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Sample records for nanotube field emitter

  1. Evaluations of carbon nanotube field emitters for electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, Hitoshi, E-mail: nakahara@nagoya-u.jp [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kusano, Yoshikazu; Kono, Takumi; Saito, Yahachi [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    Brightness of carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters was already reported elsewhere. However, brightness of electron emitter is affected by a virtual source size of the emitter, which strongly depends on electron optical configuration around the emitter. In this work, I-V characteristics and brightness of a CNT emitter are measured under a practical field emission electron gun (e-gun) configuration to investigate availability of CNT for electron microscopy. As a result, it is obtained that an emission area of MWNT is smaller than its tip surface area, and the emission area corresponds to a five-membered-ring with 2nd nearest six-membered-rings on the MWNT cap surface. Reduced brightness of MWNT is measured as at least 2.6x10{sup 9} A/m{sup 2} sr V. It is concluded that even a thick MWNT has enough brightness under a practical e-gun electrode configuration and suitable for electron microscopy.

  2. Evaluations of carbon nanotube field emitters for electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Hitoshi; Kusano, Yoshikazu; Kono, Takumi; Saito, Yahachi

    2009-11-01

    Brightness of carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters was already reported elsewhere. However, brightness of electron emitter is affected by a virtual source size of the emitter, which strongly depends on electron optical configuration around the emitter. In this work, I- V characteristics and brightness of a CNT emitter are measured under a practical field emission electron gun (e-gun) configuration to investigate availability of CNT for electron microscopy. As a result, it is obtained that an emission area of MWNT is smaller than its tip surface area, and the emission area corresponds to a five-membered-ring with 2nd nearest six-membered-rings on the MWNT cap surface. Reduced brightness of MWNT is measured as at least 2.6×109 A/m 2 sr V. It is concluded that even a thick MWNT has enough brightness under a practical e-gun electrode configuration and suitable for electron microscopy.

  3. Fowler Nordheim theory of carbon nanotube based field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parveen, Shama; Kumar, Avshish [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi (India); Husain, Samina [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi (India); Husain, Mushahid, E-mail: mush_reslab@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi (India)

    2017-01-15

    Field emission (FE) phenomena are generally explained in the frame-work of Fowler Nordheim (FN) theory which was given for flat metal surfaces. In this work, an effort has been made to present the field emission mechanism in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which have tip type geometry at nanoscale. High aspect ratio of CNTs leads to large field enhancement factor and lower operating voltages because the electric field strength in the vicinity of the nanotubes tip can be enhanced by thousand times. The work function of nanostructure by using FN plot has been calculated with reverse engineering. With the help of modified FN equation, an important formula for effective emitting area (active area for emission of electrons) has been derived and employed to calculate the active emitting area for CNT field emitters. Therefore, it is of great interest to present a state of art study on the complete solution of FN equation for CNTs based field emitter displays. This manuscript will also provide a better understanding of calculation of different FE parameters of CNTs field emitters using FN equation.

  4. A fabrication method for field emitter array of carbon nanotubes with improved carbon nanotube rooting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouhan, V., E-mail: vchouhan@post.kek.jp [School of High Energy Accelerator, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Noguchi, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Kato, S. [School of High Energy Accelerator, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2015-11-30

    We have developed a technique for fabrication of a field emitter array (FEA) of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to obtain a high emission current along with a high current density. The FEA was prepared with many small equidistant circular emitters of randomly oriented multiwall carbon nanotubes. The fabrication of a FEA substrate followed with deposition of titanium nitride (TiN) film on a tantalum (Ta) substrate and circular titanium (Ti) islands on the TiN coated Ta substrate in a DC magnetron sputtering coater. CNTs were dispersed on the substrate and rooted into the circular Ti islands at a high temperature to prepare an array of circular emitters of CNTs. The TiN film was applied on a Ta substrate to make a reaction barrier between the Ta substrate and CNTs in order to root CNTs only into the Ti islands without a reaction with the Ta substrate at the high temperature. A high emission current of 31.7 mA with an effective current density of 34.5 A/cm{sup 2} was drawn at 6.5 V/μm from a FEA having 130 circular emitters in a diameter of 50 μm and with a pitch of 200 μm. The high emission current was ascribed to the good quality rooting of CNTs into the Ti islands and an edge effect, in which a high emission current was expected from the peripheries of the circular emitters. - Highlights: • We developed a method to fabricate a field emitter array of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). • CNT rooting into array of titanium islands was improved at a high temperature. • Titanium nitride film was used to stop reaction between CNT and tantalum substrate. • Strong edge effect was achieved from an array of small circular emitters of CNTs. • The good quality CNT rooting and the edge effect enhanced an emission current.

  5. Electron field emission characteristics of graphene/carbon nanotubes hybrid field emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Leifeng; He, Hong; Yu, Hua; Cao, Yiqi; Lei, Da; Menggen, QiQiGe; Wu, Chaoxing; Hu, Liqin

    2014-01-01

    The graphene (GP) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) hybrid nanostructure emitter was constructed by a larger scale electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method. The field emission (FE) performance of the hybrid emitter is greatly improved compared with that of only GP or MCNTs emitter. The low turn-on electric field (EF), the low threshold EF and the reliability FE properties are obtained from the hybrid emitter. The better FE properties result from the improved electrical properties. For further enhancement FE of hybrids, Ag Nanoparticles (NPs) were decorated on the hybrids and FE characteristics were also studied. These studies indicate that we can use the hybrid nanostructure to improve conductivity and contact resistance, which results in enhancement of the FE properties

  6. Field emission from optimized structure of carbon nanotube field emitter array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chouhan, V.; Noguchi, T.; Kato, S.

    2016-01-01

    The authors report a detail study on the emission properties of field emitter array (FEA) of micro-circular emitters of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The FEAs were fabricated on patterned substrates prepared with an array of circular titanium (Ti) islands on titanium nitride coated tantalum substrates. CNTs were rooted into these Ti islands to prepare an array of circular emitters. The circular emitters were prepared in different diameters and pitches in order to optimize their structure for acquiring a high emission current. The pitch was varied from 0 to 600 μm, while a diameter of circular emitters was kept constant to be 50 μm in order to optimize a pitch. For diameter optimization, a diameter was changed from 50 to 200 μm while keeping a constant edge-to-edge distance of 150 μm between the circular emitters. The FEA with a diameter of 50 μm and a pitch of 120 μm was found to be the best to achieve an emission current of 47 mA corresponding to an effective current density of 30.5 A/cm"2 at 7 V/μm. The excellent emission current was attributed to good quality of CNT rooting into the substrate and optimized FEA structure, which provided a high electric field on a whole circular emitter of 50 μm and the best combination of the strong edge effect and CNT coverage. The experimental results were confirmed with computer simulation.

  7. Field emission from optimized structure of carbon nanotube field emitter array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouhan, V., E-mail: vchouhan@post.kek.jp, E-mail: vijaychouhan84@gmail.com [School of High Energy Accelerator, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Noguchi, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Kato, S. [School of High Energy Accelerator, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)

    2016-04-07

    The authors report a detail study on the emission properties of field emitter array (FEA) of micro-circular emitters of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The FEAs were fabricated on patterned substrates prepared with an array of circular titanium (Ti) islands on titanium nitride coated tantalum substrates. CNTs were rooted into these Ti islands to prepare an array of circular emitters. The circular emitters were prepared in different diameters and pitches in order to optimize their structure for acquiring a high emission current. The pitch was varied from 0 to 600 μm, while a diameter of circular emitters was kept constant to be 50 μm in order to optimize a pitch. For diameter optimization, a diameter was changed from 50 to 200 μm while keeping a constant edge-to-edge distance of 150 μm between the circular emitters. The FEA with a diameter of 50 μm and a pitch of 120 μm was found to be the best to achieve an emission current of 47 mA corresponding to an effective current density of 30.5 A/cm{sup 2} at 7 V/μm. The excellent emission current was attributed to good quality of CNT rooting into the substrate and optimized FEA structure, which provided a high electric field on a whole circular emitter of 50 μm and the best combination of the strong edge effect and CNT coverage. The experimental results were confirmed with computer simulation.

  8. Emitter spacing effects on field emission properties of laser-treated single-walled carbon nanotube buckypapers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Yiwen; Miao, Hsin-Yuan; Zhang Mei; Liang, Richard; Zhang, Chuck; Wang, Ben [High-Performance Materials Institute, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Lin, Ryan Jiyao, E-mail: kenymiao@thu.edu.tw, E-mail: mzhang@eng.fsu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Terre Haute, IN 47803 (United States)

    2010-12-10

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters on buckypaper were activated by laser treatment and their field emission properties were investigated. The pristine buckypapers and CNT emitters' height, diameter, and spacing were characterized through optical analysis. The emitter spacing directly impacted the emission results when the laser power and treatment times were fixed. The increasing emitter density increased the enhanced field emission current and luminance. However, a continuous and excessive increase of emitter density with spacing reduction generated the screening effect. As a result, the extended screening effect from the smaller spacing eventually crippled the field emission effectiveness. Luminance intensity and uniformity of field emission suggest that the highly effective buckypaper will have a density of 2500 emission spots cm{sup -2}, which presents an effective field enhancement factor of 3721 and a moderated screening effect of 0.005. Proper laser treatment is an effective post-treatment process for optimizing field emission, luminance, and durability performance for buckypaper cold cathodes.

  9. Highly reliable field electron emitters produced from reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Highly reliable field electron emitters were developed using a formulation for reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube (CNT) composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers and a ball-milling method. We carefully controlled the ball-milling sequence and time to avoid any damage to the CNTs, which incorporated fillers that were fully dispersed as paste constituents. The field electron emitters fabricated by printing the CNT pastes were found to exhibit almost perfect adhesion of the CNT emitters to the cathode, along with good uniformity and reproducibility. A high field enhancement factor of around 10 000 was achieved from the CNT field emitters developed. By selecting nano-sized metal alloys and oxides and using the same formulation sequence, we also developed reliable field emitters that could survive high-temperature post processing. These field emitters had high durability to post vacuum annealing at 950 °C, guaranteeing survival of the brazing process used in the sealing of field emission x-ray tubes. We evaluated the field emitters in a triode configuration in the harsh environment of a tiny vacuum-sealed vessel and observed very reliable operation for 30 h at a high current density of 350 mA cm-2. The CNT pastes and related field emitters that were developed could be usefully applied in reliable field emission devices.

  10. Effectively Improved Field Emission Properties of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes/Graphenes Composite Field Emitter by Covering on the Si Pyramidal Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Leifeng; Yu, Hua; Zhong, Jiasong

    2015-01-01

    The composite nanostructure emitter of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphenes was deposited on pyramidal silicon substrate by the simple larger scale electrophoretic deposition process. The field emission (FE) properties of the composite/pyramidal Si device were greatly improved compared...

  11. A digital miniature x-ray tube with a high-density triode carbon nanotube field emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Kim, Jae-Woo; Song, Yoon-Ho; Ahn, Seungjoon

    2013-01-01

    We have fabricated a digital miniature x-ray tube (6 mm in diameter and 32 mm in length) with a high-density triode carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitter for special x-ray applications. The triode CNT emitter was densely formed within a diameter of below 4 mm with the focusing-functional gate. The brazing process enables us to obtain and maintain a desired vacuum level for the reliable electron emission from the CNT emitters after the vacuum packaging. The miniature x-ray tube exhibited a stable and reliable operation over 250 h in a pulse mode at an anode voltage of above 25 kV.

  12. Light radiation through a transparent cathode plate with single-walled carbon nanotube field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, E.S.; Goak, J.C.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, S.H.; Han, J.H.; Lee, C.S.; Sok, J.H.; Seo, Y.H.; Park, K.S.; Lee, N.S.

    2010-01-01

    In the conventional carbon nanotube backlight units (CNT-BLUs), light passes through the phosphor-coated anode glass plate, which thus faces closely the thin film transistor (TFT) backplate of a liquid crystal display panel. This configuration makes heat dissipation structurally difficult because light emission and heat generation occur simultaneously at the anode. We propose a novel configuration of a CNT-BLU where the cathode rather than the anode faces the TFT backplate by turning it upside down. In this design, light passes through the transparent cathode glass plate while heating occurs at the anode. We demonstrated a novel design of CNT-BLU by fabricating transparent single-walled CNT field emitters on the cathode and by coating a reflecting metal layer on the anode. This study hopefully provides a clue to solve the anode-heating problem which would be inevitably confronted for high-luminance and large-area CNT-BLUs.

  13. Interface control: A modified rooting technique for enhancing field emission from multiwall carbon nanotube based bulk emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahiri, Indranil [Nanomaterials and Device Lab, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Choi, Wonbong, E-mail: choiw@fiu.edu [Nanomaterials and Device Lab, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have raised hopes that these materials might find wide application as cold cathodes in various electron sources. The excellent field emission properties shown by CNT-based field emitters has further stimulated this expectation. However, efficient performance of a practical field emitter, which comprises a large number of randomly or regularly oriented CNTs, is restricted primarily due to poor junctions formed between CNTs and substrates. This study is aimed at enhancing the junction performance by way of a modified 'rooting' technique-interface control. In this process, the interface between CNTs and substrate has been tailored with different metals in an attempt to improve the CNT-substrate junction performance. Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized on different interface-controlled substrates, i.e. Cu, Al, W, Si and low-temperature co-fired ceramic. All the samples produced mat-type, randomly oriented MWCNT structures. Among the four different substrates studied, MWCNT-based field emitters on Cu substrate demonstrated the best field emission response, in terms of low turn-on field, high emission current, good field enhancement factor and excellent stability in long-term operation. Emitter structures and their field emission behavior were correlated and it was shown that interface control, as an advanced 'rooting' process, plays an important role in determining the emission response from a bulk field emitter.

  14. Interface control: A modified rooting technique for enhancing field emission from multiwall carbon nanotube based bulk emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahiri, Indranil; Choi, Wonbong

    2011-01-01

    The unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have raised hopes that these materials might find wide application as cold cathodes in various electron sources. The excellent field emission properties shown by CNT-based field emitters has further stimulated this expectation. However, efficient performance of a practical field emitter, which comprises a large number of randomly or regularly oriented CNTs, is restricted primarily due to poor junctions formed between CNTs and substrates. This study is aimed at enhancing the junction performance by way of a modified 'rooting' technique-interface control. In this process, the interface between CNTs and substrate has been tailored with different metals in an attempt to improve the CNT-substrate junction performance. Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized on different interface-controlled substrates, i.e. Cu, Al, W, Si and low-temperature co-fired ceramic. All the samples produced mat-type, randomly oriented MWCNT structures. Among the four different substrates studied, MWCNT-based field emitters on Cu substrate demonstrated the best field emission response, in terms of low turn-on field, high emission current, good field enhancement factor and excellent stability in long-term operation. Emitter structures and their field emission behavior were correlated and it was shown that interface control, as an advanced 'rooting' process, plays an important role in determining the emission response from a bulk field emitter.

  15. Current-Fluctuation Mechanism of Field Emitters Using Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with High Crystallinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiro Shimoi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Field emitters can be used as a cathode electrode in a cathodoluminescence device, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs that are synthesized by arc discharge are expected to exhibit good field emission (FE properties. However, a cathodoluminescence device that uses field emitters radiates rays whose intensity considerably fluctuates at a low frequency, and the radiant fluctuation is caused by FE current fluctuation. To solve this problem, is very important to obtain a stable output for field emitters in a cathodoluminescence device. The authors consider that the electron-emission fluctuation is caused by Fowler–Nordheim electron tunneling and that the electrons in the Fowler–Nordheim regime pass through an inelastic potential barrier. We attempted to develop a theoretical model to analyze the power spectrum of the FE current fluctuation using metallic SWCNTs as field emitters, owing to their electrical conductivity by determining their FE properties. Field emitters that use metallic SWCNTs with high crystallinity were successfully developed to achieve a fluctuating FE current from field emitters at a low frequency by employing inelastic electron tunneling. This paper is the first report of the successful development of an inelastic-electron-tunneling model with a Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation for metallic SWCNTs based on the evaluation of FE properties.

  16. Miniature X-ray Tube for Electric Brachytherapy using Carbon Nanotube Field Emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hyun Jin; Ha, Jun Mok; Cho, Sung Oh

    2011-01-01

    An electric brachytherapy using a miniature x-ray tube has a major advantage to reduce the x-ray exposure of human body during the cancer radiation therapy by optimal positioning of x-ray radiation source and treatment objectives. In the view of a smaller electronic x-ray source, the CNT field emitter based xray tube can be more minimized than thermionic filament emitter based one because of a simple power supplier connection of cold field emission in diode type as well as a higher electron emission brightness of CNT. This abstract is for introducing the design of a prototype CNT field emitter based miniature x-ray tube. We have vacuum sealed CNT miniature x-ray tube with 7∼10 mm diameter, and characteristics of electron emission and x-ray transportation using MCNP5 code are surveyed

  17. Asymmetrical field emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  18. Deduction of work function of carbon nanotube field emitter by use of curved-surface theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgcombe, C J; Jonge, N de

    2007-01-01

    The theory given earlier for field emission from a curved surface has been extended to use the parameter d characterizing the energy distribution. Measurement of the curvature of the Fowler-Nordheim plot together with d for the same emitter enables the work function of the surface to be deduced, together with emitter radius, notional surface field, effective solid angle of emission and supply factor. For this calculation an assumed form of potential distribution was used, but it is desirable to repeat the calculation with a potential obtained from atomic-scale simulation

  19. Carbon Nanotube Field Emitters Synthesized on Metal Alloy Substrate by PECVD for Customized Compact Field Emission Devices to Be Used in X-Ray Source Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangjun Park

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a simple, efficient, and economical process is reported for the direct synthesis of carbon nanotube (CNT field emitters on metal alloy. Given that CNT field emitters can be customized with ease for compact and cold field emission devices, they are promising replacements for thermionic emitters in widely accessible X-ray source electron guns. High performance CNT emitter samples were prepared in optimized plasma conditions through the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD process and subsequently characterized by using a scanning electron microscope, tunneling electron microscope, and Raman spectroscopy. For the cathode current, field emission (FE characteristics with respective turn on (1 μA/cm2 and threshold (1 mA/cm2 field of 2.84 and 4.05 V/μm were obtained. For a field of 5.24 V/μm, maximum current density of 7 mA/cm2 was achieved and a field enhancement factor β of 2838 was calculated. In addition, the CNT emitters sustained a current density of 6.7 mA/cm2 for 420 min under a field of 5.2 V/μm, confirming good operational stability. Finally, an X-ray generated image of an integrated circuit was taken using the compact field emission device developed herein.

  20. Stationary scanning x-ray source based on carbon nanotube field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.; Yang, G.; Cheng, Y.; Gao, B.; Qiu, Q.; Lee, Y.Z.; Lu, J.P.; Zhou, O.

    2005-01-01

    We report a field emission x-ray source that can generate a scanning x-ray beam to image an object from multiple projection angles without mechanical motion. The key component of the device is a gated carbon nanotube field emission cathode with an array of electron emitting pixels that are individually addressable via a metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor-based electronic circuit. The characteristics of this x-ray source are measured and its imaging capability is demonstrated. The device can potentially lead to a fast data acquisition rate for laminography and tomosynthesis with a simplified experimental setup

  1. Effect of increased crystallinity of single-walled carbon nanotubes used as field emitters on their electrical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoi, Norihiro, E-mail: shimoi@mail.kankyo.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-20 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-12-07

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) synthesized by arc discharge are expected to exhibit good field emission (FE) properties at a low driving voltage. We used a coating containing homogeneously dispersed highly crystalline SWCNTs produced by a high-temperature annealing process to fabricate an FE device by a wet-coating process at a low cost. Using the coating, we succeeded in reducing the power consumption of field emitters for planar lighting devices. SWCNTs synthesized by arc discharge have crystal defects in the carbon network, which are considered to induce inelastic electron tunneling that deteriorates the electrical conductivity of the SWCNTs. In this study, the blocking of the transport of electrons in SWCNTs with crystal defects is simulated using an inelastic electron tunneling model. We succeeded in clarifying the mechanism underlying the electrical conductivity of SWCNTs by controlling their crystallinity. In addition, it was confirmed that field emitters using highly crystalline SWCNTs can lead to new applications operating with low power consumption and new devices that may change our daily lives in the future.

  2. Use of tapered Pyrex capillary tubes to increase the mechanical stability of multiwall carbon nanotubes field emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, M. S.; Bani Ali, E. S.; Hagmann, M. J.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, NanocylTM NC 7000 Thin Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used with a high aspect ratio (>150) made by the process of catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). The field emitter tips were prepared by inserting these MWCT into fine glass capillary tubes that were pulled at high temperatures and then cut. Measurements were carried out under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions with a base pressure of 10-9 mbar. The data show the effects of initial conditioning of MWCNT and hysteresis. Compression of the MWCNT by the capillary tubes appears to provide adequate mechanical support without requiring the use of a low-melting point electrically-conductive binder as has been used previously. Emission currents in excess of 1 μA were obtained so this technique shows promise as a reliable, stable, powerful electron source.

  3. Characteristics of Transmission-type Microfocus X-ray Tube based-on Carbon Nanotube Field Emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Sung Hwan; Ihsan, Aamir; Cho, Sung Oh

    2007-01-01

    A high resolution microfocus x-ray source is widely applied to noninvasive detection for industrial demands, material science and engineering, and to diagnostic study of microbiology and micro-tomography. Carbon nanotube (CNT) is regarded as an excellent electron emitter, which outperforms conventional electron sources in point of brightness. It has been suggested that CNT is used as an electron source of a high resolution x-ray tube according to their low threshold field with atomically sharp geometry, chemically robust structure, and electric conductivity. Several researchers have reported miniaturized x-ray tube based on diode structure and micro x-ray radiography and computed tomography systems using triode types with precise emission control and electrostatic focusing. Especially, a microfocus x-ray source of 30 μm resolution has been demonstrated recently using an elliptical CNT cathode and asymmetrical Eingel lens. However, to increase the spatial resolution of x-ray source, a smaller CNT emitter is desired. Electron focusing optics must be corrected to reduce aberrations. A thin wire tip end can provide a micro-area of CNT substrate, and a magnetic lens and transmission x-ray target are proper to reduce the lens aberration and a focal length. Until now, CNT based microfocus x-ray source with less than 10 um resolution has not been shown. Here we report a microfocus x-ray source with 4.7 μm x-ray focal spot consisted of a conical CNT tip, a single solenoid lens, and a transmission type x-ray target. A magnified x-ray image larger than 230 times was resolved with advantage of microfocused focal spot and transmission x-ray target

  4. Study of Thermal-Field Emission Properties and Investigation of Temperature dependent Noise in the Emission Current form vertical Carbon nanotube emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Kolekar, Sadhu

    2017-05-05

    We have investigated temperature dependent field electron emission characteristics of vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The generalized expression for electron emission from well defined cathode surface is given by Millikan and Lauritsen [1] for the combination of temperature and electric field effect. The same expression has been used to explain the electron emission characteristics from vertical CNT emitters. Furthermore, this has been applied to explain the electron emission for different temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1500 K. The real-time field electron emission images at room temperature and 1500 K are recorded by using Charge Coupled Device (CCD), in order to understand the effect of temperature on electron emission spots in image morphology (as indicated by ring like structures) and electron emission spot intensity of the emitters. Moreover, the field electron emission images can be used to calculate the total number of emitters per cm2 for electron emission. The calculated number of emitters per cm2 is 4.5x107 and, the actual number emitters per cm2 present for electron emission calculated from Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) data is 1.2x1012. The measured Current-Voltage (I-V) characteristics obey the Folwer-Nordheim (F-N) type behavior. The fluctuations in the emission current are recorded at different temperatures and, temperature dependence of power spectral density obeys power law relation s(f)=I2/f2 with that of emission current and frequency.

  5. Direct Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube Field Emitters on Metal Substrate for Open-Type X-ray Source in Medical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Prasad Gupta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the design, fabrication and characterization of a carbon nanotube enabled open-type X-ray system for medical imaging. We directly grew the carbon nanotubes used as electron emitter for electron gun on a non-polished raw metallic rectangular-rounded substrate with an area of 0.1377 cm2 through a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. The stable field emission properties with triode electrodes after electrical aging treatment showed an anode emission current of 0.63 mA at a gate field of 7.51 V/μm. The 4.5-inch cubic shape open type X-ray system was developed consisting of an X-ray aperture, a vacuum part, an anode high voltage part, and a field emission electron gun including three electrodes with focusing, gate and cathode electrodes. Using this system, we obtained high-resolution X-ray images accelerated at 42–70 kV voltage by digital switching control between emitter and ground electrode.

  6. Direct Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube Field Emitters on Metal Substrate for Open-Type X-ray Source in Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amar Prasad; Park, Sangjun; Yeo, Seung Jun; Jung, Jaeik; Cho, Chonggil; Paik, Sang Hyun; Park, Hunkuk; Cho, Young Chul; Kim, Seung Hoon; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ahn, Jeung Sun; Ryu, Jehwang

    2017-07-29

    We report the design, fabrication and characterization of a carbon nanotube enabled open-type X-ray system for medical imaging. We directly grew the carbon nanotubes used as electron emitter for electron gun on a non-polished raw metallic rectangular-rounded substrate with an area of 0.1377 cm² through a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. The stable field emission properties with triode electrodes after electrical aging treatment showed an anode emission current of 0.63 mA at a gate field of 7.51 V/μm. The 4.5-inch cubic shape open type X-ray system was developed consisting of an X-ray aperture, a vacuum part, an anode high voltage part, and a field emission electron gun including three electrodes with focusing, gate and cathode electrodes. Using this system, we obtained high-resolution X-ray images accelerated at 42-70 kV voltage by digital switching control between emitter and ground electrode.

  7. Highly stable carbon nanotube field emitters on small metal tips against electrical arcing for miniature X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jun Mok; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Hyun Nam; Raza, Hamid Saeed; Cho, Sung Oh

    2015-01-01

    If CNT emitters are operated at a high voltage or at a high electric field, electrical arcing (or vacuum breakdown) can occur. Arcing can be initiated by the removed CNTs, impurities on the CNTs or substrates, protrusion of CNTs, low operating vacuum, and a very high electric field. Since arcing is accompanied with a very high current flow and it can produce plasma channel near the emitter, CNTs are seriously damaged or sometimes CNTs are almost completely removed from the substrate by the arcing events. Detachment of CNTs from a substrate is an irreversible catastrophic phenomenon for a device operation. In addition to the detachment of CNTs, arcing induces a sudden voltage drop and thus device operation is stopped. The metal mixture strongly attached CNTs to the tip substrate. Due to the strong adhesion, CNT emitters could be pre-treated with electrical conditioning process without seriously damaging the CNTs even though many intense arcing events were induced at the small and sharp geometry of the tip substrate. Impurities that were loosely bound to the substrates were almost removed and CNTs heights became uniform after the electrical conditioning process

  8. Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes: A better field emitter and stable nanofluid with better thermal conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, S.K.; Jha, A. [School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Chattopadhyay, K.K., E-mail: kalyan_chattopadhyay@yahoo.com [Thin Film & Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs). • Improved dispersion enhanced thermal conductivity of engine oil. • Again f-a-CNTs showed enhanced field emission property compared to pure a-CNTs. - Abstract: Amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) were synthesized at low temperature in open atmosphere and further functionalized by treating them in thionyl chloride added stearic acid-dichloro methane solution. The as prepared functionalized a-CNTs (f-a-CNTs) were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The nanofluid was prepared by dispersing f-a-CNTs in engine oil using ultrasonic treatment. The effective thermal conductivity of as prepared nanofluid was investigated at different loading (volume fraction of f-a-CNTs). Obtained experimental data of thermal conductivity were compared with the predicted values, calculated using existing theoretical models. Stability of the nanofluid was tested by means of zeta potential measurement to optimize the loading. The as prepared f-a-CNTs sample also showed improved field emission result as compared to pristine a-CNTs. Dependence of field emission behavior on inter electrode distance was investigated too.

  9. Enhancement of electron emission and long-term stability of tip-type carbon nanotube field emitters via lithium coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Pil; Chang, Han-Beet; Kim, Bu-Jong; Park, Jin-Seok

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were deposited on conical tip-type substrates via electrophoresis and coated with lithium (Li) thin films with diverse thicknesses via electroplating. For the as-deposited (i.e., without Li coating) CNT, the turn-on (or triggering) electric field was 0.92 V/μm, and the emission current, which was generated at an applied field of 1.2 V/μm was 56 μA. In the case of the 4.7 nm-thick Li-coated CNT, the turn-on field decreased to 0.65 V/μm and the emission current at the same applied field increased more than ten times to 618 μA. The analysis based on the Kelvin probe measurement and Fowler–Nordheim theory indicated that the coating of Li caused a loss in the structural-aspect-ratio of the CNTs and it reduced their effective work functions from 5.36 eV to 4.90 eV, which led to a great improvement of their electron emission characteristics. The results obtained in this study also showed that the long-term emission stability could be enhanced by the coating of thin Li films on CNTs. - Highlights: ► CNTs are deposited via electrophoretic deposition (EPD). ► Thin films of Li are coated on CNTs via electroplating, without plasma damage. ► Li coating enhanced field emission properties and emission stability of CNTs. ► The effective work functions and field enhancement factors of CNTs are evaluated

  10. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube field emitter arrays with Ohmic base contact to silicon by Fe-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morassutto, M.; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Smithers, M.A.; Smithers, M.A.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, dense arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes are obtained by thermal catalytic chemical vapor deposition, using Fe catalyst dispersed on a thin Ta layer. Alignment of the carbon nanotubes depends on the original Fe layer thickness from which the catalyst dispersion is obtained by

  11. Study of Thermal-Field Emission Properties and Investigation of Temperature dependent Noise in the Emission Current form vertical Carbon nanotube emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Kolekar, Sadhu; Patole, Shashikant P.; Patil, Sumati; Yoo, J.B.; Dharmadhikari, C.V.

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated temperature dependent field electron emission characteristics of vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The generalized expression for electron emission from well defined cathode surface is given by Millikan and Lauritsen [1

  12. Shielding in ungated field emitter arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J. R. [U.S. Navy Reserve, Navy Operational Support Center New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana 70143 (United States); Jensen, K. L. [Code 6854, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Shiffler, D. A. [Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Petillo, J. J. [Leidos, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821 (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Cathodes consisting of arrays of high aspect ratio field emitters are of great interest as sources of electron beams for vacuum electronic devices. The desire for high currents and current densities drives the cathode designer towards a denser array, but for ungated emitters, denser arrays also lead to increased shielding, in which the field enhancement factor β of each emitter is reduced due to the presence of the other emitters in the array. To facilitate the study of these arrays, we have developed a method for modeling high aspect ratio emitters using tapered dipole line charges. This method can be used to investigate proximity effects from similar emitters an arbitrary distance away and is much less computationally demanding than competing simulation approaches. Here, we introduce this method and use it to study shielding as a function of array geometry. Emitters with aspect ratios of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} are modeled, and the shielding-induced reduction in β is considered as a function of tip-to-tip spacing for emitter pairs and for large arrays with triangular and square unit cells. Shielding is found to be negligible when the emitter spacing is greater than the emitter height for the two-emitter array, or about 2.5 times the emitter height in the large arrays, in agreement with previously published results. Because the onset of shielding occurs at virtually the same emitter spacing in the square and triangular arrays, the triangular array is preferred for its higher emitter density at a given emitter spacing. The primary contribution to shielding in large arrays is found to come from emitters within a distance of three times the unit cell spacing for both square and triangular arrays.

  13. Surface-conduction electron-emitter characteristics and fabrication based on vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Yi-Ting [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Li, Kuan-Wei [Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Honda, Shin-ichi [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Lin, Pao-Hung; Huang, Ying-Sheng [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Lee, Kuei-Yi, E-mail: kylee@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2017-06-01

    Graphical abstract: The pattern design provides a new structure of surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED). Delta-star shaped vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays with 20o tips can simultaneously provide three emitters to bombard the sides of equilateral triangles pattern of VACNT, which produces numerous secondary electrons and enhance the SED efficiency. - Highlights: • The carbon nanotube (CNT) has replaced palladium oxide (PdO) as the electrode material for surface-conduction electron-emitter (SCE) applications. • The vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays with 20° tips of the delta-star arrangement are used as cathodes that easily emit electrons. The cathode pattern simultaneously provides three emitters to bombard the sides of equilateral triangles pattern of VACNT. • The VACNT arrays were covered with magnesium oxide (MgO) nanostructures to promote the surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED) efficiency (η). • The η was stably maintained in the 75–85% range. The proposed design provides a facile new method for developing SED applications. - Abstract: The carbon nanotube (CNT) has replaced palladium oxide (PdO) as the electrode material for surface-conduction electron-emitter (SCE) applications. Vertically aligned CNT arrays with a delta-star arrangement were patterned and synthesized onto a quartz substrate using photolithography and thermal chemical vapor deposition. Delta-star shaped VACNT arrays with 20° tips are used as cathodes that easily emit electrons because of their high electrical field gradient. In order to improve the field emission and secondary electrons (SEs) in SCE applications, magnesium oxide (MgO) nanostructures were coated onto the VACNT arrays to promote the surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED) efficiency (η). According to the definition of η in SCE applications, in this study, the η was stably maintained in the 75–85% range. The proposed design provides a facile new method for

  14. Simple-to-prepare multipoint field emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sominskii, G. G.; Taradaev, E. P.; Tumareva, T. A.; Mishin, M. V.; Kornishin, S. Yu.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate multitip field emitters prepared by electroerosion treatment of the surface of molybdenum samples. Their characteristics are determined for operation with a protecting activated fullerene coating. Our experiments indicate that such cathodes are promising for high-voltage electron devices operating in technical vacuum.

  15. Infrared Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Carbon Nanotube Emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Arko; Murawski, Caroline; Zakharko, Yuriy; Zaumseil, Jana; Gather, Malte C

    2018-03-01

    While organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) covering all colors of the visible spectrum are widespread, suitable organic emitter materials in the near-infrared (nIR) beyond 800 nm are still lacking. Here, the first OLED based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the emitter is demonstrated. By using a multilayer stacked architecture with matching charge blocking and charge-transport layers, narrow-band electroluminescence at wavelengths between 1000 and 1200 nm is achieved, with spectral features characteristic of excitonic and trionic emission of the employed (6,5) SWCNTs. Here, the OLED performance is investigated in detail and it is found that local conduction hot-spots lead to pronounced trion emission. Analysis of the emissive dipole orientation shows a strong horizontal alignment of the SWCNTs with an average inclination angle of 12.9° with respect to the plane, leading to an exceptionally high outcoupling efficiency of 49%. The SWCNT-based OLEDs represent a highly attractive platform for emission across the entire nIR. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Source brightness and useful beam current of carbon nanotubes and other very small emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruit, P.; Bezuijen, M.; Barth, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    The potential application of carbon nanotubes as electron sources in electron microscopes is analyzed. The resolution and probe current that can be obtained from a carbon nanotube emitter in a low-voltage scanning electron microscope are calculated and compared to the state of the art using Schottky electron sources. Many analytical equations for probe-size versus probe-current relations in different parameter regimes are obtained. It is shown that for most carbon nanotube emitters, the gun lens aberrations are larger than the emitters' virtual source size and thus restrict the microscope's performance. The result is that the advantages of the higher brightness of nanotube emitters are limited unless the angular emission current is increased over present day values or the gun lens aberrations are decreased. For some nanotubes with a closed cap, it is known that the emitted electron beam is coherent over the full emission cone. We argue that for such emitters the parameter ''brightness'' becomes meaningless. The influence of phase variations in the electron wave front emitted from such a nanotube emitter on the focusing of the electron beam is analyzed

  17. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube emitter on metal foil for medical X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Je Hwang; Kim, Wan Sun; Lee, Seung Ho; Eom, Young Ju; Park, Hun Kuk; Park, Kyu Chang

    2013-10-01

    A simple method is proposed for growing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on metal foil using the triode direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The carbon nanotube (CNT) electron emitter was fabricated using fewer process steps with an acid treated metal substrate. The CNT emitter was used for X-ray generation, and the X-ray image of mouse's joint was obtained with an anode current of 0.5 mA at an anode bias of 60 kV. The simple fabrication of a well-aligned CNT with a protection layer on metal foil, and its X-ray application, were studied.

  18. Hafnium carbide nanocrystal chains for field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Song; Li, Hejun; Zhang, Yulei; Ren, Jincui; Qiang, Xinfa; Zhang, Shouyang

    2014-01-01

    A hafnium carbide (HfC) nanostructure, i.e., HfC nanocrystal chain, was synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. X-ray diffractometer, field-emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer were employed to characterize the product. The synthesized one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with many faceted octahedral nanocrystals possess diameters of tens of nanometers to 500 nm and lengths of a few microns. The chain-like structures possess a single crystalline structure and preferential growth direction along the [1 0 0] crystal orientation. The growth of the chains occurred through the vapor–liquid–solid process along with a negative-feedback mechanism. The field emission (FE) properties of the HfC nanocrystal chains as the cold cathode emitters were examined. The HfC nanocrystal chains display good FE properties with a low turn-on field of about 3.9 V μm −1 and a high field enhancement factor of 2157, implying potential applications in vacuum microelectronics.

  19. Special features of electron sources with CNT field emitter and micro grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, Wolfram; Schleussner, Detlef

    2005-01-01

    A micro-sized electron source plays an important role for new vacuum triode applications. For these applications, an electron source with CNT field emitter and micro grid for 1 mA was developed and investigated. The miniaturisation of the electron source was achieved by the use of a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitter and a micro grid, with a distance of only a few micrometers. Because of the threshold field strength for field emission of CNTs being in the range 1-5 V/μm, the grid voltage can be lower than 100 V. In our contribution, we discuss the influence of the micro grid on electron source properties, especially anode-current hysteresis, anode-field penetration through the micro grid and micro-lensing effect

  20. Simulation and fabrication of carbon nanotubes field emission pressure sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Kaiyou; Chen Ting; Yan Bingyong; Lin Yangkui; Xu Dong; Sun Zhuo; Cai Bingchu

    2006-01-01

    A novel field emission pressure sensor has been achieved utilizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the electron source. The sensor consists of the anode sensing film fabricated by wet etching process and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) cathode in the micro-vacuum chamber. MWNTs on the silicon substrate were grown by thermal CVD. The prototype pressure sensor has a measured sensitivity of about 0.17-0.77 nA/Pa (101-550 KPa). The work shows the potential use of CNTs-based field-emitter in microsensors, such as accelerometers and tactile sensors

  1. Graphene field emitters: A review of fabrication, characterization and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Leifeng, E-mail: chlf@hdu.edu.cn [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yu, Hu; Zhong, Jiasong; Song, Lihui [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Wu, Jun, E-mail: wujun@hdu.edu.cn [Institute of Electron Device & Application, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310018 (China); Su, Weitao [College of Materials and Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • The preparation, characterization and field emission properties for Gs are reviewed. • The review provides an updated progress on design and construction of Gs field emitters. • The review offers fundamental insights into understanding and design of Gs emitters. • The review can broach the subject and inspire readers in field of Gs based emitters. - Abstract: Graphenes are beneficial to electrons field emission due to its high aspect ratio, high carrier density, the larger carrier mobility, excellent electrical and thermal conductivity, excellent mechanical strength and chemical stability. In recent years, graphene or reduced oxide graphene field emitters have been successfully constructed by various methods such as chemical vapor deposition, chemical exfoliation, electrophoretic deposition, screen-printing and chemical synthesis methods. Graphene emitters are tried to construct in distribution with some angles or vertical orientation with respect to the substrate surface. The vertical alignment of graphene sheets or edges arrays can facilitate efficient electron emission from the atomically thick sheets. Therefore they have even more a low turn-on and threshold-field electronic field, high field enhancement factor, high current stability and high luminance. In this review, we shortly survey and discuss recent research progress in graphene field emission properties with particular an emphasis on their preparing method, characterization and applications in devices especially for vertical graphene and single layer graphene, also including their challenges and future prospects.

  2. Current-voltage characteristics of carbon nanostructured field emitters in different power supply modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, E. O.; Kolosko, A. G.; Filippov, S. V.; Romanov, P. A.; Terukov, E. I.; Shchegolkov, A. V.; Tkachev, A. G.

    2017-12-01

    We received and compared the current-voltage characteristics of large-area field emitters based on nanocomposites with graphene and nanotubes. The characteristics were measured in two high voltage scanning modes: the "slow" and the "fast". Correlation between two types of hysteresis observed in these regimes was determined. Conditions for transition from "reverse" hysteresis to the "direct" one were experimentally defined. Analysis of the eight-shaped hysteresis was provided with calculation of the effective emission parameters. The phenomenological model of adsorption-desorption processes in the field emission system was proposed.

  3. Design and fabrication of carbon nanotube field-emission cathode with coaxial gate and ballast resistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yonghai; Yeow, John T W; Jaffray, David A

    2013-10-25

    A low density vertically aligned carbon nanotube-based field-emission cathode with a ballast resistor and coaxial gate is designed and fabricated. The ballast resistor can overcome the non-uniformity of the local field-enhancement factor at the emitter apex. The self-aligned fabrication process of the coaxial gate can avoid the effects of emitter tip misalignment and height non-uniformity. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Field emission of carbon nanotubes grown on nickel substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yemin; Huo Kaifu; Chen Hong; Lu Yinong; Xu Li; Hu Zheng; Chen Yi

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been synthesized directly on the electrically conducting nickel substrate without additional catalyst. Field emission properties of the as-prepared sample were characterized using parallel plate diode configurations. It was observed that the field emission qualitatively follows the conventional Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) theory from the straight line of ln(I/V 2 ) versus 1/V plot at the high applied field region. The uniformity and stability of the electron emission have also been examined. The low electron turn-on field (E to ) and high emission current density indicates the potential applications of this new CNT-based emitter

  5. Spectrum of classes of point emitters of electromagnetic wave fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Román

    2016-09-01

    The spectrum of classes of point emitters has been introduced as a numerical tool suitable for the design, analysis, and synthesis of non-paraxial optical fields in arbitrary states of spatial coherence. In this paper, the polarization state of planar electromagnetic wave fields is included in the spectrum of classes, thus increasing its modeling capabilities. In this context, optical processing is realized as a filtering on the spectrum of classes of point emitters, performed by the complex degree of spatial coherence and the two-point correlation of polarization, which could be implemented dynamically by using programmable optical devices.

  6. A compact electron gun using field emitter array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asakawa, M.R.; Ikeda, A.; Miyabe, N.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kusaba, M.; Tsunawaki, Y.

    2008-01-01

    A compact electron gun using field emitter array has been developed. With a simple triode configuration consisting of FEA, mid-electrode and anode electrode, the electron gun produces a parallel beam with a diameter of 0.5 mm. This electron gun is applicable for compact radiation sources such as Cherenkov free-electron lasers

  7. Field emission from individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes prepared in an electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, N.; van Druten, N.J.

    2003-01-01

    Individual multiwalled carbon nanotube field emitters were prepared in a scanning electron microscope. The angular current density, energy spectra, and the emission stability of the field-emitted electrons were measured. An estimate of the electron source brightness was extracted from the

  8. Large-scale aligned silicon carbonitride nanotube arrays: Synthesis, characterization, and field emission property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, L.; Xu, Z.; Liu, K. H.; Wang, W. L.; Liu, S.; Bai, X. D.; Wang, E. G.; Li, J. C.; Liu, C.

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale aligned silicon carbonitride (SiCN) nanotube arrays have been synthesized by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition using SiH 4 , CH 4 , and N 2 as precursors. The three elements of Si, C, and N are chemically bonded with each other and the nanotube composition can be adjusted by varying the SiH 4 concentration, as revealed by electron energy loss spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The evolution of microstructure of the SiCN nanotubes with different Si concentrations was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The dependence of field emission characteristics of the SiCN nanotubes on the composition has been investigated. With the increasing Si concentration, the SiCN nanotube exhibits more favorable oxidation resistance, which suggests that SiCN nanotube is a promising candidate as stable field emitter

  9. High performance bulk metallic glass/carbon nanotube composite cathodes for electron field emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojati-Talemi, Pejman; Gibson, Mark A.; East, Daniel; Simon, George P.

    2011-01-01

    We report the preparation of new nanocomposites based on a combination of bulk metallic glass and carbon nanotubes for electron field emission applications. The use of bulk metallic glass as the matrix ensures high electrical and thermal conductivity, high thermal stability, and ease of processing, whilst the well dispersed carbon nanotubes act as highly efficient electron emitters. These advantages, alongside excellent electron emission properties, make these composites one of the best reported options for electron emission applications to date.

  10. High performance bulk metallic glass/carbon nanotube composite cathodes for electron field emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojati-Talemi, Pejman [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Vic 3800 (Australia); Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Gibson, Mark A. [Process Science and Engineering, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Clayton, Vic 3168 (Australia); East, Daniel; Simon, George P. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Vic 3800 (Australia)

    2011-11-07

    We report the preparation of new nanocomposites based on a combination of bulk metallic glass and carbon nanotubes for electron field emission applications. The use of bulk metallic glass as the matrix ensures high electrical and thermal conductivity, high thermal stability, and ease of processing, whilst the well dispersed carbon nanotubes act as highly efficient electron emitters. These advantages, alongside excellent electron emission properties, make these composites one of the best reported options for electron emission applications to date.

  11. Laser-assisted electron emission from gated field-emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, H; Yokoo, K; Mimura, H; Shimawaki, H; Hosono, A

    2002-01-01

    Enhancement of electron emission by illumination of gated field-emitters was studied using a 100 mW cw YAG laser at a wavelength of 532 nm, intensities up to 10 sup 7 W/m sup 2 and mechanically chopped with a rise time of 4 mu s. When shining an array of 640 silicon emitters, the emission current responded quickly to on-off of the laser. The increase of the emission current was proportional to the basic emission current at low gate voltages, but it was saturated at approx 3 mu A as the basic current approached 100 mu A with the increase of gate voltage. The emission increase was proportional to the square root of laser power at low gate voltages and to the laser power at elevated gate voltages. For 1- and 3-tip silicon emitters, the rise and fall of the current due to on-off of the laser showed a significant time lag. The magnitude of emission increase was independent of the position of laser spot on the emitter base and reached 2 mu A at a basic current of 5 mu A without showing signs of saturation. The mech...

  12. Tellurium adsorption on tungsten and molybdenum field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, R.A.; Kiwanga, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    Studies of the adsorption of tellurium onto tungsten and molybdenum field emitters are described and the results obtained are compared with those obtained in previous work on the adsorption of silicon and selenium. The adsorption of Te onto W was found to be much more uniform than in the case of Se. Although Te is metallic in many of its properties its adsorptive behavior on field emitters is found to be similar to that of selenium and these adsorptive properties are basically common to all semiconductors. The most evident property of these adsorbates is that the work function and emission current decrease simultaneously at coverages of less than half a monolayer and the work function subsequently increases. (B.D.)

  13. Multi-gated field emitters for a micro-column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimura, Hidenori; Kioke, Akifumi; Aoki, Toru; Neo, Yoichiro; Yoshida, Tomoya; Nagao, Masayoshi

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a multi-gated field emitter (FE) such as a quadruple-gated FE with a three-stacked electrode lens and a quintuple-gated FE with a four-stacked electrode lens. Both the FEs can focus the electron beam. However, the quintuple-gated FE has a stronger electron convergence than the quadruple-gated FE, and a beam crossover is clearly observed for the quintuple-gated FE.

  14. Ion production from LiF-coated field emitter tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pregenzer, A.L.; Bieg, K.W.; Olson, R.E.; Panitz, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Ion emission has been obtained from a LiF-coated tungsten field-emitter tip. Ion formation is thought to be caused by the high electric field experienced by the LiF. At the time of emission the electric field at the surface of the LiF is calculated to be on the order of 100 MV/cm. Inside the LiF the field is on the order of 10 MV/cm. These fields exceed the value needed to produce bulk dielectric breakdown in LiF. The surface field is of sufficient magnitude to produce ion emission by field evaporation from the crystal surface. Even prior to dielectric breakdown, precursor processes can lead to ion formation. Electric-field-stress fragmentation of the LiF layer is thought to occur, followed by ionization of the fragments

  15. Low Emittance Gun Project based on Field Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Ganter, Romain; Dehler, M; Gobrecht, Jens; Gough, Chris; Ingold, Gerhard; Leemann, Simon C; Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Paraliev, Martin; Pedrozzi, Marco; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Schlott, Volker; Sehr, Harald; Streun, Andreas; Wrulich, Albin F; Zelenika, Sasa

    2004-01-01

    The design of an electron gun capable of producing beam emittance one order of magnitude lower than current technology would reduce considerably the cost and size of a free electron laser emitting at 0.1nm. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) including a gate and a focusing layer are an attractive technology for such high brightness sources. Electrons are extracted from micrometric tips thanks to voltage pulses between gate and tips. The focusing layer should then reduce the initial divergence of each emitted beamlets. This FEA will be inserted in a high gradient diode configuration coupled with a radiofrequency structure. In the diode part very high electric field pulses (several hundreds of MV/m) will limit the degradation of emittance due to space charge effect. This first acceleration will be obtained with high voltage pulses (typically a megavolt in a few hundred of nanoseconds) synchronized with the low voltage pulses applied to the FEA (typically one hundred of volts in one nanosecond at frequency below kilohe...

  16. The effects of emitter-tied field plates on lateral PNP ionizing radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnaby, H.J.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Cirba, C.R.; Pease, R.L.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Kosier, S.L.

    1998-03-01

    Radiation response comparisons of lateral PNP bipolar technologies reveal that device hardening may be achieved by extending the emitter contact over the active base. The emitter-tied field plate suppresses recombination of carriers with interface traps

  17. Discrete space charge affected field emission: Flat and hemisphere emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Kevin L., E-mail: kevin.jensen@nrl.navy.mil [Code 6854, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Shiffler, Donald A.; Tang, Wilkin [Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Rittersdorf, Ian M. [Code 6770, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lebowitz, Joel L. [Department of Mathematics and Department of Physics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States); Harris, John R. [U.S. Navy Reserve, New Orleans, Louisiana 70143 (United States); Lau, Y. Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Petillo, John J. [Leidos, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821 (United States); Luginsland, John W. [Physics and Electronics Directorate, AFOSR, Arlington, Virginia 22203 (United States)

    2015-05-21

    Models of space-charge affected thermal-field emission from protrusions, able to incorporate the effects of both surface roughness and elongated field emitter structures in beam optics codes, are desirable but difficult. The models proposed here treat the meso-scale diode region separate from the micro-scale regions characteristic of the emission sites. The consequences of discrete emission events are given for both one-dimensional (sheets of charge) and three dimensional (rings of charge) models: in the former, results converge to steady state conditions found by theory (e.g., Rokhlenko et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 107, 014904 (2010)]) but show oscillatory structure as they do. Surface roughness or geometric features are handled using a ring of charge model, from which the image charges are found and used to modify the apex field and emitted current. The roughness model is shown to have additional constraints related to the discrete nature of electron charge. The ability of a unit cell model to treat field emitter structures and incorporate surface roughness effects inside a beam optics code is assessed.

  18. Controlling the diameters and field emission properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Yool; Kang, Young Il; Cho, Kyoung Ik; Choi, Kyu Seok; Kim, Do Jin

    2001-01-01

    We report here the synthesis of vertically well-aligned carbon nanotubes and the effect of catalytic metal layer on the diameter of grown carbon nanotubes and the field emission characteristics of them, The carbon nanotubes were grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition at temperatures below 900 .deg. C on Fe metal catalytic layer, deposited by sputtering process on a Si substrate and pretreated by heat and NH 3 gas. We found that the thickness of metal layers could be an important parameter in controlling the diameters of carbon nanotubes. With varying the thickness of the metal layers the grain sizes of them also vary so that the diameters of the nanotubes could be controlled. Field emission measurement has been made on the carbon nanotube field emitters at room temperature in a vacuum chamber below 10 -6 Torr. Our vertically aligned carbon nanotube field emitter of the smallest diameter emits a current density about 10 mA/cm 2 at 7.2 V/μm. The field emission property of the carbon nanotubes shows strong dependence on the nanotube diameters as expected

  19. Electron field emission characteristics of carbon nanotube on tungsten tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan Ngoc Hong; Bui Hung Thang; Nguyen Tuan Hong; Phan Ngoc Minh; Lee, Soonil

    2009-01-01

    Electron field emission characteristic of carbon nanotubes on tungsten tip was investigated in 2x10 -6 Torr vacuum. The measurement results showed that the CNTs/W tip could emit electron at 0.7 V/μm (nearly 10 times lower than that of the W tip itself) and reach up to 26 μA at the electric field of 1 V/μm. The emission characteristic follows the Fowler-Nordheim mechanism. Analysis of the emission characteristic showed that the CNTs/W tip has a very high value of field enhancement factor (β = 4.1 x 10 4 cm -1 ) that is much higher than that of the tungsten tip itself. The results confirmed the excellent field emission behavior of the CNTs materials and the CNTs/W tip is a prospective candidate for advanced electron field emitter.

  20. Field emission response from multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown on electrochemically engineered copper foil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, Amit Kumar; Jain, Vaibhav [Nanomaterials and Applications Lab., Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, 247667, Uttarakhand (India); Saini, Krishna [Nanomaterials and Applications Lab., Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, 247667, Uttarakhand (India); Centre of Excellence: Nanotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, 247667, Uttarakhand (India); Lahiri, Indranil, E-mail: indrafmt@iitr.ac.in [Nanomaterials and Applications Lab., Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, 247667, Uttarakhand (India); Centre of Excellence: Nanotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee, 247667, Uttarakhand (India)

    2017-02-01

    Exciting properties of carbon nanotube has proven it to be a promising candidate for field emission applications, if its processing cost can be reduced effectively. In this research, a new electrochemical technique is proposed for growing carbon nanotubes in selective areas by thermal chemical vapour deposition. In this process, electrochemical processing is used to create localized pits and deposition of catalysts, which act as roots to support growth and alignment of the CNTs on copper substrate. CNTs grown thus were characterized and studied using scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy, elucidating presence of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). These CNT emitters have comparatively lower turn-on field and higher field enhancement factor. - Highlights: • Electrochemical pitting for localized carbon nanotube growth is proposed. • Electrochemical pitting method shows patterning effect on the substrate. • Size and density of pits depend on voltage, pH and temperature. • CNTs thus grown shows good field emission response.

  1. Field emitters with low turn on electric field based on carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qilong; Mu Hui; Zhang Xiaobing; Lei Wei; Wang Jinchan; Zhao Hongping

    2007-01-01

    Field emitters of vertical carbon fibers on a silicon substrate are fabricated by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. After an ageing process of 150 min, field emission measurement of the fibers is carried out in a vacuum chamber with a base pressure of 5.0 x 10 -4 Pa. The experimental results display that field emission performance of the carbon fibers depends strongly on the vacuum level during the experiments. After the field emission measurement, damage to the carbon fiber field emitters is observed from the scanning electron microscopic images

  2. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingqi; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Qingxiao; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Zhihong; Zhang, Xixiang; Abutaha, Anas I.; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2012-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) have been developed using pure semiconducting carbon nanotubes. The source and drain were vertically stacked, separated by a dielectric, and the carbon nanotubes were placed

  3. Field Emitter Arrays for a Free Electron Laser Application

    CERN Document Server

    Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Ganter, Romain; Gobrecht, Jens; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Wrulich, Albin F

    2004-01-01

    The development of a new electron gun with the lowest possible emittance would help reducing the total length and cost of a free electron laser. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are an attractive technology for electron sources of ultra high brightness. Indeed, several thousands of microscopic tips can be deposited on a 1 mm diameter area. Electrons are then extracted by applying voltage to a first grid layer close to the tip apexes, the so called gate layer, and focused by a second grid layer one micrometer above the tips. The typical aperture diameter of the gate and the focusing layer is in the range of one micrometer. One challenge for such cathodes is to produce peak currents in the ampere range since the usual applications of FEAs require less than milliampere. Encouraging peak current performances have been obtained by applying voltage pulses at low frequency between gate and tips. In this paper we report on different tip materials available on the market: diamond FEAs from Extreme Devices Inc., ZrC single ...

  4. Field emission characteristics of a small number of carbon fiber emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkin W. Tang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports an experiment that studies the emission characteristics of small number of field emitters. The experiment consists of nine carbon fibers in a square configuration. Experimental results show that the emission characteristics depend strongly on the separation between each emitter, providing evidence of the electric field screening effects. Our results indicate that as the separation between the emitters decreases, the emission current for a given voltage also decreases. The authors compare the experimental results to four carbon fiber emitters in a linear and square configurations as well as to two carbon fiber emitters in a paired array. Voltage-current traces show that the turn-on voltage is always larger for the nine carbon fiber emitters as compared to the two and four emitters in linear configurations, and approximately identical to the four emitters in a square configuration. The observations and analysis reported here, based on Fowler-Nordheim field emission theory, suggest the electric field screening effect depends critically on the number of emitters, the separation between them, and their overall geometric configuration.

  5. Chemically doped three-dimensional porous graphene monoliths for high-performance flexible field emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho Young; Jeong, Sooyeon; Jeong, Seung Yol; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Han, Joong Tark; Jeong, Mun Seok; Lee, Geon-Woong; Jeong, Hee Jin

    2015-03-12

    Despite the recent progress in the fabrication of field emitters based on graphene nanosheets, their morphological and electrical properties, which affect their degree of field enhancement as well as the electron tunnelling barrier height, should be controlled to allow for better field-emission properties. Here we report a method that allows the synthesis of graphene-based emitters with a high field-enhancement factor and a low work function. The method involves forming monolithic three-dimensional (3D) graphene structures by freeze-drying of a highly concentrated graphene paste and subsequent work-function engineering by chemical doping. Graphene structures with vertically aligned edges were successfully fabricated by the freeze-drying process. Furthermore, their number density could be controlled by varying the composition of the graphene paste. Al- and Au-doped 3D graphene emitters were fabricated by introducing the corresponding dopant solutions into the graphene sheets. The resulting field-emission characteristics of the resulting emitters are discussed. The synthesized 3D graphene emitters were highly flexible, maintaining their field-emission properties even when bent at large angles. This is attributed to the high crystallinity and emitter density and good chemical stability of the 3D graphene emitters, as well as to the strong interactions between the 3D graphene emitters and the substrate.

  6. Tellurium adsorption on single crystal faces of molybdenum and tungsten field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, R.A.; Kiwanga, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this letter is to report the extension of previous studies of Te adsorption on Mo and W field emitters to measurements on single crystal planes. The adsorption of semiconductors on metallic emitters has been found to be characterized by simultaneous decreases in emission current and the Fowler-Nordheim work function for adsorbate coverages of less than a monolayer. (Auth.)

  7. Room-temperature deposition of diamond-like carbon field emitter on flexible substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.; Iliev, M.N.; Liu, J.R.; Ma, K.B.; Chu, W.-K.; Badi, N.; Bensaoula, A.; Svedberg, E.B.

    2006-01-01

    Room-temperature fabrication of diamond-like carbon electron field emitters on flexible polyimide substrate is reported. These thin film field emitters are made using an Ar gas cluster ion beam assisted C 6 vapor deposition method. The bond structure of the as-deposited diamond-like carbon film was studied using Raman spectroscopy. The field emission characteristics of the deposited films were also measured. Electron current densities over 15 mA/cm 2 have been recorded under an electrical field of about 65 V/μm. These diamond-like carbon field emitters are easy and inexpensive to fabricate. The results are promising for flexible field-emission fabrication without the need of complex patterning and tip shaping as compared to the Spindt-type field emitters

  8. Schottky’s conjecture, field emitters, and the point charge model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin L. Jensen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A Point Charge Model of conical field emitters, in which the emitter is defined by an equipotential surface of judiciously placed charges over a planar conductor, is used to confirm Schottky’s conjecture that field enhancement factors are multiplicative for a small protrusion placed on top of a larger base structure. Importantly, it is shown that Schottky’s conjecture for conical / ellipsoidal field emitters remains unexpectedly valid even when the dimensions of the protrusion begin to approach the dimensions of the base structure. The model is analytic and therefore the methodology is extensible to other configurations.

  9. Macroscopic electrical field distribution and field-induced surface stresses of needle-shaped field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moy, Charles K.S., E-mail: charles.moy@sydney.edu.au [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ranzi, Gianluca [ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Petersen, Timothy C. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ringer, Simon P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2011-05-15

    One major concern since the development of the field ion microscope is the mechanical strength of the specimens. The macroscopic shape of the imaging tip greatly influences field-induced stresses and there is merit in further study of this phenomenon from a classical perspective. Understanding the geometrical, as opposed to localized electronic, factors that affect the stress might improve the quality and success rate of atom probe experiments. This study uses macroscopic electrostatic principles and finite element modelling to investigate field-induced stresses in relation to the shape of the tip. Three two-dimensional idealized models are considered, namely hyperbolic, parabolic and sphere-on-orthogonal-cone; the shapes of which are compared to experimental tips prepared by electro-polishing. Three dimensional morphologies of both a nano-porous and single-crystal aluminium tip are measured using electron tomography to quantitatively test the assumption of cylindrical symmetry for electro-polished tips. The porous tip was prepared and studied to demonstrate a fragile specimen for which such finite element studies could determine potential mechanical failure, prior to any exhaustive atom probe investigation. -- Research highlights: {yields} We use electrostatic principles and finite element to model field-induced stresses. {yields} We study two-dimensional idealized needle-shaped field emitters. {yields} Stress distribution of hyperbolic, parabolic and sphere-on-orthogonal-cone tips mapped. {yields} Electron tomography to obtain the morphology of three-dimensional aluminium tips. {yields} Studies of the morphology of the porous tip demonstrate a fragile specimen.

  10. Field electron emission from branched nanotubes film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Baoqing; Tian Shikai; Yang Zhonghai

    2005-01-01

    We describe the preparation and analyses of films composed of branched carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNTs were grown on a Ni catalyst film using chemical vapor deposition from a gas containing acetylene. From scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analyses, the branched structure of the CNTs was determined; the field emission characteristics in a vacuum chamber indicated a lower turn on field for branched CNTs than normal CNTs

  11. Analytical and numerical study of New field emitter processing for superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Vladimir; Petrov, Victor

    2018-02-01

    In this article a scientific prove for a new technology to maximize the accelerating gradient in superconducting cavities by processing on higher order mode frequencies is presented. As dominant energy source the heating of field emitters by an induced rf current (rf-heating) is considered. The field emitter structure is assumed to be a chain of conductive particles, which are formed by attractive forces.

  12. Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes over vertically aligned silicon nanowire bundles for achieving uniform field emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yung-Jr; Huang, Yung-Jui; Chang, Hsuan-Chen; Lee, Kuei-Yi; Lee, San-Liang

    2014-01-01

    A fabrication strategy is proposed to enable precise coverage of as-grown carbon nanotube (CNT) mats atop vertically aligned silicon nanowire (VA-SiNW) bundles in order to realize a uniform bundle array of CNT-SiNW heterojunctions over a large sample area. No obvious electrical degradation of as-fabricated SiNWs is observed according to the measured current-voltage characteristic of a two-terminal single-nanowire device. Bundle arrangement of CNT-SiNW heterojunctions is optimized to relax the electrostatic screening effect and to maximize the field enhancement factor. As a result, superior field emission performance and relatively stable emission current over 12 h is obtained. A bright and uniform fluorescent radiation is observed from CNT-SiNW-based field emitters regardless of its bundle periodicity, verifying the existence of high-density and efficient field emitters on the proposed CNT-SiNW bundle arrays.

  13. Relation between field energy and RMS emittance in intense particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangler, T.P.; Crandall, K.R.; Mills, R.S.; Reiser, M.

    1985-01-01

    An equation is presented for continuous beams with azimuthal symmetry and continuous linear focusing, which expresses a relationship between the rate of change for squared rms emittance and the rate of change for a quantity we call the nonlinear field energy. The nonlinear field energy depends on the shape of the charge distribution and corresponds to the residual field energy possessed by beams with nonuniform charge distributions. The equation can be integrated for the case of an rms matched beam to yield a formula for space-charge-induced emittance growth that we have tested numerically for a variety of initial distributions. The results provide a framework for discussing the scaling of rms emittance growth and an explanation for the well-established lower limit on output emittance. 15 refs., 4 figs

  14. Determining the field emitter temperature during laser irradiation in the pulsed laser atom probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellogg, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    Three methods are discussed for determining the field emitter temperature during laser irradiation in the recently developed Pulsed Laser Atom Probe. A procedure based on the reduction of the lattice evaporation field with increasing emitter temperature is found to be the most convenient and reliable method between 60 and 500 K. Calibration curves (plots of the evaporation field versus temperature) are presented for dc and pulsed field evaporation of W, Mo, and Rh. These results show directly the important influence of the evaporation rate on the temperature dependence of the evaporation field. The possibility of a temperature calibration based on the ionic charge state distribution of field evaporated lattice atoms is also discussed. The shift in the charge state distributions which occurs when the emitter temperature is increased and the applied field strength is decreased at a constant rate of evaporation is shown to be due to the changing field and not the changing temperature. Nevertheless, the emitter temperature can be deduced from the charge state distribution for a specified evaporation rate. Charge state distributions as a function of field strength and temperature are presented for the same three materials. Finally, a preliminary experiment is reported which shows that the emitter temperature can be determined from field ion microscope observations of single atom surface diffusion over low index crystal planes. This last calibration procedure is shown to be very useful at higher temperatures (>600 K) where the other two methods become unreliable

  15. Highly flexible and robust N-doped SiC nanoneedle field emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Shanliang

    2015-01-23

    Flexible field emission (FE) emitters, whose unique advantages are lightweight and conformable, promise to enable a wide range of technologies, such as roll-up flexible FE displays, e-papers and flexible light-emitting diodes. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time highly flexible SiC field emitters with low turn-on fields and excellent emission stabilities. n-Type SiC nanoneedles with ultra-sharp tips and tailored N-doping levels were synthesized via a catalyst-assisted pyrolysis process on carbon fabrics by controlling the gas mixture and cooling rate. The turn-on field, threshold field and current emission fluctuation of SiC nanoneedle emitters with an N-doping level of 7.58 at.% are 1.11 V μm-1, 1.55 V μm-1 and 8.1%, respectively, suggesting the best overall performance for such flexible field emitters. Furthermore, characterization of the FE properties under repeated bending cycles and different bending states reveal that the SiC field emitters are mechanically and electrically robust with unprecedentedly high flexibility and stabilities. These findings underscore the importance of concurrent morphology and composition controls in nanomaterial synthesis and establish SiC nanoneedles as the most promising candidate for flexible FE applications. © 2015 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.

  16. Highly flexible and robust N-doped SiC nanoneedle field emitters

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Shanliang; Ying, Pengzhan; Wang, Lin; Wei, Guodong; Gao, Fengmei; Zheng, Jinju; Shang, Minhui; Yang, Zuobao; Yang, Weiyou; Wu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Flexible field emission (FE) emitters, whose unique advantages are lightweight and conformable, promise to enable a wide range of technologies, such as roll-up flexible FE displays, e-papers and flexible light-emitting diodes. In this work, we demonstrate for the first time highly flexible SiC field emitters with low turn-on fields and excellent emission stabilities. n-Type SiC nanoneedles with ultra-sharp tips and tailored N-doping levels were synthesized via a catalyst-assisted pyrolysis process on carbon fabrics by controlling the gas mixture and cooling rate. The turn-on field, threshold field and current emission fluctuation of SiC nanoneedle emitters with an N-doping level of 7.58 at.% are 1.11 V μm-1, 1.55 V μm-1 and 8.1%, respectively, suggesting the best overall performance for such flexible field emitters. Furthermore, characterization of the FE properties under repeated bending cycles and different bending states reveal that the SiC field emitters are mechanically and electrically robust with unprecedentedly high flexibility and stabilities. These findings underscore the importance of concurrent morphology and composition controls in nanomaterial synthesis and establish SiC nanoneedles as the most promising candidate for flexible FE applications. © 2015 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.

  17. Growth of vertically aligned arrays of carbon nanotubes for high field emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D.; Lim, S.H.; Guilley, A.J.; Cojocaru, C.S.; Bouree, J.E.; Vila, L.; Ryu, J.H.; Park, K.C.; Jang, J.

    2008-01-01

    Vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes have been grown on Ni-coated silicon substrates, by using either direct current diode or triode plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition at low temperature (around 620 deg. C). Acetylene gas has been used as the carbon source while ammonia and hydrogen have been used for etching. However densely packed (∼ 10 9 cm -2 ) CNTs were obtained when the pressure was ∼ 100 Pa. The alignment of nanotubes is a necessary, but not a sufficient condition in order to get an efficient electron emission: the growth of nanotubes should be controlled along regular arrays, in order to minimize the electrostatic interactions between them. So a three dimensional numerical simulation has been developed to calculate the local electric field in the vicinity of the tips for a finite square array of nanotubes and thus to calculate the maximum of the electron emission current density as a function of the spacing between nanotubes. Finally the triode plasma-enhanced process combined with pre-patterned catalyst films (using different lithography techniques) has been chosen in order to grow regular arrays of aligned CNTs with different pitches in the micrometer range. The comparison between the experimental and the simulation data permits to define the most efficient CNT-based electron field emitters

  18. Carbon nanotubes growing on rapid thermal annealed Ni and their application to a triode-type field emission device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uh, Hyung Soo; Park, Sang Sik

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a new triode-type field emitter arrays using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as an electron emitter source. In the proposed structure, the gate electrode is located underneath the cathode electrode and the extractor electrode is surrounded by CNT emitters. CNTs were selectively grown on the patterned Ni catalyst layer by using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Vertically aligned CNTs were grown with gas mixture of acetylene and ammonia under external DC bias. Compared with a conventional under-gate structure, the proposed structure reduced the turn-on voltage by about 30%. In addition, with a view to controlling the density of CNTs, Ni catalyst thickness was varied and rapid thermal annealing (RTA) treatment was optionally adopted before CNT growth. With controlled Ni thickness and RTA condition, field emission efficiency was greatly improved by reducing the density of CNTs, which is due to the reduction of the electric field screening effect caused by dense CNTs

  19. Microelectrode for energy and current control of nanotip field electron emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lüneburg, S.; Müller, M.; Paarmann, A.; Ernstorfer, R.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging experiments and applications in electron microscopy, holography, and diffraction benefit from miniaturized electron guns for compact experimental setups. We present a highly compact microelectrode integrated field emitter that consists of a tungsten nanotip coated with a few micrometers thick polyimide film followed by a several nanometers thick gold film, both positioned behind the exposed emitter apex by approximately 10–30 μm. The control of the electric field strength at the nanometer scale tip apex allows suppression, extraction, and energy tuning of field-emitted electrons. The performance of the microelectrode is demonstrated experimentally and supported by numerical simulations

  20. Modeling of Diamond Field-Emitter-Arrays for high brightness photocathode applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Thomas; Huang, Chengkun; Piryatinski, Andrei; Lewellen, John; Nichols, Kimberly; Choi, Bo; Pavlenko, Vitaly; Shchegolkov, Dmitry; Nguyen, Dinh; Andrews, Heather; Simakov, Evgenya

    2017-10-01

    We propose to employ Diamond Field-Emitter-Arrays (DFEAs) as high-current-density ultra-low-emittance photocathodes for compact laser-driven dielectric accelerators capable of generating ultra-high brightness electron beams for advanced applications. We develop a semi-classical Monte-Carlo photoemission model for DFEAs that includes carriers' transport to the emitter surface and tunneling through the surface under external fields. The model accounts for the electronic structure size quantization affecting the transport and tunneling process within the sharp diamond tips. We compare this first principle model with other field emission models, such as the Child-Langmuir and Murphy-Good models. By further including effects of carrier photoexcitation, we perform simulations of the DFEAs' photoemission quantum yield and the emitted electron beam. Details of the theoretical model and validation against preliminary experimental data will be presented. Work ssupported by LDRD program at LANL.

  1. Electrophoretic deposition and field emission properties of patterned carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Haifeng; Song Hang; Li Zhiming; Yuan Guang; Jin Yixin

    2005-01-01

    Patterned carbon nanotubes on silicon substrates were obtained using electrophoretic method. The carbon nanotubes migrated towards the patterned silicon electrode in the electrophoresis suspension under the applied voltage. The carbon nanotubes arrays adhered well on the silicon substrates. The surface images of carbon nanotubes were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The field emission properties of the patterned carbon nanotubes were tested in a diode structure under a vacuum pressure below 5 x 10 -4 Pa. The measured emission area was about 1.0 mm 2 . The emission current density up to 30 mA/cm 2 at an electric field of 8 V/μm has been obtained. The deposition of patterned carbon nanotubes by electrophoresis is an alternative method to prepare field emission arrays

  2. Root Causes of Field Emitters in SRF Cavities Placed in CEBAF Tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli

    2016-05-01

    It has been suspected that appearance of new field emitters can occur in SRF cavities after their placement in accelerator tunnel for long term beam operation. This apparently has been the case for CEBAF. However, no physical evidence has been shown in the past. In this contribution, we will report on the recent results concerning the root cause of field emitters in SRF cavities placed in CEBAF tunnel. We will discuss these results in the context of high-reliability and low-cryogenic-loss operation of CEBAF.

  3. Viability of Using Diamond Field Emitter Array Cathodes in Free Electron Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    essential component of a field emitter array is the shape of the electric field lines and equipotential lines at the surface of the array. The...BARRIER AND QUANTUM TUNNELING ...........25 B. FIELD ENHANCEMENT AND SURFACE PROTRUSIONS .........26 C. ELECTRIC FIELDS AND ELECTRON TRAVEL...26 Figure 4. Diagram of a protrusion (triangular in shape) from the surface of a cathode. The protrusion is of height h, with a

  4. Characterization of NiSi nanowires as field emitters and limitations of Fowler-Nordheim model at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkadi, Amina B.; Gale, E.; Isakovic, A. F.

    2015-03-01

    Nanoscale field emitters are of technological interest because of the anticipated faster turn-on time, better sustainability and compactness. This report focuses on NiSi nanowires as field emitters for two reasons: (a) possible enhancement of field emission in nanoscale field emitters over bulk, and (b) achieving the same field emission properties as in bulk, but at a lower energy cost. To this end, we have grown, fabricated and characterized NiSi nanowires as field emitters. Depending on the geometry of the NiSi nanowires (aspect ratio, shape etc.), the relevant major field emission parameters, such as (1) the turn-on field, (2) the work function, and (3) the field enhancement factor, can be comparable or even superior to other recently explored nanoscale field emitters, such as CdS and ZnO. We also report on a comparative performance of various nanoscale field emitters and on the difficulties in the performance comparison in the light of relatively poor applicability of the standard Folwer-Nordheim model for field emission analysis for the case of the nanoscale field emitters. Proposed modifications are discussed. This work is supported through SRC-ATIC Grant 2011-KJ-2190. We also acknoweldge BNL-CFN and Cornell CNF facilities and staff.

  5. Control of the electromagnetic environment of a quantum emitter by shaping the vacuum field in a coupled-cavity system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johne, R.; Schutjens, H.A.W.; Fattahpoor, S.; Jin, C.; Fiore, A.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the ultrafast control of the emitter-field coupling rate in cavity quantum electrodynamics. This is achieved by the control of the vacuum field seen by the emitter through a modulation of the optical modes in a coupled-cavity structure. The scheme allows the on-off switching

  6. A field performance evaluation of drip emitters: pressure versus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field evaluation of irrigation systems (drip) can form a basis for decision making as to whether the irrigation system needs rehabilitation, overhaul or even dismantling if found to be very uneconomical. A comprehensive field evaluation of irrigation systems involves determining the overall efficiency of the system, for example, ...

  7. Effect of very high magnetic field on the optical properties of firefly light emitter oxyluciferin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Weihang; Nakamura, Daisuke [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Wang, Yu [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Developmental Biology, Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Mochizuki, Toshimitsu [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Fukushima Renewable Energy Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 2-2-9 Machiike-dai, Koriyama, Fukushima 963-0215 (Japan); Akiyama, Hidefumi [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Takeyama, Shojiro, E-mail: takeyama@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Magnetic field effect on enzymatic reactions is under intensive study in the past decades. Recently, it was reported that firefly bioluminescence was suppressed and red-shifted significantly when exposed to external magnetic field. However in this work, by means of selective excitation, we confirmed that emission properties of firefly light emitter “oxyluciferin” are completely immune to external magnetic field of up to 53 T. These findings pose strong contrast to existing relevant results. Potential reasons for the discrepancies found and the underlying physics towards the understanding of firefly bioluminescence were discussed. - Highlights: • Effect of ultra-high magnetic field on the optical properties of firefly light emitter oxyluciferin was reported. • Emission properties of oxyluciferin were confirmed to be immune to external high magnetic fields up to 53 T. • .Potential reasons for the discrepancies between our results and previous reports and the underlying physics were discussed.

  8. High resolution structuring of emitter tips for the gaseous field ionization source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubby, J.A.; Siegel, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Extraction of a stable, high brightness ion beam from an apertured field ion emitter surface requires microfabrication procedures to sculpture the surface topography on both microscopic (100 --1000 nm) and near atomic (10 --100 nm) length scales. Structuring on a near atomic scale is required to confine and stabilize the ion beam by local enhancement of the surface electrostatic field and to orient that emission on the optical axis. Control of the emitter contour on a microscopic scale is required for manipulating the supply of neutral molecules to the ionization site and also affects beam stability. We have developed a method using ion milling for configuring surface contour on microscopic and near atomic length scales which utilizes the morphological changes occurring at ion bombarded surfaces as a result of erosion by sputtering. A SEM study of the microscopic emitter topographical development is compared to computer simulations of the kinematical wave equation which depicts the erosion process. In this way, prediction of configuration on a length scale large compared to the ion penetration depth has been established. TEM observations show the surface development on the length scale of ion penetration depth. Preliminary results using this microfabricated emitter in a gaseous field ion source to produce a hydrogen ion beam with high angular beam confinement are given. Requirements for surface topography that are essential to obtain stable high brightness ion beams are discussed

  9. Multi-field electron emission pattern of 2D emitter: Illustrated with graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ma; Li, Zhibing

    2016-11-01

    The mechanism of laser-assisted multi-field electron emission of two-dimensional emitters is investigated theoretically. The process is basically a cold field electron emission but having more controllable components: a uniform electric field controls the emission potential barrier, a magnetic field controls the quantum states of the emitter, while an optical field controls electron populations of specified quantum states. It provides a highly orientational vacuum electron line source whose divergence angle over the beam plane is inversely proportional to square root of the emitter height. Calculations are carried out for graphene with the armchair emission edge, as a concrete example. The rate equation incorporating the optical excitation, phonon scattering, and thermal relaxation is solved in the quasi-equilibrium approximation for electron population in the bands. The far-field emission patterns, that inherit the features of the Landau bands, are obtained. It is found that the optical field generates a characteristic structure at one wing of the emission pattern.

  10. Beam emittance growth caused by transverse deflecting fields in a linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, A W; Richter, B; Yao, C Y [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, CA (USA)

    1980-12-01

    The effect of the beam-generated transverse deflecting fields on the emittance of an intense bunch of particles in a high-energy linear accelerator is analyzed in this paper. The equation of motion is solved by a perturbation method for cases of a coasting beam and a uniformly accelerated beam. The results are applied to obtain some design tolerance specifications for the recently proposed SLAC Single Pass Collider.

  11. Cylindrical-shaped nanotube field effect transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2015-12-29

    A cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET may be manufactured on silicon (Si) substrates as a ring etched into a gate stack and filled with semiconductor material. An inner gate electrode couples to a region of the gate stack inside the inner circumference of the ring. An outer gate electrode couples to a region of the gate stack outside the outer circumference of the ring. The multi-gate cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET operates in volume inversion for ring widths below 15 nanometers. The cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET demonstrates better short channel effect (SCE) mitigation and higher performance (I.sub.on/I.sub.off) than conventional transistor devices. The cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET may also be manufactured with higher yields and cheaper costs than conventional transistors.

  12. Cylindrical-shaped nanotube field effect transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Fahad, Hossain M.; Smith, Casey E.; Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2015-01-01

    A cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET may be manufactured on silicon (Si) substrates as a ring etched into a gate stack and filled with semiconductor material. An inner gate electrode couples to a region of the gate stack inside the inner circumference of the ring. An outer gate electrode couples to a region of the gate stack outside the outer circumference of the ring. The multi-gate cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET operates in volume inversion for ring widths below 15 nanometers. The cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET demonstrates better short channel effect (SCE) mitigation and higher performance (I.sub.on/I.sub.off) than conventional transistor devices. The cylindrical-shaped nanotube FET may also be manufactured with higher yields and cheaper costs than conventional transistors.

  13. Properties of multiple field ion emitters of tungsten and a simple method for improving their ionization efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, F.; Beckey, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    The ion emission properties of the multiple tungsten emitters developed recently for field ionization mass spectrometry were investigated with the aid of a sector type mass spectrometer at emitter-cathode voltages of 10-15 kV using acetone, n-heptane and benzene as test substances. The emitters, which comprised a 10-μm tungsten filament bearing thickly arrayed microneedles of tungsten, produced very weak and unstable signals at voltages of about 10 kV, but increasing the voltage to 14 kV led to intensifying ion currents high enough to yield mass spectra of satisfactory quality. During the course of the experiments, it was observed that nucleating tungsten carbide particles on the emitter surface by means of a high-field chemical reaction with benzene vapours can significanlty promote the field ionization of gas molecules, presumably as a result of the field enhancement resulting from roughening of the surface. (Auth.)

  14. Effect of synthesis parameters on morphology of polyaniline (PANI) and field emission investigation of PANI nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bankar, Prashant K.; More, Mahendra A., E-mail: mam@physics.unipune.ac.in [Center for Advanced Studies in Materials Science and Condensed Matter Physics, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune-411007 (India); Patil, Sandip S. [Department of Physics, Modern College of Arts, Science and Commerce, Shivajinagar, Pune-411005. India (India)

    2015-06-24

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanostructures have been synthesized by simple chemical oxidation route at different monomer concentration along with variation in synthesis temperature. The effect of variation of synthesis parameters has been revealed using different characterization techniques. The structural and morphological characterization of the synthesized PANI nanostructures was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), whereas Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been used to reveal the chemical properties. With the variation in the synthesis temperature and monomer concentration, various morphologies characterized by formation of PANI nanoparticles, nanofibres, nanotubes and nanospheres, are revealed from the SEM analysis. The FTIR analysis reveals the formation of conducting state of PANI under prevailing experimental conditions. The field emission investigation of the conducting PANI nanotubes was performed in all metal UHV system at base pressure of 1x10{sup −8} mbar. The turn on field required to draw emission of 1 nA current was observed to be ∼ 2.2 V/μm and threshold field (corresponding to emission current density of 1 µA/cm2) was found to be 3.2 V/μm. The emission current was observed to be stable for more than three hours at a preset value 1 µA. The simple synthesis route and good field emission characteristics indicate potential of PANI nanofibres as a promising emitter for field emission based micro/nano devices.

  15. An Investigation of Emitters Clogging Under Magnetic Field and Water Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kiani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Water scarcity is one of the major problems for crop production. Using drip irrigation as an effective method in the efficient use of water is expanding in arid and semi-arid regions. One of the problems in under pressure irrigation during use of saline, unconventional and waste is emitters clogging. There are several ways to prevent particle deposits in pipes and clogging of emitters. Generally, conventional methods are divided into two categories: physical and chemical methods. In physical method, suspended solids and inorganic materials are removed using particles sediment sand and disc filters. In the chemical method the pH drops by adding acid to water resulting in the dissolution of carbonate sediments. With chlorine handling, organisms (i.e. algae, fungi and bacteria that are the main causes of biological clogging are destroyed. However, the application of these methods is not successful in all cases. It has been observed that the emitters have gradually become obstructed. Magnetic water is obtained by passing water through permanent magnets or through the electromagnets installed in or on a feed pipeline. When a fluid passes through the magnetized field, its structure and some physical characteristic such as density, salt solution capacity, and deposition ratio of solid particles will be changed. An experimental study showed that a relatively weak magnetic influence increases the viscosity of water and consequently causes stronger hydrogen bonds under the magnetic field.There exist very few documented research projects related to the magnetization of water technology and its application to agricultural issues in general and emitter clogging in drip irrigation method, in particular. This technology is already used in some countries, especially in the Persian Gulf states. This research was designed and implemented aimed at increasing knowledge about the application of magnetic technology and its effects on emitters clogging

  16. Analysis of transverse RMS emittance growth of a beam induced by spherical and chromatic aberration in a solenoidal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, Radhakanta, E-mail: radhakanta.physics@gmail.com [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Nayak, Biswaranjan [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Sharma, Archana; Mittal, Kailash C. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400094 (India); Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-01-21

    In a medium energy beam transport line transverse rms emittance growth associated with spherical aberration is analysed. An analytical expression is derived for beam optics in a solenoid field considering terms up to the third order in the radial displacement. Two important phenomena: effect of spherical aberrations in axial-symmetric focusing lens and influence of nonlinear space charge forces on beam emittance growth are discussed for different beam distributions. In the second part nonlinear effect associated with chromatic aberration that describes the growth of emittance and distortion of phase space area is discussed.

  17. The study of explosive emission from carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, Sergey

    2002-01-01

    The carbon nanotubes (CNT) found applications for high density current electron emitters. The main interest for forming of high current electron beams using CNT is high concentration of electrical field on the nanotubes and high value of yield by electrons for field emission. The experimental results for time processes of forming cathode plasma and extraction of electron beam are presented in the report

  18. Ampère-Class Pulsed Field Emission from Carbon-Nanotube Cathodes in a Radiofrequency Resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalcea, D. [Northern Illinois U.; Faillace, L. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Hartzell, J. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Panuganti, H. [Northern Illinois U.; Boucher, S. M. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Murokh, A. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Piot, P. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, J. C.T. [Fermilab

    2014-12-01

    Pulsed field emission from cold carbon-nanotube cathodes placed in a radiofrequency resonant cavity was observed. The cathodes were located on the backplate of a conventional $1+\\frac{1}{2}$-cell resonant cavity operating at 1.3-GHz and resulted in the production of bunch train with maximum average current close to 0.7 Amp\\`ere. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristic, transverse emittance, and pulse duration are presented and, when possible, compared to numerical simulations. The implications of our results to high-average-current electron sources are briefly discussed.

  19. Transport properties of hydrogen passivated silicon nanotubes and silicon nanotube field effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2017-01-24

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of silicon nanotubes attached to metallic electrodes from first principles, using density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. The influence of the surface termination is studied as well as the dependence of the transport characteristics on the chirality, diameter, and length. Strong electronic coupling between nanotubes and electrodes is found to be a general feature that results in low contact resistance. The conductance in the tunneling regime is discussed in terms of the complex band structure. Silicon nanotube field effect transistors are simulated by applying a uniform potential gate. Our results demonstrate very high values of transconductance, outperforming the best commercial silicon field effect transistors, combined with low values of sub-threshold swing.

  20. Extremely environment-hard and low work function transfer-mold field emitter arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamoto, Masayuki, E-mail: m-nakamoto@rie.shizuoka.ac.jp [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8011 (Japan); Moon, Jonghyun [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8011 (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    Extremely environment-hard and low work function field-emitter arrays (FEAs) were fabricated by a transfer-mold emitter fabrication method to produce highly reliable vacuum nanoelectronic devices able to operate stably at low voltage in highly oxidizing atmospheres. Amorphous carbon (a-C) having a work function of 3.6 eV and sp{sup 3} fraction of 85.6% prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition was used as the emitter material. The field-emission characteristics of the obtained transfer-mold FEAs strongly depended on their work function and morphology. The environment-hard characteristics of the transfer-mold a-C FEAs were compared with those of the transfer-mold titanium nitride FEAs and nickel FEAs. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to confirm the stable chemical states of the FEAs after oxygen radical treatment. The small amount of material oxidized (6.3%) at the surface of the a-C FEAs compared with 11.8% for the TiN-FEAs and 39.0% for Ni FEAs after oxygen radical treatment explained their almost constant work function in oxidizing atmospheres. The emission fluctuation rates of transfer-mold a-C FEAs without resistive layers under in situ radical treatment were as low as ±5.0%, compared with 5–100% for conventional FEAs with resistive layers not under highly oxidizing atmospheres. Therefore, the present environment-hard and low work function transfer-mold a-C FEAs are expected to be useful for reliable vacuum nanoelectronic devices.

  1. The fabrication and evaluation of diamond cold cathodes for field emitter display applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, N.A.

    1998-08-01

    Semiconducting diamond is a candidate wide-band gap material for applications in vacuum microelectronic devices. Its potential use in components that are operated at high frequencies, handle high powers or are subjected to extremes of temperature and radiation have yet to be commercially realised. The work presented below sets out to determine whether semiconducting diamond is a suitable material for such active electronic devices by examining the most efficient means of initiating electron emission from Chemical Vapour Deposited (CVD), semiconducting diamond. Novel methods are reported for the incorporation of impurity atoms of Nitrogen and Phosphorus into CVD diamond that employ ion-implantation techniques. Demonstration of the efficient incorporation of these impurities to form donor states with low activation energies into polycrystalline diamond would facilitate efficient room temperature operation of pn junctions devices. The effectiveness of boron as a p-type dopant in CVD diamond films has enabled the investigation of potential field emitter structures using different boron concentrations in order to identify their respective conduction mechanisms and to make a comparison of their relative electron emission performance. It has been concluded that efficient electron emission is observed to originate from the interface of n + -p, silicon/diamond heterojunctions that employ thin p-type regions which are less than 5μm thick. The emission current may be controlled by the application of a low voltage forward bias of less than 1 volt. Only the np junction containing 400 ppm of boron in the p-diamond layer demonstrated forward biased electron emission. It is proposed that carrier conduction across the junction interface involves recombination and tunnelling steps between interface trap states. Furthermore it is believed that due to the junction interface being in direct contact with vacuum, within this region of the emitter structure, a surface conduction emission

  2. Linear Optical Response of Silicon Nanotubes Under Axial Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the optical properties of silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) in the low energy region, E < 0.5 eV, and middle energy region, 1.8 eV < E < 2 eV. The dependence of optical matrix elements and linear susceptibility on radius and magnetic field, in terms of one-dimensional (1-d) wavevector and subband index, is calculated using the tight-binding approximation. It is found that, on increasing the nanotube diameter, the low-energy peaks show red-shift and their intensities are decreased. Also, we found that in the middle energy region all tubes have two distinct peaks, where the energy position of the second peak is approximately constant and independent of the nanotube diameter. Comparing the band structure of these tubes in different magnetic fields, several differences are clearly seen, such as splitting of degenerate bands, creation of additional band-edge states, and bandgap modification. It is found that applying the magnetic field leads to a phase transition in zigzag silicon hexagonal nanotubes (Si h-NTs), unlike in zigzag silicon gear-like nanotubes (Si g-NTs), which remain semiconducting in any magnetic field. We found that the axial magnetic field has two effects on the linear susceptibility spectrum, namely broadening and splitting. The axial magnetic field leads to the creation of a peak with energy less than 0.2 eV in metallic Si h-NTs, whereas in the absence of a magnetic field such a transition is not allowed.

  3. Preparation of Powdery Carbon Nanotwist and Application to Printed Field Emitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Hosokawa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an automatic production system with sequencer control for the synthesis of carbon nanofibriform based on catalytic CVD using a substrate was developed. The carbon nanotwist (CNTw, which is one of the helical carbon nanofibers, was then synthesized in powdery form with an Ni–SnO2-composed catalyst. The production rate was 5 400 times that of the conventional CVD system and Ni–Cu–In2O3 catalyst. The powdery CNTw was easily scraped off the substrate, then pasted with organic binder, and printed by a squeegee method on ITO glass substrate for an electron field emitter. The field emission performance was found to be better than that of the directly grown CNTw film in conventional CVD with Ni–Cu catalyst.

  4. Gated field-emitter cathodes for high-power microwave applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barasch, E.F.; Demroff, H.P.; Elliott, T.S.; Kasprowicz, T.B.; Lee, B.; Mazumdar, T.; McIntyre, P.M.; Pang, Y.; Smith, D.D.; Trost, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    Gated field-emitter cathodes have been fabricated on silicon wafers. Two fabrication approaches have been employed: a knife-edge array and a porous silicon structure. The knife-edge array consists of a pattern of knife-edges, sharpened to ∼200 A radius, configured with an insulated metal gate structure at a gap of ∼500 A. The porous silicon cathode consists of an insulating porous layer, containing pores of ∼50 A diameter, densely spaced in the native silicon, biased for field emission by a thin gate metallization on the surface. Emission current density of 20 A/cm 2 has been obtained with only 10 V bias. Fabrication processes and test results are presented. (Author) 4 figs., tab., 12 refs

  5. Field emission properties of the graphenated carbon nanotube electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanin, H., E-mail: hudson.zanin@bristol.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Faculdade de Engenharia Elétrica e Computação, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotônica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N. 400, CEP 13 083-852 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Ceragioli, H.J.; Peterlevitz, A.C.; Baranauskas, Vitor [Faculdade de Engenharia Elétrica e Computação, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotônica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N. 400, CEP 13 083-852 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Marciano, F.R.; Lobo, A.O. [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology/Institute of Research and Development at UNIVAP, Av. Shishima Hifumi, 2911, CEP 12244-000 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Facile method to prepare graphenated carbon nanotubes (g-CNTs). • The electric field emission behaviour of g-CNTs was studied. • g-CNTs show better emission current stability than non-graphenated CNTs. - Abstract: Reduced graphene oxide-coated carbon nanotubes (RGO-CNT) electrodes have been prepared by hot filament chemical vapour deposition system in one-step growth process. We studied RGO-CNT electrodes behaviour as cold cathode in field emission test. Our results show that RGO-CNT retain the low threshold voltage typical of CNTs, but with greatly improved emission current stability. The field emission enhancement value is significantly higher than that expected being caused by geometric effect (height divided by the radius of nanotube). This suggested that the field emission of this hybrid structure is not only from a single tip, but eventually it is from several tips with contribution of graphene nanosheets at CNT's walls. This phenomenon explains why the graphenated carbon nanotubes do not burn out as quickly as CNT does until emission ceases completely. These preliminaries results make nanocarbon materials good candidates for applications as electron sources for several devices.

  6. Waferscale assembly of Field-Aligned nanotube Networks (FANs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria; Bøggild, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the integration of nanotube networks on 512 individual devices on a full 4-inch wafer in less than 60 seconds with a roughly 80% yield using dielectrophoresis. We present here investigations of the morphology and electrical resistance of such field aligned networks for different fr...

  7. Development of Field-Emission Electron Gun from Carbon Nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Hozumi, Y

    2004-01-01

    Aiming to use a narrow energy-spread electron beam easily and low costly on injector electron guns, we have been tested field emission cathodes of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Experiments for these three years brought us important suggestions and a few rules of thumb. Now at last, anode current of 3.0 [A/cm2

  8. Enhanced field emission properties of tilted graphene nanoribbons on aggregated TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Shang-Chao, E-mail: schung99@gmail.com [Department of Information Technology & Communication, Shih Chien University Kaohsiung Campus, Neimen, Kaohsiung 845, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yu-Jyun [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering & Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Graphene nanoribbons (GNBs) slanted on aggregate TiO{sub 2} nanotube (A-TNTs) as field-emitters. • Turn-on electric field and field enhancement factor β are dependent on the substrate morphology. • Various quantities of GNRs are deposited on top of A-TNTs (GNRs/A-TNTs) with different morphologies. • With an increase of GNBs compositions, the specimens' turn-on electric field is reduced to 2.8 V/μm. • The field enhancement factor increased rapidly to about 1964 with the addition of GNRs. - Abstract: Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) slanted on aggregate TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (A-TNTs) with various compositions as field-emitters are reported. The morphology, crystalline structure, and composition of the as-obtained specimens were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectrometry. The dependence of the turn-on electric field and the field enhancement factor β on substrate morphology was studied. An increase of GNRs reduces the specimens’ turn-on electric field to 2.8 V/μm and the field enhancement factor increased rapidly to about 1964 with the addition of GNRs. Results show a strong dependence of the field emission on GNR composition aligned with the gradient on the top of the A-TNT substrate. Enhanced FE properties of the modified TNTs can be mainly attributed to their improved electrical properties and rougher surface morphology.

  9. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingqi

    2012-10-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) have been developed using pure semiconducting carbon nanotubes. The source and drain were vertically stacked, separated by a dielectric, and the carbon nanotubes were placed on the sidewall of the stack to bridge the source and drain. Both the effective gate dielectric and gate electrode were normal to the substrate surface. The channel length is determined by the dielectric thickness between source and drain electrodes, making it easier to fabricate sub-micrometer transistors without using time-consuming electron beam lithography. The transistor area is much smaller than the planar CNTFET due to the vertical arrangement of source and drain and the reduced channel area. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using a laser-driven field emitter: Femtosecond resolution with a high coherence electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feist, Armin; Bach, Nora; Rubiano da Silva, Nara; Danz, Thomas; Möller, Marcel; Priebe, Katharina E.; Domröse, Till; Gatzmann, J. Gregor; Rost, Stefan; Schauss, Jakob; Strauch, Stefanie; Bormann, Reiner; Sivis, Murat; Schäfer, Sascha, E-mail: sascha.schaefer@phys.uni-goettingen.de; Ropers, Claus, E-mail: claus.ropers@uni-goettingen.de

    2017-05-15

    We present the development of the first ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UTEM) driven by localized photoemission from a field emitter cathode. We describe the implementation of the instrument, the photoemitter concept and the quantitative electron beam parameters achieved. Establishing a new source for ultrafast TEM, the Göttingen UTEM employs nano-localized linear photoemission from a Schottky emitter, which enables operation with freely tunable temporal structure, from continuous wave to femtosecond pulsed mode. Using this emission mechanism, we achieve record pulse properties in ultrafast electron microscopy of 9 Å focused beam diameter, 200 fs pulse duration and 0.6 eV energy width. We illustrate the possibility to conduct ultrafast imaging, diffraction, holography and spectroscopy with this instrument and also discuss opportunities to harness quantum coherent interactions between intense laser fields and free-electron beams. - Highlights: • First implementation of an ultrafast TEM employing a nanoscale photocathode. • Localized single photon-photoemission from nanoscopic field emitter yields low emittance ultrashort electron pulses. • Electron pulses focused down to ~9 Å, with a duration of 200 fs and an energy width of 0.6 eV are demonstrated. • Quantitative characterization of ultrafast electron gun emittance and brightness. • A range of applications of high coherence ultrashort electron pulses is shown.

  11. Diamond field emitter array cathodes and possibilities for employing additive manufacturing for dielectric laser accelerating structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andrews, Heather Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Herman, Matthew Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hubbard, Kevin Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Weis, Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-20

    These are slides for a presentation at Stanford University. The outline is as follows: Motivation: customers for compact accelerators, LANL's technologies for laser acceleration, DFEA cathodes, and additive manufacturing of micron-size structures. Among the stated conclusions are the following: preliminary study identified DFEA cathodes as promising sources for DLAs--high beam current and small emittance; additive manufacturing with Nanoscribe Professional GT can produce structures with the right scale features for a DLA operating at micron wavelengths (fabrication tolerances need to be studied, DLAs require new materials). Future plans include DLA experiment with a beam produced by the DFEA cathode with field emission, demonstration of photoemission from DFEAs, and new structures to print and test.

  12. Improvements in emittance wake field optimization for the SLAC Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Decker, Franz Josef

    2003-01-01

    The transverse emittances in the SLAC Linear Collider can be severely diluted by collective wakefield effects and dispersion. For the 1997/98 SLC/SLD run important changes were implemented in the way the emittance is optimized. Early in the linac, where the energy spread is large due to BNS damping, the emittance growth is dominated by dispersion. In this regime emittance tuning bumps may introduce additional wakefield tails and their use is now avoided. At the end of the linac the energy spread is minimal and the emittance measurement is most sensitive to wakefield emittance dilution. In previous years, the emittances were tuned on wire scanners located near but not at the end of the linac (after about 90% of its length). Simulations show that emittance growth of up to 100% can occur in the remaining 10%. In this run wire scanners at the entrance of the Final Focus, the last place where the emittances can be measured, were used for the optimization. Screens at the end of the linac allow additional real time ...

  13. High-performance field emission device utilizing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes-based pillar architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Bipin Kumar; Kedawat, Garima; Gangwar, Amit Kumar; Nagpal, Kanika; Kashyap, Pradeep Kumar; Srivastava, Shubhda; Singh, Satbir; Kumar, Pawan; Suryawanshi, Sachin R.; Seo, Deok Min; Tripathi, Prashant; More, Mahendra A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Late, Dattatray J.

    2018-01-01

    The vertical aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based pillar architectures were created on laminated silicon oxide/silicon (SiO2/Si) wafer substrate at 775 °C by using water-assisted chemical vapor deposition under low pressure process condition. The lamination was carried out by aluminum (Al, 10.0 nm thickness) as a barrier layer and iron (Fe, 1.5 nm thickness) as a catalyst precursor layer sequentially on a silicon wafer substrate. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that synthesized CNTs are vertically aligned and uniformly distributed with a high density. The CNTs have approximately 2-30 walls with an inner diameter of 3-8 nm. Raman spectrum analysis shows G-band at 1580 cm-1 and D-band at 1340 cm-1. The G-band is higher than D-band, which indicates that CNTs are highly graphitized. The field emission analysis of the CNTs revealed high field emission current density (4mA/cm2 at 1.2V/μm), low turn-on field (0.6 V/μm) and field enhancement factor (6917) with better stability and longer lifetime. Emitter morphology resulting in improved promising field emission performances, which is a crucial factor for the fabrication of pillared shaped vertical aligned CNTs bundles as practical electron sources.

  14. High-performance field emission device utilizing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes-based pillar architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipin Kumar Gupta

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The vertical aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs-based pillar architectures were created on laminated silicon oxide/silicon (SiO2/Si wafer substrate at 775 °C by using water-assisted chemical vapor deposition under low pressure process condition. The lamination was carried out by aluminum (Al, 10.0 nm thickness as a barrier layer and iron (Fe, 1.5 nm thickness as a catalyst precursor layer sequentially on a silicon wafer substrate. Scanning electron microscope (SEM images show that synthesized CNTs are vertically aligned and uniformly distributed with a high density. The CNTs have approximately 2–30 walls with an inner diameter of 3–8 nm. Raman spectrum analysis shows G-band at 1580 cm−1 and D-band at 1340 cm−1. The G-band is higher than D-band, which indicates that CNTs are highly graphitized. The field emission analysis of the CNTs revealed high field emission current density (4mA/cm2 at 1.2V/μm, low turn-on field (0.6 V/μm and field enhancement factor (6917 with better stability and longer lifetime. Emitter morphology resulting in improved promising field emission performances, which is a crucial factor for the fabrication of pillared shaped vertical aligned CNTs bundles as practical electron sources.

  15. Field penetration induced charge redistribution effects on the field emission properties of carbon nanotubes - a first-principle study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-W.; Lee, M.-H.; Clark, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of field penetration induced charge redistribution on the field emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been studied by the first-principle calculations. It is found that the carbon nanotube becomes polarized under external electric field leading to a charge redistribution. The resulting band bending induced by field penetration into the nanotube tip surface can further reduce the effective workfunction of the carbon nanotubes. The magnitude of the redistributed charge ΔQ is found to be nearly linear to the applied external field strength. In addition, we found that the capped (9, 0) zigzag nanotube demonstrates better field emission properties than the capped (5, 5) armchair nanotube due to the fact that the charge redistribution of π electrons along the zigzag-like tube axis is easier than for the armchair-like tube. The density of states (DOS) of the capped region of the nanotube is found to be enhanced with a value 30% higher than that of the sidewall part for the capped (5, 5) nanotube and 40% for the capped (9, 0) nanotube under an electric field of 0.33 V/A. Such enhancements of the DOS at the carbon nanotube tip show that electrons near the Fermi level will emit more easily due to the change of the surface band structure resulting from the field penetration in a high field

  16. Experimental and theoretical study on field emission properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles decorated carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhou, Wei-Man; Liu, Wei-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Li

    2015-05-01

    Field emission properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated experimentally and theoretically. CNTs are in situ decorated with ZnO NPs during the growth process by chemical vapor deposition using a carbon source from the iron phthalocyanine pyrolysis. The experimental field emission test shows that the ZnO NP decoration significantly improves the emission current from 50 μA to 275 μA at 550 V and the reduced threshold voltage from 450 V to 350 V. The field emission mechanism of ZnO NPs on CNTs is theoretically studied by the density functional theory (DFT) combined with the Penn-Plummer method. The ZnO NPs reconstruct the ZnO-CNT structure and pull down the surface barrier of the entire emitter system to 0.49 eV so as to reduce the threshold electric field. The simulation results suggest that the presence of ZnO NPs would increase the LDOS near the Fermi level and increase the emission current. The calculation results are consistent with the experiment results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91123018, 61172040, and 61172041) and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014JM7277).

  17. Experimental and theoretical study on field emission properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles decorated carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xin; Zhou Wei-Man; Liu Wei-Hua; Wang Xiao-Li

    2015-01-01

    Field emission properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated experimentally and theoretically. CNTs are in situ decorated with ZnO NPs during the growth process by chemical vapor deposition using a carbon source from the iron phthalocyanine pyrolysis. The experimental field emission test shows that the ZnO NP decoration significantly improves the emission current from 50 μA to 275 μA at 550 V and the reduced threshold voltage from 450 V to 350 V. The field emission mechanism of ZnO NPs on CNTs is theoretically studied by the density functional theory (DFT) combined with the Penn–Plummer method. The ZnO NPs reconstruct the ZnO–CNT structure and pull down the surface barrier of the entire emitter system to 0.49 eV so as to reduce the threshold electric field. The simulation results suggest that the presence of ZnO NPs would increase the LDOS near the Fermi level and increase the emission current. The calculation results are consistent with the experiment results. (paper)

  18. Pulsed laser-deposited nanocrystalline GdB{sub 6} thin films on W and Re as field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suryawanshi, Sachin R.; More, Mahendra A. [Savitribai Phule Pune University, Department of Physics, Centre for Advanced Studies in Materials Science and Condensed Matter Physics, Pune (India); Singh, Anil K.; Sinha, Sucharita [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Phase, Deodatta M. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research Indore Centre, Indore (India); Late, Dattatray J. [CSIR-National Chemical Laboratory, Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, Pune (India)

    2016-10-15

    Gadolinium hexaboride (GdB{sub 6}) nanocrystalline thin films were grown on tungsten (W), rhenium (Re) tips and foil substrates using optimized pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. The X-ray diffraction analysis reveals formation of pure, crystalline cubic phase of GdB{sub 6} on W and Re substrates, under the prevailing PLD conditions. The field emission (FE) studies of GdB{sub 6}/W and GdB{sub 6}/Re emitters were performed in a planar diode configuration at the base pressure ∝10{sup -8} mbar. The GdB{sub 6}/W and GdB{sub 6}/Re tip emitters deliver high emission current densities of ∝1.4 and 0.811 mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of ∝6.0 and 7.0 V/μm, respectively. The Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) plots were found to be nearly linear showing metallic nature of the emitters. The noticeably high values of field enhancement factor (β) estimated using the slopes of the F-N plots indicate that the PLD GdB{sub 6} coating on W and Re substrates comprises of high-aspect-ratio nanostructures. Interestingly, the GdB{sub 6}/W and GdB{sub 6}/Re planar emitters exhibit excellent current stability at the preset values over a long-term operation, as compared to the tip emitters. Furthermore, the values of workfunction of the GdB{sub 6}/W and GdB6/Re emitters, experimentally measured using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, are found to be same, ∝1.6 ± 0.1 eV. Despite possessing same workfunction value, the FE characteristics of the GdB{sub 6}/W emitter are markedly different from that of GdB{sub 6}/Re emitter, which can be attributed to the growth of GdB{sub 6} films on W and Re substrates. (orig.)

  19. Integrating carbon nanotubes into silicon by means of vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingqi; Wang, Qingxiao; Yue, Weisheng; Guo, Zaibing; LI, LIANG; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Xianbin; Abutaha, Anas I.; Alshareef, Husam N.; Zhang, Yafei; Zhang, Xixiang

    2014-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have been integrated into silicon for use in vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs). A unique feature of these devices is that a silicon substrate and a metal contact are used as the source and drain for the vertical transistors, respectively. These CNTFETs show very different characteristics from those fabricated with two metal contacts. Surprisingly, the transfer characteristics of the vertical CNTFETs can be either ambipolar or unipolar (p-type or n-type) depending on the sign of the drain voltage. Furthermore, the p-type/n-type character of the devices is defined by the doping type of the silicon substrate used in the fabrication process. A semiclassical model is used to simulate the performance of these CNTFETs by taking the conductance change of the Si contact under the gate voltage into consideration. The calculation results are consistent with the experimental observations. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  20. Design, Fabrication, and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Devices for Advanced Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radauscher, Erich Justin

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as promising candidates for electron field emission (FE) cathodes in integrated FE devices. These nanostructured carbon materials possess exceptional properties and their synthesis can be thoroughly controlled. Their integration into advanced electronic devices, including not only FE cathodes, but sensors, energy storage devices, and circuit components, has seen rapid growth in recent years. The results of the studies presented here demonstrate that the CNT field emitter is an excellent candidate for next generation vacuum microelectronics and related electron emission devices in several advanced applications. The work presented in this study addresses determining factors that currently confine the performance and application of CNT-FE devices. Characterization studies and improvements to the FE properties of CNTs, along with Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) design and fabrication, were utilized in achieving these goals. Important performance limiting parameters, including emitter lifetime and failure from poor substrate adhesion, are examined. The compatibility and integration of CNT emitters with the governing MEMS substrate (i.e., polycrystalline silicon), and its impact on these performance limiting parameters, are reported. CNT growth mechanisms and kinetics were investigated and compared to silicon (100) to improve the design of CNT emitter integrated MEMS based electronic devices, specifically in vacuum microelectronic device (VMD) applications. Improved growth allowed for design and development of novel cold-cathode FE devices utilizing CNT field emitters. A chemical ionization (CI) source based on a CNT-FE electron source was developed and evaluated in a commercial desktop mass spectrometer for explosives trace detection. This work demonstrated the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. The CNT-FE source demonstrated low power requirements, pulsing

  1. Optimizing the e-beam profile of a single carbon nanotube field emission device for electric propulsion systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Fujioka Mologni

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary studies on field emission (FE arrays comprised of carbon nanotubes (CNT as an electron source for electric propulsion system show remarkably promising results. Design parameters for a carbon nanotube (CNT field-emission device operating on triode configuration were numerically simulated and optimized in order to enhance the e-beam focusing quality. An additional focus gate (FG was integrated to the device to control the profile of the emitted e-beam. An axisymmetric finite element model was developed to calculate the electric field distribution on the vacuum region and a modified Fowler-Nordheim (FN equation was used to evaluate the current density emission and the effective emitter area. Afterward, a FE simulation was employed in order to calculate the trajectory of the emitted electrons and define the electron-optical properties of the e-beam. The integration of the FG was fully investigated via computational intelligence techniques. The best performance device according to our simulations presents a collimated e-beam profile that suits well for field emission displays, magnetic field detection and electron microscopy. The automated computational design tool presented in this study strongly benefits the robust design of integrated electron-optical systems for vacuum field emission applications, including electrodynamic tethering and electric propulsion systems.

  2. Field Emission Property of Double-walled Carbon Nanotubes Related to Purification and Transmittance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, KiTae; Jang, HyunChul; Hong, Wanshick; Park, Kyoungwan; Sok, Junghyun; Lyu, SeungChul; Lee, Hansung; Lee, Naesung; Han, Moonsup; Park, Yunsun

    2011-01-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with high purity were produced by the catalytic decomposition of tetrahydrofuran (THF) using a Fe-Mo/MgO catalyst at 800°C. The as-synthesized DWCNTs typically have catalytic impurities and amorphous carbon, which were removed by a two-step purification process consisting of acid treatment and oxidation. In the acid treatment, metallic catalysts were removed in HCl at room temperature for 5 hr with magnetic stirring. Subsequently, the oxidation, using air at 380°C for 5 hr in the a vertical-type furnace, was used to remove the amorphous carbon particles. The DWCNT suspension was prepared by dispersing the purified DWCNTs in the aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate solution with horn-type sonication. This was then air-sprayed on ITO glass to fabricate DWCNT field emitters. The field emission properties of DWCNT films related to transmittance were studied. This study provides the possibility of the application of large-area transparent CNT field emission cathodes.

  3. Analysis of Field Emission of Fabricated Nanogap in Pd Strips for Surface Conduction Electron-Emitter Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hsiang-Yu; Li, Yiming; Tsai, Chih-Hao; Pan, Fu-Ming

    2008-04-01

    We study the field emission (FE) property of a nanometer-scale gap structure in a palladium strip, which was fabricated by hydrogen absorption under high-pressure treatment. A vigorous cracking process could be accompanied by extensive atomic migration during the hydrogen treatment. A three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell method is adopted to simulate the electron emission in a surface-conduction electron-emitter display (SED) device. Examinations of conducting characteristics, FE efficiency, the local field around the emitter, and the current density on the anode plate with one FE emitter are conducted. The image of a light spot is successfully produced on a phosphor plate, which implies that the explored electrode with nanometer separation possesses a potential SED application. Experimental observation and numerical simulation show that the proposed structure can be used as a surface conduction electron emitter and has a high FE efficiency with low turn-on voltage and a different electron emission mechanism. This study benefits the advanced SED design for a new type of electron source.

  4. Magnetic Field Effect on Ultrashort Two-dimensional Optical Pulse Propagation in Silicon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konobeeva, N. N.; Evdokimov, R. A.; Belonenko, M. B.

    2018-05-01

    The paper deals with the magnetic field effect which provides a stable propagation of ultrashort pulses in silicon nanotubes from the viewpoint of their waveform. The equation is derived for the electromagnetic field observed in silicon nanotubes with a glance to the magnetic field for two-dimensional optical pulses. The analysis is given to the dependence between the waveform of ultrashort optical pulses and the magnetic flux passing through the cross-sectional area of the nanotube.

  5. Smith-Purcell experiment utilizing a field-emitter array cathode: measurements of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, H.; Kawamura, Y.; Yokoo, K.; Shimawaki, H.; Hosono, A.

    2001-01-01

    Smith-Purcell (SP) radiation at wavelengths of 350-750 nm was produced in a tabletop experiment using a field-emitter array (FEA) cathode. The electron gun was 5 cm long, and a 25 mmx25 mm holographic replica grating was placed behind the slit provided in the anode. A regulated DC power supply accelerated electron beams in excess of 10 μA up to 45 keV, while a small Van de Graaff generator accelerated smaller currents to higher energies. The grating had a 0.556 μm period, 30 deg. blaze and a 0.2 μm thick aluminum coating. Spectral characteristics of the radiation were measured both manually and automatically; in the latter case, the spectrometer was driven by a stepping motor to scan the wavelength, and AD-converted signals from a photomultiplier tube were processed by a personal computer. The measurement, made at 80 deg. relative to the electron beam, showed good agreement with theoretical wavelengths of the SP radiation. Diffraction orders were -2 and -3 for beam energies higher than 45 keV, -3 to -5 at 15-25 keV, and -2 to -4 in between. The experiment has thus provided evidence for the practical applicability of FEAs to compact radiation sources

  6. Smith-Purcell experiment utilizing a field-emitter array cathode measurements of radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, H; Yokoo, K; Shimawaki, H; Hosono, A

    2001-01-01

    Smith-Purcell (SP) radiation at wavelengths of 350-750 nm was produced in a tabletop experiment using a field-emitter array (FEA) cathode. The electron gun was 5 cm long, and a 25 mmx25 mm holographic replica grating was placed behind the slit provided in the anode. A regulated DC power supply accelerated electron beams in excess of 10 mu A up to 45 keV, while a small Van de Graaff generator accelerated smaller currents to higher energies. The grating had a 0.556 mu m period, 30 deg. blaze and a 0.2 mu m thick aluminum coating. Spectral characteristics of the radiation were measured both manually and automatically; in the latter case, the spectrometer was driven by a stepping motor to scan the wavelength, and AD-converted signals from a photomultiplier tube were processed by a personal computer. The measurement, made at 80 deg. relative to the electron beam, showed good agreement with theoretical wavelengths of the SP radiation. Diffraction orders were -2 and -3 for beam energies higher than 45 keV, -3 to -5 ...

  7. Field Emission from Carbon Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Giubileo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Field emission electron sources in vacuum electronics are largely considered to achieve faster response, higher efficiency and lower energy consumption in comparison with conventional thermionic emitters. Carbon nanotubes had a leading role in renewing attention to field emission technologies in the early 1990s, due to their exceptional electron emitting properties enabled by their large aspect ratio, high electrical conductivity, and thermal and chemical stability. In the last decade, the search for improved emitters has been extended to several carbon nanostructures, comprising carbon nanotubes, either individual or films, diamond structures, graphitic materials, graphene, etc. Here, we review the main results in the development of carbon-based field emitters.

  8. A study of junction effect transistors and their roles in carbon nanotube field emission cathodes in compact pulsed power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Qiong

    This thesis is focusing on a study of junction effect transistors (JFETs) in compact pulsed power applications. Pulsed power usually requires switches with high hold-off voltage, high current, low forward voltage drop, and fast switching speed. 4H-SiC, with a bandgap of 3.26 eV (The bandgap of Si is 1.12eV) and other physical and electrical superior properties, has gained much attention in high power, high temperature and high frequency applications. One topic of this thesis is to evaluate if 4H-SiC JFETs have a potential to replace gas phase switches to make pulsed power system compact and portable. Some other pulsed power applications require cathodes of providing stable, uniform, high electron-beam current. So the other topic of this research is to evaluate if Si JFET-controlled carbon nanotube field emitter cold cathode will provide the necessary e-beam source. In the topic of "4H-SiC JFETs", it focuses on the design and simulation of a novel 4H-SiC normally-off VJFET with high breakdown voltage using the 2-D simulator ATLAS. To ensure realistic simulations, we utilized reasonable physical models and the established parameters as the input into these models. The influence of key design parameters were investigated which would extend pulsed power limitations. After optimizing the key design parameters, with a 50-mum drift region, the predicted breakdown voltage for the VJFET is above 8kV at a leakage current of 1x10-5A/cm2 . The specific on-state resistance is 35 mO·cm 2 at VGS = 2.7 V, and the switching speed is several ns. The simulation results suggest that the 4H-SiC VJFET is a potential candidate for improving switching performance in repetitive pulsed power applications. To evaluate the 4H-SiC VJFETs in pulsed power circuits, we extracted some circuit model parameters from the simulated I-V curves. Those parameters are necessary for circuit simulation program such as SPICE. This method could be used as a test bench without fabricating the devices to

  9. Field emission from a composite structure consisting of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes and carbon nanocones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, C M; Chen, M Y; Hwang, J; Gan, J-Y; Kou, C S

    2006-01-01

    Vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWCNTs) have been fabricated on carbon nanocones (CNCs) in a gravity-assisted chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process. The CNCs with nanoscale Co particles at the top were first grown on the Co/Si(100) substrate biased at 350 V in a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition process. The CNCs typically are ∼200 nm in height, and their diameters are ∼100 nm near the bottom and ∼10 nm at the top. The nanoscale Co particles ∼10 nm in diameter act as catalysts which favour the growth of VA-SWCNTs out of CNCs at 850 0 C in the gravity-assisted CVD process. The average length and the growth time of VA-SWCNTs are ∼150 nm and 1.5 min, equivalent to a growth rate of ∼6 μm h -1 . The diameters of VA-SWCNTs are estimated to be 1.2-2.1 nm. When VA-SWCNTs are fabricated on CNCs, the turn-on voltage is reduced from 3.9 to 0.7 V μm -1 and the emission current density at the electric field of 5 V μm -1 is enhanced by a factor of more than 200. The composite VA-SWCNT/CNC structure is potentially an excellent field emitter. The emission stability of the VA-SWCNT/CNC field emitter is discussed

  10. Beam emittance and the effects of the rf, space charge and wake fields: Application to the ATF photoelectron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Laser driven photoelectron guns are of interest for use in new methods of accelerations, future development of Linear Colliders and new experiments such as Free Electron laser (IFEL). Such guns are potential source of low emittance-high current and short bunch length electron beams, where the emitted electrons are accelerated quickly to a relativistic energy by a strong rf, electric field in the cavity. We present a brief overview of the beam dynamic studies, e.g. emittance for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ATF high brightness photocathode radio frequency gun (now in operation), and show the effects of the rf, Space Charge, and Wake fields on the photoelectrons. 4 refs., 7 figs

  11. Performance of a carbon nanotube field emission electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; King, Todd T.; Bis, Rachael A.; Jones, Hollis H.; Herrero, Federico; Lynch, Bernard A.; Roman, Patrick; Mahaffy, Paul

    2007-04-01

    A cold cathode field emission electron gun (e-gun) based on a patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) film has been fabricated for use in a miniaturized reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOF MS), with future applications in other charged particle spectrometers, and performance of the CNT e-gun has been evaluated. A thermionic electron gun has also been fabricated and evaluated in parallel and its performance is used as a benchmark in the evaluation of our CNT e-gun. Implications for future improvements and integration into the RTOF MS are discussed.

  12. Error correcting circuit design with carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqiang; Cai, Li; Yang, Xiaokuo; Liu, Baojun; Liu, Zhongyong

    2018-03-01

    In this work, a parallel error correcting circuit based on (7, 4) Hamming code is designed and implemented with carbon nanotube field effect transistors, and its function is validated by simulation in HSpice with the Stanford model. A grouping method which is able to correct multiple bit errors in 16-bit and 32-bit application is proposed, and its error correction capability is analyzed. Performance of circuits implemented with CNTFETs and traditional MOSFETs respectively is also compared, and the former shows a 34.4% decrement of layout area and a 56.9% decrement of power consumption.

  13. Electric field effect in the growth of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaza, E., E-mail: ericvpp@gmail.com; Briceño-Fuenmayor, H. [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Laboratorio de Física de Fluidos y Plasma (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Arévalo, J. [Instituto Zuliano de Investigaciones Tecnológicas (INZIT), Unidad de Caracterización y Estructura de Materiales (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Atencio, R. [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Centro de Investigación y Tecnología de Materiales (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Corredor, L. [Instituto Zuliano de Investigaciones Tecnológicas (INZIT), Unidad de Caracterización y Estructura de Materiales (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) under a controlled electric field in a chemical vapor deposition system is investigated. We evaluate the influence of this external field on the morphological and structural characteristics of CNTs. Scanning electron microscopy results display a large presence of carbonaceous material in the positive plate, which appear to be a consequence of the attraction of electric forces over the electronically unbalanced cracked carbon molecules in the heating zone. We also observe a growth behavior for CNTs, in which catalyst particles are localized either at the bottom or the upper part of the nanotube, depending on the intensity and direction of the electric field. A Raman analysis from all obtained carbon materials shows the presence of two peaks, corresponding to the D ∼ 1340 cm{sup −1} and G ∼ 1590 cm{sup −1} bands attributed to multiwall CNTs. The average diameter of the CNTs is in the range between 90 and 40 nm. These results provide experimental evidence for the dependence of the catalyst and subtract interaction on the growing mechanism, in which weak chemical or electronic interactions could stimulate a top-growing as the strongest base-growing process.

  14. Structures of water molecules in carbon nanotubes under electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winarto,; Takaiwa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising for water transport through membranes and for use as nano-pumps. The development of CNT-based nanofluidic devices, however, requires a better understanding of the properties of water molecules in CNTs because they can be very different from those in the bulk. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of axial electric fields on the structure of water molecules in CNTs having diameters ranging from (7,7) to (10,10). The water dipole moments were aligned parallel to the electric field, which increases the density of water inside the CNTs and forms ordered ice-like structures. The electric field induces the transition from liquid to ice nanotubes in a wide range of CNT diameters. Moreover, we found an increase in the lifetime of hydrogen bonds for water structures in the CNTs. Fast librational motion breaks some hydrogen bonds, but the molecular pairs do not separate and the hydrogen bonds reform. Thus, hydrogen bonds maintain the water structure in the CNTs, and the water molecules move collectively, decreasing the axial diffusion coefficient and permeation rate

  15. Enhanced field emission from carbon nanotubes by hydrogen plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi, C.Y.; Bai, X.D.; Wang, E.G.

    2002-01-01

    The field emission capability of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been improved by hydrogen plasma treatment, and the enhanced emission mechanism has been studied systematically using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman, and transmission electron microscopy. The hydrogen concentration in the samples increases with increasing plasma treatment duration. A C δ- -H δ+ dipole layer may form on CNTs' surface and a high density of defects results from the plasma treatment, which is likely to make the external surface of CNTs more active to emit electrons after treatment. In addition, the sharp edge of CNTs' top, after removal of the catalyst particles, may increase the local electronic field more effectively. The present study suggests that hydrogen plasma treatment is a useful method for improving the field electron emission property of CNTs

  16. Potential of carbon nanotube field effect transistors for analogue circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Hayat, Khizar

    2013-05-11

    This Letter presents a detailed comparison of carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNFETs) and metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) with special focus on carbon nanotube FET\\'s potential for implementing analogue circuits in the mm-wave and sub-terahertz range. The latest CNFET lithographic dimensions place it at-par with complementary metal oxide semiconductor in terms of current handling capability, whereas the forecasted improvement in the lithography enables the CNFETs to handle more than twice the current of MOSFETs. The comparison of RF parameters shows superior performance of CNFETs with a g m , f T and f max of 2.7, 2.6 and 4.5 times higher, respectively. MOSFET- and CNFET-based inverter, three-stage ring oscillator and LC oscillator have been designed and compared as well. The CNFET-based inverters are found to be ten times faster, the ring oscillator demonstrates three times higher oscillation frequency and CNFET-based LC oscillator also shows improved performance than its MOSFET counterpart.

  17. Potential of carbon nanotube field effect transistors for analogue circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Hayat, Khizar; Cheema, Hammad; Shamim, Atif

    2013-01-01

    This Letter presents a detailed comparison of carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNFETs) and metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) with special focus on carbon nanotube FET's potential for implementing analogue circuits in the mm-wave and sub-terahertz range. The latest CNFET lithographic dimensions place it at-par with complementary metal oxide semiconductor in terms of current handling capability, whereas the forecasted improvement in the lithography enables the CNFETs to handle more than twice the current of MOSFETs. The comparison of RF parameters shows superior performance of CNFETs with a g m , f T and f max of 2.7, 2.6 and 4.5 times higher, respectively. MOSFET- and CNFET-based inverter, three-stage ring oscillator and LC oscillator have been designed and compared as well. The CNFET-based inverters are found to be ten times faster, the ring oscillator demonstrates three times higher oscillation frequency and CNFET-based LC oscillator also shows improved performance than its MOSFET counterpart.

  18. Sensors based on carbon nanotube field-effect transistors and molecular recognition approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Cid Salavert, Cristina Carlota

    2009-01-01

    The general objective of this thesis is to develop chemical sensors whose sensing capacities are based on the principle of molecular recognition and where the transduction is carried out by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT).The sensing device used is the carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET). The new structure of the CNTFET allows nanotubes to be integrated at the surface of the devices, thus exploiting SWCNTs' sensitivity to changes in their environment. The functionalization...

  19. Emittance preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kain, V; Arduini, G; Goddard, B; Holzer, B J; Jowett, J M; Meddahi, M; Mertens, T; Roncarolo, F; Schaumann, M; Versteegen, R; Wenninger, J [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    Emittance measurements during the LHC proton run 2011 indicated a blow-up of 20 % to 30 % from LHC injection to collisions. This presentation will show the emittance preservation throughout the different parts of the LHC cycle and discuss the current limitations on emittance determination. An overview of emittance preservation through the injector complex as function of bunch intensity will also be given. Possible sources for the observed blow-up and required tests in 2012 will be presented. Possible improvements of emittance diagnostics and analysis tools for 2012 will be shown.

  20. Nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond based field emitter array for a flat-panel x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posada, Chrystian M.; Grant, Edwin J.; Lee, Hyoung K.; Castaño, Carlos H.; Divan, Ralu; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Rosenmann, Daniel; Stan, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    A field emission based flat-panel transmission x-ray source is being developed as an alternative for medical and industrial imaging. A field emitter array (FEA) prototype based on nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond film has been fabricated to be used as the electron source of this flat panel x-ray source. The FEA prototype was developed using conventional microfabrication techniques. The field emission characteristics of the FEA prototype were evaluated. Results indicated that emission current densities of the order of 6 mA/cm 2 could be obtained at electric fields as low as 10 V/μm to 20 V/μm. During the prototype microfabrication process, issues such as delamination of the extraction gate and poor etching of the SiO 2 insulating layer located between the emitters and the extraction layer were encountered. Consequently, alternative FEA designs were investigated. Experimental and simulation data from the first FEA prototype were compared and the results were used to evaluate the performance of alternative single and double gate designs that would yield better field emission characteristics compared to the first FEA prototype. The best simulation results are obtained for the double gate FEA design, when the diameter of the collimator gate is around 2.6 times the diameter of the extraction gate

  1. Fabrication of multi-emitter array of CNT for enhancement of current density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouhan, Vijay, E-mail: vchouhan@post.kek.jp [Department of Accelerator Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Noguchi, Tsuneyuki [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization-KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kato, Shigeki [Department of Accelerator Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); High Energy Accelerator Research Organization-KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2011-11-11

    We studied and compared field emission properties of two kinds of emitters of randomly oriented multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), viz. continuous film emitter (CFE) and multi-emitter array (MEA). The CFE has a continuous film of MWNTs while the MEA consists of many equidistant small circular emitters. Both types of emitters were prepared by dispersing MWNTs over a titanium (Ti) film (for CFEs) or Ti circular islands (for MEAs) deposited on tantalum (Ta) followed by rooting of MWNTs into the Ti film or the Ti islands at high temperature. Emission properties of both types of emitters were analyzed with changing their emission areas. In case of the CFEs, current density decreased with an increase in emission area whereas consistent current densities were achieved from MEAs with different emission areas. In other words, the total emission current was achieved in proportion to the emission area in the case of MEAs. Additionally a high current density of 22 A/cm{sup 2} was achieved at an electric field of 8 V/{mu}m from MEAs, which was far better than that obtained from CFEs. The high current density in MEAs was attributed to edge effect, in which higher emission current is achieved from the edge of film emitter. The results indicate that the field emission characteristics can be greatly improved if a cathode contains many small equidistant circular emitters instead of a continuous film. The outstanding stability of the CFE and the MEA has been demonstrated for 2100 and 1007 h, respectively.

  2. Transparent conducting oxide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivov, Yahya; Singh, Vivek; Ding, Yuchen; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-09-01

    Thin film or porous membranes made of hollow, transparent, conducting oxide (TCO) nanotubes, with high chemical stability, functionalized surfaces and large surface areas, can provide an excellent platform for a wide variety of nanostructured photovoltaic, photodetector, photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic devices. While large-bandgap oxide semiconductors offer transparency for incident light (below their nominal bandgap), their low carrier concentration and poor conductivity makes them unsuitable for charge conduction. Moreover, materials with high conductivity have nominally low bandgaps and hence poor light transmittance. Here, we demonstrate thin films and membranes made from TiO2 nanotubes heavily-doped with shallow Niobium (Nb) donors (up to 10%, without phase segregation), using a modified electrochemical anodization process, to fabricate transparent conducting hollow nanotubes. Temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics revealed that TiO2 TCO nanotubes, doped with 10% Nb, show metal-like behavior with resistivity decreasing from 6.5 × 10-4 Ωcm at T = 300 K (compared to 6.5 × 10-1 Ωcm for nominally undoped nanotubes) to 2.2 × 10-4 Ωcm at T = 20 K. Optical properties, studied by reflectance measurements, showed light transmittance up to 90%, within wavelength range 400 nm-1000 nm. Nb doping also improves the field emission properties of TCO nanotubes demonstrating an order of magnitude increase in field-emitter current, compared to undoped samples.

  3. Electron Emitters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tzeng, Yonhua

    2002-01-01

    When two carbon-nanotube coated electrodes are placed at a small distance from each other, electron emission from carbon nanotubes allows a DC or AC electrical current to flow between these two electrodes...

  4. Optical trapping of cold neutral atoms using a two-color evanescent light field around a carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nga, Do Thi; Viet, Nguyen Ai; Nga, Dao Thi Thuy; Lan, Nguyen Thi Phuong

    2014-01-01

    We suggest a new schema of trapping cold atoms using a two-color evanescent light field around a carbon nanotube. The two light fields circularly polarized sending through a carbon nanotube generates an evanescent wave around this nanotube. By evanescent effect, the wave decays away from the nanotube producing a set of trapping minima of the total potential in the transverse plane as a ring around the nanotube. This schema allows capture of atoms to a cylindrical shell around the nanotube. We consider some possible boundary conditions leading to the non-trivial bound state solution. Our result will be compared to some recent trapping models and our previous trapping models.

  5. Site-specific nucleation and controlled growth of a vertical tellurium nanowire array for high performance field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safdar, Muhammad; Zhan Xueying; Mirza, Misbah; Wang Zhenxing; Sun Lianfeng; He Jun; Niu Mutong; Zhang Jinping; Zhao Qing

    2013-01-01

    We report the controlled growth of highly ordered and well aligned one-dimensional tellurium nanostructure arrays via a one-step catalyst-free physical vapor deposition method. The density, size and fine structures of tellurium nanowires are systematically studied and optimized. Field emission measurement was performed to display notable dependence on nanostructure morphologies. The ordered nanowire array based field emitter has a turn-on field as low as 3.27 V μm −1 and a higher field enhancement factor of 3270. Our finding offers the possibility of controlling the growth of tellurium nanowire arrays and opens up new means for their potential applications in electronic devices and displays. (paper)

  6. Compressive effect of the magnetic field on the positron range in commonly used positron emitters simulated using Geant4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chong; Cao, Xingzhong; Liu, Fuyan; Tang, Haohui; Zhang, Zhiming; Wang, Baoyi; Wei, Long

    2017-11-01

    The compressive effect of a magnetic field on the positron range from commonly used positron emitters in PET (Positron Emission Tomography) was simulated using the Geant4 toolkit with H2O as the environmental material. The compression of the positron range, which was different in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field, showed finite final variation of relative change rate versus the magnetic field. The variation greatly depended on the positron-emission energy spectrum in the same medium. Furthermore, the volume of the positron annihilation point was dramatically compressed as the magnetic field was set in the range of 3-6T. It was more prominent for 82Rb , which is generally used as a positron source in PET technology.

  7. Half-lives of proton emitters using relativistic mean field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahu, Bidhubhusan; Patra, S. K.; Agarwalla, S. K.

    2011-01-01

    The proton radioactivity lifetimes of proton emitters from the ground and the isomeric states are calculated using the microscopic M3Y + Ex and R3Y + Ex (proposed) nucleon-nucleus interaction potentials. These interaction potentials are obtained by single folding the densities of the daughter nuclei supplemented by a zero-range pseudopotential. The quantum-mechanical-tunneling probability is calculated within the WKB approximation. The calculated results are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data for both the M3Y and R3Y interactions.

  8. Increased field-emission site density from regrown carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.Y.; Gupta, S.; Liang, M.; Nemanich, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Electron field-emission properties of as-grown, etched, and regrown carbon nanotube thin films were investigated. The aligned carbon nanotube films were deposited by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique. The surface of the as-grown film contained a carbon nanotube mat of amorphous carbon and entangled nanotubes with some tubes protruding from the surface. Hydrogen plasma etching resulted in the removal of the surface layer, and regrowth on the etched surface displayed the formation of a new carbon nanotube mat. The emission site density and the current-voltage dependence of the field emission from all of the samples were analyzed. The results showed that the as-grown sample had a few strong emission spots and a relatively high emission current density (∼20 μA/cm 2 at 1 V/μm), while the regrown sample exhibited a significantly increased emission site density

  9. Field emission characteristics of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with honeycomb configuration grown onto glass substrate with titanium coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yung-Jui [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Chang, Hsin-Yueh; Chang, Hsuan-Chen [Department of Electronic and computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Shih, Yi-Ting; Su, Wei-Jhih [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Ciou, Chen-Hong [Department of Electronic and computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Ling [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Honda, Shin-ichi [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Huang, Ying-Sheng [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic and computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Lee, Kuei-Yi, E-mail: kylee@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic and computer Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • We have successfully designed the honeycomb patterns on glass substrate by photolithography technique. • Honeycomb-VACNTs were synthesized successfully onto glass substrate by using thermal CVD and covered different Ti films on VACNTs by e-beam evaporation. • After coating the Ti films, the current density reached 7 mA/cm{sup 2} when the electric field was 2.5 V/μm. • The fluorescence of VACNTs with Ti 15 nm films exhibits the high brightness screen and emission uniformity. -- Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown successfully onto a glass substrate using thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD) with C{sub 2}H{sub 2} gas at 700 °C. The synthesized CNTs exhibited good crystallinity and a vertically aligned morphology. The vertically aligned CNTs (VACNTs) were patterned with a honeycomb configuration using photolithography and characterized using field emission (FE) applications. Owing to the electric field concentration, the FE current density of VACNTs with honeycomb configuration was higher than that of the un-patterned VACNTs. Ti was coated onto the VACNT surface utilizing the relatively lower work function property to enhance the FE current density. The FE current density reached up to 7.0 mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied electric field of 2.5 V/μm. A fluorescent screen was monitored to demonstrate uniform FE VACNTs with a honeycomb configuration. The designed field emitter provided an admirable example for FE applications.

  10. Method of synthesizing small-diameter carbon nanotubes with electron field emission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie (Inventor); Du, Chunsheng (Inventor); Qian, Cheng (Inventor); Gao, Bo (Inventor); Qiu, Qi (Inventor); Zhou, Otto Z. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube material having an outer diameter less than 10 nm and a number of walls less than ten are disclosed. Also disclosed are an electron field emission device including a substrate, an optionally layer of adhesion-promoting layer, and a layer of electron field emission material. The electron field emission material includes a carbon nanotube having a number of concentric graphene shells per tube of from two to ten, an outer diameter from 2 to 8 nm, and a nanotube length greater than 0.1 microns. One method to fabricate carbon nanotubes includes the steps of (a) producing a catalyst containing Fe and Mo supported on MgO powder, (b) using a mixture of hydrogen and carbon containing gas as precursors, and (c) heating the catalyst to a temperature above 950.degree. C. to produce a carbon nanotube. Another method of fabricating an electron field emission cathode includes the steps of (a) synthesizing electron field emission materials containing carbon nanotubes with a number of concentric graphene shells per tube from two to ten, an outer diameter of from 2 to 8 nm, and a length greater than 0.1 microns, (b) dispersing the electron field emission material in a suitable solvent, (c) depositing the electron field emission materials onto a substrate, and (d) annealing the substrate.

  11. Transport properties of hydrogen passivated silicon nanotubes and silicon nanotube field effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñ oz, Enrique; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of silicon nanotubes attached to metallic electrodes from first principles, using density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function method. The influence of the surface termination

  12. Characterization of electron bunches from field emitter array cathodes for use in next-generation x-ray free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leemann, S. C.

    2007-01-01

    PSI is interested in developing an x-ray free electron laser (X-FEL) as a companion radiation source to the existing Swiss Light Source. In order to achieve radiation wavelengths as low as 1 Α, the X-FEL requires excellent electron beam quality and high beam energy. The energy requirements and thus the size and cost of the project can be reduced considerably if an ultra-low emittance electron source is developed. Therefore PSI has started the Low Emittance Gun Project with the aim to design a novel type of electron source that will deliver an electron beam with unprecedented emittance at high peak currents to the linear accelerator of the proposed X-FEL. A source candidate for such a gun is field emission from cold cathodes. In order to gain first experience with field emission guns, investigate the dynamics of space charge dominated electron beams and to develop diagnostics capable of resolving ultra-low emittances, it was decided to build a 100 keV DC gun test stand. In the scope of this thesis, the test stand has been designed, assembled and commissioned. For the first time, transverse phase space measurements of bunches emitted by field emitter arrays in pulsed DC accelerating fields have been performed. (author)

  13. Plasma-induced field emission study of carbon nanotube cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Shen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on the plasma-induced field emission (PFE properties of a large area carbon nanotube (CNT cathode on a 2 MeV linear induction accelerator injector is presented. Experimental results show that the cathode is able to emit intense electron beams. Intense electron beams of 14.9–127.8  A/cm^{2} are obtained from the cathode. The CNT cathode desorbs gases from the CNTs during the PFE process. The fast cathode plasma expansion affects the diode perveance. The amount of outgassing is estimated to be 0.06–0.49  Pa·L, and the ratio of outgassing and electron are roughly calculated to be within the range of 170–350 atoms per electron. The effect of the outgassing is analyzed, and the outgassing mass spectrum of the CNT cathode has been studied during the PFE. There is a significant desorption of CO_{2}, N_{2}(CO, and H_{2} gases, which plays an important role during the PFE process. All the experiments demonstrate that the outgassing plays an important role in the formation of the cathode plasma. Moreover, the characteristic turn-on time of the CNT cathode was measured to be 39 ns.

  14. Effect of substrate material on the growth and field emission characteristics of large-area carbon nanotube forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ummethala, Raghunandan; Täschner, Christine; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Büchner, Bernd [IFW Dresden, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Wenger, Daniela; Tedde, Sandro F. [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Technology Centre, Guenther-Scharowsky-Strasse 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Eckert, Jürgen [Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Jahnstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Department Materials Physics, Montanuniversität Leoben, Jahnstraße 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2016-01-28

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a promising replacement for tungsten filaments as electron emitters in conventional x-ray sources, owing to their higher aspect ratio, superior mechanical stability, chemical inertness, and high electrical and thermal conductivities. Conditions for realizing the best emission behavior from CNTs have been formulated over the last few years. In this paper, we report the relatively less-investigated factor, namely, the influence of the nature of substrate material on the growth as well as field emission characteristics of large-area multiwalled CNTs for their practical application in medical x-ray sources. We compare the morphology of CNTs on a variety of substrates such as stainless steel, copper, molybdenum, graphite, few-layer graphene, and carbon nanowalls grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition following a simple drop-coating of catalyst. We find that CNTs grown on stainless steel and graphite show the best combination of emission characteristics under pulsed operation mode. These studies are helpful in selecting the optimum substrate material for field emission applications. Ex situ studies on field emission degradation of CNTs are presented towards the end.

  15. Effect of substrate material on the growth and field emission characteristics of large-area carbon nanotube forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ummethala, Raghunandan; Wenger, Daniela; Tedde, Sandro F.; Täschner, Christine; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Büchner, Bernd; Eckert, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a promising replacement for tungsten filaments as electron emitters in conventional x-ray sources, owing to their higher aspect ratio, superior mechanical stability, chemical inertness, and high electrical and thermal conductivities. Conditions for realizing the best emission behavior from CNTs have been formulated over the last few years. In this paper, we report the relatively less-investigated factor, namely, the influence of the nature of substrate material on the growth as well as field emission characteristics of large-area multiwalled CNTs for their practical application in medical x-ray sources. We compare the morphology of CNTs on a variety of substrates such as stainless steel, copper, molybdenum, graphite, few-layer graphene, and carbon nanowalls grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition following a simple drop-coating of catalyst. We find that CNTs grown on stainless steel and graphite show the best combination of emission characteristics under pulsed operation mode. These studies are helpful in selecting the optimum substrate material for field emission applications. Ex situ studies on field emission degradation of CNTs are presented towards the end.

  16. Features of electron-phonon interactions in nanotubes with chiral symmetry in magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kibis, O V

    2001-01-01

    Interaction of the electrons with acoustic phonons in the nanotube with chiral symmetry by availability of the magnetic field, parallel to the nanotube axis, is considered. It is shown that the electron energy spectrum is asymmetric relative to the electron wave vector inversion and for that reason the electron-phonon interaction appears to be different for similar phonons with mutually contrary directions of the wave vector. This phenomenon leads to origination of the electromotive force by the spatially uniform electron gas heating and to appearance of the quadrupole component in the nanotube volt-ampere characteristics

  17. Highly stable field emission from ZnO nanowire field emitters controlled by an amorphous indium–gallium–zinc-oxide thin film transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojie; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Zhipeng; Ou, Hai; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun

    2018-04-01

    Lowering the driving voltage and improving the stability of nanowire field emitters are essential for them to be applied in devices. In this study the characteristics of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire field emitter arrays (FEAs) controlled by an amorphous indium–gallium–zinc-oxide thin film transistor (a-IGZO TFT) were studied. A low driving voltage along with stabilization of the field emission current were achieved. Modulation of field emission currents up to three orders of magnitude was achieved at a gate voltage of 0–32 V for a constant anode voltage. Additionally, a-IGZO TFT control can dramatically reduce the emission current fluctuation (i.e., from 46.11 to 1.79% at an emission current of ∼3.7 µA). Both the a-IGZO TFT and ZnO nanowire FEAs were prepared on glass substrates in our research, demonstrating the feasibility of realizing large area a-IGZO TFT-controlled ZnO nanowire FEAs.

  18. Carbon nanotubes field-effect transistor for rapid detection of DHA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thi Thuy; Nguyen Duc Chien; Mai Anh Tuan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development of DNA sensor based on a network carbon nanotubes field effect transistor (CNTFETs) for Escherichia coli bacteria detection. The DNA sequences were immobilized on single-walled carbon nanotubes of transistor CNTFETs by using absorption. The hybridization of the DNA probe sequences and complementary DNA strands was detected by electrical conductance change from the electron doping by DNA hybridization directly on the carbon nanotubes leading to the change in the metal-CNTs barrier energy through the modulation of the electrode work function of carbon nanotubes field effect transistor. The results showed that the response time of DNA sensor was approximately 1 min and the sensitivity of DNA sensor was at 0.565 μA/nM; the detection limit of the sensor was about 1 pM of E. coli bacteria sample. (author)

  19. Field-Flow Fractionation of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John P. Selegue

    2011-11-17

    During the grant period, we carried out FFF studies of carbonaceous soot, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nano-onions and polyoxometallates. FFF alone does not provide enough information to fully characterize samples, so our suite of characterization techniques grew to include light scattering (especially Photon Correlation Spectroscopy), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and spectroscopic methods. We developed convenient techniques to deposit and examine minute FFF fractions by electron microscopy. In collaboration with Arthur Cammers (University of Kentucky), we used Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (Fl-FFF) to monitor the solution-phase growth of keplerates, a class of polyoxometallate (POM) nanoparticles. We monitored the evolution of Mo-POM nanostructures over the course of weeks by by using flow field-flow fractionation and corroborated the nanoparticle structures by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total molybdenum in the solution and precipitate phases was monitored by using inductively coupled plasma analyses, and total Mo-POM concentration by following the UV-visible spectra of the solution phase. We observe crystallization-driven formation of (Mo132) keplerate and solution phase-driven evolution of structurally related nanoscopic species (3-60 nm). FFF analyses of other classes of materials were less successful. Attempts to analyze platelets of layered materials, including exfoliated graphite (graphene) and TaS2 and MoS2, were disappointing. We were not able to optimize flow conditions for the layered materials. The metal sulfides react with the aqueous carrier liquid and settle out of suspension quickly because of their high density.

  20. Dynamics of a quantum emitter resonantly coupled to both external field and localized surface plasmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nerkararyan, Khachatur V.; Yezekyan, Torgom S.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2018-01-01

    electromagnetic field. Considering the QDE-field interactions in the regime of strong QDE-field coupling, we show that the feedback provided by the MNP on the QDE (due to the LSP excitation with the field generated by the dipole moment of the QDE transition) influences significantly the coherent process of Rabi...

  1. Synthesis and field emission properties of carbon nanotubes grown in ethanol flame based on a photoresist-assisted catalyst annealing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaoxia; Fang Guojia; Liu Nishuang; Wang Chong; Zheng Qiao; Zhou Hai; Zhao Dongshan; Long Hao; Liu Yuping; Zhao Xingzhong

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been grown directly on a Si substrate without a diffusion barrier in ethanol diffusion flame using Ni as the catalyst after a photoresist-assisted catalyst annealing process. The growth mechanism of as-synthesized CNTs is confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission-electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The photoresist is the key for the formation of active catalyst particles during annealing process, which then result in the growth of CNTs. The catalyst annealing temperature has been found to affect the morphologies and field electron emission properties of CNTs significantly. The field emission properties of as-grown CNTs are investigated with a diode structure and the obtained CNTs exhibit enhanced characteristics. This technique will be applicable to a low-cost fabrication process of electron-emitter arrays.

  2. Breakdown voltage reduction by field emission in multi-walled carbon nanotubes based ionization gas sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saheed, M. Shuaib M.; Muti Mohamed, Norani; Arif Burhanudin, Zainal, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my [Centre of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-03-24

    Ionization gas sensors using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are demonstrated. The sharp tips of the nanotubes generate large non-uniform electric fields at relatively low applied voltage. The enhancement of the electric field results in field emission of electrons that dominates the breakdown mechanism in gas sensor with gap spacing below 14 μm. More than 90% reduction in breakdown voltage is observed for sensors with MWCNT and 7 μm gap spacing. Transition of breakdown mechanism, dominated by avalanche electrons to field emission electrons, as decreasing gap spacing is also observed and discussed.

  3. Harvesting Triplet Excitons with Exciplex Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Emitters toward High Performance Heterostructured Organic Light-Emitting Field Effect Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li; Hu, Yongsheng; Liu, Zheqin; Lv, Ying; Guo, Xiaoyang; Liu, Xingyuan

    2017-01-25

    The utilization of triplet excitons plays a key role in obtaining high emission efficiency for organic electroluminescent devices. However, to date, only phosphorescent materials have been implemented to harvest the triplet excitons in the organic light-emitting field effect transistors (OLEFETs). In this work, we report the first incorporation of exciplex thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters in heterostructured OLEFETs to harvest the triplet excitons. By developing a new kind of exciplex TADF emitter constituted by m-MTDATA (4,4',4″-tris(N-3-methylphenyl-N-phenylamino)triphenylamine) as the donor and OXD-7 (1,3-bis[2-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazo-5-yl]benzene) as the acceptor, an exciton utilization efficiency of 74.3% for the devices was achieved. It is found that the injection barrier between hole transport layer and emission layer as well as the ratio between donor and acceptor would influence the external quantum efficiency (EQE) significantly. Devices with a maximum EQE of 3.76% which is far exceeding the reported results for devices with conventional fluorescent emitters were successfully demonstrated. Moreover, the EQE at high brightness even outperformed the result for organic light-emitting diode based on the same emitter. Our results demonstrate that the exciplex TADF emitters can be promising candidates to develop OLEFETs with high performance.

  4. Dielectric Response and Born Dynamic Charge of BN Nanotubes from Ab Initio Finite Electric Field Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guang-Yu; Ishibashi, Shoji; Tamura, Tomoyuki; Terakura, Kiyoyuki

    2007-03-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in 1991 by Iijima, carbon and other nanotubes have attracted considerable interest worldwide because of their unusual properties and also great potentials for technological applications. Though CNTs continue to attract great interest, other nanotubes such as BN nanotubes (BN-NTs) may offer different opportunities that CNTs cannot provide. In this contribution, we present the results of our recent systematic ab initio calculations of the static dielectric constant, electric polarizability, Born dynamical charge, electrostriction coefficient and piezoelectric constant of BN-NTs using the latest crystalline finite electric field theory [1]. [1] I. Souza, J. Iniguez, and D. Vanderbilt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 117602 (2002); P. Umari and A. Pasquarello, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 157602 (2002).

  5. Experimental Development of Low-emittance Field-emission Electron Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueangaranwong, A. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator & Detector Development; Buzzard, C. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Divan, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Korampally, V. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Piot, P. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator & Detector Development; Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2016-10-10

    Field emission electron sources are capable of extreme brightness when excited by static or time-dependent electro- magnetic fields. We are currently developing a cathode test stand operating in DC mode with possibility to trigger the emission using ultra-short (~ 100-fs) laser pulses. This contribution describes the status of an experiment to investigate field-emission using cathodes under development at NIU in collaboration with the Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials.

  6. Electrical responses by effects of molecular adsorption on channel and junctions of carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Donghun; Park, Wanjun

    2008-01-01

    We report the adsorption effect on the electrical transport of nanotube field effect transistors. The source-drain current is monitored separately for the nanotube channel and the metal-nanotube junction under different pressures of ambient air with a blocking passivation. The metal-nanotube junction shows a significant change from p-type to ambipolar upon vacuum pumping, while the nanotube channel changes modestly. The metal-nanotube junction is found to be far more sensitive to the environment than the nanotube channel. We suggest that the adsorption states underneath the blocking layer do not desorb, and thus the positive carriers would not be diluted upon the vacuum pumping. This result is interpreted as the formation of an i-p-i and p-i-p junction with charge transfer by oxygen molecules. (fast track communication)

  7. An ionization pressure gauge with LaB6 emitter for long-term operation in strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, U.; Pedersen, T. S.; Marquardt, M.; Singer, M.

    2018-03-01

    We report here on a potentially significant improvement in the design of neutral pressure gauges of the so-called ASDEX-type which were first used in the Axially Symmetric Divertor EXperiment (ASDEX). Such gauges are considered state-of-the-art and are in wide use in fusion experiments, but they nonetheless suffer from a relatively high failure rate when operated at high magnetic field strengths for long times. This is therefore a significant concern for long-pulse, high-field experiments such as Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) and ITER. The new design is much more robust. The improvement is to use a LaB6 crystal instead of a tungsten wire as the thermionic emitter of electrons in the gauge. Such a LaB6 prototype gauge was successfully operated for a total of 60 h in B = 3.1 T, confirming the significantly improved robustness of the new design and qualifying it for near-term operation in W7-X. With the LaB6 crystal, an order of magnitude reduction in heating current is achieved, relative to the tungsten filament based gauges, from 15-20 A to 1-2 A. This reduces the Lorenz forces and the heating power by an order of magnitude also and is presumably the reason for the much improved robustness. The new gauge design, test environment setup at the superconducting magnet, and results from test operation are described.

  8. Effects of potassium hydroxide post-treatments on the field-emission properties of thermal chemical vapor deposited carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Ying; Lee, Shih-Fong; Chang, Yung-Ping; Hsiao, Wei-Shao

    2011-12-01

    In this study, a simple potassium hydroxide treatment was applied to functionalize the surface and to modify the structure of multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown on silicon substrates by thermal chemical vapor deposition. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometry were employed to investigate the mechanism causing the modified field-emission properties of carbon nanotubes. From our experimental data, the emitted currents of carbon nanotubes after potassium hydroxide treatment are enhanced by more than one order of magnitude compared with those of untreated carbon nanotubes. The emitted current density of carbon nanotubes increases from 0.44 mA/cm2 to 7.92 mA/cm2 after 30 minutes KOH treatment. This technique provides a simple, economical, and effective way to enhance the field-emission properties of carbon nanotubes.

  9. Intense nonneutral beam propagation in a periodic solenoidal field using a macroscopic fluid model with zero thermal emittance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, R.C.; Stoltz, P.; Chen, C.

    1997-08-01

    A macroscopic fluid model is developed to describe the nonlinear dynamics and collective processes in an intense high-current beam propagating in the z-direction through a periodic focusing solenoidal field B z (z + S) = B z (z), where S is the axial periodicity length. The analysis assumes that space-charge effects dominate the effects of thermal beam emittance, Kr b 2 much-gt ε th 2 , and is based on the macroscopic moment-Maxwell equations, truncated by neglecting the pressure tensor and higher-order moments. Assuming a thin beam with r b much-lt S, azimuthally symmetric beam equilibria with ∂/∂t = 0 = ∂/∂θ are investigated. To illustrate the considerable flexibility of the macroscopic formalism, assuming (nearly) uniform axial flow velocity V b over the beam cross section, beam equilibrium properties are calculated for two examples: (a) uniform radial density profile over the interval 0 ≤ r b (z), and (b) an infinitesimally thin annular beam centered at r = r b (z). The analysis generally allows for the azimuthal flow velocity V θb (r,z) to differ from the Larmor frequency, and the model is used to calculate the (leading-order) correction δV zb (r,z) to the axial flow velocity for the step-function density profile in case (a) above

  10. Enhancement of electron field emission of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes by nitrogen plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B.B. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University of Technology, 69 Hongguang Rd, Lijiatuo, Banan District, Chongqing 400054 (China); Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); Cheng, Q.J. [Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Chen, X. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Ostrikov, K., E-mail: kostya.ostrikov@csiro.au [Plasma Nanoscience Centre Australia (PNCA), CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield, NSW 2070 (Australia); Plasma Nanoscience, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2011-09-22

    Highlights: > A new and custom-designed bias-enhanced hot-filament chemical vapor deposition system is developed to synthesize vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. > The carbon nanotubes are later treated with nitrogen plasmas. > The electron field emission characteristics of the carbon nanotubes are significantly improved after the nitrogen plasma treatment. > A new physical mechanism is proposed to interpret the improvement of the field emission characteristics. - Abstract: The electron field emission (EFE) characteristics from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) without and with treatment by the nitrogen plasma are investigated. The VACNTs with the plasma treatment showed a significant improvement in the EFE property compared to the untreated VACNTs. The morphological, structural, and compositional properties of the VACNTs are extensively examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It is shown that the significant EFE improvement of the VACNTs after the nitrogen plasma treatment is closely related to the variation of the morphological and structural properties of the VACNTs. The high current density (299.6 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}) achieved at a low applied field (3.50 V/{mu}m) suggests that the VACNTs after nitrogen plasma treatment can serve as effective electron field emission sources for numerous applications.

  11. Enhancement of electron field emission of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes by nitrogen plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B.B.; Cheng, Q.J.; Chen, X.; Ostrikov, K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A new and custom-designed bias-enhanced hot-filament chemical vapor deposition system is developed to synthesize vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. → The carbon nanotubes are later treated with nitrogen plasmas. → The electron field emission characteristics of the carbon nanotubes are significantly improved after the nitrogen plasma treatment. → A new physical mechanism is proposed to interpret the improvement of the field emission characteristics. - Abstract: The electron field emission (EFE) characteristics from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) without and with treatment by the nitrogen plasma are investigated. The VACNTs with the plasma treatment showed a significant improvement in the EFE property compared to the untreated VACNTs. The morphological, structural, and compositional properties of the VACNTs are extensively examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It is shown that the significant EFE improvement of the VACNTs after the nitrogen plasma treatment is closely related to the variation of the morphological and structural properties of the VACNTs. The high current density (299.6 μA/cm 2 ) achieved at a low applied field (3.50 V/μm) suggests that the VACNTs after nitrogen plasma treatment can serve as effective electron field emission sources for numerous applications.

  12. Flexible Field Emitter for X-ray Generation by Implanting CNTs into Nickel Foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports on a flexible Ni micro wire with CNTs embedded into its surface. By using micromachining technology, for the first time, we could implant nanoscale materials into micro-scale metal substrate at room temperature. Thanks to the effective direct contact and the strong interactions between CNTs and the substrate, field emission current of 1.11 mA (current density of 22.2 mA/cm2) could be achieved from the micro wire. Moreover, the wire shows excellent mechanical properties for large amplitude bending, which is beneficial for geometric designing. To check the practical application of the wire, a simplified X-ray imaging system was set up by modifying a conventional tube. The gray shade that appears on the sensitive film after being exposed to the radiation confirms the X-ray generation.

  13. Effect of vacancy defect on electrical properties of chiral single-walled carbon nanotube under external electrical field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yu-Pin; Tien Li-Gan; Tsai Chuen-Horng; Lee Ming-Hsien; Li Feng-Yin

    2011-01-01

    Ab initio calculations demonstrated that the energy gap modulation of a chiral carbon nanotube with mono-vacancy defect can be achieved by applying a transverse electric field. The bandstructure of this defective carbon nanotube varying due to the external electric field is distinctly different from those of the perfect nanotube and defective zigzag nanotube. This variation in bandstructure strongly depends on not only the chirality of the nanotube and also the applied direction of the transverse electric field. A mechanism is proposed to explain the response of the local energy gap between the valence band maximum state and the local gap state under external electric field. Several potential applications of these phenomena are discussed. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  14. Extraction of emission parameters for large-area field emitters, using a technically complete Fowler–Nordheim-type equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    In papers on cold field electron emission from large-area field emitters (LAFEs), it has become widespread practice to publish a misleading Fowler–Nordheim-type (FN-type) equation. This equation over-predicts the LAFE-average current density by a large highly variable factor thought to usually lie between 10 3 and 10 9 . This equation, although often referenced to FN’s 1928 paper, is a simplified equation used in undergraduate teaching, does not apply unmodified to LAFEs and does not appear in the 1928 paper. Technological LAFE papers often do not cite any theoretical work more recent than 1928, and often do not comment on the discrepancy between theory and experiment. This usage has occurred widely, in several high-profile American and UK applied-science journals (including Nanotechnology), and in various other places. It does not inhibit practical LAFE development, but can give a misleading impression of potential LAFE performance to non-experts. This paper shows how the misleading equation can be replaced by a conceptually complete FN-type equation that uses three high-level correction factors. One of these, or a combination of two of them, may be useful as an additional measure of LAFE quality; this paper describes a method for estimating factor values using experimental data and discusses when it can be used. Suggestions are made for improved engineering practice in reporting LAFE results. Some of these should help to prevent situations arising whereby an equation appearing in high-profile applied-science journals is used to support statements that an engineering regulatory body might deem to involve professional negligence. (paper)

  15. Carbon nanotubes in an inhomogeneous transverse magnetic field: exactly solvable model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubský, Vít; Kuru, S.; Negro, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 11 (2014), s. 115307 ISSN 1751-8113 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR GPP203/11/P038 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * dirac equation * magnetic field * finite-gap system Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.583, year: 2014

  16. Calibration method for a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Masuhiro; Murata, Katsuyuki; Ataka, Tatsuaki; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    An easy calibration method based on the Langmuir adsorption theory is proposed for a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (NTFET) biosensor. This method was applied to three NTFET biosensors that had approximately the same structure but exhibited different characteristics. After calibration, their experimentally determined characteristics exhibited a good agreement with the calibration curve. The reason why the observed characteristics of these NTFET biosensors differed among the devices was that the carbon nanotube (CNT) that formed the channel was not uniform. Although the controlled growth of a CNT is difficult, it is shown that an NTFET biosensor can be easy calibrated using the proposed calibration method, regardless of the CNT channel structures

  17. Si/Ge hetero-structure nanotube tunnel field effect transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Hanna, A. N.

    2015-01-07

    We discuss the physics of conventional channel material (silicon/germanium hetero-structure) based transistor topology mainly core/shell (inner/outer) gated nanotube vs. gate-all-around nanowire architecture for tunnel field effect transistor application. We show that nanotube topology can result in higher performance through higher normalized current when compared to nanowire architecture at Vdd-=-1-V due to the availability of larger tunneling cross section and lower Shockley-Reed-Hall recombination. Both architectures are able to achieve sub 60-mV/dec performance for more than five orders of magnitude of drain current. This enables the nanotube configuration achieving performance same as the nanowire architecture even when Vdd is scaled down to 0.5-V.

  18. Si/Ge hetero-structure nanotube tunnel field effect transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Hanna, A. N.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the physics of conventional channel material (silicon/germanium hetero-structure) based transistor topology mainly core/shell (inner/outer) gated nanotube vs. gate-all-around nanowire architecture for tunnel field effect transistor application. We show that nanotube topology can result in higher performance through higher normalized current when compared to nanowire architecture at Vdd-=-1-V due to the availability of larger tunneling cross section and lower Shockley-Reed-Hall recombination. Both architectures are able to achieve sub 60-mV/dec performance for more than five orders of magnitude of drain current. This enables the nanotube configuration achieving performance same as the nanowire architecture even when Vdd is scaled down to 0.5-V.

  19. Plasma-induced field emission and plasma expansion of carbon nanotube cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Qingliang; Zhang Yue; Qi Junjie; Huang Yunhua; Xia Liansheng; Gao Zhanjun; Gu Yousong

    2007-01-01

    High intensity electron emission cathodes based on carbon nanotube films have been successfully fabricated. An investigation of the explosive field emission properties of the carbon nanotube cathode in a double-pulse mode was presented and a high emission current density of 245 A cm -2 was obtained. The formation of the cathode plasma layer was proved and the production process of the electron beams from the cathode was explained. The time and space resolution of the electron beams flow from the cathode was investigated. The plasma expanded at a velocity of ∼8.17 cm μs -1 towards the anode and influenced on the intensity and distribution of electron beams obviously. The formation of cathode plasma had no preferential position and the local enhancement of electron beams was random. This carbon nanotube cathode appears to be suitable for high-power microwave device applications

  20. Electronic and optical properties of finite carbon nanotubes in an electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, R B; Lee, C H; Chang, C P; Lin, M F

    2007-01-01

    The effects, caused by the geometric structure and an electric field (E), on the electronic and optical properties of quasi-zero-dimensional finite carbon nanotubes are explored by employing the tight-binding model coupled with curvature effects. Electronic properties (state energies, symmetry of electronic states, energy spacing and state degeneracy) are significantly affected by the magnitude and the direction of the electric field and the geometric structure (radius, length and chirality). The electric field, by lowering the symmetry of finite carbon nanotubes, modifies the electronic properties. Thus, the optical excitation spectra, excited by electric polarization parallel to the nanotube axis, exhibit rich delta-function-like peaks, which reveal the characteristics of the electronic properties. Therefore it follows that geometric structure and E influence the low-energy absorption spectra, i.e. the change of frequency of the first peak, the alternation of the peak height and the production of the new peaks. There are more absorption peaks when E is oriented closer to the cross-section plane. Moreover, the very complicated optical absorption spectra are characteristic for the individual chiral carbon nanotube due to its specific geometric structure. Above all, the predicted absorption spectra and the associated electronic properties could be verified by optical measurements

  1. Realisation of a ultra-high vacuum system and technique development of microscopical emitters preparation in silicium. First measurements of field emission current and field photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Manouni, A.

    1990-12-01

    The development of research in the domain of photocathode (electron sources) illuminated by laser light to produce intense multiple bunches of electrons in short time is needed by many applications as linear collider e + e - , free electron laser, lasertron, etc... In this way, after a study of field emission, of photoemission and of photofield emission, we prepared microscopical emitters in silicium heavy and weakly doped a boron using a technique of microlithography. Then, we realized a system of ultra-high vacuum of studying property of emission from photocathodes realized. The experiment results obtained in field emission and photofield emission have shown that a behaviour unexpected for P-silicium tips array compared to P + -silicon tips array. With P-type silicon, a quantum yield of 21 percent has been measured for laser power of 140 mW and for applied field of 1.125 x 10 7 V/m and an instantaneous response to laser light beam has been observed. It has been noted that presence of oxyde at the surface of photocathode limits extensively the emission current. The fluctuations of emission current are due to quality of vacuum [fr

  2. Electron Gas Dynamic Conductivity Tensor on the Nanotube Surface in Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Ermolaev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kubo formula was derived for the electron gas conductivity tensor on the nanotube surface in longitudinal magnetic field considering spatial and time dispersion. Components of the degenerate and nondegenerate electron gas conductivity tensor were calculated. The study has showed that under high electron density, the conductivity undergoes oscillations of de Haas-van Alphen and Aharonov-Bohm types with the density of electrons and magnetic field changes.

  3. Effect of oxygen plasma on field emission characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Avshish; Parveen, Shama; Husain, Samina; Ali, Javid; Zulfequar, Mohammad [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025 (India); Harsh [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Husain, Mushahid, E-mail: mush-reslab@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025 (India); Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India)

    2014-02-28

    Field emission properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) grown on iron catalyst film by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system were studied in diode configuration. The results were analysed in the framework of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The grown SWCNTs were found to be excellent field emitters, having emission current density higher than 20 mA/cm{sup 2} at a turn-on field of 1.3 V/μm. The as grown SWCNTs were further treated with Oxygen (O{sub 2}) plasma for 5 min and again field emission characteristics were measured. The O{sub 2} plasma treated SWCNTs have shown dramatic improvement in their field emission properties with emission current density of 111 mA/cm{sup 2} at a much lower turn on field of 0.8 V/μm. The as grown as well as plasma treated SWCNTs were also characterized by various techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy before and after O{sub 2} plasma treatment and the findings are being reported in this paper.

  4. Emittance growth due to the wake field driven by an electron beam accelerated in an RF-gun of free electron laser 'ELSA'

    CERN Document Server

    Salah, W

    2000-01-01

    It appears that the ease of the parameter chosen for 'ELSA' photo injector, the influence of the exit aperture, in terms of beam quality, is slight concerning the transverse emittance: (DELTA epsilon sub p sub e sub r sub p sub e sub n sub d sub i sub c sub u sub l sub a sub r /epsilon sub p sub e sub r sub p sub e sub n sub d sub i sub c sub u sub l sub a sub = = r)(z)approx 3% at maximum, and negligible concerning the axial emittance. To complete this paper, we recall the results previously obtained concerning the wake field of a closed or open cavity for a beam approaching the anode . They had quantitatively specified the expected deep asymmetry between the conducting walls regarding their contribution to the total wake field, besides the space-charge contribution. (Given that the radial walls have no time to contribute, these conducting walls are the cathode and the anode.) Thus, concerning the effects on whole-beam emittances, the correction (DELTA epsilon sub p sub e sub r sub p sub e sub n sub d sub i ...

  5. Selective growth of carbon nanotube on silicon substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xiao-ping; H. ABE; T. SHIMIZU; A. ANDO; H. TOKUMOT; ZHU Shen-ming; ZHOU Hao-shen

    2006-01-01

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) growth of iron oxide-deposited trench-patterns and the locally-ordered CNT arrays on silicon substrate were achieved by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition(STCVD) of ethanol vapor. The CNTs were uniformly synthesized with good selectivity on trench-patterned silicon substrates. This fabrication process is compatible with currently used semiconductor-processing technologies,and the carbon-nanotube fabrication process can be widely applied for the development of electronic devices using carbon-nanotube field emitters as cold cathodes and can revolutionize the area of field-emitting electronic devices. The site-selective growth of CNT from an iron oxide nanoparticle catalyst patterned were also achieved by drying-mediated self-assembly technique. The present method offers a simple and cost-effective method to grow carbon nanotubes with self-assembled patterns.

  6. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanli [El Cerrito, CA; Fabbri, Jason D [San Francisco, CA; Melosh, Nicholas A [Menlo Park, CA; Hussain, Zahid [Orinda, CA; Shen, Zhi-Xun [Stanford, CA

    2012-04-10

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  7. A comparative study of nitrogen plasma effect on field emission characteristics of single wall carbon nanotubes synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Avshish; Parveen, Shama; Husain, Samina; Ali, Javid [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025 (India); Zulfequar, Mohammad [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025 (India); Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025 (India); Harsh [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025 (India); Husain, Mushahid, E-mail: mush_reslab@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025 (India); Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been successfully grown on nickel (Ni) deposited silicon substrate. • The diameter distribution of the grown (SWCNTs) is in the range 1–2 nm. • A current density of 25.0 mA/cm{sup 2} at 1.9 V/μm of the grown SWCNTs is observed with a high turn-on field (E{sub to}) of 1.3 V/μm. • After N{sub 2} nitrogen plasma treatment, huge current density of 81.5 mA/cm{sup 2} at 2.0 V/μm was recorded with low E{sub to} of 1.2 V/μm. • The comparison of these two typical results indicates a drastic enhancement in the field emission properties after plasma treatments. - Abstract: Vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with large scale control of diameter, length and alignment have successfully been grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The nickel (Ni) as catalyst deposited on silicon (Si) substrate was used to grow the SWCNTs. Field emission (FE) characteristics of the as grown SWCNTs were measured using indigenously designed setup in which a diode is configured in such a way that by applying negative voltage on the copper plate (cathode) with respect to stainless steel anode plate, current density can be recorded. To measure the FE characteristics, SWCNTs film pasted on the copper plate with silver epoxy was used as electron emitter source. The effective area of anode was ∼78.5 mm{sup 2} for field emission measurements. The emission measurements were carried out under high vacuum pressure of the order of 10{sup −6} Torr to minimize the electron scattering and degradation of the emitters. The distance between anode and cathode was kept 500 μm (constant) during entire field emission studies. The grown SWCNTs are excellent field emitters, having emission current density higher than 25 mA/cm{sup 2} at turn-on field 1.3 V/μm. In order to enhance the field emission characteristics, the as grown SWCNTs have been treated under nitrogen (N{sub 2

  8. Transport properties of finite carbon nanotubes under electric and magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T S; Lin, M F

    2006-01-01

    Electronic and transport properties of finite carbon nanotubes subject to the influences of a transverse electric field and a magnetic field with varying polar angles are studied by the tight-binding model. The external fields will modify the state energies, destroy the state degeneracy, and modulate the energy gap. Both the state energy and the energy gap exhibit rich dependence on the field strength, the magnetic field direction, and the types of carbon nanotubes. The semiconductor-metal transition would be allowed for certain field strengths and magnetic field directions. The variations of state energies with the external fields will also be reflected in the electrical and thermal conductance. The number, the heights, and the positions of the conductance peaks are strongly dependent on the external fields. The heights of the electrical and thermal conductance peaks display a quantized behaviour, while that of the Peltier coefficient does not. Finally, it is found that the validity of the Wiedemann-Franz law depends upon the temperature, the field strength, the electronic structure, and the chemical potential

  9. Performance of Solution Processed Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors with Graphene Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Gangavarapu, P R Yasasvi; Lokesh, Punith Chikkahalli; Bhat, K N; Naik, A K

    2016-01-01

    This work evaluates the performance of carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFET) using few layer graphene as the contact electrode material. We present the experimental results obtained on the barrier height at CNT graphene junction using temperature dependent IV measurements. The estimated barrier height in our devices for both holes and electrons is close to zero or slightly negative indicating the Ohmic contact of graphene with the valence and conduction bands of CNTs. In addition,...

  10. Study of gaseous interactions in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors through selective Si3N4 passivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Ning; Zhang Qing; Tan, O K; Marzari, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with Si 3 N 4 passivated source and drain contacts and exposed carbon nanotube channel show n-type characteristics in air. In contrast, by passivating only the source contact, a diode-like behavior with a maximum current rectification ratio of 4.6 x 10 3 is observed. The rectifying characteristic vanishes in a vacuum but recovers once the devices are exposed to air. From our experiments, key parameters, such as critical gas pressure, adsorption energy of oxygen molecules and the contact barrier height modulation, can be obtained for studying the gaseous interaction in the carbon nanotube devices.

  11. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei, E-mail: ouyangwei@phy.ecnu.edu.cn; Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo [Engineering Research Center for Nanophotonics and Advanced Instrument, Ministry of Education, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai 200062 (China); Xu, Peng; Wang, Miao [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, 38 ZheDa Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Li, Jun [Department of Electronic Science and Technology, Tongji University, 4800 Caoan Road, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2015-02-16

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm{sup −1} and threshold field of 0.657 V μm{sup −1} corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  12. In situ measurements and transmission electron microscopy of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taekyung; Kim, Seongwon; Olson, Eric; Zuo Jianmin

    2008-01-01

    We present the design and operation of a transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-compatible carbon nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistor (FET). The device is configured with microfabricated slits, which allows direct observation of CNTs in a FET using TEM and measurement of electrical transport while inside the TEM. As demonstrations of the device architecture, two examples are presented. The first example is an in situ electrical transport measurement of a bundle of carbon nanotubes. The second example is a study of electron beam radiation effect on CNT bundles using a 200 keV electron beam. In situ electrical transport measurement during the beam irradiation shows a signature of wall- or tube-breakdown. Stepwise current drops were observed when a high intensity electron beam was used to cut individual CNT bundles in a device with multiple bundles

  13. Are Nanotube Architectures More Advantageous Than Nanowire Architectures For Field Effect Transistors?

    KAUST Repository

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2012-06-27

    Decade long research in 1D nanowire field effect transistors (FET) shows although it has ultra-low off-state leakage current and a single device uses a very small area, its drive current generation per device is extremely low. Thus it requires arrays of nanowires to be integrated together to achieve appreciable amount of current necessary for high performance computation causing an area penalty and compromised functionality. Here we show that a FET with a nanotube architecture and core-shell gate stacks is capable of achieving the desirable leakage characteristics of the nanowire FET while generating a much larger drive current with area efficiency. The core-shell gate stacks of silicon nanotube FETs tighten the electrostatic control and enable volume inversion mode operation leading to improved short channel behavior and enhanced performance. Our comparative study is based on semi-classical transport models with quantum confinement effects which offers new opportunity for future generation high performance computation.

  14. Linear optical response of carbon nanotubes under axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Rostam; Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2010-04-01

    We considered single walled carbon naotubes (SWCNTs) as real three dimensional (3D) systems in a cylindrical coordinate. The optical matrix elements and linear susceptibility, χ(ω), in the tight binding approximation in terms of one-dimensional wave vector, kz and subband index, l are calculated. In an external axial magnetic field optical frequency dependence of linear susceptibility are investigated. We found that axial magnetic field has two effects on the imaginary part of the linear susceptibility spectrum, in agreement with experimental results. The first effect is broadening and the second, splitting. Also we found that for all metallic zigzag and armchair SWCNTs, the axial magnetic field leads to the creation of a peak with energy less than 1.5 eV, contrary to what is observed in the absence of a magnetic field.

  15. Transport properties of field effect transistors with randomly networked single walled carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Park, Wanjun

    2009-01-01

    The transport properties of randomly networked single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) transistors with different channel lengths of L c = 2-10 μm were investigated. Randomly networked SWNTs were directly grown for the two different densities of ρ ∼ 25 μm -2 and ρ ∼ 50 μm -2 by water plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The field effect transport is governed mainly by formation of the current paths that is related to the nanotube density. On the other hand, the off-state conductivity deviates from linear dependence for both nanotube density and channel length. The field effect mobility of holes is estimated as 4-13 cm 2 V -1 s -1 for the nanotube transistors based on the simple MOS theory. The mobility is increased for the higher density without meaningful dependence on the channel lengths.

  16. Near-field thermal radiation between hyperbolic metamaterials: Graphite and carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X. L.; Zhang, R. Z.; Zhang, Z. M., E-mail: zhuomin.zhang@me.gatech.edu [G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2013-11-18

    The near-field radiative heat transfer for two hyperbolic metamaterials, namely, graphite and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), is investigated. Graphite is a naturally existing uniaxial medium, while CNT arrays can be modeled as an effective anisotropic medium. Different hyperbolic modes can be separately supported by these materials in certain infrared regions, resulting in a strong enhancement in near-field heat transfer. It is predicted that the heat flux between two CNT arrays can exceed that between SiC plates at any vacuum gap distance and is about 10 times higher with a 10 nm gap.

  17. Emittance Growth in the NLCTA First Chicane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yipeng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the emittance growth in the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator) first chicane region is evaluated by simulation studies. It is demonstrated that the higher order fields of the chicane dipole magnet and the dipole corrector magnet (which is attached on the quadrupoles) are the main contributions for the emittance growth, especially for the case with a large initial emittance (γε 0 = 5 (micro)m for instance). These simulation results agree with the experimental observations.

  18. Stable magnetization of iron filled carbon nanotube MFM probes in external magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolny, Franziska; Weissker, Uhland; Muehl, Thomas; Lutz, Matthias U; Mueller, Christian; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Buechner, Bernd, E-mail: f.wolny@ifw-dresden.d [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-01-01

    We present results on the application of an iron filled carbon nanotube (Fe-CNT) as a probe for magnetic force microscopy (MFM) in an external magnetic field. If an external field is applied parallel to the sample surface, conventional ferromagnetically coated MFM probes often have the disadvantage that the magnetization of the coating turns towards the direction of the applied field. Then it is difficult to distinguish the effect of the external field on the sample from those on the MFM probe. The Fe-CNT MFM probe has a large shape anisotropy due to the high aspect ratio of the enclosed iron nanowire. Thanks to this the direction of the magnetization stays mainly oriented along the long nanotube axis in in-plane fields up to our experimental limit of 250 mT. Thus, the quality of the MFM images remains unchanged. Apart from this, it is shown that Fe-CNT MFM probe yields a very good magnetic resolution of about 25 nm due to the small diameter of the iron filling.

  19. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Detection Using Au-Decorated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keum-Ju Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that Au-cluster-decorated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs may be used to discriminate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP. Nanoscale Au clusters were formed on the side walls of carbon nanotubes in a transistor geometry using electrochemical deposition. The effect of Au cluster decoration appeared as hole doping when electrical transport characteristics were examined. Thiolated single-stranded probe peptide nucleic acid (PNA was successfully immobilized on Au clusters decorating single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (SWNT-FETs, resulting in a conductance decrease that could be explained by a decrease in Au work function upon adsorption of thiolated PNA. Although a target single-stranded DNA (ssDNA with a single mismatch did not cause any change in electrical conductance, a clear decrease in conductance was observed with matched ssDNA, thereby showing the possibility of SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism detection using Au-cluster-decorated SWNT-FETs. However, a power to discriminate SNP target is lost in high ionic environment. We can conclude that observed SNP discrimination in low ionic environment is due to the hampered binding of SNP target on nanoscale surfaces in low ionic conditions.

  20. Recent progress in nanostructured next-generation field emission devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, Gaurav; Lahiri, Indranil

    2014-01-01

    Field emission has been known to mankind for more than a century, and extensive research in this field for the last 40–50 years has led to development of exciting applications such as electron sources, miniature x-ray devices, display materials, etc. In the last decade, large-area field emitters were projected as an important material to revolutionize healthcare and medical devices, and space research. With the advent of nanotechnology and advancements related to carbon nanotubes, field emitters are demonstrating highly enhanced performance and novel applications. Next-generation emitters need ultra-high emission current density, high brightness, excellent stability and reproducible performance. Novel design considerations and application of new materials can lead to achievement of these capabilities. This article presents an overview of recent developments in this field and their effects on improved performance of field emitters. These advancements are demonstrated to hold great potential for application in next-generation field emission devices. (topical review)

  1. Recent progress in nanostructured next-generation field emission devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Gaurav; Lahiri, Indranil

    2014-08-01

    Field emission has been known to mankind for more than a century, and extensive research in this field for the last 40-50 years has led to development of exciting applications such as electron sources, miniature x-ray devices, display materials, etc. In the last decade, large-area field emitters were projected as an important material to revolutionize healthcare and medical devices, and space research. With the advent of nanotechnology and advancements related to carbon nanotubes, field emitters are demonstrating highly enhanced performance and novel applications. Next-generation emitters need ultra-high emission current density, high brightness, excellent stability and reproducible performance. Novel design considerations and application of new materials can lead to achievement of these capabilities. This article presents an overview of recent developments in this field and their effects on improved performance of field emitters. These advancements are demonstrated to hold great potential for application in next-generation field emission devices.

  2. Oxygen plasma assisted end-opening and field emission enhancement in vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, A.; Roy, S.S.; Hazra, K.S.; Wadhwa, S.; Ray, S.C.; Mitra, S.K.; Misra, D.S.; McLaughlin, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We showed Ar/O 2 plasma can be effective for the end opening of aligned CNTs. ► The field emission property was dramatically enhanced after plasma modification. ► Microstructures were clearly understood by Raman and SEM analysis. ► Surface wet-ability at various functionalised conditions was studied. - Abstract: This paper highlights the changes in micro-structural and field emission properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) via oxygen plasma treatment. We find that exposure of very low power oxygen plasma (6 W) at 13.56 MHz for 15–20 min, opens the tip of vertically aligned CNTs. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images were used to identify the quality and micro-structural changes of the nanotube morphology and surfaces. Raman spectra showed that the numbers of defects were increased throughout the oxygen plasma treatment process. In addition, the hydrophobic nature of the VACNTs is altered significantly and the contact angle decreases drastically from 110° to 40°. It was observed that the electron field emission (EFE) characteristics are significantly enhanced. The turn-on electric field (ETOE) of CNTs decreased from ∼0.80 V μm −1 (untreated) to ∼0.60 V μm −1 (oxygen treated). We believe that the open ended VACNTs would be immensely valuable for applications such as micro/nanofluidic based filtering elements and display devices.

  3. Field emission properties of low-density carbon nanotubes prepared on anodic aluminum-oxide template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Soo-Hwan [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kun-Hong [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-08-15

    Anodic aluminum-oxide (AAO) templates were fabricated by two-step anodizing an Al film. After the Co catalyst had been electrochemically deposited onto the bottom of the AAO template, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown by using catalytic pyrolysis of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and H{sub 2} at 650 .deg. C. Overgrowth of CNTs with low density on the AAO templates was observed. The field-emission measurements on the samples showed a turn-on field of 2.17 V/mum and a field enhancement factor of 5700. The emission pattern on a phosphor screen was quite homogeneous over the area at a relatively low electric field.

  4. Scattering effects on the performance of carbon nanotube field effect transistor in a compact model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamieh, S. D.; Desgreys, P.; Naviner, J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFET) are being extensively studied as possible successors to CMOS. Device simulators have been developed to estimate their performance in sub-10-nm and device structures have been fabricated. In this work, a new compact model of single-walled semiconducting CNTFET is proposed implementing the calculation of energy conduction sub-band minima and the treatment of scattering effects through energy shift in CNTFET. The developed model has been used to simulate I-V characteristics using VHDL-AMS simulator.

  5. Dynamic response of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors analyzed by S-parameters measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethoux, J.-M. [Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie, C.N.R.S. U.M.R. 8520, BP 60069, F-59652, Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Happy, H. [Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie, C.N.R.S. U.M.R. 8520, BP 60069, F-59652, Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)]. E-mail: henri.happy@iemn.univ-lille1.fr; Dambrine, G. [Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie, C.N.R.S. U.M.R. 8520, BP 60069, F-59652, Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Derycke, V. [Laboratoire d' Electronique Moleculaire, SPEC, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay F-91191, Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Goffman, M. [Laboratoire d' Electronique Moleculaire, SPEC, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay F-91191, Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Bourgoin, J.-P. [Laboratoire d' Electronique Moleculaire, SPEC, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay F-91191, Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2006-12-15

    Carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CN-FET) with a metallic back gate have been fabricated. By assembling a number of CNs in parallel, driving currents in the mA range have been obtained. The dynamic response of the CN-FETs has been investigated through S-parameters measurements. A current gain (|H {sub 21}|{sup 2}) cut-off frequency (f {sub t}) of 8 GHz, and a maximum stable gain (MSG) value of 10 dB at 1 GHz have been obtained. The extraction of an equivalent circuit is proposed.

  6. Dynamic response of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors analyzed by S-parameters measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethoux, J.-M.; Happy, H.; Dambrine, G.; Derycke, V.; Goffman, M.; Bourgoin, J.-P.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CN-FET) with a metallic back gate have been fabricated. By assembling a number of CNs in parallel, driving currents in the mA range have been obtained. The dynamic response of the CN-FETs has been investigated through S-parameters measurements. A current gain (|H 21 | 2 ) cut-off frequency (f t ) of 8 GHz, and a maximum stable gain (MSG) value of 10 dB at 1 GHz have been obtained. The extraction of an equivalent circuit is proposed

  7. Fringing-field dielectrophoretic assembly of ultrahigh-density semiconducting nanotube arrays with a self-limited pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Han, Shu-Jen; Tulevski, George S.

    2014-09-01

    One key challenge of realizing practical high-performance electronic devices based on single-walled carbon nanotubes is to produce electronically pure nanotube arrays with both a minuscule and uniform inter-tube pitch for sufficient device-packing density and homogeneity. Here we develop a method in which the alternating voltage-fringing electric field formed between surface microelectrodes and the substrate is utilized to assemble semiconducting nanotubes into well-aligned, ultrahigh-density and submonolayered arrays, with a consistent pitch as small as 21±6 nm determined by a self-limiting mechanism, based on the unique field focusing and screening effects of the fringing field. Field-effect transistors based on such nanotube arrays exhibit record high device transconductance (>50 μS μm-1) and decent on current per nanotube (~1 μA per tube) together with high on/off ratios at a drain bias of -1 V.

  8. Yb:KYW planar waveguide laser Q-switched by evanescent-field interaction with carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Jun Wan; Choi, Sun Young; Yeom, Dong-Il; Aravazhi, S.; Pollnau, Markus; Griebner, Uwe; Petrov, Valentin; Rotermund, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    We report Q-switched operation of a planar waveguide laser by evanescent-field interaction with single-walled carbon nanotubes deposited on top of the waveguide. The saturable-absorber-integrated gain medium, which operates based on evanescent-field interaction, enables the realization of a

  9. Solid-state single-photon emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk; Toth, Milos

    2016-10-01

    Single-photon emitters play an important role in many leading quantum technologies. There is still no 'ideal' on-demand single-photon emitter, but a plethora of promising material systems have been developed, and several have transitioned from proof-of-concept to engineering efforts with steadily improving performance. Here, we review recent progress in the race towards true single-photon emitters required for a range of quantum information processing applications. We focus on solid-state systems including quantum dots, defects in solids, two-dimensional hosts and carbon nanotubes, as these are well positioned to benefit from recent breakthroughs in nanofabrication and materials growth techniques. We consider the main challenges and key advantages of each platform, with a focus on scalable on-chip integration and fabrication of identical sources on photonic circuits.

  10. Field emission from carbon nanotube bundle arrays grown on self-aligned ZnO nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chun; Fang Guojia; Yuan Longyan; Liu Nishuang; Ai Lei; Xiang Qi; Zhao Dongshan; Pan Chunxu; Zhao Xingzhong

    2007-01-01

    The field emission (FE) properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundle arrays grown on vertically self-aligned ZnO nanorods (ZNRs) are reported. The ZNRs were first synthesized on ZnO-seed-coated Si substrate by the vapour phase transport method, and then the radically grown CNTs were grown directly on the surface of the ZNRs from ethanol flames. The CNT/ZNR composite showed a turn-on field of 1.5 V μm -1 (at 0.1 μA cm -2 ), a threshold field of 4.5 V μm -1 (at 1 mA cm -2 ) and a stable emission current with fluctuations of 5%, demonstrating significantly enhanced FE of ZNRs due to the low work function and high aspect ratio of the CNTs, and large surface-to-volume ratio of the underlying ZNRs

  11. Effects of axial magnetic field on the electronic and optical properties of boron nitride nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2011-07-01

    The splitting of band structure and absorption spectrum, for boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) under axial magnetic field, is studied using the tight binding approximation. It is found that the band splitting ( ΔE) at the Γ point is linearly proportional to the magnetic field ( Φ/Φ0). Our results indicate that the splitting rate νii, of the two first bands nearest to the Fermi level, is a linear function of n -2 for all (n,0) zigzag BNNTs. By investigation of the dependence of band structure and absorption spectrum to the magnetic field, we found that absorption splitting is equal to band splitting and the splitting rate of band structure can be used to determine the splitting rate of the absorption spectrum.

  12. Initiation of vacuum breakdown and failure mechanism of the carbon nanotube during thermal field emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Cai; Lie, Liu; Jin-Chuan, Ju; Xue-Long, Zhao; Hong-Yu, Zhou; Xiao, Wang

    2016-04-01

    The carbon nanotube (CNT)-based materials can be used as vacuum device cathodes. Owing to the excellent field emission properties of CNT, it has great potentials in the applications of an explosive field emission cathode. The falling off of CNT from the substrate, which frequently appears in experiments, restricts its application. In addition, the onset time of vacuum breakdown limits the performance of the high-power explosive-emission-cathode-based diode. In this paper, the characteristics of the CNT, electric field strength, contact resistance and the kind of substrate material are varied to study the parameter effects on the onset time of vacuum breakdown and failure mechanism of the CNT by using the finite element method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11305263 and 61401484).

  13. Effect of Substrate Morphology on Growth and Field Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotube Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Vikram

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCarbon nanotube (CNT films were grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process on four types of Si substrates: (i mirror polished, (ii catalyst patterned, (iii mechanically polished having pits of varying size and shape, and (iv electrochemically etched. Iron thin film was used as catalytic material and acetylene and ammonia as the precursors. Morphological and structural characteristics of the films were investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopes, respectively. CNT films of different morphology such as vertically aligned, randomly oriented flowers, or honey-comb like, depending on the morphology of the Si substrates, were obtained. CNTs had sharp tip and bamboo-like internal structure irrespective of growth morphology of the films. Comparative field emission measurements showed that patterned CNT films and that with randomly oriented morphology had superior emission characteristics with threshold field as low as ~2.0 V/μm. The defective (bamboo-structure structures of CNTs have been suggested for the enhanced emission performance of randomly oriented nanotube samples.

  14. Emittance measurements of the CLIO electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, R.; Devanz, G.; Joly, P.; Kergosien, B.; Lesrel, J.

    1997-02-01

    We have designed a setup to measure the transverse emittance at the CLIO accelerator exit, based on the "3 gradients" method. The beam transverse size is measured simply by scanning it with a steering coil across a fixed jaw and recording the transmitted current, at various quadrupole strengths. A code then performs a complete calculation of the emittance using the transfer matrix of the quadrupole instead of the usual classical lens approximation. We have studied the influence of various parameters on the emittance: Magnetic field on the e-gun and the peak current. We have also improved a little the emittance by replacing a mismatched pipe between the buncher and accelerating section to avoid wake-field effects; The resulting improvements of the emittance have led to an increase in the FEL emitted power.

  15. Device and circuit-level performance of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with benchmarking against a nano-MOSFET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Michael Loong Peng; Lentaris, Georgios; Amaratunga Aj, Gehan

    2012-08-19

    The performance of a semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) is assessed and tabulated for parameters against those of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Both CNT and MOSFET models considered agree well with the trends in the available experimental data. The results obtained show that nanotubes can significantly reduce the drain-induced barrier lowering effect and subthreshold swing in silicon channel replacement while sustaining smaller channel area at higher current density. Performance metrics of both devices such as current drive strength, current on-off ratio (Ion/Ioff), energy-delay product, and power-delay product for logic gates, namely NAND and NOR, are presented. Design rules used for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) are compatible with the 45-nm MOSFET technology. The parasitics associated with interconnects are also incorporated in the model. Interconnects can affect the propagation delay in a CNTFET. Smaller length interconnects result in higher cutoff frequency.

  16. Purification of carbon nanotubes through an electric field near the arranged microelectrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Hyung Cheoul; Lee, Hyung Woo; Yeom, Sujin; Kwak, Yoon Keun; Lee, Seung S; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we attempt to purify multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) using electrophoresis induced by the application of an AC electric field to a set of microelectrodes in a microliquid channel. This purifying method is different from conventional methods based on chemical processes. It was observed that most of the MWNTs could pass along the microliquid channel without attaching to the electrode under specific conditions of 1 kHz, at 0.2 V rms μm -1 . On the other hand, the majority of the carbon impurities attached to the electrodes under identical conditions. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images and Raman spectra confirm that this condition is beneficial for removing carbon impurities. The proposed approach has potential applicability in the development of microdevices that can simultaneously perform the purification and fabrication of MWNTs

  17. Comparison between arc drops in ignited thermionic converters with and without ion reflections at the emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, L.

    1985-01-01

    The output performance of two thermionic energy converters is compared. One converter has a normal emitter, working with zero field at the emitter which is close to the optimum working point, and the other has a low work function emitter and ion reflection at the emitter. A simple model of the plasma and the sheaths shows that a converter working with a low work function emitter and ion reflections gives a worse performance than a similar converter with a normal emitter

  18. Water-processed carbon nanotube/graphene hybrids with enhanced field emission properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Meng; Xu, Peng; Wang, Xu; Wu, Huizhen; Wang, Miao; Song, Yenan; Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Pei; Shang, Xuefu

    2015-01-01

    Integrating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene into hybrid structures provides a novel approach to three dimensional (3D) materials with advantageous properties. Here we present a water-processing method to create integrated CNT/graphene hybrids and test their field emission properties. With an optimized mass ratio of CNTs to graphene, the hybrid shows a significantly enhanced field emission performance, such as turn-on electric field of 0.79 V/μm, threshold electric field of 1.05 V/μm, maximum current density of 0.1 mA/cm 2 , and field enhancement factor of ∼1.3 × 10 4 . The optimized mass ratio for field emission emphasizes the importance of both CNTs and graphene in the hybrid. We also hypothesize a possible mechanism for this enhanced field emission performance from the CNT/graphene hybrid. During the solution treatment, graphene oxide behaves as surfactant sheets for CNTs to form a well dispersed solution, which leads to a better organized 3D structure with more conducting channels for electron transport

  19. Water-processed carbon nanotube/graphene hybrids with enhanced field emission properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Meng; Xu, Peng; Wang, Xu; Wu, Huizhen; Wang, Miao, E-mail: peizhao@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: miaowang@css.zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Song, Yenan; Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Pei, E-mail: peizhao@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: miaowang@css.zju.edu.cn [Institute of Applied Mechanics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Shang, Xuefu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Integrating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene into hybrid structures provides a novel approach to three dimensional (3D) materials with advantageous properties. Here we present a water-processing method to create integrated CNT/graphene hybrids and test their field emission properties. With an optimized mass ratio of CNTs to graphene, the hybrid shows a significantly enhanced field emission performance, such as turn-on electric field of 0.79 V/μm, threshold electric field of 1.05 V/μm, maximum current density of 0.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, and field enhancement factor of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 4}. The optimized mass ratio for field emission emphasizes the importance of both CNTs and graphene in the hybrid. We also hypothesize a possible mechanism for this enhanced field emission performance from the CNT/graphene hybrid. During the solution treatment, graphene oxide behaves as surfactant sheets for CNTs to form a well dispersed solution, which leads to a better organized 3D structure with more conducting channels for electron transport.

  20. Improved field emission performance of carbon nanotube by introducing copper metallic particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yiren

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To improve the field emission performance of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, a simple and low-cost method was adopted in this article. We introduced copper particles for decorating the CNTs so as to form copper particle-CNT composites. The composites were fabricated by electrophoretic deposition technique which produced copper metallic particles localized on the outer wall of CNTs and deposited them onto indium tin oxide (ITO electrode. The results showed that the conductivity increased from 10-5 to 4 × 10-5 S while the turn-on field was reduced from 3.4 to 2.2 V/μm. Moreover, the field emission current tended to be undiminished after continuous emission for 24 h. The reasons were summarized that introducing copper metallic particles to decorate CNTs could increase the surface roughness of the CNTs which was beneficial to field emission, restrain field emission current from saturating when the applied electric field was above the critical field. In addition, it could also improve the electrical contact by increasing the contact area between CNT and ITO electrode that was beneficial to the electron transport and avoided instable electron emission caused by thermal injury of CNTs.

  1. Oxygen plasma assisted end-opening and field emission enhancement in vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathur, A. [NIBEC, School of Engineering, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, BT37 0QB (United Kingdom); Roy, S.S., E-mail: sinharoy@ualberta.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6T 2G8 (Canada); Hazra, K.S. [Department of Physics, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai-400076 (India); Wadhwa, S. [NIBEC, School of Engineering, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, BT37 0QB (United Kingdom); Ray, S.C. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa); Mitra, S.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6T 2G8 (Canada); Misra, D.S. [Department of Physics, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai-400076 (India); McLaughlin, J.A. [NIBEC, School of Engineering, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, BT37 0QB (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed Ar/O{sub 2} plasma can be effective for the end opening of aligned CNTs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The field emission property was dramatically enhanced after plasma modification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures were clearly understood by Raman and SEM analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface wet-ability at various functionalised conditions was studied. - Abstract: This paper highlights the changes in micro-structural and field emission properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) via oxygen plasma treatment. We find that exposure of very low power oxygen plasma (6 W) at 13.56 MHz for 15-20 min, opens the tip of vertically aligned CNTs. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images were used to identify the quality and micro-structural changes of the nanotube morphology and surfaces. Raman spectra showed that the numbers of defects were increased throughout the oxygen plasma treatment process. In addition, the hydrophobic nature of the VACNTs is altered significantly and the contact angle decreases drastically from 110 Degree-Sign to 40 Degree-Sign . It was observed that the electron field emission (EFE) characteristics are significantly enhanced. The turn-on electric field (ETOE) of CNTs decreased from {approx}0.80 V {mu}m{sup -1} (untreated) to {approx}0.60 V {mu}m{sup -1} (oxygen treated). We believe that the open ended VACNTs would be immensely valuable for applications such as micro/nanofluidic based filtering elements and display devices.

  2. Unique Characteristics of Vertical Carbon Nanotube Field-effect Transistors on Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingqi; Yue, Weisheng; Guo, Zaibing; Yang, Yang; Wang, Xianbin; Syed, Ahad A.; Zhang, Yafei

    2014-01-01

    A vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) based on silicon (Si) substrate has been proposed and simulated using a semi-classical theory. A single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and an n-type Si nanowire in series construct the channel of the transistor. The CNTFET presents ambipolar characteristics at positive drain voltage (Vd) and n-type characteristics at negative Vd. The current is significantly influenced by the doping level of n-Si and the SWNT band gap. The n-branch current of the ambipolar characteristics increases with increasing doping level of the n-Si while the p-branch current decreases. The SWNT band gap has the same influence on the p-branch current at a positive Vd and n-type characteristics at negative Vd. The lower the SWNT band gap, the higher the current. However, it has no impact on the n-branch current in the ambipolar characteristics. Thick oxide is found to significantly degrade the current and the subthreshold slope of the CNTFETs.

  3. Unique Characteristics of Vertical Carbon Nanotube Field-effect Transistors on Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingqi

    2014-07-01

    A vertical carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) based on silicon (Si) substrate has been proposed and simulated using a semi-classical theory. A single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and an n-type Si nanowire in series construct the channel of the transistor. The CNTFET presents ambipolar characteristics at positive drain voltage (Vd) and n-type characteristics at negative Vd. The current is significantly influenced by the doping level of n-Si and the SWNT band gap. The n-branch current of the ambipolar characteristics increases with increasing doping level of the n-Si while the p-branch current decreases. The SWNT band gap has the same influence on the p-branch current at a positive Vd and n-type characteristics at negative Vd. The lower the SWNT band gap, the higher the current. However, it has no impact on the n-branch current in the ambipolar characteristics. Thick oxide is found to significantly degrade the current and the subthreshold slope of the CNTFETs.

  4. Tuning vertical alignment and field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekanth, M.; Ghosh, S.; Srivastava, P.

    2018-01-01

    We report the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube bundles on Si substrate by thermal chemical vapor deposition technique. Vertical alignment was achieved without any carrier gas or lithography-assisted deposition. Growth has been carried out at 850 °C for different quantities of solution of xylene and ferrocene ranging from 2.25 to 3.00 ml in steps of 0.25 ml at a fixed concentration of 0.02 gm (ferrocene) per ml. To understand the growth mechanism, deposition was carried out for different concentrations of the solution by changing only the ferrocene quantity, ranging from 0.01 to 0.03 gm/ml. A tunable vertical alignment of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been achieved by this process and examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopic techniques. Micro-crystalline structural analysis has been done using Raman spectroscopy. A systematic variation in field emission (FE) current density has been observed. The highest FE current density is seen for the film grown with 0.02 gm/ml concentration, which is attributed to the better alignment of CNTs, less structural disorder and less entanglement of CNTs on the surface. The alignment of CNTs has been qualitatively understood on the basis of self-assembled catalytic particles.

  5. Influence of contact height on the performance of vertically aligned carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingqi; Cheng, Yingchun; Guo, Zaibing; Wang, Zhihong; Zhu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Qing; Chan-Park, Chanpark; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Zhang, Xixiang

    2013-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) have been experimentally demonstrated (J. Li et al., Carbon, 2012, 50, 4628-4632). The source and drain contact heights in vertical CNTFETs could be much higher than in flat CNTFETs if the fabrication process is not optimized. To understand the impact of contact height on transistor performance, we use a semi-classical method to calculate the characteristics of CNTFETs with different contact heights. The results show that the drain current decreases with increasing contact height and saturates at a value governed by the thickness of the oxide. The current reduction caused by the increased contact height becomes more significant when the gate oxide is thicker. The higher the drain voltage, the larger the current reduction. It becomes even worse when the band gap of the carbon nanotube is larger. The current can differ by a factor of more than five between the CNTEFTs with low and high contact heights when the oxide thickness is 50 nm. In addition, the influence of the contact height is limited by the channel length. The contact height plays a minor role when the channel length is less than 100 nm. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  6. Polymer-Sorted Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Networks for High-Performance Ambipolar Field-Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Efficient selection of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from as-grown nanotube samples is crucial for their application as printable and flexible semiconductors in field-effect transistors (FETs). In this study, we use atactic poly(9-dodecyl-9-methyl-fluorene) (a-PF-1-12), a polyfluorene derivative with asymmetric side-chains, for the selective dispersion of semiconducting SWNTs with large diameters (>1 nm) from plasma torch-grown SWNTs. Lowering the molecular weight of the dispersing polymer leads to a significant improvement of selectivity. Combining dense semiconducting SWNT networks deposited from an enriched SWNT dispersion with a polymer/metal-oxide hybrid dielectric enables transistors with balanced ambipolar, contact resistance-corrected mobilities of up to 50 cm2·V–1·s–1, low ohmic contact resistance, steep subthreshold swings (0.12–0.14 V/dec) and high on/off ratios (106) even for short channel lengths (<10 μm). These FETs operate at low voltages (<3 V) and show almost no current hysteresis. The resulting ambipolar complementary-like inverters exhibit gains up to 61. PMID:25493421

  7. Frequency, delay and velocity analysis for intrinsic channel region of carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Geetha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Gate wrap around field effect transistor is preferred for its good channel control. To study the high frequency behaviour of the device, parameters like cut-off frequency, transit or delay time, velocity are calculated and plotted. Double-walled and array of channels are considered in this work for enhanced output and impedance matching of the device with the measuring equipment terminal respectively. The perfomance of double-walledcarbon nanotube is compared with single-walled carbon nanotube and found that the device with double-wall shows appreciable improvement in its characteristics. Analysis of these parameters are done with various values of source/drain length, gate length, tube diameters and channel densities. The maximum cut-off frequency is found to be 72.3 THz with corresponding velocity as 5x106 m/s for channel density as 3 and gate length as 11nm. The number of channel is varied from 3 to 21 and found that the perfromance of the device containing double-walled carbon nano tube is better for channel number lesser than or equal to 12. The proposed modelling can be used for designing devices to handle high speed applications of future generation.

  8. Improved field emission from indium decorated multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreekanth, M.; Ghosh, S., E-mail: santanu1@physics.iitd.ernet.in; Biswas, P.; Kumar, S.; Srivastava, P.

    2016-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Improved field emission properties have been achieved for Indium (In) decorated MWCNTs and are shown using the schematic of field emission set up with In/CNT cathode, and a plot of J-E characteristics for pristine and In decorated CNTs. - Highlights: • Field emission (FE) properties have been studied for the first time from Indium (In) decorated MWCNT films. • Observed increased density of states near the Fermi level for In decorated films. • Superior field emission properties have been achieved for In decorated CNT films. - Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films were grown using thermal chemical vapor deposition (T-CVD) process and were decorated with indium metal particles by thermal evaporation technique. The In metal particles are found to get oxidized. The In decorated films show 250% enhancement in the FE current density, lower turn-on and threshold fields, and better temporal stability as compared to their undecorated counterpart. This improvement in field emission properties is primarily attributed to increased density of states near the Fermi level. The presence of O 2p states along with a small contribution from In 5s states results in the enhancement of density of states in the vicinity of the Fermi level.

  9. Tumour Cell Membrane Poration and Ablation by Pulsed Low-Intensity Electric Field with Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Electroporation is a physical method to increase permeabilization of cell membrane by electrical pulses. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs can potentially act like “lighting rods” or exhibit direct physical force on cell membrane under alternating electromagnetic fields thus reducing the required field strength. A cell poration/ablation system was built for exploring these effects of CNTs in which two-electrode sets were constructed and two perpendicular electric fields could be generated sequentially. By applying this system to breast cancer cells in the presence of multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs, the effective pulse amplitude was reduced to 50 V/cm (main field/15 V/cm (alignment field at the optimized pulse frequency (5 Hz of 500 pulses. Under these conditions instant cell membrane permeabilization was increased to 38.62%, 2.77-fold higher than that without CNTs. Moreover, we also observed irreversible electroporation occurred under these conditions, such that only 39.23% of the cells were viable 24 h post treatment, in contrast to 87.01% cell viability without presence of CNTs. These results indicate that CNT-enhanced electroporation has the potential for tumour cell ablation by significantly lower electric fields than that in conventional electroporation therapy thus avoiding potential risks associated with the use of high intensity electric pulses.

  10. The tunable mechanical property of water-filled carbon nanotubes under an electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Zhongqiang; Zhang, Hongwu; Chen, Zhen; Zong, Zhi; Zheng, Yonggang

    2014-03-01

    The spring-induced compression of water-filled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) under an electric field is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Due to the incompressibility and polarity of water, the mechanical property of CNTs can be tuned through filling with water molecules and applying an electric field. To explore the variation of the mechanical property of water-filled CNTs, the effects of the CNT length, the filling density and the electric field intensity are examined. The simulation results indicate that the water filling and electric field can result in a slight change in the elastic property (the elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio) of water-filled CNTs. However, the yield stress and average post-buckling stress exhibit a significant response to the water density and electric field intensity. As compared to hollow CNTs, the increment in yield stress of the water-filled CNTs under an electric field of 2.0 V Å-1 is up to 35.29%, which is even higher than that resulting from metal filling. The findings from this study provide a valuable theoretical basis for designing and fabricating the controlling units at the nanoscale.

  11. Selective detection of SO2 at room temperature based on organoplatinum functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cid, C.C.; Jimenez-Cadena, G.; Riu, J.; Maroto, A.; Rius, F.X.; Batema, G.D.; van Koten, G.

    2009-01-01

    We report a field effect transistor (FET) based on a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) that for the first time can selectively detect a single gaseous molecule in air by chemically functionalizing the SWCNTs with a selective molecular receptor. As a target model we used SO2. The

  12. Application of carbon nanotubes to topographical resolution enhancement of tapered fiber scanning near field optical microscopy probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, S. T.; Jarvis, S. P.

    2003-05-01

    Scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM) probes are typically tapered optical fibers with metallic coatings. The tip diameters are generally in excess of 300 nm and thus provide poor topographical resolution. Here we report on the attachment multiwalled carbon nanotubes to the probes in order to substantially enhance the topographical resolution, without adversely affecting the optical resolution.

  13. Field emission electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Egorov, Nikolay

    2017-01-01

    This book is dedicated to field emission electronics, a promising field at the interface between “classic” vacuum electronics and nanotechnology. In addition to theoretical models, it includes detailed descriptions of experimental and research techniques and production technologies for different types of field emitters based on various construction principles. It particularly focuses on research into and production of field cathodes and electron guns using recently developed nanomaterials and carbon nanotubes. Further, it discusses the applications of field emission cathodes in new technologies such as light sources, flat screens, microwave and X-ray devices.

  14. Enhanced field emission properties of vertically aligned double-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Guohai; Shin, Dong Hoon; Lee, Cheol Jin; Iwasaki, Takayuki; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Vertically aligned double-walled carbon nanotube (VA-DWCNT) arrays were synthesized by point-arc microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition on Cr/n-Si and SiO 2 /n-Si substrates. The outer tube diameters of VA-DWCNTs are in the range of 2.5-3.8 nm, and the average interlayer spacing is approximately 0.42 nm. The field emission properties of these VA-DWCNTs were studied. It was found that a VA-DWCNT array grown on a Cr/n-Si substrate had better field emission properties as compared with a VA-DWCNT array grown on a SiO 2 /n-Si substrate and randomly oriented DWCNTs, showing a turn-on field of about 0.85 V μm -1 at the emission current density of 0.1 μA cm -2 and a threshold field of 1.67 V μm -1 at the emission current density of 1.0 mA cm -2 . The better field emission performance of the VA-DWCNT array was mainly attributed to the vertical alignment of DWCNTs on the Cr/n-Si substrate and the low contact resistance between CNTs and the Cr/n-Si substrate

  15. Optical absorption of zigzag single walled boron nitride nanotubes in axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2013-11-01

    We have investigated the effect of axial magnetic field on the band structure, dipole matrix elements and absorption spectrum in different energy ranges, using tight binding approximation. It is found that magnetic field breaks the degeneracy in the band structure and creates new allowed transitions in the dipole matrix which leads to creation of new peaks in the absorption spectrum. It is found that, unlike to CNTs which show metallic-semiconductor transition, the BNNTs remain semiconductor in any magnetic field strength. By calculation the diameter dependence of peak positions, we found that the positions of three first peaks in the lower energy region (E <5.3 eV) are proportional to n-2. In the middle energy region (7 < E < 7.5 eV) all (n, 0) zigzag BNNTs, with even and odd nanotube index, have two distinct peaks in the absence of magnetic field which these peaks may be used to identify zigzag BNNTs from other tube chiralities. For odd (even) tubes, in the middle energy region, applying the magnetic field leads to splitting of these two peaks into three (five) distinct peaks.

  16. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda García-García

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules.

  17. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization using carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star, Alexander; Tu, Eugene; Niemann, Joseph; Gabriel, Jean-Christophe P.; Joiner, C. Steve; Valcke, Christian

    2006-01-01

    We report carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors (NTNFETs) that function as selective detectors of DNA immobilization and hybridization. NTNFETs with immobilized synthetic oligonucleotides have been shown to specifically recognize target DNA sequences, including H63D single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination in the HFE gene, responsible for hereditary hemochromatosis. The electronic responses of NTNFETs upon single-stranded DNA immobilization and subsequent DNA hybridization events were confirmed by using fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotides and then were further explored for label-free DNA detection at picomolar to micromolar concentrations. We have also observed a strong effect of DNA counterions on the electronic response, thus suggesting a charge-based mechanism of DNA detection using NTNFET devices. Implementation of label-free electronic detection assays using NTNFETs constitutes an important step toward low-cost, low-complexity, highly sensitive and accurate molecular diagnostics. hemochromatosis | SNP | biosensor

  18. Continuous adjustment of threshold voltage in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors through gate engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Donglai; Zhao, Chenyi; Liu, Lijun; Zhang, Zhiyong; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2018-04-01

    In this letter, we report a gate engineering method to adjust threshold voltage of carbon nanotube (CNT) based field-effect transistors (FETs) continuously in a wide range, which makes the application of CNT FETs especially in digital integrated circuits (ICs) easier. Top-gated FETs are fabricated using solution-processed CNT network films with stacking Pd and Sc films as gate electrodes. By decreasing the thickness of the lower layer metal (Pd) from 20 nm to zero, the effective work function of the gate decreases, thus tuning the threshold voltage (Vt) of CNT FETs from -1.0 V to 0.2 V. The continuous adjustment of threshold voltage through gate engineering lays a solid foundation for multi-threshold technology in CNT based ICs, which then can simultaneously provide high performance and low power circuit modules on one chip.

  19. Detection of influenza A virus using carbon nanotubes field effect transistor based DNA sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thi Luyen; Nguyen, Thi Thuy; Huyen Tran, Thi Thu; Chu, Van Tuan; Thinh Tran, Quang; Tuan Mai, Anh

    2017-09-01

    The carbon nanotubes field effect transistor (CNTFET) based DNA sensor was developed, in this paper, for detection of influenza A virus DNA. Number of factors that influence the output signal and analytical results were investigated. The initial probe DNA, decides the available DNA strands on CNTs, was 10 μM. The hybridization time for defined single helix was 120 min. The hybridization temperature was set at 30 °C to get a net change in drain current of the DNA sensor without altering properties of any biological compounds. The response time of the DNA sensor was less than one minute with a high reproducibility. In addition, the DNA sensor has a wide linear detection range from 1 pM to 10 nM, and a very low detection limit of 1 pM. Finally, after 7-month storage in 7.4 pH buffer, the output signal of DNA sensor recovered 97%.

  20. Large-current-controllable carbon nanotube field-effect transistor in electrolyte solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myodo, Miho; Inaba, Masafumi; Ohara, Kazuyoshi; Kato, Ryogo; Kobayashi, Mikinori; Hirano, Yu; Suzuki, Kazuma; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Large-current-controllable carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) were fabricated with mm-long CNT sheets. The sheets, synthesized by remote-plasma-enhanced CVD, contained both single- and double-walled CNTs. Titanium was deposited on the sheet as source and drain electrodes, and an electrolyte solution was used as a gate electrode (solution gate) to apply a gate voltage to the CNTs through electric double layers formed around the CNTs. The drain current came to be well modulated as electrolyte solution penetrated into the sheets, and one of the solution gate CNT-FETs was able to control a large current of over 2.5 A. In addition, we determined the transconductance parameter per tube and compared it with values for other CNT-FETs. The potential of CNT sheets for applications requiring the control of large current is exhibited in this study.

  1. Au nanoparticles attached carbon nanotubes as a high performance active element in field effect transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myeongsoon; Kim, Don

    2016-01-01

    The Au nanoparticles attached carbon nanotubes (Au-CNTs), diameter ranged from 40 to 250 nm, were prepared and discussed their chemical and electrical properties. The shape and crystallinity of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) phase depended main2ly on the diameter of CNTs (r_A_u_-_C_N_T). Highly crystalline, straight CNTs were observed when the r_A_u_-_C_N_T exceeded 80 nm, and less crystalline noodle-shaped CNTs were observed when the r_A_u_-_C_N_T was smaller than 80 nm. The crystallinity of the CNT phase was confirmed by analyzing the G and D bands in their Raman spectra and the electrical conductivities of the Au-CNTs. The electrical conductivity of the highly crystalline carbon phase of Au-CNTs (r_A_u_-_C_N_T = 250 nm) was ∼10"4 S/cm. The back-gated field effect transistors (FETs) based on the Au-CNTs, which were assembled on a SiO_2/Si wafer using the dielectrophoresis technique, showed that the Au-CNTs would be a good functional electronic material for future electronic and sensing applications. The transconductance and hole mobility of the FETs, which were assembled with the highly crystalline Au-CNTs (r_A_u_-_C_N_T = 250 nm), reached to 3.6 × 10"−"4 A/V and 3.1 × 10"4 cm"2/V s, respectively. These values are in the middle of those of reported for single walled carbon nanotubes and graphene. However, we could not find any field effect in a CNTFET, which assembled without Au nanoparticles, through the same process. - Highlights: • The shape and crystallinity of the CNTs depended mainly on the diameter of CNTs. • The electrical conductivity of the highly crystalline Au-CNTs was ∼10"4 S/cm. • The Au-CNT FET shows typical p-channel gate effect with the on/off ratio of ∼10"4. • The Au-CNT FET shows very high transconductance (g_m) and carrier mobility (μ_h).

  2. Au nanoparticles attached carbon nanotubes as a high performance active element in field effect transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myeongsoon; Kim, Don, E-mail: donkim@pknu.ac.kr

    2016-08-15

    The Au nanoparticles attached carbon nanotubes (Au-CNTs), diameter ranged from 40 to 250 nm, were prepared and discussed their chemical and electrical properties. The shape and crystallinity of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) phase depended main2ly on the diameter of CNTs (r{sub Au-CNT}). Highly crystalline, straight CNTs were observed when the r{sub Au-CNT} exceeded 80 nm, and less crystalline noodle-shaped CNTs were observed when the r{sub Au-CNT} was smaller than 80 nm. The crystallinity of the CNT phase was confirmed by analyzing the G and D bands in their Raman spectra and the electrical conductivities of the Au-CNTs. The electrical conductivity of the highly crystalline carbon phase of Au-CNTs (r{sub Au-CNT} = 250 nm) was ∼10{sup 4} S/cm. The back-gated field effect transistors (FETs) based on the Au-CNTs, which were assembled on a SiO{sub 2}/Si wafer using the dielectrophoresis technique, showed that the Au-CNTs would be a good functional electronic material for future electronic and sensing applications. The transconductance and hole mobility of the FETs, which were assembled with the highly crystalline Au-CNTs (r{sub Au-CNT} = 250 nm), reached to 3.6 × 10{sup −4} A/V and 3.1 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup 2}/V s, respectively. These values are in the middle of those of reported for single walled carbon nanotubes and graphene. However, we could not find any field effect in a CNTFET, which assembled without Au nanoparticles, through the same process. - Highlights: • The shape and crystallinity of the CNTs depended mainly on the diameter of CNTs. • The electrical conductivity of the highly crystalline Au-CNTs was ∼10{sup 4} S/cm. • The Au-CNT FET shows typical p-channel gate effect with the on/off ratio of ∼10{sup 4}. • The Au-CNT FET shows very high transconductance (g{sub m}) and carrier mobility (μ{sub h}).

  3. Application of slope-intercept diagram to determine the parameters of the nanocomposite field emitters in-situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, I U; Kolosko, A G; Filippov, S V; Yudkina, N A; Popov, E O

    2016-01-01

    The method of the field emission data online processing of materials, perspective for a nanoelectronics, is developed. The method is based on the slope-intercept diagram analysis of the current voltage characteristics registered during the experiment. It allows to build calibration grids of the microscopic emission parameters, such as work function, effective emission area and field enhancement factor, and and to estimate changes in the sample structure online. (paper)

  4. Optimization of field emission properties of carbon nanotubes by Taguchi method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, J.-H.; Chang, C.-C.; Chen, S.-L.; Lu, D.-S.; Kung, C.-Y.; Huang, F.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    It is the purpose of this study to evaluate the field emission property of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) prepared by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) method. Nickel layer of 5 nm in thickness on 20-nm thickness titanium nitride film was transformed into discrete islands after hydrogen plasma pretreatment. CNTs were then grown up on Ni-coated areas by MPCVD. Through the practice of Taguchi method, superior CNT films with very low emission onset electric field, about 0.7 V/μm (at J = 10 μA/cm 2 ), are attained without post-deposition treatment. It is found that microwave power has the most important influence on the field emission characteristics of CNT films. The increase of methane flow ratio will downgrade the degree of graphitization of CNT and thus its field emission characteristics. Scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer analysis reveal that CNT growth by MPCVD is based on tip-growth mechanism. TEM micrographs validate the hollow, bamboo-like structure of the multi-walled CNTs

  5. Enhanced field emission properties of carbon nanotube bundles confined in SiO2 pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yu Dian; Grapov, Dmitry; Hu, Liangxing; Kong, Qinyu; Tay, Beng Kang; Labunov, Vladimir; Miao, Jianmin; Coquet, Philippe; Aditya, Sheel

    2018-02-01

    It has been widely reported that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit superior field emission (FE) properties due to their high aspect ratios and unique structural properties. Among the various types of CNTs, random growth CNTs exhibit promising FE properties due to their reduced inter-tube screening effect. However, growing random growth CNTs on individual catalyst islands often results in spread out CNT bundles, which reduces overall field enhancement. In this study, significant improvement in FE properties in CNT bundles is demonstrated by confining them in microfabricated SiO2 pits. Growing CNT bundles in narrow (0.5 μm diameter and 2 μm height) SiO2 pits achieves FE current density of 1-1.4 A cm-2, which is much higher than for freestanding CNT bundles (76.9 mA cm-2). From the Fowler Nordheim plots, confined CNT bundles show a higher field enhancement factor. This improvement can be attributed to the reduced bundle diameter by SiO2 pit confinement, which yields bundles with higher aspect ratios. Combining the obtained outcomes, it can be conclusively summarized that confining CNTs in SiO2 pits yields higher FE current density due to the higher field enhancement of confined CNTs.

  6. Electromechanical interactions in a carbon nanotube based thin film field emitting diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, N; Mahapatra, D Roy; Sun, Y; Yeow, J T W; Melnik, R V N; Jaffray, D A

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as promising candidates for biomedical x-ray devices and other applications of field emission. CNTs grown/deposited in a thin film are used as cathodes for field emission. In spite of the good performance of such cathodes, the procedure to estimate the device current is not straightforward and the required insight towards design optimization is not well developed. In this paper, we report an analysis aided by a computational model and experiments by which the process of evolution and self-assembly (reorientation) of CNTs is characterized and the device current is estimated. The modeling approach involves two steps: (i) a phenomenological description of the degradation and fragmentation of CNTs and (ii) a mechanics based modeling of electromechanical interaction among CNTs during field emission. A computational scheme is developed by which the states of CNTs are updated in a time incremental manner. Finally, the device current is obtained by using the Fowler-Nordheim equation for field emission and by integrating the current density over computational cells. A detailed analysis of the results reveals the deflected shapes of the CNTs in an ensemble and the extent to which the initial state of geometry and orientation angles affect the device current. Experimental results confirm these effects

  7. Transport of ions through a (6,6) carbon nanotube under electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Xu, Zhen; Zhou, Zhe-Wei; Hu, Guo-Hui

    2014-11-01

    The transport of water and ions through carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is crucial in nanotechnology and biotechnology. Previous investigation indicated that the ions can hardly pass through (6,6) CNTs due to their hydrated shells. In the present study, utilizing molecular dynamics simulation, it is shown that the energy barrier mainly originating from the hydrated water molecules could be overcome by applying an electric field large enough in the CNT axis direction. Potential of mean force is calculated to show the reduction of energy barrier when the electric field is present for (Na+, K+, Cl-) ions. Consequently, ionic flux through (6,6) CNTs can be found once the electric field becomes larger than a threshold value. The variation of the coordination numbers of ions at different locations from the bulk to the center of the CNT is also explored to elaborate this dynamic process. The thresholds of the electric field are different for Na+, K+, and Cl- due to their characteristics. This consequence might be potentially applied in ion selectivity in the future.

  8. Cu incorporated amorphous diamond like carbon (DLC) composites: An efficient electron field emitter over a wide range of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sk Faruque; Alam, Md Shahbaz; Mukherjee, Nillohit

    2018-03-01

    The effect of temperature on the electron field emission properties of copper incorporated amorphous diamond like carbon (a-Cu:DLC) thin films have been reported. The a-Cu:DLC thin films have been deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass and silicon substrate by the radio frequency sputtering process. The chemical composition of the films was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the micro structure was established using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The sp2 and sp3 bonding ratio in the a-Cu:DLC have been analyzed by the Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy studies. The material showed excellent electron field emission properties; which was optimized by varying the copper atomic percentage and temperature of the films. It was found that the threshold field and effective emission barrier were reduced significantly by copper incorporation as well as temperature and a detailed explanation towards emission mechanism has been provided.

  9. Carbon nanotube substrates and catalyzed hot stamp for polishing and patterning the substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhuang [Evanston, IL; Hauge, Robert H [Houston, TX; Schmidt, Howard K [Houston, TX; Kim, Myung Jong [Houston, TX; Kittrell, W Carter [Houston, TX

    2009-09-08

    The present invention is generally directed to catalyzed hot stamp methods for polishing and/or patterning carbon nanotube-containing substrates. In some embodiments, the substrate, as a carbon nanotube fiber end, is brought into contact with a hot stamp (typically at 200-800.degree. C.), and is kept in contact with the hot stamp until the morphology/patterns on the hot stamp have been transferred to the substrate. In some embodiments, the hot stamp is made of material comprising one or more transition metals (Fe, Ni, Co, Pt, Ag, Au, etc.), which can catalyze the etching reaction of carbon with H.sub.2, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2O, and/or O.sub.2. Such methods can (1) polish the carbon nanotube-containing substrate with a microscopically smooth finish, and/or (2) transfer pre-defined patterns from the hot stamp to the substrate. Such polished or patterned carbon nanotube substrates can find application as carbon nanotube electrodes, field emitters, and field emitter arrays for displays and electron sources.

  10. Nanofabrication of Arrays of Silicon Field Emitters with Vertical Silicon Nanowire Current Limiters and Self-Aligned Gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-19

    limiters, MEMS, NEMS, field emission, cold cathodes (Some figures may appear in colour only in the online journal) 1. Introduction Dense arrays of silicon... attention has been given to densely packed, highly ordered, top-down fabricated, single crystal vertical silicon nanowire devices that are embedded

  11. Near-field radiation between graphene-covered carbon nanotube arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Richard Z.; Liu, Xianglei; Zhang, Zhuomin M., E-mail: zhuomin.zhang@me.gatech.edu [George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    It has been shown that at small separation distances, thermal radiation between hyperbolic metamaterials is enhanced over blackbodies. This theoretical study considers near-field radiation when graphene is covered on the surfaces of two semi-infinite vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays separated by a sub-micron vacuum gap. Doped graphene is found to improve photon tunneling in a broad hyperbolic frequency range, due to the interaction with graphene-graphene surface plasmon polaritons (SPP). In order to elucidate the SPP resonance between graphene on hyperbolic substrates, vacuum-suspended graphene sheets separated by similar gap distances are compared. Increasing the Fermi energy through doping shifts the spectral heat flux peak toward higher frequencies. Although the presence of graphene on VACNT does not offer huge near-field heat flux enhancement over uncovered VACNT, this study identifies conditions (i.e., gap distance and doping level) that best utilize graphene to augment near-field radiation. Through the investigation of spatial Poynting vectors, heavily doped graphene is found to increase penetration depths in hyperbolic modes and the result is sensitive to the frequency regime. This study may have an impact on designing carbon-based vacuum thermophotovoltaics and thermal switches.

  12. Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: Circuitry and mechanical design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kia, Kaveh Kazemi [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Islamic Azad University of Bonab, Bonab (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bonabi, Fahimeh [Department of Engineering, Islamic Azad University of Bonab, Bonab (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 {mu}s. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  13. Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: circuitry and mechanical design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Kaveh Kazemi; Bonabi, Fahimeh

    2012-12-01

    A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 μs. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  14. Longitudinal waves in carbon nanotubes in the presence of transverse magnetic field and elastic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hu; Liu, Hua; Yang, Jialing

    2017-09-01

    In the present paper, the coupling effect of transverse magnetic field and elastic medium on the longitudinal wave propagation along a carbon nanotube (CNT) is studied. Based on the nonlocal elasticity theory and Hamilton's principle, a unified nonlocal rod theory which takes into account the effects of small size scale, lateral inertia and radial deformation is proposed. The existing rod theories including the classic rod theory, the Rayleigh-Love theory and Rayleigh-Bishop theory for macro solids can be treated as the special cases of the present model. A two-parameter foundation model (Pasternak-type model) is used to represent the elastic medium. The influence of transverse magnetic field, Pasternak-type elastic medium and small size scale on the longitudinal wave propagation behavior of the CNT is investigated in detail. It is shown that the influences of lateral inertia and radial deformation cannot be neglected in analyzing the longitudinal wave propagation characteristics of the CNT. The results also show that the elastic medium and the transverse magnetic field will also affect the longitudinal wave dispersion behavior of the CNT significantly. The results obtained in this paper are helpful for understanding the mechanical behaviors of nanostructures embedded in an elastic medium.

  15. Illuminating the future of silicon photonics: optical coupling of carbon nanotubes to microrings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Y K

    2015-01-01

    Advances in carbon nanotube material quality and processing techniques have led to an increased interest in nanotube photonics. In particular, emission in the telecommunication wavelengths makes nanotubes compatible with silicon photonics. Noury et al (2014 Nanotechnology 25 215201) have reported on carbon nanotube photoluminescence coupled to silicon microring resonators, underscoring the advantage of combining carbon nanotube emitters with silicon photonics. Their results open up the possibility of using nanotubes in other waveguide-based devices, taking advantage of well-established technologies. (viewpoint)

  16. Strain on field effect transistors with single–walled–carbon nanotube network on flexible substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T. G. [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Research center for Time-domain Nano-functional Device, Giheung, Yong-In, Gyeonggi 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, U. J.; Lee, E. H. [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Frontier Research Laboratory, Giheung, Yong-In, Gyeonggi 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, J. S. [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, S. W., E-mail: swnano.hwang@samsung.com, E-mail: sangsig@korea.ac.kr [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Research center for Time-domain Nano-functional Device, Giheung, Yong-In, Gyeonggi 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Frontier Research Laboratory, Giheung, Yong-In, Gyeonggi 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S., E-mail: swnano.hwang@samsung.com, E-mail: sangsig@korea.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-07

    We have systematically analyzed the effect of strain on the electrical properties of flexible field effect transistors with a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network on a polyethersulfone substrate. The strain was applied and estimated at the microscopic scale (<1 μm) by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with indigenously designed special bending jig. Interestingly, the strain estimated at the microscopic scale was found to be significantly different from the strain calculated at the macroscopic scale (centimeter-scale), by a factor of up to 4. Further in-depth analysis using SEM indicated that the significant difference in strain, obtained from two different measurement scales (microscale and macroscale), could be attributed to the formation of cracks and tears in the SWCNT network, or at the junction of SWCNT network and electrode during the strain process. Due to this irreversible morphological change, the electrical properties, such as on current level and field effect mobility, lowered by 14.3% and 4.6%, respectively.

  17. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/diamond double-layered structure for improved field electron emission stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L., E-mail: qiaoqin.yang@mail.usask.ca; Yang, Q.; Zhang, C.; Li, Y.S.

    2013-12-31

    A double-layered nanostructure consisting of a layer of vertically aligned Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and a layer of diamond beneath has been synthesized on silicon substrate by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition. The synthesis was achieved by first depositing a layer of diamond on silicon and then depositing a top layer of vertically aligned CNTs by applying a negative bias on the substrate holder. The growth of CNTs was catalyzed by a thin layer of spin-coated iron nitride. The surface morphology and structure of the CNTs/diamond double-layered structure were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscope, Energy Dispersive X-ray spectrum, and Raman Spectroscopy. Their field electron emission (FEE) properties were measured by KEITHLEY 237 high voltage measurement unit, showing much higher FEE current stability than single layered CNTs. - Highlights: • A new double-layered nanostructure consisting of a layer of vertically aligned CNTs and a layer of diamond beneath has been synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. • This double-layered structure exhibits superior field electron emission stability. • The improvement of emission stability is due to the combination of the unique properties of diamond and CNTs.

  18. Growth and field emission properties of one-dimensional carbon composite structure consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes and nanocones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongxin; Feng, Peter X; Fonseca, Luis; Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir I; Weiner, Brad R

    2009-01-01

    A simple approach is demonstrated for quickly growing a large-area aligned carbon composite nanostructure consisting of vertically aligned nanotubes and nanocones by the catalyst-assisted pulsed laser deposition techniques. The pyrolytic graphite was used as carbon source. The carbon nanocones were first grown on the molybdenum substrate with Ni catalysts. The carbon nanotubes have a uniform shape and length, aligned vertically on carbon nanocones, and the average diameter is about 7 nm. The special carbon composite arrays exhibit excellent field emission behaviours. The long-term field emission current stability of the one-dimensioned carbon nanostructure has also been investigated. No obvious current density decay was observed after a 10-day continuous experiment, indicating the super stability of the sample as cathode material.

  19. Improved field emission properties of thiolated multi-wall carbon nanotubes on a flexible carbon cloth substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, F T; Chen, P Y; Cheng, T C; Chien, C H; Li, B J

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we report the observation of enhanced field emission properties from thiolated multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) produced by a simple and effective two-step chemical surface modification technique. This technique implements carboxylation and thiolation on the MWCNTs synthesized by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) on the flexible carbon cloth substrate. The resulting thiolated MWCNTs were found to have a very low threshold field value of 1.25 V μm -1 and a rather high field enhancement factor of 1.93 x 10 4 , which are crucial for applications in versatile vacuum microelectronics

  20. Nanotube cathodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  1. Nanotube cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  2. Beam emittance measurements on multicusp ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarstedt, M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used for various applications. Presently, the implementation of this type of ion source planned for the development of an ion beam lithography machine, which will be used for the projection of sub-0.2 {mu}m patterns onto a wafer substrate. Since, for this application, a very good beam quality and a small ion energy spread are required, emittance measurements have been performed on a multicusp ion source for various source conditions. It is shown that the installation of proper capacitors between the extraction electrodes is necessary to avoid rf-pickup, which otherwise leads to a distortion of the beam emittance. The influence of the magnetic filter field on the beam emittance has been investigated, and the beam emittance of a dc filament-discharge plasma has also been compared to that of an rf-generated plasma.

  3. Beam emittance measurements on multicusp ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarstedt, M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.

    1995-08-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used for various applications. Presently, the implementation of this type of ion source planned for the development of an ion beam lithography machine, which will be used for the projection of sub-0.2 μm patterns onto a wafer substrate. Since, for this application, a very good beam quality and a small ion energy spread are required, emittance measurements have been performed on a multicusp ion source for various source conditions. It is shown that the installation of proper capacitors between the extraction electrodes is necessary to avoid rf-pickup, which otherwise leads to a distortion of the beam emittance. The influence of the magnetic filter field on the beam emittance has been investigated, and the beam emittance of a dc filament-discharge plasma has also been compared to that of an rf-generated plasma

  4. Fabrication and characterization of junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor for cholesterol detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, Md. Abdul, E-mail: abdulnpl@gmail.com; Dutta, Jiten Ch. [Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Tezpur University, Napaam, Tezpur, Assam 784028 (India)

    2014-08-04

    We have reported fabrication and characterization of polyaniline (PANI)/zinc oxide (ZnO) membrane-based junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor deposited on indium tin oxide glass plate for the detection of cholesterol (0.5–22.2 mM). Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) has been immobilized on the PANI/ZnO membrane by physical adsorption technique. Electrical response has been recorded using digital multimeter (Agilent 3458A) in the presence of phosphate buffer saline of 50 mM, pH 7.0, and 0.9% NaCl contained in a glass pot. The results of response studies for cholesterol reveal linearity as 0.5–16.6 mM and improved sensitivity of 60 mV/decade in good agreement with Nernstian limit ∼59.2 mV/decade. The life time of this sensor has been found up to 5 months and response time of 1 s. The limit of detection with regression coefficient (r) ∼ 0.998 and Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub m}) were found to be ∼0.25 and 1.4 mM, respectively, indicating high affinity of ChOx to cholesterol. The results obtained in this work show negligible interference with glucose and urea.

  5. Negative differential resistance in BN co-doped coaxial carbon nanotube field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Khurshed A.; Parvaiz, M. Shunaid

    2016-12-01

    The CNTFETs are the most promising advanced alternatives to the conventional FETs due to their outstanding structure and electrical properties. In this paper, we report the I-V characteristics of zig-zag (4, 0) semiconducting coaxial carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET) using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism. The CNTFET is co-doped with two, four and six boron-nitrogen (BN) atoms separately near the electrodes using the substitutional doping method and the I-V characteristics were calculated for each model using Atomistic Tool Kit software (version 13.8.1) and its virtual interface. The results reveal that all models show negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior with the maximum peak to valley current ratio (PVCR) of 3.2 at 300 K for the four atom doped model. The NDR behavior is due to the band to band tunneling (BTBT) in semiconducting CNTFET and decreases as the doping in the channel increases. The results are beneficial for next generation designing of nano devices and their potential applications in electronic industry.

  6. Targeting Antibodies to Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors by Pyrene Hydrazide Modification of Heavy Chain Carbohydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steingrimur Stefansson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNT-FET studies have used immobilized antibodies as the ligand binding moiety. However, antibodies are not optimal for CNT-FET detection due to their large size and charge. Their size can prevent ligands from reaching within the Debye length of the CNTs and a layer of charged antibodies on the circuits can drown out any ligand signal. In an attempt to minimize the antibody footprint on CNT-FETs, we examined whether pyrene hydrazide modification of antibody carbohydrates could reduce the concentration required to functionalize CNT circuits. The carbohydrates are almost exclusively on the antibody Fc region and this site-specific modification could mediate uniform antibody orientation on the CNTs. We compared the hydrazide modification of anti-E. coli O157:H7 polyclonal antibodies to pyrenebutanoic acid succinimidyl ester-coated CNTs and carbodiimide-mediated antibody CNT attachment. Our results show that the pyrene hydrazide modification was superior to those methods with respect to bacteria detection and less than 1 nM labeled antibody was required to functionalize the circuits.

  7. Highly Uniform Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors and Medium Scale Integrated Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingyan; Zhang, Panpan; Ding, Li; Han, Jie; Qiu, Song; Li, Qingwen; Zhang, Zhiyong; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2016-08-10

    Top-gated p-type field-effect transistors (FETs) have been fabricated in batch based on carbon nanotube (CNT) network thin films prepared from CNT solution and present high yield and highly uniform performance with small threshold voltage distribution with standard deviation of 34 mV. According to the property of FETs, various logical and arithmetical gates, shifters, and d-latch circuits were designed and demonstrated with rail-to-rail output. In particular, a 4-bit adder consisting of 140 p-type CNT FETs was demonstrated with higher packing density and lower supply voltage than other published integrated circuits based on CNT films, which indicates that CNT based integrated circuits can reach to medium scale. In addition, a 2-bit multiplier has been realized for the first time. Benefitted from the high uniformity and suitable threshold voltage of CNT FETs, all of the fabricated circuits based on CNT FETs can be driven by a single voltage as small as 2 V.

  8. High performance dendrimer functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes field effect transistor biosensor for protein detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Sharma, Vikash; Puri, Nitin K.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Kotnala, Ravinder K.

    2016-12-01

    We report a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistor (FET) functionalized with Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer with 128 carboxyl groups as anchors for site specific biomolecular immobilization of protein antibody for C-reactive protein (CRP) detection. The FET device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and current-gate voltage (I-Vg) characteristic studies. A concentration-dependent decrease in the source-drain current was observed in the regime of clinical significance, with a detection limit of ˜85 pM and a high sensitivity of 20% change in current (ΔI/I) per decade CRP concentration, showing SWNT being locally gated by the binding of CRP to antibody (anti-CRP) on the FET device. The low value of the dissociation constant (Kd = 0.31 ± 0.13 μg ml-1) indicated a high affinity of the device towards CRP analyte arising due to high anti-CRP loading with a better probe orientation on the 3-dimensional PAMAM structure.

  9. Detailed simulation study of a dual material gate carbon nanotube field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orouji, Ali A.; Arefinia, Zahra

    2009-02-01

    For the first time, a new type of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET), the dual material gate (DMG)-CNTFET, is proposed and simulated using quantum simulation that is based on self-consistent solution between two-dimensional Poisson equation and Schrödinger equation with open boundary conditions, within the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) framework. The proposed structure is similar to that of the conventional coaxial CNTFET with the exception that the gate of the DMG-CNTFET consists of two laterally contacting metals with different work functions. Simulation results show DMG-CNTFET significantly decreases leakage current, drain conductance and subthreshold swing, and increases on-off current ratio and voltage gain as compared to conventional CNTFET. We demonstrate that the potential in the channel region exhibits a step function that ensures the screening of the drain potential variation by the gate near the drain resulting in suppressed short-channel effects like the drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) and hot-carrier effect.

  10. Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscope for the Study of Polymer-Nanotube Interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carroll, David

    2000-01-01

    ... optical properties in comparison to the intrinsic polymers Recent absorption and luminescence studies of carbon nanotube composites based on electro-optic polymer hosts such as MEH-PPV, have revealed...

  11. Demonstration of high current carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors at industrially relevant voltages

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Mitchell

    The display market is presently dominated by the active matrix liquid crystal display (LCD). However, the active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) display is argued to become the successor to the LCD, and is already beginning its way into the market, mainly in small size displays. But, for AMOLED technology to become comparable in market share to LCD, larger size displays must become available at a competitive price with their LCD counterparts. A major issue preventing low-cost large AMOLED displays is the thin-film transistor (TFT) technology. Unlike the voltage driven LCD, the OLEDs in the AMOLED display are current driven. Because of this, the mature amorphous silicon TFT backplane technology used in the LCD must be upgraded to a material possessing a higher mobility. Polycrystalline silicon and transparent oxide TFT technologies are being considered to fill this need. But these technologies bring with them significant manufacturing complexity and cost concerns. Carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors (CN-VFETs) offer a unique solution to this problem (now known as the AMOLED backplane problem). The CN-VFET allows the use of organic semiconductors to be used for the semiconductor layer. Organics are known for their low-cost large area processing compatibility. Although the mobility of the best organics is only comparable to that of amorphous silicon, the CN-VFET makes up for this by orienting the channel vertically, as opposed to horizontally (like in conventional TFTs). This allows the CN-VFET to achieve sub-micron channel lengths without expensive high resolution patterning. Additionally, because the CN-VFET can be easily converted into a light emitting transistor (called the carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic light emitting transistor---CN-VOLET) by essentially stacking an OLED on top of the CN-VFET, more potential benefits can be realized. These potential benefits include, increased aperture ratio, increased OLED

  12. A Carbon Nanotube-based NEMS Parametric Amplifier for Enhanced Radio Wave Detection and Electronic Signal Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, B J; Sussman, A; Zettl, A [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mickelson, W, E-mail: azettl@berkeley.edu [Center of Integrated Nanomechanical Systems, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-07-20

    We propose a scheme for a parametric amplifier based on a single suspended carbon nanotube field-emitter. This novel electromechanical nanotube device acts as a phase-sensitive, variable-gain, band-pass-filtering amplifier for electronic signal processing and, at the same time, can operate as a variable-sensitivity, tuneable detector and transducer of radio frequency electromagnetic waves. The amplifier can exhibit infinite gain at pumping voltages much less than 10 Volts. Additionally, the amplifier's low overhead power consumption (10-1000 nW) make it exceptionally attractive for ultra-low-power applications.

  13. A Carbon Nanotube-based NEMS Parametric Amplifier for Enhanced Radio Wave Detection and Electronic Signal Amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman, B J; Sussman, A; Zettl, A; Mickelson, W

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme for a parametric amplifier based on a single suspended carbon nanotube field-emitter. This novel electromechanical nanotube device acts as a phase-sensitive, variable-gain, band-pass-filtering amplifier for electronic signal processing and, at the same time, can operate as a variable-sensitivity, tuneable detector and transducer of radio frequency electromagnetic waves. The amplifier can exhibit infinite gain at pumping voltages much less than 10 Volts. Additionally, the amplifier's low overhead power consumption (10-1000 nW) make it exceptionally attractive for ultra-low-power applications.

  14. Solution-processed single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors and bootstrapped inverters for disintegratable, transient electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Sung Hun, E-mail: harin74@gmail.com, E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jrogers@illinois.edu; Shin, Jongmin; Cho, In-Tak; Lee, Jong-Ho, E-mail: harin74@gmail.com, E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jrogers@illinois.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Inter-University Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sang Youn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Display R and D Center, Samsung Display Co., Yongin-city, Gyeongki-do 446–711 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Joon; Lee, Chi Hwan; Rogers, John A., E-mail: harin74@gmail.com, E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jrogers@illinois.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-07-07

    This paper presents materials, device designs, and physical/electrical characteristics of a form of nanotube electronics that is physically transient, in the sense that all constituent elements dissolve and/or disperse upon immersion into water. Studies of contact effects illustrate the ability to use water soluble metals such as magnesium for source/drain contacts in nanotube based field effect transistors. High mobilities and on/off ratios in transistors that use molybdenum, silicon nitride, and silicon oxide enable full swing characteristics for inverters at low voltages (∼5 V) and with high gains (∼30). Dissolution/disintegration tests of such systems on water soluble sheets of polyvinyl alcohol demonstrate physical transience within 30 min.

  15. The fabrication of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with semiconductors as the source and drain contact materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Z; Camino, F E

    2009-04-01

    Sb(2)Te(3) and Bi(2)Te(2)Se semiconductor materials were used as the source and drain contact materials in the fabrication of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs). Ultra-purified single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were ultrasonically dispersed in N-methyl pyrrolidone solvent. Dielectrophoresis was used to deposit and align SWCNTs for fabrication of CNTFETs. The Sb(2)Te(3)- and Bi(2)Te(2)Se-based CNTFETs demonstrate p-type metal-oxide-silicon-like I-V curves with high on/off drain-source current ratio at large drain-source voltages and good saturation of drain-source current with increasing drain-source voltage. The fabrication process developed is novel and has general meaning, and could be used for the fabrication of SWCNT-based integrated devices and systems with semiconductor contact materials.

  16. Solution-processed single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors and bootstrapped inverters for disintegratable, transient electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Sung Hun; Shin, Jongmin; Cho, In-Tak; Lee, Jong-Ho; Han, Sang Youn; Lee, Dong Joon; Lee, Chi Hwan; Rogers, John A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents materials, device designs, and physical/electrical characteristics of a form of nanotube electronics that is physically transient, in the sense that all constituent elements dissolve and/or disperse upon immersion into water. Studies of contact effects illustrate the ability to use water soluble metals such as magnesium for source/drain contacts in nanotube based field effect transistors. High mobilities and on/off ratios in transistors that use molybdenum, silicon nitride, and silicon oxide enable full swing characteristics for inverters at low voltages (∼5 V) and with high gains (∼30). Dissolution/disintegration tests of such systems on water soluble sheets of polyvinyl alcohol demonstrate physical transience within 30 min.

  17. Jamming of Quantum Emitters by Active Coated Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    to effectively cloak the emitters to a far-field observer is reported and explained through thorough near- and far-field investigations. This property offers an interesting route toward the jamming of quantum emitters/nanoantennas that might be of potential use, for instance, in biological fluorescence assays...

  18. Ultralow field emission from thinned, open-ended, and defected carbon nanotubes by using microwave hydrogen plasma processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jian-Hua, E-mail: jhdeng1983@163.com [College of Physics and Materials Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Cheng, Lin; Wang, Fan-Jie; Yu, Bin; Li, Guo-Zheng; Li, De-Jun [College of Physics and Materials Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Cheng, Guo-An [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Thinned, open-ended, and defected carbon nanotubes were prepared by using hydrogen plasma processing. The processed carbon nanotubes have far better field emission performance than that of the pristine ones. - Highlights: • CVD prepared CNT arrays were processed by microwave hydrogen plasma. • Thinned, open-ended, and defected CNTs were obtained. • Processed CNTs have far better field emission performance than the pristine ones. • Processed CNTs have applicable emission stability after being perfectly aged. - Abstract: Ultralow field emission is achieved from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by using microwave hydrogen plasma processing. After the processing, typical capped CNT tips are removed, with thinned, open-ended, and defected CNTs left. Structural analyses indicate that the processed CNTs have more SP{sup 3}-hybridized defects as compared to the pristine ones. The morphology of CNTs can be readily controlled by adjusting microwave powers, which change the shape of CNTs by means of hydrogen plasma etching. Processed CNTs with optimal morphology are found to have an ultralow turn-on field of 0.566 V/μm and threshold field of 0.896 V/μm, much better than 0.948 and 1.559 V/μm of the as-grown CNTs, respectively. This improved FE performance is ascribed to the structural changes of CNTs after the processing. The thinned and open-ended shape of CNTs can facilitate electron tunneling through barriers and additionally, the increased defects at tube walls can serve as new active emission sites. Furthermore, our plasma processed CNTs exhibit excellent field emission stability at a large emission current density of 10.36 mA/cm{sup 2} after being perfectly aged, showing promising prospects in applications as high-performance vacuum electron sources.

  19. A power system design and analysis of carbon nano-tubes field emission displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jong C.; Yao, W. C.

    2006-01-01

    In new generation Flat Panel Displays(FPD), a lot of design methods are being deployed, including OLED, PDP, TFT-LCD, Back Projection and Field Emission Display(FED) etc. These new generation FPDs have their respective pluses and minuses. Each has its selling points and market attractions. But among them, FED principles are most close to that of CRT displays. Not only FEDs are advantageous in their good degree of saturation of color, but also they have excellent contrast, luminance and electricity consumption etc. It has been considered as the main products of future generation FPDs. Japan and countries all over the world are successively proposing and launching related FED products in the fields. This will not only drive the FEDs into a wave of new trends, but also it will be able to replace most of the current FPD products within a short time. In this paper, based on these solid trends, we are determined to put into our resources and efforts to perform research on these important FEDs technologies and products, particularly in Carbon Nano-Tubes FEDs(CNT-FED). Our research group has already performed research on CNT-FED subjects for almost three years. During the course of our research, we have run into a lot of issues and problems. We have made every effort to overcome some of them. This paper performs comparative analysis of three power option for small size (4-inch) CNT-FEDs to drive the FED effects such as the direct current power, pulsed power and sinusoidal power respectively. This paper performs comparative analysis of three power options for small sized CNT-FEDs. It was concluded that the pulsed power option will produce the best results overall among the three power options. It is felt that these data presented can then be referenced and used to design a power system circuit to get an optimum design for better luminance and least power consumption for small sized commercial CNT-FED products.

  20. Dynamics of ultra-short electromagnetic pulses in the system of chiral carbon nanotube waveguides in the presence of external alternating electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konobeeva, N.N., E-mail: yana_nn@inbox.ru [Volgograd State University, University Avenue 100, Volgograd 400062 (Russian Federation); Belonenko, M.B. [Volgograd Institute of Business, Uzhno-ukrainskaya str., Volgograd 400048 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-01

    The paper addresses the propagation of ultra-short optical pulses in chiral carbon nanotubes in the presence of external alternating electric field. Following the assumption that the considered optical pulses are represented in the form of discrete solitons, we analyze the wave equation for the electromagnetic field and consider the dynamics of pulses in external field, their initial amplitudes and frequencies.

  1. Optical Performance of Carbon-Nanotube Electron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonge, Niels de; Allioux, Myriam; Oostveen, Jim T.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Milne, William I.

    2005-01-01

    The figure of merit for the electron optical performance of carbon-nanotube (CNT) electron sources is presented. This figure is given by the relation between the reduced brightness and the energy spread in the region of stable emission. It is shown experimentally that a CNT electron source exhibits a highly stable emission process that follows the Fowler-Nordheim theory for field emission, fixing the relationship among the energy spread, the current, and the radius. The performance of the CNT emitter under realistic operating conditions is compared with state-of-the-art electron point sources. It is demonstrated that the reduced brightness is a function of the tunneling parameter, a measure of the energy spread at low temperatures, only, independent of the geometry of the emitter

  2. Simulation of diode characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with symmetric source and drain contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingqi; Zhang, Xixiang

    2011-01-01

    The diode characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) with symmetric source and drain contacts have been experimentally found at zero gate voltage (Li J. et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 92 (2008) 133111). We calculate this characteristic using a semiclassical method based on Schottky barrier transistor mechanism. The influences of metal work function, the diameter of the carbon nanotubes and the dielectric thickness on the rectification behavior have been studied. The calculation results show that the metal with a higher work function results in a better diode characteristics for a p-type CNTFET. For single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with different band gaps, both forward current and reverse current increase with decreasing band gap, but the ratio of forward current to reverse current decreases with decreasing band gap. This result is well consistent with the experimental observations reported previously. The simulation of the dielectric thickness effect indicates that the thinner the dielectric layer, the better the rectification behavior. The CNTFETs without a bottom gate could not show the diode characteristics, which is consistent with the reported experimental observation. © 2011 Europhysics Letters Association.

  3. Simulation of diode characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with symmetric source and drain contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jingqi

    2011-09-01

    The diode characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) with symmetric source and drain contacts have been experimentally found at zero gate voltage (Li J. et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 92 (2008) 133111). We calculate this characteristic using a semiclassical method based on Schottky barrier transistor mechanism. The influences of metal work function, the diameter of the carbon nanotubes and the dielectric thickness on the rectification behavior have been studied. The calculation results show that the metal with a higher work function results in a better diode characteristics for a p-type CNTFET. For single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with different band gaps, both forward current and reverse current increase with decreasing band gap, but the ratio of forward current to reverse current decreases with decreasing band gap. This result is well consistent with the experimental observations reported previously. The simulation of the dielectric thickness effect indicates that the thinner the dielectric layer, the better the rectification behavior. The CNTFETs without a bottom gate could not show the diode characteristics, which is consistent with the reported experimental observation. © 2011 Europhysics Letters Association.

  4. Effect of magnetic field on thermal conductivity and viscosity of a magnetic nanofluid loaded with carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahsavar, Amin [Kermanshah University of Technology, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimpour, Mohammad Reza; Saghafian, Mohsen [Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shafii, M. B. [Sharif University of Technology, Tehran(Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The present work examines experimentally the effect of magnetic field on the viscosity and thermal conductivity of a hybrid nanofluid containing tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and Gum arabic (GA) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The hybrid nanofluid was prepared by using ultrasonic dispersion method. Magnetic field was created by a pair of spaced apart magnet plates. The effect of temperature on the time variation of thermal conductivity under applied magnetic field was also investigated. According to the results of this study, viscosity of the hybrid nanofluid increases with the strength of magnetic field, while it decreases with the increase of temperature. Additionally, it is found that the hybrid nanofluid behaves as a shear thinning fluid at low shear rates while it exhibits Newtonian behavior at high shear rates. Furthermore, results show that when an external magnetic field is applied to the studied magnetic nanofluids, the thermal conductivity experiences a peak.

  5. Ammonia volatilization from a paddy field following applications of urea: rice plants are both an absorber and an emitter for atmospheric ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kentaro; Nishimura, Seiichi; Yagi, Kazuyuki

    2008-02-15

    Ammonia (NH(3)) volatilization from a paddy field following applications of urea was measured. Two lysimeters of Gray Lowland soil with a pH (H(2)O) of 5.7 were used for the experiment. Urea was applied at a rate of 50 kg N ha(-1) by incorporation as the basal fertilization (BF) and at rates of 30 and 10 kg N ha(-1) by top-dressing as the first (SF1) and second (SF2) supplemental fertilizations, respectively. Two wind tunnels per lysimeter were installed just after BF; one was transplanted with rice plants (PR plot), and the other was without rice plants (NR plot). Weak volatilization was observed at the PR plots after BF. By contrast, strong volatilization was observed at the PR plots after SF1 with a maximum flux of 150 g N ha(-1) h(-1); however, almost no volatilization was observed after SF2. The NH(3) volatilization loss accounted for 2.1%, 20.9%, 0.5%, and 8.2% of the applied urea at each application, BF, SF1, SF2, and the total application, respectively, for which only the net fluxes as volatilization were accumulated. The NH(3) volatilization fluxes from the paddy water surface (F(vol)) at the NR plots were estimated using a film model for its verification. After confirmation of good correlation, the film model was applied to estimate F(vol) at the PR plots. The NH(3) exchange fluxes by rice plants (F(ric)) were obtained by subtracting F(vol) from the observed net NH(3) flux. The derived F(ric) showed that the rice plants emitted NH(3) remarkably just after SF1 when a relatively high rate of urea was applied, although they absorbed atmospheric NH(3) in the other periods. In conclusion, rice plants are essentially an absorber of atmospheric NH(3); however, they turn into an emitter of NH(3) under excess nutrition of ammoniacal nitrogen.

  6. Cancer from internal emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boecker, B.B.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Irradiation from internal emitters, or internally deposited radionuclides, is an important component of radiation exposures encountered in the workplace, home, or general environment. Long-term studies of human populations exposed to various internal emitters by different routes of exposure are producing critical information for the protection of workers and members of the general public. The purpose of this report is to examine recent developments and discuss their potential importance for understanding lifetime cancer risks from internal emitters. The major populations of persons being studied for lifetime health effects from internally deposited radionuclides are well known: Lung cancer in underground miners who inhaled Rn progeny, liver cancer from persons injected with the Th-containing radiographic contrast medium Thorotrast, bone cancer from occupational or medical intakes of 226 Ra or medical injections of 224 Ra, and thyroid cancer from exposures to iodine radionuclides in the environment or for medical purposes

  7. Low emittance photoinjectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrario, Massimo

    2001-01-01

    Photon colliders require high charge polarized electron beams with very low normalized emittances, possibly lower than the actual damping rings design goals. Recent analytical and numerical efforts in understanding beam dynamics in RF photoinjectors have raised again the question as to whether the performances of an RF electron gun based injector could be competitive with respect to a damping ring. As a matter of discussion we report in this paper the most recent results concerning low emittance photoinjector designs: the production of polarized electron beams by DC and/or RF guns is illustrated together with space charge compensation techniques and thermal emittance effects. New ideas concerning multi-gun injection system and generation of flat beams by RF gun are also discussed

  8. Influence of DC electric field on the Lennard-Jones potential and phonon vibrations of carbon nanotube on catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeidi, Mohammadreza; Vaezzadeh, Majid; Badakhshan, Farzaneh

    2011-01-01

    Influence of DC electric field on carbon nanotube (CNT) growth in chemical vapor deposition is studied. Investigation of electric field effect in van der Waals interaction shows that increase in DC electric field raises the magnitude of attractive term of the Lennard-Jones potential. By using a theoretical model based on phonon vibrations of CNT on catalyst, it is shown that there is an optimum field for growth. Also it is observed that CNT under optimum electric field is longer than CNT in the absence of field. Finally, the relation between optimum DC electric field and type of catalyst is investigated and for some intervals of electric field, the best catalyst is introduced, which is very useful for experimental researches. -- Research highlights: → Influence of DC electric field on CNT growth in CVD. → Effect of electric field on van der Waals interaction between CNT and its catalyst. → Applying DC electric field increases attractive term of Lennard-Jonespotential. → There is an optimum DC field for CNT growth. → For catalyst with stronger van der Waals interaction, optimum field is smaller.

  9. Effect of Longitudinal Magnetic Field on Vibration Characteristics of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Viscoelastic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D. P.; Lei, Y.; Shen, Z. B.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of longitudinal magnetic field on vibration response of a sing-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) embedded in viscoelastic medium is investigated. Based on nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, Maxwell's relations, and Kelvin viscoelastic foundation model, the governing equations of motion for vibration analysis are established. The complex natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes in closed form for the embedded SWCNT with arbitrary boundary conditions are obtained using transfer function method (TFM). The new analytical expressions for the complex natural frequencies are also derived for certain typical boundary conditions and Kelvin-Voigt model. Numerical results from the model are presented to show the effects of nonlocal parameter, viscoelastic parameter, boundary conditions, aspect ratio, and strength of the magnetic field on vibration characteristics for the embedded SWCNT in longitudinal magnetic field. The results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed methods for vibration analysis of embedded SWCNTs under magnetic field.

  10. Non-Planar Nanotube and Wavy Architecture Based Ultra-High Performance Field Effect Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Hanna, Amir

    2016-11-01

    This dissertation presents a unique concept for a device architecture named the nanotube (NT) architecture, which is capable of higher drive current compared to the Gate-All-Around Nanowire architecture when applied to heterostructure Tunnel Field Effect Transistors. Through the use of inner/outer core-shell gates, heterostructure NT TFET leverages physically larger tunneling area thus achieving higher driver current (ION) and saving real estates by eliminating arraying requirement. We discuss the physics of p-type (Silicon/Indium Arsenide) and n-type (Silicon/Germanium hetero-structure) based TFETs. Numerical TCAD simulations have shown that NT TFETs have 5x and 1.6 x higher normalized ION when compared to GAA NW TFET for p and n-type TFETs, respectively. This is due to the availability of larger tunneling junction cross sectional area, and lower Shockley-Reed-Hall recombination, while achieving sub 60 mV/dec performance for more than 5 orders of magnitude of drain current, thus enabling scaling down of Vdd to 0.5 V. This dissertation also introduces a novel thin-film-transistors architecture that is named the Wavy Channel (WC) architecture, which allows for extending device width by integrating vertical fin-like substrate corrugations giving rise to up to 50% larger device width, without occupying extra chip area. The novel architecture shows 2x higher output drive current per unit chip area when compared to conventional planar architecture. The current increase is attributed to both the extra device width and 50% enhancement in field effect mobility due to electrostatic gating effects. Digital circuits are fabricated to demonstrate the potential of integrating WC TFT based circuits. WC inverters have shown 2× the peak-to-peak output voltage for the same input, and ~2× the operation frequency of the planar inverters for the same peak-to-peak output voltage. WC NAND circuits have shown 2× higher peak-to-peak output voltage, and 3× lower high-to-low propagation

  11. A Carbon Nanotube Electron Source Based Ionization Vacuum Gauge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changkun Dong; Ganapati Myneni

    2003-10-01

    The results of fabrication and performance of an ionization vacuum gauge using a carbon nanotube (CNT) electron source are presented. The electron source was constructed with multi-wall nanotubes (MWNT), which were grown using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The electron emission of the source was stable in vacuum pressure up to 10-7 Torr, which is better than the metal field emitters. The measurement linearity of the gauge was better than {+-}10% from 10-6 to 10-10 Torr. The gauge sensitivity of 4 Torr-1 was achieved under 50 {micro}A electron emission in nitrogen. The gauge is expected to find applications in vacuum measurements from 10-7 Torr to below 10-11 Torr.

  12. Investigation of Schottky-Barrier carbon nanotube field-effect transistor by an efficient semi-classical numerical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changxin; Zhang Wei; Zhao Bo; Zhang Yafei

    2009-01-01

    An efficient semi-classical numerical modeling approach has been developed to simulate the coaxial Schottky-barrier carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (SB-CNTFET). In the modeling, the electrostatic potential of the CNT is obtained by self-consistently solving the analytic expression of CNT carrier distribution and the cylindrical Poisson equation, which significantly enhances the computational efficiency and simultaneously present a result in good agreement to that obtained from the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism based on the first principle. With this method, the effects of the CNT diameter, power supply voltage, thickness and dielectric constant of gate insulator on the device performance are investigated.

  13. FACET Emittance Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederico, J; Hogan, M.J.; Nosochkov, Y.; Litos, M.D.; Raubenheimer, T.; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The FACET beamline consists of a chicane and final focus system to compress the 23 GeV, 3.2 nC electron bunches to {approx}20 {micro}m long and {approx}10 {micro}m wide. Simulations of the FACET beamline indicate the short-duration and large, 1.5% rms energy spread beams may suffer a factor of four emittance growth from a combination of chromaticity, incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). Emittance growth is directly correlated to head erosion in plasma wakefield acceleration and is a limiting factor in single stage performance. Studies of the geometric, CSR, and ISR components are presented. Numerical calculation of the rms emittance can be overwhelmed by long tails in the simulated phase space distributions; more useful definitions of emittance are given. A complete simulation of the beamline is presented as well, which agrees with design specifications.

  14. FACET Emittance Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederico, Joel

    2011-01-01

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The FACET beamline consists of a chicane and final focus system to compress the 23 GeV, 3.2 nC electron bunches to ∼20 (micro)m long and ∼10 (micro)m wide. Simulations of the FACET beamline indicate the short-duration and large, 1.5% rms energy spread beams may suffer a factor of four emittance growth from a combination of chromaticity, incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). Emittance growth is directly correlated to head erosion in plasma wakefield acceleration and is a limiting factor in single stage performance. Studies of the geometric, CSR, and ISR components are presented. Numerical calculation of the rms emittance can be overwhelmed by long tails in the simulated phase space distributions; more useful definitions of emittance are given. A complete simulation of the beamline is presented as well, which agrees with design specifications.

  15. Magnetic-Field Dependence of Tunnel Couplings in Carbon Nanotube Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove-Rasmussen, Kasper; Grap, S.; Paaske, Jens

    2012-01-01

    By means of sequential and cotunneling spectroscopy, we study the tunnel couplings between metallic leads and individual levels in a carbon nanotube quantum dot. The levels are ordered in shells consisting of two doublets with strong- and weak-tunnel couplings, leading to gate-dependent level...

  16. Emittance growth due to dipole ripple and sextupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, H.J.; Ellison, J.A.; Syphers, M.J.; Newberger, B.S.

    1993-05-01

    Ripple in the power supplies for storage ring magnets can have adverse effects on the circulating beams: orbit distortion and emittance growth from dipole ripple, tune modulation and dynamic aperture reduction from quadrupole ripple, etc. In this paper, we study the effects of ripple in the horizontal bending field of the SSC in the presence of nonlinearity, in particular, the growth in beam emittance

  17. Recent advances in carbon nanotube-based electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Prithu; Ahuja, Prerit

    2008-01-01

    CNT-electronics is a field involving synthesis of carbon nanotubes-based novel electronic circuits, comparable to the size of molecules, the practically fundamental size possible. It has brought a new paradigm in science as it has enabled scientists to increase the device integration density tremendously, hence achieving better efficiency and speed. Here we review the state-of-art current research on the applications of CNTs in electronics and present recent results outlining their potential along with illustrating some current concerns in the research field. Unconventional projects such as CNT-based biological sensors, transistors, field emitters, integrated circuits, etc. are taking CNT-based electronics to its extremes. The field holds a promise for mass production of high speed and efficient electronic devices. However, the chemical complexity, reproducibility and other factors make the field a challenging one, which need to be addressed before the field realizes its true potential

  18. Chirality dependence of dipole matrix element of carbon nanotubes in axial magnetic field: A third neighbor tight binding approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2014-02-01

    We have studied the electronic structure and dipole matrix element, D, of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) under magnetic field, using the third nearest neighbor tight binding model. It is shown that the 1NN and 3NN-TB band structures show differences such as the spacing and mixing of neighbor subbands. Applying the magnetic field leads to breaking the degeneracy behavior in the D transitions and creates new allowed transitions corresponding to the band modifications. It is found that |D| is proportional to the inverse tube radius and chiral angle. Our numerical results show that amount of filed induced splitting for the first optical peak is proportional to the magnetic field by the splitting rate ν11. It is shown that ν11 changes linearly and parabolicly with the chiral angle and radius, respectively.

  19. Studies of emittance growth in the ATF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, F.

    1997-03-01

    Several different mechanisms of emittance growth in the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at KEK are investigated: the author calculates rise times of the fast beam-ion instability for the damping ring (DR), and discusses the emittance growth caused by coherent synchrotron radiation in the beam-transport line (BT), the effect of quadrupole wake fields in the injector linac, and, finally, a single-bunch head-tail ion effect that can occur in both the DR and the BT. A first attempt to measure the quadrupole wake on the real machine is also reported

  20. Generalized superradiant assembly for nanophotonic thermal emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallawaarachchi, Sudaraka; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Stockman, Mark I.; Premaratne, Malin

    2018-03-01

    Superradiance explains the collective enhancement of emission, observed when nanophotonic emitters are arranged within subwavelength proximity and perfect symmetry. Thermal superradiant emitter assemblies with variable photon far-field coupling rates are known to be capable of outperforming their conventional, nonsuperradiant counterparts. However, due to the inability to account for assemblies comprising emitters with various materials and dimensional configurations, existing thermal superradiant models are inadequate and incongruent. In this paper, a generalized thermal superradiant assembly for nanophotonic emitters is developed from first principles. Spectral analysis shows that not only does the proposed model outperform existing models in power delivery, but also portrays unforeseen and startling characteristics during emission. These electromagnetically induced transparency like (EIT-like) and superscattering-like characteristics are reported here for a superradiant assembly, and the effects escalate as the emitters become increasingly disparate. The fact that the EIT-like characteristics are in close agreement with a recent experimental observation involving the superradiant decay of qubits strongly bolsters the validity of the proposed model.

  1. Using hydrocarbon as a carbon source for synthesis of carbon nanotube by electric field induced needle-pulsed plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazemi Kia, Kaveh; Bonabi, Fahimeh

    2013-01-01

    In this work different hydrocarbons are used as the carbon source, in the production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nano onions. An electric field induced needle pulse arc-discharge reactor is used. The influence of starting carbon on the synthesis of CNTs is investigated. The production efficiency is compared for Acetone, Isopropanol and Naphthalene as simple hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbons are preheated and then pretreated by electric field before being exposed to plasma. The hydrocarbon vapor is injected into plasma through a graphite spout in the cathode assembly. The pulsed plasma takes place between two graphite rods while a strong electric field has been already established alongside the electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 μs. Mechanism of precursor decomposition is discussed by describing three forms of energy that are utilized to disintegrate the precursor molecules: thermal energy, electric field and kinetic energy of plasma. Molecular polarity of a hydrocarbon is one of the reasons for choosing carbon raw material as a precursor in an electric field induced low power pulsed-plasma. The results show that in order to obtain high quality carbon nanotubes, Acetone is preferred to Isopropanol and Naphthalene. Scanning probe microscopy techniques are used to investigate the products. - Highlights: • We synthesized CNTs (carbon nano tubes) by needle pulsed plasma. • We use different hydrocarbons as carbon source in the production of CNTs. • We investigated the influence of starting carbon on the synthesis of CNTs. • Thermal energy, electric field and kinetic energy are used to break carbon bonds. • Polar hydrocarbon molecules are more efficient than nonpolar ones in production

  2. Influence of viscosity of the medium on the disposition of carbon nanotubes anisotropic structures formation induced by electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovenko, O.S.; Matsuj, L.Yu.; Zhuravkov, O.V.; Vovchenko, L.D.

    2014-01-01

    To obtain carbon nanotubes (CNT)-polymer composites with anisotropic physical properties an electric field application can be used. This investigation considers factors of CNT anisotropic distribution formation induced by electric field and consideration is supported with experimental results where some factors were varied. In the article an influence of magnitude and type of electric field and time of processing by electric field on CNT anisotropic structures formation in polymer mediums of different viscosities (oil, epoxy resins) is investigated. The aim of this work was to examine the CNT structuration process induced by electric field in viscous mediums and to find out the most optimal conditions of preparation of polymer/carbon composite materials (CM) with specified distribution of carbon filler induced by electric field. Scoping on polymer/carbon CM structuration was conducted by optical microscopy method. It was found that the main factors during CNT network formation are the type and viscosity of polymer binder and applied electric field parameters. It was observed that for high viscous polymer CNT network formation is unfeasible even at high applied electric field strength. But also for low viscous medium at relatively low electric field strength the CNT network formation is complicated too. And it was seen from optical observation that a type of the polymer variation causes different response of network form under the same experimental conditions. These distinctions are considered in the article

  3. Detection of Quinoline in G. boninense-Infected Plants Using Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: A Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akanbi, Fowotade Sulayman; Yusof, Nor Azah; Abdullah, Jaafar; Sulaiman, Yusran; Hushiarian, Roozbeh

    2017-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) reinforced with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and chitosan nanoparticles (CTSNPs) were anchored on a screen-printed electrode to fabricate a multi-walled structure for the detection of quinoline. The surface morphology of the nanocomposites and the modified electrode was examined by an ultra-high resolution field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to confirm the presence of specific functional groups on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes MWCNTs. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) were used to monitor the layer-by-layer assembly of ultra-thin films of nanocomposites on the surface of the electrode and other electrochemical characterizations. Under optimized conditions, the novel sensor displayed outstanding electrochemical reactivity towards the electro-oxidation of quinoline. The linear range was fixed between 0.0004 and 1.0 μM, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 3.75 nM. The fabricated electrode exhibited high stability with excellent sensitivity and selectivity, specifically attributable to the salient characteristics of AuNPs, CTSNPs, and MWCNTs and the synergistic inter-relationship between them. The newly developed electrode was tested in the field. The Ipa increased with an increase in the amount of quinoline solution added, and the peak potential deviated minimally, depicting the real capability of the newly fabricated electrode.

  4. Detection of Quinoline in G. boninense-Infected Plants Using Functionalized Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: A Field Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fowotade Sulayman Akanbi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs reinforced with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs and chitosan nanoparticles (CTSNPs were anchored on a screen-printed electrode to fabricate a multi-walled structure for the detection of quinoline. The surface morphology of the nanocomposites and the modified electrode was examined by an ultra-high resolution field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM, and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy was used to confirm the presence of specific functional groups on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes MWCNTs. Cyclic voltammetry (CV and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV were used to monitor the layer-by-layer assembly of ultra-thin films of nanocomposites on the surface of the electrode and other electrochemical characterizations. Under optimized conditions, the novel sensor displayed outstanding electrochemical reactivity towards the electro-oxidation of quinoline. The linear range was fixed between 0.0004 and 1.0 μM, with a limit of detection (LOD of 3.75 nM. The fabricated electrode exhibited high stability with excellent sensitivity and selectivity, specifically attributable to the salient characteristics of AuNPs, CTSNPs, and MWCNTs and the synergistic inter-relationship between them. The newly developed electrode was tested in the field. The Ipa increased with an increase in the amount of quinoline solution added, and the peak potential deviated minimally, depicting the real capability of the newly fabricated electrode.

  5. A nanotube-based field emission x-ray source for microcomputed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.; Cheng, Y.; Lee, Y.Z.; Gao, B.; Qiu, Q.; Lin, W.L.; Lalush, D.; Lu, J.P.; Zhou, O.

    2005-01-01

    Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) is a noninvasive imaging tool commonly used to probe the internal structures of small animals for biomedical research and for the inspection of microelectronics. Here we report the development of a micro-CT scanner with a carbon nanotube- (CNT-) based microfocus x-ray source. The performance of the CNT x-ray source and the imaging capability of the micro-CT scanner were characterized

  6. Low-emittance Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The effects of synchrotron radiation on particle motion in storage rings are discussed. In the absence of radiation, particle motion is symplectic, and the beam emittances are conserved. The inclusion of radiation effects in a classical approximation leads to emittance damping: expressions for the damping times are derived. Then, it is shown that quantum radiation effects lead to excitation of the beam emittances. General expressions for the equilibrium longitudinal and horizontal (natural) emittances are derived. The impact of lattice design on the natural emittance is discussed, with particular attention to the special cases of FODO-, achromat- and theoretical-minimum-emittance-style lattices. Finally, the effects of betatron coupling and vertical dispersion (generated by magnet alignment and lattice tuning errors) on the vertical emittance are considered.

  7. Rare Earth Garnet Selective Emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.75, sup 4)|(sub 15/2) - (sup 4)|(sub 13/2),for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.65, (sup 5)|(sub 7) - (sup 5)|(sub 8) for Ho-YAG) at 1500 K. In addition, low out-of-band spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda) less than 0.2, suggest these materials would be excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500 K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. Selective emitters in the near IR are of special interest for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. The most promising solid selective emitters for use in a TPV system are rare earth oxides. Early spectral emittance work on rare earth oxides showed strong emission bands in the infrared (0.9 - 3 microns). However, the emittance outside the emission band was also significant and the efficiency of these emitters was low. Recent improvements in efficiency have been made with emitters fabricated from fine (5 - 10 microns) rare earth oxide fibers similar to the Welsbach mantle used in gas lanterns. However, the rare earth garnet emitters are more rugged than the mantle type emitters. A thin film selective emitter on a low emissivity substrate such as gold, platinum etc., is rugged and easily adapted to a wide variety of thermal sources. The garnet structure and its many subgroups have been successfully used as hosts for rare earth ions, introduced as substitutional

  8. Spherical proton emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, S.; Semmes, P.B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    1997-01-01

    Various theoretical approaches to proton emission from spherical nuclei are investigated, and it is found that all the methods employed give very similar results. The calculated decay widths are found to be qualitatively insensitive to the parameters of the proton-nucleus potential, i.e., changing the potential parameters over a fairly large range typically changes the decay width by no more than a factor of ∼3. Proton half-lives of observed heavy proton emitters are, in general, well reproduced by spherical calculations with the spectroscopic factors calculated in the independent quasiparticle approximation. The quantitative agreement with experimental data obtained in our study requires that the parameters of the proton-nucleus potential be chosen carefully. It also suggests that deformed proton emitters will provide invaluable spectroscopic information on the angular momentum decomposition of single-proton orbitals in deformed nuclei. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  9. Dosimetry of internal emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The Dosimetry of Internal Emitter Program endeavors to refine the correlation between radiation dose and observed biological effects. The program is presently engaged in the development of studies that will demonstrate the applicability of microdosimetry models developed under the Microdosimetry of Internal Sources Program. The program also provides guidance and assistance to Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Biology Department in the dosimetric analysis of internally deposited radionuclides. This report deals with alpha particle dosimetry plutonium 239 inhalation, and in vitro studies of chromosomal observations

  10. Nonintercepting emittance monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.H.; Clendenin, J.E.; James, M.B.; Sheppard, J.C.

    1983-08-01

    A nonintercepting emittance monitor is a helpful device for measuring and improving particle beams in accelerators and storage rings as it allows continuous monitoring of the beam's distribution in phase space, and perhaps closed loop computer control of the distributions. Stripline position monitors are being investigated for use as nonintercepting emittance monitors for a beam focused by a FODO array in the first 100 meters of our linear accelerator. The technique described here uses the signal from the four stripline probes of a single position monitor to measure the quadrupole mode of the wall current in the beam pipe. This current is a function of the quadrupole moment of the beam, sigma 2 /sub x/ - sigma 2 /sub y/. In general, six independent measurements of the quadrupole moment are necessary to determine the beam emittance. This technique is dependent on the characteristically large variations of sigma 2 /sub x/ - sigma 2 /sub y/ in a FODO array. It will not work in a focusing system where the beam is round at each focusing element

  11. Control of unidirectional transport of single-file water molecules through carbon nanotubes in an electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiaye; Guo, Hongxia

    2011-01-25

    The transport of water molecules through nanopores is not only crucial to biological activities but also useful for designing novel nanofluidic devices. Despite considerable effort and progress that has been made, a controllable and unidirectional water flow is still difficult to achieve and the underlying mechanism is far from being understood. In this paper, using molecular dynamics simulations, we systematically investigate the effects of an external electric field on the transport of single-file water molecules through a carbon nanotube (CNT). We find that the orientation of water molecules inside the CNT can be well-tuned by the electric field and is strongly coupled to the water flux. This orientation-induced water flux is energetically due to the asymmetrical water-water interaction along the CNT axis. The wavelike water density profiles are disturbed under strong field strengths. The frequency of flipping for the water dipoles will decrease as the field strength is increased, and the flipping events vanish completely for the relatively large field strengths. Most importantly, a critical field strength E(c) related to the water flux is found. The water flux is increased as E is increased for E ≤ E(c), while it is almost unchanged for E > E(c). Thus, the electric field offers a level of governing for unidirectional water flow, which may have some biological applications and provides a route for designing efficient nanopumps.

  12. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H− ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, A.; Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2014-01-01

    The prototype rf-driven H − ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H − ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (T PE ) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used T PE of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H − ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances

  13. Enhancement of adsorption and diffusion of lithium in single-walled carbon nanotubes by external electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Wenwu; Wang, Zhiguo, E-mail: zgwang@uestc.edu.cn; Fu, Y.Q., E-mail: richard.fu@northumbria.ac.uk [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, School of Physical Electronics, Center for Public Security Information and Equipment Integration Technology (China)

    2016-11-15

    Effects of an external transverse electric field on the adsorption and diffusion of Li atoms on the single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were investigated using density functional theory. Results showed that the adsorption energy was significantly enhanced by applying the electric field. As the external electric field was increased from 0.0 to 0.6 V/Å, the adsorption energies were decreased from −1.37 to −2.31, −1.32 to −2.46, and −1.33 to −2.63 eV for the Li atoms adsorbed on (6,6), (8,8), and (10,10) CNTs, respectively. Meanwhile, the diffusion barriers of the Li atoms on the CNTs were also decreased as the external electric field was applied. When the external electric field was increased from 0.0 to 0.6 V/Å, the energy barriers were decreased from 0.42, 0.40, and 0.39 eV to 0.20, 0.17, and 0.15 eV for Li diffusion in the (6,6), (8,8), and (10,10) CNTs, respectively. The results proved that an external electric field can be applied to enhance the adsorption and diffusion of Li atoms on the CNTs (used as the anode) for lithium ion batteries.

  14. Enhancement of adsorption and diffusion of lithium in single-walled carbon nanotubes by external electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Wenwu; Wang, Zhiguo; Fu, Y.Q.

    2016-01-01

    Effects of an external transverse electric field on the adsorption and diffusion of Li atoms on the single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were investigated using density functional theory. Results showed that the adsorption energy was significantly enhanced by applying the electric field. As the external electric field was increased from 0.0 to 0.6 V/Å, the adsorption energies were decreased from −1.37 to −2.31, −1.32 to −2.46, and −1.33 to −2.63 eV for the Li atoms adsorbed on (6,6), (8,8), and (10,10) CNTs, respectively. Meanwhile, the diffusion barriers of the Li atoms on the CNTs were also decreased as the external electric field was applied. When the external electric field was increased from 0.0 to 0.6 V/Å, the energy barriers were decreased from 0.42, 0.40, and 0.39 eV to 0.20, 0.17, and 0.15 eV for Li diffusion in the (6,6), (8,8), and (10,10) CNTs, respectively. The results proved that an external electric field can be applied to enhance the adsorption and diffusion of Li atoms on the CNTs (used as the anode) for lithium ion batteries.

  15. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daojing [Daly City, CA; Yang, Peidong [Kensington, CA; Kim, Woong [Seoul, KR; Fan, Rong [Pasadena, CA

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  16. High current plasma electron emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiksel, G.; Almagri, A.F.; Craig, D.

    1995-07-01

    A high current plasma electron emitter based on a miniature plasma source has been developed. The emitting plasma is created by a pulsed high current gas discharge. The electron emission current is 1 kA at 300 V at the pulse duration of 10 ms. The prototype injector described in this paper will be used for a 20 kA electrostatic current injection experiment in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed-field pinch. The source will be replicated in order to attain this total current requirement. The source has a simple design and has proven very reliable in operation. A high emission current, small size (3.7 cm in diameter), and low impurity generation make the source suitable for a variety of fusion and technological applications

  17. Movement of Irrigation Water in Soil from a Surface Emitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Abbas Dawood

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available rickle irrigation is one of the most conservative irrigation techniques since it implies supplying water directly on the soil through emitters. Emitters dissipate energy of water at the end of the trickle irrigation system and provide water at emission points. The area wetted by an emitter depends upon the discharge of emitter, soil texture, initial soil water content, and soil permeability. The objectives of this research were to predict water distribution profiles through different soils for different conditions and quantify the distribution profiles in terms of main characteristics of soil and emitter. The wetting patterns were simulated at the end of each hour for a total time of application of 12 hrs, emitter discharges of 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 lph, and five initial volumetric soil water contents. Simulation of water flow from a single surface emitter was carried out by using the numerically-based software Hydrus-2D/3D, Version 2.04. Two approaches were used in developing formulas to predict the domains of the wetted pattern. In order to verify the results obtained by implementing the software Hydrus-2D/3D a field experiment was conducted to measure the wetted diameter and compare measured values with simulated ones. The results of the research showed that the developed formulas to express the wetted diameter and depth in terms of emitter discharge, time of application, and initial soil water content are very general and can be used with very good accuracy.

  18. Low emittance electron storage rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levichev, E. B.

    2018-01-01

    Low-emittance electron (positron) beams are essential for synchrotron light sources, linear collider damping rings, and circular Crab Waist colliders. In this review, the principles and methods of emittance minimization are discussed, prospects for developing relativistic electron storage rings with small beam phase volume are assessed, and problems related to emittance minimization are examined together with their possible solutions. The special features and engineering implementation aspects of various facilities are briefly reviewed.

  19. Improved field emission properties of carbon nanotubes grown on stainless steel substrate and its application in ionization gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Detian; Cheng, Yongjun; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Huzhong; Dong, Changkun; Li, Da

    2016-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique on different substrates. Microstructures and field emission characteristics of the as-grown CNT arrays were investigated systematically, and its application in ionization gauge was also evaluated preliminarily. The results indicate that the as-grown CNT arrays are vertically well-aligned relating to the substrate surfaces, but the CNTs grown on stainless steel substrate are longer and more crystalline than the ones grown on silicon wafer substrate. The field emission behaviors of the as-grown CNT arrays are strongly dependent upon substrate properties. Namely, the CNT array grown on stainless steel substrate has better field emission properties, including lower turn on and threshold fields, better emission stability and repeatability, compared with the one grown on silicon wafer substrate. The superior field emission properties of the CNT array grown on stainless steel substrate are mainly attributed to low contact resistance, high thermal conductivity, good adhesion strength, etc. In addition, the metrological behaviors of ionization gauge with the CNT array grown on stainless steel substrate as an electron source were investigated, and this novel cathode ionization gauge extends the lower limit of linear pressure measurement to 10-8 Pa, which is one order of magnitude lower than the result reported for the same of gauge with CNT cathode.

  20. High-performance carbon-nanotube-based complementary field-effect-transistors and integrated circuits with yttrium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Shibo; Zhang, Zhiyong, E-mail: zyzhang@pku.edu.cn; Si, Jia; Zhong, Donglai; Peng, Lian-Mao, E-mail: lmpeng@pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, Department of Electronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-08-11

    High-performance p-type carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors utilizing yttrium oxide as gate dielectric are presented by optimizing oxidization and annealing processes. Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) field-effect-transistors (FETs) are then fabricated on CNTs, and the p- and n-type devices exhibit symmetrical high performances, especially with low threshold voltage near to zero. The corresponding CMOS CNT inverter is demonstrated to operate at an ultra-low supply voltage down to 0.2 V, while displaying sufficient voltage gain, high noise margin, and low power consumption. Yttrium oxide is proven to be a competitive gate dielectric for constructing high-performance CNT CMOS FETs and integrated circuits.

  1. Optical absorption of carbon nanotube diodes: Strength of the electronic transitions and sensitivity to the electric field polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencarelli, Davide; Pierantoni, Luca; Rozzi, Tullio

    2008-03-01

    Aim of this work is to model electrostatically doped carbon nanotubes (CNT), which have recently proved to perform as ideal PN diodes, also showing photovoltaic properties. The new model is able to predict the optical absorption of semiconducting CNT as function of size and chirality. We justify theoretically, for the first time, the experimentally observed capability of CNTs to detect and select not only a well defined set of frequencies, as resulting from their discrete band structure, but also the polarization of the incident radiation. The analysis develops from an approach proposed in a recent contribution. The periodic structure of CNTs is formally modeled as a photonic crystal, that is characterized by means of numerical simulators. Longitudinal and transverse components of the electric field are shown to excite distinct interband transitions between well defined energy levels. Equivalently, for a given energy of the incident radiation, absorption may show polarization ratios strongly exceeding unity.

  2. A Molecular Dynamics of Cold Neutral Atoms Captured by Carbon Nanotube Under Electric Field and Thermal Effect as a Selective Atoms Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Elson C; Neto, Abel F G; Maneschy, Carlos E; Chen, James; Ramalho, Teodorico C; Neto, A M J C

    2015-05-01

    Here we analyzed several physical behaviors through computational simulation of systems consisting of a zig-zag type carbon nanotube and relaxed cold atoms (Rb, Au, Si and Ar). These atoms were chosen due to their different chemical properties. The atoms individually were relaxed on the outside of the nanotube during the simulations. Each system was found under the influence of a uniform electric field parallel to the carbon nanotube and under the thermal effect of the initial temperature at the simulations. Because of the electric field, the cold atoms orbited the carbon nanotube while increasing the initial temperature allowed the variation of the radius of the orbiting atoms. We calculated the following quantities: kinetic energy, potential energy and total energy and in situ temperature, molar entropy variation and average radius of the orbit of the atoms. Our data suggest that only the action of electric field is enough to generate the attractive potential and this system could be used as a selected atoms sensor.

  3. Influence of high-energy electron irradiation on field emission properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Sandip S. [Center for Advanced Studies in Material Science and Condensed Matter Physics, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Koinkar, Pankaj M. [Center for International Cooperation in Engineering Education (CICEE), University of Tokushima, 2-1 Minami-Josanjima-Cho, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan); Dhole, Sanjay D. [Center for Advanced Studies in Material Science and Condensed Matter Physics, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); More, Mahendra A., E-mail: mam@physics.unipune.ac.i [Center for Advanced Studies in Material Science and Condensed Matter Physics, Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Murakami, Ri-ichi, E-mail: murakami@me.tokushima-u.ac.j [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tokushima, 2-1 Minami-Josanjima-Cho, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    The effect of very high energy electron beam irradiation on the field emission characteristics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been investigated. The MWCNTs films deposited on silicon (Si) substrates were irradiated with 6 MeV electron beam at different fluence of 1x10{sup 15}, 2x10{sup 15} and 3x10{sup 15} electrons/cm{sup 2}. The irradiated films were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and micro-Raman spectrometer. The SEM analysis clearly revealed a change in surface morphology of the films upon irradiation. The Raman spectra of the irradiated films show structural damage caused by the interaction of high-energy electrons. The field emission studies were carried out in a planar diode configuration at the base pressure of {approx}1x10{sup -8} mbar. The values of the threshold field, required to draw an emission current density of {approx}1 {mu}A/cm{sup 2}, are found to be {approx}0.52, 1.9, 1.3 and 0.8 V/{mu}m for untreated, irradiated with fluence of 1x10{sup 15}, 2x10{sup 15} and 3x10{sup 15} electrons/cm{sup 2}. The irradiated films exhibit better emission current stability as compared to the untreated film. The improved field emission properties of the irradiated films have been attributed to the structural damage as revealed from the Raman studies.

  4. Comment on "Water-processed carbon nanotube/graphene hybrids with enhanced field emission properties" [AIP Advances 5, 097130 (2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Reena; Bhatia, Ravi

    2018-03-01

    In their research paper, M. Song et al. [AIP ADVANCES 5, 097130 (2015)] have claimed to have achieved enhanced field emission (FE) characteristics of carbon nanotubes (CNT)/graphene hybrids experimentally, exhibiting improved FE parameters e.g. turn-on electric field of 0.79 V/μm, threshold electric field of 1.05 V/μm, maximum emission current density (Jmax) of 5.76 mA/cm2, and field enhancement factor (β) of ˜1.3 × 104. The authors have emphasized on the surprisingly high value of β to be the basis of their claim of achieving superior FE performance which is further attributed to the optimized mass ratio CNT/ graphene, which is 5:1 in the present case. However, the claim based upon high value of β is misleading because it does not corroborate with the obtained Jmax parameter. Also, the obtained value of J is quite low in the mentioned study as compared to the reported values. For an instance, Sameera et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 111, 044307 (2012) & Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 033102 (2013)] have reported FE properties of CNT composites and reduced graphene oxide with Jmax and β values of the order of ˜102 mA/cm2 and 6 × 103, respectively. Therefore, the conclusions drawn by M. Song et al. [AIP ADVANCES 5, 097130 (2015)] in their paper do no hold.

  5. Few emitters in a cavity: from cooperative emission to individualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffeves, A; Portolan, S; Gerace, D; Drezet, A; Franca Santos, M

    2011-01-01

    We study the temporal correlations of the field emitted by an electromagnetic resonator coupled to a mesoscopic number of two-level emitters that are incoherently pumped by a weak external drive. We solve the master equation of the system for increasing number of emitters and as a function of the cavity quality factor, and we identify three main regimes characterized by well-distinguished statistical properties of the emitted radiation. For small cavity decay rates, the emission events are uncorrelated and the number of photons in the emitted field becomes larger than one, resembling the build-up of a laser field inside the cavity. At intermediate decay rates (as compared with the emitter-cavity coupling) and for a few emitters, the statistics of the emitted radiation is bunched and strikingly dependent on the parity of the number of emitters. The latter property is related to the cooperativity of the emitters mediated by their coupling to the cavity mode, and its connection with steady-state subradiance is discussed. Finally, in the bad cavity regime the typical situation of emission from a collection of individual emitters is recovered. We also analyze how the cooperative behavior evolves as a function of pure dephasing, which allows us to recover the case of a classical source made of an ensemble of independent emitters, similar to what is obtained for a very leaky cavity. State-of-the-art techniques of Q-switch of resonant cavities, allied with the recent capability of tuning single emitters in and out of resonance, suggest this system to be a versatile source of different quantum states of light.

  6. Few emitters in a cavity: from cooperative emission to individualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auffeves, A; Portolan, S [CEA/CNRS/UJF Joint Team ' Nanophysics and Semiconductors' , Institut Neel-CNRS, BP 166, 25 Rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Gerace, D [Dipartimento di Fisica ' Alessandro Volta' and UdR CNISM, Universita di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Drezet, A [Institut Neel-CNRS, BP 166, 25 Rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Franca Santos, M, E-mail: msantos@fisica.ufmg.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, CP 702, 30123-970 (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    We study the temporal correlations of the field emitted by an electromagnetic resonator coupled to a mesoscopic number of two-level emitters that are incoherently pumped by a weak external drive. We solve the master equation of the system for increasing number of emitters and as a function of the cavity quality factor, and we identify three main regimes characterized by well-distinguished statistical properties of the emitted radiation. For small cavity decay rates, the emission events are uncorrelated and the number of photons in the emitted field becomes larger than one, resembling the build-up of a laser field inside the cavity. At intermediate decay rates (as compared with the emitter-cavity coupling) and for a few emitters, the statistics of the emitted radiation is bunched and strikingly dependent on the parity of the number of emitters. The latter property is related to the cooperativity of the emitters mediated by their coupling to the cavity mode, and its connection with steady-state subradiance is discussed. Finally, in the bad cavity regime the typical situation of emission from a collection of individual emitters is recovered. We also analyze how the cooperative behavior evolves as a function of pure dephasing, which allows us to recover the case of a classical source made of an ensemble of independent emitters, similar to what is obtained for a very leaky cavity. State-of-the-art techniques of Q-switch of resonant cavities, allied with the recent capability of tuning single emitters in and out of resonance, suggest this system to be a versatile source of different quantum states of light.

  7. Ultraclean individual suspended single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siyu; Zhang, Jian; Nshimiyimana, Jean Pierre; Chi, Xiannian; Hu, Xiao; Wu, Pei; Liu, Jia; Wang, Gongtang; Sun, Lianfeng

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we report an effective technique of fabricating ultraclean individual suspended single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) transistors. The surface tension of molten silver is utilized to suspend an individual SWNT between a pair of Pd electrodes during annealing treatment. This approach avoids the usage and the residues of organic resist attached to SWNTs, resulting ultraclean SWNT devices. And the resistance per micrometer of suspended SWNTs is found to be smaller than that of non-suspended SWNTs, indicating the effect of the substrate on the electrical properties of SWNTs. The ON-state resistance (˜50 kΩ), mobility of 8600 cm2 V-1 s-1 and large on/off ratio (˜105) of semiconducting suspended SWNT devices indicate its advantages and potential applications.

  8. Emittance growth in rf linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameson, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    As the space-charge limit is approached, the current that can be accelerated in an rf linac and the output emittance that can be expected are discussed. The role of the envelope equations to estimate limits is outlined. The results of numerical experiments to explore general properties of emittance growth are given

  9. Beam phase space and emittance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buon, J.

    1990-12-01

    The classical and elementary results for canonical phase space, the Liouville theorem and the beam emittance are reviewed. Then, the importance of phase portraits to obtain a geometrical description of motion is emphasized, with examples in accelerator physics. Finally, a statistical point of view is used to define beam emittance, to study its law of approximate conservation and to treat two particular examples

  10. Controlled growth of well-aligned carbon nanotubes with large diameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianbao; Liu, Yunqi; Zhu, Daoben

    2001-06-01

    Well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with large diameters (25-200 nm) were synthesized by pyrolysis of iron(II) phthalocyanine. The outer diameter up to 218.5 nm and the length of the well-aligned CNTs can be systematically controlled by varying the growth time. A tube-in-tube nano-structure with large and small diameters of 176 and 16.7 nm, respectively, was found. The grain sizes of the iron catalyst play an important role in controlling the CNT diameters. These results are of great importance to design new aligned CNT-based electron field emitters in the potential application of panel displays.

  11. Improved field emission properties of carbon nanotubes grown on stainless steel substrate and its application in ionization gauge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Detian; Cheng, Yongjun [Science and Technology on Vacuum Technology and Physics Laboratory, Lanzhou Institute of Physics, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Yongjun, E-mail: wyjlxlz@163.com [Science and Technology on Vacuum Technology and Physics Laboratory, Lanzhou Institute of Physics, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, Huzhong [Science and Technology on Vacuum Technology and Physics Laboratory, Lanzhou Institute of Physics, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Dong, Changkun [Institute of Micro-Nano Structures and Optoelectronics, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Li, Da [Division of Advanced Nanomaterials, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215125 (China)

    2016-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The high quality CNT arrays were successfully grown on conductive stainless steel substrates. • The CNT array grown on stainless steel substrate exhibited superior field emission properties. • A high vacuum level about 10–8 Pa was measured by resultant CNT-based ionization gauge. • The ionization gauge with CNT cathode demonstrated a high stability. - Abstract: Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique on different substrates. Microstructures and field emission characteristics of the as-grown CNT arrays were investigated systematically, and its application in ionization gauge was also evaluated preliminarily. The results indicate that the as-grown CNT arrays are vertically well-aligned relating to the substrate surfaces, but the CNTs grown on stainless steel substrate are longer and more crystalline than the ones grown on silicon wafer substrate. The field emission behaviors of the as-grown CNT arrays are strongly dependent upon substrate properties. Namely, the CNT array grown on stainless steel substrate has better field emission properties, including lower turn on and threshold fields, better emission stability and repeatability, compared with the one grown on silicon wafer substrate. The superior field emission properties of the CNT array grown on stainless steel substrate are mainly attributed to low contact resistance, high thermal conductivity, good adhesion strength, etc. In addition, the metrological behaviors of ionization gauge with the CNT array grown on stainless steel substrate as an electron source were investigated, and this novel cathode ionization gauge extends the lower limit of linear pressure measurement to 10{sup −8} Pa, which is one order of magnitude lower than the result reported for the same of gauge with CNT cathode.

  12. Polymer nanotube nanocomposites: synthesis, properties, and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mittal, Vikas

    2010-01-01

    ... in these commercially important areas of polymer technology. It sums up recent advances in nanotube composite synthesis technology, provides basic introduction to polymer nanotubes nanocomposite technology for the readers new to this field, provides valuable...

  13. Emittance and beam size distortion due to linear coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzen, G.

    1993-01-01

    At injection, the presence of linear coupling may result in an increased beam emittance and in increased beam dimensions. Results for the emittance in the presence of linear coupling will be found. These results for the emittance distortion show that the harmonics of the skew quadrupole field close to ν x + ν y are the important harmonics. Results will be found for the important driving terms for the emittance distortion. It will be shown that if these driving terms are corrected, then the total emittance is unchanged, var-epsilon x + var-epsilon y = var-epsilon 1 + var-epsilon 2 . Also, the increase in the beam dimensions will be limited to a factor which is less than 1.414. If the correction is good enough, see below for details, one can achieve var-epsilon 1 = var-epsilon x , var-epsilon 2 = var-epsilon where var-epsilon 1 , var-epsilon 2 are the emittances in the presence of coupling, and the beam dimensions are unchanged. Global correction of the emittance and beam size distortion appears possible

  14. Thermoelectric power in ultrathin films, quantum wires and carbon nanotubes under classically large magnetic field: Simplified theory and relative comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A.; Choudhury, S. [Electronics and Communication Engineering, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Technology, Majitar, East Sikkim 737 132 (India); Saha, S. [Electronics and Communication Engineering, Mallabhum Institute of Technology College Campus, Brajaradhanagar, P.O. Gosaipur, P.S. Bishnupur, District - Bankura 722 122 (India); Pahari, S. [Administration Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); De, D. [Department of Computer Science Engineering, West Bengal University of Technology, BF 142, Sector 1, Kolkatta 700 064, West Bengal (India); Bhattacharya, S. [Nano Scale Device Research Laboratory, Center for Electronics Design and Technology, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Ghatak, K.P., E-mail: kamakhyaghatak@yahoo.co.i [Department of Electronic Science, University Calcutta, 92 Acharyya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India)

    2010-01-01

    We study the thermoelectric power under classically large magnetic field (TPM) in ultrathin films (UFs), quantum wires (QWs) of non-linear optical materials on the basis of a newly formulated electron dispersion law considering the anisotropies of the effective electron masses, the spin-orbit splitting constants and the presence of the crystal field splitting within the framework of k.p formalism. The results of quantum confined III-V compounds form the special cases of our generalized analysis. The TPM has also been studied for quantum confined II-VI, stressed materials, bismuth and carbon nanotubes (CNs) on the basis of respective dispersion relations. It is found taking quantum confined CdGeAs{sub 2}, InAs, InSb, CdS, stressed n-InSb and Bi that the TPM increases with increasing film thickness and decreasing electron statistics exhibiting quantized nature for all types of quantum confinement. The TPM in CNs exhibits oscillatory dependence with increasing carrier concentration and the signature of the entirely different types of quantum systems are evident from the plots. Besides, under certain special conditions, all the results for all the materials gets simplified to the well-known expression of the TPM for non-degenerate materials having parabolic energy bands, leading to the compatibility test.

  15. Donor impurity in nanotube with two GaAs/GaAlAs quantum wells: Magnetic field effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J D; Escorcia, R; Sierra-Ortega, J, E-mail: jdavid0831@gmail.co [Grupo de Investigacion en teorIa de la Materia Condensada, Universidad del Magdalena, A.A. 731, Santa Marta (Colombia)

    2009-05-01

    Micro-tubes containing two GaAs/GaAlAs quantum wells (QWs) in a section of the tube layer has been fabricated and optical properties of the embedded QWs has been studied. The ground state binding energy of an off-axis donor in a cylindrical nanotube, containing two GaAs/GaAlAs quantum wells (QWs) in the presence of a uniform magnetic field is calculated as a function of the donor location as well as the density of states. A trial function for describing the asymmetric electron charge distribution is taken as a product of the combination of 1s and 2p{sub x,y} subband wave functions and an unknown function that depends only on electron-ion separation. We found that the increasing the magnetic field the increasing the binding energy while the impurity is located in the QW1, whereas the opposite occurs when the impurity is located in the QW2. Two peaks in the curves of the binding energy, as a function of the impurity position, are also found as well as in the density of impurity states.

  16. Flutter instability of cantilevered carbon nanotubes caused by magnetic fluid flow subjected to a longitudinal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Goughari, Moslem; Jeon, Soo; Kwon, Hyock-Ju

    2018-04-01

    CNT (Carbon nanotube)-based fluidic systems hold a great potential for emerging medical applications such as drug delivery for cancer therapy. CNTs can be used to deliver anticancer drugs into a target site under a magnetic field guidance. One of the critical issues in designing such systems is how to avoid the vibration induced by the fluid flow, which is undesirable and may even promote the structural instability. The main objective of the present research is to develop a fluid structure interaction (FSI) model to investigate the flutter instability of a cantilevered CNT induced by a magnetic fluid flow under a longitudinal magnetic field. The CNT is assumed to be embedded in a viscoelastic matrix to consider the effect of biological medium around it. To obtain a dynamical model for the system, the Navier-Stokes theory of magnetic-fluid flow is coupled to the Euler-Bernoulli beam model for CNT. The small size effects of the magnetic fluid and CNT are considered through the small scale parameters including Knudsen number (Kn) and the nonlocal parameter. Then, the extended Galerkin's method is applied to solve the FSI governing equations, and to derive the stability diagrams of the system. Results show how the magnetic properties of the fluid flow have an effect on improving the stability of the cantilevered CNT by increasing the flutter velocity.

  17. Band-to-band tunneling in a carbon nanotube metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor is dominated by phonon assisted tunneling

    OpenAIRE

    Koswatta, Siyuranga O.; Lundstrom, Mark S.; Nikonov, Dmitri E.

    2007-01-01

    Band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) devices have recently gained a lot of interest due to their potential for reducing power dissipation in integrated circuits. We have performed extensive simulations for the BTBT operation of carbon nanotube metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (CNT-MOSFETs) using the non-equilibrium Green's functions formalism for both ballistic and dissipative quantum transport. In comparison with recently reported experimental data (Y. Lu et al, J. Am. Chem. Soc.,...

  18. Magnetization measurement of single La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 nanotubes in perpendicular magnetic fields using a micromechanical torsional oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonio, D.; Dolz, M.I.; Pastoriza, H.

    2010-01-01

    Using a silicon micromechanical resonator as a sensitive magnetometer, the authors have studied both experimentally and theoretically the magnetic behavior of two isolated ferromagnetic nanotubes of perovskite La 0.67 Ca 0.33 MnO 3 . The article investigates the specific configuration where a magnetic field H is applied perpendicular to the magnetic easy axis of an isolated nanotube characterized by an uniaxial anisotropy constant K. In this situation, the magnetization M reduces the effective elastic constant k M of the resonator. This softening of the mechanical system is opposed to the hardening effect of M observed in a previous work, where H was applied parallel to the easy axis. Moreover, in this magnetic field configuration two distinct magnetization regimes are manifested, depending on the magnitude of H. For H>>2K/M the magnetization is almost parallel to the applied magnetic field and for H<<2K/M it is almost parallel to the easy axis of the nanotube. At a certain value of H there is a sharp transition from one regime to the other, accompanied by a peak in the energy dissipation.

  19. Analysis of the mechanical behavior of single wall carbon nanotubes by a modified molecular structural mechanics model incorporating an advanced chemical force field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Oliver; Wallmersperger, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    The outstanding properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) keep attracting the attention of researchers from different fields. CNTs are promising candidates for applications e.g. in lightweight construction but also in electronics, medicine and many more. The basis for the realization of the manifold applications is a detailed knowledge of the material properties of the carbon nanotubes. In particular for applications in lightweight constructions or in composites, the knowledge of the mechanical behavior of the CNTs is of vital interest. Hence, a lot of effort is put into the experimental and theoretical determination of the mechanical material properties of CNTs. Due to their small size, special techniques have to be applied. In this research, a modified molecular structural mechanics model for the numerical determination of the mechanical behavior of carbon nanotubes is presented. It uses an advanced approach for the geometrical representation of the CNT structure while the covalent bonds in the CNTs are represented by beam elements. Furthermore, the model is specifically designed to overcome major drawbacks in existing molecular structural mechanics models. This includes energetic consistency with the underlying chemical force field. The model is developed further to enable the application of a more advanced chemical force field representation. The developed model is able to predict, inter alia, the lateral and radial stiffness properties of the CNTs. The results for the lateral stiffness are given and discussed in order to emphasize the progress made with the presented approach.

  20. Experimental investigation of thermal emittance components of copper photocathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Qian

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With progress of photoinjector technology, thermal emittance has become the primary limitation of electron beam brightness. Extensive efforts have been devoted to study thermal emittance, but experiment results differ between research groups and few can be well interpreted. Besides the ambiguity of photoemission mechanism, variations of cathode surface conditions during cathode preparation, such as work function, field enhancement factor, and surface roughness, will cause thermal emittance differences. In this paper, we report an experimental study of electric field dependence of copper cathode quantum efficiency (QE and thermal emittance in a radio frequency (rf gun, through which in situ cathode surface parameters and thermal emittance contributions from photon energy, Schottky effect, and surface roughness are extracted. It is found the QE of a copper cathode illuminated by a 266 nm UV laser increased substantially to 1.5×10^{-4} after cathode cleaning during rf conditioning, and a copper work function of 4.16 eV, which is much lower than nominal value (4.65 eV, was measured. Experimental results also show a thermal emittance growth as much as 0.92  mm mrad/mm at 50  MV/m due to the cathode surface roughness effect, which is consistent with cathode surface morphology measurements.

  1. Effects of an electric field on the electronic and optical properties of zigzag boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2011-02-01

    We have investigated the electro-optical properties of zigzag BNNTs, under an external electric field, using the tight binding approximation. It is found that an electric field modifies the band structure and splits the band degeneracy. Also the large electric strength leads to coupling the neighbor subbands which these effects reflect in the DOS and JDOS spectrum. It has been shown that, unlike CNTs, the band gap of BNNTs can be reduced linearly by applying a transverse external electric field. Also we show that the larger diameter tubes are more sensitive than small ones. The semiconducting metallic transition can be achieved through increasing the applied fields. The number and position of peaks in the JDOS spectrum are dependent on electric field strength. It is found that at a high electric field, the two lowest subbands are oscillatory with multiple nodes at the Fermi level.

  2. Electrohydrodynamic emitters of ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudnikov, V.G.; Shabalin, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    Physical processes determining generation of ion beams with high emission current density in electrohydrodynamic emitters are considered. Electrohydrodynamic effects developing in ion emission features and kinetics of ion interaction in beams with high density are discussed. Factors determining the size of the emission zone, emission stability at high and low currents, cluster generation, increase of energy spread and decrease of brightness are analyzed. Problems on practical provision of stable EHD emitter functioning are considered. 94 refs.; 8 figs.; 1 tab

  3. Nanodiamond Emitters of Single Photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasov I.I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Luminescence properties of single color centers were studied in nanodiamonds of different origin. It was found that single photon emitters could be realized even in molecularsized diamond (less than 2 nm capable of housing stable luminescent center “silicon-vacancy.” First results on incorporation of single-photon emitters based on luminescent nanodiamonds in plasmonic nanoantennas to enhance the photon count rate and directionality, diminish the fluorescence decay time, and provide polarization selectivity are presented.

  4. A device for electron gun emittance measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aune, B.; Corveller, P.; Jablonka, M.; Joly, J.M.

    1985-05-01

    In order to improve the final emittance of the beam delivered by the ALS electron linac a new gun is going to be installed. To measure its emittance and evaluate the contribution of different factors to emittance growth we have developed an emittance measurement device. We describe the experimental and mathematical procedure we have followed, and give some results of measurements

  5. Synthesis of MoS₂ nano-petal forest supported on carbon nanotubes for enhanced field emission performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murawala, Aditya P.; Loh, Tamie A. J.; Chua, Daniel H. C., E-mail: msechcd@nus.edu.sg [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-09-21

    We report the fabrication of a three-dimensional forest of highly crystalline two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) nano-petals encapsulating vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) in a core-shell configuration. Growth was conducted via magnetron sputtering at room temperature and it was found that the nano-petal morphology was formed only when a critical threshold in sputter deposition time was reached. Below this threshold, an amorphous tubular structure composed of mainly molybdenum oxides dominates instead. The presence of the MoS₂ nano-petals was shown to impart photoluminescence to the CNTs, in addition to significantly enhancing their electron emission properties, where the turn-on field was lowered from 2.50 Vμm⁻¹ for pristine CNTs to 0.80 Vμm⁻¹ for MoS₂-CNT heterostructures fabricated at 30 min sputter deposition time. Photoluminescence was detected at wavelengths of approximately 684 nm and 615 nm, with the band at 684 nm gradually blue-shifting as sputter time was increased. These results demonstrate that it is possible to synthesize 2D MoS₂ layers without the need for chemical routes and high growth temperatures.

  6. Controlled Growth of Carbon Nanotubes on Micropatterned Au/Cr Composite Film and Field Emission from Their Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamide, Koichi; Araki, Hisashi; Yoshino, Katsumi

    2003-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays with a controlled density are prepared on a micropatterned Au/Cr composite film formed on a quartz glass plate by pyrolysis of Ni-phthalocyanine at 800°C. It is clarified from characteristic X-ray analyses for those samples that a catalytic Ni nanoparticle is not contained within the base of the whisker-like CNT in contrast to that of the bamboo-like CNT, suggesting that the growth process of the present novel CNT is incompatible with that of the bamboo-like CNT. In the Au/Cr composite film, both the Cr atomic content of approximately 30% and the presence of the Ni catalyst devoid of a particle-like shape are important factors for the growth of CNTs. Field emission from the novel CNT arrays exhibits a lower turn-on voltage and a higher current density compared with that from the bamboo-like arrays formed on a quartz plate.

  7. Change in carrier type in high-k gate carbon nanotube field-effect transistors by interface fixed charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, N; Ohno, Y; Kitamura, T; Kishimoto, S; Mizutani, T

    2010-01-01

    We study the phenomenon of change in carrier type in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) caused by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of a HfO 2 gate insulator. When a HfO 2 layer is deposited on a CNFET, the type of carrier changes from p-type to n-type. The so-obtained n-type device has good performance and stability in air. The conductivity of such a device with a channel length of 0.7 μm is 11% of the quantum conductance 4e 2 /h. The contact resistance for electron current is estimated to be 14 kΩ. The n-type conduction of this CNFET is maintained for more than 100 days. The change in carrier type is attributed to positive fixed charges introduced at the interface between the HfO 2 and SiO 2 layers. We also propose a novel technique to control the type of conduction by utilizing interface fixed charges; this technique is compatible with Si CMOS process technology.

  8. Carbon nanotube feedback-gate field-effect transistor: suppressing current leakage and increasing on/off ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chenguang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhong, Donglai; Si, Jia; Yang, Yingjun; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2015-01-27

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) based on moderate or large diameter carbon nanotubes (CNTs) usually suffer from ambipolar behavior, large off-state current and small current on/off ratio, which are highly undesirable for digital electronics. To overcome these problems, a feedback-gate (FBG) FET structure is designed and tested. This FBG FET differs from normal top-gate FET by an extra feedback-gate, which is connected directly to the drain electrode of the FET. It is demonstrated that a FBG FET based on a semiconducting CNT with a diameter of 1.5 nm may exhibit low off-state current of about 1 × 10(-13) A, high current on/off ratio of larger than 1 × 10(8), negligible drain-induced off-state leakage current, and good subthreshold swing of 75 mV/DEC even at large source-drain bias and room temperature. The FBG structure is promising for CNT FETs to meet the standard for low-static-power logic electronics applications, and could also be utilized for building FETs using other small band gap semiconductors to suppress leakage current.

  9. Universal model of bias-stress-induced instability in inkjet-printed carbon nanotube networks field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Haesun; Choi, Sungju; Jang, Jun Tae; Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Juhee; Lee, Yongwoo; Rhee, Jihyun; Ahn, Geumho; Yu, Hye Ri; Kim, Dong Myong; Choi, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dae Hwan

    2018-02-01

    We propose a universal model for bias-stress (BS)-induced instability in the inkjet-printed carbon nanotube (CNT) networks used in field-effect transistors (FETs). By combining two experimental methods, i.e., a comparison between air and vacuum BS tests and interface trap extraction, BS instability is explained regardless of either the BS polarity or ambient condition, using a single platform constituted by four key factors: OH- adsorption/desorption followed by a change in carrier concentration, electron concentration in CNT channel corroborated with H2O/O2 molecules in ambient, charge trapping/detrapping, and interface trap generation. Under negative BS (NBS), the negative threshold voltage shift (ΔVT) is dominated by OH- desorption, which is followed by hole trapping in the interface and/or gate insulator. Under positive BS (PBS), the positive ΔVT is dominated by OH- adsorption, which is followed by electron trapping in the interface and/or gate insulator. This instability is compensated by interface trap extraction; PBS instability is slightly more complicated than NBS instability. Furthermore, our model is verified using device simulation, which gives insights on how much each mechanism contributes to BS instability. Our result is potentially useful for the design of highly stable CNT-based flexible circuits in the Internet of Things wearable healthcare era.

  10. Nanotubes on Display: How Carbon Nanotubes Can Be Integrated into Electronic Displays

    KAUST Repository

    Opatkiewicz, Justin; LeMieux, Melburne C.; Bao, Zhenan

    2010-01-01

    Random networks of single-walled carbon nanotubes show promise for use in the field of flexible electronics. Nanotube networks have been difficult to utilize because of the mixture of electronic types synthesized when grown. A variety of separation

  11. Incorporating a hybrid urease-carbon nanotubes sensitive nanofilm on capacitive field-effect sensors for urea detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, José R; Molinnus, Denise; Beging, Stefan; Schöning, Michael J

    2014-06-03

    The ideal combination among biomolecules and nanomaterials is the key for reaching biosensing units with high sensitivity. The challenge, however, is to find out a stable and sensitive film architecture that can be incorporated on the sensor's surface. In this paper, we report on the benefits of incorporating a layer-by-layer (LbL) nanofilm of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on capacitive electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) field-effect sensors for detecting urea. Three sensor arrangements were studied in order to investigate the adequate film architecture, involving the LbL film with the enzyme urease: (i) urease immobilized directly onto a bare EIS [EIS-urease] sensor; (ii) urease atop the LbL film over the EIS [EIS-(PAMAM/CNT)-urease] sensor; and (iii) urease sandwiched between the LbL film and another CNT layer [EIS-(PAMAM/CNT)-urease-CNT]. The surface morphology of all three urea-based EIS biosensors was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), while the biosensing abilities were studied by means of capacitance-voltage (C/V) and dynamic constant-capacitance (ConCap) measureaments at urea concentrations ranging from 0.1 mM to 100 mM. The EIS-urease and EIS-(PAMAM/CNT)-urease sensors showed similar sensitivity (~18 mV/decade) and a nonregular signal behavior as the urea concentration increased. On the other hand, the EIS-(PAMAM/CNT)-urease-CNT sensor exhibited a superior output signal performance and higher sensitivity of about 33 mV/decade. The presence of the additional CNT layer was decisive to achieve a urea based EIS sensor with enhanced properties. Such sensitive architecture demonstrates that the incorporation of an adequate hybrid enzyme-nanofilm as sensing unit opens new prospects for biosensing applications using the field-effect sensor platform.

  12. Associating biosensing properties with the morphological structure of multilayers containing carbon nanotubes on field-effect devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Jose R. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil); Institute of Nano- and Biotechnologies, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Juelich (Germany); Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-2), Research Centre Juelich (Germany); Baecker, Matthias; Poghossian, Arshak; Schoening, Michael J. [Institute of Nano- and Biotechnologies, Aachen University of Applied Sciences, Juelich (Germany); Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-2), Research Centre Juelich (Germany); Zucolotto, Valtencir; Oliveira, Osvaldo N. Jr. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos (Brazil)

    2010-04-15

    The control of molecular architecture provided by the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique has led to enhanced biosensors, in which advantageous features of distinct materials can be combined. Full optimization of biosensing performance, however, is only reached if the film morphology is suitable for the principle of detection of a specific biosensor. In this paper, we report a detailed morphology analysis of LbL films made with alternating layers of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers, which were then covered with a layer of penicillinase (PEN). An optimized performance to detect penicillin G was obtained with 6-bilayer SWNT/PAMAM LbL films deposited on p-Si-SiO{sub 2}-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} chips, used in biosensors based on a capacitive electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) and a light-addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS) structure, respectively. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) images indicated that the LbL films were porous, with a large surface area due to interconnection of SWNT into PAMAM layers. This morphology was instrumental for the adsorption of a larger quantity of PEN, with the resulting LbL film being highly stable. The experiments to detect penicillin were performed with constant-capacitance (ConCap) and constant-current (CC) measurements for EIS and LAPS sensors, respectively, which revealed an enhanced detection signal and sensitivity of ca. 100 mV/decade for the field-effect sensors modified with the PAMAM/SWNT LbL film. It is concluded that controlling film morphology is essential for an enhanced performance of biosensors, not only in terms of sensitivity but also stability and response time. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantchenko, Oxana S; Seidman, Seth J; Guag, Joshua W; Witters, Donald M; Sponberg, Curt L

    2011-06-09

    The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz. The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters.

  14. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guag Joshua W

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID emitters. Methods Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz Results The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. Conclusions The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters.

  15. Calculations of emittance and damping time effects in the SLC damping rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limberg, T.; Moshammer, H.; Raubenheimer, T.; Spencer, J.; Siemann, R.

    1992-03-01

    In a recent NDR machine experiment the transverse emittance was studied as a function of store time and tune. To explain the observed transverse emittance damping time constants, the magnetic measurement data of the longitudinal field of the bending magnets had to be taken into account. The variation of the transverse emittances with tune due to misalignments and the associated anomalous dispersion is studied as well as the effect of synchrobetatron coupling due to dispersion in the RF cavities

  16. A Platform to Optimize the Field Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotube Based Fibers (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    characterization of key metrics , such as effective field enhancement factor and emission area. It is imperative to address issues relating to whether...important are the effects of Coulomb repulsion between adjacent emitting CNTs on the FE characteristics? When do space-charge effects become important and

  17. A Au82Si18 liquid metal field-ion emitter for the production of Si ions: fundamental properties and mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischoff, L.; Mair, G.L.R.; Aidinis, C.J.; Londos, C.A.; Akhmadaliev, C.; Ganetsos, Th.

    2004-01-01

    Focused silicon beams are useful for direct write applications, e.g., lithography on silicon without the undesirable effect of substrate contamination. However, since pure silicon is not amenable to liquid metal ion source (LMIS) manufacture, a suitable alloy containing silicon has to be produced. This paper covers almost all fundamental aspects of a Au 82 Si 18 eutectic, including the most detailed beam mass spectra reported to date of a AuSi source. A finding worthy of note in this investigation, manifested in the behaviour of the ion extraction voltage with temperature, is the abnormal behaviour of the surface tension coefficient of the alloy with temperature. An important deduction from this work, however, concerns the mechanisms responsible for the creation of doubly charged ions: reasons of self-consistency indicate that while Si 2+ is directly field evaporated, Au 2+ must form by the post-ionization of Au + . Finally, two different mechanisms seem to co-exist, as far as the production of cluster ions is concerned. While for cluster ions containing only a few atoms some sort of surface field-ionization mechanism might be responsible for their creation, for larger clusters, a droplet break-up mechanism, possibly by ion capture, seems very likely

  18. Radiation emitter-detector package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, J.T.; Limm, A.C.; Nyul, P.; Tassia, V.S. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Mounted on the metallic base of a radiation emitter-detector is a mounting block is a first projection, and a second projection. A radiation detector is on the first projection and a semiconductor electroluminescent device, i.e., a radiation emitter, is on the second projection such that the plane of the recombination region of the electroluminescent device is perpendicular to the radiation incident surface of the radiation detector. The electroluminescent device has a primary emission and a secondary emission in a direction different from the primary emission. A radiation emitter-detector package as described is ideally suited to those applications wherein the secondary radiation of the electroluminescent device is fed into a feedback circuit regulating the biasing current of the electroluminescent device

  19. Electronic structure and field emission properties of nitrogen doped graphene nano-flakes (GNFs:N) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs:N)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Sekhar C., E-mail: Raysc@unisa.ac.za [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Private Bag X6, Florida, 1710, Science Campus, Christiaan de Wet and Pioneer Avenue, Florida Park, Johannesburg (South Africa); Pong, W.F. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Papakonstantinou, P. [Nanotechnology and Integrated Bio-Engineering Centre, University of Ulster, Shore Road, Newtownabbey BT37 0QB (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Highlights: • Nitrogen doped graphene nano-flakes (GNFs:N) and carbon nano-tubes (CNTs:N) are used to study the electronic/bonding structure along with their defects state. • The I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio obtained from Raman spectroscopy used for the study of the defects states of CNTs:N than GNFs:N. • The electron field emission result shows that the turn on electric field is lower in case of CNTs:N than GNFs:N. • All results are good agreement with XANES and the results obtained from Raman spectra. - Abstract: Substitution of hetero-atom doping is a promising route to modulate the outstanding material properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene for customized applications. Nitrogen-doping has been introduced to ensure tunable work-function, enhanced n-type carrier concentration, diminished surface energy, and manageable polarization. Along with the promising assessment of N-doping effects, research on the N-doped carbon based composite structures is emerging for the synergistic integration with various functional materials. Nitrogen undoped/doped graphene nano-flakes (GNFs/GNFs:N) and multiwall carbon nano-tubes (MWCNTs/MWCNTs:N) are used for comparative study of their electronic/bonding structure along with their defects state. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy shows that the GNFs:N produce mainly pyridine like structure; whereas MWCNTs:N shows graphitic nitrogen atoms are attached with the carbon lattice. The I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio obtained from Raman spectroscopy shows that the defects is higher in MWCNTs:N than GNFs:N. The electron field emission result shows that the turn on electric field is lower (higher electron emission current) in case of MWCNTs:N than GNFs:N and are good agreement with XANES and the results obtained from Raman spectra.

  20. Beam phase space and emittance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buon, J.

    1992-02-01

    The classical and elementary results for canonical phase space, the Liouville theorem and the beam emittance are reviewed. Then, the importance of phase portraits to obtain a geometrical description of motion is emphasized, with examples in accelerator physics. Finally, a statistical point of view is used to define beam emittance, to study its law of approximate conservation, with three particular examples, and to introduce a beam envelope-ellipse and the β-function, emphasing the statistical features of its properties. (author) 14 refs.; 11 figs

  1. Combustion powered thermophotovoltaic emitter system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHenry, R.S. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Naval Architecture, Ocean and Marine Engineering

    1995-07-01

    The US Naval Academy (USNA) has recently completed an engineering design project for a high temperature thermophotovoltaic (TPV) photon emitter. The final apparatus was to be portable, completely self contained, and was to incorporate cycle efficiency optimization such as exhaust stream recuperation. Through computer modeling and prototype experimentation, a methane fueled emitter system was designed from structural ceramic materials to fulfill the high temperature requirements necessary for high system efficiency. This paper outlines the engineering design process, discusses obstacles and solutions encountered, and presents the final design.

  2. Emittance growth caused by bends in the Los Alamos free-electron laser energy recovery experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1987-01-01

    Experimentally transporting the beam from the wiggler to the decelerators in the energy recovery experiment (ERX) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory free-electron laser was more difficult than expected because of the large initial emittance in the beam. This emittance was apparently caused in an early 60 0 achromatic bend. To get this beam through subsequent bends without wall interception, the quadrupole focusing had to be changed from the design amount; as a result, the emittance grew further. This paper discusses various mechanisms for this emittance growth in the 60 0 bend, including effects caused by path changes in the bend resulting from wake-field-induced energy changes of particles in the beam and examines emittance filters, ranging from a simple aperture near a beam crossover to more complicated telescope schemes designed to regain the original emittance before the 60 0 bend

  3. Radial arrays of nano-electrospray ionization emitters and methods of forming electrosprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan T [West Richland, WA; Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2010-10-19

    Electrospray ionization emitter arrays, as well as methods for forming electrosprays, are described. The arrays are characterized by a radial configuration of three or more nano-electrospray ionization emitters without an extractor electrode. The methods are characterized by distributing fluid flow of the liquid sample among three or more nano-electrospray ionization emitters, forming an electrospray at outlets of the emitters without utilizing an extractor electrode, and directing the electrosprays into an entrance to a mass spectrometry device. Each of the nano-electrospray ionization emitters can have a discrete channel for fluid flow. The nano-electrospray ionization emitters are circularly arranged such that each is shielded substantially equally from an electrospray-inducing electric field.

  4. Multibunch emittance growth and its corrections in S-Band linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.

    1994-11-01

    Multibunch emittance growths caused by long range wake fields with the misalignments of accelerating structures and quadrupoles in S-Band linear collider are studied. Tolerances for the misalignment errors of accelerating structures and quadrupoles are given corresponding to different detuned+damped structures. At the end of main linac, emittance corrector (EC) is proposed to be used to reduce further the multibunch emittance. Numerical simulations show that the effect of EC is obvious (multibunch emittance can be reduced about one order of magnitude), and it is believed that this kind of EC will be necessary for future linear colliders. (author). 16 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Emittance growth due to noise and its suppression with the Feedback system in large hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Shiltsev, V.; Stupakov, G.

    1993-03-01

    The problem of emittance growth due to random fluctuation of the magnetic field in hadron colliders is considered. Based on a simple one-dimensional linear model, a formula for an emittance growth rate as a function of the noise spectrum is derived. Different sources of the noise are analyzed and their role is estimated for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). A theory of feedback suppression of the emittance growth is developed which predicts the residual growth of the emittance in the accelerator with a feedback system

  6. Analysis of emittance compensation and simulation results to photo-cathode RF gun

    CERN Document Server

    LiuShengGuang

    2002-01-01

    The emittance compensation technology will be used on the photo-cathode RF gun for Shanghai SDUV-FEL. The space charge force and its effect on electron beam transverse emittance in RF gun is studied, the principle of emittance compensation in phase-space is discussed. The authors have designed a compensation solenoid and calculated its magnetic field distribution. Its performance has been studied by the code PARMELA. A simulation result indicates that the normalized transverse RMS emittance for electron beam of 1.5 nC is 1.612 pi mm centre dot mrad, electron energy E = 5.71 MeV

  7. Mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvetat, J.-P.; Bonard, J.-M.; Thomson, N. H.; Kulik, A. J.; Forró, L.; Benoit, W.; Zuppiroli, L.

    A variety of outstanding experimental results on the elucidation of the elastic properties of carbon nanotubes are fast appearing. These are based mainly on the techniques of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine the Young's moduli of single-wall nanotube bundles and multi-walled nanotubes, prepared by a number of methods. These results are confirming the theoretical predictions that carbon nanotubes have high strength plus extraordinary flexibility and resilience. As well as summarising the most notable achievements of theory and experiment in the last few years, this paper explains the properties of nanotubes in the wider context of materials science and highlights the contribution of our research group in this rapidly expanding field. A deeper understanding of the relationship between the structural order of the nanotubes and their mechanical properties will be necessary for the development of carbon-nanotube-based composites. Our research to date illustrates a qualitative relationship between the Young's modulus of a nanotube and the amount of disorder in the atomic structure of the walls. Other exciting results indicate that composites will benefit from the exceptional mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, but that the major outstanding problem of load transfer efficiency must be overcome before suitable engineering materials can be produced.

  8. Characterization of a Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Electron Gun for the VAPoR Miniaturized Pyrolysis-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Stephanie; Li, Mary; Costen, Nicholas; Hess, Larry; Feng, Steve; King, Todd; Brinckerhoff, William; Mahaffy, Paul; Glavin, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We are developing the VAPoR (Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith) instrument towards studying soil composition, volatiles, and trapped noble gases in the polar regions of the Moon. VAPOR will ingest a soil sample and conduct analysis by pyrolysis and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToF-MS). Here, we describe miniaturization efforts within this development, including a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission electron gun that is under consideration for use as the electron impact ionization source for the ToF-MS.

  9. Mobilities in ambipolar field effect transistors based on single-walled carbon nanotube network and formed on a gold nanoparticle template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wongsaeng, Chalao [Department of Science, Faculty of Sciences and Agricultural Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Lanna Tak, Tak 63000 (Thailand); Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Singjai, Pisith, E-mail: pisith.s@cmu.ac.th [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-04-07

    Ambipolar field effect transistors based on a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network formed on a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) template with polyvinyl alcohol as a gate insulator were studied by measuring the current–gate voltage characteristics. It was found that the mobilities of holes and electrons increased with increasing AuNP number density. The disturbances in the flow pattern of the carbon feedstock in the chemical vapor deposition growth that were produced by the AuNP geometry, resulted in the differences in the crystallinity and the diameter, as well as the changes in the degree of the semiconductor behavior of the SWNTs.

  10. Low emittance configuration for spear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumberg, L.N.; Harris, J.; Stege, R.; Cerino, J.; Hettel, R.; Hofmann, A.; Liu, R.Z.; Wiedemann, H.; Winick, H.

    1985-01-01

    The quality of synchrotron radiation beams from SPEAR, in particular the brilliance of undulator radiation, can be improved significantly by reducing the emittance of the stored electron beam. A reduction of the horizontal emittance by a factor of 3.5 to a value of 130 nanometer-radians (nm-r) at 3 GeV has been achieved by using stronger focussing, mainly in the horizontal plane. The low emittance configuration also reduces the dispersion and vertical beta functions in the straight sections, making them more suitable for wigglers. The higher betatron tunes lead to a larger phase advance between the two kickers, which has to be corrected during injection by shunting current from some quadrupoles. The configuration was optimized within SPEAR hardware limitations and tested for dynamic aperture with the tracking program PATRICIA. After implementation of this scheme, beam was successfully injected and accumulated. The measured emittance of the stored beam was in agreement with calculations. Presently the configuration is being made operational

  11. Measuring emittances and sigma matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, J.; Rivkin, L.

    1984-03-01

    The method used for measuring emittance at the SLAC Linac and the linear collider damping ring is described. The basis of the method is derived using one two-by-two matrix to specify the state of the input beam (sigma matrix) and another to describe the lens-drift transport system (R-matrix)

  12. Method for nano-pumping using carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insepov, Zeke [Darien, IL; Hassanein, Ahmed [Bolingbrook, IL

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates generally to the field of nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and, more specifically, to a method and system for nano-pumping media through carbon nanotubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for nano-pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more carbon nanotubes, the one or more nanotubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more nanotubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the carbon nanotubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the nanotube.

  13. Effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the bioavailability of PCBs in field-contaminated sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adsorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) to black carbon is a well studied phenomenon. One emerging class of engineered black carbon materials are single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Little research has investigated the potential of SWNT to adsorb and sequester HO...

  14. Metal-filled carbon nanotube based optical nanoantennas: bubbling, reshaping, and in situ characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zheng; Tao, Xinyong; Cui, Xudong; Fan, Xudong; Zhang, Xiaobin; Dong, Lixin

    2012-09-21

    Controlled fabrication of metal nanospheres on nanotube tips for optical antennas is investigated experimentally. Resembling soap bubble blowing using a straw, the fabrication process is based on nanofluidic mass delivery at the attogram scale using metal-filled carbon nanotubes (m@CNTs). Two methods have been investigated including electron-beam-induced bubbling (EBIB) and electromigration-based bubbling (EMBB). EBIB involves the bombardment of an m@CNT with a high energy electron beam of a transmission electron microscope (TEM), with which the encapsulated metal is melted and flowed out from the nanotube, generating a metallic particle on a nanotube tip. In the case where the encapsulated materials inside the CNT have a higher melting point than what the beam energy can reach, EMBB is an optional process to apply. Experiments show that, under a low bias (2.0-2.5 V), nanoparticles can be formed on the nanotube tips. The final shape and crystallinity of the nanoparticles are determined by the cooling rate. Instant cooling occurs with a relatively large heat sink and causes the instant shaping of the solid deposit, which is typically similar to the shape of the molten state. With a smaller heat sink as a probe, it is possible to keep the deposit in a molten state. Instant cooling by separating the deposit from the probe can result in a perfect sphere. Surface and volume plasmons characterized with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) prove that resonance occurs between a pair of as-fabricated spheres on the tip structures. Such spheres on pillars can serve as nano-optical antennas and will enable devices such as scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probes, scanning anodes for field emitters, and single molecule detectors, which can find applications in bio-sensing, molecular detection, and high-resolution optical microscopy.

  15. Transverse emittance dilution due to coupler kicks in linear accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Buckley

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main concerns in the design of low emittance linear accelerators (linacs is the preservation of beam emittance. Here we discuss one possible source of emittance dilution, the coupler kick, due to transverse electromagnetic fields in the accelerating cavities of the linac caused by the power coupler geometry. In addition to emittance growth, the coupler kick also produces orbit distortions. It is common wisdom that emittance growth from coupler kicks can be strongly reduced by using two couplers per cavity mounted opposite each other or by having the couplers of successive cavities alternate from above to below the beam pipe so as to cancel each individual kick. While this is correct, including two couplers per cavity or alternating the coupler location requires large technical changes and increased cost for superconducting cryomodules where cryogenic pipes are arranged parallel to a string of several cavities. We therefore analyze consequences of alternate coupler placements. We show here that alternating the coupler location from above to below compensates the emittance growth as well as the orbit distortions. For sufficiently large Q values, alternating the coupler location from before to after the cavity leads to a cancellation of the orbit distortion but not of the emittance growth, whereas alternating the coupler location from before and above to behind and below the cavity cancels the emittance growth but not the orbit distortion. We show that cancellations hold for sufficiently large Q values. These compensations hold even when each cavity is individually detuned, e.g., by microphonics. Another effective method for reducing coupler kicks that is studied is the optimization of the phase of the coupler kick so as to minimize the effects on emittance from each coupler. This technique is independent of the coupler geometry but relies on operating on crest. A final technique studied is symmetrization of the cavity geometry in the

  16. Dynamic Properties of Individual Carbon Nanotube Emitters for Maskless Lithography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ribaya, Bryan P; Niemann, Darrell L; Makarewicz, Joseph; Gunther, Norman G; Nguyen, Cattien V; Rahman, Mahmud

    2008-01-01

    .... The individual CNT's low electron beam energy spread and high brightness values make it particularly desirable for advanced applications such as electron microscopy and electron beam lithography...

  17. Dielectric optical antenna thermal emitters and metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Jonathan Aaron

    Optical antennas are critical components in nanophotonics research due to their unparalleled ability to concentrate electromagnetic energy into nanoscale volumes. Researchers typically construct such antennas from wavelength-size metallic structures. However, recent research has begun to exploit the scattering resonances of high-permittivity particles to realize all-dielectric optical antennas, emitters, and metamaterials. In this thesis, we experimentally and theoretically characterize the resonant modes of subwavelength rod-shaped dielectric particles and demonstrate their use in negative index metamaterials and novel infrared light emitters. At mid-infrared frequencies, Silicon Carbide (SiC) is an ideal system for studying the behavior of dielectric optical antennas. At frequencies below the TO phonon resonance, SiC behaves like a dielectric with very large refractive index. Using infrared spectroscopy and analytical Mie calculations we show that individual rod-shaped SiC particles exhibit a multitude of resonant modes. Detailed investigations of these SiC optical antennas reveal a wealth of new physics and applications. We discuss the distinct electromagnetic field profile for each mode, and demonstrate that two of the dielectric-type Mie resonances can be combined in a particle array to form a negative index metamaterial. We further show that these particles can serve as "broadcasting" antennas. Using a custom-built thermal emission microscope we collect emissivity spectra from single SiC particles at elevated temperatures, highlighting their use as subwavelength resonant light emitters. Finally, we derive and verify a variety of general analytical results applicable to all cylindrical dielectric antennas.

  18. Dielectric Optical Antenna Emitters and Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Jon

    2009-03-01

    Optical antennas are critical components in nanophotonics research due to their unparalleled ability to concentrate electromagnetic energy into nanoscale volumes. Researchers typically construct such antennas from wavelength-size metallic structures. However, recent research has begun to exploit the scattering resonances of high-permittivity particles to realize all-dielectric optical antennas, emitters, and metamaterials. In this talk, we experimentally and theoretically characterize the resonant modes of subwavelength rod-shaped dielectric particles and demonstrate their use in negative index metamaterials and novel infrared light emitters. At mid-infrared frequencies, Silicon Carbide (SiC) is an ideal system for studying the behavior of dielectric optical antennas. At frequencies below the TO phonon resonance, SiC behaves like a dielectric with very large refractive index. Using infrared spectroscopy and analytical Mie calculations we show that individual rod-shaped SiC particles exhibit a multitude of resonant modes. Detailed investigations of these SiC optical antennas reveal a wealth of new physics and applications. We discuss the distinct electromagnetic field profile for each mode, and demonstrate that two of the dielectric-type Mie resonances can be combined in a particle array to form a negative index metamaterial [1]. We further show that these particles can serve as ``broadcasting'' antennas. Using a custom-built thermal emission microscope we collect emissivity spectra from single SiC particles at elevated temperatures, highlighting their use as subwavelength resonant light emitters. Finally, we derive and verify a variety of general analytical results applicable to all cylindrical dielectric antennas and discuss extensions of the demonstrated concepts to different materials systems and frequency regimes. [1] J.A. Schuller, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 107401 (2007)

  19. Emittances Studies at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhoplav, Rodion; Melissinos, A C; Regis-Guy Piot, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector incorporates an L-band rf-gun capable of generating 1-10 nC bunches. The bunches are then accelerated to 16 MeV with a TESLA superconducting cavity. In the present paper we present parametric studies of transverse emittances and energy spread for a various operating points of the electron source (RF-gun E-field, laser length and spot size, and solenoid settings). We especially study the impact, on transverse emittance, of Gaussian and Plateau temporal distribution of the photocathode drive-laser.

  20. High Current Emission from Patterned Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Fabricated by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Linfan; Chen, Jiangtao; Yang, Bingjun; Jiao, Tifeng

    2015-12-01

    Vertically, carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays were successfully fabricated on hexagon patterned Si substrates through radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using gas mixtures of acetylene (C2H2) and hydrogen (H2) with Fe/Al2O3 catalysts. The CNTs were found to be graphitized with multi-walled structures. Different H2/C2H2 gas flow rate ratio was used to investigate the effect on CNT growth, and the field emission properties were optimized. The CNT emitters exhibited excellent field emission performance (the turn-on and threshold fields were 2.1 and 2.4 V/μm, respectively). The largest emission current could reach 70 mA/cm2. The emission current was stable, and no obvious deterioration was observed during the long-term stability test of 50 h. The results were relevant for practical applications based on CNTs.

  1. Transverse and longitudinal emittance measurements in the ELSA linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loulergue, A.; Dowell, D.H.; Joly, S.; De Brion, J.P.; Haouat, G.; Schumann, F.

    1997-01-01

    The ELSA RF linac photoinjector has been designed to deliver high-brightness electron beams. The present paper deals with the transverse and longitudinal emittance measurements, at different locations along the ELSA beam line, and the analysis of their variations as a function of the photoinjector parameters : magnetic field generated by the anode focusing lens, bunch charge and pulse duration. While transverse emittance has been already studied in other similar installations, there has been little study of the electron beam longitudinal dynamics. Experimental results are presented and compared to simulation-code expectations. For 2.0 nC, 85 A electron bunches, a normalized rms emittance of 2 π mm mrad and a brightness of 4.5 x 10 13 A/(π m rad) 2 at the linac exit have been measured as well as less than 10 keV rms energy spread (or less than 0.1% at 16.5 MeV). (orig.)

  2. RF emittance in a low energy electron linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaye Hajari, Sh.; Haghtalab, S.; Shaker, H.; Kelisani, M. Dayyani

    2018-04-01

    Transverse beam dynamics of an 8 MeV low current (10 mA) S-band traveling wave electron linear accelerator has been studied and optimized. The main issue is to limit the beam emittance, mainly induced by the transverse RF forces. The linac is being constructed at Institute for Research in Fundamental Science (IPM), Tehran Iran Labeled as Iran's First Linac, nearly all components of this accelerator are designed and constructed within the country. This paper discusses the RF coupler induced field asymmetry and the corresponding emittance at different focusing levels, introduces a detailed beam dynamics design of a solenoid focusing channel aiming to reduce the emittance growth and studies the solenoid misalignment tolerances. In addition it has been demonstrated that a prebuncher cavity with appropriate parameters can help improving the beam quality in the transverse plane.

  3. Emittance studies of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell photocathode rf gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, D.T.; Miller, R.H.; Wang, X.J.

    1997-01-01

    The symmetrized 1.6 cell S-band photocathode gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A novel emittance compensation solenoid magnet has also been designed, built and is in operation at the ATF. These two subsystems form an emittance compensated photoinjector used for beam dynamics, advanced acceleration and free electron laser experiments at the ATF. The highest acceleration field achieved on the copper cathode is 150 MV/m, and the guns normal operating field is 130 MV/m. The maximum rf pulse length is 3 micros. The transverse emittance of the photoelectron beam were measured for various injection parameters. The 1 nC emittance results are presented along with electron bunch length measurements that indicated that at above the 400 pC, space charge bunch lengthening is occurring. The thermal emittance, ε o , of the copper cathode has been measured

  4. Self-assembled ordered carbon-nanotube arrays and membranes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Siegal, Michael P.; Yelton, William Graham

    2004-11-01

    Imagine free-standing flexible membranes with highly-aligned arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) running through their thickness. Perhaps with both ends of the CNTs open for highly controlled nanofiltration? Or CNTs at heights uniformly above a polymer membrane for a flexible array of nanoelectrodes or field-emitters? How about CNT films with incredible amounts of accessible surface area for analyte adsorption? These self-assembled crystalline nanotubes consist of multiple layers of graphene sheets rolled into concentric cylinders. Tube diameters (3-300 nm), inner-bore diameters (2-15 nm), and lengths (nanometers - microns) are controlled to tailor physical, mechanical, and chemical properties. We proposed to explore growth and characterize nanotube arrays to help determine their exciting functionality for Sandia applications. Thermal chemical vapor deposition growth in a furnace nucleates from a metal catalyst. Ordered arrays grow using templates from self-assembled hexagonal arrays of nanopores in anodized-aluminum oxide. Polymeric-binders can mechanically hold the CNTs in place for polishing, lift-off, and membrane formation. The stiffness, electrical and thermal conductivities of CNTs make them ideally suited for a wide-variety of possible applications. Large-area, highly-accessible gas-adsorbing carbon surfaces, superb cold-cathode field-emission, and unique nanoscale geometries can lead to advanced microsensors using analyte adsorption, arrays of functionalized nanoelectrodes for enhanced electrochemical detection of biological/explosive compounds, or mass-ionizers for gas-phase detection. Materials studies involving membrane formation may lead to exciting breakthroughs in nanofiltration/nanochromatography for the separation of chemical and biological agents. With controlled nanofilter sizes, ultrafiltration will be viable to separate and preconcentrate viruses and many strains of bacteria for 'down-stream' analysis.

  5. Emittance growth of bunched beams in bends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsten, B.E.; Raubenheimer, T.O.

    1995-01-01

    Talman [Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 1429 (1986)] has proposed a novel relativistic effect that occurs when a charged particle beam is bent in the magnetic field from an external dipole. The consequence of this effect is that the space-charge forces from the particles do not exhibit the usual inverse-square energy dependence and some part of them are, in fact, independent of energy. This led to speculation that this effect could introduce significant emittance growth for a bending electron beam. Subsequently, it was shown that this effect's influence on the beam's transverse motion is canceled for a dc beam by a potential depression within the beam (to first order in the beam radius divided by the bend radius). In this paper, we extend the analysis to include short bunch lengths (as compared to the beam pipe dimensions) and find that there is no longer the cancellation for forces both transverse to and in the direction of motion. We provide an estimate for the emittance growth as a function of bend angle, beam radius, and current, and for magnetic compression of an electron bunch

  6. Narrowband infrared emitters for combat ID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pralle, Martin U.; Puscasu, Irina; Daly, James; Fallon, Keith; Loges, Peter; Greenwald, Anton; Johnson, Edward

    2007-04-01

    There is a strong desire to create narrowband infrared light sources as personnel beacons for application in infrared Identify Friend or Foe (IFF) systems. This demand has augmented dramatically in recent years with the reports of friendly fire casualties in Afghanistan and Iraq. ICx Photonics' photonic crystal enhanced TM (PCE TM) infrared emitter technology affords the possibility of creating narrowband IR light sources tuned to specific IR wavebands (near 1-2 microns, mid 3-5 microns, and long 8-12 microns) making it the ideal solution for infrared IFF. This technology is based on a metal coated 2D photonic crystal of air holes in a silicon substrate. Upon thermal excitation the photonic crystal modifies the emitted yielding narrowband IR light with center wavelength commensurate with the periodicity of the lattice. We have integrated this technology with microhotplate MEMS devices to yield 15mW IR light sources in the 3-5 micron waveband with wall plug efficiencies in excess of 10%, 2 orders of magnitude more efficient that conventional IR LEDs. We have further extended this technology into the LWIR with a light source that produces 9 mW of 8-12 micron light at an efficiency of 8%. Viewing distances >500 meters were observed with fielded camera technologies, ideal for ground to ground troop identification. When grouped into an emitter panel, the viewing distances were extended to 5 miles, ideal for ground to air identification.

  7. Carbon Nanotubes and Modern Nanoagriculture

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2015-01-27

    Since their discovery, carbon nanotubes have been prominent members of the nanomaterial family. Owing to their extraordinary physical, chemical, and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes have been proven to be a useful tool in the field of plant science. They were frequently perceived to bring about valuable biotechnological and agricultural applications that still remain beyond experimental realization. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated the ability of carbon nanotubes to traverse different plant cell barriers. These studies, also, assessed the toxicity and environmental impacts of these nanomaterials. The knowledge provided by these studies is of practical and fundamental importance for diverse applications including intracellular labeling and imaging, genetic transformation, and for enhancing our knowledge of plant cell biology. Although different types of nanoparticles have been found to activate physiological processes in plants, carbon nanotubes received particular interest. Following addition to germination medium, carbon nanotubes enhanced root growth and elongation of some plants such as onion, cucumber and rye-grass. They, also, modulated the expression of some genes that are essential for cell division and plant development. In addition, multi-walled carbon nanotubes were evidenced to penetrate thick seed coats, stimulate germination, and to enhance growth of young tomato seedlings. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes can penetrate deeply into the root system and further distribute into the leaves and the fruits. In recent studies, carbon nanotubes were reported to be chemically entrapped into the structure of plant tracheary elements. This should activate studies in the fields of plant defense and wood engineering. Although, all of these effects on plant physiology and plant developmental biology have not been fully understood, the valuable findings promises more research activity in the near future toward complete scientific understanding of

  8. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ( 211 At) and natural bismuth-212 ( 212 Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ( 223 Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs

  9. Carbon nanotubes : their synthesis and integration into nanofabricated structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Druzhinina, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    The field of nanotechnology has experienced constantly increasing interest over the past decades both from industry and academy. Commonly used nanomaterials include: nanoparticles, nanowires, quantum dots, fullerenes, and carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes, in particular, are promising building

  10. Silicon nanotube field effect transistor with core-shell gate stacks for enhanced high-performance operation and area scaling benefits

    KAUST Repository

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2011-10-12

    We introduce the concept of a silicon nanotube field effect transistor whose unique core-shell gate stacks help achieve full volume inversion by giving a surge in minority carrier concentration in the near vicinity of the ultrathin channel and at the same time rapid roll-off at the source and drain junctions constituting velocity saturation-induced higher drive current-enhanced high performance per device with efficient real estate consumption. The core-shell gate stacks also provide superior short channel effects control than classical planar metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) and gate-all-around nanowire FET. The proposed device offers the true potential to be an ideal blend for quantum ballistic transport study of device property control by bottom-up approach and high-density integration compatibility using top-down state-of-the-art complementary metal oxide semiconductor flow. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  11. Silicon nanotube field effect transistor with core-shell gate stacks for enhanced high-performance operation and area scaling benefits

    KAUST Repository

    Fahad, Hossain M.; Smith, Casey; Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    We introduce the concept of a silicon nanotube field effect transistor whose unique core-shell gate stacks help achieve full volume inversion by giving a surge in minority carrier concentration in the near vicinity of the ultrathin channel and at the same time rapid roll-off at the source and drain junctions constituting velocity saturation-induced higher drive current-enhanced high performance per device with efficient real estate consumption. The core-shell gate stacks also provide superior short channel effects control than classical planar metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) and gate-all-around nanowire FET. The proposed device offers the true potential to be an ideal blend for quantum ballistic transport study of device property control by bottom-up approach and high-density integration compatibility using top-down state-of-the-art complementary metal oxide semiconductor flow. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  12. Divergent effect of electric fields on the mechanical property of water-filled carbon nanotubes with an application as a nanoscale trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang; Zhou, Lili; Zhao, Junfei; Zhang, Hongwu; Chen, Zhen

    2018-01-01

    Polar water molecules exhibit extraordinary phenomena under nanoscale confinement. Through the application of an electric field, a water-filled carbon nanotube (CNT) that has been successfully fabricated in the laboratory is expected to have distinct responses to the external electricity. Here, we examine the effect of electric field direction on the mechanical property of water-filled CNTs. It is observed that a longitudinal electric field enhances, but the transverse electric field reduces the elastic modulus and critical buckling stress of water-filled CNTs. The divergent effect of the electric field is attributed to the competition between the axial and circumferential pressures induced by polar water molecules. Furthermore, it is notable that the transverse electric field could result in an internal pressure with elliptical distribution, which is an effective and convenient approach to apply nonuniform pressure on nanochannels. Based on pre-strained water-filled CNTs, we designed a nanoscale trigger with an evident and rapid height change initiated by switching the direction of the electric field. The reported finding provides a foundation for an electricity-controlled property of nanochannels filled with polar molecules and provides an insight into the design of nanoscale functional devices.

  13. A contribution from dielectric analysis to the study of the formation of multi-wall carbon nanotubes percolated networks in epoxy resin under an electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risi, Celso L.S.; Hattenhauer, Irineu; Ramos, Airton; Coelho, Luiz A.F.; Pezzin, Sérgio H.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of percolation networks in epoxy matrix nanocomposites reinforced with multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) during the curing process, at different MWNT contents, was studied by using a parallel plate cell subjected to a 300 V/cm AC electric field at 1 kHz. The percolation was verified by the electrical current output measured during and after the resin curing. The behavior of electric dipoles was characterized by impedance spectroscopy and followed the Debye first order dispersion model, by which an average relaxation time of 6.0 × 10 −4 s and a cut-off frequency of 1.7 kHz were experimentally found. By applying the theory of percolation, a critical probability, p c , equal to 0.038 vol% and an exponent of conductivity of 2.0 were found. Both aligned and random samples showed dipole relaxation times typical of interfacial and/or charge-hopping polarization, while the permittivity exhibited an exponential decrease with frequency. This behavior can be related to the increased ability to trap electrical charges due to the formation of the carbon nanotubes network. Optical and electron microscopies confirm the theoretical prediction that the application of an electric field during cure helps the process of MWNT debundling in epoxy resin. - Highlights: • We report the formation of percolating networks of MWNTs under AC electric field. • MWNT/epoxy dielectric properties were measured by impedance spectroscopy. • Lower percolation thresholds were obtained for composites with aligned CNTs. • Application of AC electric field helps the debundling of CNTs. • CNT/Epoxy with percolated networks presents interfacial and hopping polarizations

  14. Optical characterization of OLED emitter properties by radiation pattern analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaemmich, Michael

    2011-09-08

    Researches in both, academia and industry are investigating optical loss channels in OLED layered systems by means of optical simulation tools in order to derive promising concepts for a further enhancement of the overall device performance. Besides other factors, the prospects of success of such optimization strategies rely severely on the credibility of the optical input data. The present thesis provides a guideline to measure the active optical properties of OLED emitter materials in situ by radiation pattern analyses. Reliable and widely applicable methods are introduced to determine the internal electroluminescence spectrum, the profile of the emission zone, the dipole emitter orientation, and the internal luminescence quantum efficiency of emissive materials from the optical far field emission of OLEDs in electrical operation. The proposed characterization procedures are applied to sets of OLEDs containing both, fluorescent polymeric materials as well as phosphorescent small-molecular emitters, respectively. On the one hand, quite expected results are obtained. On the other hand, several novel and truly surprising results are found. Most importantly, this thesis contains the first report of a non-isotropic, mainly parallel emitter orientation in a phosphorescent small-molecular guest-host system (Ir(MDQ)2(acac) in a-NPD). Due to the latter result, emitter orientation based optimization of phosphorescent OLEDs seems to be within reach. Since parallel dipoles emit preferably into air, the utilization of smart emissive materials with advantageous molecular orientation is capable to boost the efficiency of phosphorescent OLEDs by 50%. Materials design, the influence of the matrix material and the substrate, as well as film deposition conditions are just a few parameters that need to be studied further in order to exploit the huge potential of the dipole emitter orientation in phosphorescent OLEDs.

  15. A statistical-based material and process guidelines for design of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors in gigascale integrated circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavami, Behnam; Raji, Mohsen; Pedram, Hossein

    2011-08-26

    Carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) show great promise as building blocks of future integrated circuits. However, synthesizing single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with accurate chirality and exact positioning control has been widely acknowledged as an exceedingly complex task. Indeed, density and chirality variations in CNT growth can compromise the reliability of CNFET-based circuits. In this paper, we present a novel statistical compact model to estimate the failure probability of CNFETs to provide some material and process guidelines for the design of CNFETs in gigascale integrated circuits. We use measured CNT spacing distributions within the framework of detailed failure analysis to demonstrate that both the CNT density and the ratio of metallic to semiconducting CNTs play dominant roles in defining the failure probability of CNFETs. Besides, it is argued that the large-scale integration of these devices within an integrated circuit will be feasible only if a specific range of CNT density with an acceptable ratio of semiconducting to metallic CNTs can be adjusted in a typical synthesis process.

  16. Emittance control and RF bunch compression in the NSRRC photoinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, W.K.; Hung, S.B.; Lee, A.P.; Chou, C.S.; Huang, N.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The high-brightness photoinjector being constructed at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center is for testing new accelerator and light-source concepts. It is the so-called split photoinjector configuration in which a short solenoid magnet is used for emittance compensation. The UV-drive laser pulses are also shaped to produce uniform cylindrical bunches for further reduction of beam emittance. However, limited by the available power from our microwave power system, the nominal accelerating gradient in the S-band booster linac is set at 18 MV/m. A simulation study with PARMELA shows that the linac operating at this gradient fails to freeze the electron beam emittance at low value. A background solenoid magnetic field is applied for beam emittance control in the linac during acceleration. A satisfactory result that meets our preliminary goal has been achieved with the solenoid magnetic field strength at 0.1 T. RF bunch compression as a means to achieve the required beam brightness for high-gain free-electron laser experiments is also examined. The reduction of bunch length to a few hundred femtoseconds can be obtained.

  17. Generation of low-emittance electron beams in electrostatic accelerators for FEL applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Chen; Elias, Luis R.

    1995-02-01

    This paper reports results of transverse emittance studies and beam propagation in electrostatic accelerators for free electron laser applications. In particular, we discuss emittance growth analysis of a low current electron beam system consisting of a miniature thermoionic electron gun and a National Electrostatics Accelerator (NEC) tube. The emittance growth phenomenon is discussed in terms of thermal effects in the electron gun cathode and aberrations produced by field gradient changes occurring inside the electron gun and throughout the accelerator tube. A method of reducing aberrations using a magnetic solenoidal field is described. Analysis of electron beam emittance was done with the EGUN code. Beam propagation along the accelerator tube was studied using a cylindrically symmetric beam envelope equation that included beam self-fields and the external accelerator fields which were derived from POISSON simulations.

  18. Generation of low-emittance electron beams in electrostatic accelerators for FEL applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Teng; Central Florida Univ., Orlando, FL; Elias, L.R. R.; Central Florida Univ., Orlando, FL

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports results of transverse emittance studies and beam propagation in electrostatic accelerators for free electron laser applications. In particular, we discuss emittance growth analysis of a low current electron beam system consisting of a miniature thermoionic electron gun and a National Electrostatics Accelerator (NEC) tube. The emittance growth phenomenon is discussed in terms of thermal effects in the electron gun cathode and aberrations produced by field gradient changes occurring inside the electron gun and throughout the accelerator tube. A method of reducing aberrations using a magnetic solenoidal field is described. Analysis of electron beam emittance was done with the EGUN code. Beam propagation along the accelerator tube was studied using a cylindrically symmetric beam envelope equation that included beam self-fields and the external accelerator fields which were derived from POISSON simulations. ((orig.))

  19. Generation of low-emittance electron beams in electrostatic accelerators for FEL applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Teng [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States). Center for Research in Electro-Optics and Lasers (CREOL)]|[Central Florida Univ., Orlando, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Elias, L.R. R. [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States). Center for Research in Electro-Optics and Lasers (CREOL)]|[Central Florida Univ., Orlando, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1995-01-30

    This paper reports results of transverse emittance studies and beam propagation in electrostatic accelerators for free electron laser applications. In particular, we discuss emittance growth analysis of a low current electron beam system consisting of a miniature thermoionic electron gun and a National Electrostatics Accelerator (NEC) tube. The emittance growth phenomenon is discussed in terms of thermal effects in the electron gun cathode and aberrations produced by field gradient changes occurring inside the electron gun and throughout the accelerator tube. A method of reducing aberrations using a magnetic solenoidal field is described. Analysis of electron beam emittance was done with the EGUN code. Beam propagation along the accelerator tube was studied using a cylindrically symmetric beam envelope equation that included beam self-fields and the external accelerator fields which were derived from POISSON simulations. ((orig.))

  20. Numerical studies of emittance exchange in 2-D charged-particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, F.W.

    1986-01-01

    We describe results obtained from a two-dimensional particle-following computer code that simulates a continuous, nonrelativistic, elliptical charged-particle beam with linear continuous focusing. Emittances and focusing strengths can be different in the two transverse directions. The results can be applied, for example, for a quadrupole transport system in a smooth approximation to a real beam with unequal emittances in the two planes. The code was used to study emittance changes caused by kinetic-energy exchange between transverse directions and by shifts in charge distributions. Simulation results for space-charge-dominated beams agree well with analytic formulas. From simulation results, an empirical formula was developed for a ''partition parameter'' (the ratio of kinetic energies in the two directions) as a function of initial conditions and beamline length. Quantitative emittance changes for each transverse direction can be predicted by using this parameter. Simulation results also agree with Hofmann's generalized differential equation relating emittance and field energy

  1. Thermal behavior of dynamic magnetizations, hysteresis loop areas and correlations of a cylindrical Ising nanotube in an oscillating magnetic field within the effective-field theory and the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deviren, Bayram; Keskin, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    The dynamical aspects of a cylindrical Ising nanotube in the presence of a time-varying magnetic field are investigated within the effective-field theory with correlations and Glauber-type stochastic approach. Temperature dependence of the dynamic magnetizations, dynamic total magnetization, hysteresis loop areas and correlations are investigated in order to characterize the nature of dynamic transitions as well as to obtain the dynamic phase transition temperatures and compensation behaviors. Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the ratio of the physical parameters in the surface shell and core, i.e., five different types of compensation behaviors in the Néel classification nomenclature exist in the system. -- Highlights: ► Kinetic cylindrical Ising nanotube is investigated using the effective-field theory. ► The dynamic magnetizations, hysteresis loop areas and correlations are calculated. ► The effects of the exchange interactions have been studied in detail. ► Five different types of compensation behaviors have been found. ► Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on ratio of physical parameters.

  2. Thermal behavior of dynamic magnetizations, hysteresis loop areas and correlations of a cylindrical Ising nanotube in an oscillating magnetic field within the effective-field theory and the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deviren, Bayram, E-mail: bayram.deviren@nevsehir.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Nevsehir University, 50300 Nevsehir (Turkey); Keskin, Mustafa [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2012-02-20

    The dynamical aspects of a cylindrical Ising nanotube in the presence of a time-varying magnetic field are investigated within the effective-field theory with correlations and Glauber-type stochastic approach. Temperature dependence of the dynamic magnetizations, dynamic total magnetization, hysteresis loop areas and correlations are investigated in order to characterize the nature of dynamic transitions as well as to obtain the dynamic phase transition temperatures and compensation behaviors. Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the ratio of the physical parameters in the surface shell and core, i.e., five different types of compensation behaviors in the Néel classification nomenclature exist in the system. -- Highlights: ► Kinetic cylindrical Ising nanotube is investigated using the effective-field theory. ► The dynamic magnetizations, hysteresis loop areas and correlations are calculated. ► The effects of the exchange interactions have been studied in detail. ► Five different types of compensation behaviors have been found. ► Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on ratio of physical parameters.

  3. Multiscale Modeling with Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, A

    2006-02-21

    Technologically important nanomaterials come in all shapes and sizes. They can range from small molecules to complex composites and mixtures. Depending upon the spatial dimensions of the system and properties under investigation computer modeling of such materials can range from equilibrium and nonequilibrium Quantum Mechanics, to force-field-based Molecular Mechanics and kinetic Monte Carlo, to Mesoscale simulation of evolving morphology, to Finite-Element computation of physical properties. This brief review illustrates some of the above modeling techniques through a number of recent applications with carbon nanotubes: nano electromechanical sensors (NEMS), chemical sensors, metal-nanotube contacts, and polymer-nanotube composites.

  4. Plasma treatment for producing electron emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Don Mayo; Walter, Kevin Carl

    2001-01-01

    Plasma treatment for producing carbonaceous field emission electron emitters is disclosed. A plasma of ions is generated in a closed chamber and used to surround the exposed surface of a carbonaceous material. A voltage is applied to an electrode that is in contact with the carbonaceous material. This voltage has a negative potential relative to a second electrode in the chamber and serves to accelerate the ions toward the carbonaceous material and provide an ion energy sufficient to etch the exposed surface of the carbonaceous material but not sufficient to result in the implantation of the ions within the carbonaceous material. Preferably, the ions used are those of an inert gas or an inert gas with a small amount of added nitrogen.

  5. Emittance growth caused by nonuniform charge distribution of bunched beam in linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yinbao; Zhang Zhenhai

    1993-09-01

    The nonlinear space charge effect of bunched beam in linac is one of the important reasons that induces the emittance growth because of the conversion of the field energy to kinetic energy. The authors have worked out the internal field energies associated with some nonuniform space change distributions of a bunched beam, such as Gaussian distribution, waterbag distribution and parabolic distribution. And the emittance growths caused by these nonuniformities are obtained

  6. Emittance control in linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    Before completing a realistic design of a next-generation linear collider, the authors must first learn the lessons taught by the first generation, the SLC. Given that, they must make designs fault tolerant by including correction and compensation in the basic design. They must also try to eliminate these faults by improved alignment and stability of components. When these two efforts cross, they have a realistic design. The techniques of generation and control of emittance reviewed here provide a foundation for a design which can obtain the necessary luminosity in a next-generation linear collider

  7. Production of alpha emitters for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vucina, J.; Orlic, M.; Lukic, D.

    2006-01-01

    The basis for the introduction of alpha emitters into nuclear medical practice are their radiobiological properties. High LET values and short ranges in biological tissues are advantageous in comparison with nowadays most often used beta emitters, primarily 90 Y and 131 I. Given are the most important criteria for the introduction of a given radionuclide in the routine use. Shown are the procedures for the production of the most important alpha emitters 211 At, 212 Bi and 213 Bi. (author)

  8. Emittance measurements by variable quadrupole method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toprek, D.

    2005-01-01

    The beam emittance is a measure of both the beam size and beam divergence, we cannot directly measure its value. If the beam size is measured at different locations or under different focusing conditions such that different parts of the phase space ellipse will be probed by the beam size monitor, the beam emittance can be determined. An emittance measurement can be performed by different methods. Here we will consider the varying quadrupole setting method.

  9. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  10. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Gang; Peng Yuemei

    2015-01-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 3 1/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design. (authors)

  11. Hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2016-04-12

    An all back contact solar cell has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. The other emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The solar cell includes contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  12. Emittance investigation of RF photo-injector

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Mao Rong; Li Zheng; Li Ming; Xu Zhou

    2002-01-01

    A high-power laser beam illuminates a photocathode surface placed on an end wall of an RF cavity. The emitted electrons are accelerated immediately to a relativistic energy by the strong RF find in the cavity. But space charge effect induces beam emittance growth especially near the cathode where the electrons are still nonrelativistic. The author analyzes the factors which lead the transverse emittance growth and method how to resolve this problem. After introducing solenoidal focusing near the photocathode, the beam emittance growth is suppressed dramatically. The beam emittance is given also after compensation and simulation results. The measurements show these results are coincident

  13. Band-to-band tunneling in a carbon nanotube metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor is dominated by phonon-assisted tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koswatta, Siyuranga O; Lundstrom, Mark S; Nikonov, Dmitri E

    2007-05-01

    Band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) devices have recently gained a lot of interest due to their potential for reducing power dissipation in integrated circuits. We have performed extensive simulations for the BTBT operation of carbon nanotube metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (CNT-MOSFETs) using the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism for both ballistic and dissipative quantum transport. In comparison with recently reported experimental data (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 3518-3519), we have obtained strong evidence that BTBT in CNT-MOSFETs is dominated by optical phonon assisted inelastic transport, which can have important implications on the transistor characteristics. It is shown that, under large biasing conditions, two-phonon scattering may also become important.

  14. Growth of a single-wall carbon nanotube film and its patterning as an n-type field effect transistor device using an integrated circuit compatible process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiau, S H; Gau, C [Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Liu, C W; Dai, B T [National Nano Device Laboratories, No. 27, Nanke 3rd Road, Science-based Industrial Park, Hsin-shi, Tainan, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: gauc@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2008-03-12

    This study presents the synthesis of a dense single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) network on a silicon substrate using alcohol as the source gas. The nanosize catalysts required are made by the reduction of metal compounds in ethanol. The key point in spreading the nanoparticles on the substrate, so that the SWNT network can be grown over the entire wafer, is making the substrate surface hydrophilic. This SWNT network is so dense that it can be treated like a thin film. Methods of patterning this SWNT film with integrated circuit compatible processes are presented and discussed for the first time in the literature. Finally, fabrication and characteristic measurements of a field effect transistor (FET) using this SWNT film are also demonstrated. This FET is shown to have better electronic properties than any other kind of thin film transistor. This thin film with good electronic properties can be readily applied in the processing of many other SWNT electronic devices.

  15. Emittance control in linear colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1991-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss the generation and control of the emittance in a next-generation linear collider. The beams are extracted from a damping ring and compressed in length by the first bunch compressor. They are then accelerated in a preaccelerator linac up to an energy appropriate for injection into a high gradient linac. In many designs this pre-acceleration is followed by another bunch compression to reach a short bunch. After acceleration in the linac, the bunches are finally focused transversely to a small spot. The proposed vertical beam sizes at the interaction point are the order of a few nanometers while the horizontal sizes are about a factor of 100 larger. This cross-sectional area is about a factor of 10 4 smaller than the SLC. However, the main question is: what are the tolerances to achieve such a small size, and how do they compare to present techniques for alignment and stability? These tolerances are very design dependent. Alignment tolerances in the linac can vary from 1 μm to 100 μm depending upon the basic approach. In this paper we discuss techniques of emittance generation and control which move alignment tolerances to the 100 μm range

  16. Designing an optimum pulsed magnetic field by a resistance/self-inductance/capacitance discharge system and alignment of carbon nanotubes embedded in polypyrrole matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemikia, Kaveh; Bonabi, Fahimeh; Asadpoorchallo, Ali; Shokrzadeh, Majid

    2015-02-01

    In this work, an optimized pulsed magnetic field production apparatus is designed based on a RLC (Resistance/Self-inductance/Capacitance) discharge circuit. An algorithm for designing an optimum magnetic coil is presented. The coil is designed to work at room temperature. With a minor physical reinforcement, the magnetic flux density can be set up to 12 Tesla with 2 ms duration time. In our design process, the magnitude and the length of the magnetic pulse are the desired parameters. The magnetic field magnitude in the RLC circuit is maximized on the basis of the optimal design of the coil. The variables which are used in the optimization process are wire diameter and the number of coil layers. The coil design ensures the critically damped response of the RLC circuit. The electrical, mechanical, and thermal constraints are applied to the design process. A locus of probable magnetic flux density values versus wire diameter and coil layer is provided to locate the optimum coil parameters. Another locus of magnetic flux density values versus capacitance and initial voltage of the RLC circuit is extracted to locate the optimum circuit parameters. Finally, the application of high magnetic fields on carbon nanotube-PolyPyrrole (CNT-PPy) nano-composite is presented. Scanning probe microscopy technique is used to observe the orientation of CNTs after exposure to a magnetic field. The result shows alignment of CNTs in a 10.3 Tesla, 1.5 ms magnetic pulse.

  17. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-02

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based on combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated together with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  18. Nanodiamond composite as a material for cold electron emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkhipov, A V; Sominski, G G; Uvarov, A A; Gordeev, S K; Korchagina, S B

    2008-01-01

    Characteristics of field-induced electron emission were investigated for one of newly designed all-carbon materials - nanodiamond composite (NDC). The composite is comprised by 4-6 nm diamond grains covered with 0.2-1 nm-thick graphite-like shells that merge at grain junctions and determine such properties as mechanical strength and high electric conductivity. Large number of uniformly distributed sp 3 -sp 2 interfaces allowed to expect enhanced electron emission in electric field. Combination of these features makes NDC a promising material for cold electron emitters in various applications. Experimental testing confirmed high efficiency of electron emission from NDC. In comparison with previousely tested forms of nanocarbon, NDC emitters demonstrated better stabily and tolerance to performance conditions. Unusual activation scenarios and thermal dependencies of emission characteristics observed in experiments with NDC can add new background for explanation of facilitated electron emission from nanocarbons with relatively 'smooth' surface morphology

  19. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2016-03-01

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based in combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth from CSR can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  20. Nanodiamond composite as a material for cold electron emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, A V; Sominski, G G; Uvarov, A A [St.Petersburg State Polytechnic University, 29 Politchnicheskaya, St.Petersburg, 195251 (Russian Federation); Gordeev, S K; Korchagina, S B [FSUE ' Central Research Institute for Materials' , 8 Paradnaya Street, St.Petersburg, 191014 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: arkhipov@rphf.spbstu.ru

    2008-03-15

    Characteristics of field-induced electron emission were investigated for one of newly designed all-carbon materials - nanodiamond composite (NDC). The composite is comprised by 4-6 nm diamond grains covered with 0.2-1 nm-thick graphite-like shells that merge at grain junctions and determine such properties as mechanical strength and high electric conductivity. Large number of uniformly distributed sp{sup 3}-sp{sup 2} interfaces allowed to expect enhanced electron emission in electric field. Combination of these features makes NDC a promising material for cold electron emitters in various applications. Experimental testing confirmed high efficiency of electron emission from NDC. In comparison with previousely tested forms of nanocarbon, NDC emitters demonstrated better stabily and tolerance to performance conditions. Unusual activation scenarios and thermal dependencies of emission characteristics observed in experiments with NDC can add new background for explanation of facilitated electron emission from nanocarbons with relatively 'smooth' surface morphology.

  1. Common mode noise on the main Tevatron bus and associated beam emittance growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, P.; Johnson, R.P.; Kuchnir, M.; Siergiej, D.; Wolff, D.

    1991-05-01

    Overlap of betatron tune frequencies with the power supply noise spectrum can cause transverse beam emittance growth in a storage ring. We have studied this effect for tunes near the integer, where the betatron frequency is low. By injecting noise onto the main power supply bus, it was determined that common mode noise was the dominant source of emittance growth. A noise suppression feed-back loop was then used to reduce the noise and the emittance growth. These experiments are described as are investigations of the common mode propagation along the Tevatron bus and measurements of the fields generated by common mode excitation of isolated Tevatron magnets. 3 refs., 4 figs

  2. Thermal Emittance Measurement of the Cs2Te Photocathode in FZD Superconducting RF

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, R; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Teichert, J

    2010-01-01

    The thermal emittance of the photocathode is an interesting physical property for the photoinjector, because it decides the minimum emittance the photoinjector can finally achieve. In this paper we will report the latest results of the thermal emittance of the Cs2Te photocathode in FZD Superconducting RF gun. The measurement is performed with solenoid scan method with very low bunch charge and relative large laser spot on cathode, in order to reduce the space charge effect as much as possible, and meanwhile to eliminate the wake fields and the effect from beam halos.

  3. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the controlled coupling of single-photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic nonlinearity on a nanoscaled platform. In this article, we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters...

  4. From classical to quantum plasmonics: Classical emitter and SPASER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balykin, V. I.

    2018-02-01

    The key advantage of plasmonics is in pushing our control of light down to the nanoscale. It is possible to envision lithographically fabricated plasmonic devices for future quantum information processing or cryptography at the nanoscale in two dimensions. A first step in this direction is a demonstration of a highly efficient nanoscale light source. Here we demonstrate two types of nanoscale sources of optical fields: 1) the classical metallic nanostructure emitter and 2) the plasmonic nanolaser - SPASER.

  5. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imagining and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography

  6. Application of Laplace transform for the exact effect of a magnetic field on heat transfer of carbon nanotubes-suspended nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebaid, Abdelhalim; Al Sharif, Mohammed A. [Tabuk Univ. (Saudi Arabia). Faculty of Science

    2015-10-01

    Since the discovery of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), there is an increasing interest in their applications in industry and medical fields. Attempts of using such CNTs as drug carriers and in cancer therapy in the presence of a magnetic field are now undertaken because of their direct impacts on increasing the thermal conductivity of base fluids. Two types of CNTs are well known for the researchers, the single-walled CNT (SWCNTs) and the multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs); however, the subject of which one is more effective in treatment of cancer deserves more investigations. The present article discusses the effect of such types of CNTs on the flow and heat transfer of nanofluids in the presence of a magnetic field. Exact analytical solution for the heat equation has been obtained by using the Laplace transform, where the solution is expressed in terms of a new special function, the generalised incomplete gamma function. The effects of various parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature distribution, and heat transfer rates have been introduced. Details of possible applications of the current results in the treatment of cancer have been also discussed.

  7. Application of Laplace transform for the exact effect of a magnetic field on heat transfer of carbon nanotubes-suspended nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebaid, Abdelhalim; Al Sharif, Mohammed A.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), there is an increasing interest in their applications in industry and medical fields. Attempts of using such CNTs as drug carriers and in cancer therapy in the presence of a magnetic field are now undertaken because of their direct impacts on increasing the thermal conductivity of base fluids. Two types of CNTs are well known for the researchers, the single-walled CNT (SWCNTs) and the multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs); however, the subject of which one is more effective in treatment of cancer deserves more investigations. The present article discusses the effect of such types of CNTs on the flow and heat transfer of nanofluids in the presence of a magnetic field. Exact analytical solution for the heat equation has been obtained by using the Laplace transform, where the solution is expressed in terms of a new special function, the generalised incomplete gamma function. The effects of various parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature distribution, and heat transfer rates have been introduced. Details of possible applications of the current results in the treatment of cancer have been also discussed.

  8. Superconducting wiggler magnets for beam-emittance damping rings

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-low emittance beams with a high bunch charge are necessary for the luminosity performance of linear electron-positron colliders, such as the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). An effective way to create ultra-low emittance beams with a high bunch charge is to use damping rings, or storage rings equipped with strong damping wiggler magnets. The remanent field of the permanent magnet materials and the ohmic losses in normal conductors limit the economically achievable pole field in accelerator magnets operated at around room temperature to below the magnetic saturation induction, which is 2.15 T for iron. In wiggler magnets, the pole field in the center of the gap is reduced further like the hyperbolic cosine of the ratio of the gap size and the period length multiplied by pi. Moreover, damping wiggler magnets require relatively large gaps because they have to accept the un-damped beam and to generate, at a small period length, a large magnetic flux density amplitude to effectively damp the beam emittance....

  9. Prototype of a subsurface drip irrigation emitter: Manufacturing, hydraulic evaluation and experimental analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Wanderley De Jesus; Rodrigues Sinobas, Leonor; Sánchez, Raúl; Arriel Botrel, Tarlei; Duarte Coelho, Rubens

    2013-04-01

    Root and soil intrusion into the conventional emitters is one of the major disadvantages to obtain a good uniformity of water application in subsurface drip irrigation (SDI). In the last years, there have been different approaches to reduce these problems such as the impregnation of emitters with herbicide, and the search for an emitter geometry impairing the intrusion of small roots. Within the last this study, has developed and evaluated an emitter model which geometry shows specific physical features to prevent emitter clogging. This work was developed at the Biosystems Engineering Department at ESALQ-USP/Brazil, and it is a part of a research in which an innovated emitteŕs model for SDI has been developed to prevent root and soil particles intrusion. An emitter with a mechanical-hydraulic mechanism (opening and closing the water outlet) for SDI was developed and manufactured using a mechanical lathe process. It was composed by a silicon elastic membrane a polyethylene tube and a Vnyl Polychloride membrane protector system. In this study the performance of the developed prototype was assessed in the laboratory and in the field conditions. In the laboratory, uniformity of water application was calculated by the water emission uniformity coefficient (CUE), and the manufacturer's coefficient of variation (CVm). In addition, variation in the membrane diameter submitted to internal pressures; head losses along the membrane, using the energy equation; and, precision and accuracy of the equation model, analyzed by Pearson's correlation coefficient (r), and by Willmott's concordance index (d) were also calculated with samples of the developed emitters. In the field, the emitters were installed in pots with and without sugar cane culture from October 2010 to January 2012. During this time, flow rate in 20 emitters were measured periodically, and the aspects of them about clogging at the end of the experiment. Emitters flow rates were measured quarterly to calculate

  10. Single walled carbon nanotubes functionally adsorbed to biopolymers for use as chemical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jr., Alan T.; Gelperin, Alan [Princeton, NJ; Staii, Cristian [Madison, WI

    2011-07-12

    Chemical field effect sensors comprising nanotube field effect devices having biopolymers such as single stranded DNA functionally adsorbed to the nanotubes are provided. Also included are arrays comprising the sensors and methods of using the devices to detect volatile compounds.

  11. Bent solenoids for spectrometers and emittance exchange sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.

    1999-01-01

    Bent solenoids can be used to transport low energy beams as they provide both confinement and dispersion of particle orbits. Solenoids are being considered both as emittance exchange sections and spectrometers in the muon cooling system as part of the study of the muon collider. They present the results of a study of bent solenoids which considers the design of coupling sections between bent solenoids to straight solenoids, drift compensation fields, aberrations, and factors relating to the construction, such as field ripple, stored energy, coil forces and field errors

  12. Hydraulic performance evaluation of pressure compensating (pc) emitters and micro-tubing for drip irrigation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangrio, A.G.; Asif, M.; Jahangir, I.

    2013-01-01

    Drip irrigation system is necessary for those areas, where the water scarcity issues are present. The present study was conducted at the field station of Climate Change, Alternate Energy and Water Resources Institute (CAEWRI), National Agricultural Research Center (NARC), Islamabad, during 2013, regarding drip irrigation system. Drip irrigation system depends on uniform emitter application flow. All the emitters were tested and replicated thrice at pressure head (34 to 207Kpa) with an increment of 34 Kpa. The minimum and maximum discharges were 1.32 - 3.52, 3.36 - 5.42, and 43.22 - 100.99 Lph, with an average of 2.42, 4.63 and 73.66 Lph, for Bow Smith, RIS and Micro-tubing, respectively. It indicates that more than 90% of emission uniformity (EU) and uniformity coefficient (CU) for all Emitters, which shows excellent water application with least standard deviation, ranging 0.12 to 2.37, throughout the operating pressure heads in all emitters. An average coefficient of variation (CV) of all emitters were behaving less than 0.07, indicating an excellent class at all operating pressure heads between 34 to 207 Kpa. Moreover, the relationship of discharge and pressure of emitters indicates that discharge increased with the increase of pressure head. The Q-H curve plays key role in the selection of emitters. (author)

  13. 3D NANOTUBE FIELD EFFECT TRANSISTORS FOR HYBRID HIGH-PERFORMANCE AND LOW-POWER OPERATION WITH HIGH CHIP-AREA EFFICIENCY

    KAUST Repository

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2014-03-01

    scaling on silicon, the amount of current generated per device has to be increased while keeping short channel effects and off-state leakage at bay. The objective of this doctoral thesis is the investigation of an innovative vertical silicon based architecture called the silicon nanotube field effect transistor (Si NTFET). This topology incorporates a dual inner/outer core/shell gate stack strategy to control the volume inversion properties in a hollow silicon 1D quasi-nanotube under a tight electrostatic configuration. Together with vertically aligned source and drain, the Si NTFET is capable of very high on-state performance (drive current) in an area-efficient configuration as opposed to arrays of gate-all-around nanowires, while maintaining leakage characteristics similar to a single nanowire. Such a device architecture offsets the need of device arraying that is needed with fin and nanowire architectures. Extensive simulations are used to validate the potential benefits of Si NTFETs over GAA NWFETs on a variety of platforms such as conventional MOSFETs, tunnel FETs, junction-less FETs. This thesis demonstrates a novel CMOS compatible process flow to fabricate vertical nanotube transistors that offer a variety of advantages such as lithography-independent gate length definition, integration of epitaxially grown silicon nanotubes with spacer based gate dielectrics and abrupt in-situ doped source/drain junctions. Experimental measurement data will showcase the various materials and processing challenges in fabricating these devices. Finally, an extension of this work to topologically transformed wavy channel FinFETs is also demonstrated keeping in line with the theme of area efficient high-performance electronics.

  14. Electrochemical biosensing based on polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yibing, E-mail: ybxie@seu.edu.cn; Zhao, Ye

    2013-12-01

    The glucose oxidase (GOD) modified polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is fabricated for electrochemical biosensing application. The titania nanotube array is grown directly on a titanium substrate through an anodic oxidation process. A thin film of polypyrrole is coated onto titania nanotube array to form polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid through a normal pulse voltammetry process. GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is prepared by the covalent immobilization of GOD onto polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid via the cross-linker of glutaraldehyde. The morphology and microstructure of nanotube electrodes are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis. The biosensing properties of this nanotube enzyme electrode have been investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The hydrophilic polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid provides highly accessible nanochannels for GOD encapsulation, presenting good enzymatic affinity. As-formed GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode well conducts bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose, exhibiting a good biosensing performance with a high sensitivity, low detection limit and wide linear detection range. - Graphical abstract: The schematic diagram presents the fabrication of glucose oxidase modified polypyrrole/titania (GOD-PPy/TiO{sub 2}) nanotube enzyme electrode for biosensing application. - Highlights: • Hydrophilic polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid is well used as biosensing substrate. • Polypyrrole promotes GOD immobilization on titania nanotubes via glutaraldehyde. • GOD-polypyrrole/titania enzyme electrode shows good bioelectrocatalytic reactivity.

  15. Electrochemical biosensing based on polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Yibing; Zhao, Ye

    2013-01-01

    The glucose oxidase (GOD) modified polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is fabricated for electrochemical biosensing application. The titania nanotube array is grown directly on a titanium substrate through an anodic oxidation process. A thin film of polypyrrole is coated onto titania nanotube array to form polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid through a normal pulse voltammetry process. GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode is prepared by the covalent immobilization of GOD onto polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid via the cross-linker of glutaraldehyde. The morphology and microstructure of nanotube electrodes are characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared analysis. The biosensing properties of this nanotube enzyme electrode have been investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The hydrophilic polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid provides highly accessible nanochannels for GOD encapsulation, presenting good enzymatic affinity. As-formed GOD-polypyrrole/titania nanotube enzyme electrode well conducts bioelectrocatalytic oxidation of glucose, exhibiting a good biosensing performance with a high sensitivity, low detection limit and wide linear detection range. - Graphical abstract: The schematic diagram presents the fabrication of glucose oxidase modified polypyrrole/titania (GOD-PPy/TiO 2 ) nanotube enzyme electrode for biosensing application. - Highlights: • Hydrophilic polypyrrole/titania nanotube hybrid is well used as biosensing substrate. • Polypyrrole promotes GOD immobilization on titania nanotubes via glutaraldehyde. • GOD-polypyrrole/titania enzyme electrode shows good bioelectrocatalytic reactivity

  16. Beam diagnostics using an emittance measurement device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarstedt, M.; Becker, R.; Klein, H.; Maaser, A.; Mueller, J.; Thomae, R.; Weber, M.

    1995-01-01

    For beam diagnostics aside from Faraday cups for current measurements and analysing magnets for the determination of beam composition and energy the most important tool is an emittance measurement device. With such a system the distribution of the beam particles in phase-space can be determined. This yields information not only on the position of the particles but also on their angle with respect to the beam axis. There are different kinds of emittance measurement devices using either circular holes or slits for separation of part of the beam. The second method (slit-slit measurement), though important for the determination of the rms-emittance, has the disadvantage of integrating over the y- and y'-coordinate (measurement in xx'-plane assumed). This leads to different emittance diagrams than point-point measurements, since in xx'-plane for each two corresponding points of rr'-plane there exists a connecting line. With regard to beam aberrations this makes xx'-emittances harder to interpret. In this paper the two kinds of emittance diagrams are discussed. Additionally the influence of the slit height on the xx'-emittance is considered. The analytical results are compared to experimental measurements in rr'-, rx'- and xx'-phase-space. (orig.)

  17. Electropolymerization of polyaniline on titanium oxide nanotubes for supercapacitor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujawar, Sarfraj H.; Ambade, Swapnil B.; Battumur, T.; Ambade, Rohan B.; Lee, Soo-Hyoung

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Polyaniline (PANI)-Titanium nanotube template (TNT) composite for supercapacitors. → The mechanism of the controlled growth of hollow open ended PANI nanotubes using a TNT template is studied. → A rare effort to electropolymerise PANI on TNTs resulting into an appreciable capacitance of 740 F g -1 . - Abstract: Vertically aligned polyaniline (PANI) nanotubes have great potential application in supercapacitor electrode material. In this paper we have investigated facile growth of PANI nanotubes on a titanium nanotube template (TNT) using electrochemical polymerization. The morphology of PANI nanostructures grown over TNT is strongly influenced by the scan rate in the electrochemical polymerization. The growth morphology of PANI nanotubes has been carefully analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The detailed growth mechanism of PANI nanotubes has been put forward. Specific capacitance value of 740 F g -1 was obtained for PANI nanotube structures (measured at charge-discharge rate of 3 A g -1 ).

  18. Insight into the Broad Field of Polymer Nanocomposites: From Carbon Nanotubes to Clay Nanoplatelets, via Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Stefanescu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Highly ordered polymer nanocomposites are complex materials that display a rich morphological behavior owing to variations in composition, structure, and properties on a nanometer length scale. Metal-polymer nanocomposite materials are becoming more popular for applications requiring low cost, high metal surface areas. Catalytic systems seem to be the most prevalent application for a wide range of metals used in polymer nanocomposites, particularly for metals like Pt, Ni, Co, and Au, with known catalytic activities. On the other hand, among the most frequently utilized techniques to prepare polymer/CNT and/or polymer/clay nanocomposites are approaches like melt mixing, solution casting, electrospinning and solid-state shear pulverization. Additionally, some of the current and potential applications of polymer/CNT and/or polymer/clay nanocomposites include photovoltaic devices, optical switches, electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding, aerospace and automotive materials, packaging, adhesives and coatings. This extensive review covers a broad range of articles, typically from high impact-factor journals, on most of the polymer-nanocomposites known to date: polymer/carbon nanotubes, polymer/metal nanospheres, and polymer/clay nanoplatelets composites. The various types of nanocomposites are described form the preparation stages to performance and applications. Comparisons of the various types of nanocomposites are conducted and conclusions are formulated.

  19. Reinforced carbon fiber laminates with oriented carbon nanotube epoxy nanocomposites: Magnetic field assisted alignment and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuxin; Yang, Song; Liu, Hu; Shao, Qian; Chen, Qiuyu; Lu, Chang; Jiang, Yuanli; Liu, Chuntai; Guo, Zhanhu

    2018-05-01

    The epoxy nanocomposites with ordered multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used to influence the micro-cracks resistance of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy (CF/EP) laminate at 77 K, Oxidized MWCNTs functionalized with Fe 3 O 4 (Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs) with good magnetic properties were prepared by co-precipitation method and used to modify epoxy (EP) for cryogenic applications. Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs reinforced carbon fiber epoxy composites were also prepared through vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). The ordered Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs were observed to have effectively improved the mechanical properties of epoxy (EP) matrix at 77 K and reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of EP matrix. The ordered Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs also obviously improved the micro-cracks resistance of CF/EP composites at 77 K. Compared to neat EP, the CTE of ordered Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs modified CF/EP composites was decreased 37.6%. Compared to CF/EP composites, the micro-cracks density of ordered Fe 3 O 4 /O-MWCNTs modified CF/EP composites at 77 K was decreased 37.2%. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nanotube phonon waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2013-10-29

    Disclosed are methods and devices in which certain types of nanotubes (e.g., carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes conduct heat with high efficiency and are therefore useful in electronic-type devices.

  1. Near-infrared magneto-optical study of excitonic states in single-walled carbon nanotubes under ultra-high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoi, H; Effendi, Mukhtar; Minami, N; Takeyama, S

    2011-01-01

    Singlet excitonic states at the first subband-edge in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been studied through near-infrared magneto-absorption spectroscopy under magnetic fields to 105.9 T. Well-resolved absorption spectra of stretch-aligned SWCNT(CoMoCAT)-gelatin films were obtained above 100 T. By the application of magnetic fields in parallel to the alignment of SWCNTs, peak shift toward the lower energy was observed for (8, 4) and (7, 6) tubes and the opposite behavior was observed for (7, 5) and (6, 5) tubes. Above 28.8 T, new peaks emerged at the higher energy side of the peak for the (8, 4) and (7, 6) tubes, and at the lower energy side of the peaks for the (7, 5) and (6, 5) tubes. The magnetic splitting between the existing peak and the new peak was symmetric for every tube, which is in line with the energy splitting due to the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Judging from the energetic positions where the new peaks emerged, the singlet dark excitonic state locates at the lower energy than the singlet bright one in the (7, 5) and (6, 5) tubes while it is suggested strongly that the bright one locates at the lower energy in the (8, 4) and (7, 6) tubes.

  2. Proof of Concept Coded Aperture Miniature Mass Spectrometer Using a Cycloidal Sector Mass Analyzer, a Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Field Emission Electron Ionization Source, and an Array Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsden, Jason J.; Herr, Philip J.; Landry, David M. W.; Kim, William; Vyas, Raul; Parker, Charles B.; Kirley, Matthew P.; Keil, Adam D.; Gilchrist, Kristin H.; Radauscher, Erich J.; Hall, Stephen D.; Carlson, James B.; Baldasaro, Nicholas; Stokes, David; Di Dona, Shane T.; Russell, Zachary E.; Grego, Sonia; Edwards, Steven J.; Sperline, Roger P.; Denton, M. Bonner; Stoner, Brian R.; Gehm, Michael E.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2018-02-01

    Despite many potential applications, miniature mass spectrometers have had limited adoption in the field due to the tradeoff between throughput and resolution that limits their performance relative to laboratory instruments. Recently, a solution to this tradeoff has been demonstrated by using spatially coded apertures in magnetic sector mass spectrometers, enabling throughput and signal-to-background improvements of greater than an order of magnitude with no loss of resolution. This paper describes a proof of concept demonstration of a cycloidal coded aperture miniature mass spectrometer (C-CAMMS) demonstrating use of spatially coded apertures in a cycloidal sector mass analyzer for the first time. C-CAMMS also incorporates a miniature carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission electron ionization source and a capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) ion array detector. Results confirm the cycloidal mass analyzer's compatibility with aperture coding. A >10× increase in throughput was achieved without loss of resolution compared with a single slit instrument. Several areas where additional improvement can be realized are identified.

  3. Wave propagation in fluid-conveying viscoelastic carbon nanotubes under longitudinal magnetic field with thermal and surface effect via nonlocal strain gradient theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Yaxin; Zhou, Lin

    2017-03-01

    Based on nonlocal strain gradient theory, wave propagation in fluid-conveying viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is studied in this paper. With consideration of thermal effect and surface effect, wave equation is derived for fluid-conveying viscoelastic SWCNTs under longitudinal magnetic field utilizing Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. The closed-form expressions are derived for the frequency and phase velocity of the wave motion. The influences of fluid flow velocity, structural damping coefficient, temperature change, magnetic flux and surface effect are discussed in detail. SWCNTs’ viscoelasticity reduces the wave frequency of the system and the influence gets remarkable with the increase of wave number. The fluid in SWCNTs decreases the frequency of wave propagation to a certain extent. The frequency (phase velocity) gets larger due to the existence of surface effect, especially when the diameters of SWCNTs and the wave number decrease. The wave frequency increases with the increase of the longitudinal magnetic field, while decreases with the increase of the temperature change. The results may be helpful for better understanding the potential applications of SWCNTs in nanotechnology.

  4. Beam emittance measurement from CERN thermionic guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kester, O.; Rao, R.; Rinolfi, L.

    1992-01-01

    In the LEP Injector Linacs (LIL) a thermionic gun provides electron beams with different peak intensities at an energy of 80 keV. The beam emittances were estimated from the EGUN programme. Since the gun is of triode type, the main contribution to the emittance comes from the grid. The simulation programme does not model the real geometry by assuming a cylindrical symmetry, while the grid does not have such symmetry. A Gun Test Facility (GTF), allowing emittance measurements, based on the 3-gradients-method was installed. The experimental results are presented. (author) 6 refs.; 6 figs

  5. Emittance compensation with dynamically optimized photoelectron beam profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenzweig, J.B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)]. E-mail: rosen@physics.ucla.edu; Cook, A.M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); England, R.J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Dunning, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Anderson, S.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Ferrario, Massimo [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionale di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 41, Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2006-02-01

    Much of the theory and experimentation concerning creation of a high-brightness electron beam from a photocathode, and then applying emittance compensation techniques, assumes that one must strive for a uniform density electron beam, having a cylindrical shape. On the other hand, this shape has large nonlinearities in the space-charge field profiles near the beam's longitudinal extrema. These nonlinearities are known to produce both transverse and longitudinal emittance growth. On the other hand, it has recently been shown by Luiten that by illuminating the cathode with an ultra-short laser pulse of appropriate transverse profile, a uniform density, ellipsoidally shaped bunch is dynamically formed, which then has linear space-charge fields in all dimensions inside of the bunch. We study here this process, and its marriage to the standard emittance compensation scenario that is implemented in most recent photoinjectors. It is seen that the two processes are compatible, with simulations indicating a very high brightness beam can be obtained. The robustness of this scheme to systematic errors is examined. Prospects for experimental tests of this scheme are discussed.

  6. Emittance compensation with dynamically optimized photoelectron beam profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Cook, A.M.; England, R.J.; Dunning, M.; Anderson, S.G.; Ferrario, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    Much of the theory and experimentation concerning creation of a high-brightness electron beam from a photocathode, and then applying emittance compensation techniques, assumes that one must strive for a uniform density electron beam, having a cylindrical shape. On the other hand, this shape has large nonlinearities in the space-charge field profiles near the beam's longitudinal extrema. These nonlinearities are known to produce both transverse and longitudinal emittance growth. On the other hand, it has recently been shown by Luiten that by illuminating the cathode with an ultra-short laser pulse of appropriate transverse profile, a uniform density, ellipsoidally shaped bunch is dynamically formed, which then has linear space-charge fields in all dimensions inside of the bunch. We study here this process, and its marriage to the standard emittance compensation scenario that is implemented in most recent photoinjectors. It is seen that the two processes are compatible, with simulations indicating a very high brightness beam can be obtained. The robustness of this scheme to systematic errors is examined. Prospects for experimental tests of this scheme are discussed

  7. Carbon nanotubes for biological and biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wenrong; Thordarson, Pall; Gooding, J Justin; Ringer, Simon P; Braet, Filip

    2007-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of carbon nanotubes, researchers have been exploring their potential in biological and biomedical applications. The recent expansion and availability of chemical modification and bio-functionalization methods have made it possible to generate a new class of bioactive carbon nanotubes which are conjugated with proteins, carbohydrates, or nucleic acids. The modification of a carbon nanotube on a molecular level using biological molecules is essentially an example of the 'bottom-up' fabrication principle of bionanotechnology. The availability of these biomodified carbon nanotube constructs opens up an entire new and exciting research direction in the field of chemical biology, finally aiming to target and to alter the cell's behaviour at the subcellular or molecular level. This review covers the latest advances of bio-functionalized carbon nanotubes with an emphasis on the development of functional biological nano-interfaces. Topics that are discussed herewith include methods for biomodification of carbon nanotubes, the development of hybrid systems of carbon nanotubes and biomolecules for bioelectronics, and carbon nanotubes as transporters for a specific delivery of peptides and/or genetic material to cells. All of these current research topics aim at translating these biotechnology modified nanotubes into potential novel therapeutic approaches. (topical review)

  8. Strong Coupling and Entanglement of Quantum Emitters Embedded in a Nanoantenna-Enhanced Plasmonic Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensen, Matthias [Institut; Heilpern, Tal [Center; Gray, Stephen K. [Center; Pfeiffer, Walter [Fakultät

    2017-10-12

    Establishing strong coupling between spatially separated and thus selectively addressable quantum emitters is a key ingredient to complex quantum optical schemes in future technologies. Insofar as many plasmonic nanostructures are concerned, however, the energy transfer and mutual interaction strength between distant quantum emitters can fail to provide strong coupling. Here, based on mode hybridization, the longevity and waveguide character of an elliptical plasmon cavity are combined with intense and highly localized field modes of suitably designed nanoantennas. Based on FDTD simulations a quantum emitter-plasmon coupling strength hg = 16.7 meV is reached while simultaneously keeping a small plasmon resonance line width h gamma(s) = 33 meV. This facilitates strong coupling, and quantum dynamical simulations reveal an oscillatory exchange of excited state population arid a notable degree of entanglement between the quantum emitters spatially separated by 1.8 mu m, i.e., about twice the operating wavelength.

  9. Internal emitter research and standard setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stannard, J.N.

    1981-01-01

    The history of the use of data from internal emitter research in the derivation of safety standards is reviewed. At first, observed biological effects were correlated with body burdens or exposure levels. This direct approach is illustrated by detailed accounts of the cases of uranium and plutonium. In the 1950's, when it was decided to provide standards for over 200 isotopes, the direct approach was replaced by a system of calculations. This necessitated changes in internal emitter research programs to provide metabolic data, and the development of models such as Reference Man and the Lung and Gastrointestinal Tract models. The continuing contribution of internal emitter research to standard setting can be seen in the references quoted in the metabolic data section of the new ICRP report (ICRP Publication 30). Present trends suggest a possible return to the direct use of internal emitter effects data for obtaining risk estimates. (U.K.)

  10. Magnetization measurement of single La{sub 0.67}Ca{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} nanotubes in perpendicular magnetic fields using a micromechanical torsional oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, D., E-mail: dario.antonio@cab.cnea.gov.a [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, (8400) S. C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Dolz, M.I.; Pastoriza, H. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, (8400) S. C. de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2010-03-15

    Using a silicon micromechanical resonator as a sensitive magnetometer, the authors have studied both experimentally and theoretically the magnetic behavior of two isolated ferromagnetic nanotubes of perovskite La{sub 0.67}Ca{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3}. The article investigates the specific configuration where a magnetic field H is applied perpendicular to the magnetic easy axis of an isolated nanotube characterized by an uniaxial anisotropy constant K. In this situation, the magnetization M reduces the effective elastic constant k{sub M} of the resonator. This softening of the mechanical system is opposed to the hardening effect of M observed in a previous work, where H was applied parallel to the easy axis. Moreover, in this magnetic field configuration two distinct magnetization regimes are manifested, depending on the magnitude of H. For H>>2K/M the magnetization is almost parallel to the applied magnetic field and for H<<2K/M it is almost parallel to the easy axis of the nanotube. At a certain value of H there is a sharp transition from one regime to the other, accompanied by a peak in the energy dissipation.

  11. Investigations on the transverse phase space at a photo injector for minimized emittance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miltchev, V.

    2006-08-15

    Radio frequency photoinjectors are electron sources able to generate beams of extremely high brightness, which are applicable to linac driven Free Electron Lasers (FEL). Because of the high phase space density, the dynamics of the electron beam is dominated by space charge interactions between the particles. This thesis studies the transverse phase space of space charge dominated electron beams produced by the Photo Injector Test Facility in Zeuthen (PITZ). The operation conditions for minimizing the transverse emittance are studied experimentally, theoretically and in simulations. The influence of the longitudinal profile of the driving UV laser pulse on the transverse emittance is investigated. Emphasis is placed on the experimental study of the emittance as a function of different machine parameters like the laser beam spot size, the amplitude of the focusing magnetic field, the rf phase and the electron bunch charge. First investigations on the thermal emittance for Cs{sub 2}Te photocathodes under rf operating conditions are presented. Measurements of the thermal emittance scaling with the photocathode laser spot size are analyzed. The significance of the applied rf field in the emittance formation process is discussed. (orig.)

  12. Investigations on the transverse phase space at a photo injector for minimized emittance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miltchev, V.

    2006-08-01

    Radio frequency photoinjectors are electron sources able to generate beams of extremely high brightness, which are applicable to linac driven Free Electron Lasers (FEL). Because of the high phase space density, the dynamics of the electron beam is dominated by space charge interactions between the particles. This thesis studies the transverse phase space of space charge dominated electron beams produced by the Photo Injector Test Facility in Zeuthen (PITZ). The operation conditions for minimizing the transverse emittance are studied experimentally, theoretically and in simulations. The influence of the longitudinal profile of the driving UV laser pulse on the transverse emittance is investigated. Emphasis is placed on the experimental study of the emittance as a function of different machine parameters like the laser beam spot size, the amplitude of the focusing magnetic field, the rf phase and the electron bunch charge. First investigations on the thermal emittance for Cs 2 Te photocathodes under rf operating conditions are presented. Measurements of the thermal emittance scaling with the photocathode laser spot size are analyzed. The significance of the applied rf field in the emittance formation process is discussed. (orig.)

  13. Carbon nanotubes based vacuum gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudyk, N. N.; Il'in, O. I.; Il'ina, M. V.; Fedotov, A. A.; Klimin, V. S.; Ageev, O. A.

    2017-11-01

    We have created an ionization type Vacuum gauge with sensor element based on an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. Obtained asymmetrical current-voltage characteristics at different voltage polarity on the electrode with the CNTs. It was found that when applying a negative potential on an electrode with the CNTs, the current in the gap is higher than at a positive potential. In the pressure range of 1 ÷ 103 Torr vacuum gauge sensitivity was 6 mV/Torr (at a current of 4.5·10-5 A) and in the range of 10-5 ÷ 1 Torr was 10 mV/Torr (at a current of 1.3·10-5 A). It is shown that the energy efficiency of vacuum gauge can be increased in the case where electrode with CNT operates as an emitter of electrons.

  14. Engineered Emitters for Improved Silicon Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Ronak A.

    In 2014, installation of 5.3GW of new Photovoltaic (PV) systems occurred in the United States, raising the total installed capacity to 16.36GW. Strong growth is predicted for the domestic PV market with analysts reporting goals of 696GW by 2020. Conventional single crystalline silicon cells are the technology of choice, accounting for 90% of the installations in the global commercial market. Cells made of GaAs offer higher efficiencies, but at a substantially higher cost. Thin film technologies such as CIGS and CdTe compete favorably with multi-crystalline Si (u-Si), but at 20% efficiency, still lag the c-Si cell in performance. The c-Si cell can be fabricated to operate at approximately 25% efficiency, but commercially the efficiencies are in the 18-21% range, which is a direct result of cost trade-offs between process complexity and rapid throughput. With the current cost of c-Si cell modules at nearly 0.60/W. The technology is well below the historic metric of 1/W for economic viability. The result is that more complex processes, once cost-prohibitive, may now be viable. An example is Panasonic's HIT cell which operates in the 22-24% efficiency range. To facilitate research and development of novel PV materials and techniques, RIT has developed a basic solar cell fabrication process. Student projects prior to this work had produced cells with 12.8% efficiency using p type substrates. This thesis reports on recent work to improve cell efficiencies while simultaneously expanding the capability of the rapid prototyping process. In addition to the p-Si substrates, cells have been produced using n-Si substrates. The cell emitter, which is often done with a single diffusion or implant has been re-engineered using a dual implant of the same dose. This dual-implanted emitter has been shown to lower contact resistance, increase Voc, and increase the efficiency. A p-Si substrate cell has been fabricated with an efficiency of 14.6% and n-Si substrate cell with a 13

  15. Self-powered detectors with thulium emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, P.; Klar, E.

    1978-01-01

    In addition to fission chambers, prompt-indicating self-powered (SPN) detectors are used for measuring the neutron flux density in the core of power reactors. Although current SPN detectors with a cobalt emitter give satisfactora results, detectors with other emitter materials have been analyzed and tested. The author describes the properties and decay pattern of the nuclide thulium and presents the results of measurements made while testing thulium detectors. (orig.) [de

  16. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    A workshop on ''Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy'' was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference

  17. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  18. Sources of Emittance in RF Photocathode Injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowell, David [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-12-11

    Advances in electron beam technology have been central to creating the current generation of x-ray free electron lasers and ultra-fast electron microscopes. These once exotic devices have become essential tools for basic research and applied science. One important beam technology for both is the electron source which, for many of these instruments, is the photocathode RF gun. The invention of the photocathode gun and the concepts of emittance compensation and beam matching in the presence of space charge and RF forces have made these high-quality beams possible. Achieving even brighter beams requires a taking a finer resolution view of the electron dynamics near the cathode during photoemission and the initial acceleration of the beam. In addition, the high brightness beam is more sensitive to degradation by the optical aberrations of the gun’s RF and magnetic lenses. This paper discusses these topics including the beam properties due to fundamental photoemission physics, space charge effects close to the cathode, and optical distortions introduced by the RF and solenoid fields. Analytic relations for these phenomena are derived and compared with numerical simulations.

  19. Effects of electric and magnetic fields on the electronic properties of zigzag carbon and boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh; Ahmadi, Eghbal

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated the electronic properties of zigzag CNTs and BNNTs under the external transverse electric field and axial magnetic field, using tight binding approximation. It was found that after switching on the electric and magnetic fields, the band modification such as distortion of the degeneracy, change in energy dispersion, subband spacing and band gap size reduction occurs. The band gap of zigzag BNNTs decreases linearly with increasing the electric field strength but the band gap variation for CNTs increases first and later decreases (Metallic) or first hold constant and then decreases (semiconductor). For type (II) CNTs, at a weak magnetic field, by increasing the electric field strength, the band gap remains constant first and then decreases and in a stronger magnetic field the band gap reduction becomes parabolic. For type (III) CNTs, in any magnetic field, the band gap increases slowly until reaches a maximum value and then decreases linearly. Unlike to CNTs, the magnetic field has less effects on the BNNTs band gap variation.

  20. Multinozzle emitter arrays for ultrahigh-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daojing; Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong

    2017-10-17

    The present invention provides for a structure comprising a plurality of emitters, wherein a first nozzle of a first emitter and a second nozzle of a second emitter emit in two directions that are not or essentially not in the same direction; wherein the walls of the nozzles and the emitters form a monolithic whole. The present invention also provides for a structure comprising an emitter with a sharpened end from which the emitter emits; wherein the emitters forms a monolithic whole. The present invention also provides for a fully integrated separation of proteins and small molecules on a silicon chip before the electrospray mass spectrometry analysis.

  1. Bioelectronic Nose Using Odorant Binding Protein-Derived Peptide and Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistor for the Assessment of Salmonella Contamination in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Manki; Kim, Daesan; Kang, Jinkyung; Lim, Jong Hyun; Lee, Seung Hwan; Ko, Hwi Jin; Hong, Seunghun; Park, Tai Hyun

    2016-12-06

    Salmonella infection is the one of the major causes of food borne illnesses including fever, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and nausea. Thus, early detection of Salmonella contamination is important for our healthy life. Conventional detection methods for the food contamination have limitations in sensitivity and rapidity; thus, the early detection has been difficult. Herein, we developed a bioelectronic nose using a carbon nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistor (FET) functionalized with Drosophila odorant binding protein (OBP)-derived peptide for easy and rapid detection of Salmonella contamination in ham. 3-Methyl-1-butanol is known as a specific volatile organic compound, generated from the ham contaminated with Salmonella. We designed and synthesized the peptide based on the sequence of the Drosophila OBP, LUSH, which specifically binds to alcohols. The C-terminus of the synthetic peptide was modified with three phenylalanine residues and directly immobilized onto CNT channels using the π-π interaction. The p-type properties of FET were clearly maintained after the functionalization using the peptide. The biosensor detected 1 fM of 3-methyl-1-butanol with high selectivity and successfully assessed Salmonella contamination in ham. These results indicate that the bioelectronic nose can be used for the rapid detection of Salmonella contamination in food.

  2. Improving band-to-band tunneling in a tunneling carbon nanotube field effect transistor by multi-level development of impurities in the drain region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Ali; Ghodrati, Maryam

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, in order to improve the performance of a tunneling carbon nanotube field effect transistor (T-CNTFET) a new structure is proposed using multi-level impurity distribution along the drain region. The new T-CNTFET structure consists of six parts in the drain with stepwise doping distribution. The impurities on the drain side are n -type and the length of each region is 5nm. Electronic features of the proposed structure are simulated by the solution of Poisson and Schrödinger equations and the self-consistent method using Non-equilibrium Green's Function (NEGF). Simulation results show that the proposed structure reduces the band curvature near the drain-channel connection and widens the tunneling barrier. As a result, band-to-band tunneling and the OFF current are reduced and the ON/OFF current ratio increases in comparison with the conventional structure. In summary, by improving the subthreshold swing parameters, delay time, power delay product ( PDP and cut-off frequency compared to the conventional structure, the proposed structure can be considered as a proper candidate for digital applications with high speed and low power dissipation.

  3. Sensing Properties of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Grown in MW Plasma Torch: Electronic and Electrochemical Behavior, Gas Sensing, Field Emission, IR Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Majzlíková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs with an average diameter below 80 nm and a thickness of the uniform VA-MWCNT layer of about 16 µm were grown in microwave plasma torch and tested for selected functional properties. IR absorption important for a construction of bolometers was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Basic electrochemical characterization was performed by cyclic voltammetry. Comparing the obtained results with the standard or MWCNT‑modified screen-printed electrodes, the prepared VA-MWCNT electrodes indicated their high potential for the construction of electrochemical sensors. Resistive CNT gas sensor revealed a good sensitivity to ammonia taking into account room temperature operation. Field emission detected from CNTs was suitable for the pressure sensing application based on the measurement of emission current in the diode structure with bending diaphragm. The advantages of microwave plasma torch growth of CNTs, i.e., fast processing and versatility of the process, can be therefore fully exploited for the integration of surface-bound grown CNTs into various sensing structures.

  4. 3D assembly of carbon nanotubes for fabrication of field-effect transistors through nanomanipulation and electron-beam-induced deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Ning; Shi, Qing; Wang, Huaping; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio; Nakajima, Masahiro; Yang, Zhan; Sun, Lining

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (3D CNTFETs) possess predictable characteristics that rival those of planar CNTFETs and Si-based MOSFETs. However, due to the lack of a reliable assembly technology, they are rarely reported on, despite the amount of attention they receive. To address this problem, we propose the novel concept of a 3D CNTFET and develop its assembly strategy based on nanomanipulation and the electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) technique inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In particular, the electrodes in our transistor design are three metallic cuboids of the same size, and their front, top and back surfaces are all wrapped up in CNTs. The assembly strategy is employed to build the structure through a repeated basic process of pick-up, placement, fixing and cutting of CNTs. The pick-up and placement is performed through one nanomanipulator with four degrees of freedom. Fixing is carried out through the EBID technique so as to improve the mechanical and electrical characteristics of the CNT/electrodes connection. CNT cutting is undertaken using the typical method of electrical breakdown. Experimental results showed that two CNTs were successfully assembled on the front sides of the cubic electrodes. This validates our assembly method for the 3D CNTFET. Also, when contact resistance was measured, tens of kilohms of resistance was observed at the CNT-EBID deposition-FET electrodes junction.. This manifests the electrical reliability of our assembly strategy. (paper)

  5. Performance and Design Considerations of a Novel Dual-Material Gate Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors: Nonequilibrium Green's Function Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefinia, Zahra; Orouji, Ali A.

    2009-02-01

    The concept of dual-material gate (DMG) is applied to the carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) with doped source and drain extensions, and the features exhibited by the resulting new structure, i.e., the DMG-CNTFET structure, have been examined for the first time by developing a two-dimensional (2D) full quantum simulation. The simulations have been done by the self-consistent solution of 2D Poisson-Schrödinger equations, within the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The results show DMG-CNTFET decreases significantly leakage current and drain conductance and increases on-off current ratio and voltage gain as compared to the single material gate counterparts CNTFET. It is seen that short channel effects in this structure are suppressed because of the perceivable step in the surface potential profile, which screens the drain potential. Moreover, these unique features can be controlled by engineering the workfunction and length of the gate metals. Therefore, this work provides an incentive for further experimental exploration.

  6. Nanometer emittance ultralow charge beams from rf photoinjectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Li

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the generation of a new class of high brightness relativistic electron beams, characterized by ultralow charge (0.1–1 pC and ultralow normalized emittance (<50  nm. These beams are created in rf photoinjectors when the laser is focused on the cathode to very small transverse sizes (<30  μm rms. In this regime, the charge density at the cathode approaches the limit set by the extraction electric field. By shaping the laser pulse to have a cigarlike aspect ratio (the longitudinal dimension much larger than the transverse dimension and a parabolic temporal profile, the resulting space charge dominated dynamics creates a uniformly filled ellipsoidal distribution and the emittance can be nearly preserved to its thermal value. We also present a new method, based on a variation of the pepper-pot technique, for single shot measurements of the ultralow emittances for this new class of beams.

  7. Electro-optical properties of zigzag and armchair boron nitride nanotubes under a transverse electric field: Tight binding calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2012-02-01

    The electro-optical properties of zigzag and armchair BNNTs in a uniform transverse electric field are investigated within tight binding approximation. It is found that the electric field modifies the band structure and splits band degeneracy where these effects reflect in the DOS and JDOS spectra. A decrease in the band gap, as a function of the electric field, is observed. This gap reduction increases with the diameter and it is independent of chirality. An analytic function to estimate the electric field needed for band gap closing is proposed which is in good agreement with DFT results. In additional, we show that the larger diameter tubes are more sensitive than small ones. Number and position of peaks in DOS and JDOS spectra for armchair and zigzag tubes with similar radius are dependent on electric field strength.

  8. Measurements of Thermal Emittance for Cesium Telluride Photocathodes at PITZ

    CERN Document Server

    Miltchev, V; Grabosch, H J; Han, J H; Krasilnikov, M; Oppelt, A; Petrosian, B; Staykov, L; Stephan, F

    2005-01-01

    The thermal emittance determines the lower emittance limit and its measurement is of high importance to understand the ultimate injector performance. In this contribution we present results of thermal emittance measurements under rf operation conditions for various Cs2Te cathodes and different accelerating gradients. Measurements of thermal emittance scaling with the cathode laser spot size are presented and analysed. The significance of the Schottky effect in the emittance formation process is discussed.

  9. A low-emittance lattice for SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safranek, J.; Wiedemann, H.

    1992-01-01

    The design and implementation of a low emittance lattice for the SPEAR storage ring including measurements of the performance of the lattice are presented (J. Safranek, Ph. D. thesis, Stanford University, 1991). The low emittance lattice is designed to optimize the performance of SPEAR as a synchrotron radiation source while keeping SPEAR hardware changes at a minimum. The horizontal emittance of the electron beam in the low emittance lattice is reduced by a factor of 4 from the previous lattice. This reduces the typical horizontal source size and divergence of the photon beams by a factor of 2 each and increases the photon beam brightness. At 3 GeV the horizontal emittance is 129 π nm rad, which makes the low emittance lattice the lowest emittance, runnning synchroton radiation source in the world in the 1.5 to 4.0 GeV energy range for the emittance scaled to 3 GeV. The measured vertical emittance was reduced to half that typically seen at SPEAR in the past. The brightness of the photon beams was further incrased by reducing β y at the insertion devices to 1.1 m and reducing the energy dispersion at the insertion devices by more than a factor of 2 on average. The horizontal despersion at the rf cavities was reduced by a factor of nearly 4 which gives much less problems with synchrobetatron resonances. The dynamic and physical apertures of the lattice are large, giving long beam lifetimes and easy injection of electrons. The measurements of the linear optics and intensity dependent phenomena gave resonable agreement with the design . The overall performance of the machine was very good. Injection rates of 10 to 20 mA/min and larger were achieved routinely, and 100 mA total current was stored. Repeated ramping of stored beam from the injection energy of 2.3 GeV to the running energy of 3.0 GeV was achieved with very little beam loss. This low emittance configuration is expected to be the operating configuration for SPEAR starting in January 1992. (orig.)

  10. Dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotube devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria

    The purpose of this project has been to assemble single-walled carbon nanotubes on electrodes at the tip of a biocompatible cantilever and use these for chemical species sensing in air and liquid, for example in order to measure the local activity from ion channels in the cell membrane....... The electrical resistance of carbon nanotubes has been shown to be extremely sensitive to gas molecules. Dielectrophoresis is a method capable of quickly attracting nanotubes on microelectrodes by using an electric field, thus enabling nanotube integration in microsystems. Dielectrophoresis offers also....... A model for the dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotubes on microelectrodes was developed and several simulations were conducted using values from the available literature for the various key parameters. The model can give qualitative results regarding the parameters dominating the dielectrophoretic...

  11. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, Manfred; Bartsch, Karl; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Graff, Andreas; Täschner, Christine; Fink, Jörg

    2001-11-01

    The catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) is a very promising process with respect to large scale production of different kinds of carbon nanostructures. By modifying the deposition temperature, the catalyst material and the hydrocarbon nanofibers with herringbone structure, multi-walled nanotubes with tubular structure and single-walled nanotubes were deposited. Furthermore, layers of aligned multi-walled nanotubes could be obtained on oxidized silicon substrates coated with thin sputtered metal layers (Co, permalloy) as well as onto WC-Co hardmetals by using the microwave assisted plasma CVD process (MWCVD). The obtained carbon modifications were characterized by scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. The hydrogen storage capability of the nanofibers and nanotubes and the electron field emission of the nanotube layers was investigated.

  12. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  13. Bandstructure modulation for Si-h and Si-g nanotubes in a transverse electric field: Tight binding approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2013-11-01

    We have investigated the electronic properties of SiNTs, under the external electric field, using Tight Binding (TB) approximation. It was found that the energy levels, energy gaps, and density of states (DOS) strongly depend on the electric field strength. The large electric strength leads to coupling the neighbor subbands and induce destruction of subband degeneracy, increase of low-energy states, and strong modulation of energy gap which these effects reflect in the DOS spectrum. It has been shown that, the band gap reduction of Si g-NTs is linearly proportional to the electric field strength. The band gap variation for Si h-NTs increases first and later decreases (Metallic) or first remains constant and then decreases (semiconductor). Also we show that the larger diameter tubes are more sensitive to the field strength than smaller ones. The semiconducting metallic transition or vice versa can be achieved through an increasing of applied fields. Number and position of peaks in DOS spectrum are dependent on electric field strength.

  14. The fabrication of vertically aligned and periodically distributed carbon nanotube bundles and periodically porous carbon nanotube films through a combination of laser interference ablation and metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dajun; Lin, Wei; Guo, Rui; Wong, C P; Das, Suman

    2012-06-01

    Scalable fabrication of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles is essential to future advances in several applications. Here, we report on the development of a simple, two-step method for fabricating vertically aligned and periodically distributed CNT bundles and periodically porous CNT films at the sub-micron scale. The method involves laser interference ablation (LIA) of an iron film followed by CNT growth via iron-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition. CNT bundles with square widths ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 µm in width, and 50-200 µm in length, are grown atop the patterned catalyst over areas spanning 8 cm(2). The CNT bundles exhibit a high degree of control over square width, orientation, uniformity, and periodicity. This simple scalable method of producing well-placed and oriented CNT bundles demonstrates a high application potential for wafer-scale integration of CNT structures into various device applications, including IC interconnects, field emitters, sensors, batteries, and optoelectronics, etc.

  15. The cataphoretic emitter effect exhibited in high intensity discharge lamp electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentel, Juergen

    2018-01-01

    A mono-layer of atoms, electropositive with respect to the substrate atoms, forms a dipole layer, reducing its work function. Such a layer is generated by diffusion of emitter material from the interior of the substrate, by vapour deposition or by deposition of emitter material onto arc electrodes by cataphoresis. This cataphoretic emitter effect is investigated within metal halide lamps with transparent YAG ceramic burners, and within model lamps. Within the YAG lamps, arcs are operated with switched-dc current between rod shaped tungsten electrodes in high pressure Hg vapour seeded with metal iodides. Within the model lamps, dc arcs are operated between rod-shaped tungsten electrodes—one doped—in atmospheric pressure Ar. Electrode temperatures are determined by 1λ -pyrometry, combined with simulation of the electrode heat balance. Plasma temperatures, atom and ion densities of emitter material are determined by emission and absorption spectroscopy. Phase resolved measurements in YAG lamps seeded with CeI3, CsI, DyI3, TmI3 and LaI3 show, within the cathodic half period, a reduction of the electrode temperature and an enhanced metal ion density in front of the electrode, and an opposite behavior after phase reversal. With increasing operating frequency, the state of the cathode overlaps onto the anodic phase—except for Cs, being low in adsorption energy. Generally, the phase averaged electrode tip temperature is reduced by seeding a lamp with emitter material; its height depends on admixtures. Measurements at tungsten electrodes doped with ThO2, La2O3 and Ce2O3 within the model lamp show that evaporated emitter material is redeposited by an emitter ion current onto the electrode surface. It reduces the work function of tungsten cathodes above the evaporation temperature of the emitter material, too; and also of cold anodes, indicating a field reversal in front of them. The formation of an emitter spot at low cathode temperature and high emitter material

  16. Visible and near-infrared radiative properties of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X J; Zhang, Z M; Flicker, J D; Ready, W J; Lee, B J

    2009-01-01

    This work investigates the reflection and scattering from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, fabricated on silicon substrate using thermally enhanced chemical vapor deposition with both tip-growth and base-growth mechanisms. The directional-hemispherical reflectance in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths was measured with an integrating sphere. The polarization-dependent bidirectional reflectance distribution function was characterized with a laser scatterometer at the wavelength of 635 nm. The effective medium theory was used to elucidate the mechanism of high absorptance (greater than 0.97 in the spectral region from 400 to 1800 nm) of the multi-walled carbon nanotube samples. It is observed that scattering by impurities on the top of the nanotubes, by the nanotube tips, and by defects and misalignment can significantly increase the reflectance and introduce retroreflection. This study may facilitate application of carbon nanotubes in pyroelectric detectors as well as thermophotovoltaic emitters and absorbers.

  17. Preparation of carbon nanotubes from vacuum pyrolysis of polycarbosilane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jou, S.; Hsu, C.K.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized by vacuum pyrolysis of two types of polycarbosilane (PCS) with iron nano-particles between 800 and 1100 deg. C. Straight nanotubes were obtained from low molecular weight (990 g/mol) PCS whereas curled nanotubes were derived from medium molecular weight (1290 g/mol) PCS. Diameters of these straight and curled nanotubes were between 5 and 20 nm. The mechansim of condensed phase growth of carbon nanotubes was discussed. Electron emission capability of these carbon nanotubes increased with their pyrolyzing temperature. The electric fields required to emit a current density of 10 -2 A/cm 2 from the straight nanotubes being pyrolyzed at 800, 900, 1000, and 1100 deg. C were 1.17, 0.73, 0.67, and 0.33 V/μm, respectively

  18. Electron emitter pulsed-type cylindrical IEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.H.; Gu, Y.; Stubbers, R.; Zich, R.; Anderl, R.; Hartwell, J.

    1997-01-01

    A cylindrical version of the single grid Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device (termed the C-device) has been developed for use as a 2.5-MeV D-D fusion neutron source for neutron activation analysis. The C-device employs a hollow-tube type cathode with similar anodes backed up by ''reflector'' dishes. The resulting discharge differs from a conventional hollow cathode discharge, by creating an explicit ion beam which is ''pinched'' in the cathode region. Resulting fusion reactions generate ∼10 6 neutron/s. A pulsed version is under development for applications requiring higher fluxes. Several pulsing techniques are under study, including an electron emitter (e-emitter) assisted discharge in a thorated tungsten wire emitter located behind a slotted area in the reflector dishes. Pulsing is initiated after establishing a low power steady-state discharge by pulsing the e-emitter current using a capacitor switch type circuit. The resulting electron jet, coupled with the discharge by the biased slot array, creates a strong pulse in the pinched ion beam. The pulse length/repetition rate are controlled by the e-emitter pulse circuit. Typical parameters in present studies are ∼30micros, 10Hz and 1-amp ion current. Corresponding neutron measurements are an In-foil type activation counter for time averaged rates. Results for a wide variety of operating conditions are presented

  19. Diamond-based single-photon emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharonovich, I; Castelletto, S; Simpson, D A; Su, C-H; Greentree, A D; Prawer, S

    2011-01-01

    The exploitation of emerging quantum technologies requires efficient fabrication of key building blocks. Sources of single photons are extremely important across many applications as they can serve as vectors for quantum information-thereby allowing long-range (perhaps even global-scale) quantum states to be made and manipulated for tasks such as quantum communication or distributed quantum computation. At the single-emitter level, quantum sources also afford new possibilities in terms of nanoscopy and bio-marking. Color centers in diamond are prominent candidates to generate and manipulate quantum states of light, as they are a photostable solid-state source of single photons at room temperature. In this review, we discuss the state of the art of diamond-based single-photon emitters and highlight their fabrication methodologies. We present the experimental techniques used to characterize the quantum emitters and discuss their photophysical properties. We outline a number of applications including quantum key distribution, bio-marking and sub-diffraction imaging, where diamond-based single emitters are playing a crucial role. We conclude with a discussion of the main challenges and perspectives for employing diamond emitters in quantum information processing.

  20. Positioning with stationary emitters in a two-dimensional space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coll, Bartolome; Ferrando, Joan Josep; Morales, Juan Antonio

    2006-01-01

    The basic elements of the relativistic positioning systems in a two-dimensional space-time have been introduced in a previous work [Phys. Rev. D 73, 084017 (2006)] where geodesic positioning systems, constituted by two geodesic emitters, have been considered in a flat space-time. Here, we want to show in what precise senses positioning systems allow to make relativistic gravimetry. For this purpose, we consider stationary positioning systems, constituted by two uniformly accelerated emitters separated by a constant distance, in two different situations: absence of gravitational field (Minkowski plane) and presence of a gravitational mass (Schwarzschild plane). The physical coordinate system constituted by the electromagnetic signals broadcasting the proper time of the emitters are the so called emission coordinates, and we show that, in such emission coordinates, the trajectories of the emitters in both situations, the absence and presence of a gravitational field, are identical. The interesting point is that, in spite of this fact, particular additional information on the system or on the user allows us not only to distinguish both space-times, but also to complete the dynamical description of emitters and user and even to measure the mass of the gravitational field. The precise information under which these dynamical and gravimetric results may be obtained is carefully pointed out

  1. Low emittance thermionic electron guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1989-01-01

    The author discusses self-field effects and external field effects for electron guns. He also discusses designs of electron guns and their uses in electron cooling systems and as an injector for electrostatic free electron lasers. He closes by looking at electron guns for linear accelerators. 20 references, 3 figures

  2. Emittance measurements of high charge state argon beams from a PIG source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bex, L.; Clark, D.J.; Ellsworth, C.E.; Estrella, R.M.; Gough, R.A.; Holley, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    The emittances of beams of Ar 4+ to Ar 8+ were measured in the axial and radial planes. The extraction voltage was 10 kV and the magnetic field was varied from about 0.5 to 0.6 Tesla. The anode slit was varied in its distance from the arc which was run both dc and pulsed. The emittance was found to be nearly independent of charge state but to increase with total beam current. A small bowing of the arc column was discovered, which made evaluation of mirror field effects difficult

  3. Emittance measurements of high charge state argon beams from a pig source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bex, L.; Clark, D.J.; Ellsworth, C.E.; Estrella, R.M.; Gough, R.A.; Holley, W.R.

    1975-10-01

    The emittances of beams of Ar 4+ to Ar 8+ were measured in the axial and radial planes. The extraction voltage was 10 kV and the magnetic field was varied from about 0.5 to 0.6 Tesla. The anode slit was varied in distance from the arc, which was run both dc and pulsed. The emittance was nearly independent of charge state, but increased with total beam current. A small bowing of the arc column, which made evaluation of mirror field effects difficult, was discovered

  4. Non-stochastic effects of different energy beta emitters on pig and mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peel, D.M.; Hopewell, J.W.; Hansen, L.S.; Coggle, J.E.; Charles, M.W.; Wells, J.

    1982-01-01

    In this collaborative study skin areas of various sizes were irradiated with different energy beta emitters. In the post-irradiation period fields were examined for erythema, desquamation, ulceration and dermal necrosis. The aim of the study is to determine the threshold doses for the different biological reactions as a function of the energy of the radiation and the size of skin field irradiated. At St. Bartholomew's Hospital and Oxford the irradiation of mouse and pig skin was carried out using strontium-90 and thulium-170 sources. In addition, mice were irradiated with thallium-204, a slightly lower energy beta emitter than thulium. (author)

  5. BEAM EMITTANCE MEASUREMENT TOOL FOR CEBAF OPERATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevtsov, Pavel; Tiefenback, Michael

    2008-01-01

    A new software tool was created at Jefferson Lab to measure the emittance of the CEBAF electron beams. The tool consists of device control and data analysis applications. The device control application handles the work of wire scanners and writes their measurement results as well as the information about accelerator settings during these measurements into wire scanner data files. The data analysis application reads these files and calculates the beam emittance on the basis of a wire scanner data processing model. Both applications are computer platform independent but are mostly used on LINUX PCs recently installed in the accelerator control room. The new tool significantly simplifies beam emittance measurement procedures for accelerator operations and contributes to a very high availability of the CEBAF machine for the nuclear physics program at Jefferson Lab.

  6. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  7. On/off ratio enhancement in single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistor by controlling network density via sonication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ho-Kyun; Choi, Jun Hee; Kim, Do-Hyun; Kim, Gyu Tae

    2018-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is generally used as a networked structure in the fabrication of a field-effect transistor (FET) since it is known that one-third of SWCNT is electrically metallic and the remains are semiconducting. In this case, the presence of metallic paths by metallic SWCNT (m-SWCNT) becomes a significant technical barrier which hinders the networks from achieving a semiconducting behavior, resulting in a low on/off ratio. Here, we report on an easy method of controlling the on/off ratio of a FET where semiconducting SWCNT (s-SWCNT) and m-SWCNT constitute networks between source and drain electrodes. A FET with SWCNT networks was simply sonicated under water to control the on/off ratio and network density. As a result, the FET having an almost metallic behavior due to the metallic paths by m-SWCNT exhibited a p-type semiconducting behavior. The on/off ratio ranged from 1 to 9.0 × 104 along sonication time. In addition, theoretical calculations based on Monte-Carlo method and circuit simulation were performed to understand and explain the phenomenon of a change in the on/off ratio and network density by sonication. On the basis of experimental and theoretical results, we found that metallic paths contributed to a high off-state current which leads to a low on/off ratio and that sonication formed sparse SWCNT networks where metallic paths of m-SWCNT were removed, resulting in a high on/off ratio. This method can open a chance to save the device which has been considered as a failed one due to a metallic behavior by a high network density leading to a low on/off ratio.

  8. MD2065: Emittance exchange with linear coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Carver, Lee Robert; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Amorim, David; Levens, Tom; Pesah, Arthur Chalom; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    In order to better understand the luminosity imbalance between ATLAS and CMS that was observed in 2016, it was proposed to perform a test whereby the horizontal and vertical emittances are exchanged by crossing the tunes in the presence of linear coupling. The luminosity before and after the exchange could be compared to see if the imbalance stems purely from the uneven emittances or if there is an additional mechanism in play. However, due to limited machine availability only tests at injection were able to performed.

  9. Minimum emittance of three-bend achromats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoyu; Xu Gang

    2012-01-01

    The calculation of the minimum emittance of three-bend achromats (TBAs) made by Mathematical software can ignore the actual magnets lattice in the matching condition of dispersion function in phase space. The minimum scaling factors of two kinds of widely used TBA lattices are obtained. Then the relationship between the lengths and the radii of the three dipoles in TBA is obtained and so is the minimum scaling factor, when the TBA lattice achieves its minimum emittance. The procedure of analysis and the results can be widely used in achromats lattices, because the calculation is not restricted by the actual lattice. (authors)

  10. Quadrupole Transfer Function for Emittance Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Peter; Jansson, Andreas; Tan, Cheng-Yang

    2008-01-01

    Historically the use of the quadrupole moment measurement has been impeded by the requirement for large dynamic range, as well as measurement sensitivity to beam position. We investigate the use of the transfer function technique [1-3] in combination with the sensitivity and 160dB revolution line rejection of the direct diode detection analog front end [4] to open the possibility of an emittance diagnostic that may be implemented without operational complication, quasi- parasitic to the operation of existing tune measurement systems. Such a diagnostic would be particularly useful as an emittance monitor during acceleration ramp development in machines like RHIC and the LHC.

  11. Rayleigh scattering in an emitter-nanofiber-coupling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shui-Jing; Gao, Fei; Xu, Da; Li, Yan; Gong, Qihuang; Xiao, Yun-Feng

    2017-04-01

    Scattering is a general process in both fundamental and applied physics. In this paper, we investigate Rayleigh scattering of a solid-state-emitter coupled to a nanofiber, by S -matrix-like theory in k -space description. Under this model, both Rayleigh scattering and dipole interaction are studied between a two-level artificial atom embedded in a nanocrystal and fiber modes (guided and radiation modes). It is found that Rayleigh scattering plays a critical role in the transport properties and quantum statistics of photons. On the one hand, Rayleigh scattering produces the transparency in the optical transmitted field of the nanofiber, accompanied by the change of atomic phase, population, and frequency shift. On the other hand, the interference between two kinds of scattering fields by Rayleigh scattering and dipole transition modifies the photon statistics (second-order autocorrelation function) of output fields, showing a strong wavelength dependence. This study provides guidance for the solid-state emitter acting as a single-photon source and can be extended to explore the scattering effect in many-body physics.

  12. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlehahn, A; Krüger, L; Gschrey, M; Schulze, J-H; Rodt, S; Strittmatter, A; Heindel, T; Reitzenstein, S

    2015-01-01

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g((2))(0) Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g((2))(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  13. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlehahn, A.; Krüger, L.; Gschrey, M.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T., E-mail: tobias.heindel@tu-berlin.de; Reitzenstein, S. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universität Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g{sup (2)}(0) < 0.04 from this Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g{sup (2)}(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  14. Density functional theory for field emission from carbon nano-structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhibing

    2015-12-01

    Electron field emission is understood as a quantum mechanical many-body problem in which an electronic quasi-particle of the emitter is converted into an electron in vacuum. Fundamental concepts of field emission, such as the field enhancement factor, work-function, edge barrier and emission current density, will be investigated, using carbon nanotubes and graphene as examples. A multi-scale algorithm basing on density functional theory is introduced. We will argue that such a first principle approach is necessary and appropriate for field emission of nano-structures, not only for a more accurate quantitative description, but, more importantly, for deeper insight into field emission. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Carbon Nanotubes as Optical Sensors in Biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrera, Consol; Torres Andón, Fernando; Feliu, Neus

    2017-11-28

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have become potential candidates for a wide range of medical applications including sensing, imaging, and drug delivery. Their photophysical properties (i.e., the capacity to emit in the near-infrared), excellent photostability, and fluorescence, which is highly sensitive to the local environment, make SWCNTs promising optical probes in biomedicine. In this Perspective, we discuss the existing strategies for and challenges of using carbon nanotubes for medical diagnosis based on intracellular sensing as well as discuss also their biocompatibility and degradability. Finally, we highlight the potential improvements of this nanotechnology and future directions in the field of carbon nanotubes for biomedical applications.

  16. Nonlinear electrostatic emittance compensation in kA, fs electron bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, S.B. van der; Loos, M.J. de; Botman, J.I.M.; Luiten, O.J.; Wiel, M.J. van der

    2002-01-01

    Nonlinear space-charge effects play an important role in emittance growth in the production of kA electron bunches with a bunch length much smaller than the bunch diameter. We propose a scheme employing the radial third-order component of an electrostatic acceleration field, to fully compensate the nonlinear space-charge effects. This results in minimal transverse root-mean-square emittance. The principle is demonstrated using our design simulations of a device for the production of high-quality, high-current, subpicosecond electron bunches using electrostatic acceleration in a 1 GV/m field. Simulations using the GPT code produce a bunch of 100 pC and 73 fs full width at half maximum pulse width, resulting in a peak current of about 1.2 kA at an energy of 2 MeV. The compensation scheme reduces the root-mean-square emittance by 34% to 0.4π mm mrad

  17. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau, P Umek, K Hernadi, P Marcoux, B Lukic, Cs Mikó, M Milas, R Gaál and L Forró Transitional behaviour in the transformation from active end

  18. Growth of nanotubes and chemical sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hone, James; Kim, Philip; Huang, X. M. H.; Chandra, B.; Caldwell, R.; Small, J.; Hong, B. H.; Someya, T.; Huang, L.; O'Brien, S.; Nuckolls, Colin P.

    2004-12-01

    We have used a number of methods to grow long aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. Geometries include individual long tubes, dense parallel arrays, and long freely suspended nanotubes. We have fabricated a variety of devices for applications such as multiprobe resistance measurement and high-current field effect transistors. In addition, we have measured conductance of single-walled semiconducting carbon nanotubes in field-effect transistor geometry and investigated the device response to water and alcoholic vapors. We observe significant changes in FET drain current when the device is exposed to various kinds of different solvent. These responses are reversible and reproducible over many cycles of vapor exposure. Our experiments demonstrate that carbon nanotube FETs are sensitive to a wide range of solvent vapors at concentrations in the ppm range.

  19. Batch fabrication of nanotubes suspended between microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Stöckli, T.; Knapp, H. F.

    2007-01-01

    be done with a simple lift-off process with standard photolithographic resist. An applied electric field is sustained between the microelectrodes during CVD to guide the nanotube growth. Comparison with simulations shows that the location and the orientation of the grown carbon nanotubes (CNT) correspond...... to the regions of maximum electric field, enabling accurate positioning of a nanotube by controlling the shape of the microelectrodes. The CNT bridges are deflected tens of nm when a DC voltage is applied between the nanotube and a gate microelectrode indicating that the clamping through the catalyst particles...... is not only mechanically stable but also electrical conducting. This method could be used to fabricate nanoelectromechanical systems based on suspended double clamped CNTs depending only on photolithography and standard Cleanroom processes....

  20. A low emittance configuration for spear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumberg, L.N.; Cerino, J.; Harris, J.; Hettel, R.; Hofmann, A.; Liu, R.Z.; Stego, R.; Wiedemann, H.; Winick, H.

    1985-01-01

    The quality of synchrotron radiation beams from SPEAR, in particular the brilliance of undulator radiation, can be improved significantly by reducing the emittance of the stored electron beam. A reduction of the horizontal emittance by a factor of 3.5 to a value of 130 nanometer-radians (nm-r) at 3 GeV has been achieved by using stronger focussing, mainly in the horizontal plane. The low emittance configuration also reduces the dispersion and vertical beta functions in the straight sections, making them more suitable for wigglers. The higher betatron tunes lead to a larger phase advance between the two kickers, which has to be corrected during injection by shunting current from some quadrupoles. The configuration was optimized within SPEAR hardware limitations and tested for dynamic aperture with the tracking program PATRICIA. After implementation of this scheme, beam was successfully injected and accumulated. The measured emittance of the stored beam was in agreement with calculations. Presently the configuration is being made operational