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Zhao, Yuliang [Chinese Academy of Science Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafty, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, No. 11, Bei yi tiao, Zhong Guan Cun, Beijing 100190 (China); Nakayama, Tomonobu, E-mail: NAKAYAMA.Tomonobu@nims.go.jp [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-04-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An effective and controllable method was developed to fabricate CNT AFM probes in-situ. • Individual carbon nanotube was assembled. • The alignment angle and protruding length of as-produced CNT probes are excellent. - Abstract: Owing to the small diameter, wear resistance, high aspect ratio of their cylindrical structure and outstanding young's modulus, carbon nanotubes are regarded as excellent probes for atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging and various applications. To take the best out of carbon nanotubes’ potentials as AFM probes, we present a facile and reliable method to attach a single carbon nanotube onto an AFM probe covered with conductive Au layer. The method involves the following steps: positioning the AFM probe exactly onto a designated multiple-walled carbon nanotube growing vertically on a conductive substrate, establishing physical contact of the probe apex to the carbon nanotube with an appropriate force, and finally flowing a DC current of typically 100 μA from the AFM probe to the substrate through the carbon nanotube. The current flow results in the fracture and attachment of the carbon nanotube onto the AFM probe. Our method is similar to that reported in previous studies to cut and assemble carbon nanotubes by flowing current under SEM, but by our method we succeed to achieve superior control of protruding length and reproducible attachment angle of the carbon nanotube in one step. Moreover, it is now possible to reliably prepare carbon nanotube probes in-situ during AFM experiments.

  4. Effect of tubular chiralities of single-walled ZnO nanotubes on electronic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qin; Liu, Zhenghui; Zhou, Liping; Yu, Yiqing; Wu, Xuemei

    2017-04-01

    The electronic transport properties of single-walled ZnO nanotubes with different chiralities are investigated by nonequilibrium Green's function combined with density functional theory. In this paper we consider three representative ZnO nanotubes, namely (3, 3) armchair, (5, 0) zigzag, and (4, 2) chiral, with a similar diameter of about 5.4 Å. Short nanotubes exhibit good conductance behavior. As the tube length increases, the conductance decreases at low bias and the nanotubes indicate semiconducting behavior. The current-voltage characteristics of the nanotubes longer than 3 nm depend weakly on the length of the tubes. The armchair and chiral ZnO nanotubes with the same length and diameter have almost overlapped current-voltage curves. The electron transport behaviors are analyzed in terms of the transmission spectra, density of states and charge population of these nanotubes. The results indicate that the resonant peaks above the Fermi level are responsible for electric currents. However, the zigzag ZnO nanotubes exhibit asymmetric current-voltage curves attributed to the built-in polarization field and give larger current than the armchair and chiral nanotubes at the same bias. The features explored here strongly suggest that the ZnO nanotubes are stable, flexible structures, which are valuable in Nano-Electromechanical System.

  5. Freestanding bucky paper with high strength from multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucky papers have been investigated by some research groups, however, due to different qualities of carbon nanotubes used, various results of strength and electronic properties were reported in the literatures. In this article, the effects of carbon nanotubes synthesized over different catalysts on the qualities of bucky papers were systemically investigated. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes were synthesized over a series of MgO supported catalysts with different weight ratios of Mo and Co. As the ratios of Mo/Co in the catalysts were increased from 0 to 3, the yields of carbon nanotubes were enhanced from 7 wt% to 400 wt%. However, the yield enhancement of carbon nanotubes was achieved at the expense of higher proportion of structural defects within carbon nanotubes, which has been proved by Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetry analysis. It was demonstrated that the tensile strength of bucky paper composed of numerous MCNTs bundles strongly depends on the structure of carbon nanotubes used. By optimizing reaction conditions, a bucky paper with high strain up to 15.36 MPa and electrical conductivity of 61.17 S cm −1 was obtained by Supercritical Fluid (SCF) drying technique. -- Highlights: ► Multi-wall carbon nanotube bucky paper. ► Structural defects of carbon nanotubes. ► CoMo catalyst. ► Tensile strength of bucky paper.

  6. Enhanced photocatalytic activity over Cd0.5Zn0.5S with stacking fault structure combined with Cu2+ modified carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Beini; Lu, Yonghong; Wu, Pingxiao; Huang, Zhujian; Zhu, Yajie; Dang, Zhi; Zhu, Nengwu; Lu, Guining; Huang, Junyi

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CdZnS with stacking faults was combined with Cu 2+ modified carbon nanotubes. • Stacking faults and carbon nanotubes (Cu) synergized to promote charge separation. • The composite exhibited enhanced photocatalytic performance. - Abstract: For enhanced photocatalytic performance of visible light responsive CdZnS, a series of Cd 0.5 Zn 0.5 S solid solutions were fabricated by different methods. It was found that the semiconductor obtained through the precipitation-hydrothermal method (CZS-PH) exhibited the highest photocatalytic hydrogen production rate of 2154 μmol h −1 g −1 . The enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen production of CZS-PH was probably due to stacking fault formation as well as narrow bandgap, a large surface area and a small crystallite size. Based on this, carbon nanotubes modified with Cu 2+ (CNTs (Cu)) were used as a cocatalyst for CZS-PH. The addition of CNTs (Cu) enhanced notably the absorption of the composites for visible light. The highest photocatalytic hydrogen production rate of the Cd 0.5 Zn 0.5 S-CNTs (Cu) composite was 2995 μmol h −1 g −1 with 1.0 wt.% of CNTs (Cu). The improvement of the photocatalytic activity by loading of CNTs (Cu) was not due to alteration of bandgap energy or surface area, and was probably attributed to suppression of the electron-hole recombination by the CNTs, with Cu 2+ anchored in the interface optimizing the photogenerated electron transfer pathway between the semiconductor and CNTs. We report here the successful combination of homojunction and heterojunction in CdZnS semiconductor, which resulted in promotion of charge separation and enhanced photocatalytic activity.

  7. Biomarker analysis of liver cells exposed to surfactant-wrapped and oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have great potential in industrial, consumer, and mechanical applications, based partly on their unique structural, optical and electronic...

  8. Transport properties of hydrogen passivated silicon nanotubes and silicon nanotube field effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2017-01-24

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of silicon nanotubes attached to metallic electrodes from first principles, using density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. The influence of the surface termination is studied as well as the dependence of the transport characteristics on the chirality, diameter, and length. Strong electronic coupling between nanotubes and electrodes is found to be a general feature that results in low contact resistance. The conductance in the tunneling regime is discussed in terms of the complex band structure. Silicon nanotube field effect transistors are simulated by applying a uniform potential gate. Our results demonstrate very high values of transconductance, outperforming the best commercial silicon field effect transistors, combined with low values of sub-threshold swing.

  9. Carbon nanotubes as liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanju; Kumar, Satish

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are the best of known materials with a combination of excellent mechanical, electronic, and thermal properties. To fully exploit individual nanotube properties for various applications, the grand challenge is to fabricate macroscopic ordered nanotube assemblies. Liquid-crystalline behavior of the nanotubes provides a unique opportunity toward reaching this challenge. In this Review, the recent developments in this area are critically reviewed by discussing the strategies for fabricating liquid-crystalline phases, addressing the solution properties of liquid-crystalline suspensions, and exploiting the practical techniques of liquid-crystal routes to prepare macroscopic nanotube fibers and films.

  10. Geometry of carbon nanotubes and mechanisms of phagocytosis and toxic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harik, Vasyl Michael

    2017-05-05

    A review of in vivo and in vitro toxicological studies of the potential toxic effects of carbon nanotubes is presented along with the analysis of experimental data and a hypothesis about the nanotube-asbestos similarity. Developments of the structure-activity paradigm have been reviewed along with the size effects and the classification of carbon nanotubes into eleven distinct classes (e.g., the high aspect ratio nanotubes, thick multi-wall nanotubes and short nanotubes). Scaling analysis of similarities between different classes of carbon nanotubes and asbestos fibers in the context of their potential toxicity and the efficiency of phagocytosis has been reviewed. The potential toxic effects of carbon nanotubes have been characterized by their normalized length, their aspect ratio and other parameters related to their inhalability, engulfment by macrophages and the effectiveness of phagocytosis. Geometric scaling parameters and the classification of carbon nanotubes are used to develop an updated parametric map for the extrapolation of the potential toxic effects resulting from the inhalation of long and short carbon nanotubes. An updated parametric map has been applied to the evaluation of the efficiency of phagocytosis involving distinct classes of carbon nanotubes. A critical value of an important nondimensional parameter characterizing the efficiency of phagocytosis for different nanotubes is presented along with its macrophage-based normalization. The present evaluation of the potential toxicological effects of the high aspect ratio carbon nanotubes is found to be in the agreement with other available studies and earlier scaling analyses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Environmental scanning electron microscopy study of the interaction of carbon nanotubes with fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Maria Pia

    The behavior of fluids at the nanoscale is currently of interest, as nanotechnology promises tools for the precise delivery and analysis of minute volumes of liquids. Because of their reported properties, ease of manipulation and hollow cavity, carbon nanotubes have attracted attention for fluidic delivery. Thus far, experimental studies on wetting of carbon nanotubes have been limited, and other work revolves around theoretical modeling. Consequently, there is a considerable lack of experimental data on the subject. In this work, environmental scanning electron microscopy was employed for visualization of the interaction of carbon nanotubes with fluids such as water, liquid crystals, and biological solutions. Carbon nanotubes of diverse surface structure and chemistry were evaluated, and hydrophobic and hydrophilic behavior was observed. Nanotubes made by catalytic chemical vapor deposition showed highly hydrophobic behavior by the formation of spherical water droplets on nanotube agglomerates. This behavior was caused by roughness of the agglomerates as well as pinning of the droplets on defects and functional groups along the walls of the nanotubes. On highly graphitic carbon nanotube agglomerates, no droplet formation was observed due to the lack of defects and terminations on the surface. Formation of "barrel" and "clam-shell" shaped droplets on individual nanotubes was also observed. Capillary condensation inside carbon nanotubes made by non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition was also observed in the environmental scanning electron microscope. Condensation was marked by the formation of a thin film of water on the inner walls of the nanotubes, followed by growth of a meniscus of low contact angle, indicating the hydrophilic nature of the nanotubes. Spontaneous elastic deformation of the nanotubes was observed upon the formation of the film due to surface tension effects. By annealing, the carbon nanotubes were graphitized, and highly hydrophobic behavior was

  12. New Method Developed To Purify Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes have attracted considerable attention because of their remarkable mechanical properties and electrical and thermal conductivities. Use of these materials as primary or secondary reinforcements in polymers or ceramics could lead to new materials with significantly enhanced mechanical strength and electrical and thermal conductivity. Use of carbon-nanotube-reinforced materials in aerospace components will enable substantial reductions in component weight and improvements in durability and safety. Potential applications for single wall carbon nanotubes include lightweight components for vehicle structures and propulsion systems, fuel cell components (bipolar plates and electrodes) and battery electrodes, and ultra-lightweight materials for use in solar sails. A major barrier to the successful use of carbon nanotubes in these components is the need for methods to economically produce pure carbon nanotubes in large enough quantities to not only evaluate their suitability for certain applications but also produce actual components. Most carbon nanotube synthesis methods, including the HiPCO (high pressure carbon monoxide) method developed by Smalley and others, employ metal catalysts that remain trapped in the final product. These catalyst impurities can affect nanotube properties and accelerate their decomposition. The development of techniques to remove most, if not all, of these impurities is essential to their successful use in practical applications. A new method has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to purify gram-scale quantities of single wall carbon nanotubes. This method, a modification of a gas phase purification technique previously reported by Smalley and others, uses a combination of high-temperature oxidations and repeated extractions with nitric and hydrochloric acid. This improved procedure significantly reduces the amount of impurities (catalyst and nonnanotube forms of carbon) within the nanotubes, increasing

  13. Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As an electrical energy storage device, supercapacitor finds attractive applications in consumer electronic products and alternative power source due to its higher energy density, fast discharge/charge time, low level of heating, safety, long-term operation stability, and no disposable parts. This work reviews the recent development of supercapacitor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs and their composites. The purpose is to give a comprehensive understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of carbon nanotubes-related supercapacitor materials and to find ways for the improvement in the performance of supercapacitor. We first discussed the effects of physical and chemical properties of pure carbon nanotubes, including size, purity, defect, shape, functionalization, and annealing, on the supercapacitance. The composites, including CNTs/oxide and CNTs/polymer, were further discussed to enhance the supercapacitance and keep the stability of the supercapacitor by optimally engineering the composition, particle size, and coverage.

  14. Encapsulation of cisplatin as an anti-cancer drug into boron-nitride and carbon nanotubes: Molecular simulation and free energy calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roosta, Sara [Molecular Simulation Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science & Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid, E-mail: hashemianzadeh@iust.ac.ir [Molecular Simulation Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Iran University of Science & Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ketabi, Sepideh, E-mail: sepidehketabi@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, East Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-01

    Encapsulation of cisplatin anticancer drug into the single walled (10, 0) carbon nanotube and (10, 0) boron-nitride nanotube was investigated by quantum mechanical calculations and Monte Carlo Simulation in aqueous solution. Solvation free energies and complexation free energies of the cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube complexes was determined as well as radial distribution functions of entitled compounds. Solvation free energies of cisplatin@ carbon nanotube and cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube were − 4.128 kcal mol{sup −1} and − 2457.124 kcal mol{sup −1} respectively. The results showed that cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube was more soluble species in water. In addition electrostatic contribution of the interaction of boron- nitride nanotube complex and solvent was − 281.937 kcal mol{sup −1} which really more than Van der Waals and so the electrostatic interactions play a distinctive role in the solvation free energies of boron- nitride nanotube compounds. On the other hand electrostatic part of the interaction of carbon nanotube complex and solvent were almost the same as Van der Waals contribution. Complexation free energies were also computed to study the stability of related structures and the free energies were negative (− 374.082 and − 245.766 kcal mol{sup −1}) which confirmed encapsulation of drug into abovementioned nanotubes. However, boron-nitride nanotubes were more appropriate for encapsulation due to their larger solubility in aqueous solution. - Highlights: • Solubility of cisplatin@ boron-nitride nanotube is larger than cisplatin@ carbon nanotube. • Boron- nitride nanotube complexes have larger electrostatic contribution in solvation free energy. • Complexation free energies confirm encapsulation of drug into the nanotubes in aqueous solution. • Boron- nitride nanotubes are appropriate drug delivery systems compared with carbon nanotubes.

  15. High frequency electromechanical memory cells based on telescoping carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, A M; Lozovik, Y E; Kulish, A S; Bichoutskaia, E

    2010-07-01

    A new method to increase the operational frequency of electromechanical memory cells based on the telescoping motion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes through the selection of the form of the switching voltage pulse is proposed. The relative motion of the walls of carbon nanotubes can be controlled through the shape of the interwall interaction energy surface. This allows the use of the memory cells in nonvolatile or volatile regime, depending on the structure of carbon nanotube. Simulations based on ab initio and semi-empirical calculations of the interwall interaction energies are used to estimate the switching voltage and the operational frequency of volatile cells with the electrodes made of carbon nanotubes. The lifetime of nonvolatile memory cells is also predicted.

  16. Synthesis of cadmium chalcogenide nanotubes at room temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Jun

    2012-10-01

    Cadmium chalcogenide (CdE, E=S, Se, Te) polycrystalline nanotubes have been synthesized from precursor of CdS/cadmium thiolate complex at room temperature. The precursor was hydrothermally synthesized at 180 °C using thioglycolic acid (TGA) and cadmium acetate as starting materials. The transformation from the rod-like precursor of CdS/cadmium thiolate complex to CdS, CdSe and CdTe nanotubes were performed under constant stirring at room temperature in aqueous solution containing S 2-, Se 2- and Te 2-, respectively. The nanotube diameter can be controlled from 150 to 400 nm related to the dimension of templates. The XRD patterns show the cadmium chalcogenide nanotubes all corresponding to face-centered cubic structure. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Manufacturing of Porous Ceramic Preforms Based on Halloysite Nanotubes (Hnts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kujawa M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the influence of manufacturing conditions on the structure and properties of porous halloysite preforms, which during pressure infiltration were soaked with a liquid alloy to obtain a metal matrix composite reinforced by ceramic, and also to find innovative possibilities for the application of mineral nanotubes obtained from halloysite. The method of manufacturing porous ceramic preforms (based on halloysite nanotubes as semi-finished products that are applicable to modern infiltrated metal matrix composites was shown. The ceramic preforms were manufactured by sintering of halloysite nanotubes (HNT, Natural Nano Company (USA, with the addition of pores and canals forming agent in the form of carbon fibres (Sigrafil C10 M250 UNS SGL Group, the Carbon Company. The resulting porous ceramic skeletons, suggest innovative application capabilities mineral nanotubes obtained from halloysite.

  18. Construction of DNA nanotubes with controllable diameters and patterns using hierarchical DNA sub-tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaolong; Wu, Xiaoxu; Song, Tao; Li, Xin

    2016-08-21

    The design of DNA nanotubes is a promising and hot research branch in structural DNA nanotechnology, which is rapidly developing as a versatile method for achieving subtle nanometer scale materials and molecular diagnostic/curative devices. Multifarious methods have been proposed to achieve varied DNA nanotubes, such as using square tiles and single-stranded tiles, but it is still a challenge to develop a bottom-up assembly way to build DNA nanotubes with different diameters and patterns using certain universal DNA nanostructures. This work addresses the challenge by assembling three types of spatial DNA nanotubes with different diameters and patterns from the so-called "basic bricks", i.e., hierarchical DNA sub-tiles. A high processing rate and throughput synthesis of DNA nanotubes are observed and analyzed by atomic force microscopy. Experimental observations and data analysis suggests the stability and controllability of DNA nanotubes assembled by hierarchical DNA sub-tiles.

  19. LDRD final report : energy conversion using chromophore-functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vance, Andrew L.; Zifer, Thomas; Zhou, Xinjian; Leonard, Francois Leonard; Wong, Bryan Matthew; Kane, Alexander; Katzenmeyer, Aaron Michael; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2010-09-01

    With the goal of studying the conversion of optical energy to electrical energy at the nanoscale, we developed and tested devices based on single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with azobenzene chromophores, where the chromophores serve as photoabsorbers and the nanotube as the electronic read-out. By synthesizing chromophores with specific absorption windows in the visible spectrum and anchoring them to the nanotube surface, we demonstrated the controlled detection of visible light of low intensity in narrow ranges of wavelengths. Our measurements suggested that upon photoabsorption, the chromophores isomerize to give a large change in dipole moment, changing the electrostatic environment of the nanotube. All-electron ab initio calculations were used to study the chromophore-nanotube hybrids, and show that the chromophores bind strongly to the nanotubes without disturbing the electronic structure of either species. Calculated values of the dipole moments supported the notion of dipole changes as the optical detection mechanism.

  20. Experimental investigation of magnetic nanotubes in PC-12 neuron cells culturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linfeng; Xie, Jining; Yancey, J.; Srivatsan, Malathi; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2007-04-01

    This report discusses the effects of magnetic nanotubes on the differentiation and growth of neurons. The magnetic nanotubes used in this study are hematite nanotubes synthesized using template method, and their structural and magnetic properties have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). PC-12 cells are differentiated into neurons in the presence of magnetic nanotubes to confirm the biocompatibility and cytotoxic effects of magnetic nanotubes during the processes of neuron differentiation and neuronal growth. The morphological changes and synapse formation of neurons are investigated, and the contact effects of magnetic nanotubes on neurite (axon and dendrites) outgrowth are explored. This research allows us to understand the interaction between magnetic nanomaterials and neurons, and pave the way towards developing potential treatments using the magnetic nano tubes for neurodegenerative disorders and injuries to the nervous system in the future.

  1. NMR strategies to study the local magnetic properties of carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2012-02-01

    The local magnetic properties of the one dimensional inner space of the nanotubes are investigated using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of encapsulated fullerene molecules inside single walled carbon nanotubes. Isotope engineering and magnetically purified nanotubes have been advantageously used on our study to discriminate between the different diamagnetic and paramagnetic shifts of the resonances. Ring currents originating from the π electrons circulating on the nanotube, are found to actively screen the applied magnetic field by -36.9 ppm. Defects and holes in the nanotube walls cancel this screening locally. What is interesting, that at high magnetic fields, the modifications of the NMR resonances of the molecules from free to encapsulated can be exploited to determine some structural characteristics of the surrounding nanotubes, never observed experimentally. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nanotechnology with Carbon Nanotubes: Mechanics, Chemistry, and Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Nanotechnology of carbon nanotubes. The contents include: 1) Nanomechanics examples; 2) Experimental validation of nanotubes in composites; 3) Anisotropic plastic collapse; 4) Spatio-temporal scales, yielding single-wall nanotubes; 5) Side-wall functionalization of nanotubes; 6) multi-wall Y junction carbon nanotubes; 7) Molecular electronics with Nanotube junctions; 8) Single-wall carbon nanotube junctions; welding; 9) biomimetic dendritic neurons: Carbon nanotube, nanotube electronics (basics), and nanotube junctions for Devices,

  3. Production of carbon nanotubes by the solar route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard, T.; Cetout, S.; Alvarez, L.; Sauvajol, J. L.; Anglaret, E.; Bernier, P.; Flamant, G.; Laplaze, D.

    1999-03-01

    The high intensity of concentrated solar radiation obtained with the Odeillo (France) solar furnace facilities can be used to produce carbon nanotubes by direct vaporization of carbon bi-metal targets under inert gas atmosphere. Electron microscope pictures and Raman spectra show that the structure of the produced carbon nanotubes is likely to depend on experimental conditions and that the growth of single-wall or multi-walled carbon nanotubes can be favored. La forte concentration du rayonnement solaire que l'on peut obtenir grâce aux installations du centre du four solaire d'Odeillo (France) nous a permis de synthétiser des nanotubes de carbone par la méthode de vaporisation-condensation en présence de gaz inerte (argon). Les observations en microscopie électronique (MEB et TEM) ainsi que l'analyse des spectres Raman montrent que la structure des nanotubes de carbone obtenus dépend fortement des conditions expérimentales et que l'on peut favoriser la croissance de nanotubes d'un type déterminé (monofeuillets ou multifeuillets) en modifiant les paramètres de synthèse.

  4. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabr...

  5. Growth, Structure, and Photocatalytic Properties of Hierarchical V2O5–TiO2 Nanotube Arrays Obtained from the One-step Anodic Oxidation of Ti–V Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María C. Nevárez-Martínez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available V2O5-TiO2 mixed oxide nanotube (NT layers were successfully prepared via the one-step anodization of Ti-V alloys. The obtained samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, UV-Vis absorption, photoluminescence spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, X-ray diffraction (DRX, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The effect of the applied voltage (30–50 V, vanadium content (5–15 wt % in the alloy, and water content (2–10 vol % in an ethylene glycol-based electrolyte was studied systematically to determine their influence on the morphology, and for the first-time, on the photocatalytic properties of these nanomaterials. The morphology of the samples varied from sponge-like to highly-organized nanotubular structures. The vanadium content in the alloy was found to have the highest influence on the morphology and the sample with the lowest vanadium content (5 wt % exhibited the best auto-alignment and self-organization (length = 1 μm, diameter = 86 nm and wall thickness = 11 nm. Additionally, a probable growth mechanism of V2O5-TiO2 nanotubes (NTs over the Ti-V alloys was presented. Toluene, in the gas phase, was effectively removed through photodegradation under visible light (LEDs, λmax = 465 nm in the presence of the modified TiO2 nanostructures. The highest degradation value was 35% after 60 min of irradiation. V2O5 species were ascribed as the main structures responsible for the generation of photoactive e− and h+ under Vis light and a possible excitation mechanism was proposed.

  6. Dispersion and alignment of carbon nanotubes in polymer based composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camponeschi, Erin Lynn

    This research is intended to create usable carbon nanotube polymer based composites for structural applications by effectively aligning and dispersing the carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix. The motivation for this research is to create very lightweight, high strength materials that will surpass their predecessors: carbon fibers. The final product then can be used in applications across the industries. This research determined the effect of three different surface-active agents and two different aligning methods on the structural features and mechanical properties of the polymer-based composite. The three types of surface-active agents used in this research are a surfactant and two different block copolymers. From this research, it will be determined how different surface-active agents adequately disperse the carbon nanotube, and the effects the dispersing agent have on a final dispersed product. In addition, the dispersing agent effects on the alignment of the carbon nanotubes and the final product can be compared. The two alignment techniques used in this research were alignment via shear flow and tethering iron oxide particles to the carbon nanotubes to induce alignment in a magnetic field. The method of shear aligning carbon nanotubes is very simplistic in theory, but actual application becomes much more challenging. This research illustrates the effects on shear alignment in a viscous polymer flow and then applies those theories to polymers. This work then compares the different alignment techniques to determine the overall increase of properties and the effective carbon nanotube alignment. This research provides a framework for the creation of dispersed and aligned composites that can be expanded upon and improved to further develop the carbon nanotubes as possible replacement fillers for composite materials.

  7. Double-walled silicon nanotubes: an ab initio investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Matheus P.

    2018-02-01

    The synthesis of silicon nanotubes realized in the last decade demonstrates multi-walled tubular structures consisting of Si atoms in {{sp}}2 and the {{sp}}3 hybridizations. However, most of the theoretical models were elaborated taking as the starting point {{sp}}2 structures analogous to carbon nanotubes. These structures are unfavorable due to the natural tendency of the Si atoms to undergo {{sp}}3. In this work, through ab initio simulations based on density functional theory, we investigated double-walled silicon nanotubes proposing layered tubes possessing most of the Si atoms in an {{sp}}3 hybridization, and with few {{sp}}2 atoms localized at the outer wall. The lowest-energy structures have metallic behavior. Furthermore, the possibility to tune the band structure with the application of a strain was demonstrated, inducing a metal-semiconductor transition. Thus, the behavior of silicon nanotubes differs significantly from carbon nanotubes, and the main source of the differences is the distortions in the lattice associated with the tendency of Si to make four chemical bonds.

  8. Transparent Electrodes with Nanotubes and Graphene for Printed Optoelectronic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Słoma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here on printed electroluminescent structures containing transparent electrodes made of carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets. Screen-printing and spray-coating techniques were employed. Electrodes and structures were examined towards optical parameters using spectrophotometer and irradiation meter. Electromechanical properties of transparent electrodes are exterminated with cyclical bending test. Accelerated aging process was conducted according to EN 62137 standard for reliability tests of electronics. We observed significant negative influence of mechanical bending on sheet resistivity of ITO, while resistivity of nanotube and graphene based electrodes remained stable. Aging process has also negative influence on ITO based structures resulting in delamination of printed layers, while those based on carbon nanomaterials remained intact. We observe negligible changes in irradiation for structures with carbon nanotube electrodes after accelerated aging process. Such materials demonstrate a high application potential in general purpose electroluminescent devices.

  9. In-situ localized carbon nanotube growth inside partially sealed enclosures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, Y. van de; Champion, A.; Bellouard, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube assemblies can be used for specific applications such as sensors and filters. We present a method and proof-of-concept to directly grow vertically-aligned carbon nanotube structures within sealed enclosures by means of a feedback-controlled laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition

  10. Analysis of long-channel nanotube field-effect-transistors (NT FETs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an analysis of long-channel nanotube (NT) field effect transistors (FET) from NASA's Ames Research Center. The structure of such a transistor including the electrode contact, 1D junction, and the planar junction is outlined. Also mentioned are various characteristics of a nanotube tip-equipped scanning tunnel microscope (STM).

  11. GaS multi-walled nanotubes from the lamellar precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, P. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Fu, L.; Cao, L. C.; Zhu, D. B.

    2005-04-01

    Inorganic fullerene-like (IF) nanotubes constructed from layered metal chalcogenides are of particular significance because of their excellent physical properties and potential application in wide fields. But very few previous studies were focused on the IF nanotubes of layered III-VI semiconductor. Therefore we investigate the preparation, structure and photoluminescence (PL) properties of GaS nanotube (an important III-VI semiconductor IF nanotube). A simple method is introduced to prepare GaS multi-walled nanotubes for the first time by annealing the natural lamellar precursor in Ar. The reaction temperature is crucial for the formation of nanotube. A suitable temperature range is 500-850 °C. Bulk quantities of GaS nanotubes with diameters of 30-150 nm and lengths up to ten micrometers were produced. Some of these nanotubes show corrugated and interlinked structure and form many segments, demonstrating a bamboo-like structure. As compared to bulk materials, the obvious distinction of the products in PL spectra at liquid nitrogen temperature of 77 K was due to the structure variety.

  12. Aqueous solution dispersement of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are dispersed in an aqueous buffer solution consisting of at least 50 weight percent water and a remainder weight percent that includes a buffer material. The buffer material has a molecular structure defined by a first end, a second end, and a middle disposed between the first and second ends. The first end is a cyclic ring with nitrogen and oxygen heteroatomes, the middle is a hydrophobic alkyl chain, and the second end is a charged group.

  13. Carbon Nanotubes by CVD and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassell, Alan; Delzeit, Lance; Nguyen, Cattien; Stevens, Ramsey; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) exhibits extraordinary mechanical and unique electronic properties and offers significant potential for structural, sensor, and nanoelectronics applications. An overview of CNT, growth methods, properties and applications is provided. Single-wall, and multi-wall CNTs have been grown by chemical vapor deposition. Catalyst development and optimization has been accomplished using combinatorial optimization methods. CNT has also been grown from the tips of silicon cantilevers for use in atomic force microscopy.

  14. Spectroelectrochemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2011), s. 47-55 ISSN 1439-4235 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC510; GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR KAN200100801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : electrochemistry * nanotubes * photoluminiscence Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.412, year: 2011

  15. InAs/Si Hetero-Junction Nanotube Tunnel Transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna, Amir N.; Fahad, Hossain M.; Hussain, Muhammad M.

    2015-01-01

    Hetero-structure tunnel junctions in non-planar gate-all-around nanowire (GAA NW) tunnel FETs (TFETs) have shown significant enhancement in ?ON? state tunnel current over their all-silicon counterpart. Here we show the unique concept of nanotube TFET in a hetero-structure configuration that is capable of much higher drive current as opposed to that of GAA NW TFETs.Through the use of inner/outer core-shell gates, a single III-V hetero-structured nanotube TFET leverages physically larger tunnel...

  16. Intrinsic Stability of the Smallest Possible Silver Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autreto, P. A. S.; Lagos, M. J.; Sato, F.; Bettini, J.; Rocha, A. R.; Rodrigues, V.; Ugarte, D.; Galvao, D. S.

    2011-02-01

    Recently, Lagos et al. [Nature Nanotech. 4, 149 (2009)1748-338710.1038/nnano.2008.414] reported the discovery of the smallest possible Ag nanotube with a square cross section. Ab initio density functional theory calculations strongly support that the stability of these hollow structures is structurally intrinsic and not the result of contamination by light atoms. We also report the first experimental observation of the theoretically predicted corrugation of the hollow structure. Quantum conductance calculations predict a unique signature of 3.6G0 for this new family of nanotubes.

  17. Computational investigation of the electronic and structural properties of CN radical on the pristine and Al-doped (6, 0) BN nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, Alireza, E-mail: alireza.soltani46@yahoo.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Gorgan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradi, Ali Varasteh [Department of Chemistry, Gorgan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahari, Mahsa [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Gorgan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Masoodi, Anis [Department of Chemistry, Gorgan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shojaee, Shamim [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Gorgan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Gorgan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    We have performed first-principle calculations to investigate the adsorption behavior of the CN radical (CåN) on the external surface of H-capped Al-doped (6, 0) zigzag single-walled BN nanotubes (BNNT). We calculated the bond length, gap energies, dipole moments, and electronic properties of the {sup ·}CN on the exterior surface of SWBNNT. Binding energy corresponding to the most stable configuration of CN radical on Al{sub N}-doped BNNT is found to be −471.73 kJ mol{sup −1}. The calculated density of states (DOS) reveals that there is a significant orbital hybridization between {sup ·}CN and Al-doping species in the adsorption process being evidence of an exothermic process. The results indicate that BNNT could be a suitable sensor.

  18. A Bio-Inspired Two-Layer Sensing Structure of Polypeptide and Multiple-Walled Carbon Nanotube to Sense Small Molecular Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a bio-inspired, two-layer, multiple-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT-polypeptide composite sensing device. The MWCNT serves as a responsive and conductive layer, and the nonselective polypeptide (40 mer coating the top of the MWCNT acts as a filter into which small molecular gases pass. Instead of using selective peptides to sense specific odorants, we propose using nonselective, peptide-based sensors to monitor various types of volatile organic compounds. In this study, depending on gas interaction and molecular sizes, the randomly selected polypeptide enabled the recognition of certain polar volatile chemical vapors, such as amines, and the improved discernment of low-concentration gases. The results of our investigation demonstrated that the polypeptide-coated sensors can detect ammonia at a level of several hundred ppm and barely responded to triethylamine.

  19. Computational investigation of the electronic and structural properties of CN radical on the pristine and Al-doped (6, 0) BN nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltani, Alireza; Moradi, Ali Varasteh; Bahari, Mahsa; Masoodi, Anis; Shojaee, Shamim

    2013-01-01

    We have performed first-principle calculations to investigate the adsorption behavior of the CN radical (CåN) on the external surface of H-capped Al-doped (6, 0) zigzag single-walled BN nanotubes (BNNT). We calculated the bond length, gap energies, dipole moments, and electronic properties of the · CN on the exterior surface of SWBNNT. Binding energy corresponding to the most stable configuration of CN radical on Al N -doped BNNT is found to be −471.73 kJ mol −1 . The calculated density of states (DOS) reveals that there is a significant orbital hybridization between · CN and Al-doping species in the adsorption process being evidence of an exothermic process. The results indicate that BNNT could be a suitable sensor

  20. Tunable functionality and toxicity studies of titanium dioxide nanotube layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feschet-Chassot, E.; Raspal, V.; Sibaud, Y.; Awitor, O.K.; Bonnemoy, F.; Bonnet, J.L.; Bohatier, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we have developed a simple process to fabricate scalable titanium dioxide nanotube layers which show a tunable functionality. The titanium dioxide nanotube layers were prepared by electrochemical anodization of Ti foil in 0.4 wt.% hydrofluoric acid solution. The nanotube layers structure and morphology were characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The surface topography and wettability were studied according to the anodization time. The sample synthesized displayed a higher contact angle while the current density reached a local minimum. Beyond this point, the contact angles decreased with anodization time. Photo-degradation of acid orange 7 in aqueous solution was used as a probe to assess the photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide nanotube layers under UV irradiation. We obtained better photocatalytic activity for the sample fabricated at higher current density. Finally we used the Ciliated Protozoan T. pyriformis, an alternative cell model used for in vitro toxicity studies, to predict the toxicity of titanium dioxide nanotube layers in a biological system. We did not observe any characteristic effect in the presence of the titanium dioxide nanotube layers on two physiological parameters related to this organism, non-specific esterases activity and population growth rate.

  1. Application of carbon nanotubes flexible strain sensor in smart textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong CHENG

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Smart textiles have not only the necessary functions of daily wear, but also the intelligence. The focus of the current textile materials research is the selection of flexible material. For flexible materials, carbon material is one of the ideal materials for preparing flexible strain gauges. The application of flexible strain sensor prepared by carbon nanotubes as a flexible material in smart textiles is the research content. The research status of carbon nanotubes flexible strain sensor is introduced from the aspects of the structure, properties and application. The characteristics and functions of flexible strain gages prepared with carbon nanotube fibers and carbon nanotube films as flexible materials are discussed in terms of selection, preparation method, performance test and application. At the same time, the advantages and disadvantages of the flexible strain sensor of carbon nanotubes are reviewed from the aspects of preparation difficulty, production cost and practical application effect. High sensitivity with high strain will be a key research direction for carbon nanotube flexible strain sensors.

  2. Applications of Quantum Chemistry to the Study of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    For several years, scientists at NASA Ames have been studying the properties of carbon nanotubes using various experimental and computational methods. In this talk, I will compare different strategies for using quantum chemistry calculations to describe the electronic structure, deformation and chemical functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and the physisorption of small molecules on nanotube surfaces. The SWNT can be treated as an infinite (periodic) or finite length carbon cylinder or as a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecule with an imposed curvature maintained by external constraints (as if it were cut out of the SWNT surface). Calculations are carried out using DFT and MP2 methods and a variety of atomic orbital basis sets from minimal (STO-3G) to valence triple zeta. The optimal approach is based on the particular SWNT property of interest. Examples to be discussed include: nanotube fluorination and other functionalization reactions; coating of nanotubes by water vapor and low-molecular weight organic molecules; and the nature of the interface between SWNT and liquids such as water and amines. In many cases, the quantum chemistry calculations are used to parameterize or validate force fields for molecular dynamics simulations. The results of these calculations have helped explain experimental data and contributed to the design of novel materials and sensors based on carbon nanotubes. Some of this research is described in the following papers:

  3. Physical Properties of GaN Nanotubes as Revealed by Computer Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Zu, Xiaotao; Weber, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Single-crystalline wurtzite GaN nanotubes have been synthesized recently with proposed applications in nanoscale electronics, optoelectronics and the biochemical-sensing field. Molecular dynamics methods with a Stillinger-Weber potential are used to investigate the melting behavior, thermal conductivity and mechanical properties of these wurtzite-type single crystalline GaN nanotubes. Four major topical areas are summarized in this chapter. (1) The melting temperature of the GaN nanotubes increases with the thickness of the nanotubes to a saturation value, which is close to the melting temperature of bulk GaN. The simulations result reveal that the nanotubes begin to melt at the surface, and then the melting rapidly extends to the interior of the nanotubes as the temperature increases. (2) The thermal conductivity of nanotubes is smaller than that of the bulk GaN single crystal. The thermal conductivity is also found to decrease with temperature and increase with increasing wall thickness of the nanotubes. The change of phonon spectrum and surface inelastic scattering may account for the reduction of thermal conductivity in the nanotubes, while thermal softening and high frequency phonon interactions at high temperatures may provide an explanation for its decrease with increasing temperature. (3) At low temperatures, the simulation results show that the nanotubes exhibit brittle properties; whereas at high temperatures, they behave as ductile materials. The brittle to ductile transition temperature generally increases with increasing wall thickness of the nanotubes and increasing strain rate. (4) The simulation temperature, tube length and strain rate affect the buckling behavior of GaN nanotubes. The critical stress decreases with the increase of simulation temperature and tube length. The dependence of buckling on tube length is consistent with the analysis of equivalent continuum structures using Euler buckling theory

  4. Hall Measurements on Carbon Nanotube Paper Modified With Electroless Deposited Platinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwuoha Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanotube paper, sometimes referred to as bucky paper, is a random arrangement of carbon nanotubes meshed into a single robust structure, which can be manipulated with relative ease. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were used to make the nanotube paper, and were subsequently modified with platinum using an electroless deposition method based on substrate enhanced electroless deposition. This involves the use of a sacrificial metal substrate that undergoes electro-dissolution while the platinum metal deposits out of solution onto the nanotube paper via a galvanic displacement reaction. The samples were characterized using SEM/EDS, and Hall-effect measurements. The SEM/EDS analysis clearly revealed deposits of platinum (Pt distributed over the nanotube paper surface, and the qualitative elemental analysis revealed co-deposition of other elements from the metal substrates used. When stainless steel was used as sacrificial metal a large degree of Pt contamination with various other metals was observed. Whereas when pure sacrificial metals were used bimetallic Pt clusters resulted. The co-deposition of a bimetallic system upon carbon nanotubes was a function of the metal type and the time of exposure. Hall-effect measurements revealed some interesting fluctuations in sheet carrier density and the dominant carrier switched from N- to P-type when Pt was deposited onto the nanotube paper. Perspectives on the use of the nanotube paper as a replacement to traditional carbon cloth in water electrolysis systems are also discussed.

  5. Nanotube formation and morphology change of Ti alloys containing Hf for dental materials use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Kang; Choe, Han-Cheol; Ko, Yeong-Mu; Brantley, William A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, Ti-Hf (10, 20, 30 and 40 wt.%) alloys were prepared by arc melting, and subjected to heat treatment for 24 h at 1000 o C in an argon atmosphere. Formation of surface nanotubes was achieved by anodizing a Ti-Hf alloy in 1.0 M H 3 PO 4 electrolytes with small amounts of NaF at room temperature. Microstructures of the alloys and nanotube morphology were examined by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The homogenized Ti-Hf alloys had a needle-like microstructure of α phase, and nanotubes formed on Ti-xHf alloys had the anatase phase after treatment that promoted crystallization. Uniform nanotubes formed for Hf contents up to 20 wt.%. Irregular nanotubes formed on the Ti-30Hf and Ti-40Hf alloys. The structure of the irregular layers on the Ti-30Hf and Ti-40Hf alloys had nanotubes of two sizes. Increasing the Hf content in Ti led to the formation of nanotubes with more narrow size. The pores in the nanotubes typically had a diameter ranging from 80-120 nm and a length of approximately 1.7 μm. It is concluded that nanotube morphology on Ti-Hf alloys can controlled by varying the amount of Hf.

  6. Chirality-Dependent Vapor-Phase Epitaxial Growth and Termination of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bilu; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Chongwu; USC nanolab Team

    2014-03-01

    Chirality-pure single-wall carbon nanotubes are highly desired for both fundamental study and many of their technological applications. Recently, we have shown that chirality-pure short nanotubes can be used as seeds for vapor-phase epitaxial cloning growth, opening up a new route toward chirality-controlled carbon nanotube synthesis. Nevertheless, the yield of vapor-phase epitaxial growth is rather limited at the present stage, due to the lack of mechanistic understanding of the process. Here we report chirality-dependent growth kinetics and termination mechanism for the vapor-phase epitaxial growth of seven single- chirality nanotubes of (9, 1), (6, 5), (8, 3), (7, 6), (10, 2), (6, 6), and (7, 7), covering near zigzag, medium chiral angle, and near armchair semiconductors, as well as armchair metallic nanotubes. Our results reveal that the growth rates of nanotubes increase with their chiral angles while the active lifetimes of the growth hold opposite trend. Consequently, the chirality distribution of a nanotube ensemble is jointly determined by both growth rates and lifetimes. These results correlate nanotube structures and properties with their growth behaviors and deepen our understanding of chirality-controlled growth of nanotubes.

  7. Synthesis of ultra-long cadmium telluride nanotubes via combinational chemical transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kee-Ryung; Cho, Hong-Baek; Choa, Yong-Ho, E-mail: choa15@hanyang.ac.kr

    2017-03-01

    Synthesis of high-throughput cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanotubes with an ultra-long aspect ratio is presented via a combination process concept combined with electrospinning, electrodeposition, and cationic exchange reaction. Ultra-long sacrificial silver (Ag) nanofibers were synthesized by electrospinning involving two-step calcination, and were then electrodeposited to create silver telluride nanotubes. These nanotubes underwent cationic exchange reaction in cadmium nitrate tetrahydrate solution with the aid of a ligand, tributylphosphine (TBP). Analysis showed that ultra-long pure zinc blende CdTe nanotubes were obtained with controlled dimension and uniform morphology. The thermodynamic driving force induced by the coordination of methanol solvent and TBP attributed to overcome the kinetic barrier between Ag{sub 2}Te and CdTe nanotubes, facilitating the synthesis of CdTe nanotubes. This synthetic process involving a topotactic reaction route paves a way for high-throughput extended synthesis of new chalcogenide hollow nanotubes for application in photodetectors and solar cells. - Highlights: • High throughput synthetic route of hollow CdTe nanotubes with ultra-long aspect ratio. • Chemical combination of electrospinning, electrodeposition & cation exchange reaction. • Pure zinc blende CdTe by controlled dimension & structural variation of Ag nanofibers. • Potential for the high throughput synthesis of new exotic chalcogenide nanotubes.

  8. Tuning porosity and radial mechanical properties of DNA origami nanotubes via crossover design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhipeng; Kawai, Kentaro; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Tabata, Osamu

    2017-06-01

    DNA origami nanotubes are utilized as structural platforms for the fabrication of various micro/nanosystems for drug delivery, optical or biological sensing, and even nanoscale robots. Their radial structural and mechanical properties, which play a crucial role in the effective use of micro/nanosystems, have not been fully studied. In particular, the effects of crossovers, which are basic structures for rationally assembling double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) helices into a nanotube configuration, have not yet been characterized experimentally. To investigate the effects of crossovers on the porosity and the radial mechanical properties of DNA origami nanotubes, we fabricated a DNA origami nanotube with varied crossover designs along the nanotube axis. The radial geometry of the DNA origami nanotube is experimentally characterized by both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM). Moreover, the radial mechanical properties of the DNA origami nanotube including the radial modulus are directly measured by force-distance-based AFM. These measurements reveal that the porosity and the radial modulus of DNA origami nanotubes can be tuned by adjusting the crossover design, which enables the optimal design and construction of DNA origami nanostructures for various applications.

  9. InAs/Si Hetero-Junction Nanotube Tunnel Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Hanna, Amir

    2015-04-29

    Hetero-structure tunnel junctions in non-planar gate-all-around nanowire (GAA NW) tunnel FETs (TFETs) have shown significant enhancement in ‘ON’ state tunnel current over their all-silicon counterpart. Here we show the unique concept of nanotube TFET in a hetero-structure configuration that is capable of much higher drive current as opposed to that of GAA NW TFETs.Through the use of inner/outer core-shell gates, a single III-V hetero-structured nanotube TFET leverages physically larger tunneling area while achieving higher driver current (ION) and saving real estates by eliminating arraying requirement. Numerical simulations has shown that a 10 nm thin nanotube TFET with a 100 nm core gate has a 5×normalized output current compared to a 10 nm diameter GAA NW TFET.

  10. Soldering of Nanotubes onto Microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Mølhave, Kristian; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina

    2003-01-01

    Suspended bridges of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes were fabricated inside a scanning electron microscope by soldering the nanotube onto microelectrodes with highly conducting gold-carbon material. By the decomposition of organometallic vapor with the electron beam, metal-containing solder...... bonds were formed at the intersection of the nanotube and the electrodes. Current-voltage curves indicated metallic conduction of the nanotubes, with resistances in the range of 9-29 kOmega. Bridges made entirely of the soldering material exhibited resistances on the order of 100 Omega, and the solder...

  11. Continuum theory for nanotube piezoelectricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, P J; Sai, Na; Mele, E J

    2005-09-09

    We develop and solve a continuum theory for the piezoelectric response of one-dimensional nanotubes and nanowires, and apply the theory to study electromechanical effects in boron-nitride nanotubes. We find that the polarization of a nanotube depends on its aspect ratio, and a dimensionless constant specifying the ratio of the strengths of the elastic and electrostatic interactions. The solutions of the model as these two parameters are varied are discussed. The theory is applied to estimate the electric potential induced along the length of a boron-nitride nanotube in response to a uniaxial stress.

  12. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  13. Current state and perspectives for organo-halide perovskite solar cells. Part 1. Crystal structures and thin film formation, morphology, processing, degradation, stability improvement by carbon nanotubes. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigmat Ashurov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental problems of the modern state of the studies of organic–inorganic organo-halide perovskites (OHP as basis for high efficiency thin film solar cells are discussed. Perovskite varieties and background properties are introduced. The chronology of development of the studies in this direction has been presented – structural aspects of these OHP perovskites, from early 2D to recent 3D MAPbI3 perovskites and important technological aspects of smooth thin film structure creation by various techniques, such as solvent engineering, spin- and dip - coating, vacuum deposition, cation exchange approach, nanoimprinting (particularly, a many-sided role of polymers. The most important theoretical problems such as electronic structure of lattice, impurity and defect states in pure and mixed perovskites, suppressed electron-hole recombination, extra-long lifetimes, and diffusion lengths are analyzed. Degradation effects associated with moisture and photo irradiation, as well as degradation of metallic electrodes to OHP solar cells have been considered. The application of carbon nanostructures: carbon nanotubes (CNT and graphene as stable semitransparent charge collectors to OHP perovskites is demonstrated on the example of original results of authors.

  14. Thermo mechanical buckling analysis of carbon nanotubes on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carbon nanotubes are cylindrical macromolecules consisting of carbon atoms arranged in a peri- odic hexagonal structure and were invented by Iijima (1991). This started a new field of research for the accurate analysis of nano-size structures. Recently there has been growing interest for application of non-local continuum ...

  15. Stability of diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes under liquid conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Castillo, Jaime; Hedstrom, Martin

    2011-01-01

    nanotubes are believed to be very stable both thermally and chemically. Previously, the chemical and thermal stability of self-organizing structures has been investigated after the evaporation of the solvent. However, it was recently discovered that the stability of the structures differed significantly...

  16. Effect of Peierls transition in armchair carbon nanotube on dynamical behaviour of encapsulated fullerene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieu Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The changes of dynamical behaviour of a single fullerene molecule inside an armchair carbon nanotube caused by the structural Peierls transition in the nanotube are considered. The structures of the smallest C20 and Fe@C20 fullerenes are computed using the spin-polarized density functional theory. Significant changes of the barriers for motion along the nanotube axis and rotation of these fullerenes inside the (8,8 nanotube are found at the Peierls transition. It is shown that the coefficients of translational and rotational diffusions of these fullerenes inside the nanotube change by several orders of magnitude. The possibility of inverse orientational melting, i.e. with a decrease of temperature, for the systems under consideration is predicted.

  17. Controlled Self-Assembly of Photofunctional Supramolecular Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Erez; Weissman, Haim; Pinkas, Iddo; Shimoni, Eyal; Rehak, Pavel; Král, Petr; Rybtchinski, Boris

    2018-01-23

    Designing supramolecular nanotubes (SNTs) with distinct dimensions and properties is highly desirable, yet challenging, since structural control strategies are lacking. Furthermore, relatively complex building blocks are often employed in SNT self-assembly. Here, we demonstrate that symmetric bolaamphiphiles having a hydrophobic core comprised of two perylene diimide moieties connected via a bipyridine linker and bearing polyethylene glycol (PEG) side chains can self-assemble into diverse molecular nanotubes. The structure of the nanotubes can be controlled by assembly conditions (solvent composition and temperature) and a PEG chain length. The resulting nanotubes differ both in diameter and cross section geometry, having widths of 3 nm (triangular-like cross-section), 4 nm (rectangular), and 5 nm (hexagonal). Molecular dynamics simulations provide insights into the stability of the tubular superstructures and their initial stages of self-assembly, revealing a key role of oligomerization via side-by-side aromatic interactions between bis-aromatic cores. Probing electronic and photonic properties of the nanotubes revealed extended electron delocalization and photoinduced charge separation that proceeds via symmetry breaking, a photofunction distinctly different from that of the fibers assembled from the same molecules. A high degree of structural control and insights into SNT self-assembly advance design approaches toward functional organic nanomaterials.

  18. Neutron scattering studies of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rols, S.; Anglaret, E.; Sauvajol, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Neutron scattering is shown to be a powerful tool for the study of both the structure and the vibrational properties of nanotubes. Comparison between the neutron diffraction data and calculations on finite-size bundles of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) allow to estimate the mean-tube diameter, the tube diameter distribution as well as the mean-size of the bundles. The technique is complementary of x-ray diffraction since it allows a characterization of large amount of samples. A good agreement is found with structural information obtained in electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Recent results probing the evolution of the diffraction spectra of SWNT samples with temperature and pressure will be presented. Moreover, the efficiency of TOF neutron scattering is demonstrated to study the phonon density of states of SWNT. Original features are recorded in the frequency range 6 to 60 meV and assigned to intratube excitations on the basis of calculations for (10,10) SWNT. At lower frequencies (below 6 meV), a peculiar frequency-dependence is observed of the density of states assigned to some contribution due to intratube and intertube excitations with peculiar q-dispersions. Preliminary results on multi-wall nanotubes will also be presented. (author)

  19. Mechanical properties of functionalized carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z Q; Liu, B; Chen, Y L; Hwang, K C; Jiang, H; Huang, Y

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) used to reinforce polymer matrix composites are functionalized to form covalent bonds with the polymer in order to enhance the CNT/polymer interfaces. These bonds destroy the perfect atomic structures of a CNT and degrade its mechanical properties. We use atomistic simulations to study the effect of hydrogenization on the mechanical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes. The elastic modulus of CNTs gradually decreases with the increasing functionalization (percentage of C-H bonds). However, both the strength and ductility drop sharply at a small percentage of functionalization, reflecting their sensitivity to C-H bonds. The cluster C-H bonds forming two rings leads to a significant reduction in the strength and ductility. The effect of carbonization has essentially the same effect as hydrogenization

  20. Activity of catalase adsorbed to carbon nanotubes: effects of carbon nanotube surface properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengdong; Luo, Shuiming; Chen, Wei

    2013-09-15

    Nanomaterials have been studied widely as the supporting materials for enzyme immobilization. However, the interactions between enzymes and carbon nanotubes (CNT) with different morphologies and surface functionalities may vary, hence influencing activities of the immobilized enzyme. To date how the adsorption mechanisms affect the activities of immobilized enzyme is not well understood. In this study the adsorption of catalase (CAT) on pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (O-SWNT), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) was investigated. The adsorbed enzyme activities decreased in the order of O-SWNT>SWNT>MWNT. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and circular dichrois (CD) analyses reveal more significant loss of α-helix and β-sheet of MWNT-adsorbed than SWNT-adsorbed CAT. The difference in enzyme activities between MWNT-adsorbed and SWNT-adsorbed CAT indicates that the curvature of surface plays an important role in the activity of immobilized enzyme. Interestingly, an increase of β-sheet content was observed for CAT adsorbed to O-SWNT. This is likely because as opposed to SWNT and MWNT, O-SWNT binds CAT largely via hydrogen bonding and such interaction allows the CAT molecule to maintain the rigidity of enzyme structure and thus the biological function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.