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Sample records for nanotube cnt features

  1. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube (CNT Composite Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Losic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes are attractive approach for designing of new membranes for advanced molecular separation because of their unique transport properties and ability to mimic biological protein channels. In this work the synthetic approach for fabrication of carbon nanotubes (CNTs composite membranes is presented. The method is based on growth of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT using chemical vapour deposition (CVD on the template of nanoporous alumina (PA membranes. The influence of experimental conditions including carbon precursor, temperature, deposition time, and PA template on CNT growth process and quality of fabricated membranes was investigated. The synthesis of CNT/PA composites with controllable nanotube dimensions such as diameters (30–150 nm, and thickness (5–100 µm, was demonstrated. The chemical composition and morphological characteristics of fabricated CNT/PA composite membranes were investigated by various characterisation techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM and x-ray diffraction (XRD. Transport properties of prepared membranes were explored by diffusion of dye (Rose Bengal used as model of hydrophilic transport molecule.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Composite Ampacity and Metallic CNT Buckypaper Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groh, Henry C., III

    2016-01-01

    NASA is currently working on developing motors for hybrid electric propulsion applications in aviation. To make electric power more feasible in airplanes higher power to weight ratios are sought for electric motors. One facet to these efforts is to improve (increase) the conductivity and (lower) density of the magnet wire used in motors. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and composites containing CNT are being explored as a possible way to increase wire conductivity and lower density. Presented here are measurements of the current carrying capacity (ampacity) of a composite made from CNT and copper. The ability of CNT to improve the conductivity of such composites is hindered by the presence of semiconductive CNT (s-CNT) that exist in CNT supplies naturally, and currently, unavoidably. To solve this problem, and avoid s-CNT, various preferential growth and sorting methods are being explored. A supply of sorted 95 metallic CNT (m-CNT) was acquired in the form of thick film Buckypaper (BP) as part of this work and characterized using Raman spectroscopy, resistivity, and density measurements. The ampacity (Acm2) of the Cu-5volCNT composite was 3.8 lower than the same gauge pure Cu wire similarly tested. The lower ampacity in the composite wire is believed to be due to the presence of s-CNT in the composite and the relatively low (proper) level of longitudinal cooling employed in the test method. Although Raman spectroscopy can be used to characterize CNT, a strong relation between the ratios of the primary peaks GGand the relative amounts of m-CNT and s-CNT was not observed. The average effective conductivity of the CNT in the sorted, 95 m-CNT BP was 2.5 times higher than the CNT in the similar but un-sorted BP. This is an indication that improvements in the conductivity of CNT composites can be made by the use of sorted, highly conductive m-CNT.

  3. Effect of iron catalyst thickness on vertically aligned carbon nanotube forest straightness for CNT-MEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulton, Kellen; Jensen, Brian D; Morrill, Nicholas B; Konneker, Adam M; Vanfleet, Richard R; Allred, David D; Davis, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of iron catalyst thickness on the straightness of growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for microelectromechanical systems fabricated using the CNT-templated-microfabrication (CNT-M) process. SEM images of samples grown using various iron catalyst thicknesses show that both straight sidewalls and good edge definition are achieved using an iron thickness between 7 and 8 nm. Below this thickness, individual CNTs are well aligned, but the sidewalls of CNT forests formed into posts and long walls are not always straight. Above this thickness, the CNT forest sidewalls are relatively straight, but edge definition is poor, with significantly increased sidewall roughness. The proximity of a device or feature to other regions of iron catalyst also affects CNT growth. By using an iron catalyst thickness appropriate for straight growth, and by adding borders of iron around features or devices, a designer can greatly improve straightness of growth for CNT-MEMS. (paper)

  4. Carbon Nano-Tube (CNT) Reinforced COPV

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reduce the structural mass of future aerospace vehicles through the development of ultra lightweight materials and structures through the use of: Carbon nanotube...

  5. Carbon nanotube (CNT)–epoxy nanocomposites: a systematic investigation of CNT dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Amit K.; Plyhm, Tiia; Barbezat, Michel; Necola, Adly; Terrasi, Giovanni P.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), 1–6 nm in diameter and a few microns in length, in a bisphenol F-based epoxy resin has been presented. Several dispersing techniques including high-speed dissolver, ultrasonic bath/horn, 3-roll mill, etc. have been employed. Optical microscopy has been extensively used to systematically characterise the state of CNT dispersion in the epoxy resin during the entire processing cycle from mixing CNT with resin to adding and curing with hardener. Complimentary viscosity measurements were also performed at various stages of nanocomposite processing. A method to produce a good CNT dispersion in resin was established, but the state of CNT dispersion was found to be extremely sensitive to its physical and chemical environments. The cured nanocomposites were further tested for their thermo-mechanical properties by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA), and for flexural and compressive mechanical properties. The measured properties of various nanocomposite plates were then discussed in view of the corresponding CNT dispersion.

  6. Hydration Phenomena of Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes (CNT/Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuvaneshwari Balasubramaniam

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The exciting features of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, such as high elastic modulus, high thermal and electrical conductivities, robustness, and nanoscopic surface properties make them attractive candidates for the cement industry. They have the potential to significantly enhanceengineering properties. CNTs play an important and critical role as nano-anchors in concrete, which enhance the strength by bridging pores in the composite matrix, thereby ensuring robust mechanical strength. The diameter, dispersion, aspect ratio, and interfacial surface interaction of CNTs affect the physical and mechanical properties of concrete, if due care is not taken. In this paper, the usable amount of CNT is scaled down considerably from 0.5% to 0.025% by weight of the cement and the fluctuation caused by these phenomena is assessed. It is observed that the properties and exact quantities of incorporated CNTs influence the hydration and consistency of the composites. In order to address these issues, the surface functionalization of CNTs and rheological studies of the composites are performed. The hydration products and functional groups are carefully optimized and characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and a Zeta potential analyzer. For Mixes 6 and 7, the compressive and tensile strength of CNTs incorporated in mortar specimens caused77% and 48% increases in split tensile strength, respectively, and 17% and 35% increases in compressive strength, respectively, after 28 days of curing and compared withthe control Mix.

  7. Influence of carbon nanotube (CNT) on the mechanical properties of LLDPE/CNT nanocomposite fibers

    KAUST Repository

    Mezghani, Khaled; Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad; Furquan, Sarfaraz; Ali, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    The present study shows the effect of adding CNT to linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) to produce LLDPE/CNT nanocomposite fibers. The LLDPE/CNT fibers were produced by melt extrusion process using a twin-screw extruder, in a controlled temperature from 160 °C to 275 °C. Further, melt extrusion process was followed by drawing of fibers at the room temperature. Three different weight percentages, 0.08, 0.3 and 1 wt.% of CNT were studied for producing nanocomposite fibers. The addition of 1 wt.% CNT in the LLDPE fiber has increased the tensile strength by 38% (350 MPa). The addition of 0.08 and 0.3 wt.% CNT in the fiber matrix has improved the ductility by 87% and 122%, respectively. Similarly, improvement in the toughness was observed by 63% and 105% for LLDPE fibers with 0.08 wt.% and 0.3 wt.% CNT respectively. The increase in the mechanical properties of the composite fibers was attributed to the alignment and distribution of CNT in the LLDPE matrix. The dispersion of CNT in the polymeric matrix has been revealed by SEM. The study shows that the small addition of CNT when properly mixed and aligned will increase the mechanical properties of pristine polymer fibers. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of carbon nanotube (CNT) on the mechanical properties of LLDPE/CNT nanocomposite fibers

    KAUST Repository

    Mezghani, Khaled

    2011-12-01

    The present study shows the effect of adding CNT to linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) to produce LLDPE/CNT nanocomposite fibers. The LLDPE/CNT fibers were produced by melt extrusion process using a twin-screw extruder, in a controlled temperature from 160 °C to 275 °C. Further, melt extrusion process was followed by drawing of fibers at the room temperature. Three different weight percentages, 0.08, 0.3 and 1 wt.% of CNT were studied for producing nanocomposite fibers. The addition of 1 wt.% CNT in the LLDPE fiber has increased the tensile strength by 38% (350 MPa). The addition of 0.08 and 0.3 wt.% CNT in the fiber matrix has improved the ductility by 87% and 122%, respectively. Similarly, improvement in the toughness was observed by 63% and 105% for LLDPE fibers with 0.08 wt.% and 0.3 wt.% CNT respectively. The increase in the mechanical properties of the composite fibers was attributed to the alignment and distribution of CNT in the LLDPE matrix. The dispersion of CNT in the polymeric matrix has been revealed by SEM. The study shows that the small addition of CNT when properly mixed and aligned will increase the mechanical properties of pristine polymer fibers. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Carbon nanotubes rooted montmorillonite (CNT-MM) reinforced nanocomposite membrane for PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manikandan, Dhanagopal, E-mail: dmani_cat@yahoo.co.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan, E-mail: mangal@udec.cl [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Avila, Ricardo E. [Personal Dosimetry Section, Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, Cas. 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Siddheswaran, Rajendran [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Ananthakumar, Solaiappan [Materials and Minerals Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Trivandrum, Kerala (India)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel montmorillonite-CNT (MM-CNT) nanohybrid materials were produced by CVD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly selective crystalline carbon nanotubes were grown over montmorillonite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fabricated Nafion-MM-CNT nanocomposite membrane by solution casting method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homogeneous dispersion of MM-CNT in the Nafion matrix was achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined effect of montmorillonite and CNT improves the thermal stability of Nafion. - Abstract: Nafion based nanocomposite membranes containing montmorillonite-carbon nanotubes (a binary hybrid material) were produced to develop high performance polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Multi walled carbon nanotubes were grown over 20 and 25 wt% iron loaded montmorillonite catalysts by CVD using acetylene as the carbon precursor. Growth experiments were carried out at optimised conditions to obtain highly selective crystalline carbon nanotubes. X-ray diffraction spectra of the catalysts were recorded for the structural characterisation and definition of particle size. The carbon nanotubes obtained were examined by various physico chemical characterisation studies such as SEM, TEM, Raman spectroscopy and TG analyses to understand the morphology and crystallinity of the CNTs. The MM-CNT hybrid material with I{sub D}/I{sub G} ratio of Raman spectral band as 0.53 represents the high selectivity towards CNTs. Thus the hybrid material produced was considered as the best nanofiller to develop polymer nanocomposites. Nafion based nanocomposite membranes were prepared by adding MM-CNT as nanofiller by solution casting method. A better dispersion of MM-CNT into the Nafion matrix was observed and the addition of the MM-CNT improved the thermal stability of the Nafion membrane.

  10. Carbon nanotubes rooted montmorillonite (CNT-MM) reinforced nanocomposite membrane for PEM fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manikandan, Dhanagopal; Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan; Avila, Ricardo E.; Siddheswaran, Rajendran; Ananthakumar, Solaiappan

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Novel montmorillonite-CNT (MM-CNT) nanohybrid materials were produced by CVD. ► Highly selective crystalline carbon nanotubes were grown over montmorillonite. ► Fabricated Nafion-MM-CNT nanocomposite membrane by solution casting method. ► Homogeneous dispersion of MM-CNT in the Nafion matrix was achieved. ► Combined effect of montmorillonite and CNT improves the thermal stability of Nafion. - Abstract: Nafion based nanocomposite membranes containing montmorillonite-carbon nanotubes (a binary hybrid material) were produced to develop high performance polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Multi walled carbon nanotubes were grown over 20 and 25 wt% iron loaded montmorillonite catalysts by CVD using acetylene as the carbon precursor. Growth experiments were carried out at optimised conditions to obtain highly selective crystalline carbon nanotubes. X-ray diffraction spectra of the catalysts were recorded for the structural characterisation and definition of particle size. The carbon nanotubes obtained were examined by various physico chemical characterisation studies such as SEM, TEM, Raman spectroscopy and TG analyses to understand the morphology and crystallinity of the CNTs. The MM-CNT hybrid material with I D /I G ratio of Raman spectral band as 0.53 represents the high selectivity towards CNTs. Thus the hybrid material produced was considered as the best nanofiller to develop polymer nanocomposites. Nafion based nanocomposite membranes were prepared by adding MM-CNT as nanofiller by solution casting method. A better dispersion of MM-CNT into the Nafion matrix was observed and the addition of the MM-CNT improved the thermal stability of the Nafion membrane.

  11. Carbon fiber/carbon nanotube reinforced hierarchical composites: Effect of CNT distribution on shearing strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, H. W.; Mishnaevsky, Leon; Yi, H. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The strength and fracture behavior of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites with carbon nanotube (CNT) secondary reinforcement are investigated experimentally and numerically. Short Beam Shearing tests have been carried out, with SEM observations of the damage evolution in the composites. 3D...... CNT nanoreinforcement into the matrix and/or the sizing of carbon fiber/reinforced composites ensures strong increase of the composite strength. The effect of secondary CNTs reinforcement is strongest when some small addition of CNTs in the polymer matrix is complemented by the fiber sizing with high...... multiscale computational (FE) models of the carbon/polymer composite with varied CNT distributions have been developed and employed to study the effect of the secondary CNT reinforcement, its distribution and content on the strength and fracture behavior of the composites. It is shown that adding secondary...

  12. A practical dimensionless equation for the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes and CNT arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Chen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results reported in the last decade on the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs have shown a fairly divergent behavior. An underlying intrinsic consistency was believed to exist in spite of the divergence in the thermal conductivity data of various CNTs. A dimenisonless equation that describes the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity was derived by introducing reduced forms relative to a chosen reference point. This equation can serve as a practical approximation to characterize the conductivity of individual CNT with different structural parameters as well as bulk CNT arrays with different bundle configurations. Comparison of predictions by the equation and historical measurements showed good agreements within their uncertainties.

  13. Self-Assembled CNT-Polymer Hybrids in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Dispersed Aqueous Triblock Copolymer Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, D.; Manjunatha, A. S.; Poojitha, C. G.

    2018-04-01

    We have carried out scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), electrical conductivity, and 1H NMR studies as a function of temperature on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) dispersed aqueous triblock copolymer (P123) solutions. The single-walled carbon nanotubes in this system aggregate to form bundles, and the bundles aggregate to form net-like structures. Depending on the temperature and phases of the polymer, this system exhibits three different self-assembled CNT-polymer hybrids. We find CNT-unimer hybrid at low temperatures, CNT-micelle hybrid at intermediate temperatures wherein the polymer micelles are adsorbed in the pores of the CNT nets, and another type of CNT-micelle hybrid at high temperatures wherein the polymer micelles are adsorbed on the surface of the CNT bundles. Our DSC thermogram showed two peaks related to these structural changes in the CNT-polymer hybrids. Temperature dependence of the 1H NMR chemical shifts of the molecular groups of the polymer and the AC electrical conductivity of the composite also showed discontinuous changes at the temperatures at which the CNT-polymer hybrid's structural changes are seen. Interestingly, for a higher CNT concentration (0.5 wt.%) in the system, the aggregated polymer micelles adsorbed on the CNTs exhibit cone-like and cube-like morphologies at the intermediate and at high temperatures respectively.

  14. Performance of Carbon Nanotube/Polysulfone (CNT/Psf Composite Membranes during Oil–Water Mixture Separation: Effect of CNT Dispersion Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Olawale Daramola

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Effect of the dispersion method employed during the synthesis of carbon nanotube (CNT/polysulfone-infused composite membranes on the quality and separation performance of the membranes during oil–water mixture separation is demonstrated. Carbon nanotube/polysulfone composite membranes containing 5% CNT and pure polysulfone membrane (with 0% CNT were synthesized using phase inversion. Three CNT dispersion methods referred to as Method 1 (M1, Method 2 (M2, and Method 3 (M3 were used to disperse the CNTs. Morphology and surface property of the synthesized membranes were checked with scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, respectively. Separation performance of the membranes was evaluated by applying the membrane to the separation of oil–water emulsion using a cross-flow filtration setup. The functional groups obtained from the FTIR spectra for the membranes and the CNTs included carboxylic acid groups (O–H and carbonyl group (C=O which are responsible for the hydrophilic properties of the membranes. The contact angles for the membranes obtained from Method 1, Method 2, and Method 3 were 76.6° ± 5.0°, 77.9° ± 1.3°, and 77.3° ± 4.5°, respectively, and 88.1° ± 2.1° was obtained for the pure polysulfone membrane. The oil rejection (OR for the synthesized composite membranes from Method 1, Method 2, and Method 3 were 48.71%, 65.86%, and 99.88%, respectively, indicating that Method 3 resulted in membrane of the best quality and separation performance.

  15. The role of linked phospholipids in the rubber-filler interaction in carbon nanotube (CNT) filler natural rubber (NR) composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le, H.H.; Abhijeet, S.; Ilish, S.; Klehm, J.; Henning, S.; Beiner, M.; Sarkawi, S.S.; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Das, A.; Fischer, D.; Stöckelhuber, K.-W.; Wiessner, S.; Khatiwada, S.P.; Adhikari, R.; Pham, T.; Heinrich, G.; Radusch, H.-J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to evidence the role of the linked phospholipids of natural rubber (NR) in the rubber-carbon nanotube (CNT) interactions in rubber composites. Three rubbers namely NR, deproteinized NR (DPNR) and a synthetic rubber isoprene (IR) were used as matrix for CNTs. The

  16. Dispersant affects the cellular influences of single-wall carbon nanotube: the role of CNT as carrier of dispersants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Masanori; Stowe, Mayumi; Tabei, Miki; Kato, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Ayako; Endoh, Shigehisa; Morimoto, Yasuo; Fujita, Katsuhide

    2013-06-01

    The application of carbon nanotube (CNT) as a functional material to engineering and life sciences is advanced. In order to evaluate the cytotoxicity of CNT in vitro, some chemical and biological reagents are used for dispersants. In the present study, the cellular influences of six kinds of chemical or biological reagents used as dispersants were examined. Pluronic F-127, Pluronic F-68, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), pulmonary surfactant preparation Surfacten®, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and Tween 80 were used in the preparation of CNT-medium dispersants. The influences of each reagent on cell viability in human lung carcinoma A549 cells were small. However, Pluronic F-127, DPPC, Surfacten® and Tween 80 induced an increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. Next, CNT-medium dispersions were prepared, using each reagent as a dispersant and applied to A549 cells. The cellular influences depended on the kind of dispersant. Cells exposed to CNT dispersion including Pluronic® F-127, Surfacten®, DPPC and Tween 80 showed LDH release to the culture supernatant. Induction of intracellular ROS level was observed in cells exposed to CNT dispersion including each reagent except BSA. These results suggest that the adsorbed dispersant reagents on the surface of the CNT affect its cellular influences, particularly the induction of oxidative stress.

  17. Special features of electron sources with CNT field emitter and micro grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, Wolfram; Schleussner, Detlef

    2005-01-01

    A micro-sized electron source plays an important role for new vacuum triode applications. For these applications, an electron source with CNT field emitter and micro grid for 1 mA was developed and investigated. The miniaturisation of the electron source was achieved by the use of a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitter and a micro grid, with a distance of only a few micrometers. Because of the threshold field strength for field emission of CNTs being in the range 1-5 V/μm, the grid voltage can be lower than 100 V. In our contribution, we discuss the influence of the micro grid on electron source properties, especially anode-current hysteresis, anode-field penetration through the micro grid and micro-lensing effect

  18. Polymer/Carbon Nanotubes (CNT Nanocomposites Processing Using Additive Manufacturing (Three-Dimensional Printing Technique: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushanta Ghoshal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing (AM/3D printing (3DP is a revolutionary technology which has been around for more than two decades, although the potential of this technique was not fully explored until recently. Because of the expansion of this technology in recent years, new materials and additives are being searched for to meet the growing demand. 3DP allows accurate fabrication of complicated models, however, structural anisotropy caused by the 3DP approaches could limit robust application. A possible solution to the inferior properties of the 3DP based materials compared to that of conventionally manufactured counterparts could be the incorporation of nanoparticles, such as carbon nanotubes (CNT which have demonstrated remarkable mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. In this article we review some of the research, products, and challenges involved in 3DP technology. The importance of CNT dispersion in the matrix polymer is highlighted and the future outlook for the 3D printed polymer/CNT nanocomposites is presented.

  19. Strain monitoring of cement-based materials with embedded polyvinyl alcohol - carbon nanotube (PVA-CNT fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoi S. Metaxa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the possibility of exploiting innovative polyvinyl alcohol fibers reinforced with carbon nanotubes (PVA-CNT fiber as a strain sensor in cement mortars used in the restoration of Cultural Heritage Monuments. Two types of PVA-CNT fibers were embedded in the matrix at a short distance from the bottom of the beam and their readings were correlated with traditional sensors, e.g. strain gauges and Fiber Optic Bragg Gratings. The Electrical Resistance Change (ERC of the embedded PVA-CNT fiber was in-situ monitored during four-point bending mechanical tests. For the case of coated PVA-CNT fiber, a linear correlation of the applied strain at the bottom surface of the specimen along with ERC values of the fiber was noticed for the low strain regime. For the case of incremental increasing loading – unloading loops, the coated and annealed PVA-CNT fiber gave the best results either as embedded or as ‘surface attached’ sensor that exhibited linear correlation of ERC with applied strain for the low applied strain regime as well as hysteresis loops during unloading. The article discusses their high potential to be exploited as strain/damage sensor in applications of civil engineering as well as in restoration of Monuments of Cultural Heritage.

  20. Why nano-oxidation with carbon nanotube probes is so stable: II. Bending behaviour of CNT probes during nano-oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramochi, H; Tokizaki, T; Ando, K; Yokoyama, H; Dagata, J A

    2007-01-01

    Part I demonstrated that nano-oxidation in the dynamic-force mode was enhanced by the use of conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) probes. Fabrication of oxide nanostructures using CNT probes benefited not only from the smaller tip apex compared to conventional probes but from improved operational stability over a wide range of exposure conditions primarily due to the hydrophobic nature of the CNT. Here we investigate the bending response of CNT probes to electrostatic and meniscus forces during nano-oxidation. We conclude that bending of the CNT introduces an additional cushion in the combined cantilever-probe deflection system, thus improving overall stability of the tip-sample junction during nano-oxidation

  1. Influence of the nanotube oxidation on the rheological and electrical properties of CNT/HDPE composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella, E-mail: mrnobile@unisa.it; Somma, Elvira; Valentino, Olga; Neitzert, Heinz-Christoph [Department of Industrial Engineering – DIIn - Università di Salerno Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132 - 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Simon, George [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2016-05-18

    Rheological and electrical properties of nanocomposites based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and high density polyethylene (HDPE), prepared by melt mixing in a micro-twin screw extruder, have been investigated. The effect of MWNT concentration (0.5 and 2.5 wt %) and nanotube surface treatment (oxidative treatment in a tubular furnace at 500°C for 1 hr in a 95% nitrogen, 5% oxygen atmosphere) has been analyzed. It has been found that the sample conductivity with oxidation of the nanotubes decreases more than 2 orders of magnitude. Scanning electron microscopy showed good adhesion and dispersion of nanotubes in the matrix, independently of the surface treatment. Electrical and rheological measurements revealed that the oxidative treatment, causing some reduction of the MWNT quality, decreases the efficiency of the nanotube matrix interaction.

  2. Sodium vanadium (III) fluorophosphate/carbon nanotubes composite (NVPF/CNT) prepared by spray-drying: good electrochemical performance thanks to well-dispersed CNT network within NVPF particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshraghi, Nicolas; Caes, Sebastien; Mahmoud, Abdelfattah; Cloots, Rudi; Vertruyen, Benedicte; Boschini, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Sodium vanadium fluorophosphate Na 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 2 F 3 was prepared by spray-drying. • Crystallization was optimum after 2 hours at 600 °C in argon. • Addition of carbon nanotubes to the spray drying solution to prepare a composite. • The CNT network inside the Na 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 2 F 3 particles provides electronic conductivity. • The composite shows good specific capacity, rate capability and cycling stability. - Abstract: We successfully prepared NASICON-type Na 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 2 F 3 (NVPF) and a Na 3 V 2 (PO 4 ) 2 F 3 /carbon nanotubes (CNT) composite by spray-drying followed by heat treatment in argon for 2 hours at 600 °C. The addition of CNT in the spray-drying solution creates a CNT network within the NVPF particles. After grinding, the smaller NVPF particles remain linked by CNT. Thanks to this conducting network, the composite powder displays competitive electrochemical performance when cycled against lithium in hybrid-ion batteries (2–4.6 V vs. Li + /Li) with specific capacities of 125 mAh g −1 at C/10, 103 mAh g −1 at 1C and 91 mAh g −1 at 4C, together with 97.5% capacity retention at 1C over 100 cycles with coulombic efficiency of 99.4%. These results demonstrate that sodium vanadium (III) fluorophosphate electrode material can be obtained in a time-efficient way using the easily up-scalable spray-drying method.

  3. On the junction physics of Schottky contact of (10, 10) MX{sub 2} (MoS{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}) nanotube and (10, 10) carbon nanotube (CNT): an atomistic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Amretashis [Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg (HWK), Delmenhorst (Germany); Universitaet Bremen, Bremen Center for Computational Materials Science (BCCMS), Bremen (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Armchair nanotubes of MoS{sub 2} and WS{sub 2} offer a sizeable band gap, with the advantage of a one dimensional (1D) electronic material, but free from edge roughness and thermodynamic instability of nanoribbons. Use of such semiconducting MX{sub 2} (MoS{sub 2}, WS{sub 2}) armchair nanotubes (NTs) in conjunction with metallic carbon nanotubes (CNT) can be useful for nanoelectronics and photonics applications. In this work, atomistic simulations of MoS{sub 2} NT-CNT and WS{sub 2} NT-CNT junctions are carried out to study the physics of such junctions. With density functional theory (DFT) we study the carrier density distribution, effective potential, electron difference density, electron localization function, electrostatic difference potential and projected local density of states of such MX{sub 2} NT-CNT 1D junctions. Thereafter the conductance of such a junction under moderate bias is studied with non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. From the forward bias characteristics simulated from NEGF, we extract diode parameters of the junction. The electrostatic simulations from DFT show the formation of an inhomogeneous Schottky barrier with a tendency towards charge transfer from metal and chalcogen atoms towards the C atoms. For low bias conditions, the ideality factor was calculated to be 1.1322 for MoS{sub 2} NT-CNT junction and 1.2526 for the WS{sub 2} NT-CNT junction. The Schottky barrier heights displayed significant bias dependent modulation and are calculated to be in the range 0.697-0.664 eV for MoS{sub 2} NT-CNT and 0.669-0.610 eV for the WS{sub 2} NT-CNT, respectively. (orig.)

  4. Postbuckling of magneto-electro-elastic CNT-MT composite nanotubes resting on a nonlinear elastic medium in a non-uniform thermal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, M.; Shamsi, M.; Saidi, A. R.

    2018-03-01

    As a first endeavor, the effect of nonlinear elastic foundation on the postbuckling behavior of smart magneto-electro-elastic (MEE) composite nanotubes is investigated. The composite nanotube is affected by a non-uniform thermal environment. A typical MEE composite nanotube consists of microtubules (MTs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a MEE cylindrical nanoshell for smart control. It is assumed that the nanoscale layers of the system are coupled by a polymer matrix or filament network depending on the application. In addition to thermal loads, magneto-electro-mechanical loads are applied to the composite nanostructure. Length scale effects are taken into account using the nonlocal elasticity theory. The principle of virtual work and von Karman's relations are used to derive the nonlinear governing differential equations of MEE CNT-MT nanotubes. Using Galerkin's method, nonlinear critical buckling loads are determined. Various types of non-uniform temperature distribution in the radial direction are considered. Finally, the effects of various parameters such as the nonlinear constant of elastic medium, thermal loading factor and small scale coefficient on the postbuckling of MEE CNT-MT nanotubes are studied.

  5. Advanced oxidation (H2O2 and/or UV) of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNT-OH and CNT-COOH) and its influence on the stabilization of CNTs in water and tannic acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czech, Bożena; Oleszczuk, Patryk; Wiącek, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    The properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized with –OH and –COOH groups during simulated water treatment with H 2 O 2 and/or UV were tested. There following properties of CNTs were investigated: specific surface area, elemental composition (CHN), dynamic light scattering, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and changes in the CNTs structure were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Treatment of CNTs with H 2 O 2 and/or UV affected their properties. This effect, however, was different depending on the functionalization of CNTs and also on the factor used (UV and/or H 2 O 2 ). H 2 O 2 plays a key role as a factor modifying the surface of CNT-OHs, whereas the properties of CNT-COOHs were most affected by UV rays. A shortening of the nanotubes, exfoliation, the opening of their ends, and changes in the surface charge were observed as a result of the action of UV and/or H 2 O 2 . The changes in observed parameters may influence the stability of the aqueous suspensions of CNTs. - Highlights: • Treatment of CNT–OH and CNT–COOH with H 2 O 2 and/or UV affected their properties. • This effect was different depending on the functionalization of CNTs and factor used. • H 2 O 2 was a factor modifying CNT-OHs surface, whereas UV affected most CNT-COOHs. • The shorten, exfoliated, open tubes with changed surface charge were observed. • All these changes influenced the stability of the aqueous suspensions of CNTs. - The research identified how advanced wastewater treatment methods (UV and/or H 2 O 2 ) affected carbon nanomaterials properties, their mobility (ability to aggregate) and then toxicity

  6. Study of distribution of Carbon nanotube in Al-CNT nanocomposite synthesized via Spark-Plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, A.; Laha, T.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, first ever attempt has been made to develop physically functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced Al-11 5Si alloy nanocomposites synthesized via novel consolidation technique viz spark plasma sintering (SPS). There is a recent trend in employing carbon nanotubes (CNTs), an allotrope of carbon, as reinforcement for high strength structural metallic composite materials, as these cylindrical nano-fibers poses extremely unique mechanical properties such as very high elastic modulus (~ 300 GPa to 1.5 TPa) as well as tensile strength (~150 GPa). However, it has remained as an ever-existing problem to achieve a porosity-free nanocrystalline matrix with homogenously dispersed CNTs, owing to the very high coagulation tendency of CNTs. The gas-atomized, spherical Al-11.5Si alloy powders (1-8 μm) were subjected to high energy ball milling for the purpose of achieving nanocrystallinity in the powders. The improvement in MWCNT dispersion was effort by treating the MWCNTs with a physical surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The nano-grained ball-milled Al-Si powders with varying MWCNT content (0.5 and 1 wt%) were consolidated via spark plasma sintering in order to retain the nano-sized grains in the Al-Si matrix, attributed to the faster and highly effective sintering kinetics of the sintering techniques. FESEM study shows problem of MWCNT agglomeration persists by addition of non-SDS treated as pristine MWCNT in the composite. After treated with SDS, MWCNTs are well separated out from each other and as a result of that good morphological and mechanical property such as high hardness value obtained after analysis. Detailed TEM study of the 0.5wt% MWCNT reinforced SPS nanocomposite revealed that the distribution of CNTs in the matrix. Mechanical analysis study of the nanocomposite attributes higher hardness in case of SDS treated CNT reinforced nanocomposite owing to less agglomeration problem of the CNT in the matrix. Nano

  7. Advanced oxidation (H₂O₂ and/or UV) of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNT-OH and CNT-COOH) and its influence on the stabilization of CNTs in water and tannic acid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Bożena; Oleszczuk, Patryk; Wiącek, Agnieszka

    2015-05-01

    The properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized with -OH and -COOH groups during simulated water treatment with H2O2 and/or UV were tested. There following properties of CNTs were investigated: specific surface area, elemental composition (CHN), dynamic light scattering, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and changes in the CNTs structure were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Treatment of CNTs with H2O2 and/or UV affected their properties. This effect, however, was different depending on the functionalization of CNTs and also on the factor used (UV and/or H2O2). H2O2 plays a key role as a factor modifying the surface of CNT-OHs, whereas the properties of CNT-COOHs were most affected by UV rays. A shortening of the nanotubes, exfoliation, the opening of their ends, and changes in the surface charge were observed as a result of the action of UV and/or H2O2. The changes in observed parameters may influence the stability of the aqueous suspensions of CNTs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Adsorption properties of the molecule resveratrol on CNT(8,0-10) nanotube: Geometry optimization, molecular structure, spectroscopic (NMR, UV/Vis, excited state), FMO, MEP and HOMO-LUMO investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Masoome; Shahab, Siyamak; Khaleghian, Mehrnoosh; Hajikolaee, Fatemeh Haji; Balakhanava, Iryna; Alnajjar, Radwan

    2018-05-01

    In the present work the adsorption properties of the molecule Resveratrol (RSV) (trans-3,5,4‧-Trihydroxystilbene) on CNT(8,0-10) nanotube was investigated by Density Functional Theory (DFT) in the gaseous phase for the first time. The non-bonded interaction effects of compounds RSV and CNT(8,0-10) nanotube on the electronic properties, chemical shift tensors and natural charge were determined and discussed. The electronic spectra of the RSV and the complex CNT(8,0-10)/RSV in the gaseous phase were calculated by Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) for investigation of the maximum wavelength value of the RSV before and after the non-bonded interaction with the CNT(8,0-10) nanotube and molecular orbitals involved in the formation of absorption spectrum of the complex RSV at maximum wavelength.

  9. A CNT (carbon nanotube) paper as cathode gas diffusion electrode for water management of passive μ-DMFC (micro-direct methanol fuel cell) with highly concentrated methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Huichao; Zhang, Yufeng; Zheng, Xue; Li, Yang; Zhang, Xuelin; Liu, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    A novel MEA (membrane electrode assembly) structure of passive μ-DMFC (micro-direct methanol fuel cell) controls water management and decreases methanol crossover. The CNT (carbon nanotube) paper replacing CP (carbon paper) as GDL (gas diffusion paper) enhances water back diffusion which passively prevents flooding in the cathode and promotes low methanol crossover. Moreover, the unique structure of CNT paper can also enhance efficiency of oxygen mass transport and catalyst utilization. The passive μ-DMFC with CNT-MEA exhibits significantly higher performance than passive μ-DMFC with CP-MEA and can operate in high methanol concentration, showing the peak power density of 23.2 mW cm −2 . The energy efficiency and fuel utilization efficiency are obviously improved from 11.54% to 22.7% and 36.61%–49.34%, respectively, and the water transport coefficient is 0.47 which is lower than previously reported passive μ-DMFC with CP. - Highlights: • This novel GDL (gas diffusion layer) solves water management and methanol crossover. • This GDL creates a hydraulic pressure in the cathode increasing water back diffusion. • This GDL improves the electrical conductivity and activity of catalyst

  10. Interaction Between New Anti-cancer Drug Syndros and CNT(6,6-6) Nanotube for Medical Applications: Geometry Optimization, Molecular Structure, Spectroscopic (NMR, UV/Vis, Excited state), FMO, MEP and HOMO-LUMO Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Masoome; Shahab, Siyamak; Khaleghian, Mehrnoosh; Kumar, Rakesh

    2018-03-01

    In the present work, Density Functional Theory (DFT) was first time employed to investigate the interaction between new drug (6aR,10aR)-6,6,9-trimethyl-3-pentyl-6a,7,8,10a-tetrahydrobenzo[c]chromen-1-ol (Syndros) and the CNT(6,6-6) Nanotube in the gaseous phase. The interaction effects of compounds Syndros and CNT (6,6-6) nanotube on the electronic properties, chemical shift tensors and natural charge was also determined and discussed. The electronic spectra of the Syndros and the complex CNT(6,6-6)/Syndros in the gas phase were calculated by Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) for the formation of adsorption effect on maximum wavelength of the Syndros. Nucleus-Independent Chemical Shifts (NICS) calculations have also been carried out for the compound Syndors and the complex CNT(6,6-6)/Syndros and the aromaticity of the compound Syndors before and after interaction with the CNT(6,6-6) Nanotube was investigated.

  11. Carbon nanotube plane fastener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Hirahara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a feature of carbon nanotubes (CNTs that arises when the surfaces of two vertically-aligned CNT brushes are pressed together. Adhesion between the CNTs creates a plane fastener-like device. Observations from scanning electron microscopy and measurements of adhesion properties indicate a device-dependence on CNT density and shape near the tip region. Among other applications, such fasteners have the potential to attach small components onto micron-sized electronic devices.

  12. Carbon nanotube/carbon nanotube composite AFM probes prepared using ion flux molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesmore, Grace; Roque, Carrollyn; Barber, Richard

    The performance of carbon nanotube-carbon nanotube composite (CNT/CNT composite) atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes is compared to that of conventional Si probes in AFM tapping mode. The ion flux molding (IFM) process, aiming an ion beam at the CNT probe, aligns the tip to a desired angle. The result is a relatively rigid tip that is oriented to offset the cantilever angle. Scans using these probes reveal an improvement in image accuracy over conventional tips, while allowing higher aspect ratio imaging of 3D surface features. Furthermore, the lifetimes of CNT-CNT composite tips are observed to be longer than both conventional tips and those claimed for other CNT technologies. Novel applications include the imaging of embiid silk. Supported by the Clare Boothe Luce Research Scholars Award and Carbon Design Innovations.

  13. Macroscopic Crosslinked Neat Carbon Nanotube Materials and CNT/Carbon Fiber Hybrid Composites: Supermolecular Structure and New Failure Mode Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    larger).48 Kim et al. studied the dispersion and alignment of CNTs in a gelatin film and the resulting DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for...with the specimen dimension of 5×1 cm2. The two ends of the sample were polished and electrodes were connected using silver paste for better...Highly Polarized Absorption and Photoluminescence of Stretch-Aligned Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Dispersed in Gelatin Films. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2005, 86

  14. Preparation and characteristics of CNT-metal composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pityana, SL

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The success in keeping carbon nanotubes (CNT) bonded to stainless steel provides a possible method for the preparation of CNT-metal composites. Alternative methods for the preparation of CNT-metal composites include hot pressing, sintering, etc...

  15. Spinnability and Characteristics of Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF)-based Bicomponent Fibers with a Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Modified Polypropylene Core for Piezoelectric Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauß, Benjamin; Steinmann, Wilhelm; Walter, Stephan; Beckers, Markus; Seide, Gunnar; Gries, Thomas; Roth, Georg

    2013-07-03

    This research explains the melt spinning of bicomponent fibers, consisting of a conductive polypropylene (PP) core and a piezoelectric sheath (polyvinylidene fluoride). Previously analyzed piezoelectric capabilities of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) are to be exploited in sensor filaments. The PP compound contains a 10 wt % carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and 2 wt % sodium stearate (NaSt). The sodium stearate is added to lower the viscosity of the melt. The compound constitutes the fiber core that is conductive due to a percolation CNT network. The PVDF sheath's piezoelectric effect is based on the formation of an all-trans conformation β phase, caused by draw-winding of the fibers. The core and sheath materials, as well as the bicomponent fibers, are characterized through different analytical methods. These include wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) to analyze crucial parameters for the development of a crystalline β phase. The distribution of CNTs in the polymer matrix, which affects the conductivity of the core, was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Thermal characterization is carried out by conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Optical microscopy is used to determine the fibers' diameter regularity (core and sheath). The materials' viscosity is determined by rheometry. Eventually, an LCR tester is used to determine the core's specific resistance.

  16. Proof of Concept Coded Aperture Miniature Mass Spectrometer Using a Cycloidal Sector Mass Analyzer, a Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Field Emission Electron Ionization Source, and an Array Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsden, Jason J.; Herr, Philip J.; Landry, David M. W.; Kim, William; Vyas, Raul; Parker, Charles B.; Kirley, Matthew P.; Keil, Adam D.; Gilchrist, Kristin H.; Radauscher, Erich J.; Hall, Stephen D.; Carlson, James B.; Baldasaro, Nicholas; Stokes, David; Di Dona, Shane T.; Russell, Zachary E.; Grego, Sonia; Edwards, Steven J.; Sperline, Roger P.; Denton, M. Bonner; Stoner, Brian R.; Gehm, Michael E.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2018-02-01

    Despite many potential applications, miniature mass spectrometers have had limited adoption in the field due to the tradeoff between throughput and resolution that limits their performance relative to laboratory instruments. Recently, a solution to this tradeoff has been demonstrated by using spatially coded apertures in magnetic sector mass spectrometers, enabling throughput and signal-to-background improvements of greater than an order of magnitude with no loss of resolution. This paper describes a proof of concept demonstration of a cycloidal coded aperture miniature mass spectrometer (C-CAMMS) demonstrating use of spatially coded apertures in a cycloidal sector mass analyzer for the first time. C-CAMMS also incorporates a miniature carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission electron ionization source and a capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) ion array detector. Results confirm the cycloidal mass analyzer's compatibility with aperture coding. A >10× increase in throughput was achieved without loss of resolution compared with a single slit instrument. Several areas where additional improvement can be realized are identified.

  17. Optimizing the physical-chemical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) on Cu(II) adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Shirley; Sorial, George A; Sahle-Demessie, Endalkachew; McAvoy, Drew C

    2014-08-30

    Systematic experiments of copper adsorption on 10 different commercially available nanomaterials were studied for the influence of physical-chemical properties and their interactions. Design of experiment and response surface methodology was used to develop a polynomial model to predict maximum copper adsorption (initial concentration, Co=10mg/L) per mass of nanomaterial, qe, using multivariable regression and maximum R-square criterion. The best subsets of properties to predict qe in order of significant contribution to the model were: bulk density, ID, mesopore volume, tube length, pore size, zeta-charge, specific surface area and OD. The highest experimental qe observed was for an alcohol-functionalized MWCNT (16.7mg/g) with relative high bulk density (0.48g/cm(3)), ID (2-5nm), 10-30μm long and ODGraphene nanoplatelets (GNP) showed poor adsorptive capacity associated to stacked-nanoplatelets, but good colloidal stability due to high functionalized surface. Good adsorption results for pristine SWCNT indicated that tubes with small diameter were more associated with good adsorption than functionalized surface. XPS and ICP analysis explored surface chemistry and purity, but pHpzc and zeta-charge were ultimately applied to indicate the degree of functionalization. Optimum CNT were identified in the scatter plot, but actual manufacturing processes introduced size and shape variations which interfered with final property results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. All carbon coaxial supercapacitors based on hollow carbon nanotube sleeve structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, Xiaobei; Xu, Ruiqiao; Zhang, Yangyang; Zhang, Li; Wei, Jinquan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Li, Xinming

    2015-01-01

    All carbon coaxial supercapacitors based on hollow carbon nanotube (CNT) sleeve structure are assembled and tested. The key advantage of the structure is that the inner core electrode is variable from CNT sleeve sponges, to CNT fibers, reduced graphene oxide fibers, and graphene woven fabrics. By changing core electrodes from sleeve sponges to CNT fibers, the electrochemical performance has been significantly enhanced. The capacitance based on sleeve sponge + CNT fiber double the capacitances of double-sleeve sponge supercapacitors thanks to reduction of the series and internal resistances. Besides, the coaxial sleeve structure possesses many other features, including high rate capacitance, long cycle life, and good flexibility. (paper)

  19. Mechanical Properties and Durability of CNT Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen Camacho

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, changes in mechanical properties of Portland cement-based mortars due to the addition of carbon nanotubes (CNT and corrosion of embedded steel rebars in CNT cement pastes are reported. Bending strength, compression strength, porosity and density of mortars were determined and related to the CNT dosages. CNT cement paste specimens were exposed to carbonation and chloride attacks, and results on steel corrosion rate tests were related to CNT dosages. The increase in CNT content implies no significant variations of mechanical properties but higher steel corrosion intensities were observed.

  20. Effects of carbon nanotube content and annealing temperature on the hardness of CNT reinforced aluminum nanocomposites processed by the high pressure torsion technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phuong, Doan Dinh, E-mail: phuongdd@ims.vast.ac.vn [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Str., Cau Giay Distr., Hanoi (Viet Nam); Trinh, Pham Van; An, Nguyen Van; Luan, Nguyen Van; Minh, Phan Ngoc [Institute of Materials Science, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Str., Cau Giay Distr., Hanoi (Viet Nam); Khisamov, Rinat Kh.; Nazarov, Konstantin S.; Zubairov, Linar R.; Mulyukov, Radik R.; Nazarov, Ayrat A. [Institute for Metals Superplasticity Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences 39, Stepan Khalturin Str., Ufa 450001 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • CNT/Al nanocomposites were consolidated by HIP and subsequently processed by the high pressure torsion technique. • High pressure torsion processing was unable to break apart or disperse the CNT agglomerates persisted in powder preparation. • HPT-processed CNT/Al nanocomposites exhibited secondary hardening during annealing at temperatures below 150 °C. - Abstract: In this paper, the microstructure and hardness of CNT reinforced aluminium (CNT/Al) nanocomposites prepared by the advanced powder metallurgy method and subsequently processed by the high pressure torsion (HPT) technique are studied. The effects of CNT content and annealing temperature on the hardness of the nanocomposites are investigated. The results show that annealing materials at temperatures below 150 °C leads to secondary hardening, while annealing at higher temperatures soften the nanocomposites. HPT-processed CNT/Al nanocomposites with 1.5 wt.% of CNTs are shown to have the highest hardness in comparison with other composites containing CNTs from 0 up to 2 wt.%. Microstructures, CNT distribution and the phase composition of CNT/Al nanocomposites are investigated by transmission and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques.

  1. Carbon nanotube array actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, S; Mahrholz, T; Wierach, P; Sinapius, M

    2013-01-01

    Experimental investigations of highly vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), also known as CNT-arrays, are the main focus of this paper. The free strain as result of an active material behavior is analyzed via a novel experimental setup. Previous test experiences of papers made of randomly oriented CNTs, also called Bucky-papers, reveal comparably low free strain. The anisotropy of aligned CNTs promises better performance. Via synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or plasma enhanced CVD (PECVD), highly aligned arrays of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are synthesized. Two different types of CNT-arrays are analyzed, morphologically first, and optically tested for their active characteristics afterwards. One type of the analyzed arrays features tube lengths of 750–2000 μm with a large variety of diameters between 20 and 50 nm and a wave-like CNT-shape. The second type features a maximum, almost uniform, length of 12 μm and a constant diameter of 50 nm. Different CNT-lengths and array types are tested due to their active behavior. As result of the presented tests, it is reported that the quality of orientation is the most decisive property for excellent active behavior. Due to their alignment, CNT-arrays feature the opportunity to clarify the actuation mechanism of architectures made of CNTs. (paper)

  2. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  3. Nickel oxide and carbon nanotube composite (NiO/CNT) as a novel cathode non-precious metal catalyst in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianjian; Zhu, Nengwu; Yang, Tingting; Zhang, Taiping; Wu, Pingxiao; Dang, Zhi

    2015-10-15

    Comparing with the precious metal catalysts, non-precious metal catalysts were preferred to use in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) due to the low cost and high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) efficiency. In this study, the transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction as well as Raman investigation revealed that the prepared nanoscale NiO was attached on the surface of CNT. Cyclic voltammogram and rotating ring-disk electrode tests showed that the NiO/CNT composite catalyst had an apparent oxygen reduction peak and 3.5 electron transfer pathway was acquired under oxygen atmosphere. The catalyst performance was highly dependent on the percentage of NiO in the CNT nanocomposites. When 77% NiO/CNT nano-sized composite was applied as cathode catalyst in membrane free single-chamber air cathode MFC, a maximum power density of 670 mW/m(2) and 0.772 V of OCV was obtained. Moreover, the MFC with pure NiO (control) could not achieve more than 0.1 V. All findings suggested that NiO/CNT could be a potential cathode catalyst for ORR in MFCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural properties of water around uncharged and charged carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezfoli, Amir Reza Ansari; Mehrabian, Mozaffar Ali; Rafsanjani, Hassan Hashemipour

    2013-01-01

    Studying the structural properties of water molecules around the carbon nanotubes is very important in a wide variety of carbon nanotubes applications. We studied the number of hydrogen bonds, oxygen and hydrogen density distributions, and water orientation around carbon nanotubes. The water density distribution for all carbon nanotubes was observed to have the same feature. In water-carbon nanotubes interface, a high-density region of water molecules exists around carbon nanotubes. The results reveal that the water orientation around carbon nanotubes is roughly dependent on carbon nanotubes surface charge. The water molecules in close distances to carbon nanotubes were found to make an HOH plane nearly perpendicular to the water-carbon nanotubes interface for carbon nanotubes with negative surface charge. For uncharged carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotubes with positive surface charge, the HOH plane was in tangential orientation with water-carbon nanotubes interface. There was also a significant reduction in hydrogen bond of water region around carbon nanotubes as compared with hydrogen bond in bulk water. This reduction was very obvious for carbon nanotubes with positive surface charge. In addition, the calculation of dynamic properties of water molecules in water-CNT interface revealed that there is a direct relation between the number of Hbonds and self-diffusion coefficient of water molecules

  5. Theoretical characterization of the topology of connected carbon nanotubes in random networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitz, Jerome; Leroy, Yann; Hebrard, Luc; Lallement, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, a lot of attention has been paid to carbon nanotube (CNT) networks and their applications to electronic devices. Many studies concentrate on the percolation threshold and the characterization of the conduction in such materials. Nevertheless, no theoretical study has yet attempted to characterize the CNT features inside finite size CNT networks. We present a theoretical approach based on geometrical and statistical considerations. We demonstrate the possibility of explicitly determining some relations existing between two neighbor CNTs and their contact efficiency in random networks of identical CNTs. We calculate the contact probability of rigid identical CNTs and we obtain a probability of 0.2027, which turns out to be independent of the CNT density. Based on this probability, we establish also the dependence of the number of contacts per CNT as a function of the CNT density. All the theoretical results are validated by very good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Enhanced Thermal, Mechanical and Morphological Properties of CNT/HDPE Nanocomposite Using MMT as Secondary Filler

    OpenAIRE

    M. E. Ali Mohsin; Agus Arsad; Othman Y. Alothman

    2014-01-01

    This study explains the influence of secondary filler on the dispersion of carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) nanocomposites (CNT/HDPE). In order to understand the mixed-fillers system, Montmorillonite (MMT) was added to CNT/HDPE nanocomposites. It was followed by investigating their effect on the thermal, mechanical and morphological properties of the aforesaid nanocomposite. Incorporation of 3 wt% each of MMT into CNT/HDPE nanocomposite resulted to the increas...

  7. Functionalization and Polymerization on the CNT Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Albuerne, Julio

    2013-07-01

    In this review we focus on the current status of using carbon nanotube (CNT) as a filler for polymer nanocomposites. Starting with the historical background of CNT, its distinct properties and the surface functionalization of the nanotube, the three different surface polymerization techniques, namely grafting "from", "to" and "through/in between" were discussed. Wider focus has been given on "grafting from" surface initiated polymerizations, including atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), reversible addition fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) Polymerization, nitroxide mediated polymerization (NMP), ring opening polymerization (ROP) and other miscellaneous polymerization methods. The grafting "to" and "through / in between" also discussed and compared with grafting from polymerization. The merits and shortcomings of all three grafting methods were discussed and the bottleneck issue in grafting from method has been highlighted. Furthermore the current and potential future industrial applications were deliberated. Finally the toxicity issue of CNTs in the final product has been reviewed with the limited available literature knowledge. © 2013 Bentham Science Publishers.

  8. Flow Boiling in a Micro-Channel Coated With Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Khanikar, Vikash; Mudawar, Issam; Fisher, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the heat transfer enhancement attributes of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) applied to the bottom wall of a shallow rectangular micro-channel. Using deionized water as working fluid, experiments were performed with both a bare copper bottom wall and a CNT-coated copper wall. Boiling curves were generated for both walls, aided by high-speed video analysis of interfacial features. CNT arrays promoted earlier, abundant and intense bubble nucleation at low mass velocities, consistent ...

  9. Powerful greenhouse gas nitrous oxide adsorption onto intrinsic and Pd doped Single walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoosefian, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Investigation of the adsorption of Nitrous oxide on SWCNT and Pd/SWCNT. • Nitrous oxide adsorbed on Pd/SWCNT system demonstrates a strong adsorption. • The Pd/SWCNT is potential sensor for the Nitrous oxide gaseous molecule detection. - Abstract: Density functional studies on the adsorption behavior of nitrous oxide (N_2O) onto intrinsic carbon nanotube (CNT) and Pd-doped (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotube (Pd-CNT) have been reported. Introduction of Pd dopant facilitates in adsorption of N_2O on the otherwise inert nanotube as observed from the adsorption energies and global reactivity descriptor values. Among three adsorption features of N_2O onto CNT, the horizontal adsorption with E_a_d_s = −0.16 eV exhibits higher adsorption energy. On the other hand the Pd-CNT exhibit strong affinity toward gas molecule and would cause a huge increase in N_2O adsorption energies. Chemical and electronic properties of CNT and Pd-CNT in the absence and presence of N_2O were investigated. Adsorption of N_2O gas molecule would affect the electronic conductance of Pd-CNT that can serve as a signal of gas sensors and the increased energy gaps demonstrate the formation of more stable systems. The atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and the natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations were performed to get more details about the nature and charge transfers in intermolecular interactions within adsorption process. As a final point, the density of states (DOSs) calculations was achieved to confirm previous results. According to our results, intrinsic CNT cannot act as a suitable adsorbent while Pd-CNT can be introduced as novel detectable complex for designing high sensitive, fast response and high efficient carbon nanotube based gas sensor to detect N_2O gas as an air pollutant. Our results could provide helpful information for the design and fabrication of the N_2O sensors.

  10. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  11. Features of chemistry natural gold nanotubes (Primor’ye)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molchanov, V. P.; Medvedev, E. I. [Far East Geological Institute, Far East Division, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-01

    A unique association of native gold amalgam, cinnabar, native metals, cohenite and moissanite has been first found and described within Fadeevka ore placer knot. To study structure and composition of above listed phases a scanning electron microscope was used. Cinnabar and auramalgam are characterized by heterogeneous composition within one grain. A microporous structure is conditioned by fractality revealed in a number of mercury-bearing micro nuggets. Nonuniformity of composition, fractality of microstructure and presence of carbides in association with cinnabar are indicative of non equilibrium character of the association. Native metals are represented by spheroids of almost pure Fe and Cu and aggregated microflakes of Zn with carbonaceous nanospheroids on its surfaces. It was inferred that the association under study crystallized during the process of gas condensation of endogenous hydrogen- hydrocarbon fluids. Key words: Gold, mercury, nanotubes, nanospheroidy.

  12. Hydrophilicity, pore structure and mechanical performance of CNT/PVDF materials affected by carboxyl contents in multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanxia; Jiang, Ce; Tian, Run; Li, Guangfen

    2018-01-01

    Poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes have been prepared by loading different type of MWCNTs-COOH as the dispersed phase via phase inversion method. The chemically functionalized MWCNTs with increasing carboxyl content were chosen for achieving a better dispersion in PVDF and altering the membrane hydrophilicity. The effect of the carboxyl content in MWCNTs on crystal structure, thermal behavior, membrane morphology, hydrophilicity, and water flux of blended membranes were investigated. Due to the addition of carbon nanotubes, various performances of the hybrid membrane had obvious changes. The most prominent was that thermal stability could be enhanced and the pore morphology was more preferable, also that the hydrophilicity were improved, further that water flux could be increased to some extent.

  13. Enhancement of the in-plane shear properties of carbon fiber composites containing carbon nanotube mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hansang

    2015-01-01

    The in-plane shear property of carbon fiber laminates is one of the most important structural features of aerospace and marine structures. Fiber-matrix debonding caused by in-plane shear loading is the major failure mode of carbon fiber composites because of the stress concentration at the interfaces. In this study, carbon nanotube mats (CNT mat) were incorporated in two different types of carbon fiber composites. For the case of woven fabric composites, mechanical interlocking between the CNTs and the carbon fibers increased resistance to shear failure. However, not much improvement was observed for the prepreg composites as a result of incorporation of the CNT mats. The reinforcement mechanism of the CNT mat layer was investigated by a fractographic study using scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the CNT mat was functionalized by three different methods and the effectiveness of the functionalization methods was determined and the most appropriate functionalization method for the CNT mat was air oxidation.

  14. Actuation mechanisms of carbon nanotube-based architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Sebastian; Mahrholz, Thorsten; Wierach, Peter; Sinapius, Michael

    2016-04-01

    State of the art smart materials such as piezo ceramics or electroactive polymers cannot feature both, mechanical stiffness and high active strain. Moreover, properties like low density, high mechanical stiffness and high strain at the same time driven by low energy play an increasingly important role for their future application. Carbon nanotubes (CNT), show this behavior. Their active behavior was observed 1999 the first time using paper-like mats made of CNT. Therefore the CNT-papers are electrical charged within an electrolyte thus forming a double- layer. The measured deflection of CNT material is based on the interaction between the charged high surface area formed by carbon nanotubes and ions provided by the electrolyte. Although CNT-papers have been extensively analyzed as well at the macro-scale as nano-scale there is still no generally accepted theory for the actuation mechanism. This paper focuses on investigations of the actuation mechanisms of CNT-papers in comparison to vertically aligned CNT-arrays. One reason of divergent results found in literature might be attributed to different types of CNT samples. While CNT-papers represent architectures of short CNTs which need to bridge each other to form the dimensions of the sample, the continuous CNTs of the array feature a length of almost 3 mm, along which the experiments are carried out. Both sample types are tested within an actuated tensile test set-up under different conditions. While the CNT-papers are tested in water-based electrolytes with comparably small redox-windows the hydrophobic CNT-arrays are tested in ionic liquids with comparatively larger redox-ranges. Furthermore an in-situ micro tensile test within an SEM is carried out to prove the optimized orientation of the MWCNTs as result of external load. It was found that the performance of CNT-papers strongly depends on the test conditions. However, the CNT-arrays are almost unaffected by the conditions showing active response at negative

  15. Solid electroytes for CNT-based actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemenschneider, Johannes; Geier, Sebastian; Mahrholz, Thorsten; Mosch, Jürgen; Monner, Hans Peter; Sinapius, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Actuators based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) have the potential to generate high forces at very low voltages. The density of the raw material is just 1330 kg/m3, which makes them well applicable for lightweight applications. Moreover, active strains of up to 1% can be achieved - due to the CNTs dimensional changes on charge injection. Therefore the nanotubes have to be arranged and electrically wired like electrodes of a capacitor. In previous works the system's response of the Nanotubes comprising a liquid electrolyte was studied in detail. The major challenge is to repeat such experiments with solid electrolytes, which is a prerequisite for structural integration. In this paper a method is proposed which makes sure the expansion is not based on thermal expansion. This is done by analysing the electrical system response. As thermal expansion is dominated by ohmic resistance the CNT based actuators show a strong capacitive behavior. This behavior is referable to the constitution of the electrochemical double layer around the nanotubes, which causes the tubes to expand. Also a novel test setup is described, which guarantees that the displacement which is measured will not be caused by bending of a bimorph but due to expansion of a single layer of nanotubes. This paper also presents experimental results demonstrating both, the method of electrical characterization of CNT based actuators with implemented solid electrolytes and the novel test setup which is used to measure the needed data. The actuators which were characterized are hybrids of CNT and the solid electrolyte NAFION which is supplying the ions needed to constitute the electrochemical double layer. The manufacturing, processing of these actuators and also some first experimental results are shown. Unfortunately, the results are not as clear as those for liquid electrolytes, which depend on the hybrid character of the analyzed devices. In the liquid electrolyte based case the CNTs are the only source of

  16. An easy two-step microwave assisted synthesis of SnO2/CNT hybrids

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motshekga, SC

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Tin oxide (SnO2) - decorated carbon nanotube (CNT) heterostructures were synthesized by microwave assisted wet impregnation method. CNTs of three different aspect ratios were compared. The hybrid samples were characterized by powder X...

  17. Reduced adhesion of macrophages on anodized titanium with select nanotube surface features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian K

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Amancherla Rajyalakshmi1, Batur Ercan2,3, K Balasubramanian1, Thomas J Webster2,31Non-Ferrous Materials Technology Development Centre, Hyderabad, India; 2School of Engineering, 3Department of Orthopedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: One of the important prerequisites for a successful orthopedic implant apart from being osteoconductive is the elicitation of a favorable immune response that does not lead to the rejection of the implant by the host tissue. Anodization is one of the simplest surface modification processes used to create nanotextured and nanotubular features on metal oxides which has been shown to improve bone formation. Anodization of titanium (Ti leads to the formation of TiO2 nanotubes on the surface, and the presence of these nanotubes mimics the natural nanoscale features of bone, which in turn contributes to improved bone cell attachment, migration, and proliferation. However, inflammatory cell responses on anodized Ti remains to be tested. It is hypothesized that surface roughness and surface feature size on anodized Ti can be carefully manipulated to control immune cell (specifically, macrophages responses. Here, when Ti samples were anodized at 10 V in the presence of 1% hydrofluoric acid (HF for 1 minute, nanotextured (nonnanotube surfaces were created. When anodization of Ti samples was carried out with 1% HF for 10 minutes at 15 V, nanotubes with 40–50 nm diameters were formed, whereas at 20 V with 1% HF for 10 minutes, nanotubes with 60–70 nm diameters were formed. In this study, a reduced density of macrophages was observed after 24 hours of culture on nanotextured and nanotubular Ti samples which were anodized at 10, 15, and 20 V, compared with conventional unmodified Ti samples. This in vitro study thus demonstrated a reduced density of macrophages on anodized Ti, thereby providing further evidence of the greater efficacy of anodized Ti for orthopedic applications.Keywords: anodization, titanium

  18. Ionic Adsorption and Desorption of CNT Nanoropes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Jun Shang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A nanorope is comprised of several carbon nanotubes (CNTs with different chiralities. A molecular dynamic model is built to investigate the ionic adsorption and desorption of the CNT nanoropes. The charge distribution on the nanorope is obtained by using a modified gradient method based on classical electrostatic theory. The electrostatic interactions among charged carbon atoms are calculated by using the Coulomb law. It was found here that the charged nanorope can adsorb heavy metal ions, and the adsorption and desorption can be realized by controlling the strength of applied electric field. The distance between the ions and the nanorope as well as the amount of ions have an effect on the adsorption capacity of the nanorope. The desorption process takes less time than that of adsorption. The study indicates that the CNT nanorope can be used as a core element of devices for sewage treatment.

  19. SEM and Raman studies of CNT films on porous Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belka, R.; Keczkowska, J.; Suchańska, M.; Firek, P.; Wronka, H.; Kozłowski, M.; Radomska, J.; Czerwosz, E.; Craciunoiu, F.

    2017-08-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films deposited on different porous silica substrates were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Raman Spectroscopy (RS). The films samples were prepared by a two-step method consisting of PVD and CVD processes. In the first step the nanocomposite Ni-C film was obtained by evaporation in dynamic vacuum from two separated sources of fullerenes and nickel acetate. Those films were deposited on porous silica and DLC/porous silica substrates. Analysis of SEM imaging showed that the obtained film are composed of carbon nanotubes, the distribution, size and quality of which depend on the type of substrate. The CNT films were studied by RS method to determine the influence of the substrate type on disordering of carbonaceous structure and quality of CNT in deposited films.

  20. Identification of energy dissipation mechanisms in CNT-reinforced nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardea, Frank; Lagoudas, Dimitris C; Naraghi, Mohammad; Glaz, Bryan; Riddick, Jaret

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present our recent findings on the mechanisms of energy dissipation in polymer-based nanocomposites obtained through experimental investigations. The matrix of the nanocomposite was polystyrene (PS) which was reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). To study the mechanical strain energy dissipation of nanocomposites, we measured the ratio of loss to storage modulus for different CNT concentrations and alignments. CNT alignment was achieved via hot-drawing of PS-CNT. In addition, CNT agglomeration was studied via a combination of SEM imaging and Raman scanning. We found that at sufficiently low strains, energy dissipation in composites with high CNT alignment is not a function of applied strain, as no interfacial slip occurs between the CNTs and PS. However, below the interfacial slip strain threshold, damping scales monotonically with CNT content, which indicates the prevalence of CNT-CNT friction dissipation mechanisms within agglomerates. At higher strains, interfacial slip also contributes to energy dissipation. However, the increase in damping with strain, especially when CNT agglomerates are present, does not scale linearly with the effective interface area between CNTs and PS, suggesting a significant contribution of friction between CNTs within agglomerates to energy dissipation at large strains. In addition, for the first time, a comparison between the energy dissipation in randomly oriented and aligned CNT composites was made. It is inferred that matrix plasticity and tearing caused by misorientation of CNTs with the loading direction is a major cause of energy dissipation. The results of our research can be used to design composites with high energy dissipation capability, especially for applications where dynamic loading may compromise structural stability and functionality, such as rotary wing structures and antennas. (paper)

  1. Biological response to purification and acid functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figarol, Agathe; Pourchez, Jérémie; Boudard, Delphine; Forest, Valérie; Tulliani, Jean-Marc; Lecompte, Jean-Pierre; Cottier, Michèle; Bernache-Assollant, Didier; Grosseau, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    Acid functionalization has been considered as an easy way to enhance the dispersion and biodegradation of carbon nanotubes (CNT). However, inconsistencies between toxicity studies of acid functionalized CNT remain unexplained. This could be due to a joint effect of the main physicochemical modifications resulting from an acid functionalization: addition of surface acid groups and purification from catalytic metallic impurities. In this study, the impact on CNT biotoxicity of these two physiochemical features was assessed separately. The in vitro biological response of RAW 264.7 macrophages was evaluated after exposure to 15-240 µg mL-1 of two types of multi-walled CNT. For each type of CNT (small: 20 nm diameter, and big: 90 nm diameter), three different surface chemical properties were studied (total of six CNT samples): pristine, acid functionalized and desorbed. Desorbed CNT were purified by the acid functionalization but presented a very low amount of surface acid groups due to a thermal treatment under vacuum. A Janus effect of acid functionalization with two opposite impacts is highlighted. The CNT purification decreased the overall toxicity, while the surface acid groups intensified it when present at a specific threshold. These acid groups especially amplified the pro-inflammatory response. The threshold mechanism which seemed to regulate the impact of acid groups should be further studied to determine its value and potential link to the other physicochemical state of the CNT. The results suggest that, for a safer-design approach, the benefit-risk balance of an acid functionalization has to be considered, depending on the CNT primary state of purification. Further research should be conducted in this direction.

  2. Mechanical properties of functionalised CNT filled kenaf reinforced epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapiai, Napisah; Jumahat, Aidah; Mahmud, Jamaluddin

    2018-04-01

    This paper aims to study the effect of functionalised carbon nanotubes (CNT) on mechanical properties of kenaf fibre reinforced polymer composites. The CNT was functionalised using acid mixtures of H2SO4:HNO3 and 3-Aminopropyl Triethoxysilane before it was incorporated into epoxy resin. Three different types of CNT were used, i.e. pristine (PCNT), acid-treated (ACNT) and acid-silane treated (SCNT), to fabricate kenaf composite. Three different filler contents were mixed in each composite system, i.e. 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 wt%. The functionalised CNT was characterized using x-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Tensile, flexural and Izod impact tests were conducted in order to evaluate the effect of CNT contents and surface treatment of mechanical properties of kenaf composites. It was observed that the inclusion of 1 wt% acid-silane treated CNT improved the tensile, flexural and impact strengths of kenaf/epoxy composite by 43.30%, 21.10%, and 130%, respectively. Silane modification had been proven to be beneficial in enhancing the dispersibility and reducing agglomeration of CNT in the epoxy matrix.

  3. Quantifying the Hierarchical Order in Self-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes from Atomic to Micrometer Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshot, Eric R; Zwissler, Darwin W; Bui, Ngoc; Kuykendall, Tevye R; Wang, Cheng; Hexemer, Alexander; Wu, Kuang Jen J; Fornasiero, Francesco

    2017-06-27

    Fundamental understanding of structure-property relationships in hierarchically organized nanostructures is crucial for the development of new functionality, yet quantifying structure across multiple length scales is challenging. In this work, we used nondestructive X-ray scattering to quantitatively map the multiscale structure of hierarchically self-organized carbon nanotube (CNT) "forests" across 4 orders of magnitude in length scale, from 2.0 Å to 1.5 μm. Fully resolved structural features include the graphitic honeycomb lattice and interlayer walls (atomic), CNT diameter (nano), as well as the greater CNT ensemble (meso) and large corrugations (micro). Correlating orientational order across hierarchical levels revealed a cascading decrease as we probed finer structural feature sizes with enhanced sensitivity to small-scale disorder. Furthermore, we established qualitative relationships for single-, few-, and multiwall CNT forest characteristics, showing that multiscale orientational order is directly correlated with number density spanning 10 9 -10 12 cm -2 , yet order is inversely proportional to CNT diameter, number of walls, and atomic defects. Lastly, we captured and quantified ultralow-q meridional scattering features and built a phenomenological model of the large-scale CNT forest morphology, which predicted and confirmed that these features arise due to microscale corrugations along the vertical forest direction. Providing detailed structural information at multiple length scales is important for design and synthesis of CNT materials as well as other hierarchically organized nanostructures.

  4. Aligned Carbon Nanotubes for High-Performance Films and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liwen

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with extraordinary properties and thus many potential applications have been predicted to be the best reinforcements for the next-generation multifunctional composite materials. Difficulties exist in transferring the most use of the unprecedented properties of individual CNTs to macroscopic forms of CNT assemblies. Therefore, this thesis focuses on two main goals: 1) discussing the issues that influence the performance of bulk CNT products, and 2) fabricating high-performance dry CNT films and composite films with an understanding of the fundamental structure-property relationship in these materials. Dry CNT films were fabricated by a winding process using CNT arrays with heights of 230 mum, 300 im and 360 mum. The structures of the as-produced films, as well as their mechanical and electrical properties were examined in order to find out the effects of different CNT lengths. It was found that the shorter CNTs synthesized by shorter time in the CVD furnace exhibited less structural defects and amorphous carbon, resulting in more compact packing and better nanotube alignment when made into dry films, thus, having better mechanical and electrical performance. A novel microcombing approach was developed to mitigate the CNT waviness and alignment in the dry films, and ultrahigh mechanical properties and exceptional electrical performance were obtained. This method utilized a pair of sharp surgical blades with microsized features at the blade edges as micro-combs to, for the first time, disentangle and straighten the wavy CNTs in the dry-drawn CNT sheet at single-layer level. The as-combed CNT sheet exhibited high level of nanotube alignment and straightness, reduced structural defects, and enhanced nanotube packing density. The dry CNT films produced by microcombing had a very high Young's modulus of 172 GPa, excellent tensile strength of 3.2 GPa, and unprecedented electrical conductivity of 1.8x10 5 S/m, which were records for CNT films or

  5. Challenges of the Modeling Methods for Investigating the Interaction between the CNT and the Surrounding Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roham Rafiee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between the carbon nanotubes (CNT and the polymer is a key factor for determining the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of the CNT/polymer nanocomposite. However, it is difficult to measure experimentally the interfacial bonding properties between the CNT and the surrounding polymer. Therefore, computational modeling is used to predict the interaction properties. Different scale models, from atomistic to continuum, are critically reviewed addressing the advantages, the disadvantages, and the future challenges. Various methods of improvement for measuring the interaction properties are described. Finally, it is concluded that the semicontinuum modeling may be the best candidate for modeling the interaction between the CNT and the polymer.

  6. A conductive surface coating for Si-CNT radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentini, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.valentini@ba.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70125 Bari (Italy); Valentini, Marco [INFN, Sezione di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Ditaranto, Nicoletta [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università degli Studi di Bari, Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Melisi, Domenico [INFN, Sezione di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Aramo, Carla, E-mail: aramo@na.infn.it [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Ambrosio, Antonio [CNR-SPIN U.O.S. di Napoli and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Casamassima, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70125 Bari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Cilmo, Marco [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Fiandrini, Emanuele [INFN, Sezione di Perugia, and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Piazza Università 1, 06100 Perugia (Italy); Grossi, Valentina [INFN, Sezione di L’Aquila, and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, Università degli Studi dell’Aquila, Via Vetoio 10 Coppito, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); and others

    2015-08-01

    Silicon–Carbon Nanotube radiation detectors need an electrically conductive coating layer to avoid the nanotube detachment from the silicon substrate and uniformly transmit the electric field to the entire nanotube active surface. Coating material must be transparent to the radiation of interest, and must provide the drain voltage necessary to collect charges generated by incident photons. For this purpose various materials have been tested and proposed in photodetector and photoconverter applications. In this article interface properties and electrical contact behavior of Indium Tin Oxide films on Carbon Nanotubes have been analyzed. Ion Beam Sputtering has been used to grow the transparent conductive layer on the nanotubes. The films were deposited at room temperature with Oxygen/Argon mixture into the sputtering beam, at fixed current and for different beam energies. Optical and electrical analyses have been performed on films. Surface chemical analysis and in depth profiling results obtained by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of the Indium Tin Oxide layer on nanotubes have been used to obtain the interface composition. Results have been applied in photodetectors realization based on multi wall Carbon Nanotubes on silicon. - Highlights: • ITO was deposited by Ion Beam Sputtering on MWCNT. • ITO on CNT makes an inter-diffusion layer of the order of one hundred nanometers. • Improvements of quantum efficiency of photon detectors based on CNT with ITO.

  7. Isotactic polypropylene/carbon nanotube composites prepared by latex technology. Thermal analysis of carbon nanotube-induced nucleation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miltner, H.E.; Grossiord, N.; Lu, K.; Loos, J.; Koning, C.E.; Van Mele, B.

    2008-01-01

    During nonisothermal crystallization of highly dispersed polypropylene/carbon nanotube (CNT) composites, considerable heterogeneous nucleation is observed to an extent scaling with the CNT surface area. Saturation occurs at higher loadings, reaching a plateau value for the crystallization onset

  8. Thermionic refrigeration at CNT-CNT junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Pipe, K. P.

    2016-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is used to study carrier energy relaxation following thermionic emission at the junction of two van der Waals bonded single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). An energy-dependent transmission probability gives rise to energy filtering at the junction, which is predicted to increase the average electron transport energy by as much as 0.115 eV, leading to an effective Seebeck coefficient of 386 μV/K. MC results predict a long energy relaxation length (˜8 μm) for hot electrons crossing the junction into the barrier SWCNT. For SWCNTs of optimal length, an analytical transport model is used to show that thermionic cooling can outweigh parasitic heat conduction due to high SWCNT thermal conductivity, leading to a significant cooling capacity (2.4 × 106 W/cm2).

  9. Effective thermo-mechanical properties and shape memory effect of CNT/SMP composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingsheng; Liu, Xia; Leng, Fangfang

    2009-07-01

    Shape memory polymer (SMP) has been applied in many fields as intelligent sensors and actuators. In order to improve the mechanical properties and recovery force of SMP, the addition of minor amounts of carbon nanotubes (CNT) into SMP has attracted wide attention. A micromechanical model and thermo-mechanical properties of CNT/SMP composites were studied in this paper. The thermo-mechanical constitutive relation of intellectual composites with isotropic and transversely isotropic CNT was obtained. Moreover, the shape memory effect of CNT/SMP composites and the effect of temperature and the volume fraction of CNT were discussed. The work shows that CNT/SMP composites exhibit excellent macroscopic thermo-mechanical properties and shape memory effect, while both of them can be affected remarkably by temperature and the microstructure parameters.

  10. Effective electrical conductivity of carbon nanotube-polymer composites: a simplified model and its validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Sung-Hwan; Yin, Huiming

    2015-01-01

    A simplified model is presented to predict the effective electrical conductivity of carbon nanotube(CNT)-polymer composite with different material proportions, which is validated by the experiments of multi-walled CNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composites. CNTs are well dispersed in a PDMS matrix, and the mixture is then cured and cast into thin films for electrical characterization. The CNTs are assumed to be statistically uniformly distributed in the PDMS matrix with the three-dimensional (3D) waviness. As the proportion of CNTs increases to a certain level, namely the percolation threshold, the discrete CNTs start to connect with each other, forming a 3D network which exhibits a significant increase of effective electrical conductivity. The eight-chain model has been used to predict the effective electrical conductivity of the composite, in which the contact resistance between CNTs has been considered through the Simmons’ equation. The eight-chain network features can be significantly changed with the modification to mixing process, CNT length and diameter, and CNT clustering and curling. A Gaussian statistics-based formulation is used to calculate the effective length of a single CNT well dispersed in the matrix. The modeling results of effective electrical conductivity agree with the experiments very well, which are highly dependent on a contact resistance between CNTs and the waviness of the CNTs. The effect of inner-nanotube distance and diameter of CNTs on the effective electrical conductivity of the CNT/PDMS composite is also discussed. (paper)

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis of MnO2/CNT nanocomposite with a CNT core/porous MnO2 sheath hierarchy architecture for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hui; Wang, Yu; Lin, Jianyi; Lu, Li

    2012-01-01

    MnO2/carbon nanotube [CNT] nanocomposites with a CNT core/porous MnO2 sheath hierarchy architecture are synthesized by a simple hydrothermal treatment. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy analyses reveal that birnessite-type MnO2 is produced through the hydrothermal synthesis. Morphological characterization reveals that three-dimensional hierarchy architecture is built with a highly porous layer consisting of interconnected MnO2 nanoflakes uniformly coated on the CNT surface. The nanocomposite with a composition of 72 wt.% (K0.2MnO2·0.33 H2O)/28 wt.% CNT has a large specific surface area of 237.8 m2/g. Electrochemical properties of the CNT, the pure MnO2, and the MnO2/CNT nanocomposite electrodes are investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The MnO2/CNT nanocomposite electrode exhibits much larger specific capacitance compared with both the CNT electrode and the pure MnO2 electrode and significantly improves rate capability compared to the pure MnO2 electrode. The superior supercapacitive performance of the MnO2/CNT nancomposite electrode is due to its high specific surface area and unique hierarchy architecture which facilitate fast electron and ion transport.

  12. CNT based thermal Brownian motor to pump water in nanodevices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oyarzua, Elton; Zambrano, Harvey; Walther, Jens Honore

    2016-01-01

    asymmetry drive the water ow in a preferential direction. We systematically modified the magnitude of the applied thermal gradient and the axial position of the fixed points. The analysis involves measurement of the vibrational modes in the CNTs using a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithm. We observed......Brownian molecular motors are nanoscale machines that exploit thermal fluctuations for directional motion by employing mechanisms such as the Feynman-Smoluchowski ratchet. In this study, using Non Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics, we propose a novel thermal Brownian motor for pumping water through...... Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs). To achieve this we impose a thermal gradient along the axis of a CNT filled with water and impose, in addition, a spatial asymmetry by flxing specific zones on the CNT in order to modify the vibrational modes of the CNT. We find that the temperature gradient and imposed spatial...

  13. Effect of support surface treatment on the synthesis, structure, and performance of Co/CNT Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eschemann, Thomas O.; Lamme, Wouter S.; Manchester, Rene L.; Parmentier, Tanja E.; Cognigni, Andrea; Ronning, Magnus; de Jong, Krijn P.

    We report the preparation of supported cobalt catalysts (9 wt% Co) on untreated (CNT) and surface-oxidized (CNT-ox) carbon nanotube materials by incipient wetness impregnation with solutions of cobalt nitrate in water, ethanol, or 1-propanol. The results show that by a judicious selection of solvent

  14. An experimental study of the composite CNT/copper coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panarin, Valentin Ye.; Svavil‧nyi, Nikolai Ye.; Khominich, Anastasiya I.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents experimental results on the preparation and investigation of the carbon nanotubes-copper composite material. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized on silicon substrates by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method and then filled with copper by evaporation from a melting pot in a vacuum. Copper evenly covered both the surface of the entangled tubes and the free substrate surface between the tubes. To improve the adhesion of tubes and matrix material, a carbon substructure was grown on the surface of tubes by adding working gas plasma to the CNT synthesis area. It is proposed to use a copper coating as a diffusion barrier upon subsequent filling of the reinforcing CNT frame by a carbide-forming materials matrix with predetermined physico-mechanical and tribological properties.

  15. Proposal of Carbon Nanotube Inductors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsubaki, K; Nakajima, Y; Hanajiri, T; Yamaguchi, H

    2006-01-01

    The inductors made of carbon Nanotube (CNT) have been proposed. Though the fabrication of the proposed inductor is still challenging and has many problems, merits of the proposed inductor are following...

  16. Progress in the realization of a silicon-CNT photodetector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aramo, C., E-mail: aramo@na.infn.it [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Ambrosio, A. [CNR-SPIN U.O.S. di Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Ambrosio, M. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Castrucci, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata,Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Cilmo, M. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); De Crescenzi, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata,Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Fiandrini, E. [INFN, Sezione di Perugia e Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, PiazzaUniversita 1, 06100 Perugia (Italy); Guarino, F. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Grossi, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi dell' Aquila, Via Vetoio 10, 67100 Coppito, L' Aquila (Italy); Nappi, E. [INFN, Sezione di Bari, e Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Bari, Via Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Passacantando, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi dell' Aquila, Via Vetoio 10, 67100 Coppito, L' Aquila (Italy); Pignatel, G. [INFN, Sezione di Perugia e Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, PiazzaUniversita 1, 06100 Perugia (Italy); and others

    2012-12-11

    The realization of a Silicon Carbon Nanotube heterojuntion opens the door to a new generation of photodetectors (Si-CNT detector) based on the coupling between this two materials. In particular the growth of Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes on the surface of a n-doped silicon substrate results on a Schottky diode junction with precise rectifying characteristics. The obtained device presents a low dark current, high efficiency in the photoresponsivity, high linearity and a wide stability range. The junction barrier is about 3.5 V in reverse polarity with a breakdown limit at more than 100 V. The spectral behavior reflects the silicon spectral range with a maximum at about 880 nm.

  17. Molecular Simulations of Cyclic Loading Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes Using the Atomistic Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT in many engineered bionanomaterials and electromechanical devices have imposed an urgent need on the understanding of the fatigue behavior and mechanism of CNT under cyclic loading conditions. To date, however, very little work has been done in this field. This paper presents the results of a theoretical study on the behavior of CNT subject to cyclic tensile and compressive loads using quasi-static molecular simulations. The Atomistic Finite Element Method (AFEM has been applied in the study. It is shown that CNT exhibited extreme cyclic loading resistance with yielding strain and strength becoming constant within limited number of loading cycles. Viscoelastic behavior including nonlinear elasticity, hysteresis, preconditioning (stress softening, and large strain have been observed. Chiral symmetry was found to have appreciable effects on the cyclic loading behavior of CNT. Mechanisms of the observed behavior have been revealed by close examination of the intrinsic geometric and mechanical features of tube structure. It was shown that the accumulated residual defect-free morphological deformation was the primary mechanism responsible for the cyclic failure of CNT, while the bond rotating and stretching experienced during loading/unloading played a dominant role on the strength, strain and modulus behavior of CNT.

  18. Polyurethane compounds having carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    The invention relates to semi-crystalline polyurethane (PUR) compositions filled with carbon nanotubes (CNT) and having improved electrical properties, which can be obtained on the basis of water-based polyurethane/CNT mixtures. The invention further relates to a method for producing polyurethane

  19. A study on carbon nanotube bridge as a electromechanical memory device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Ha Lee, Jun; Joo Lee, Hoong; Hwang, Ho Jung

    2005-04-01

    A nanoelectromechanical (NEM) nanotube random access memory (NRAM) device based on carbon nanotube (CNT) was investigated using atomistic simulations. For the CNT-based NEM memory, the mechanical properties of the CNT-bridge and van der Waals interactions between the CNT-bridge and substrate were very important. The critical amplitude of the CNT-bridge was 16% of the length of the CNT-bridge. As molecular dynamics time increased, the CNT-bridge went to the steady state under the electrostatic force with the damping of the potential and the kinetic energies of the CNT-bridge. The interatomic interaction between the CNT-bridge and substrate, value of the CNT-bridge slack, and damping rate of the CNT-bridge were very important for the operation of the NEM memory device as a nonvolatile memory.

  20. Integrated Sensing of Alcohols by CNT Blended HAp Nano Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh R. ANJUM

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The research work reports the application of carbon nanotubes (CNT blended Hydroxyapatite (HAp composites as ideal thick film substrates for the detection of hazardous and flammable methanol vapours. The main objective of this work is to improve the temperature-dependent sensitivity of the sensor for the detection of lower methanol concentration. In this study, the sensing ability of native HAp and CNT blended HAp thick films is studied for the detection of methanol vapours present in ambient air individually and in the form of a mixture of methanol, ethanol, and propanol. The sensing parameters are studied using two probe electrical method. The sensor substrate is made by means of doping of different concentrations of CNT in HAp. The sensing of methanol vapours is studied at a fixed concentration of 100 ppm. Native HAp substrate shows good sensitivity for methanol at room temperature; however, its sensing performance is inferior to the CNT blended materials. The blended composites exhibit impressive sensing ability compared with native HAp in terms of sensitivity, response/ recovery time and maximum uptake limit. The sensing mechanism for methanol detection, the role of HAp as a parent material and CNT as an additive, is explained using a suitable sensing mechanism.

  1. Enhanced ionic liquid mobility induced by confinement in 1D CNT membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrod, Q.; Ferdeghini, F.; Judeinstein, P.; Genevaz, N.; Ramos, R.; Fournier, A.; Dijon, J.; Ollivier, J.; Rols, S.; Yu, D.; Mole, R. A.; Zanotti, J.-M.

    2016-04-01

    Water confined within carbon nanotubes (CNT) exhibits tremendous enhanced transport properties. Here, we extend this result to ionic liquids (IL) confined in vertically aligned CNT membranes. Under confinement, the IL self-diffusion coefficient is increased by a factor 3 compared to its bulk reference. This could lead to high power battery separators.Water confined within carbon nanotubes (CNT) exhibits tremendous enhanced transport properties. Here, we extend this result to ionic liquids (IL) confined in vertically aligned CNT membranes. Under confinement, the IL self-diffusion coefficient is increased by a factor 3 compared to its bulk reference. This could lead to high power battery separators. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01445c

  2. Electrical conductivity of metal–carbon nanotube structures: Effect of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The electrical properties of asymmetric metal–carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been studied using ... The models with asymmetric metal contacts and carbon nanotube bear resemblance to experimental ... ordinary mechanical strength.

  3. Fabrication technology of CNT-Nickel Oxide based planar pseudocapacitor for MEMS and NEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, E. A.; Kitsyuk, E. P.; Gavrilin, I. M.; Gromov, D. G.; Gruzdev, N. E.; Gavrilov, S. A.; Dronov, A. A.; Pavlov, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Fabrication technology of planar pseudocapacitor (PsC) based on carbon nanotube (CNT) forest, synthesized using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method, covered with thin nickel oxide layer deposited by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method, is demonstrated. Dependences of deposited oxide layers thickness on device specific capacities is studied. It is shown that pseudocapacity of nickel oxide thin layer increases specific capacity of the CNT's based device up to 2.5 times.

  4. New CNT/poly(brilliant green) and CNT/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) based electrochemical enzyme biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsan, Madalina M; Pifferi, Valentina; Falciola, Luigi; Brett, Christopher M A

    2016-07-13

    A combination of the electroactive polymer poly(brilliant green) (PBG) or conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) with carbon nanotubes to obtain CNT/PBG and CNT/PEDOT modified carbon film electrodes (CFE) has been investigated as a new biosensor platform, incorporating the enzymes glucose oxidase (GOx) as test enzyme, alcohol oxidase (AlcOx) or alcohol dehydrogenase (AlcDH). The sensing parameters were optimized for all biosensors based on CNT/PBG/CFE, CNT/PEDOT/CFE platforms. Under optimized conditions, both GOx biosensors exhibited very similar sensitivities, while in the case of AlcOx and AlcDH biosensors, AlcOx/CNT/PBG/CFE was found to give a higher sensitivity and lower detection limit. The influence of dissolved O2 on oxidase-biosensor performance was investigated and was shown to be different for each enzyme. Comparisons were made with similar reported biosensors, showing the advantages of the new biosensors, and excellent selectivity against potential interferents was successfully demonstrated. Finally, alcohol biosensors were successfully used for the determination of ethanol in alcoholic beverages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of CNT content and sintering temperature on some properties of CNT-reinforced MgAl composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islak Serkan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium and its alloys are considered as an important material for modern light structures at the present time and therefore they have a wide area of usage especially in electronics, aircraft, and automotive industries. Its popularity increases further as a result of its production as a composite material. In this study, carbon nanotube (CNT reinforced MgAl matrix composite materials were produced by using the hot pressing method. While 0.25 wt%, 0.50 wt%, 0.75 wt%, and 1.00 wt% CNT were added, 450°C, 500°C, and 550°C was selected as sintering temperatures. The effect of sintering temperature and amount of CNT on some properties of the composites was examined. Microstructure and phase composition of the materials were examined by using optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. The hardness of the composites was measured in Brinell. Relative densities of the materials were determined in accordance with Archimedes’ principle. A dense and slightly porous structure was obtained based on both SEM images and density measurements. XRD analyses showed that there were Mg, Mg17Al12, and MgO phases in the composites. The reason for the absence of Al in graphics was that Al formed the solid solution by being dissolved in Mg. Also, the C peak could not be determined for CNT. The hardness of the composites increased with the increasing sintering temperature and CNT addition. The highest hardness value was measured as 88.45 HB10 with the addition of 1.00 wt% CNT at 550°C. Free distribution of CNT in the matrix caused this hardness increase.

  6. Nanotechnology and textiles engineered by carbon nanotubes for the realization of advanced personal protective equipments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andretta, Antonio, E-mail: Antonio-Andretta@klopman.com [Klopman International S.R.L., Via Mola dei Frati, 03100 Frosinone (Italy); Terranova, Maria Letizia; Lavecchia, Teresa; Gay, Stefano; Tamburri, Emanuela [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Minima lab, Università di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Roma (Italy); Picano, Alfredo; Mascioletti, Alessandro; Stirpe, Daniele [Labor - Industrial Research Lab, Via Giacomo Peroni, 386 C/O Tecnopolo Tiburtino, 00131 Roma (Italy); Cucchiella, Cristian; Pascucci, Eddy [InfoSolution S.p.A, Via Zoe Fontana 10, 00131 Roma, Via Luigi Cadorna 67, 20090 Vimodrone (MI) (Italy); Dugnani, Giovanni; Gatti, Davide [Tpa Spa - Tecnologie e Prodotti per l' Automazione, Via Carducci 221, 20099 Sesto San Giovanni (MI) (Italy); Laria, Giuseppe [Centre of Research for Pure and Applied Mathematics, via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Codenotti, Barbara [Lavanderie dell' Alto Adige S.p.A., via Nazionale 55, 39040 Ora (Italy); Maldini, Giorgio [Meta System S.p.A., Via Galimberti 8, 42124 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Roth, Siegmar [SINEUROP-Nanotech GmbH, TBC Kernerstrasse 34, 70182 Stuttgart (Germany); Passeri, Daniele; Rossi, Marco [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base ed Applicate per l' Ingegneria and CNIS, Sapienza Università di Roma, Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy)

    2014-06-19

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and CNT-based active materials have been used to assemble the gas sensing unit of innovative platforms able to detect toxic atmospheres developing in confined workplaces. The main goal of the project was to realize a full-featured, operator-friendly safety detection and monitoring system based on multifunctional textiles nanotechnologies. The fabricated sensing platform consists of a multiple gas detector coupled with a specifically designed telecommunication infrastructure. The portable device, totally integrated in the workwear, offers several advantages over the conventional safety tools employed in industrial work activities.

  7. CNT Nanobombs for Specific Eradication of Cancer Cells: A New Concept in Cancer Theranosticss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadollah Omidi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Whole extermination of cancerous cells/tissue seems no longer to be a dream. Exploiting advanced photoactive nanomaterials such as functionalized fullerenes and carbon nanotubes (CNTs can act as CNT nanobombs (CNT-NBs when exposed to the near infrared (NIR radiation. PEGylated CNTs tagged with an antibody/aptamer can target cancer cells. Once attached to cancer cells, the NIR emission (700-1100 nm, in which body tissues are mostly transparent, can be applied to CNT-NBs which can absorb the light and get heated up. The resultant enhanced temperature can abolish the cancer. Once stealth CNT-NBs are tagged with imaging moieties, it would be a matter of computer gaming for physician who can inject it for real time visualization and destruction of cancer by activation of the NIR laser. While, many nanosystems (NSs are still in waiting list for clinical translation, our dreams may come true by applying stealth CNT-NBs against cancer.

  8. Effect of acid treated carbon nanotubes on mechanical, rheological and thermal properties of polystyrene nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Amr, Issam Thaher; Al-Amer, Adnan M J; Selvin, Thomas P.; Al-Harthi, Mamdouh Ahmed; Girei, Salihu Adamu; Sougrat, Rachid; Atieh, Muataz Ali

    2011-01-01

    In this work, multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT) were functionalized by acid treatment and characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Polystyrene/CNT composites of both the untreated

  9. Toxicity study of complex CNT-PEG(-NH2)-DOX synthesis on neuroblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurulhuda, I.; Mazatulikhma, M. Z.; Alrokayan, S.; Khan, H.; Rusop, M.

    2018-05-01

    The synthesized carbon nanotubes was functionalized with PEG and drug (doxorubicin) was tested on neuroblastoma cells. The treatment was done for 24 and 48 h. The concentration of CNT and doxorubicin were at 2.5, 5, 10 µg/ml and 0.5, 0.1, 0.05 µM, respectively. The result showed the longer time treatment do have effect on the cells viability and the complex functionalized CNT have high cells viability rather than the drug and CNT treatment alone.

  10. Impact of carbon nanotube length on electron transport in aligned carbon nanotube networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeonyoon; Stein, Itai Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Devoe, Mackenzie E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Lewis, Diana J.; Lachman, Noa; Buschhorn, Samuel T.; Wardle, Brian L., E-mail: wardle@mit.edu [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Kessler, Seth S. [Metis Design Corporation, 205 Portland St., Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2015-02-02

    Here, we quantify the electron transport properties of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) networks as a function of the CNT length, where the electrical conductivities may be tuned by up to 10× with anisotropies exceeding 40%. Testing at elevated temperatures demonstrates that the aligned CNT networks have a negative temperature coefficient of resistance, and application of the fluctuation induced tunneling model leads to an activation energy of ≈14 meV for electron tunneling at the CNT-CNT junctions. Since the tunneling activation energy is shown to be independent of both CNT length and orientation, the variation in electron transport is attributed to the number of CNT-CNT junctions an electron must tunnel through during its percolated path, which is proportional to the morphology of the aligned CNT network.

  11. Impact of carbon nanotube length on electron transport in aligned carbon nanotube networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeonyoon; Stein, Itai Y.; Devoe, Mackenzie E.; Lewis, Diana J.; Lachman, Noa; Buschhorn, Samuel T.; Wardle, Brian L.; Kessler, Seth S.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we quantify the electron transport properties of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) networks as a function of the CNT length, where the electrical conductivities may be tuned by up to 10× with anisotropies exceeding 40%. Testing at elevated temperatures demonstrates that the aligned CNT networks have a negative temperature coefficient of resistance, and application of the fluctuation induced tunneling model leads to an activation energy of ≈14 meV for electron tunneling at the CNT-CNT junctions. Since the tunneling activation energy is shown to be independent of both CNT length and orientation, the variation in electron transport is attributed to the number of CNT-CNT junctions an electron must tunnel through during its percolated path, which is proportional to the morphology of the aligned CNT network

  12. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  13. Carbon Nanotube based Nanotechnolgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, M.

    2000-10-01

    Carbon nanotube(CNT) was discovered in the early 1990s and is an off-spring of C60(the fullerene or buckyball). CNT, depending on chirality and diameter, can be metallic or semiconductor and thus allows formation of metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semiconductor junctions. CNT exhibits extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties and offers remarkable potential for revolutionary applications in electronics devices, computing and data storage technology, sensors, composites, storage of hydrogen or lithium for battery development, nanoelectromechanical systems(NEMS), and as tip in scanning probe microscopy(SPM) for imaging and nanolithography. Thus the CNT synthesis, characterization and applications touch upon all disciplines of science and engineering. A common growth method now is based on CVD though surface catalysis is key to synthesis, in contrast to many CVD applications common in microelectronics. A plasma based variation is gaining some attention. This talk will provide an overview of CNT properties, growth methods, applications, and research challenges and opportunities ahead.

  14. Powerful greenhouse gas nitrous oxide adsorption onto intrinsic and Pd doped Single walled carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoosefian, Mehdi, E-mail: m.yoosefian@kgut.ac.ir

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Investigation of the adsorption of Nitrous oxide on SWCNT and Pd/SWCNT. • Nitrous oxide adsorbed on Pd/SWCNT system demonstrates a strong adsorption. • The Pd/SWCNT is potential sensor for the Nitrous oxide gaseous molecule detection. - Abstract: Density functional studies on the adsorption behavior of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) onto intrinsic carbon nanotube (CNT) and Pd-doped (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotube (Pd-CNT) have been reported. Introduction of Pd dopant facilitates in adsorption of N{sub 2}O on the otherwise inert nanotube as observed from the adsorption energies and global reactivity descriptor values. Among three adsorption features of N{sub 2}O onto CNT, the horizontal adsorption with E{sub ads} = −0.16 eV exhibits higher adsorption energy. On the other hand the Pd-CNT exhibit strong affinity toward gas molecule and would cause a huge increase in N{sub 2}O adsorption energies. Chemical and electronic properties of CNT and Pd-CNT in the absence and presence of N{sub 2}O were investigated. Adsorption of N{sub 2}O gas molecule would affect the electronic conductance of Pd-CNT that can serve as a signal of gas sensors and the increased energy gaps demonstrate the formation of more stable systems. The atoms in molecules (AIM) theory and the natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations were performed to get more details about the nature and charge transfers in intermolecular interactions within adsorption process. As a final point, the density of states (DOSs) calculations was achieved to confirm previous results. According to our results, intrinsic CNT cannot act as a suitable adsorbent while Pd-CNT can be introduced as novel detectable complex for designing high sensitive, fast response and high efficient carbon nanotube based gas sensor to detect N{sub 2}O gas as an air pollutant. Our results could provide helpful information for the design and fabrication of the N{sub 2}O sensors.

  15. Investigation of Mechanical Properties and Morphology of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Cellulose Acetate Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quazi Nahida Sultana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose acetate (CA fibers were reinforced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs at 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5% and 2.0%. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, fracture strain and toughness of the nanocomposite fiber increased up to 1.5 wt. % of the carbon nanotube (CNT loading, however, further inclusion (2.0% of MWCNTs in CA decreased the mechanical properties. Experimental properties were also compared with analytical predictions using a Shear lag model for strength and the rule of mixture for modulus. A solution spinning process, coupled with sonication, mixing, and extrusion, was used to process the CNT-reinforced composite fiber. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images of the cross sections of neat CA and CA-MWCNT fibers showed the formation of voids and irregular features. The enhanced interconnected fibrillation in the CNT-reinforced CA samples resulted in improved mechanical properties, which were observed by tensile testing. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR spectra showed the area under the curve for C–H bonding after the inclusion of CNT. There was no significant shift of wavenumber for the inclusion of MWCNT in the CA matrix, which indicates that the sonication process of the CNT-loaded solution did not degrade the CA bonding structure.

  16. Fabrication of nanostructured clay-carbon nanotube hybrid nanofiller by chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manikandan, Dhanagopal, E-mail: dmani_cat@yahoo.co.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan, E-mail: mangal@udec.cl [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Siddheswaran, Rajendran [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Avila, Ricardo E. [Personal Dosimetry Section, Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, Santiago (Chile); Ananthakumar, Solaiappan [Materials and Minerals Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (NIIST), Trivandrum, Kerala (India)

    2012-03-01

    Growth of multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) assemblies by chemical vapour decomposition (CVD) technique was achieved through decomposition of acetylene using iron impregnated montmorillonite (MM) catalysts. Various amounts of iron loaded montmorillonite catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation method and calcined at 450 Degree-Sign C. The catalysts were subjected to X-ray diffraction (XRD) and surface area analyses. Acetylene decomposition at a feed ratio of N{sub 2}:H{sub 2}:C{sub 2}H{sub 2} = 1:1:0.18 was conducted in the presence of iron impregnated montmorillonite catalysts in the CVD reactor for the growth of CNT structures. The role of Fe-activated clay catalyst on the formation of CNT structures has been systematically examined at various temperatures and correlated with the morphological features of CNTs. Catalyst assisted acetylene decomposition results the formation of different carbon nanostructures such as nanotubes, nanofibres and nanoflakes. These clay-CNT products were characterised for their morphological, thermal, qualitative and quantitative analyses. The morphological variations of CNT assemblies reveal Fe-montmorillonite catalysts have high selectivity at given reaction conditions. Thermogravimetric and Raman spectral analyses prove that the CNTs contain a good crystallanity and less structural defects.

  17. Fabrication of nanostructured clay-carbon nanotube hybrid nanofiller by chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manikandan, Dhanagopal; Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan; Siddheswaran, Rajendran; Avila, Ricardo E.; Ananthakumar, Solaiappan

    2012-01-01

    Growth of multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) assemblies by chemical vapour decomposition (CVD) technique was achieved through decomposition of acetylene using iron impregnated montmorillonite (MM) catalysts. Various amounts of iron loaded montmorillonite catalysts were prepared by wet impregnation method and calcined at 450 °C. The catalysts were subjected to X-ray diffraction (XRD) and surface area analyses. Acetylene decomposition at a feed ratio of N 2 :H 2 :C 2 H 2 = 1:1:0.18 was conducted in the presence of iron impregnated montmorillonite catalysts in the CVD reactor for the growth of CNT structures. The role of Fe-activated clay catalyst on the formation of CNT structures has been systematically examined at various temperatures and correlated with the morphological features of CNTs. Catalyst assisted acetylene decomposition results the formation of different carbon nanostructures such as nanotubes, nanofibres and nanoflakes. These clay-CNT products were characterised for their morphological, thermal, qualitative and quantitative analyses. The morphological variations of CNT assemblies reveal Fe-montmorillonite catalysts have high selectivity at given reaction conditions. Thermogravimetric and Raman spectral analyses prove that the CNTs contain a good crystallanity and less structural defects.

  18. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  19. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  20. A study on electromechanical carbon nanotube memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Hwang, Ho Jung

    2005-01-01

    Electromechanical operations of carbon-nanotube (CNT) bridge memory device were investigated by using atomistic simulations based on empirical potentials. The nanotube-bridge memory device was operated by the electrostatic and the van der Waals forces acting on the nanotube-bridge. For the CNT bridge memory device, the van der Waals interactions between the CNT bridge and the oxide were very important. As the distance between the CNT bridge and the oxide decreased and the van der Waals interaction energy increased, the pull-in bias of the CNT-bridge decreased and the nonvolatility of the nanotube-bridge memory device increased, while the pull-out voltages increased. When the materials composed of the oxide film are different, since the van der Waals interactions must be also different, the oxide materials must be carefully selected for the CNT-bridge memory device to work as a nonvolatile memory.

  1. The study of explosive emission from carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, Sergey

    2002-01-01

    The carbon nanotubes (CNT) found applications for high density current electron emitters. The main interest for forming of high current electron beams using CNT is high concentration of electrical field on the nanotubes and high value of yield by electrons for field emission. The experimental results for time processes of forming cathode plasma and extraction of electron beam are presented in the report

  2. 3D RVE models able to capture and quantify the dispersion, agglomeration and orientation state of CNT in CNT/PP nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Atiqur Bhuiyan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this study is to investigate the capabilities of 3D RVE models in predicting the tensile modulus of carbon nanotube polypropylene (CNT/PP composites which differ slightly in the dispersion, agglomeration and orientation states of CNT within the PP matrix. The composites are made using melt mixing followed by either injection molding or melt spinning of fibers. The dispersion, agglomeration and orientation of CNT within the PP are experimentally altered by using a surfactant and by forcing the molten material to flow through a narrow orifice (melt spinning that promotes alignment of CNT along the flow/drawing direction. An elaborate image analysis technique is used to quantify the CNT characteristics in terms of probability distribution functions (PDF. The PDF are then introduced to the 3D RVE models which also account for the CNT-PP interfacial interactions. It is concluded that the 3D RVE models can accurately distinguish among the different cases (dispersion, distribution, geometry and alignment of CNT as the predicted tensile modulus is in good agreement with the experimentally determined one.

  3. Fabrication of CNT Dispersion Fluid by Wet-Jet Milling Method for Coating on Bipolar Plate of Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Almowarai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Water based carbon nanotube (CNT dispersion was produced by wet-jet milling method. Commercial CNT was originally agglomerated at the particle size of less than 1 mm. The wet-jet milling process exfoliated CNTs from the agglomerates and dispersed them into water. Sedimentation of the CNTs in the dispersion fluid was not observed for more than a month. The produced CNT dispersion was characterized by the SEM and the viscometer. CNT/PTFE composite film was formed with the CNT dispersion in this study. The electrical conductivity of the composite film increased to 10 times when the CNT dispersion, which was produced by the wet-jet milling method, was used as a constituent of the film. Moreover, the composite film was applied to bipolar plate of fuel cell and increased the output power of the fuel cell to 1.3 times.

  4. Sonochemical synthesis and characterization of Pt/CNT, Pt/TiO2, and Pt/CNT/TiO2 electrocatalysts for methanol electro-oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedolla-Valdez, Z.I.; Verde-Gómez, Y.; Valenzuela-Muñiz, A.M.; Gochi-Ponce, Y.; Oropeza-Guzmán, M.T.; Berhault, Gilles; Alonso-Núñez, G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pt/CNT/TiO 2 electrocatalyst was successfully prepared by the sonochemical method. • The electrocatalyst Pt/CNT/TiO 2 was synthesized without heat treatments, additives or surfactants. • The TiO 2 -Pt interaction improves the CO-tolerance of Pt/CNT/TiO 2 , as well as the electrocatalyst stability. • Low amount of multi-walled carbon nanotubes increases the current density of Pt/CNT/TiO 2 significantly compared to Pt/TiO 2 . - Abstract: Pt electrocatalyst supported on composite formed of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and titanium oxide (CNT/TiO 2 ) was successfully synthesized by a sonochemical method without heat treatments, surfactants or additives. This electrocatalyst could be used for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) applications. For comparison, Pt/CNT and Pt/TiO 2 electrocatalysts were prepared as reference samples. Structural properties and morphology of the synthesized materials were examined by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and their specific surface areas were determined by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method. The Pt and acid-treated CNT contents were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, respectively. The electrochemical properties of the synthesized electrocatalysts were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry in a three-electrode cell at room temperature. The evaluation performed using electrochemical techniques suggests that TiO 2 promotes the CO-tolerance due to TiO 2 -Pt interaction. The CV tests demonstrated that 6 wt.% of acid-treated CNT increases significantly the current density when Pt selectively interacts with TiO 2 .

  5. Influence of composite processing on the properties of CNT grown on carbon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignier, Claire; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Camillieri, Brigitte; Durand, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) grafted on carbon fibres (CF) are the subject of more and more studies on the reinforcement of composite materials thanks to the CNT' mechanical properties. This study concerns the growth of CNT directly on CF by the flame method, which is an assembly-line process. However the industrial-scale use of this method and of the composite processing leads to stresses on the CNT-grafted fabrics, such as friction and pulling-out. The aim of this study is to determine the behaviour of the CNT under these kinds of stresses and to study theirs consequences in composite processing. For this purpose, adhesion tests and friction tests were performed as well as analysis of the surface by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). In friction tests, CNT formed a transfer film, and its effect on the wettability of the fabric with epoxy resin is determined. Finally, the wear of the CNT does not influence the wettability of the fabric. Furthermore, it is proven that the nature of the catalyst needed to grow the CNT modifies the behaviour of the surface.

  6. Fabrication process and electromagnetic wave absorption characterization of a CNT/Ni/epoxy nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seongwoo; Mo, Chan Bin; Lee, Haeshin; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Since carbon nanotube (CNT) was first discovered in 1991, it has been considered as a viable type of conductive filler for electromagnetic wave absorption materials in the GHz range. In this paper, pearl-necklace-structure CNT/Ni nano-powders were fabricated by a polyol process as conductive fillers. Compared to synthesized CNT, pearl-necklace Ni-decorated CNT increased the electrical conductivity by an order of 1 due to the enhancement of the Ni-conductive network. Moreover, the decorated Ni particles prevented the agglomeration of CNTs by counterbalancing the Van der Walls interaction between the CNTs. A CNT/Ni nanocomposite showed a homogeneous dispersion in an epoxy-based matrix. This enhanced physical morphology and electrical properties lead to an increase in the loss tangent and reflection loss in the CNT/Ni/Epoxy nanocomposite compared to these characteristics of a CNT/Epoxy nanocomposite in range of 8-12 GHz. The electromagnetic wave absorption properties of CNT/Ni/epoxy nanocomposites will provide enormous opportunities for electronic applications where lightweight EMI shielding or electro-magnetic wave absorption properties are necessary.

  7. Chromium carbide-CNT nanocomposites with enhanced mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Virendra; Diaz, Rene; Balani, Kantesh; Agarwal, Arvind; Seal, Sudipta

    2009-01-01

    Chromium carbide is widely used as a tribological coating material in high-temperature applications requiring high wear resistance and hardness. Herein, an attempt has been made to further enhance the mechanical and wear properties of chromium carbide coatings by reinforcing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a potential replacement of soft binder matrix using plasma spraying. The microstructures of the sprayed CNT-reinforced Cr 3 C 2 coatings were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties were assessed using micro-Vickers hardness, nanoindentation and wear measurements. CNT reinforcement improved the hardness of the coating by 40% and decreased the wear rate of the coating by almost 45-50%. Cr 3 C 2 reinforced with 2 wt.% CNT had an elastic modulus 304.5 ± 29.2 GPa, hardness of 1175 ± 60 VH 0.300 and a coefficient of friction of 0.654. It was concluded that the CNT reinforcement increased the wear resistance by forming intersplat bridges while the improvement in the hardness was attributed to the deformation resistance of CNTs under indentation

  8. Constructing carbon nanotube junctions by Ar ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishaq, Ahmad; Ni Zhichun; Yan Long; Gong Jinlong; Zhu Dezhang

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) irradiated by Ar ion beams at elevated temperature were studied. The irradiation-induced defects in CNTs are greatly reduced by elevated temperature. Moreover, the two types of CNT junctions, the crossing junction and the parallel junction, were formed. And the CNT networks may be fabricated by the two types of CNT junctions. The formation process and the corresponding mechanism of CNT networks are discussed.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Based Electric Propulsion Thruster with Low Power Consumption, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project is to develop field emission electric propulsion (FEEP) thruster using carbon nanotubes (CNT) integrated anode. FEEP thrusters have gained...

  10. Noncovalent Attachment of PbS Quantum Dots to Single- and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Attachment of PbS quantum dots (QD to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT is described; wherein commercially obtained PbS-QD of size 2.7 nm, stabilized by oleic acid, are added to a suspension of single- or multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNT prefunctionalized noncovalently with 1,2-benzenedimethanethiol (1,2-BDMT in ethanol. The aromatic part of 1,2-BDMT attaches to the CNT by π-π stacking interactions, noncovalently functionalizing the CNT. The thiol part of the 1,2-BDMT on the functionalized CNT replaces oleic acid on the surface of the QD facilitating the noncovalent attachment of the QD to the CNT. The composites were characterized by TEM and FTIR spectroscopy. Quenching of NIR fluorescence of the PbS-QD on attachment to the carbon nanotubes (CNT was observed, indicating FRET from the QD to the CNT.

  11. Features of electron-phonon interactions in nanotubes with chiral symmetry in magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kibis, O V

    2001-01-01

    Interaction of the electrons with acoustic phonons in the nanotube with chiral symmetry by availability of the magnetic field, parallel to the nanotube axis, is considered. It is shown that the electron energy spectrum is asymmetric relative to the electron wave vector inversion and for that reason the electron-phonon interaction appears to be different for similar phonons with mutually contrary directions of the wave vector. This phenomenon leads to origination of the electromotive force by the spatially uniform electron gas heating and to appearance of the quadrupole component in the nanotube volt-ampere characteristics

  12. A comprehensive theoretical investigation about the bio-functionalization capability of single walled CNT, BNNT and SiCNT using DNA/RNA nucleobases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinezhad, Heshmatollah; Ganji, Masoud Darvish; Soleymani, Elham; Tajbakhsh, Mahmood

    2017-11-01

    By means of Density Functional Theory (DFT) based calculations, we have elucidated the interactions between five nucleobases and three nanotubes, namely: CNT, BNNT and SiCNT. The energetics and equilibrium geometries have been calculated within the framework of revPBE method in combination with third version of Grimme's atom pair-wise dispersion corrections with Becke-Johnson damping (D3BJ). The obtained results in terms of adsorption energy values and geometrical parameters suggest that the overall interactions are divided into two parts: non-covalently and covalently bonded systems as the nucleobases are physisorbed onto the surface of CNT and BNNT (Eads ranges from -0.57 to -0.76 eV and -0.54 to -0.78 eV for CNT and BNNT complexes, respectively) while the type of interactions between nucleobase molecules and SiCNT has been found to be of covalent type with the Eads ranging from -0.61 to -1.8 eV. Moreover, the empirical dispersion corrections have been found to play crucial roles in obtaining reliable geometries and adsorption energy values for the non-covalently bonded systems. The role of solvation on the overall interactions has also been explored using the COSMO model within a media with dielectric constant of 78.39 which resembles the water environment and the results revealed that the interaction strength showed a decreasing trend with increasing the polarity of the system. Considering the adsorption energy differences between each nucleobase and the nanotubes, the SiCNT showed promising performance in differentiating between the nucleobase molecules and exhibited the highest affinity to be biofunctionalized in comparison to other nanotubes. The findings of the present work would be very useful for understanding the underlying phenomena behind the interface interactions and would aid future experimental investigations in the fields of biotechnology and materials science.

  13. Tribological properties of copper-based composites with copper coated NbSe2 and CNT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Beibei; Yang, Jin; Zhang, Qing; Huang, Hong; Li, Hongping; Tang, Hua; Li, Changsheng

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Morphology of copper coated NbSe 2 and CNT; friction coefficient and wear rate of copper-based composites. - Highlights: • NbSe 2 and CNT were coated with copper layers by the means of electroless plating. • The mechanical and tribological properties of copper composites were studied. • The enhancement mechanisms of copper coated NbSe 2 and CNT were proposed. • Copper–copper coated (12 wt.%NbSe 2 –3 wt.%CNT) composite had the best wear resistance. - Abstract: Copper-based composites with copper coated NbSe 2 and/or CNT were fabricated by the powder metallurgy technique. The morphology and phase composition of copper coated NbSe 2 and carbon nanotube (CNT) were observed using high solution transmission electronic microscope (HRTEM), scanning electronic microscope (SEM equipped with EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The density, hardness, and bending strength of as-prepared copper-based composites were measured, and their tribological properties were investigated using UMT-2 tester. Results indicated that all copper-based composites showed decreased density and bending strength, but increased hardness in comparison with copper matrix. Besides, the incorporation of copper coated NbSe 2 improved the friction-reducing and anti-wear properties of copper matrix. Addition of copper coated CNT greatly enhanced the mechanical and tribological properties. In particular, when the content of copper coated CNT was 3 wt.%, the corresponding composite exhibited the best tribological properties. This was because NbSe 2 was distributed chaotically in matrix, which greatly improved the friction-reducing property of copper, while CNT with superior mechanical strength enhanced the wear resistance by increasing the load-carrying capacity. More importantly, copper layers coated on NbSe 2 and CNT favored the good interfacial combination between fillers and copper matrix showing beneficial effect for the stresses transferring from matrix to fillers

  14. Bioaccumulation and ecotoxicity of carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Petra; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Baun, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have numerous industrial applications and may be released to the environment. In the aquatic environment, pristine or functionalized CNT have different dispersion behavior, potentially leading to different risks of exposure along the water column. Data included in this review...

  15. In-line manufacture of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Nicol Michele; Signorelli, Riccardo; Martini, Fabrizio; Corripio Luna, Oscar Enrique

    2015-04-28

    Mass production of carbon nanotubes (CNT) are facilitated by methods and apparatus disclosed herein. Advantageously, the methods and apparatus make use of a single production unit, and therefore provide for uninterrupted progress in a fabrication process. Embodiments of control systems for a variety of CNT production apparatus are included.

  16. Stable and solid pellets of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes produced under high pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Pâmela Andréa Mantey dos [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência dos Materiais (Brazil); Gallas, Marcia Russman [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, Instituto de Física (Brazil); Radtke, Cláudio; Benvenutti, Edilson Valmir [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, Instituto de Química (Brazil); Elias, Ana Laura [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics and Center for 2-D and Layered Materials (United States); Rajukumar, Lakshmy Pulickal [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States); Terrones, Humberto [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy (United States); Endo, Morinobu [Shinshu University, Carbon Institute of Science and Technology (Japan); Terrones, Mauricio [The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics and Center for 2-D and Layered Materials (United States); Costa, Tania Maria Haas, E-mail: taniaha@iq.ufrgs.br, E-mail: taniahac@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência dos Materiais (Brazil)

    2015-06-15

    High pressure/temperature was applied on samples of pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), functionalized nanotubes (f-MWCNT), and nanotubes doped with nitrogen (CN{sub x}MWNT). Cylindrical compact pellets of f-MWCNT with diameters of about 6 mm were obtained under pressure of 4.0 GPa at room temperature and at 400 °C, using graphite as pressure transmitting medium. The best pellet samples were produced using nitric and sulfuric acids for the functionalization of MWCNT. The effect of high pressure/temperature on CNT was investigated by several spectroscopy and characterization techniques, such as Raman spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms, and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that MWCNT maintain their main features in the compacted pellets, such as integrity, original morphology, and structure, demonstrating that high-pressure/temperature compaction can indeed be used to fabricate novel CNT self-supported materials. Additionally, the specific surface area and porosity are unchanged, which is important when using bulk CNT in adsorption processes. Raman analysis of the G’-band showed a shift to lower wavenumbers when f-MWCNT were processed under high pressure, suggesting that CNT are under tensile stress.

  17. Electrostatically telescoping nanotube nonvolatile memory device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Jiang Qing

    2007-01-01

    We propose a nonvolatile memory based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) serving as the key building blocks for molecular-scale computers and investigate the dynamic operations of a double-walled CNT memory element by classical molecular dynamics simulations. The localized potential energy wells achieved from both the interwall van der Waals energy and CNT-metal binding energy make the bistability of the CNT positions and the electrostatic attractive forces induced by the voltage differences lead to the reversibility of this CNT memory. The material for the electrodes should be carefully chosen to achieve the nonvolatility of this memory. The kinetic energy of the CNT shuttle experiences several rebounds induced by the collisions of the CNT onto the metal electrodes, and this is critically important to the performance of such an electrostatically telescoping CNT memory because the collision time is sufficiently long to cause a delay of the state transition

  18. Laser printing of nanoparticle toner enables digital control of micropatterned carbon nanotube growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsen, Erik S; Stevens, Adam G; Hart, A John

    2013-05-01

    Commercialization of materials utilizing patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests, such as hierarchical composite structures, dry adhesives, and contact probe arrays, will require catalyst patterning techniques that do not rely on cleanroom photolithography. We demonstrate the large scale patterning of CNT growth catalyst via adaptation of a laser-based electrostatic printing process that uses magnetic ink character recognition (MICR) toner. The MICR toner contains iron oxide nanoparticles that serve as the catalyst for CNT growth, which are printed onto a flexible polymer (polyimide) and then transferred to a rigid substrate (silicon or alumina) under heat and mechanical pressure. Then, the substrate is processed for CNT growth under an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) recipe. This process enables digital control of patterned CNT growth via the laser intensity, which controls the CNT density; and via the grayscale level, which controls the pixelation of the image into arrays of micropillars. Moreover, virtually any pattern can be designed using standard software (e.g., MS Word, AutoCAD, etc.) and printed on demand. Using a standard office printer, we realize isolated CNT microstructures as small as 140 μm and isolated catalyst ″pixels″ as small as 70 μm (one grayscale dot) and determine that individual toner microparticles result in features of approximately 5-10 μm . We demonstrate that grayscale CNT patterns can function as dry adhesives and that large-area catalyst patterns can be printed directly onto metal foils or transferred to ceramic plates. Laser printing therefore shows promise to enable high-speed micropatterning of nanoparticle-containing thin films under ambient conditions, possibly for a wide variety of nanostructures by engineering of toners containing nanoparticles of desired composition, size, and shape.

  19. Electromagnetic characteristics of carbon nanotube film materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube (CNT possesses remarkable electrical conductivity, which shows great potential for the application as electromagnetic shielding material. This paper aims to characterize the electromagnetic parameters of a high CNT loading film by using waveguide method. The effects of layer number of CNT laminate, CNT alignment and resin impregnation on the electromagnetic characteristics were analyzed. It is shown that CNT film exhibits anisotropic electromagnetic characteristic. Pristine CNT film shows higher real part of complex permittivity, conductivity and shielding effectiveness when the polarized direction of incident wave is perpendicular to the winding direction of CNT film. For the CNT film laminates, complex permittivity increases with increasing layer number, and correspondingly, shielding effectiveness decreases. The five-layer CNT film shows extraordinary shielding performance with shielding effectiveness ranging from 67 dB to 78 dB in X-band. Stretching process induces the alignment of CNTs. When aligned direction of CNTs is parallel to the electric field, CNT film shows negative permittivity and higher conductivity. Moreover, resin impregnation into CNT film leads to the decrease of conductivity and shielding effectiveness. This research will contribute to the structural design for the application of CNT film as electromagnetic shielding materials.

  20. Respiratory toxicity of multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, Julie; Huaux, Francois; Moreau, Nicolas; Misson, Pierre; Heilier, Jean-Francois; Delos, Monique; Arras, Mohammed; Fonseca, Antonio; Nagy, Janos B.; Lison, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes focus the attention of many scientists because of their huge potential of industrial applications, but there is a paucity of information on the toxicological properties of this material. The aim of this experimental study was to characterize the biological reactivity of purified multi-wall carbon nanotubes in the rat lung and in vitro. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT) or ground CNT were administered intratracheally (0.5, 2 or 5 mg) to Sprague-Dawley rats and we estimated lung persistence, inflammation and fibrosis biochemically and histologically. CNT and ground CNT were still present in the lung after 60 days (80% and 40% of the lowest dose) and both induced inflammatory and fibrotic reactions. At 2 months, pulmonary lesions induced by CNT were characterized by the formation of collagen-rich granulomas protruding in the bronchial lumen, in association with alveolitis in the surrounding tissues. These lesions were caused by the accumulation of large CNT agglomerates in the airways. Ground CNT were better dispersed in the lung parenchyma and also induced inflammatory and fibrotic responses. Both CNT and ground CNT stimulated the production of TNF-α in the lung of treated animals. In vitro, ground CNT induced the overproduction of TNF-α by macrophages. These results suggest that carbon nanotubes are potentially toxic to humans and that strict industrial hygiene measures should to be taken to limit exposure during their manipulation

  1. A Novel Method of Mechanical Oxidation of CNT for Polymer Nanocomposite Application: Evaluation of Mechanical, Dynamic Mechanical, and Rheological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Pandey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach of oxidation of carbon nanotubes has been used to oxidize the CNTs. A comparative aspect of the mechanical oxidation and acid oxidation process has been established. FTIR analysis and titration method have shown the higher feasibility of the mechanical oxidation method to oxidize the CNTs. Comparatively less damage to the CNTs has been observed in case of mechanically oxidized as compared to acid oxidized CNTs. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposites reinforced with the acid oxidized CNT (ACNT and mechanically oxidized CNTs (McCNT were analyzed and relatively higher properties in the nanocomposites reinforced with McCNT were noticed. The less degree of entanglement in the McCNTs was noticed as compared to ACNTs. The dynamic mechanical analysis of the nanocomposites revealed much improved load transfer capability in the McCNT reinforced composites. Further, the rheological properties of the nanocomposites revealed the higher performance of McCNT reinforced composites.

  2. Discovery of carbon nanotubes. Sara ni carbon nanotube e

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, S

    1994-01-20

    This paper describes the following matters on carbon nanotubes (CNt): CNt is discovered in carbon deposits generated in the tip of a negative electrode during DC arc discharge between carbon electrodes. CNt has a construction in which cylinders made of normally several layers are superposed, based on cylindrical crystals in a single layer with six-member rings of carbon atoms laid out. Spiral arrangement of carbon six-member rings has been discovered in the single-layered crystals. Five-member rings exist in a location where the CNt tip is closed, and seven-member rings in a location where the CNt presents a saddle-like curve, without exceptions. It is introduced theoretically that the electronic structure of the single-layered CNt depends on the cylinder diameter and spiral pitch. Replacing part of the carbon negative electrode with iron, and vaporizing iron and carbon simultaneously through arc discharge can result in a single-layered CNt with a diameter of 1 nm. Heating the CNt deposited with metallic lead in an oxygen atmosphere can form CNt containing lead compounds. 19 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Amine functionalized graphene oxide/CNT nanocomposite for ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of trinitrotoluene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sablok, Kavita; Bhalla, Vijayender; Sharma, Priyanka; Kaushal, Roohi; Chaudhary, Shilpa [Institute of Microbial Technology (CSIR) Sector-39A, Chandigarh160036 (India); Suri, C. Raman, E-mail: raman@imtech.res.in [Institute of Microbial Technology (CSIR) Sector-39A, Chandigarh160036 (India)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Binding of electron-deficient trinitrotoluene to the electron rich amino groups to form JM complexes. ► rGO/CNT based platform for enhanced electrochemical detection. ► Functionalization and characterization of rGO/CNT with amine derivative. ► Ultrasenstitive and specific detection of TNT. -- Abstract: Binding of electron-deficient trinitrotoluene (TNT) to the electron rich amine groups on a substrate form specific charge-transfer Jackson–Meisenheimer (JM) complex. In the present work, we report formation of specific JM complex on amine functionalized reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotubes- (a-rGO/CNT) nanocomposite leading to sensitive detection of TNT. The CNT were dispersed using graphene oxide that provides excellent dispersion by attaching to CNT through its hydrophobic domains and solubilizes through the available -OH and -COOH groups on screen printed electrode (SPE). The GO was reduced electrochemically to form reduced graphene that remarkably increases electrochemical properties owing to the intercalation of high aspect CNT on graphene flakes as shown by TEM micrograph. The surface amine functionalization of dropcasted and rGO/CNT was carried out using a bi-functional cross linker ethylenediamine. The extent of amine functionalization on modified electrodes was confirmed using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and confocal microscopy. The FTIR and Raman spectra further suggested the formation of JM complex between amine functionalized electrodes and TNT leading to a shift in peak intensity together with peak broadening. The a-rGO/CNT nanocomposite prepared electrode surface leads to ultra-trace detection of TNT upto 0.01 ppb with good reproducibility (n = 3). The a-rGO/CNT sensing platform could be an alternate for sensitive detection of TNT explosive for various security and environmental applications.

  4. Amine functionalized graphene oxide/CNT nanocomposite for ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of trinitrotoluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sablok, Kavita; Bhalla, Vijayender; Sharma, Priyanka; Kaushal, Roohi; Chaudhary, Shilpa; Suri, C. Raman

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Binding of electron-deficient trinitrotoluene to the electron rich amino groups to form JM complexes. ► rGO/CNT based platform for enhanced electrochemical detection. ► Functionalization and characterization of rGO/CNT with amine derivative. ► Ultrasenstitive and specific detection of TNT. -- Abstract: Binding of electron-deficient trinitrotoluene (TNT) to the electron rich amine groups on a substrate form specific charge-transfer Jackson–Meisenheimer (JM) complex. In the present work, we report formation of specific JM complex on amine functionalized reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotubes- (a-rGO/CNT) nanocomposite leading to sensitive detection of TNT. The CNT were dispersed using graphene oxide that provides excellent dispersion by attaching to CNT through its hydrophobic domains and solubilizes through the available -OH and -COOH groups on screen printed electrode (SPE). The GO was reduced electrochemically to form reduced graphene that remarkably increases electrochemical properties owing to the intercalation of high aspect CNT on graphene flakes as shown by TEM micrograph. The surface amine functionalization of dropcasted and rGO/CNT was carried out using a bi-functional cross linker ethylenediamine. The extent of amine functionalization on modified electrodes was confirmed using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and confocal microscopy. The FTIR and Raman spectra further suggested the formation of JM complex between amine functionalized electrodes and TNT leading to a shift in peak intensity together with peak broadening. The a-rGO/CNT nanocomposite prepared electrode surface leads to ultra-trace detection of TNT upto 0.01 ppb with good reproducibility (n = 3). The a-rGO/CNT sensing platform could be an alternate for sensitive detection of TNT explosive for various security and environmental applications

  5. The effect of hydroxylation on CNT to form Chitosan-CNT composites: A DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Rui; Ran, Maofei; Wen, Jie; Sun, Wenjing; Chu, Wei; Jiang, Chengfa; He, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The effect of hydroxylation on CNT to form Chitosan-CNT composites was studied. • The adsorption of Chitosan on CNTs is very weak by electrostatic interactions. • Chitosan loads onto CNT-OH_n via hydrogen-bond interactions. • Chitosan transfers electron to CNT-OH_n and thus improves the reactivity of CNT. - Abstract: The effect of types of CNTs (pristine and hydroxylated) on the synthesis of Chitosan-CNT (CS-CNT) composites was investigated theoretically. The adsorption energy (E_a_d_s) of CS on the pristine CNT and hydroxylated CNTs (CNT-OH_n, n = 1–6) as well as the structural and electronic properties of said composites have been investigated. Results show that the adsorption of CS on CNT and CNT-OH_n is thermodynamically favored. The E_a_d_s of CS on CNTs was calculated to be −20.387 kcal/mol from electrostatic interactions. For CS adsorbed into CNT-OH_n, E_a_d_s ranges from −20.612 to −37.567 kcal/mol. Hydroxyl groups on CNT are the main adsorption sites for CS loading onto CNT-OH_n via hydrogen-bond interactions. The CS-CNT-OH_3 is the most sable composite among tested complexes. The energy gap (ΔE_g_a_p) of CS-CNT-OH_3 was calculated less than pristine CNT and CNT-OH_3, indicative of the composites being more reactive than that of pristine CNTs and CNT-OH_3. It was proved that CS can transfer electron to the hydroxylated CNTs, thus overcoming the drawbacks of CNTs being chemically inert.

  6. The effect of hydroxylation on CNT to form Chitosan-CNT composites: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Rui [China-America Cancer Research Institute, Key Laboratory for Medical Molecular Diagnostics of Guangdong Province, Guangdong Medical University, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Ran, Maofei [College of Chemistry & Environment Protection Engineering, Southwest University for Nationalities, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Wen, Jie [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu 610500, Sichuan (China); Sun, Wenjing, E-mail: swj_gdmc@163.com [China-America Cancer Research Institute, Key Laboratory for Medical Molecular Diagnostics of Guangdong Province, Guangdong Medical University, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China); Chu, Wei; Jiang, Chengfa [Department of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); He, Zhiwei, E-mail: zhiweihe688@yahoo.com [China-America Cancer Research Institute, Key Laboratory for Medical Molecular Diagnostics of Guangdong Province, Guangdong Medical University, Dongguan, Guangdong 523808 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The effect of hydroxylation on CNT to form Chitosan-CNT composites was studied. • The adsorption of Chitosan on CNTs is very weak by electrostatic interactions. • Chitosan loads onto CNT-OH{sub n} via hydrogen-bond interactions. • Chitosan transfers electron to CNT-OH{sub n} and thus improves the reactivity of CNT. - Abstract: The effect of types of CNTs (pristine and hydroxylated) on the synthesis of Chitosan-CNT (CS-CNT) composites was investigated theoretically. The adsorption energy (E{sub ads}) of CS on the pristine CNT and hydroxylated CNTs (CNT-OH{sub n}, n = 1–6) as well as the structural and electronic properties of said composites have been investigated. Results show that the adsorption of CS on CNT and CNT-OH{sub n} is thermodynamically favored. The E{sub ads} of CS on CNTs was calculated to be −20.387 kcal/mol from electrostatic interactions. For CS adsorbed into CNT-OH{sub n}, E{sub ads} ranges from −20.612 to −37.567 kcal/mol. Hydroxyl groups on CNT are the main adsorption sites for CS loading onto CNT-OH{sub n} via hydrogen-bond interactions. The CS-CNT-OH{sub 3} is the most sable composite among tested complexes. The energy gap (ΔE{sub gap}) of CS-CNT-OH{sub 3} was calculated less than pristine CNT and CNT-OH{sub 3}, indicative of the composites being more reactive than that of pristine CNTs and CNT-OH{sub 3}. It was proved that CS can transfer electron to the hydroxylated CNTs, thus overcoming the drawbacks of CNTs being chemically inert.

  7. Mechanical and electrical properties of low density polyethylene filled with carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabet, Maziyar; Soleimani, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) reveal outstanding electrical and mechanical properties in addition to nanometer scale diameter and high aspect ratio, consequently, making it an ideal reinforcing agent for high strength polymer composites. Low density polyethylene (LDPE)/CNT composites were prepared via melt compounding. Mechanical and electrical properties of (LDPE)/CNT composites with different CNT contents were studied in this research

  8. Carbon nanotubes as electromechanical resonators : Single-electron tunneling, nonlinearity, and high-bandwidth readout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerwaldt, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) is a remarkable material and can be thought of as a single-atom thick cylinder of carbon atoms capped of with a semisphere. This is called a single-walled CNT and, depending on how the cylinder is rolled up, CNTs are either semiconducting or metallic. A CNT is made into a

  9. Exploring the in vitro and in vivo compatibility of PLA, PLA/GNP and PLA/CNT-COOH biodegradable nanocomposites: Prospects for tendon and ligament applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia Pinto, Viviana; Costa-Almeida, Raquel; Rodrigues, Ilda; Guardão, Luísa; Soares, Raquel; Miranda Guedes, Rui

    2017-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructive surgeries are the most frequent orthopedic procedures in the knee. Currently, existing strategies fail in completely restoring tissue functionality and have a high failure rate associated, presenting a compelling argument towards the development of novel materials envisioning ACL reinforcement. Tendons and ligaments, in general, have a strong demand in terms of biomechanical features of developed constructs. We have previously developed polylactic acid (PLA)-based biodegradable films reinforced either with graphene nanoplatelets (PLA/GNP) or with carboxyl-functionalized carbon nanotubes (PLA/CNT-COOH). In the present study, we comparatively assessed the biological performance of PLA, PLA/GNP, and PLA/CNT-COOH by seeding human dermal fibroblasts (HFF-1) and studying cell viability and proliferation. In vivo tests were also performed by subcutaneous implantation in 6-week-old C57Bl/6 mice. Results showed that all formulations studied herein did not elicit cytotoxic responses in seeded HFF-1, supporting cell proliferation up to 3 days in culture. Moreover, animal studies indicated no physiological signs of severe inflammatory response after 1 and 2 weeks after implantation. Taken together, our results present a preliminary assessment on the compatibility of PLA reinforced with GNP and CNT-COOH nanofillers, highlighting the potential use of these carbon-based nanofillers for the fabrication of reinforced synthetic polymer-based structures for ACL reinforcement. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2182-2190, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Superabsorbent hydrogel composite based on copolymer cellulose/poly (vinyl alcohol)/CNT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoerunnisa, Fitri, E-mail: fitri.khoerunnisa@gmail.com; Hendrawan,; Sonjaya, Yaya; Putri, Oceu Dwi [Department of Chemistry, Indonesia University of Education, Setiabudi 229 Bandung, West Java, Indonesia 40154 (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    Superabsorbent hydrogels are cross-linked hydrophilic polymers that can absorb and retain a large volume of water, saline solution, or physiological fluids. A distinctive superabsorbent hydrogel composite based on cellulose/ poly (vinyl alcohol)/ carbon nanotubes was successfully synthesized via the graft bio-copolymerization in an aqueous medium with glutaraldehide as a crosslinking agent. The effect of carbon nanotubes (CNT) on water absorption capacity and mechanical properties of superabsorbent composite were particularly investigated. The Fourier transform infrared spectra showed the evidence of copolymerization of hydrogel precursors as well as the interaction of CNT filler with the hydrogel matrices, as indicated by the shifting of peak intensity and position of several functional groups (O-H, C-H sp{sup 3}, C=O, C-N, C-O). The modification of hydrogel surface morphology and porosity owing to CNT insertion was also confirmed by scanning electron microscopy images. The CNT insertion improved the mechanical strength of superabsorbent hydrogel composites. Moreover, insertion of CNT into hydrogel matrix remarkably increased the swelling capacity of superabsorbent composites up to 840%. This huge water absorption capacity of hydrogel composites offers promising applications in development of superabsorbent polymers.

  11. Superabsorbent hydrogel composite based on copolymer cellulose/poly (vinyl alcohol)/CNT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoerunnisa, Fitri; Hendrawan,; Sonjaya, Yaya; Putri, Oceu Dwi

    2016-01-01

    Superabsorbent hydrogels are cross-linked hydrophilic polymers that can absorb and retain a large volume of water, saline solution, or physiological fluids. A distinctive superabsorbent hydrogel composite based on cellulose/ poly (vinyl alcohol)/ carbon nanotubes was successfully synthesized via the graft bio-copolymerization in an aqueous medium with glutaraldehide as a crosslinking agent. The effect of carbon nanotubes (CNT) on water absorption capacity and mechanical properties of superabsorbent composite were particularly investigated. The Fourier transform infrared spectra showed the evidence of copolymerization of hydrogel precursors as well as the interaction of CNT filler with the hydrogel matrices, as indicated by the shifting of peak intensity and position of several functional groups (O-H, C-H sp"3, C=O, C-N, C-O). The modification of hydrogel surface morphology and porosity owing to CNT insertion was also confirmed by scanning electron microscopy images. The CNT insertion improved the mechanical strength of superabsorbent hydrogel composites. Moreover, insertion of CNT into hydrogel matrix remarkably increased the swelling capacity of superabsorbent composites up to 840%. This huge water absorption capacity of hydrogel composites offers promising applications in development of superabsorbent polymers.

  12. Synthesis and highly visible-induced photocatalytic activity of CNT-CdSe composite for methylene blue solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ming-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carbon nanotube-cadmium selenide (CNT-CdSe composite was synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method derived from multi-walled carbon nanotubes as a stating material. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrophotometer. The as-synthesized CNT-CdSe composite efficiently catalyzed the photodegradation of methylene blue in aqueous solutions under visible-light irradiation, exhibiting higher photocatalytic activity.

  13. Growth and structural discrimination of cortical neurons on randomly oriented and vertically aligned dense carbon nanotube networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Nick

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The growth of cortical neurons on three dimensional structures of spatially defined (structured randomly oriented, as well as on vertically aligned, carbon nanotubes (CNT is studied. Cortical neurons are attracted towards both types of CNT nano-architectures. For both, neurons form clusters in close vicinity to the CNT structures whereupon the randomly oriented CNTs are more closely colonised than the CNT pillars. Neurons develop communication paths via neurites on both nanoarchitectures. These neuron cells attach preferentially on the CNT sidewalls of the vertically aligned CNT architecture instead than onto the tips of the individual CNT pillars.

  14. Carbon nanotube formation by laser direct writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.-T.; Su, H.-C.; Tsai, C.-M.; Liu, K.-L.; Chen, G.-D.; Huang, R.-H.; Yew, T.-R.

    2008-01-01

    This letter presents carbon nanotube (CNT) formation by laser direct writing using 248 nm KrF excimer pulsed laser in air at room temperature, which was applied to irradiate amorphous carbon (a-C) assisted by Ni catalysts underneath for the transformation of carbon species into CNTs. The CNTs were synthesized under appropriate combination of laser energy density and a-C thickness. The growth mechanism and key parameters to determine the success of CNT formation were also discussed. The demonstration of the CNT growth by laser direct writing in air at room temperature opens an opportunity of in-position CNT formation at low temperatures

  15. Effect of milling time and CNT concentration on hardness of CNT/Al2024 composites produced by mechanical alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Bustamante, R.; Pérez-Bustamante, F.; Estrada-Guel, I.; Licea-Jiménez, L.; Miki-Yoshida, M.; Martínez-Sánchez, R.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube/2024 aluminum alloy (CNT/Al 2024 ) composites were fabricated with a combination of mechanical alloying (MA) and powder metallurgy routes. Composites were microstructurally and mechanically evaluated at sintering condition. A homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in the Al matrix was observed by a field emission scanning electron microscopy. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed not only the presence of well dispersed CNTs but also needle-like shape aluminum carbide (Al 4 C 3 ) crystals in the Al matrix. The formation of Al 4 C 3 was suggested as the interaction between the outer shells of CNTs and the Al matrix during MA process in which crystallization took place after the sintering process. The mechanical behavior of composites was evaluated by Vickers microhardness measurements indicating a significant improvement in hardness as function of the CNT content. This improvement was associated to a homogeneous dispersion of CNTs and the presence of Al 4 C 3 in the aluminum alloy matrix. - Highlights: ► The 2024 aluminum alloy was reinforced by CNTs by mechanical alloying process. ► Composites were microstructural and mechanically evaluated after sintering condition. ► The greater the CNT concentration, the greater the hardness of the composites. ► Higher hardness in composites is achieved at 20 h of milling. ► The formation of Al 4 C 3 does not present a direct relationship with the milling time.

  16. A three-dimensional carbon nanotube network for water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilli, L; Pisani, C; Scarselli, M; Castrucci, P; De Crescenzi, M; Gautron, E; D’Orazio, F; Passacantando, M; Moscone, D

    2014-01-01

    The bulk synthesis of freestanding carbon nanotube (CNT) frameworks is developed through a sulfur-addition strategy during an ambient-pressure chemical vapour deposition process, with ferrocene used as the catalyst precursor. This approach enhances the CNTs’ length and contorted morphology, which are the key features leading to the formation of the synthesized porous networks. We demonstrate that such a three-dimensional structure selectively uptakes from water a mass of toxic organic solvent (i.e. o-dichlorobenzene) about 3.5 times higher than that absorbed by individual CNTs. In addition, owing to the presence of highly defective nanostructures constituting them, our samples exhibit an oil-absorption capacity higher than that reported in the literature for similar CNT sponges. (paper)

  17. Coated carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian [Newton, MA; Chen, Jinghua [Chestnut Hill, MA; Huang, Zhongping [Belmont, MA; Wang, Dezhi [Wellesley, MA

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode materials comprising aligned CNT substrates coated with an electrically conducting polymer, and the fabrication of electrodes for use in high performance electrical energy storage devices. In particular, the present invention provides conductive CNTs electrode material whose electrical properties render them especially suitable for use in high efficiency rechargeable batteries. The present invention also provides methods for obtaining surface modified conductive CNT electrode materials comprising an array of individual linear, aligned CNTs having a uniform surface coating of an electrically conductive polymer such as polypyrrole, and their use in electrical energy storage devices.

  18. Multiporous carbon allotropes transformed from symmetry-matched carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yingxiang, E-mail: yingxiangcai@ncu.edu.cn; Wang, Hao; Xu, Shengliang; Hu, Yujie; Liu, Ning; Xu, Xuechun [Department of Physics, NanChang University, Jiangxi, Nanchang 330031 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with homogeneous diameters have been proven to transform into new carbon allotropes under pressure but no studies on the compression of inhomogeneous CNTs have been reported. In this study, we propose to build new carbon allotropes from the bottom-up by applying pressure on symmetry-matched inhomogeneous CNTs. We find that the (3,0) CNT with point group C{sub 3v} and the (6,0) CNT with point group C{sub 6v} form an all sp{sup 3} hybridized hexagonal 3060-Carbon crystal, but the (4,0) CNT with point group D{sub 4h} and the (8,0) CNT with point group D{sub 8h} polymerize into a sp{sup 2}+sp{sup 3} hybridized tetragonal 4080-Carbon structure. Their thermodynamic, mechanical and dynamic stabilities show that they are potential carbon allotropes to be experimentally synthesized. The multiporous structures, excellently mechanical properties and special electronic structures (semiconductive 3060-Carbon and semimetallic 4080-Carbon) imply their many potential applications, such as gases purification, hydrogen storage and lightweight semiconductor devices. In addition, we simulate their feature XRD patterns which are helpful for identifying the two carbon crystals in future experimental studies.

  19. Multiporous carbon allotropes transformed from symmetry-matched carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxiang Cai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs with homogeneous diameters have been proven to transform into new carbon allotropes under pressure but no studies on the compression of inhomogeneous CNTs have been reported. In this study, we propose to build new carbon allotropes from the bottom-up by applying pressure on symmetry-matched inhomogeneous CNTs. We find that the (3,0 CNT with point group C3v and the (6,0 CNT with point group C6v form an all sp3 hybridized hexagonal 3060-Carbon crystal, but the (4,0 CNT with point group D4h and the (8,0 CNT with point group D8h polymerize into a sp2+sp3 hybridized tetragonal 4080-Carbon structure. Their thermodynamic, mechanical and dynamic stabilities show that they are potential carbon allotropes to be experimentally synthesized. The multiporous structures, excellently mechanical properties and special electronic structures (semiconductive 3060-Carbon and semimetallic 4080-Carbon imply their many potential applications, such as gases purification, hydrogen storage and lightweight semiconductor devices. In addition, we simulate their feature XRD patterns which are helpful for identifying the two carbon crystals in future experimental studies.

  20. Progress and challenges of carbon nanotube membrane in water treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jieun

    2016-05-25

    The potential of the carbon nanotube (CNT) membrane has been highly strengthened in water treatment during the last decade. According to works published up to now, the unique and excellent characteristics of CNT outperformed conventional polymer membranes. Such achievements of CNT membranes are greatly dependent on their fabrication methods. Further, the intrinsic properties of CNT could be a critical factor of applicability to membrane processes. This article provides an explicit and systematic review of the progress of CNT membranes addressing the current epidemic—whether (i) the CNT membranes could tackle current challenges in the pressure- or thermally driven membrane processes and (ii) CNT hybrid nanocomposite as a new generation of materials could complement current CNT-enhanced membrane. © 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  1. Interaction of electromagnetic radiation with magnetically functionalized CNT nanocomposite in the subterahertz frequency range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atdaev, A.; Danilyuk, A. L.; Labunov, V. A.; Prischepa, S. L., E-mail: prischepa@bsuir.by [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics (Belarus); Pavlov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics Nanotechnologies (Russian Federation); Basaev, A. S.; Shaman, Yu. P. [SMC Technological Center (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The interaction of electromagnetic radiation with a magnetically functionalized nanocomposite based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is considered using the model of random distribution of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in the carbon matrix characterized by the presence of resistive–inductive–capacitive coupling (contours). The model is based on the representation of the nanocomposite as a system consisting of the CNT matrix, ferromagnetic nanoparticles, and the interfaces between CNTs and nanoparticles. The wide range of possible resonant phenomena caused both by the presence of contours and the properties of the CNT nanocomposite is shown.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Templated Microfabrication of Porous Silicon-Carbon Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun; Jensen, David; Dadson, Andrew; Vail, Michael; Linford, Matthew; Vanfleet, Richard; Davis, Robert

    2010-10-01

    Carbon nanotube templated microfabrication (CNT-M) of porous materials is demonstrated. Partial chemical infiltration of three dimensional carbon nanotube structures with silicon resulted in a mechanically robust material, precisely structured from the 10 nm scale to the 100 micron scale. Nanoscale dimensions are determined by the diameter and spacing of the resulting silicon/carbon nanotubes while the microscale dimensions are controlled by lithographic patterning of the CNT growth catalyst. We demonstrate the utility of this hierarchical structuring approach by using CNT-M to fabricate thin layer chromatography (TLC) separations media with precise microscale channels for fluid flow control and nanoscale porosity for high analyte capacity.

  3. Electrokinetic remediation of heavy metals contaminated kaolin by a CNT-covered polyethylene terephthalate yarn cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Lizhu; Li, Haiyan; Xu, Xingjian; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Nana; Yu, Hongwen

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, carbon nanotube (CNT) covered polyethylene terephthalate yarns (PET-CNT) electrode has been investigated as a novel cathode material for the electrokinetic (EK) remediation of multi-metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn) contaminated kaolin. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that CNT was successfully covered on the surface of PET. The results obtained from EK process showed that PET-CNT as a cathode obviously elevated electric current and electro-osmotic flow (EOF), significantly decreased kaolin pH, and enhanced heavy metals removal efficiencies. The removal efficiencies of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in PET-CNT treatment were 89.7%, 63.6%, 90.7%, 19.2%, and 88.7%, respectively. In comparison with the Pt/Ti and graphite treatments, the removal efficiencies of Cd, Ni, and Zn were improved at least about 30%, Cu and Pb were improved at least 16.6% and 6.9%, respectively. Our results demonstrated the PET-CNT was a good alternative cathode material for enhancing efficiency of EK remediation.

  4. Photodetector based on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A.; Kitsyuk, E.; Ryazanov, R.; Timoshenkov, V.; Adamov, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Photodetector based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) was investigated. Sensors were done on quartz and silicon susbtrate. Samples of photodetectors sensors were produced by planar technology. This technology included deposition of first metal layer (Al), lithography for pads formation, etching, and formation of local catalyst area by inverse lithography. Vertically-aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes were directly synthesized on substrate by PECVD method. I-V analysis and spectrum sensitivity of photodetector were investigated for 0.4 μm - 1.2 μm wavelength. Resistivity of CNT layers over temperature was detected in the range of -20°C to 100°C.

  5. Electrical properties of carbon nanotubes modified GaSe glassy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Hana; Khan, Zubair M. S. H.; Islam, Shama; Rahman, Raja Saifu; Husain, M.; Zulfequar, M.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we report the investigation of the effect of Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) addition on the electrical properties of GaSe Glassy system. Dielectric constant and dielectric loss of GaSe glassy system are found to increase on CNT addition. The conductivity of GaSe glasy systems is also found to increase on CNT addition. This behavior is attributed to the excellent conduction properties of Carbon Nanotube.

  6. Raman spectral features of single walled carbon nanotubes synthesized by laser vaporization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moodley, MK

    2006-07-05

    Full Text Available synthesized boxshadowdwnSemi-conductor tubes were favoured boxshadowdwnImproved crystallinity as indicated by narrower line- widths. Thank You Acknowledgements to the CSIR NLC for support on carbon nanotube research ... www.csir.co.za Experimental……..cont. Experimental parameters • two laser combined and vaporize a composite target • target in a tube furnace in continuous flow of Argon • temperature kept at 1000 OC • Ar flow of 200 sccm • Pressure at 375 Torr...

  7. MiniCNT - A Tabletop Stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Chris; Pedersen, Thomas; Berkery, John

    2006-10-01

    MiniCNT is a scaled down version of the Columbia Non-Neutral Torus, a stellarator built to study confinement of non-neutral plasmas on magnetic surfaces. MiniCNT is a glass vacuum chamber capable of holding pressures six orders of magnitude below atmospheric pressure. Unlike CNT, in which plasmas are invisible, MiniCNT allows some collisions with neutrals, causing it to glow. Using two twelve-volt car batteries to power four magnetic coils, MiniCNT generates a 0.02 Tesla magnetic field. While CNT, being larger, is obviously more accurate, there are multiple benefits in MiniCNT. First, it is more flexible and can be adjusted to fit many scenarios easily. The car batteries can be switched for other power sources, the coils can be realigned, and the chamber can be pumped to various pressures of various gases. Also, it is visually accessible; while CNT has glass viewing ports and its plasma is dark, MiniCNT is made of glass and its plasma glows, allowing visualization of the magnetic surfaces.

  8. Feasibility of multi-walled carbon nanotube probes in AFM anodization lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ji Sun; Bae, Sukjong; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal Hyun; Jung, Ki Young; Han, Cheolsu; Chung, Chung Choo; Lee, Haiwon

    2007-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) tips were used in atomic force microscope (AFM) anodization lithography to investigate their advantages over conventional tips. The CNT tip required a larger threshold voltage than the mother silicon tip due to the Schottky barrier at the CNT-Si interface. Current-to-voltage curves distinguished the junction property between CNTs and mother tips. The CNT-platinum tip, which is more conductive than the CNT-silicon tip, showed promising results for AFM anodization lithography. Finally, the nanostructures with high aspect ratio were fabricated using a pulsed bias voltage technique as well as the CNT tip

  9. Inhalation of rod-like carbon nanotubes causes unconventional allergic airway inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Rydman, Elina M.; Ilves, Marit; Koivisto, Antti J.; Kinaret, Pia A. S.; Fortino, Vittorio; Savinko, Terhi S.; Lehto, Maili T.; Pulkkinen, Ville; Vippola, Minnamari; Hämeri, Kaarle J.; Matikainen, Sampsa; Wolff, Henrik; Savolainen, Kai M.; Greco, Dario; Alenius, Harri

    2014-01-01

    Background Carbon nanotubes (CNT) represent a great promise for technological and industrial development but serious concerns on their health effects have also emerged. Rod-shaped CNT are, in fact, able to induce asbestos-like pathogenicity in mice including granuloma formation in abdominal cavity and sub-pleural fibrosis. Exposure to CNT, especially in the occupational context, happens mainly by inhalation. However, little is known about the possible effects of CNT on pulmonary allergic dise...

  10. A nanostructured electrode of IrOx foil on the carbon nanotubes for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Min; Cai, Jhen-Hong; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Lee, Kuei-Yi; Tsai, Dah-Shyang; Tiong, Kwong-Kau

    2011-09-01

    IrOx nanofoils (IrOxNF) of high surface area are sputtered on multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT) in the preparation of a structured electrode on a stainless steel (SUS) substrate for supercapacitor applications. This IrOx/CNT/SUS electrode is featured with intriguing IrOx curved foils of 2-3 nm in thickness and 400-500 nm in height, grown on top of the vertically aligned CNT film with a tube diameter of ~ 40 nm. These nanofoils are moderately oxidized during reactive sputtering and appeared translucent under the electron microscope. Detailed structural analysis shows that they are comprised of contiguous grains of iridium metal, iridium dioxide, and glassy iridium oxide. Considerable Raman line broadening is also evidenced for the attributed nanosized iridium oxides. Two capacitive properties of the electrode are significantly enhanced with addition of the curved IrOx foils. First, IrOxNF reduces the electrode Ohmic resistance, which was measured at 3.5 Ω cm2 for the CNT/SUS and 2.5 Ω cm2 for IrOxNF/CNT/SUS using impedance spectroscopy. Second, IrOxNF raises the electrode capacitance from 17.7 F g - 1 (CNT/SUS) to 317 F g - 1 (IrOx/CNT/SUS), measured with cyclic voltammetry. This notable increase is further confirmed by the galvanostatic charge/discharge experiment, measuring 370 F g - 1 after 2000 uninterrupted cycles between - 1.0 and 0.0 V (versus Ag/AgCl).

  11. A nanostructured electrode of IrO{sub x} foil on the carbon nanotubes for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yi-Min; Cai, Jhen-Hong; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Lee, Kuei-Yi [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 43 Keelung Road, Section 4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Dah-Shyang [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 43 Keelung Road, Section 4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Tiong, Kwong-Kau, E-mail: ysh@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-02

    IrO{sub x} nanofoils (IrO{sub x}NF) of high surface area are sputtered on multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT) in the preparation of a structured electrode on a stainless steel (SUS) substrate for supercapacitor applications. This IrO{sub x}/CNT/SUS electrode is featured with intriguing IrO{sub x} curved foils of 2-3 nm in thickness and 400-500 nm in height, grown on top of the vertically aligned CNT film with a tube diameter of {approx} 40 nm. These nanofoils are moderately oxidized during reactive sputtering and appeared translucent under the electron microscope. Detailed structural analysis shows that they are comprised of contiguous grains of iridium metal, iridium dioxide, and glassy iridium oxide. Considerable Raman line broadening is also evidenced for the attributed nanosized iridium oxides. Two capacitive properties of the electrode are significantly enhanced with addition of the curved IrO{sub x} foils. First, IrO{sub x}NF reduces the electrode Ohmic resistance, which was measured at 3.5 {Omega} cm{sup 2} for the CNT/SUS and 2.5 {Omega} cm{sup 2} for IrO{sub x}NF/CNT/SUS using impedance spectroscopy. Second, IrO{sub x}NF raises the electrode capacitance from 17.7 F g{sup -1} (CNT/SUS) to 317 F g{sup -1} (IrO{sub x}/CNT/SUS), measured with cyclic voltammetry. This notable increase is further confirmed by the galvanostatic charge/discharge experiment, measuring 370 F g{sup -1} after 2000 uninterrupted cycles between - 1.0 and 0.0 V (versus Ag/AgCl).

  12. Modeling Energy & Reliability of a CNT based WSN on an HPC Setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Pathak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the effect of innovations in Nanotechnology on Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN and have modeled Carbon Nanotube (CNT based sensor nodes from a device prospective. A WSN model has been programmed in Simulink-MATLAB and a library has been developed. Integration of CNT in WSN for various modules such as sensors, microprocessors, batteries etc has been shown. Also average energy consumption for the system has been formulated and its reliability has been shown holistically. A proposition has been put forward on the changes needed in existing sensor node structure to improve its efficiency and to facilitate as well as enhance the assimilation of CNT based devices in a WSN. Finally we have commented on the challenges that exist in this technology and described the important factors that need to be considered for calculating reliability. This research will help in practical implementation of CNT based devices and analysis of their key effects on the WSN environment. The work has been executed on Simulink and Distributive Computing toolbox of MATLAB. The proposal has been compared to the recent developments and past experimental results reported in this field. This attempt to derieve the energy consumption and reliability implications will help in development of real devices using CNT which is a major hurdle in bringing the success from lab to commercial market. Recent research in CNT has been used to model an energy efficient model which will also lead to the development CAD tools. Library for Reliability and Energy consumption includes analysis of various parts of a WSN system which is being constructed from CNT. Nano routing in a CNT system is also implemented with its dependencies. Finally the computations were executed on a HPC setup and the model showed remarkable speedup.

  13. Designing Neat and Composite Carbon Nanotube Materials by Porosimetric Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobashi, Kazufumi; Yoon, Howon; Ata, Seisuke; Yamada, Takeo; Futaba, Don N; Hata, Kenji

    2017-12-06

    We propose a porosimetry-based method to characterize pores formed by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the CNT agglomerates for designing neat CNT-based materials and composites. CNT agglomerates contain pores between individual CNTs and/or CNT bundles (micropore  50 nm). We investigated these pores structured by CNTs with different diameters and number of walls, clarifying the broader size distribution and the larger volume with increased diameters and number of walls. Further, we demonstrated that CNT agglomerate structures with different bulk density were distinguished depending on the pore sizes. Our method also revealed that CNT dispersibility in solvent correlated with the pore sizes of CNT agglomerates. By making use of these knowledge on tailorable pores for CNT agglomerates, we successfully found the correlation between electrical conductivity for CNT rubber composites and pore sizes of CNT agglomerates. Therefore, our method can distinguish diverse CNT agglomerate structures and guide pore sizes of CNT agglomerates to give high electrical conductivity of CNT rubber composites.

  14. Carbon Micronymphaea: Graphene on Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Won Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the morphology of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotube (CNT, graphene, and their hybrid structure under various operating conditions during a one-step synthesis via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD. We focus on the synthetic aspects of carbon hybrid material composed of heteroepitaxially grown graphene on top of a vertical array of carbon nanotubes, called carbon micronymphaea. We characterize the structural features of this unique nanocomposite by uses of electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. We observe carbon nanofibers, poorly aligned and well-aligned vertical arrays of CNT sequentially as the growth temperature increases, while we always discover the carbon hybrids, called carbon micronymphaea, at specific cooling rate of 15°C/s, which is optimal for the carbon precipitation from the Ni nanoparticles in this study. We expect one-pot synthesized graphene-on-nanotube hybrid structure poses great potential for applications that demand ultrahigh surface-to-volume ratios with intact graphitic nature and directional electronic and thermal transports.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulation for the Mechanical Properties of CNT/Polymer Nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seung Hwa; Cho, Maeg Hyo

    2007-01-01

    In order to obtain mechanical properties of CNT/Polymer nano-composites, molecular dynamics simulation is performed. Overall system was modeled as a flexible unit cell in which carbon nanotubes are embedded into a polyethylene matrix for N σ T ensemble simulation. COMPASS force field was chosen to describe inter and intra molecular potential and bulk effect was achieved via periodic boundary conditions. In CNT-polymer interface, only Lennard-Jones non-bond potential was considered. Using Parrinello-Rahman fluctuation method, mechanical properties of orthotropic nano-composites under various temperatures were successfully obtained. Also, we investigated thermal behavior of the short CNT reinforced nanocomposites system with predicting glass transition temperature

  16. Integration and road tests of a self-sensing CNT concrete pavement system for traffic detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Baoguo; Zhang, Kun; Burnham, Tom; Kwon, Eil; Yu, Xun

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a self-sensing carbon nanotube (CNT) concrete pavement system for traffic detection is proposed and tested in a roadway. Pre-cast and cast-in-place self-sensing CNT concrete sensors were simultaneously integrated into a controlled pavement test section at the Minnesota Road Research Facility (MnROAD), USA. Road tests of the system were conducted by using an MnROAD five-axle semi-trailer tractor truck and a van, respectively, both in the winter and summer. Test results show that the proposed self-sensing pavement system can accurately detect the passing of different vehicles under different vehicular speeds and test environments. These findings indicate that the developed self-sensing CNT concrete pavement system can achieve real-time vehicle flow detection with a high detection rate and a low false-alarm rate.

  17. Electrical properties of transparent CNT and ITO coatings on PET substrate including nano-structural aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joung-Man; Wang, Zuo-Jia; Kwon, Dong-Jun; Gu, Ga-Young; Lawrence DeVries, K.

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectra and surface resistance measurement were used to investigate optical transmittance and conductive properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) and indium tin oxide (ITO) coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates. Conductive CNT and ITO coatings were successfully fabricated on PET by a spray-coating method. Thin coatings of both materials exhibited good conductivity and transparency. Changes in electrical and optical properties of the coatings were studied as a function of the coating suspension concentration. Interfacial durability of the coatings on PET substrates was also investigated under fatigue and bending loads. CNT coated substrates, with high aspect ratios, exhibited no detectable change in surface resistance up to 2000 cyclic loadings, whereas the ITO coated substrates exhibited a substantial increase in surface resistance at 1000 loading cycles. This change in resistance is attributed to a reduction in the number and effectiveness of the electrical contact points due to the inherent brittle nature of ITO.

  18. Integrating Metal-Oxide-Decorated CNT Networks with a CMOS Readout in a Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhwan Kim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We have implemented a tin-oxide-decorated carbon nanotube (CNT network gas sensor system on a single die. We have also demonstrated the deposition of metallic tin on the CNT network, its subsequent oxidation in air, and the improvement of the lifetime of the sensors. The fabricated array of CNT sensors contains 128 sensor cells for added redundancy and increased accuracy. The read-out integrated circuit (ROIC was combined with coarse and fine time-to-digital converters to extend its resolution in a power-efficient way. The ROIC is fabricated using a 0.35 µm CMOS process, and the whole sensor system consumes 30 mA at 5 V. The sensor system was successfully tested in the detection of ammonia gas at elevated temperatures.

  19. Integration and road tests of a self-sensing CNT concrete pavement system for traffic detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Baoguo; Zhang, Kun; Yu, Xun; Burnham, Tom; Kwon, Eil

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a self-sensing carbon nanotube (CNT) concrete pavement system for traffic detection is proposed and tested in a roadway. Pre-cast and cast-in-place self-sensing CNT concrete sensors were simultaneously integrated into a controlled pavement test section at the Minnesota Road Research Facility (MnROAD), USA. Road tests of the system were conducted by using an MnROAD five-axle semi-trailer tractor truck and a van, respectively, both in the winter and summer. Test results show that the proposed self-sensing pavement system can accurately detect the passing of different vehicles under different vehicular speeds and test environments. These findings indicate that the developed self-sensing CNT concrete pavement system can achieve real-time vehicle flow detection with a high detection rate and a low false-alarm rate. (paper)

  20. Realizing one-dimensional quantum and high-frequency transport features in aligned single-walled carbon nanotube ropes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ncube, Siphephile; Chimowa, George; Chiguvare, Zivayi; Bhattacharyya, Somnath, E-mail: Somnath.Bhattacharyya@wits.ac.za [Nano-Scale Transport Physics Laboratory, School of Physics and DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2014-07-14

    The superiority of the electronic transport properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes over SWNT mats is verified from low temperature and frequency-dependent transport. The overall change of resistance versus in nanotube mats shows that 3D variable range hopping is the dominant conduction mechanism within the 2–300 K range. The magneto-resistance (MR) is found to be predominantly negative with a parabolic nature, which can also be described by the hopping model. Although the positive upturn of the MR at low temperatures establishes the contribution from quantum interference, the inherent quantum transport in individual tubes is suppressed at elevated temperatures. Therefore, to minimize multi-channel effects from inter-tube interactions and other defects, two-terminal devices were fabricated from aligned SWNT (extracted from a mat) for low temperature transport as well as high-frequency measurements. In contrast to the mat, the aligned ropes exhibit step-like features in the differential conductance within the 80–300 K temperature range. The effects of plasmon propagation, unique to one dimension, were identified in electronic transport as a non-universal power-law dependence of the differential conductance on temperature and source-drain voltage. The complex impedance showed high power transmission capabilities up to 65 GHz as well as oscillations in the frequency range up to 30 GHz. The measurements suggest that aligned SWNT ropes have a realistic potential for high-speed device applications.

  1. Realizing one-dimensional quantum and high-frequency transport features in aligned single-walled carbon nanotube ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncube, Siphephile; Chimowa, George; Chiguvare, Zivayi; Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2014-07-01

    The superiority of the electronic transport properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes over SWNT mats is verified from low temperature and frequency-dependent transport. The overall change of resistance versus in nanotube mats shows that 3D variable range hopping is the dominant conduction mechanism within the 2-300 K range. The magneto-resistance (MR) is found to be predominantly negative with a parabolic nature, which can also be described by the hopping model. Although the positive upturn of the MR at low temperatures establishes the contribution from quantum interference, the inherent quantum transport in individual tubes is suppressed at elevated temperatures. Therefore, to minimize multi-channel effects from inter-tube interactions and other defects, two-terminal devices were fabricated from aligned SWNT (extracted from a mat) for low temperature transport as well as high-frequency measurements. In contrast to the mat, the aligned ropes exhibit step-like features in the differential conductance within the 80-300 K temperature range. The effects of plasmon propagation, unique to one dimension, were identified in electronic transport as a non-universal power-law dependence of the differential conductance on temperature and source-drain voltage. The complex impedance showed high power transmission capabilities up to 65 GHz as well as oscillations in the frequency range up to 30 GHz. The measurements suggest that aligned SWNT ropes have a realistic potential for high-speed device applications.

  2. Graphene quantum dots-carbon nanotube hybrid arrays for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Zhao, Yang; Lu, Gewu; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Zhipan; Li, Hui; Shao, Huibo; Qu, Liangti

    2013-05-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been successfully deposited onto aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by a benign electrochemical method and the capacitive properties of the as-formed GQD/CNT hybrid arrays were evaluated in symmetrical supercapacitors. It was found that supercapacitors fabricated from GQD/CNT hybrid arrays exhibited a high capacitance of 44 mF cm-2, representing a more than 200% improvement over that of bare CNT electrodes.

  3. Effects of inter-tube coupling on the electro-optical properties of silicon carbide nanotube bundles studied by density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Somayeh

    2015-09-01

    The electronic and optical properties of bundled armchair and zigzag silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) are investigated by using density functional theory. The effects of inter-tube coupling on the electronic dispersions of SiCNT bundles are demonstrated. It was found that the band structure of (6, 0) SiCNT bundle shows metallic feature. The calculated dielectric functions of the armchair and zigzag bundles are similar to that of the isolated tubes, except for the appearance of broadened peaks, small shifts of peak positions about 0.1 eV and increasing of peak intensities. For (6, 0) SiCNT with smaller radius, by considering interband and interaband transitions, the band structure coupling causes an extra peak at low energies.

  4. Community effects of carbon nanotubes in aquatic sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velzeboer, I.; Kupryianchyk, D.; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic sediments form an important sink for manufactured nanomaterials, like carbon nanotubes (CNT) and fullerenes, thus potentially causing adverse effects to the aquatic environment, especially to benthic organisms. To date, most nanoparticle effect studies used single species tests in the

  5. Nanotube cathodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  6. Nanotube cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  7. Controlled growth of CNT in mesoporous AAO through optimized conditions for membrane preparation and CVD operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciambelli, P; Sarno, M; Leone, C; Sannino, D [Department of Chemical and Food Engineering, University of Salerno, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Arurault, L; Fontorbes, S; Datas, L; Lenormand, P; Le Blond Du Plouy, S, E-mail: msarno@unisa.it, E-mail: arurault@chimie.ups-tlse.fr [Universite de Toulouse, CIRIMAT, UPS/INPT/CNRS, LCMIE, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-07-01

    Anodic aluminium oxide (RAAO) membranes with a mesoporous structure were prepared under strictly controlling experimental process conditions, and physically and chemically characterized by a wide range of experimental techniques. Commercial anodic aluminium oxide (CAAO) membranes were also investigated for comparison. We demonstrated that RAAO membranes have lower content of both water and phosphorus and showed better porosity shape than CAAO. The RAAO membranes were used for template growth of carbon nanotubes (CNT) inside its pores by ethylene chemical vapour deposition (CVD) in the absence of a catalyst. A composite material, containing one nanotube for each channel, having the same length as the membrane thickness and an external diameter close to the diameter of the membrane holes, was obtained. Yield, selectivity and quality of CNTs in terms of diameter, length and arrangement (i.e. number of tubes for each channel) were optimized by investigating the effect of changing the experimental conditions for the CVD process. We showed that upon thermal treatment RAAO membranes were made up of crystallized allotropic alumina phases, which govern the subsequent CNT growth, because of their catalytic activity, likely due to their Lewis acidity. The strict control of experimental conditions for membrane preparation and CNT growth allowed us to enhance the carbon structural order, which is a critical requisite for CNT application as a substitute for copper in novel nano-interconnects.

  8. Pore-Structure-Optimized CNT-Carbon Nanofibers from Starch for Rechargeable Lithium Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjin Jeong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Porous carbon materials are used for many electrochemical applications due to their outstanding properties. However, research on controlling the pore structure and analyzing the carbon structures is still necessary to achieve enhanced electrochemical properties. In this study, mesoporous carbon nanotube (CNT-carbon nanofiber electrodes were developed by heat-treatment of electrospun starch with carbon nanotubes, and then applied as a binder-free electrochemical electrode for a lithium-ion battery. Using the unique lamellar structure of starch, mesoporous CNT-carbon nanofibers were prepared and their pore structures were controlled by manipulating the heat-treatment conditions. The activation process greatly increased the volume of micropores and mesopores of carbon nanofibers by etching carbons with CO2 gas, and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET specific area increased to about 982.4 m2·g−1. The activated CNT-carbon nanofibers exhibited a high specific capacity (743 mAh·g−1 and good cycle performance (510 mAh·g−1 after 30 cycles due to their larger specific surface area. This condition presents many adsorption sites of lithium ions, and higher electrical conductivity, compared with carbon nanofibers without CNT. The research suggests that by controlling the heat-treatment conditions and activation process, the pore structure of the carbon nanofibers made from starch could be tuned to provide the conditions needed for various applications.

  9. Nanomorphology of graphene and CNT reinforced polymer and its effect on damage: Micromechanical numerical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontefisso, Alessandro; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2016-01-01

    of nanocomposites with inclusions of arbitrary and complex shapes. The effect of curved, zigzagged, snakelike shapes of real carbon nanotubes, as well as re-stacking of graphene on the damage evolution was studied in the computational experiments based on the developed code. The potential of hybrid (carbon...... nanotubes and graphene) nanoscale reinforcement was studied with view on its effect of damage resistance. It was demonstrated that idealized, cylinder like models of carbon nanotubes in polymers lead to an underestimation of the stress concentration and damage likelihood in the nanocomposites. The main...... damage mechanisms in CNT reinforced polymers are debonding and pull-out/fiber bridging, while in graphene reinforced polymers the main role is played by crack deviation and stack splitting, with following micro-crack merging. The potential of hybrid (carbon nanotubes and graphene) nanoscale reinforcement...

  10. Carbon nanotube yarns as strong flexible conductive capacitive electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, F.; Wagterveld, R.M.; Gebben, B.; Otto, M.J.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Hamelers, H.V.M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn, consisting of 23 µm diameter CNT filaments, can be used as capacitive electrodes that are long, flexible, conductive and strong, for applications in energy and electrochemical water treatment. We measure the charge storage capacity as function of salt concentration, and

  11. Thermal expansion producing easier formation of a black phosphorus nanotube from nanoribbon on carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jing; Cai, Kun

    2018-02-01

    As a novel one-dimensional material having excellent electrical properties, a black phosphorus (BP) nanotube has wide potential applications in nanodevices. A BP nanotube has not yet, however, been discovered in experiments or fabricated via chemical synthesis. In this study, the feasibility of forming a nanotube from a parallelogram nanoribbon upon a carbon nanotube (CNT) at different temperatures is discussed through the use of molecular dynamics simulations. Results obtained demonstrate that an ideal BP nanotube from the same nanoribbon can be obtained via self-assembly on a CNT at 50 K or lower temperature. At temperatures between 50-100 K, the BP nanotube formed from a single ribbon has defects at both ends. When the temperature is higher than 100 K, it is difficult to obtain a BP nanotube of high quality. It is discovered that when the ribbon can only wind upon the same CNT at low temperature, it may form into an ideal nanotube by increasing the temperature of the system. The reason is that the BP ribbon has a higher thermal expansion than the CNT under the same temperature difference.

  12. Modification of Ammonia Decomposition Activity of Ruthenium Nanoparticles by N-Doping of CNT Supports

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Tamsin; Zhan, G; Wu, Kejun; Torrente Murciano, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The use of ammonia as a hydrogen vector has the potential to unlock the hydrogen economy. In this context, this paper presents novel insights into improving the ammonia decomposition activity of ruthenium nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes (CNT) by nitrogen doping. Our results can be applied to develop more active systems capable of delivering hydrogen on demand, with a view to move towards the low temperature target of less than 150 °C. Herein we demonstrate that nitrogen doping of ...

  13. Enhancing graphene/CNT based electrochemical detection using magneto-nanobioprobes

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Priyanka Sharma, V Bhalla, E Senthil Prasad, V Dravid, G Shekhawat & C. Raman Suri ### Abstract This protocol describes an optimized signal amplification strategy to develop an ultra-sensitive magneto-electrochemical biosensing platform. The new protocol combines the advantages of carbon nanotube (CNT) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) together with electrochemical bursting of magnetic nanoparticles. The method involves synthesis of gold-iron (Au/Fe) nano-structures function...

  14. Effects of surface functionalization on the electronic and structural properties of carbon nanotubes: A computational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, M. S.; Pascoini, A. L.; Knupp, W. G.; Camps, I.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have important electronic, mechanical and optical properties. These features may be different when comparing a pristine nanotube with other presenting its surface functionalized. These changes can be explored in areas of research and application, such as construction of nanodevices that act as sensors and filters. Following this idea, in the current work, we present the results from a systematic study of CNT's surface functionalized with hydroxyl and carboxyl groups. Using the entropy as selection criterion, we filtered a library of 10k stochastically generated complexes for each functional concentration (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25%). The structurally related parameters (root-mean-square deviation, entropy, and volume/area) have a monotonic relationship with functionalization concentration. Differently, the electronic parameters (frontier molecular orbital energies, electronic gap, molecular hardness, and electrophilicity index) present and oscillatory behavior. For a set of concentrations, the nanotubes present spin polarized properties that can be used in spintronics.

  15. Electron percolation in realistic models of carbon nanotube networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoneau, Louis-Philippe; Villeneuve, Jérémie; Rochefort, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The influence of penetrable and curved carbon nanotubes (CNT) on the charge percolation in three-dimensional disordered CNT networks have been studied with Monte-Carlo simulations. By considering carbon nanotubes as solid objects but where the overlap between their electron cloud can be controlled, we observed that the structural characteristics of networks containing lower aspect ratio CNT are highly sensitive to the degree of penetration between crossed nanotubes. Following our efficient strategy to displace CNT to different positions to create more realistic statistical models, we conclude that the connectivity between objects increases with the hard-core/soft-shell radii ratio. In contrast, the presence of curved CNT in the random networks leads to an increasing percolation threshold and to a decreasing electrical conductivity at saturation. The waviness of CNT decreases the effective distance between the nanotube extremities, hence reducing their connectivity and degrading their electrical properties. We present the results of our simulation in terms of thickness of the CNT network from which simple structural parameters such as the volume fraction or the carbon nanotube density can be accurately evaluated with our more realistic models

  16. Electron percolation in realistic models of carbon nanotube networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, Louis-Philippe; Villeneuve, Jérémie; Rochefort, Alain

    2015-09-01

    The influence of penetrable and curved carbon nanotubes (CNT) on the charge percolation in three-dimensional disordered CNT networks have been studied with Monte-Carlo simulations. By considering carbon nanotubes as solid objects but where the overlap between their electron cloud can be controlled, we observed that the structural characteristics of networks containing lower aspect ratio CNT are highly sensitive to the degree of penetration between crossed nanotubes. Following our efficient strategy to displace CNT to different positions to create more realistic statistical models, we conclude that the connectivity between objects increases with the hard-core/soft-shell radii ratio. In contrast, the presence of curved CNT in the random networks leads to an increasing percolation threshold and to a decreasing electrical conductivity at saturation. The waviness of CNT decreases the effective distance between the nanotube extremities, hence reducing their connectivity and degrading their electrical properties. We present the results of our simulation in terms of thickness of the CNT network from which simple structural parameters such as the volume fraction or the carbon nanotube density can be accurately evaluated with our more realistic models.

  17. Carbon nanotubes and methods of making carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie; Zhou, Lu; Saih, Youssef

    2017-01-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods that can be used to produce carbon nanotubes (hereinafter CNT) having an inner diameter about 5-55 nm, methods of tuning the inner diameter of CNTs (e.g., by adjusting reaction pressure

  18. Carbon nanotubes and methods of making carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-04-27

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods that can be used to produce carbon nanotubes (hereinafter CNT) having an inner diameter about 5-55 nm, methods of tuning the inner diameter of CNTs (e.g., by adjusting reaction pressure), CNTs having an inner diameter of greater than 20 nm or more, and the like.

  19. Carbon Nanotube Fiber Pretreatments for Electrodeposition of Copper

    OpenAIRE

    Hannula, Pyry-Mikko; Junnila, Minttu; Janas, Dawid; Aromaa, Jari; Forsén, Olof; Lundström, Mari

    2018-01-01

    There is increasing interest towards developing carbon nanotube-copper (CNT-Cu) composites due to potentially improved properties. Carbon nanotube macroscopic materials typically exhibit high resistivity, low electrochemical reactivity, and the presence of impurities, which impede its use as a substrate for electrochemical deposition of metals. In this research, different CNT fiber pretreatment methods, such as heat treatment, immersion in Watts bath, anodization, and exposure to boric acid (...

  20. STIR: Microwave Response of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymer Nanocomposite Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-28

    STIR: RDRL-ROE-M: Microwave Response of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymer Nanocomposite Welds Thrust 1 of the STIR project examines the heat response of...polymer composites loaded with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to microwave irradiation. This involves (1) a study of how CNT loading affects dielectric...properties of polymer composites and (2) a study of how CNT loading affects the heating response to microwave radiation. Our hypothesis is that the

  1. Voltage-Gated Transport of Nanoparticles across Free-Standing All-Carbon-Nanotube-Based Hollow-Fiber Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Gaoliang; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo; Fan, Xinfei; Yu, Hongtao; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-07-15

    Understanding the mechanism underlying controllable transmembrane transport observed in biological membranes benefits the development of next-generation separation membranes for a variety of important applications. In this work, on the basis of common structural features of cell membranes, a very simple biomimetic membrane system exhibiting gated transmembrane performance has been constructed using all-carbon-nanotube (CNT)-based hollow-fiber membranes. The conductive CNT membranes with hydrophobic pore channels can be positively or negatively charged and are consequently capable of regulating the transport of nanoparticles across their pore channels by their "opening" or "closing". The switch between penetration and rejection of nanoparticles through/by CNT membranes is of high efficiency and especially allows dynamic control. The underlying mechanism is that CNT pore channels with different polarities can prompt or prevent the formation of their noncovalent interactions with charged nanoparticles, resulting in their rejection or penetration by/through the CNT membranes. The theory about noncovalent interactions and charged pore channels may provide new insight into understanding the complicated ionically and bimolecularly gated transport across cell membranes and can contribute to many other important applications beyond the water purification and resource recovery demonstrated in this study.

  2. Effect of Modified and Nonmodified Carbon Nanotubes on the Rheological Behavior of High Density Polyethylene Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewunmi A. Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of studies on the rheological behavior of nanocomposites of high density polyethylene (HDPE with pristine multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT as well as phenol and 1-octadecanol (C18 functionalized CNT at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 wt% loading. The viscosity reduction at 1 wt% CNT follows the order, pristine CNT < phenol functionalized CNT < C18 functionalized CNT. As the filler loading increases from 1 to 2, 3, and 4 wt%, neat HDPE and filled HDPE systems show similar moduli and viscosity, particularly in the low frequency region. As the filler loading increases further to 5 and 7 wt%, the viscosity and moduli become greater than the neat HDPE. The storage modulus, tan, and the Cole-Cole plots show that CNT network formation occurs at higher CNT loading. The critical CNT loading or the rheological percolation threshold, where network formation occurs is found to be strongly dependant on the functionalization of CNT. For pristine CNT, the rheological percolation threshold is around 4 wt%, but for functionalized CNT it is around 7 wt%. The surface morphologies of CNT and functionalized CNT at 1 wt% loading showed good dispersion while at 7 wt% loading, dispersion was also achieved, but there are few regions with agglomeration of CNT.

  3. Interfacial durability and electrical properties of CNT or ITO/PVDF nanocomposites for self-sensor and micro actuator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joung-Man; Gu, Ga-Young; Wang, Zuo-Jia; Kwon, Dong-Jun; DeVries, K. Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial durability and electrical properties of CNT (carbon nanotube) or ITO (indium tin oxide) coated PVDF (poly(vinylidene fluoride)) nanocomposites were investigated for self-sensor and micro-actuator applications. The electrical resistivity of nanocomposites and the durability of interfacial adhesion were measured using a four points method during cyclic fatigue loading. Although the CNT/PVDF nanocomposites exhibited lower electrical resistivity due to the inherently low resistivity of CNT, both composite types showed good self-sensing performance. The durability of the adhesion at the interface was also good for both CNT and ITO/PVDF nanocomposites. Static contact angle, surface energy, work of adhesion, and spreading coefficient between either CNT or ITO and PVDF were determined as checks to verify the durability of the interfacial adhesion. The actuation performance of CNT or ITO coated PVDF specimens was determined through measurements of the induced displacement using a laser displacement sensor, while both the frequency and voltage were changed. The displacement of these actuated nanocomposites increased with increasing voltage and decreased with increasing frequency. CNT/PVDF nanocomposites exhibited better performance as self-sensors and micro-actuators than did ITO/PVDF nanocomposites.

  4. Release of particles by abrasion of CNT composites using a belt sander

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Yasuto; Nobuyuki, Kato; Ishibashi, Tomonori; Nagaya, Taiki; Yoneda, Minoru

    2017-01-01

    There have been many reports on the effect of exposure to nanomaterials such as titanium dioxide, silver, and carbon nanotube (CNT) on human health. Several experiments have examined the abrasion of CNT composites, in which CNT nanoparticles are embedded within a resin or rubber matrix, yielding varying results. Separate study of free CNTs and CNT nanoparticles in relation to health is important due to the different physicochemical characteristics of the two types of material. This study investigated the abrasion of CNT composites using a belt sander inside an enclosed chamber, with variation in the applied load and belt sander speed. At lower speeds, the population of particles with diameters of ∼100 nm was observed to increase (cf. mode values of ∼10 nm), and we found a relationship between the amount of the raising dust and the abrasion conditions. From these results, we propose a robust and widely applicable method to create particles of nanomaterial-containing composite materials of various types in order to conduct accelerated exposure assessment studies. (paper)

  5. Design, simulation and comparative analysis of CNT based cascode operational transconductance amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamuddin, M.; Loan, Sajad A.; Alamoud, Abdul R.; Abbassi, Shuja A.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, design and calibrated simulation of carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET)-based cascode operational transconductance amplifiers (COTA) have been performed. Three structures of CNTFET-based COTAs have been designed using HSPICE and have been compared with the conventional CMOS-based COTAs. The proposed COTAs include one using pure CNTFETs and two others that employ CNTFETs, as well as the conventional MOSFETs. The simulation study has revealed that the CNTFET-based COTAs have significantly outperformed the conventional MOSFET-based COTAs. A significant increase in dc gain, output resistance and slew rate of 81.4%, 25% and 13.2%, respectively, have been achieved in the proposed pure CNT-based COTA in comparison to the conventional CMOS-based COTA. The power consumption in the pure CNT-COTA is 324 times less in comparison to the conventional CMOS-COTA. Further, the phase margin (PM), gain margin (GM), common mode and power supply rejection ratios have been significantly increased in the proposed CNT-based COTAs in comparison to the conventional CMOS-based COTAs. Furthermore, to see the advantage of cascoding, the proposed CNT-based cascode OTAs have been compared with the CNT-based OTAs. It has been observed that by incorporating the concept of cascode in the CNTFET-based OTAs, significant increases in gain (12.5%) and output resistance (13.07%) have been achieved. The performance of the proposed COTAs has been further observed by changing the number of CNTs (N), CNT pitch (S) and CNT diameter (DCNT) in the CNTFETs used. It has been observed that the performance of the proposed COTAs can be significantly improved by using optimum values of N, S and DCNT.

  6. Design, simulation and comparative analysis of CNT based cascode operational transconductance amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizamuddin, M; Loan, Sajad A; Alamoud, Abdul R; Abbassi, Shuja A

    2015-01-01

    In this work, design and calibrated simulation of carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET)-based cascode operational transconductance amplifiers (COTA) have been performed. Three structures of CNTFET-based COTAs have been designed using HSPICE and have been compared with the conventional CMOS-based COTAs. The proposed COTAs include one using pure CNTFETs and two others that employ CNTFETs, as well as the conventional MOSFETs. The simulation study has revealed that the CNTFET-based COTAs have significantly outperformed the conventional MOSFET-based COTAs. A significant increase in dc gain, output resistance and slew rate of 81.4%, 25% and 13.2%, respectively, have been achieved in the proposed pure CNT-based COTA in comparison to the conventional CMOS-based COTA. The power consumption in the pure CNT-COTA is 324 times less in comparison to the conventional CMOS-COTA. Further, the phase margin (PM), gain margin (GM), common mode and power supply rejection ratios have been significantly increased in the proposed CNT-based COTAs in comparison to the conventional CMOS-based COTAs. Furthermore, to see the advantage of cascoding, the proposed CNT-based cascode OTAs have been compared with the CNT-based OTAs. It has been observed that by incorporating the concept of cascode in the CNTFET-based OTAs, significant increases in gain (12.5%) and output resistance (13.07%) have been achieved. The performance of the proposed COTAs has been further observed by changing the number of CNTs (N), CNT pitch (S) and CNT diameter (D_C_N_T) in the CNTFETs used. It has been observed that the performance of the proposed COTAs can be significantly improved by using optimum values of N, S and D_C_N_T. (paper)

  7. Nonhomogeneous morphology and the elastic modulus of aligned carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Yoonjin; Gao, Yuan; Kenny, Thomas W; Goodson, Kenneth E; Guzman de Villoria, Roberto; Wardle, Brian L; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays offer the potential to develop nanostructured materials that leverage their outstanding physical properties. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs), also named CNT forests, CNT arrays, or CNT turfs, can provide high heat conductivity and sufficient mechanical compliance to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch for use as thermal interface materials (TIMs). This paper reports measurements of the in-plane moduli of vertically aligned, single-walled CNT (SWCNT) and multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) films. The mechanical response of these films is related to the nonhomogeneous morphology of the grown nanotubes, such as entangled nanotubes of a top crust layer, aligned CNTs in the middle region, and CNTs in the bottom layer. To investigate how the entanglements govern the overall mechanical moduli of CNT films, we remove the crust layer consisting of CNT entanglements by etching the CNT films from the top. A microfabricated cantilever technique shows that crust removal reduces the resulting moduli of the etched SWCNT films by as much as 40%, whereas the moduli of the etched MWCNT films do not change significantly, suggesting a minimal crust effect on the film modulus for thick MWCNT films (>90 μm). This improved understanding will allow us to engineer the mechanical moduli of CNT films for TIMs or packaging applications. (paper)

  8. Nonhomogeneous morphology and the elastic modulus of aligned carbon nanotube films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Yoonjin; Gao, Yuan; Guzman de Villoria, Roberto; Wardle, Brian L.; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo; Kenny, Thomas W.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays offer the potential to develop nanostructured materials that leverage their outstanding physical properties. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs), also named CNT forests, CNT arrays, or CNT turfs, can provide high heat conductivity and sufficient mechanical compliance to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch for use as thermal interface materials (TIMs). This paper reports measurements of the in-plane moduli of vertically aligned, single-walled CNT (SWCNT) and multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) films. The mechanical response of these films is related to the nonhomogeneous morphology of the grown nanotubes, such as entangled nanotubes of a top crust layer, aligned CNTs in the middle region, and CNTs in the bottom layer. To investigate how the entanglements govern the overall mechanical moduli of CNT films, we remove the crust layer consisting of CNT entanglements by etching the CNT films from the top. A microfabricated cantilever technique shows that crust removal reduces the resulting moduli of the etched SWCNT films by as much as 40%, whereas the moduli of the etched MWCNT films do not change significantly, suggesting a minimal crust effect on the film modulus for thick MWCNT films (>90 μm). This improved understanding will allow us to engineer the mechanical moduli of CNT films for TIMs or packaging applications.

  9. Hierarchical cellulose-derived CNF/CNT composites for electrostatic energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmenko, V; Saleem, A M; Staaf, H; Haque, M; Bhaskar, A; Enoksson, P; Flygare, M; Svensson, K; Desmaris, V

    2016-01-01

    Today many applications require new effective approaches for energy delivery on demand. Supercapacitors are viewed as essential energy storage devices that can continuously provide quick energy. The performance of supercapacitors is mostly determined by electrode materials that can store energy via electrostatic charge accumulation. This study presents new sustainable cellulose-derived composite electrodes which consist of carbon nanofibrous (CNF) mats covered with vapor-grown carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNF/CNT electrodes have high electrical conductivity and surface area: the two most important features that are responsible for good electrochemical performance of supercapacitor electrodes. The results show that the composite electrodes have fairly high values of specific capacitance (101 F g −1 at 5 mV s −1 ), energy and power density (10.28 W h kg −1 and 1.99 kW kg −1 , respectively, at 1 A g −1 ) and can retain excellent performance over at least 2000 cycles (96.6% retention). These results indicate that sustainable cellulose-derived composites can be extensively used in the future as supercapacitor electrodes. (paper)

  10. First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Study on Helium- filled Carbon Nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agusta, M K; Prasetiyo, I; Saputro, A G; Dipojono, H K; Maezono, R

    2016-01-01

    Investigation on carbon nanotube (CNT) filled by Helium (He) atoms is conducted using Density Functional Theory and Molecular Dynamics Simulation. It reveals that He atom is repelled by CNT's wall and find its stable position at the tube center. Vibrational analysis on modes corespond to radial inward and outward breathing movement of CNT shows that He filling tends to pull the CNT wall in inward direction. Furthermore, examination on C-C stretch mode reveals that the existence of He improve the stiffness of CNT's wall. Molecular dynamics calculations which are done on (3,3) and (5,5) nanotube with 0.25 gr/cm 3 and 0.5 gr/cm 3 He density at 300 K and 1500 K confirms the increase of stiffness of CNT wall by interaction with He atoms. Effects of variation of chirality, temperature and He density on CNT wall stiffness is also reported. (paper)

  11. Effect of acid treated carbon nanotubes on mechanical, rheological and thermal properties of polystyrene nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Amr, Issam Thaher

    2011-09-01

    In this work, multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT) were functionalized by acid treatment and characterized using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Polystyrene/CNT composites of both the untreated and acid treated carbon nanotubes were prepared by thermal bulk polymerization without any initiator at different loadings of CNT. The tensile tests showed that the addition of 0.5 wt.% of acid treated CNT results in 22% increase in Young\\'s modulus. The DSC measurements showed a decrease in glass transition temperature (Tg) of PS in the composites. The rheological studies at 190 °C showed that the addition of untreated CNT increases the viscoelastic behavior of the PS matrix, while the acid treated CNT acts as plasticizer. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that the incorporation of CNT into PS enhanced the thermal properties of the matrix polymer. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Functionalizing CNTs for Making Epoxy/CNT Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Rajagopal, Ramasubramaniam

    2009-01-01

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with linear molecular side chains of polyphenylene ether (PPE) has been shown to be effective in solubilizing the CNTs in the solvent components of solutions that are cast to make epoxy/CNT composite films. (In the absence of solubilization, the CNTs tend to clump together instead of becoming dispersed in solution as needed to impart, to the films, the desired CNT properties of electrical conductivity and mechanical strength.) Because the PPE functionalizes the CNTs in a noncovalent manner, the functionalization does not damage the CNTs. The functionalization can also be exploited to improve the interactions between CNTs and epoxy matrices to enhance the properties of the resulting composite films. In addition to the CNTs, solvent, epoxy resin, epoxy hardener, and PPE, a properly formulated solution also includes a small amount of polycarbonate, which serves to fill voids that, if allowed to remain, would degrade the performance of the film. To form the film, the solution is drop-cast or spin-cast, then the solvent is allowed to evaporate.

  13. Thermal properties of alkali-activated aluminosilicates with CNT admixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmeskal, Oldrich; Trhlikova, Lucie; Fiala, Lukas; Florian, Pavel; Cerny, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Material properties of electrically conductive cement-based materials with increased attention paid on electric and thermal properties were often studied in the last years. Both electric and thermal properties play an important role thanks to their possible utilization in various practical applications (e.g. snow-melting systems or building structures monitoring systems without the need of an external monitoring system). The DC/AC characteristics depend significantly on the electrical resistivity and the electrical capacity of bulk materials. With respect to the DC/AC characteristics of cement-based materials, such materials can be basically classified as electric insulators. In order to enhance them, various conductive admixtures such as those based on different forms of carbon, can be used. Typical representatives of carbon-based admixtures are carbon nanotubes (CNT), carbon fibers (CF), graphite powder (GP) and carbon black (CB). With an adequate amount of such admixtures, electric properties significantly change and new materials with higher added value can be prepared. However, other types of materials can be enhanced in the same way. Alkali-activated aluminosilicates (AAA) based on blast furnace slag are materials with high compressive strength comparable with cement-based materials. Moreover, the price of slag is lower than of Portland cement. Therefore, this paper deals with the study of thermal properties of this promising material with different concentrations of CNT. Within the paper a simple method of basic thermal parameters determination based on the thermal transient response to a heat power step is presented.

  14. Gate dielectric strength dependent performance of CNT MOSFET and CNT TFET: A tight binding study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Shamim Sarker

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative study between CNT MOSFET and CNT TFET taking into account of different dielectric strength of gate oxide materials. Here we have studied the transfer characteristics, on/off current (ION/IOFF ratio and subthreshold slope of the device using Non Equilibrium Greens Function (NEGF formalism in tight binding frameworks. The results are obtained by solving the NEGF and Poisson’s equation self-consistently in NanoTCADViDES environment and found that the ON state performance of CNT MOSFET and CNT TFET have significant dependency on the dielectric strength of the gate oxide materials. The figure of merits of the devices also demonstrates that the CNT TFET is promising for high-speed and low-power logic applications. Keywords: CNT TFET, Subthreshold slop, Barrier width, Conduction band (C.B and Valance band (V.B, Oxide dielectric strength, Tight binding approach

  15. Pressure-driven opening of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Vitaly V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2016-03-01

    The closing and opening of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is essential for their applications in nanoscale chemistry and biology. We report reactive molecular dynamics simulations of CNT opening triggered by internal pressure of encapsulated gas molecules. Confined argon generates 4000 bars of pressure inside capped CNT and lowers the opening temperature by 200 K. Chemical interactions greatly enhance the efficiency of CNT opening: fluorine-filled CNTs open by fluorination of carbon bonds at temperature and pressure that are 700 K and 1000 bar lower than for argon-filled CNTs. Moreover, pressure induced CNT opening by confined gases leaves the CNT cylinders intact and removes only the fullerene caps, while the empty CNT decomposes completely. In practice, the increase in pressure can be achieved by near-infrared light, which penetrates through water and biological tissues and is absorbed by CNTs, resulting in rapid local heating. Spanning over a thousand of bars and Kelvin, the reactive and non-reactive scenarios of CNT opening represent extreme cases and allow for a broad experimental control over properties of the CNT interior and release conditions of the confined species. The detailed insights into the thermodynamic conditions and chemical mechanisms of the pressure-induced CNT opening provide practical guidelines for the development of novel nanoreactors, catalysts, photo-catalysts, imaging labels and drug delivery vehicles.

  16. NARloy-Z-Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: (1) NARloy-Z (Cu-3%Ag-0.5%Zr) is the state of the art, high thermal conductivity structural alloy used for making liquid rocket engine main combustion chamber liner. It has a Thermal conductivity approx 80% of pure copper. (2) Improving the thermal conductivity of NARloy-Z will help to improve the heat transfer efficiency of combustion chamber. (3)Will also help to reduce the propulsion system mass and increase performance. It will also increases thrust to weight ratio. (4) Improving heat transfer helps to design and build better thermal management systems for nuclear propulsion and other applications. Can Carbon nanotubes (CNT) help to improve the thermal conductivity (TC)of NARloy-Z? (1)CNT's have TC of approx 20X that of copper (2) 5vol% CNT could potentially double the TC of NARloy-Z if properly aligned (3) Improvement will be less if CNT s are randomly distributed, provided there is a good thermal bond between CNT and matrix. Prior research has shown poor results (1) No TC improvement in the copper-CNT composite reported (2)Reported values are typically lower (3) Attributed to high contact thermal resistance between CNT and Cu matrix (4)Results suggest that a bonding material between CNT and copper matrix is required to lower the contact thermal resistance It is hypothesized that Zr in NARloy-Z could act as a bonding agent to lower the contact thermal resistance between CNT and matrix.

  17. Impact of incomplete metal coverage on the electrical properties of metal-CNT contacts: A large-scale ab initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fediai, Artem, E-mail: artem.fediai@nano.tu-dresden.de; Ryndyk, Dmitry A. [Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergman Center of Biomaterials, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Seifert, Gotthard [Theoretical Chemistry, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Dresden Center for Computational Materials Science, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Mothes, Sven; Schroter, Michael; Claus, Martin [Chair for Electron Devices and Integrated Circuits, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Cuniberti, Gianaurelio [Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergman Center of Biomaterials, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Dresden Center for Computational Materials Science, TU Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-09-05

    Using a dedicated combination of the non-equilibrium Green function formalism and large-scale density functional theory calculations, we investigated how incomplete metal coverage influences two of the most important electrical properties of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based transistors: contact resistance and its scaling with contact length, and maximum current. These quantities have been derived from parameter-free simulations of atomic systems that are as close as possible to experimental geometries. Physical mechanisms that govern these dependences have been identified for various metals, representing different CNT-metal interaction strengths from chemisorption to physisorption. Our results pave the way for an application-oriented design of CNT-metal contacts.

  18. Epoxy composite dusts with and without carbon nanotubes cause similar pulmonary responses, but differences in liver histology in mice following pulmonary deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Mortensen, Alicja; Szarek, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Background: The toxicity of dusts from mechanical abrasion of multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) epoxy nanocomposites is unknown. We compared the toxic effects of dusts generated by sanding of epoxy composites with and without CNT. The used CNT type was included for comparison.Methods: Mice recei...

  19. Studies of the neoclassical transport for CNT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiwald, B; Nemov, V V; Pedersen, T Sunn; Kernbichler, W

    2007-01-01

    The original optimization of the Columbia Nonneutral Torus (CNT) considering only volume (and error field resilience) was also successful in optimizing the stored energy. To assess the general confinement properties of a device, studies of the 1/ν neoclassical transport (effective ripple ε eff ) are important. For CNT the field line tracing code NEO is used to compute ε eff . NEO is used by the code SORSSA for computation of the total stored energy based on neoclassical transport

  20. Synthesis and Characterization Carbon Nanotubes Doped Carbon Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuelong; Yan, Meifang; Liu, Zhenfa

    2017-12-01

    Polycondensation of phloroglucinol, resorcinol and formaldehyde with carbon nanotube (CNT) as the additives, using sodium carbonate as the catalyst, leads to the formation of CNT - doped carbon aerogels. The structure of carbon aerogels (CAs) with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The specific surface area, pore size distribution and pore volume were measured by surface area analyzer. The results show that when the optimum doping dosage is 5%, the specific surface area of CNT - doped carbon aerogel is up to 665 m2 g-1 and exhibit plentiful mesoporous.

  1. Reactor scale modeling of multi-walled carbon nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Chiu, Wilson K.S.

    2011-01-01

    As the mechanisms of carbon nanotube (CNT) growth becomes known, it becomes important to understand how to implement this knowledge into reactor scale models to optimize CNT growth. In past work, we have reported fundamental mechanisms and competing deposition regimes that dictate single wall carbon nanotube growth. In this study, we will further explore the growth of carbon nanotubes with multiple walls. A tube flow chemical vapor deposition reactor is simulated using the commercial software package COMSOL, and considered the growth of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. It was found that the limiting reaction processes for multi-walled carbon nanotubes change at different temperatures than the single walled carbon nanotubes and it was shown that the reactions directly governing CNT growth are a limiting process over certain parameters. This work shows that the optimum conditions for CNT growth are dependent on temperature, chemical concentration, and the number of nanotube walls. Optimal reactor conditions have been identified as defined by (1) a critical inlet methane concentration that results in hydrogen abstraction limited versus hydrocarbon adsorption limited reaction kinetic regime, and (2) activation energy of reaction for a given reactor temperature and inlet methane concentration. Successful optimization of a CNT growth processes requires taking all of those variables into account.

  2. Fabrication of Microscale Carbon Nanotube Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gengzhi Sun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have excellent mechanical, chemical, and electronic properties, but realizing these excellences in practical applications needs to assemble individual CNTs into larger-scale products. Recently, CNT fibers demonstrate the potential of retaining CNT's superior properties at macroscale level. High-performance CNT fibers have been widely obtained by several fabrication approaches. Here in this paper, we review several key spinning techniques including surfactant-based coagulation spinning, liquid-crystal-based solution spinning, spinning from vertical-aligned CNT arrays, and spinning from CNT aerogel. The method, principle, limitations, and recent progress of each technique have been addressed, and the fiber properties and their dependences on spinning parameters are also discussed.

  3. Advanced gecko-foot-mimetic dry adhesives based on carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihao; Xia, Zhenhai; Dai, Liming

    2013-01-21

    Geckos can run freely on vertical walls and even ceilings. Recent studies have discovered that gecko's extraordinary climbing ability comes from a remarkable design of nature with nanoscale beta-keratin elastic hairs on their feet and toes, which collectively generate sufficiently strong van der Waals force to hold the animal onto an opposing surface while at the same time disengaging at will. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) arrays, resembling gecko's adhesive foot hairs with additional superior mechanical, chemical and electrical properties, have been demonstrated to be a promising candidate for advanced fibrillar dry adhesives. The VA-CNT arrays with tailor-made hierarchical structures can be patterned and/or transferred onto various flexible substrates, including responsive polymers. This, together with recent advances in nanofabrication techniques, could offer 'smart' dry adhesives for various potential applications, even where traditional adhesives cannot be used. A detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms governing the material properties and adhesion performances is critical to the design and fabrication of gecko inspired CNT dry adhesives of practical significance. In this feature article, we present an overview of recent progress in both fundamental and applied frontiers for the development of CNT-based adhesives by summarizing important studies in this exciting field, including our own work.

  4. A numerical investigation on piezoresistive behaviour of carbon nanotube/polymer composites: mechanism and optimizing principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhifeng; Ye Xiongying

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled polymeric composites can be used as a kind of flexible piezoresistive material in potentially many fields. Due to the diversity of CNTs and polymers, the mechanism and features of their piezoresistive behaviour is still not fully understood. This paper reports our investigations into the mechanism and optimization of piezoresistive CNT/polymer composites. Numerical simulation results showed that the junction resistances between CNTs are a major component of the network conductance of the composite as well as the piezoresistive behaviour. Average junction gap variation (AJGV) was introduced as a quantitative description of the conductance variation of a CNT network caused by strain and the conductance variation of the CNT network was found to be dominated by AJGV. Numerical simulation and analytical results indicated that the key parameters affecting AJGV include the orientation and diameter of CNTs, Poisson’s ratio of the polymer, and the concentration of CNTs in the polymer matrix. An optimizing principle was then given for piezoresistive CNT/polymer composites. (paper)

  5. Advanced gecko-foot-mimetic dry adhesives based on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihao; Xia, Zhenhai; Dai, Liming

    2012-12-01

    Geckos can run freely on vertical walls and even ceilings. Recent studies have discovered that gecko's extraordinary climbing ability comes from a remarkable design of nature with nanoscale beta-keratin elastic hairs on their feet and toes, which collectively generate sufficiently strong van der Waals force to hold the animal onto an opposing surface while at the same time disengaging at will. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) arrays, resembling gecko's adhesive foot hairs with additional superior mechanical, chemical and electrical properties, have been demonstrated to be a promising candidate for advanced fibrillar dry adhesives. The VA-CNT arrays with tailor-made hierarchical structures can be patterned and/or transferred onto various flexible substrates, including responsive polymers. This, together with recent advances in nanofabrication techniques, could offer `smart' dry adhesives for various potential applications, even where traditional adhesives cannot be used. A detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms governing the material properties and adhesion performances is critical to the design and fabrication of gecko inspired CNT dry adhesives of practical significance. In this feature article, we present an overview of recent progress in both fundamental and applied frontiers for the development of CNT-based adhesives by summarizing important studies in this exciting field, including our own work.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Thin Film Transistors for Flat Panel Display Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xuelei; Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Tian, Boyuan; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising materials for both high performance transistors for high speed computing and thin film transistors for macroelectronics, which can provide more functions at low cost. Among macroelectronics applications, carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFT) are expected to be used soon for backplanes in flat panel displays (FPDs) due to their superior performance. In this paper, we review the challenges of CNT-TFT technology for FPD applications. The device performance of state-of-the-art CNT-TFTs are compared with the requirements of TFTs for FPDs. Compatibility of the fabrication processes of CNT-TFTs and current TFT technologies are critically examined. Though CNT-TFT technology is not yet ready for backplane production line of FPDs, the challenges can be overcome by close collaboration between research institutes and FPD manufacturers in the short term.

  7. Development of a new foil compounded from carbon nanotubes and sputter-deposition carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroo Hasebe; Hironori Kuboki; Hiroki Okuno; Isao Yamane; Hiroshi Imao; Nobuhisa Fukunishi; Masayuki Kase; Osamu Kamigaito

    2014-01-01

    New carbon-nanotube-sputter-deposition-carbon (CNT-SDC) foils were developed and used in the U beam time at the RIKEN RI Beam Factory (RIBF) from October to December 2011. The lifetimes of these new foils were drastically extended, and stable, high-intensity U beams were successfully provided to users. The lifetime of the CNT-SDC foils was 2-5 C, which was 100 times longer than those of static C-foils previously used. The qualitative analysis of the CNT-SDC foils clearly showed that the CNT structure and bundles were broken by beam irradiation. In addition, it was found that CNT bundles in the CNT-SDC foil were grown after the carbon deposition procedure. This structure was considered to be the reason that the CNT-SDC foils maintain advantages of both CNT and SDC foils. (author)

  8. Electrostatically actuated oscillator of bundle and double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Song, Ki Oh; Hwang, Ho Jung [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ha; Lee, Hoong Joo [Sangmyung University, Chonan (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Keun [Semyung University, Jecheon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Sik; Song, Young Jin [Konyang University, Nonsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    Schematics of capacitively driven carbon nanotube (CNT) oscillators were presented and investigated by using classical molecular dynamics simulations. While the capacitive force acting on a CNT oscillator extruded it, the force exerted by the excess van der Waals energy sucked the CNT oscillator into the bundle or outer shell. The CNT oscillator could be oscillated by using both the Coulomb and the van der Waals interactions. The van der Waals force of the bundle-type CNT oscillator was less than the van der Waals force of the double-walled CNT oscillator. Molecular dynamics simulation results showed that double-walled CNT oscillators were better than bundle-type CNT oscillators in the aspects of both energy dissipation and stable operation.

  9. Release and nonvolatile operation of carbon nanotube nanorelay by resonant vibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagota, Tatsuya; Takei, Kuniharu; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji, E-mail: akita@pe.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Nagataki, Atsuko [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Materials Analysis Research Center, KRI, Inc., Osaka 554-0051 (Japan)

    2013-11-11

    We investigated the release of a stuck carbon nanotube (CNT) cantilever beam in nanorelay applications using a nano-manipulator. Even with strong adhesion induced by electrostatic attraction that is 100 times stronger than the van der Waals interaction, successful release of a nanotube arm from a stuck state was realized by the application of a resonant vibration to the stuck CNT arm. Furthermore, nonvolatile operation of the nanotube nanorelay was demonstrated by the application of the resonant vibration to the stuck CNT arm.

  10. Nanostructued core–shell Sn nanowires @ CNTs with controllable thickness of CNT shells for lithium ion battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yu; Li, Xifei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruying [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Cai, Mei [General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, MI 48090-9055 (United States); Sun, Xueliang, E-mail: xsun@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sn nanowires encapsulated in CNTs directly grew on current collectors. • The thickness of CNTs were controlled via growth time, gas flow rate and synthesis temperature. • Thick CNTs contributed to a better capacity retention while thin CNTs led to a higher capacity. • The core–shell structures formed in one-step CVD process. - Abstract: Core–shell structure of Sn nanowires encapsulated in amorphous carbon nanotubes (Sn@CNTs) with controlled thickness of CNT shells was in situ prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The thickness of CNT shells was accurately controlled from 4 to 99 nm by using different growth time, flow rate of hydrocarbon gas (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and synthesis temperature. The microstructure and composition of the coaxial Sn@CNTs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. Moreover, the Sn@CNTs were studied as anode materials for Li-ion batteries and showed excellent cycle performance. The capacity was affected by the thickness of outer CNT shells: thick CNT shells contributed to a better retention while thin CNT shells led to a higher capacity. The thin CNT shell of 6 nm presented the highest capacity around 630 mAh g{sup −1}.

  11. Nanostructued core–shell Sn nanowires @ CNTs with controllable thickness of CNT shells for lithium ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Yu; Li, Xifei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruying; Cai, Mei; Sun, Xueliang

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Sn nanowires encapsulated in CNTs directly grew on current collectors. • The thickness of CNTs were controlled via growth time, gas flow rate and synthesis temperature. • Thick CNTs contributed to a better capacity retention while thin CNTs led to a higher capacity. • The core–shell structures formed in one-step CVD process. - Abstract: Core–shell structure of Sn nanowires encapsulated in amorphous carbon nanotubes (Sn@CNTs) with controlled thickness of CNT shells was in situ prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The thickness of CNT shells was accurately controlled from 4 to 99 nm by using different growth time, flow rate of hydrocarbon gas (C 2 H 4 ) and synthesis temperature. The microstructure and composition of the coaxial Sn@CNTs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques. Moreover, the Sn@CNTs were studied as anode materials for Li-ion batteries and showed excellent cycle performance. The capacity was affected by the thickness of outer CNT shells: thick CNT shells contributed to a better retention while thin CNT shells led to a higher capacity. The thin CNT shell of 6 nm presented the highest capacity around 630 mAh g −1

  12. EXACT SOLUTION FOR TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT BUCKLING ANALYSIS OF FG-CNT-REINFORCED MINDLIN PLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Mousavi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research deals with the buckling analysis of nanocomposite polymeric temperature-dependent plates reinforced by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs. For the carbon-nanotube reinforced composite (CNTRC plate, uniform distribution (UD and three types of functionally graded (FG distribution patterns of SWCNT reinforcements are assumed. The material properties of FG-CNTRC plate are graded in the thickness direction and estimated based on the rule of mixture. The CNTRC is located in a elastic medium which is simulated with temperature-dependent Pasternak medium. Based on orthotropic Mindlin plate theory, the governing equations are derived using Hamilton’s principle and solved by Navier method. The influences of the volume fractions of carbon nanotubes, elastic medium, temperature and distribution type of CNTs are considered on the buckling of the plate. Results indicate that CNT distribution close to top and bottom are more efficient than those distributed nearby the mid-plane for increasing the stiffness of plates.

  13. Interface feature characterization and Schottky interfacial layer confirmation of TiO{sub 2} nanotube array film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongchao [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, 410083 Changsha (China); Chongyi Zhangyuan Tungsten Industry Corporation Limited, 341300 Ganzhou (China); Tang, Ningxin; Yang, Hongzhi; Leng, Xian [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, 410083 Changsha (China); Zou, Jianpeng, E-mail: zoujp@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, 410083 Changsha (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Interfacial fusion of TiO{sub 2} nanotube film increases with annealing temperature. • Interface bonding force of the film increases with annealing temperature. • We report the forth stage of nanofibers formation in the growing mechanism. • TiO{sub 2} nanotubes grow from Schottky interface layer rather than from Ti substrate. • Schottky interface layer's thickness of 35–45 nm is half the diameter of nanotube. - Abstract: We report here characterization of the interfacial microstructure and properties of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanotube array films fabricated by anodization. Field effect scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), nanoindentation, atomic force microscopy (AFM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) were used to characterize the interface of the film. With increasing annealing temperature from 200 °C to 800 °C, the interfacial fusion between the film and the Ti substrate increased. The phase transformation of the TiO{sub 2} nanotube film from amorphous to anatase to rutile took place gradually; as the phase transformation progressed, the force needed to break the film increased. The growth of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays occurs in four stages: barrier layer formation, penetrating micropore formation, regular nanotube formation, and nanofiber formation. The TiO{sub 2} nanotubes grow from the Schottky interface layer rather than from the Ti substrate. The Schottky interface layer's thickness of 35–45 nm was identified as half the diameter of the corresponding nanotube, which shows good agreement to the Schottky interface layer growth model. The TiO{sub 2} nanotube film was amorphous and the Ti substrate was highly crystallized with many dislocation walls.

  14. Carbon Nanotubes Growth by CVD on Graphite Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Muntele, I.; Ila, D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Due to the superior electrical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT), synthesizing CNT on various substances for electronics devices and reinforced composites have been engaged in many efforts for applications. This presentation will illustrate CNT synthesized on graphite fibers by thermal CVD. On the fiber surface, iron nanoparticles as catalysts for CNT growth are coated. The growth temperature ranges from 600 to 1000 C and the pressure ranges from 100 Torr to one atmosphere. Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 10% to 100% are used for the CNT synthesis. At high growth temperatures (greater than or equal to 900 C), the rapid inter-diffusion of the transition metal iron on the graphite surface results in the rough fiber surface without any CNT grown on it. When the growth temperature is relative low (650-800 C), CNT with catalytic particles on the nanotube top ends are fabricated on the graphite surface. (Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 10% to 100% are used for the CNT synthesis.) (By measuring the samples) Using micro Raman spectroscopy in the breath mode region, single-walled or multi-walled CNT (MWCNT), depending on growth concentrations, are found. Morphology, length and diameter of these MWCNT are determined by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The detailed results of syntheses and characterizations will be discussed in the presentation.

  15. Using Carbon Nanotubes for Nanometer-Scale Energy Transfer Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jessica; Shafran, Eyal; Mangum, Ben; Mu, Chun; Gerton, Jordan

    2009-10-01

    We investigate optical energy transfer between fluorophores and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). CNTs are grown on Si-oxide wafers by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), lifted off substrates by atomic force microscope (AFM) tips via Van der Waals forces, then shortened by electrical pulses. The tip-attached CNTs are scanned over fluorescent CdSe-ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with sub-nm precision while recording the fluorescence rate. A novel photon counting technique enables us to produce 3D maps of the QD-CNT coupling, revealing nanoscale lateral and vertical features. All CNTs tested (>50) strongly quenched the QD fluorescence, apparently independent of chirality. In some data, a delay in the recovery of QD fluorescence following CNT-QD contact was observed, suggesting possible charge transfer in this system. In the future, we will perform time-resolved studies to quantify the rate of energy and charge transfer processes and study the possible differences in fluorescence quenching and nanotube-QD energy transfer when comparing single-walled (SW) versus multi-walled (MW) CNTs, attempting to grow substrates consisting primarily of SW or MWCNTs and characterizing the structure of tip-attached CNTs using optical spectroscopy.

  16. Nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization and catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dommele, S.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen containing Carbon Nanotubes (NCNT) have altered physical- and chemical properties with respect to polarity, conductivity and reactivity as compared to conventional carbon nanotubes (CNT) and have potential for use in electronic applications or catalysis. In this thesis the incorporation of

  17. Electrical conductivity of metal–carbon nanotube structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electrical properties of asymmetric metal–carbon nanotube (CNT) structures have been studied using density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method with Atomistix tool kit. The models with asymmetric metal contacts and carbon nanotube bear resemblance to experimental set-ups. The study ...

  18. CVD synthesis of carbon nanotubes using a finely dispersed cobalt catalyst and their use in double layer electrochemical capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, A.K.; Sharon, Maheshwar; Banerjee, Rangan; Neumann-Spallart, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) were obtained by chemical vapour deposition (CVD), decomposing turpentine oil over finely dispersed Co metal as a catalyst at 675 deg. C. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images reveal that the nanotubes are densely packed and of 10-50 nm in diameter. The XRD pattern of purified CNT shows that they are graphitic in nature. Resistivity measurements of these CNT indicate that they are highly conducting. Hall measurements of CNT reveal that electrons are the majority carriers with a carrier concentration of 1.35x10 20 cm -3 . Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and constant current charging/discharging was used to characterise the behaviour of electrochemical double layer capacitors of purified CNT with H 2 SO 4 . For CNT/2 M H 2 SO 4 /CNT, a capacitance of 12 F g -1 (based on the weight of the active material) was obtained

  19. Self-assembled dopamine nanolayers wrapped carbon nanotubes as carbon-carbon bi-functional nanocatalyst for highly efficient oxygen reduction reaction and antiviral drug monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalafallah, Diab; Akhtar, Naeem; Alothman, Othman Y.; Fouad, H.; Abdelrazek khalil, Khalil

    2017-09-01

    Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts are the heart of eco-friendly energy resources particularly low temperature fuel cells. Although valuable efforts have been devoted to synthesize high performance catalysts for ORR, considerable challenges are extremely desirable in the development of energy technologies. Herein, we report a simple self-polymerization method to build a thin film of dopamine along the tubular nanostructures of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) in a weak alkaline solution. The dopamine@CNT hybrid (denoted as DA@CNT) reveals an enhanced electrocatalytic activity towards ORR with highly positive onset potential and cathodic current as a result of their outstanding features of longitudinal mesoporous structure, high surface area, and ornamentation of DA layers with nitrogen moieties, which enable fast electron transport and fully exposed electroactive sites. Impressively, the as-obtained hybrid afford remarkable electrochemical durability for prolonged test time of 60,000 s compared to benchmark Pt/C (20 wt%) catalyst. Furthermore, the developed DA@CNT electrode was successfully applied to access the quality of antiviral drug named Valacyclovir (VCR). The DA@CNT electrode shows enhanced sensing performance in terms of large linear range (3-75 nM), low limit of detection (2.55 nM) than CNT based electrode, indicating the effectiveness of the DA coating. Interestingly, the synergetic effect of nanostructured DA and CNT can significantly boost the electronic configuration and exposure level of active species for ORR and biomolecule recognition. Therefore, the existing carbon-based porous electrocatalyst may find numerous translational applications as attractive alternative to noble metals in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells and quality control assessment of pharmaceutical and therapeutic drugs.

  20. Soft but Powerful Artificial Muscles Based on 3D Graphene-CNT-Ni Heteronanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Bae, Seok-Hu; Kotal, Moumita; Stalbaum, Tyler; Kim, Kwang J; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2017-08-01

    Bioinspired soft ionic actuators, which exhibit large strain and high durability under low input voltages, are regarded as prospective candidates for future soft electronics. However, due to the intrinsic drawback of weak blocking force, the feasible applications of soft ionic actuators are limited until now. An electroactive artificial muscle electro-chemomechanically reinforced with 3D graphene-carbon nanotube-nickel heteronanostructures (G-CNT-Ni) to improve blocking force and bending deformation of the ionic actuators is demonstrated. The G-CNT-Ni heteronanostructure, which provides an electrically conductive 3D network and sufficient contact area with mobile ions in the polymer electrolyte, is embedded as a nanofiller in both ionic polymer and conductive electrodes of the ionic actuators. An ionic exchangeable composite membrane consisting of Nafion, G-CNT-Ni and ionic liquid (IL) shows improved tensile modulus and strength of up to 166% and 98%, respectively, and increased ionic conductivity of 0.254 S m -1 . The ionic actuator exhibits enhanced actuation performances including three times larger bending deformation, 2.37 times higher blocking force, and 4 h durability. The electroactive artificial muscle electro-chemomechanically reinforced with 3D G-CNT-Ni heteronanostructures offers improvements over current soft ionic actuator technologies and can advance the practical engineering applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Fabrication Process and Thermoelectric Properties of CNT/Bi2(Se,Te3 Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Tae Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube/bismuth-selenium-tellurium composites were fabricated by consolidating CNT/Bi2(Se,Te3 composite powders prepared from a polyol-reduction process. The synthesized composite powders exhibit CNTs homogeneously dispersed among Bi2(Se,Te3 matrix nanopowders of 300 nm in size. The powders were densified into a CNT/Bi2(Se,Te3 composite in which CNTs were randomly dispersed in the matrix through spark plasma sintering process. The effect of an addition of Se on the dimensionless figure-of-merit (ZT of the composite was clearly shown in 3 vol.% CNT/Bi2(Se,Te3 composite as compared to CNT/Bi2Te3 composite throughout the temperature range of 298 to 473 K. These results imply that matrix modifications such as an addition of Se as well as the incorporation of CNTs into bismuth telluride thermoelectric materials is a promising means of achieving synergistic enhancement of the thermoelectric performance levels of these materials.

  2. Morphology, rheology and electrical resistivity of PLLA/HDPE/CNT nanocomposites: Effect of maleic anhydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Li-na; Chen, Jie; Dai, Jian; Chen, Hai-ming; Yang, Jing-hui [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Wang, Yong, E-mail: yongwang1976@163.com [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zhang, Chao-liang [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2015-02-15

    As a part of serial work about tuning the selective location of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in immiscible polymer blends, this work reports the effects of component polarity and viscosity ratio between components on the selective location of CNTs and the resultant electrical resistivity of the nanocomposites. To achieve the research aim, maleic anhydride (MA) was grafted onto poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) main chain through a reactive compounding processing. After that, different contents of CNTs were incorporated into blends of high density polyethylene (HDPE) and PLLA (or PLLA-g-MA). The morphologies of the ternary nanocomposites and the selective location of CNTs in the nanocomposites were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The microstructure of nanocomposites and the dispersion of CNTs were further proved by rheological measurement. Finally, the electrical resistivity of nanocomposites containing different CNT contents was measured. The results showed that through increasing the polarity of PLLA and decreasing the melt viscosity, CNTs were kinetically trapped at the blend interface region. Consequently, largely decreased percolation threshold was achieved for the PLLA-g-MA/HDPE/CNT nanocomposites. The morphological changes as well as the rheological properties were also comparatively analyzed. - Highlights: • PLLA/HDPE/CNT and PLLA-g-MA/HDPE/CNT composites were prepared. • Different selective location states of CNTs were achieved in different composites. • Selectively located CNTs at the interface resulted in lower percolation threshold.

  3. Flexible transparent conductive films combining flexographic printed silver grids with CNT coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo, Lixin; Fang, Yi; Zhai, Qingbin; Li, Luhai; Ran, Jun; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    A high-performance ITO-free transparent conductive film (TCF) has been made by combining high resolution Ag grids with a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating. Ag grids printed with flexography have a 20 μm line width at a grid interval of 400 μm. The Ag grid/CNT hybrid film exhibits excellent overall performance, with a typical sheet resistance of 14.8 Ω/□ and 82.6% light transmittance at room temperature. This means a 23.98% reduction in sheet resistance and only 2.52% loss in transmittance compared to a pure Ag grid film. Analysis indicates that filling areas between the Ag grids and interconnecting the silver nanoparticles with the CNT coating are the primary reasons for the significantly improved conductivity of the hybrid film that also exhibits excellent flexibility and mechanical strength compared to an ITO film. The hybrid film may fully satisfy the requirements of different applications, e.g. use as the anode of polymer solar cells (PSCs). The J–V curve shows that the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the PSCs using the Ag grid/CNT hybrid anode is 0.61%, which is 24.5% higher than that of the pure Ag grids with a PCE of 0.49%. Further investigations to improve the performance of the solar cells based on the printed hybrid TCFs are ongoing. (paper)

  4. Plasmonic-Resonant Bowtie Antenna for Carbon Nanotube Photodetectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of bowtie antennas for carbon nanotube (CNT photodetectors has been investigated. CNT photodetectors have shown outstanding performance by using CNT as sensing element. However, detection wavelength is much larger than the diameter of the CNT, resulting in small fill factor. Bowtie antenna can confine light into a subwavelength volume based on plasmonic resonance, thus integrating a bowtie antenna to CNT photodetectors can highly improve photoresponse of the detectors. The electric field enhancement of bowtie antennas was calculated using the device geometry by considering fabrication difficulties and photodetector structure. It is shown that the electric field intensity enhancement increased exponentially with distance reduction between the CNT photodetector to the antenna. A redshift of the peak resonance wavelength is predicted due to the increase of tip angles of the bowtie antennas. Experimental results showed that photocurrent enhancement agreed well with theoretical calculations. Bowtie antennas may find wide applications in nanoscale photonic sensors.

  5. Electrostatic capacitance and Faraday cage behavior of carbon nanotube forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ya' akobovitz, A. [Mechanosynthesis Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Sciences, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Bedewy, M. [Mechanosynthesis Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Hart, A. J. [Mechanosynthesis Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Laboratory for Manufacturing and Productivity, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-02-02

    Understanding of the electrostatic properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) forests is essential to enable their integration in microelectronic and micromechanical devices. In this study, we sought to understand how the hierarchical geometry and morphology of CNT forests determines their capacitance. First, we find that at small gaps, solid micropillars have greater capacitance, yet at larger gaps the capacitance of the CNT forests is greater. The surface area of the CNT forest accessible to the electrostatic field was extracted by analysis of the measured capacitance, and, by relating the capacitance to the average density of CNTs in the forest, we find that the penetration depth of the electrostatic field is on the order of several microns. Therefore, CNT forests can behave as a miniature Faraday cage. The unique electrostatic properties of CNT forests could therefore enable their use as long-range proximity sensors and as shielding elements for miniature electronic devices.

  6. Fabrication of highly conductive carbon nanotube fibers for electrical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Fengmei; Li, Can; Wei, Jinquan; Xu, Ruiqiao; Zhang, Zelin; Cui, Xian; Wang, Kunlin; Wu, Dehai

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have great potential for use as electrical wires because of their outstanding electrical and mechanical properties. Here, we fabricate lightweight CNT fibers with electrical conductivity as high as that of stainless steel from macroscopic CNT films by drawing them through diamond wire-drawing dies. The entangled CNT bundles are straightened by suffering tension, which improves the alignment of the fibers. The loose fibers are squeezed by the diamond wire-drawing dies, which reduces the intertube space and contact resistance. The CNT fibers prepared by drawing have an electrical conductivity as high as 1.6 × 10 6 s m −1 . The fibers are very stable when kept in the air and under cyclic tensile test. A prototype of CNT motor is demonstrated by replacing the copper wires with the CNT fibers. (paper)

  7. Capillary assisted deposition of carbon nanotube film for strain sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zida; Xue, Xufeng; Lin, Feng; Wang, Yize; Ward, Kevin; Fu, Jianping

    2017-10-01

    Advances in stretchable electronics offer the possibility of developing skin-like motion sensors. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), owing to their superior electrical properties, have great potential for applications in such sensors. In this paper, we report a method for deposition and patterning of CNTs on soft, elastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates using capillary action. Micropillar arrays were generated on PDMS surfaces before treatment with plasma to render them hydrophilic. Capillary force enabled by the micropillar array spreads CNT solution evenly on PDMS surfaces. Solvent evaporation leaves a uniform deposition and patterning of CNTs on PDMS surfaces. We studied the effect of the CNT concentration and micropillar gap size on CNT coating uniformity, film conductivity, and piezoresistivity. Leveraging the piezoresistivity of deposited CNT films, we further designed and characterized a device for the contraction force measurement. Our capillary assisted deposition method of CNT films showed great application potential in fabrication of flexible CNT thin films for strain sensing.

  8. Electrostatic capacitance and Faraday cage behavior of carbon nanotube forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ya'akobovitz, A.; Bedewy, M.; Hart, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the electrostatic properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) forests is essential to enable their integration in microelectronic and micromechanical devices. In this study, we sought to understand how the hierarchical geometry and morphology of CNT forests determines their capacitance. First, we find that at small gaps, solid micropillars have greater capacitance, yet at larger gaps the capacitance of the CNT forests is greater. The surface area of the CNT forest accessible to the electrostatic field was extracted by analysis of the measured capacitance, and, by relating the capacitance to the average density of CNTs in the forest, we find that the penetration depth of the electrostatic field is on the order of several microns. Therefore, CNT forests can behave as a miniature Faraday cage. The unique electrostatic properties of CNT forests could therefore enable their use as long-range proximity sensors and as shielding elements for miniature electronic devices

  9. Electrostatic capacitance and Faraday cage behavior of carbon nanotube forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya'akobovitz, A.; Bedewy, M.; Hart, A. J.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding of the electrostatic properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) forests is essential to enable their integration in microelectronic and micromechanical devices. In this study, we sought to understand how the hierarchical geometry and morphology of CNT forests determines their capacitance. First, we find that at small gaps, solid micropillars have greater capacitance, yet at larger gaps the capacitance of the CNT forests is greater. The surface area of the CNT forest accessible to the electrostatic field was extracted by analysis of the measured capacitance, and, by relating the capacitance to the average density of CNTs in the forest, we find that the penetration depth of the electrostatic field is on the order of several microns. Therefore, CNT forests can behave as a miniature Faraday cage. The unique electrostatic properties of CNT forests could therefore enable their use as long-range proximity sensors and as shielding elements for miniature electronic devices.

  10. A new approach to fabrication of Cs/BG/CNT nanocomposite scaffold towards bone tissue engineering and evaluation of its properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokri, S. [Department of Nanotechnology Engineering, Faculty of Advanced Sciences and Technologies, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Movahedi, B., E-mail: b.movahedi@ast.ui.ac.ir [Department of Nanotechnology Engineering, Faculty of Advanced Sciences and Technologies, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafieinia, M. [Biosensor Research Center, Department of Advanced Medical Technology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, 64716 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salehi, H. [Department of Anatomical Sciences, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, 64716 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nanocomposite scaffold was produced using a novel technique. • Bioactive glass, carbon nanotube and chitosan were used for fabrication of nanocomposite scaffold. • The compressive strength of the scaffold was near to the cancellous bone. • Biodegradability of the scaffolds in PBS shows the slow destruction. - Abstract: In the present study, bioactive glass (BG), carbon nanotube (CNT), and chitosan (Cs) were used with different ratios for the fabrication of nanocomposite scaffold for bone tissue engineering. BG was synthesized by sol–gel process and CNT was functionalized by immersing in sulfuric acid as well as nitric acid. Nanocomposite scaffold was produced using a novel technique, hot press, and salt leaching process and cross-linked by Hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI). The optimum porosity of the scaffold with respect to the ratio of salt and precursor was kept around 70%. Mechanical properties of the scaffolds were increased by the addition of CNT and hence, the compressive strength of them with 4 wt% CNT was increased up to 5.95 ± 0.5 MPa. The nanocomposite scaffolds were characterized by FT-IR, SEM, XRD, and electrochemical analysis. Furthermore, scaffolds were immersed in PBS for evaluating the biodegradability, water absorption, and CNT release. The results indicated that water absorption of the scaffolds was increased by adding CNT to the scaffold. The amount of released CNT after 30 days was measured within 6 × 10{sup −4} and 1 × 10{sup −3} mg/ml. Attachment and proliferation of MG63 osteoblast cell line on Cs/BG/CNT scaffolds were investigated by MTT assay indicating no toxicity for this nanocomposite scaffolds. According to the results of the experiments, the nanocomposite scaffold with modified composition (Cs/BG/CNT, 80:20:2 wt%) was the best one in matters of mechanical, chemical, and cellular properties and also the most appropriate for trabecular bone tissue.

  11. Atomic-Oxygen-Durable and Electrically-Conductive CNT-POSS-Polyimide Flexible Films for Space Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atar, Nurit; Grossman, Eitan; Gouzman, Irina; Bolker, Asaf; Murray, Vanessa J; Marshall, Brooks C; Qian, Min; Minton, Timothy K; Hanein, Yael

    2015-06-10

    In low Earth orbit (LEO), hazards such as atomic oxygen (AO) or electrostatic discharge (ESD) degrade polymeric materials, specifically, the extensively used polyimide (PI) Kapton. We prepared PI-based nanocomposite films that show both AO durability and ESD protection by incorporating polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) and carbon nanotube (CNT) additives. The unique methods that are reported prevent CNT agglomeration and degradation of the CNT properties that are common in dispersion-based processes. The influence of the POSS content on the electrical, mechanical, and thermo-optical properties of the CNT-POSS-PI films was investigated and compared to those of control PI and CNT-PI films. CNT-POSS-PI films with 5 and 15 wt % POSS content exhibited sheet resistivities as low as 200 Ω/□, and these resistivities remained essentially unchanged after exposure to AO with a fluence of ∼2.3 × 10(20) O atoms cm(-2). CNT-POSS-PI films with 15 wt % POSS content exhibited an erosion yield of 4.8 × 10(-25) cm(3) O atom(-1) under 2.3 × 10(20) O atoms cm(-2) AO fluence, roughly one order of magnitude lower than that of pure PI films. The durability of the conductivity of the composite films was demonstrated by rolling film samples with a tight radius up to 300 times. The stability of the films to thermal cycling and ionizing radiation was also demonstrated. These properties make the prepared CNT-POSS-PI films with 15 wt % POSS content excellent candidates for applications where AO durability and electrical conductivity are required for flexible and thermally stable materials. Hence, they are suggested here for LEO applications such as the outer layers of spacecraft thermal blankets.

  12. Modification of carbon nanotube's dispersion using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as cancer drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulan, Praswati PDK.; Wulandari, Hanifia; Ulwan, Sekar H.; Purwanto, Widodo W.; Mulia, Kamarza

    2018-02-01

    Cancer is a disease that causes many deaths globally. Cancer treatments have side effects that can danger the human body. Carbon nanotube (CNT) becomes drug (anti-cancer) delivery towards cancer cells that have been targeted. Yet, CNT tends to aggregate. It could be overcome by functionalization (modification) of CNT using Cetyltrimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB). The variations we use were CNT-CTAB with a dose of CNT 100 mg and CTAB varied between 80, 90, 100, 110, and 120 mg. There were several stages of CNT modification process: dispersion, filtration, washing, and drying. The optimum condition obtained was on CNT-110 mg CTAB because it could be dispersed up to 70 hours better than pure CNT, Zeta Potential (ZP) ≥16 mV, and absorbance Uv-vis 1.05. Both the ZP value and the absorbance of Uv-vis showed the CNT dispersion modified to be better than the pure CNT. Furthermore, SEM-EDX did not produce structural damage to CNT modified surfaces, the percentage of the mass of Oxygen (O) elements as characteristic of increased hydrophilic properties, and Ni elements as toxic impurities become reduced. FTIR spectrum results showed the highest intensity occurred at CTAB CNT-110mg at 1221 m-1. This strong C-N vibration interaction suggests that CNTs CNT modification become readily dispersed in water.

  13. Measuring the electrical resistivity and contact resistance of vertical carbon nanotube bundles for application as interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiodarelli, Nicolo'; Li, Yunlong; Arstila, Kai; Richard, Olivier; Cott, Daire J; Heyns, Marc; De Gendt, Stefan; Groeseneken, Guido; Vereecken, Philippe M; Masahito, Sugiura; Kashiwagi, Yusaku

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are known to be materials with potential for manufacturing sub-20 nm high aspect ratio vertical interconnects in future microchips. In order to be successful with respect to contending against established tungsten or copper based interconnects, though, CNT must fulfil their promise of also providing low electrical resistance in integrated structures using scalable integration processes fully compatible with silicon technology. Hence, carefully engineered growth and integration solutions are required before we can fully exploit their potentialities. This work tackles the problem of optimizing a CNT integration process from the electrical perspective. The technique of measuring the CNT resistance as a function of the CNT length is here extended to CNT integrated in vertical contacts. This allows extracting the linear resistivity and the contact resistance of the CNT, two parameters to our knowledge never reported separately for vertical CNT contacts and which are of utmost importance, as they respectively measure the quality of the CNT and that of their metal contacts. The technique proposed allows electrically distinguishing the impact of each processing step individually on the CNT resistivity and the CNT contact resistance. Hence it constitutes a powerful technique for optimizing the process and developing CNT contacts of superior quality. This can be of relevant technological importance not only for interconnects but also for all those applications that rely on the electrical properties of CNT grown with a catalytic chemical vapor deposition method at low temperature.

  14. Carbon nanotube based pressure sensor for flexible electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Hye-Mi; Sim, Jin Woo; Kwon, Jinhyeong; Yun, Jongju; Baik, Seunghyun; Chang, Won Seok

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The electromechanical change of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Fabrication of CNT field-effect transistor on flexible substrate. • CNT based FET integrated active pressure sensor. • The integrated device yields an increase in the source-drain current under pressure. - Abstract: A pressure sensor was developed based on an arrangement of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) supported by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The VACNTs embedded in the PDMS matrix were structurally flexible and provided repeated sensing operation due to the high elasticities of both the polymer and the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance increased in the presence of a loading pressure, which compressed the material and induced contact between neighboring CNTs, thereby producing a dense current path and better CNT/metal contacts. To achieve flexible functional electronics, VACNTs based pressure sensor was integrated with field-effect transistor, which is fabricated using sprayed semiconducting carbon nanotubes on plastic substrate

  15. Carbon nanotube based pressure sensor for flexible electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Hye-Mi [Department of Nano Mechanics, Nanomechanical Systems Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Sim, Jin Woo [Advanced Nano Technology Ltd., Seoul 132-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Jinhyeong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Jongju; Baik, Seunghyun [SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Department of Energy Science and School of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Won Seok, E-mail: paul@kimm.re.kr [Department of Nano Mechanics, Nanomechanical Systems Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The electromechanical change of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes. • Fabrication of CNT field-effect transistor on flexible substrate. • CNT based FET integrated active pressure sensor. • The integrated device yields an increase in the source-drain current under pressure. - Abstract: A pressure sensor was developed based on an arrangement of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) supported by a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. The VACNTs embedded in the PDMS matrix were structurally flexible and provided repeated sensing operation due to the high elasticities of both the polymer and the carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance increased in the presence of a loading pressure, which compressed the material and induced contact between neighboring CNTs, thereby producing a dense current path and better CNT/metal contacts. To achieve flexible functional electronics, VACNTs based pressure sensor was integrated with field-effect transistor, which is fabricated using sprayed semiconducting carbon nanotubes on plastic substrate.

  16. Selective growth of carbon nanotube on silicon substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xiao-ping; H. ABE; T. SHIMIZU; A. ANDO; H. TOKUMOT; ZHU Shen-ming; ZHOU Hao-shen

    2006-01-01

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) growth of iron oxide-deposited trench-patterns and the locally-ordered CNT arrays on silicon substrate were achieved by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition(STCVD) of ethanol vapor. The CNTs were uniformly synthesized with good selectivity on trench-patterned silicon substrates. This fabrication process is compatible with currently used semiconductor-processing technologies,and the carbon-nanotube fabrication process can be widely applied for the development of electronic devices using carbon-nanotube field emitters as cold cathodes and can revolutionize the area of field-emitting electronic devices. The site-selective growth of CNT from an iron oxide nanoparticle catalyst patterned were also achieved by drying-mediated self-assembly technique. The present method offers a simple and cost-effective method to grow carbon nanotubes with self-assembled patterns.

  17. Carbon nanotube release from polymers into a food simulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Yining; Uysal Unalan, Ilke; Rubino, Maria; Auras, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    The release assessment of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was performed on two types of polymer-CNT nanocomposites: polypropylene (PP) and polyamide 6 (PA6) containing 3 wt% CNT. Nanocomposite films were prepared and then exposed to ethanol as a fatty-food simulant at 40 °C, and the amount of CNT release into ethanol was determined by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The CNTs released into ethanol were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and verified by Raman spectroscopy. UV-Vis analysis showed a very small amount of CNT release from the nanocomposite films into ethanol over 60 d: maximum CNT concentrations in ethanol were 1.3 mg/L for the PP-CNT film and 1.2 mg/L for the PA6-CNT film. GFAAS results indicated that the amount of CNTs released into ethanol after 12 d was over 20-fold higher than the results obtained by UV-Vis. Overestimation of CNT release by GFAAS suggested aggregation and poor dispersion of CNTs in the solvent. This assumption was verified by TEM images exhibiting the embedded CNTs in the polymer flakes, which could be poorly dispersed in the solvent. In general, CNT release from the nanocomposite films was considered a surface phenomenon, as indicated by detachment of CNT-containing polymer flakes from the film surface. - Highlights: • Release of CNT from polypropylene and polyamide nanocomposites were quantified and validated with TEM and Raman. • Spectroscopy and silane-labeled CNT were used for tracking the release of CNT. • The release behavior of CNT from nanocomposites was mostly generated from the polymer surfaces.

  18. Batch fabrication of nanotubes suspended between microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Stöckli, T.; Knapp, H. F.

    2007-01-01

    be done with a simple lift-off process with standard photolithographic resist. An applied electric field is sustained between the microelectrodes during CVD to guide the nanotube growth. Comparison with simulations shows that the location and the orientation of the grown carbon nanotubes (CNT) correspond...... to the regions of maximum electric field, enabling accurate positioning of a nanotube by controlling the shape of the microelectrodes. The CNT bridges are deflected tens of nm when a DC voltage is applied between the nanotube and a gate microelectrode indicating that the clamping through the catalyst particles...... is not only mechanically stable but also electrical conducting. This method could be used to fabricate nanoelectromechanical systems based on suspended double clamped CNTs depending only on photolithography and standard Cleanroom processes....

  19. A room-temperature non-volatile CNT-based molecular memory cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Senbin; Jing, Qingshen; Han, Ray P. S.

    2013-04-01

    Recent experiments with a carbon nanotube (CNT) system confirmed that the innertube can oscillate back-and-forth even under a room-temperature excitation. This demonstration of relative motion suggests that it is now feasible to build a CNT-based molecular memory cell (MC), and the key to bring the concept to reality is the precision control of the moving tube for sustained and reliable read/write (RW) operations. Here, we show that by using a 2-section outertube design, we are able to suitably recalibrate the system energetics and obtain the designed performance characteristics of a MC. Further, the resulting energy modification enables the MC to operate as a non-volatile memory element at room temperatures. Our paper explores a fundamental understanding of a MC and its response at the molecular level to roadmap a novel approach in memory technologies that can be harnessed to overcome the miniaturization limit and memory volatility in memory technologies.

  20. Carbon nanotube release from polymers into a food simulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yining; Uysal Unalan, Ilke; Rubino, Maria; Auras, Rafael

    2017-10-01

    The release assessment of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was performed on two types of polymer-CNT nanocomposites: polypropylene (PP) and polyamide 6 (PA6) containing 3 wt% CNT. Nanocomposite films were prepared and then exposed to ethanol as a fatty-food simulant at 40 °C, and the amount of CNT release into ethanol was determined by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The CNTs released into ethanol were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and verified by Raman spectroscopy. UV-Vis analysis showed a very small amount of CNT release from the nanocomposite films into ethanol over 60 d: maximum CNT concentrations in ethanol were 1.3 mg/L for the PP-CNT film and 1.2 mg/L for the PA6-CNT film. GFAAS results indicated that the amount of CNTs released into ethanol after 12 d was over 20-fold higher than the results obtained by UV-Vis. Overestimation of CNT release by GFAAS suggested aggregation and poor dispersion of CNTs in the solvent. This assumption was verified by TEM images exhibiting the embedded CNTs in the polymer flakes, which could be poorly dispersed in the solvent. In general, CNT release from the nanocomposite films was considered a surface phenomenon, as indicated by detachment of CNT-containing polymer flakes from the film surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermoresistive mechanisms of carbon nanotube/polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen-Puc, M.; Oliva-Avilés, A. I.; Avilés, F.

    2018-01-01

    The mechanisms governing thermoresistivity of carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer composites are theoretically and experimentally investigated. Two modeling approaches are proposed to this aim considering a broad range of CNT concentrations (0.5-50 wt%). In the first model, thermal expansion of the polymer composite is predicted using a finite element model; the resulting CNT-to-CNT separation distance feeds a classical tunneling model to predict the dependence of the electrical resistance with temperature. The second approach uses the general effective medium considering the dilution of the CNT volume fraction due to the thermal expansion of the polymer. Both models predict that the electrical resistance increases with increased temperature (i.e. a positive temperature coefficient of resistance, TCR) for all investigated CNT concentrations, with higher TCRs for lower CNT concentrations. Comparison between modeling outcomes and experimental data suggests that polymer thermal expansion (and tunneling) play a dominant role for low CNT concentrations (≤ 10 wt%) heated above room temperature. On the other hand, for composites at high CNT concentrations (50 wt%) or for freezing temperatures (-110 °C), a negative TCR was experimentally obtained, suggesting that for those conditions the CNT intrinsic thermoresistivity and the electronic conduction between CNTs by thermal activation may play a paramount role.

  2. An analytical approach to evaluate the performance of graphene and carbon nanotubes for NH3 gas sensor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Akbari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon, in its variety of allotropes, especially graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs, holds great potential for applications in variety of sensors because of dangling π-bonds that can react with chemical elements. In spite of their excellent features, carbon nanotubes (CNTs and graphene have not been fully exploited in the development of the nanoelectronic industry mainly because of poor understanding of the band structure of these allotropes. A mathematical model is proposed with a clear purpose to acquire an analytical understanding of the field-effect-transistor (FET based gas detection mechanism. The conductance change in the CNT/graphene channel resulting from the chemical reaction between the gas and channel surface molecules is emphasized. NH3 has been used as the prototype gas to be detected by the nanosensor and the corresponding current–voltage (I–V characteristics of the FET-based sensor are studied. A graphene-based gas sensor model is also developed. The results from graphene and CNT models are compared with the experimental data. A satisfactory agreement, within the uncertainties of the experiments, is obtained. Graphene-based gas sensor exhibits higher conductivity compared to that of CNT-based counterpart for similar ambient conditions.

  3. An analytical approach to evaluate the performance of graphene and carbon nanotubes for NH3 gas sensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Elnaz; Arora, Vijay Kumar; Enzevaee, Aria; Ahmadi, Mohamad T; Saeidmanesh, Mehdi; Khaledian, Mohsen; Karimi, Hediyeh; Yusof, Rubiyah

    2014-01-01

    Carbon, in its variety of allotropes, especially graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), holds great potential for applications in variety of sensors because of dangling π-bonds that can react with chemical elements. In spite of their excellent features, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene have not been fully exploited in the development of the nanoelectronic industry mainly because of poor understanding of the band structure of these allotropes. A mathematical model is proposed with a clear purpose to acquire an analytical understanding of the field-effect-transistor (FET) based gas detection mechanism. The conductance change in the CNT/graphene channel resulting from the chemical reaction between the gas and channel surface molecules is emphasized. NH3 has been used as the prototype gas to be detected by the nanosensor and the corresponding current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the FET-based sensor are studied. A graphene-based gas sensor model is also developed. The results from graphene and CNT models are compared with the experimental data. A satisfactory agreement, within the uncertainties of the experiments, is obtained. Graphene-based gas sensor exhibits higher conductivity compared to that of CNT-based counterpart for similar ambient conditions.

  4. Electric Double-Layer Capacitor Fabricated with Addition of Carbon Nanotube to Polarizable Electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshiyuki Show

    2012-01-01

    Electrical double-layer capacitor (EDLC) was fabricated with addition of carbon nanotube (CNT) to polarization electrodes as a conducting material. The CNT addition reduced the series resistance of the EDLC by one-twentieth, while the capacitance was not increased by the CNT addition. The low series resistance leaded to the high electrical energy stored in the EDLC. In this paper, the dependence of the series resistance, the specific capacitance, the energy, and the energy efficiencies on the...

  5. Active vacuum brazing of CNT films to metal substrates for superior electron field emission performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longtin, Rémi; Sanchez-Valencia, Juan Ramon; Shorubalko, Ivan; Furrer, Roman; Hack, Erwin; Elsener, Hansrudolf; Gröning, Oliver; Greenwood, Paul; Rupesinghe, Nalin; Teo, Kenneth; Leinenbach, Christian; Gröning, Pierangelo

    2015-02-01

    The joining of macroscopic films of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to titanium substrates is demonstrated by active vacuum brazing at 820 °C with a Ag-Cu-Ti alloy and at 880 °C with a Cu-Sn-Ti-Zr alloy. The brazing methodology was elaborated in order to enable the production of highly electrically and thermally conductive CNT/metal substrate contacts. The interfacial electrical resistances of the joints were measured to be as low as 0.35 Ω. The improved interfacial transport properties in the brazed films lead to superior electron field-emission properties when compared to the as-grown films. An emission current of 150 μA was drawn from the brazed nanotubes at an applied electric field of 0.6 V μm-1. The improvement in electron field-emission is mainly attributed to the reduction of the contact resistance between the nanotubes and the substrate. The joints have high re-melting temperatures up to the solidus temperatures of the alloys; far greater than what is achievable with standard solders, thus expanding the application potential of CNT films to high-current and high-power applications where substantial frictional or resistive heating is expected.

  6. Preparation and Characterisation of LiFePO4/CNT Material for Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rushanah Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Li-ion battery cathode materials were synthesised via a mechanical activation and thermal treatment process and systematically studied. LiFePO4/CNT composite cathode materials were successfully prepared from LiFePO4 material. The synthesis technique involved growth of carbon nanotubes onto the LiFePO4 using a novel spray pyrolysis-modified CVD technique. The technique yielded LiFePO4/CNT composite cathode material displaying good electrochemical activity. The composite cathode exhibited excellent electrochemical performances with 163 mAh/g discharge capacity with 94% cycle efficiency at a 0.1 C discharge rate in the first cycle, with a capacity fade of approximately 10% after 30 cycles. The results indicate that carbon nanotube addition can enable LiFePO4 to display a higher discharge capacity at a fast rate with high efficiency. The research is of potential interest for the application of carbon nanotubes as a new conducting additive in cathode preparation and for the development of high-power Li-ion batteries for hybrid electric vehicles.

  7. Electrochemical behaviour and nanoscale characteristics of CNT-based fibers as new substrate for cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polizu, S.; Yahia, L.H. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire d' innovation et d' analyse de la bioperformance; Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de nouveaux materiaux pour l' energie et l' electrochimie; Maugey, M.; Poulin, P. [Centre de Recherche Paul Pascal, CNRS, Bordeaux (France); Rouabhia, M. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Faculty of Medicine

    2008-07-01

    This paper reported on a study in which carbon nanotube (CNT) macroscopic fibers were formulated by a newly developed non-covalent method for fabricating fibrous substrate. The covalent and noncovalent chemistry of CNTs has been widely used in the development of CNT-based biomaterials as active substrates for living cells. Time of Flight Mass Spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) analysis was used to determine the surface characteristics of the CNT-based fibers produced by wet spinning method. The structure and texture of fibers were imaged using Low-Vacuum Scanning Electron Microscopy (LV-SEM) equipped with an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) for microanalysis. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging revealed the structure of fibers. Cyclic Voltametry (CV) measurements were performed to examine the electrochemical behaviour of fibers. Sulfuric acid and a cell culture medium was used as the 2 different electrolytes. The influences of environmental parameters on the electrochemical phenomena taking place were identified. The intrinsic electrochemical characteristics of fibers were revealed through measurements in acid environment. The cell culture medium simulated the physiological conditions. It was concluded that the newly developed wet spinning method is very efficient for making CNT-based fibers as electroactive biomaterials. The structural nanoscale details evidenced a good alignment of nanotubes in the thread and the critical role it plays in electrochemical interactions. The differences induced by the variation of electrolytes suggest that a relationship could be established between the fiber chemistry and the electrochemical response. This correlation has considerably potential for the design of new biomedical devices. 2 refs.

  8. Carbon nanotube-coated macroporous sponge for microbial fuel cell electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Xie, Xing; Ye, Meng; Hu, Liangbing; Liu, Nian; McDonough, James R.; Chen, Wei; Alshareef, Husam N.; Criddle, Craig S.; Cui, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The materials that are used to make electrodes and their internal structures significantly affect microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance. In this study, we describe a carbon nanotube (CNT)-sponge composite prepared by coating a sponge with CNTs

  9. Mesoscopic distinct element method-enabled multiscale computational design of carbon nanotube-based composite materials

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a sustained effort to develop super-lightweight composites by using polymer impregnation of carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets. This promising area is still in...

  10. ELECTROCHEMICAL DETERMINATION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE AT CARBON NANOTUBE MODIFIED ELECTRODES. (R830900)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) modified glassy carbon electrodes exhibiting a strong and stable electrocatalytic response towards sulfide are described. A substantial (400 mV) decrease in the overvoltage of the sulfide oxidation reaction (compared to ordinary carbon electrodes) is...

  11. FIB-SEM imaging of carbon nanotubes in mouse lung tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købler, Carsten; Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun

    2014-01-01

    Ultrastructural characterisation is important for understanding carbon nanotube (CNT) toxicity and how the CNTs interact with cells and tissues. The standard method for this involves using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, in particular, the sample preparation, using a microtome...

  12. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes via Electrophilic Substitution Reaction in Polyphosphoric Acid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baek, Jong-Beom

    2006-01-01

    .... Furthermore, on the basis of all supportive evidences, this work provides one of the most efficient methods to directly and uniformly grafting the surfaces of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nanofibers (CNF...

  13. Microstructure and mechanical performance of modified mortar using hemp fibres and carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Hamzaoui, Rabah; Guessasma, Sofiane; Mecheri, Boubakeur; Eshtiaghi, Amir M.; Bennabi, Abdelkrim

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical performance of modified mortar using hemp fibres is studied following various processing conditions. Hemp fibres combined with carbon nanotubes (CNT) are introduced in mortar and their effect is studied as function of curing time

  14. Rational control on floating catalysts for the growth of carbon nanotube assemblies: From vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays to carbon nanotube films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hongyuan; Chen, Minghai; Zhang, Yongyi; Li, Qingwen

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Floating catalyst CVD for the growth of CNT films and arrays was investigated. • The structure of CNT array grown in floating catalyst CVD was revealed. • Temperature was proved as a key for the growth of different CNT assemblies. • The increase of growth temperature induced the growth of single-walled CNT film. - Abstract: Floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD) has been widely used for the growth of various carbon nanotube (CNT) macrostructures, mainly including vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays and none-woven CNT films. However, it is still unclear for the reason why these CNT macrostructures with largely different morphologies were received via the similar method. In this research, it revealed that the growth temperature largely affected the nucleation status of floating catalysts and thus controlled the morphologies of CNT macrostructures from VACNT arrays to none-woven CNT films. In low temperatures (below 800 °C), VACNTs were grown by bottom-up mechanism with several CNTs, but not one individual from bottom to up along the array height direction. Furthermore, VACNT arrays were only grown on some substrates that can induce iron atoms aggregating to catalyst particles with a suitable size. When increasing the growth temperature higher than 800 °C, more catalyst particles were nucleated in the gas flow, which induced the formation of none-woven CNT films composed of thin CNTs (single-walled CNTs and double-walled CNTs). This research was significative for understanding CNT growth mechanism via FCCVD process and the synthesis of different CNT macrostructures by this strategy.

  15. Rational control on floating catalysts for the growth of carbon nanotube assemblies: From vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays to carbon nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hongyuan; Chen, Minghai, E-mail: mhchen2008@sinano.ac.cn; Zhang, Yongyi; Li, Qingwen

    2015-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Floating catalyst CVD for the growth of CNT films and arrays was investigated. • The structure of CNT array grown in floating catalyst CVD was revealed. • Temperature was proved as a key for the growth of different CNT assemblies. • The increase of growth temperature induced the growth of single-walled CNT film. - Abstract: Floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (FCCVD) has been widely used for the growth of various carbon nanotube (CNT) macrostructures, mainly including vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays and none-woven CNT films. However, it is still unclear for the reason why these CNT macrostructures with largely different morphologies were received via the similar method. In this research, it revealed that the growth temperature largely affected the nucleation status of floating catalysts and thus controlled the morphologies of CNT macrostructures from VACNT arrays to none-woven CNT films. In low temperatures (below 800 °C), VACNTs were grown by bottom-up mechanism with several CNTs, but not one individual from bottom to up along the array height direction. Furthermore, VACNT arrays were only grown on some substrates that can induce iron atoms aggregating to catalyst particles with a suitable size. When increasing the growth temperature higher than 800 °C, more catalyst particles were nucleated in the gas flow, which induced the formation of none-woven CNT films composed of thin CNTs (single-walled CNTs and double-walled CNTs). This research was significative for understanding CNT growth mechanism via FCCVD process and the synthesis of different CNT macrostructures by this strategy.

  16. The fabrication of vertically aligned and periodically distributed carbon nanotube bundles and periodically porous carbon nanotube films through a combination of laser interference ablation and metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dajun; Lin, Wei; Guo, Rui; Wong, C P; Das, Suman

    2012-06-01

    Scalable fabrication of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles is essential to future advances in several applications. Here, we report on the development of a simple, two-step method for fabricating vertically aligned and periodically distributed CNT bundles and periodically porous CNT films at the sub-micron scale. The method involves laser interference ablation (LIA) of an iron film followed by CNT growth via iron-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition. CNT bundles with square widths ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 µm in width, and 50-200 µm in length, are grown atop the patterned catalyst over areas spanning 8 cm(2). The CNT bundles exhibit a high degree of control over square width, orientation, uniformity, and periodicity. This simple scalable method of producing well-placed and oriented CNT bundles demonstrates a high application potential for wafer-scale integration of CNT structures into various device applications, including IC interconnects, field emitters, sensors, batteries, and optoelectronics, etc.

  17. Free-standing 3D polyaniline-CNT/Ni-fiber hybrid electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Fang, Yuzhu; Liu, Hong; Wu, Xiaoming; Lu, Yong

    2012-04-01

    Free-standing 3D macroscopic polyaniline (PANi)-carbon nanotube (CNT)-nickel fiber hybrids have been developed, and they deliver high specific capacitance (725 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1) and high energy density at high rates (~22 W h kg-1 at 2000 W kg-1, based on total electrode mass) with good cyclability.Free-standing 3D macroscopic polyaniline (PANi)-carbon nanotube (CNT)-nickel fiber hybrids have been developed, and they deliver high specific capacitance (725 F g-1 at 0.5 A g-1) and high energy density at high rates (~22 W h kg-1 at 2000 W kg-1, based on total electrode mass) with good cyclability. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details on preparation, characterization, and electrochemical testing; Fig. S1-S8, Schemes S1 and S2. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30252g

  18. Transport and Retention of Carboxymethylcellulose-Modified Carbon Nanotube-Magnetite Nanohybrids in Water-Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Su, C.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon-metal oxide nanohybrids (NHs) are increasingly recognized as the next-generation, promising group of nanomaterials for solving emerging environmental issues and challenges. This research, for the first time, systematically explored the transport and retention of the multifunctional carbon nanotube-magnetite (CNT-Fe3O4) NHs in water-saturated porous media under environmentally relevant physicochemical conditions. An environment-benign macromolecule, carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), was employed to stabilize the NHs. Classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory and colloid transport model were used to describe the transport and retention of the NHs. Our results showed that transport of the magnetic CNT-Fe3O4 NHs was lower than that of the parent CNT due to greater aggregation (induced by magnetic attraction) during transport. The DLVO theory well-interpreted the NHs' transport; and secondary minimum played dominant roles in NHs' retention. A novel transport feature, an initial low and following sharp peaks occurred frequently in the NHs' breakthrough curves; and the magnitude and location of both transport peaks varied with different experimental conditions due to the interplay between variability of the fluid viscosity and aggregation-dispersion nature of the NHs. Very promisingly, the estimated maximum transport distance of NHs using the Tufenkji-Elimelech equation ranged between 0.38-46 m, supporting the feasibility of employing the magnetically recyclable CNT-Fe3O4 NHs for in-situ nanoremediation of contaminated soils, sediment aquifers, and groundwater.

  19. Thermal management of thermoacoustic sound projectors using a free-standing carbon nanotube aerogel sheet as a heat source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, Ali E; Mayo, Nathanael K; Baughman, Ray H; Avirovik, Dragan; Priya, Shashank; Zarnetske, Michael R; Blottman, John B

    2014-10-10

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) aerogel sheets produce smooth-spectra sound over a wide frequency range (1-10(5) Hz) by means of thermoacoustic (TA) sound generation. Protective encapsulation of CNT sheets in inert gases between rigid vibrating plates provides resonant features for the TA sound projector and attractive performance at needed low frequencies. Energy conversion efficiencies in air of 2% and 10% underwater, which can be enhanced by further increasing the modulation temperature. Using a developed method for accurate temperature measurements for the thin aerogel CNT sheets, heat dissipation processes, failure mechanisms, and associated power densities are investigated for encapsulated multilayered CNT TA heaters and related to the thermal diffusivity distance when sheet layers are separated. Resulting thermal management methods for high applied power are discussed and deployed to construct efficient and tunable underwater sound projector for operation at relatively low frequencies, 10 Hz-10 kHz. The optimal design of these TA projectors for high-power SONAR arrays is discussed.

  20. Thermal management of thermoacoustic sound projectors using a free-standing carbon nanotube aerogel sheet as a heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, Ali E; Mayo, Nathanael K; Baughman, Ray H; Avirovik, Dragan; Priya, Shashank; Zarnetske, Michael R; Blottman, John B

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) aerogel sheets produce smooth-spectra sound over a wide frequency range (1–10 5 Hz) by means of thermoacoustic (TA) sound generation. Protective encapsulation of CNT sheets in inert gases between rigid vibrating plates provides resonant features for the TA sound projector and attractive performance at needed low frequencies. Energy conversion efficiencies in air of 2% and 10% underwater, which can be enhanced by further increasing the modulation temperature. Using a developed method for accurate temperature measurements for the thin aerogel CNT sheets, heat dissipation processes, failure mechanisms, and associated power densities are investigated for encapsulated multilayered CNT TA heaters and related to the thermal diffusivity distance when sheet layers are separated. Resulting thermal management methods for high applied power are discussed and deployed to construct efficient and tunable underwater sound projector for operation at relatively low frequencies, 10 Hz–10 kHz. The optimal design of these TA projectors for high-power SONAR arrays is discussed. (paper)

  1. High-conductivity polymer nanocomposites obtained by tailoring the characteristics of carbon nanotube fillers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossiord, N.; Loos, J.; Laake, van L.C.; Maugey, M.; Zakri, C.; Koning, C.E.; Hart, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the influence of carbon nanotube (CNT) characteristics on the electrical conductivity of polystyrene nanocomposites produced using a latex-based approach. We processed both industrially-produced multi-wall CNT (MWCNT) powders and MWCNTs from vertically-aligned films

  2. Towards entanglement detection in nanotube Cooper pair splitters with disorder and spin-orbit coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hels, Morten Canth

    to have god correspondence with transport data obtained from a two-terminal CNT quantum dot device. A CNT CPS device is fabricated which allows identification of non-collinear spin-orbit magnetic fields in the two segments of the device. This is made possible because the curved nanotube exhibits low...

  3. Ultrafast cooling by covalently bonded graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid immersed in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jie; Walther, Jens Honore; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    , we demonstrate, through transient heat-dissipation simulations, that a covalently bonded graphene-carbon nanotube (G-CNT) hybrid immersed in water is a promising solution for the ultrafast cooling of such high-temperature and high heat-flux surfaces. The G-CNT hybrid offers a unique platform...

  4. Dynamic behavior of a black phosphorus and carbon nanotube composite system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Jiao; Cai, Haifang; Cai, Kun; Qin, Qing-Hua

    2017-01-01

    A double walled nanotube composite is constructed by placing a black-phosphorene-based nanotube (BPNT) in a carbon nanotube (CNT). When driving the CNT to rotate by stators in a thermal driven rotary nanomotor, the BPNT behaves differently from the CNT. For instance, the BPNT can be actuated to rotate by the CNT, but its rotational acceleration differs from that of the CNT. The BPNT oscillates along the tube axis when it is longer than the CNT. The results obtained indicate that the BPNT functions with high structural stability when acting as a rotor with rotational frequency of ∼20 GHz at 250 K. If at a higher temperature than 250 K, say 300 K, the rotating BPNT shows weaker structural stability than its status at 250 K. When the two tubes in the rotor are of equal length, the rotational frequency of the BPNT drops rapidly after the BPNT is collapsed, owing to more broken P–P bonds. When the black-phosphorene nanotube is longer than the CNT, it rotates synchronously with the CNT even if it is collapsed. Hence, in the design of a nanomotor with a rotor from BPNT, the working rotational frequency should be lower than a certain threshold at a higher temperature. (paper)

  5. Carbon Nanotube Paper-Based Electroanalytical Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngmi Koo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report on carbon nanotube paper-based electroanalytical devices. A highly aligned-carbon nanotube (HA-CNT array, grown using chemical vapor deposition (CVD, was processed to form bi-layered paper with an integrated cellulose-based Origami-chip as the electroanalytical device. We used an inverse-ordered fabrication method from a thick carbon nanotube (CNT sheet to a thin CNT sheet. A 200-layered HA-CNT sheet and a 100-layered HA-CNT sheet are explored as a working electrode. The device was fabricated using the following methods: (1 cellulose-based paper was patterned using a wax printer, (2 electrical connection was made using a silver ink-based circuit printer, and (3 three electrodes were stacked on a 2D Origami cell. Electrochemical behavior was evaluated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and cyclic voltammetry (CV. We believe that this platform could attract a great deal of interest for use in various chemical and biomedical applications.

  6. Preparation and Application of Immobilized Surfactant-Modified PANi-CNT/TiO2 under Visible-Light Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Yuan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermally and sol-gel-synthesized immobilized surfactant-modified polyaniline-carbon nanotubes/TiO2 (PANi-CNT/TiO2 photocatalysts were prepared and their application in the degradation of diethyl phthalate (DEP under visible light at 410 nm was investigated in this sturdy. To improve the dispersion of nanoparticles and the transfer of electrons, the TiO2 surface was modified with both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS and functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNT-COOH and CNT-COCl. With the addition of PANi, which was increased from 1%–5%, the adsorption edge of the prepared photocatalysts shifted to 442 nm. The SDS linked the PANi polymers to achieve a thickness of coating of the film of up to 314–400 nm and 1301–1600 nm for sol-gel hydrolysis and hydrothermally-synthesized photocatalysts, respectively. An appropriate film thickness would extend the transfer path of the electrons and inhibit the recombination of the electrons and the electron-holes. The photo-degradation performance of DEP by the hydrothermally-synthesized photocatalysts was better than those by sol-gel hydrolysis. The results revealed that the hydroxyl radicals were the key oxidant in the degradation of DEP using hydrothermally-synthesized PANi-CNT/TiO2 photocatalysts. The morphology and functional groups of the raw materials of photocatalysts were characterized and a comparison of photocatalytic activity with other TiO2-based photocatalysts was also provided.

  7. Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts for Carbon Nanotube Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Benjamin F.

    2003-01-01

    Work this summer involved and new and unique process for producing the metal nanoparticle catalysts needed for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth. There are many applications attributed to CNT's, and their properties have deemed them to be a hot spot in research today. Many groups have demonstrated the versatility in CNT's by exploring a wide spectrum of roles that these nanotubes are able to fill. A short list of such promising applications are: nanoscaled electronic circuitry, storage media, chemical sensors, microscope enhancement, and coating reinforcement. Different methods have been used to grow these CNT's. Some examples are laser ablation, flame synthesis, or furnace synthesis. Every single approach requires the presence of a metal catalyst (Fe, Co, and Ni are among the best) that is small enough to produce a CNT. Herein lies the uniqueness of this work. Microemulsions (containing inverse micelles) were used to generate these metal particles for subsequent CNT growth. The goal of this summer work was basically to accomplish as much preliminary work as possible. I strived to pinpoint which variable (experimental process, metal product, substrate, method of application, CVD conditions, etc.) was the determining factor in the results. The resulting SEM images were sufficient for the appropriate comparisons to be made. The future work of this project consists of the optimization of the more promising experimental procedures and further exploration onto what exactly dictated the results.

  8. Carbon nanotube-based ethanol sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahim, Sean; Colbern, Steve; Gump, Robert; Moser, Alex; Grigorian, Leonid

    2009-01-01

    Sensors containing metal-carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrid materials as the active sensing layer were demonstrated for ethanol vapor detection at room temperature. The metal-CNT hybrid materials were synthesized by infiltrating single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with the transition metals Ti, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Pd or Pt. Each sensor was prepared by drop-casting dilute dispersions of a metal-CNT hybrid onto quartz substrate electrodes and the impedimetric responses to varying ethanol concentration were recorded. Upon exposure to ethanol vapor, the ac impedance (Z') of the sensors was found to decrease to different extents. The sensor containing pristine CNT material was virtually non-responsive at low ethanol concentrations (<50 ppm). In contrast, all metal-CNT hybrid sensors showed extremely high sensitivity to trace ethanol levels with 100-fold or more gains in sensitivity relative to the starting SWNT sensor. All hybrid sensors, with the exception of Ni filled CNT, exhibited significantly larger sensor responses to ethanol vapor up to 250 ppm compared to the starting SWNT sensor.

  9. Coaxial Manganese Dioxide@N-doped Carbon Nanotubes as Superior Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, Jie; Gu, Xin; Jiang, Xiaolei; Chen, Liang; Wang, Nana; Yang, Jian; Ma, Xiaojian

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • MnO 2 @N-dopedcarbonnanotube(N-CNT) composites are prepared by a facile process. • MnO 2 @N-CNT anodes exhibit better electrochemical properties than MnO 2 @CNT. • MnO 2 @N-CNT anodes show a capacity of 1415 mAh g −1 at 100 mA g −1 after 150 cycles. - Abstract: Carbon nanotube (CNT) has been widely applied to transition metal oxides anodes for lithium ion batteries, acting as a buffer, hollow backbone and conductive additive. Since the presence of N in carbon materials can enhance the reactivity and electrical conductivity, N-doped carbon nanotube (N-CNT) might be a better choice than pure CNT, which is exemplified by coaxial manganese dioxide@N-doped carbon nanotubes as a superior anode. The electrochemical properties of MnO 2 @N-CNT are investigated in terms of cycling stability and rate capability. The nanocomposite can deliver a specific capacity of 1415 mAh g −1 after 100 cycles at the current density of 100 mA g −1 , which is better than that of MnO 2 @commercial CNT and MnO 2 . The excellent performance might be related to the integration of hollow structure, one-dimensional nanoscale size as well as combination with N-doped carbon materials.

  10. Non-damaging and scalable carbon nanotube synthesis on carbon fibres

    OpenAIRE

    De Luca, H; Anthony, DB; Qian, H; Greenhalgh, E; Bismarck, A; Shaffer, M

    2016-01-01

    The growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on carbon fibres (CFs) to produce a hierarchical fibre with two differing reinforcement length scales, in this instance nanometre and micrometre respectively, is considered a route to improve current state-of-the-art fibre reinforced composites [1]. The scalable production of carbon nanotube-grafted-carbon fibres (CNT-g-CFs) has been limited due to high temperatures, the use of flammable gases and the requirement of inert conditions for CNT synthesis, whi...

  11. The effect of surface modifications of carbon nanotubes on the electrical properties of inkjet-printed SWNT/PEDOT-PSS composite line patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najeeb, C K; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Chang, Jingbo; Kim, Jae-Ho

    2010-01-01

    We prepared nanocomposite inks of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS) filled with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) purified by acidic treatment, carboxylated by chemical oxidation and carboxyl-functionalized nanotubes physically modified with a natural gum, gum arabic. Inkjet printing of line patterns with a feature size of 100 μm width and lengths ranging from 1 to 5 cm was performed on glass substrates with a piezoelectric inkjet printer. The carboxyl-functionalized SWNT-based composite demonstrated a significant decrease (fourfold) of electrical resistance for the line patterns compared to that with a purified CNT-based composite due to improved dispersability of nanotubes in the polymer matrix. The use of gum arabic for the dispersion of carboxyl-functionalized nanotubes demonstrated a further drastic decrease (18-fold) of the resistance compared with a purified CNT-based composite owing to the formation of an extended continuous network within the line pattern. The inkjet-printed conductive patterns can be applied in various fields, such as flexible high speed transistors, high efficiency solar cells and transparent electrodes.

  12. Binding energy and mechanical stability of single- and multi-walled carbon nanotube serpentines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Junhua; Lu, Lixin; Rabczuk, Timon

    2014-01-01

    Recently, Geblinger et al. [Nat. Nanotechnol. 3, 195 (2008)] and Machado et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 105502 (2013)] reported the experimental and molecular dynamics realization of S-like shaped single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the so-called CNT serpentines. We reported here results from continuum modeling of the binding energy γ between different single- and multi-walled CNT serpentines and substrates as well as the mechanical stability of the CNT serpentine formation. The critical length for the mechanical stability and adhesion of different CNT serpentines are determined in dependence of E i I i , d, and γ, where E i I i and d are the CNT bending stiffness and distance of the CNT translation period. Our continuum model is validated by comparing its solution to full-atom molecular dynamics calculations. The derived analytical solutions are of great importance for understanding the interaction mechanism between different single- and multi-walled CNT serpentines and substrates

  13. Flexible transfer of aligned carbon nanotube films for integration at lower temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Yang; Gong Jingfeng; Zhang Kai; Chan, Philip C H; Yuen, Matthew M F

    2007-01-01

    The high growth temperature of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) hinders their direct assembly on temperature-sensitive substrates. We present a method to transfer an aligned CNT film at room temperature to overcome this problem. Using a 'liftoff' technique with hydrofluoric acid solution, we separate the aligned CNT film from the silicon substrate. The lifted-off CNT film is suspended in water, remaining intact and aligned due to the crowding effect. We then transfer the suspended film to various substrates that are sensitive to high temperature. To illustrate the quality of the transferred CNT film, we demonstrate that the thermal interface resistance of the transferred CNT film is comparable with that of as-grown CNT film. This transfer process can be extended to many microelectronics applications, such as field emission devices, integrated circuit interconnects and sensors, requiring processing temperatures not compatible with CNT growth

  14. Magnetic study of iron-containing carbon nanotubes: Feasibility for magnetic hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupskaya, Y. [Leibniz-Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, 01171 Dresden (Germany)], E-mail: y.krupskaya@ifw-dresden.de; Mahn, C.; Parameswaran, A. [Leibniz-Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Taylor, A.; Kraemer, K. [Department of Urology, Dresden University of Technology, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Hampel, S.; Leonhardt, A.; Ritschel, M.; Buechner, B.; Klingeler, R. [Leibniz-Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, 01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    We present a detailed magnetic study of iron containing carbon nanotubes (Fe-CNT), which highlights their potential for contactless magnetic heating in hyperthermia cancer treatment. Magnetic field dependent AC inductive heating experiments on Fe-CNT dispersions show a substantial temperature increase of Fe-CNT dispersions in applied AC magnetic fields. DC and AC magnetization studies have been done in order to elucidate the heating mechanism. We observe a different magnetic response of Fe-CNT powder compared to Fe-CNT dispersed in aqueous solution, e.g., ferromagnetic Fe-CNT in powder do not show any hysteresis when being dispersed in liquid. Our data indicate the motion of Fe-CNT in liquid in applied magnetic fields.

  15. Two-dimensional dopant profiling by electrostatic force microscopy using carbon nanotube modified cantilevers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, S.-C.; Chang, Y.-C.; Chang, C.-S.; Tsong, T T; Hsu, Chen-Chih; Wu, Chih-I; Lin, W-H; Woon, W-Y; Lin, L-T; Tao, H-J

    2008-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) dopant profiling technique is demonstrated in this work. We apply a unique cantilever probe in electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) modified by the attachment of a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT). Furthermore, the tip apex of the MWNT was trimmed to the sharpness of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). This ultra-sharp MWNT tip helps us to resolve dopant features to within 10 nm in air, which approaches the resolution achieved by ultra-high vacuum scanning tunnelling microscopy (UHV STM). In this study, the CNT-probed EFM is used to profile 2D buried dopant distribution under a nano-scale device structure and shows the feasibility of device characterization for sub-45 nm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) field-effect transistors

  16. A carbon nanotube-based pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimov, Kh S; Saleem, M; Khan, Adam; Qasuria, T A; Mateen, A; Karieva, Z M

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based Al/CNT/Al pressure sensor was designed, fabricated and investigated. The sensor was fabricated by depositing CNTs on an adhesive elastic polymer tape and placing this in an elastic casing. The diameter of multiwalled nanotubes varied between 10 and 30 nm. The nominal thickness of the CNT layers in the sensors was in the range ∼300-430 μm. The inter-electrode distance (length) and the width of the surface-type sensors were in the ranges 4-6 and 3-4 mm, respectively. The dc resistance of the sensors decreased 3-4 times as the pressure was increased up to 17 kN m -2 . The resistance-pressure relationships were simulated.

  17. Multifunctional CNT-polymer composites for ultra-tough structural supercapacitors and desalination devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jim; Kovalenko, Igor; Boukhalfa, Sofiane; Lashmore, David; Sanghadasa, Mohan; Yushin, Gleb

    2013-12-03

    Pulsed electrodeposition of polyaniline (PANI) allows the fabrication of flexible, electrically conductive, nonwoven PANI-carbon nanotube (PANI-CNT) composite fabrics. They possess specific tensile strength and a modulus of toughness higher than that of aluminum matrix composites, titanium and aluminum alloys, steels, and many other structural materials. Electrochemical tests show that these nanocomposites additionally offer excellent cycle stability and ion electro-sorption and storage properties. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Thermal Influence of CNT on the Polyamide 12 Nanocomposite for Selective Laser Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaming Bai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The thermal influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs on the PA12 in the laser sintering process was assessed by physical experiments and a three dimensional simulation model. It appears that, by adding the CNTs into the PA12 matrix, the thermal conductivity increased. A double ellipsoidal heat flux model was applied to input a three dimensional, continuous moving, volumetric laser heat source. The predicted three dimensional temperature distributions suggested that the laser heat was conducted wider and deeper in the PA12-CNT sample than PA12. Greater heat conduction can reduce the interspace between two successive layers, and result in the increase of the parts’ density and properties.

  19. Enhanced electrochemical capacitance of polyimidazole coated covellite CuS dispersed CNT composite materials for application in supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Seenu; Gopi, Chandu V V M; Kim, Hee Je

    2016-08-02

    Great attention has been paid to the design and synthesis of distinct core/shell heterostructures for high-performance supercapacitors. We have prepared unique heterostructures consisting of polyimidazole-coated copper sulphide over a carbon nanotube network (CuS@CNT) on nickel foam, which was accomplished through a facile and cost-effective solvothermal method combined with a dip coating process. Hexagonal covellite CuS nanoparticles were dispersed on CNTs using a solvothermal method where dimethylformamide and distilled water were used as solvents. The synthesized CuS and CuS@CNT supercapacitor electrode materials were thoroughly characterized. The polymer supported electrode (PIM/CuS@CNT) shows a high areal capacitance of 1.51 F cm(-2) at a current density of 1.2 A g(-1), which is higher than the CuS@CNT electrode and many other previously reported CuS electrode materials. After 1000 cycles at a high current density of 1.2 A g(-1), the retention rate is 92%, indicating good long-term cycling stability. These results indicate that the PIM/CuS@CNT electrode is promising for high-performance supercapacitor applications.

  20. The Dependence of CNT Aerogel Synthesis on Sulfur-driven Catalyst Nucleation Processes and a Critical Catalyst Particle Mass Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoecker, Christian; Smail, Fiona; Pick, Martin; Weller, Lee; Boies, Adam M

    2017-11-06

    The floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (FC-CVD) process permits macro-scale assembly of nanoscale materials, enabling continuous production of carbon nanotube (CNT) aerogels. Despite the intensive research in the field, fundamental uncertainties remain regarding how catalyst particle dynamics within the system influence the CNT aerogel formation, thus limiting effective scale-up. While aerogel formation in FC-CVD reactors requires a catalyst (typically iron, Fe) and a promotor (typically sulfur, S), their synergistic roles are not fully understood. This paper presents a paradigm shift in the understanding of the role of S in the process with new experimental studies identifying that S lowers the nucleation barrier of the catalyst nanoparticles. Furthermore, CNT aerogel formation requires a critical threshold of Fe x C y  > 160 mg/m 3 , but is surprisingly independent of the initial catalyst diameter or number concentration. The robustness of the critical catalyst mass concentration principle is proved further by producing CNTs using alternative catalyst systems; Fe nanoparticles from a plasma spark generator and cobaltocene and nickelocene precursors. This finding provides evidence that low-cost and high throughput CNT aerogel routes may be achieved by decoupled and enhanced catalyst production and control, opening up new possibilities for large-scale CNT synthesis.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of CNT/TiO2/ZnO Composites with High Photocatalytic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhen Huang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Novel carbon nanotubes (CNTs/titanium dioxide (TiO2/zinc oxide (ZnO composites have been successfully synthesized via a two-step solution method using titanyl sulfate as the titanium precursor. Its structural performances were researched by various characterization methods, such as X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS. The performance of the composites was tested by degrading rhodamine B (RhB under UV-vis illumination and found to strongly rely on the content of ZnO. The experimental results showed that the CNT/TiO2/ZnO-90 wt % expressed more outstanding photocatalytic performance compared to the corresponding binary composites and the CNT/TiO2/ZnO-85 wt %, CNT/TiO2/ZnO-95 wt % materials. The improved photocatalytic activity was attributed to synergistic effect of CNT, TiO2 and ZnO, in which ZnO can absorb photons to produce electrons and holes, whereas TiO2 and CNT can reduce the electron-hole recombination.

  2. Ni Nanobuffer Layer Provides Light-Weight CNT/Cu Fibers with Superior Robustness, Conductivity, and Ampacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jingyun; Liu, Dandan; Zhao, Jingna; Hou, Ligan; Liu, Tong; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhao, Yonghao; Zhu, Yuntian T; Li, Qingwen

    2018-03-07

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber has not shown its advantage as next-generation light-weight conductor due to the large contact resistance between CNTs, as reflected by its low conductivity and ampacity. Coating CNT fiber with a metal layer like Cu has become an effective solution to this problem. However, the weak CNT-Cu interfacial bonding significantly limits the mechanical and electrical performances. Here, we report that a strong CNT-Cu interface can be formed by introducing a Ni nanobuffer layer before depositing the Cu layer. The Ni nanobuffer layer remarkably promotes the load and heat transfer efficiencies between the CNT fiber and Cu layer and improves the quality of the deposited Cu layer. As a result, the new composite fiber with a 2 μm thick Cu layer can exhibit a superhigh effective strength >800 MPa, electrical conductivity >2 × 10 7 S/m, and ampacity >1 × 10 5 A/cm 2 . The composite fiber can also sustain 10 000 times of bending and continuously work for 100 h at 90% ampacity.

  3. Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes for Everyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu-Dutt, Sharmistha; Minus, Marilyn L.; Jain, Rahul; Nepal, Dhriti; Kumar, Satish

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the extraordinary potential to change our lives by improving existing products and enabling new ones. Current and future research and industrial workforce professionals are very likely to encounter some aspects of nanotechnology including CNT science and technology in their education or profession. The simple structure…

  4. Carbon Nanotubes as Thermally Induced Water Pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oyarzua, Elton; Walther, Jens Honore; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2017-01-01

    Thermal Brownian motors (TBMs) are nanoscale machines that exploit thermal fluctuations to provide useful work. We introduce a TBM-based nanopump which enables continuous water flow through a carbon nanotube (CNT) by imposing an axial thermal gradient along its surface. We impose spatial asymmetry...

  5. Biodistribution of Carbon Nanotubes in Animal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Møller, Peter Horn; Clausen, Per Axel

    2017-01-01

    The many interesting physical and chemical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) make it one of the most commercially attractive materials in the era of nanotechnology. Here, we review the recent publications on in vivo biodistribution of pristine and functionalized forms of single-walled and multi...

  6. Analysis of ionic conductance of carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Bazant, M.Z.

    2016-01-01

    We use space-charge (SC) theory (also called the capillary pore model) to describe the ionic conductance, G, of charged carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Based on the reversible adsorption of hydroxyl ions to CNT pore walls, we use a Langmuir isotherm for surface ionization and make calculations as a

  7. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, M. S.; Lerner, B.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A.; Obregon, P. D. Pareja; Julian, P. M.; Mandolesi, P. S.; Buffa, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  8. Field emission characteristics of SnO2/CNT composite prepared by microwave assisted wet impregnation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kesavan Pillai, Sreejarani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available SnO2/CNT composites were prepared by microwave assisted wet impregnation at 60 °C. The process was optimized by varying the microwave power and reaction time. Raman analysis showed the typical features of the rutile phase of as-synthesized SnO2...

  9. High efficiency carbon nanotube thread antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amram Bengio, E.; Senic, Damir; Taylor, Lauren W.; Tsentalovich, Dmitri E.; Chen, Peiyu; Holloway, Christopher L.; Babakhani, Aydin; Long, Christian J.; Novotny, David R.; Booth, James C.; Orloff, Nathan D.; Pasquali, Matteo

    2017-10-01

    Although previous research has explored the underlying theory of high-frequency behavior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and CNT bundles for antennas, there is a gap in the literature for direct experimental measurements of radiation efficiency. These measurements are crucial for any practical application of CNT materials in wireless communication. In this letter, we report a measurement technique to accurately characterize the radiation efficiency of λ/4 monopole antennas made from the CNT thread. We measure the highest absolute values of radiation efficiency for CNT antennas of any type, matching that of copper wire. To capture the weight savings, we propose a specific radiation efficiency metric and show that these CNT antennas exceed copper's performance by over an order of magnitude at 1 GHz and 2.4 GHz. We also report direct experimental observation that, contrary to metals, the radiation efficiency of the CNT thread improves significantly at higher frequencies. These results pave the way for practical applications of CNT thread antennas, particularly in the aerospace and wearable electronics industries where weight saving is a priority.

  10. Control of growth mode of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Hong Quang; Kim, Do-Hyung

    2009-01-01

    We have conducted an experimental study to investigate the synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by a dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique. The synthesis of base and tip-type of CNTs was selectively controlled by changing the catalyst size, catalyst film thickness correlated with altering the NH 3 pretreatment plasma current. These types of CNT showed distinctive properties in nanotube structure, growth rate and vertical alignment, which were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and in situ optical interference measurement. The vertically aligned behaviour of CNT was systematically studied by using a fine-patterned catalyst layer with diverse critical dimensions. Freestanding single CNT was successfully realized by optimum tip-type CNT growth, conventional photolithography and wet-etch process.

  11. As(III) Removal from Drinking Water by Carbon Nanotube Membranes with Magnetron-Sputtered Copper: Performance and Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Hongyan; Zhang, Quan; Cheng, Guo-An; Huang, Haiou

    2018-06-07

    Current approaches for functionalizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) often utilize harsh chemical conditions, and the resulting harmful wastes can cause various environmental and health concerns. In this study, magnetron sputtering technique is facilely employed to functionalize CNT membranes by depositing Cu onto premade CNT membranes without using any chemical treatment. A comparative evaluation of the substrate polymeric membrane (mixed cellulose ester (MCE)), MCE sputtered with copper (Cu/MCE), the pristine CNT membrane (CNT), and CNT membrane sputtered with Cu (Cu/CNT) shows that Cu/CNT possesses mechanically stable structures and similar membrane permeability as MCE. More importantly, Cu/CNT outperforms other membranes with high As(III) removal efficiency of above 90%, as compared to less than 10% by MCE and CNT, and 75% by Cu/MCE from water. The performance of Cu/CNT membranes for As(III) removal is also investigated as a function of ionic strength, sputtering time, co-existing ions, solution pH, and the reusability. Further characterizations of As speciation in the filtrate and on Cu/CNT reveal that arsenite removal by Cu/CNT possibly began with Cu-catalyzed oxidation of arsenite to arsenate, followed by adsorptive filtration of arsenate by the membrane. Overall, this study demonstrates that magnetron sputtering is a promising greener technology for the productions of metal-CNT composite membranes for environmental applications.

  12. Grafting Carbon Nanotubes on Glass Fiber by Dip Coating Technique to Enhance Tensile and Interfacial Shear Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahador Dastorian Jamnani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of noncovalent bonding and mechanical interlocking of carbon nanotubes (CNT coating on tensile and interfacial strength of glass fiber were investigated. CNT were coated over glass fiber by a simple dip coating method. Acid treated CNT were suspended in isopropanol solution containing Nafion as binding agent. To achieve uniform distribution of CNT over the glass fiber, an optimized dispersion process was developed by two parameters: CNT concentration and soaking time. CNT concentration was varied from 0.4 to 2 mg/mL and soaking time was varied from 1 to 180 min. The provided micrographs demonstrated appropriate coating of CNT on glass fiber by use of CNT-Nafion mixture. The effects of CNT concentration and soaking time on coating layer were studied by performing single fiber tensile test and pull-out test. The obtained results showed that the optimum CNT concentration and soaking time were 1 mg/mL and 60 min, respectively, which led to significant improvement of tensile strength and interfacial shear stress. It was found that, at other concentrations and soaking times, CNT agglomeration or acutely curly tubes appeared over the fiber surface which caused a reduction of nanotubes interaction on the glass fiber.

  13. Stable, Microfabricated Thin Layer Chromatography Plates without Volume Distortion on Patterned, Carbon and Al2O3-Primed Carbon Nanotube Forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, David S.; Kanyal, Supriya S.; Gupta, Vipul; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Engelhard, Mark H.; Vanfleet, Richard; Davis, Robert C.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2012-09-28

    In a recent report (Song, J.; et al., Advanced Functional Materials 2011, 21, 1132-1139) some of us described the fabrication of thin layer chromatography (TLC) plates from patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests, which were directly infiltrated/coated with silicon by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) of silicon using SiH4. Following infiltration, the nanotubes were removed from the assemblies and the silicon simultaneously converted to SiO2 in a high temperature oxidation step. However, while straightforward, this process had some shortcomings, not the least of which was some distortion of the lithographically patterned features during the volume expansion that accompanied oxidation. Herein we overcome theis issue and also take substantial steps forward in the microfabrication of TLC plates by showing: (i) A new method for creating an adhesion promotion layer on CNT forests by depositing a few nanometers of carbon followed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3. This method for appears to be new, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the expected presence of oxygen after carbon deposition. ALD of Al2O3 alone and in combination with the carbon on patterned CNT forests was also explored as an adhesion promotion layer for CNT forest infiltration. (ii) Rapid, conformal deposition of an inorganic material that does not require subsequent oxidation: fast pseudo-ALD growth of SiO2 via alumina catalyzed deposition of tris(tert-butoxy)silanol onto the carbon/Al2O3-primed CNT forests. (iii) Faithful reproduction of the features in the masks used to microfabricate the TLC plates (M-TLC) this advance springs from the previous two points. (iv) A bonded (amino) phase on a CNT-templated microfabricated TLC plate. (v) Fast, highly efficient (125,000 - 225,000 N/m) separations of fluorescent dyes on M-TLC plates. (vi) Extensive characterization of our new materials by TEM, SEM, EDAX, DRIFT, and XPS. (vii) A substantially lower process temperature for the

  14. Investigation of the Effect of Mixing Methods and Chemical Treatments on the Conductivity of the CNT/PLA Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Brijpal Singh

    The growing popularity of Poly lactic acid (PLA) is mainly due to its biocompatibility, good mechanical properties, and its synthesis from renewable resources. PLA can be compounded with electrically conductive fillers (e.g., carbon nanotubes (CNTs)) to form conductive polymer composites (CPCs). These fillers provide conductive functionality to the composite material by forming percolation paths. Featuring very low weight densities, CPCs have the potential to replace metals in the electronic industry, if they exhibit similar electrical conductivities to that of the metals. The current challenges being faced during the mixing of CNTs in the polymer matrix are: formation of aggregates due to strong van der Waals forces and breakage of CNTs during dispersion. In this study, we compare: (1) two fabrication methods to create CPCs (i.e., solution mixing by sonication and melt extrusion) (2) effect of various CNT functionalization techniques (i.e., acid and plasma treatments) on the conductivity of CPCs and (3) effect of using binding molecules like para-phenylenediamine, that act as bridges in between the CNTs in the CPCs and its effect on the conductivity of CPCs. Such conductive composite materials find widespread technological applications which either require, or could benefit from, the ability to pattern micro-sized features in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) architectures. Direct-write fabrication technique is used to realise these printed patterns, using the CPC solution as ink. First, the composites comprising of 30% PLA by weight in Dichloromethane (DCM) and CNTs in different concentrations (up to 5wt. %) are fabricated using a two-step sonication method (i.e., dissolving PLA in DCM and then dispersing the CNTs in this polymer solution). Second, CPCs are fabricated using a twin screw micro extruder operating at 180°C. To verify the effects of functionalization of the CNTs on the conductivity of composites, the CNTs are functionalized by three

  15. Polymer Coating of Carbon Nanotube Fibers for Electric Microcables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noe T. Alvarez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are considered the most promising candidates to replace Cu and Al in a large number of electrical, mechanical and thermal applications. Although most CNT industrial applications require macro and micro size CNT fiber assemblies, several techniques to make conducting CNT fibers, threads, yarns and ropes have been reported to this day, and improvement of their electrical and mechanical conductivity continues. Some electrical applications of these CNT conducting fibers require an insulating layer for electrical insulation and protection against mechanical tearing. Ideally, a flexible insulator such as hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR on the CNT fiber can allow fabrication of CNT coils that can be assembled into lightweight, corrosion resistant electrical motors and transformers. HNBR is a largely used commercial polymer that unlike other cable-coating polymers such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC, it provides unique continuous and uniform coating on the CNT fibers. The polymer coated/insulated CNT fibers have a 26.54 μm average diameter—which is approximately four times the diameter of a red blood cell—is produced by a simple dip-coating process. Our results confirm that HNBR in solution creates a few microns uniform insulation and mechanical protection over a CNT fiber that is used as the electrically conducting core.

  16. Electrochemical impedance measurement of a carbon nanotube probe electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inaba, Akira; Takei, Yusuke; Kan, Tetsuo; Shimoyama, Isao; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    We measured and analyzed the electrochemical impedance of carbon nanotube (CNT) probe electrodes fabricated through the physical separation of insulated CNT bridges. The fabricated CNT electrodes were free-standing CNTs that were completely covered with an insulator, except for their tips. Typical dimensions of the nanoelectrodes were 1–10 nm in CNT diameter, 80–300 nm in insulator diameter, 0.5–4 μm in exposed CNT length and 1–10 μm in probe length. The electrochemical impedance at frequencies ranging from 40 Hz to 1 MHz was measured in physiological saline. The measured impedance of the CNT electrode was constant at 32 MΩ at frequencies below 1 kHz and was inversely proportional to frequency at frequencies above 10 kHz. By means of comparison with the parasitic capacitive impedance of the insulator membrane, we confirmed that the electrode was sufficiently insulated such that the measured constant impedance was given by the exposed CNT tip. Consequently, we can use the CNT electrode for highly localized electrochemical impedance measurements below 1 kHz. Considering an equivalent circuit and the nanoscopic dimensions of the CNT electrode, we demonstrated that the constant impedance was governed by diffusion impedance, whereas the solution resistance, charge-transfer resistance and double-layer capacitance were negligible. (paper)

  17. Carbon nanotube growth for through silicon via application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, R; Zhang, C; Chen, B; Zhong, G; Robertson, J; Van der Veen, M H; Arstila, K; Hantschel, T

    2013-01-01

    Through silicon via (TSV) technology is key for next generation three-dimensional integrated circuits, and carbon nanotubes (CNT) provide a promising alternative to metal for filling the TSV. Three catalyst preparation methods for achieving CNT growth from the bottom of the TSV are investigated. Compared with sputtering and evaporation, catalyst deposition using dip-coating in a FeCl 2 solution is found to be a more efficient method for realizing a bottom-up filling of the TSV (aspect ratio 5 or 10) with CNT. The CNT bundles grown in 5 min exceed the 50 μm length of the TSV and are multi-wall CNT with three to eight walls. The CNT bundles inside the TSV were electrically characterized by creating a direct contact using a four-point nanoprober setup. A low resistance of the CNT bundle of 69.7 Ω (297 Ω) was measured when the CNT bundle was contacted midway along (over the full length of) the 25 μm deep TSV. The electrical characterization in combination with the good filling of the TSV demonstrates the potential use of CNT in fully integrated TSV applications. (paper)

  18. Water desalination by electrical resonance inside carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jia-Wei; Ding, Hong-Ming; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2016-10-12

    Although previous studies have indicated that the carbon nanotube (CNT) can be used for directed transportation of water and ions, it is still a challenging problem to design a CNT-based device for high performance water desalination. In this study, by using molecular dynamics simulations, we successfully design one type of CNT as a highly efficient desalination membrane through electrical resonance. By decorating the two ends of the CNT with vibrational charges, an alternating electric field is created inside the CNT. When the amplitude of the vibrational charge is 0.05 e, and the vibrational frequency is between 10 THz and 20 THz, the CNT can completely block the transportation of ions. The decrease of the amplitude or the deviation of the frequency in an appropriate range will gradually increase the ion flow. Besides, we also reveal the underlying molecular mechanism of ion blockage, i.e., the electric resonance can disrupt the water structure inside the CNT and then alter the hydration energy of ions inside the CNT. More importantly, we further demonstrate that this mechanism is universal, which is independent of the type of ions and the size of CNT. The present work could be useful for designing water desalination membranes with lower energy consumption and higher fresh water production.

  19. Polymer Coating of Carbon Nanotube Fibers for Electric Microcables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Noe T.; Ochmann, Timothy; Kienzle, Nicholas; Ruff, Brad; Haase, Mark R.; Hopkins, Tracy; Pixley, Sarah; Mast, David; Schulz, Mark J.; Shanov, Vesselin

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered the most promising candidates to replace Cu and Al in a large number of electrical, mechanical and thermal applications. Although most CNT industrial applications require macro and micro size CNT fiber assemblies, several techniques to make conducting CNT fibers, threads, yarns and ropes have been reported to this day, and improvement of their electrical and mechanical conductivity continues. Some electrical applications of these CNT conducting fibers require an insulating layer for electrical insulation and protection against mechanical tearing. Ideally, a flexible insulator such as hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) on the CNT fiber can allow fabrication of CNT coils that can be assembled into lightweight, corrosion resistant electrical motors and transformers. HNBR is a largely used commercial polymer that unlike other cable-coating polymers such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), it provides unique continuous and uniform coating on the CNT fibers. The polymer coated/insulated CNT fibers have a 26.54 μm average diameter—which is approximately four times the diameter of a red blood cell—is produced by a simple dip-coating process. Our results confirm that HNBR in solution creates a few microns uniform insulation and mechanical protection over a CNT fiber that is used as the electrically conducting core. PMID:28344254

  20. Ultra High Energy Density Cathodes with Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    a) Carbon nanotube paper coated with NCA cathode composite for testing as positive electrode in Li-ion battery (b) Comparison of NCA specific...received and purified CNT electrodes coated with NCA cathode composite. (b) Discharge capacities as a function of rate and cycle for NCA on Al and...thickness increases. The first approach was to cast SOA NCA cathode composites onto CNT current collectors using an adjustable blade coater. The

  1. Effects of carbon nanotube arrays on nucleate pool boiling

    OpenAIRE

    Ujereh, Sebastine; Fisher, Timothy; Mudawar, Issam

    2007-01-01

    Experiments were performed to assess the impact coating silicon and copper substrates with nanotubes (CNTs) have on pool boiling performance. Different CNT array densities and area coverages were tested on 1.27 1.27 mm2 samples in FC-72. The CNT preparation techniques used provided strong adherence of CNTs to both substrate materials. Very small contact angle enabled deep penetration of FC-72 liquid inside surface cavities of smooth uncoated silicon surfaces, requiring unusually high surface...

  2. Production and Properties of Carbon Nanotube/Cellulose Composite Paper

    OpenAIRE

    Maria, Kazi Hanium; Mieno, Tetsu

    2017-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube/cellulose composite papers have been prepared by mixing the cellulose with MWNT/gelatin solution and drying at room temperature. The CNTs form an interconnected network on the cellulose paper and as a result CNT paper sheet exhibits enhanced electrical properties and thermal stabilities. It is found that both sides of CNT paper sheet have the uniform electrical conductivities. The sheet exhibits strong microwave absorption in the microwave range of 10.5 GHz. The CN...

  3. Microstructure and durability of Portland cement-carbon nanotube composites

    OpenAIRE

    MacLeod, Alastair James Neil

    2017-01-01

    The incorporation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), fibres with diameters less than 100 nanometres that exhibit a tensile strength in excess of ten times greater than steel, into Portland cement (OPC) is a relatively novel, yet promising, development for next-generation construction materials exhibiting enhanced strength and ductility, even multifunctionality. When added to Portland cement, creating a Portland cement-CNT nanocomposite material (OPC-CNT), CNTs promote the nucleation of the princi...

  4. Ballistic resistance capacity of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mylvaganam, Kausala; Zhang, L C

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have high strength, light weight and excellent energy absorption capacity and therefore have great potential applications in making antiballistic materials. By examining the ballistic impact and bouncing-back processes on carbon nanotubes, this investigation shows that nanotubes with large radii withstand higher bullet speeds and the ballistic resistance is the highest when the bullet hits the centre of the CNT; the ballistic resistance of CNTs will remain the same on subsequent bullet strikes if the impact is after a small time interval

  5. Calibration method for a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Masuhiro; Murata, Katsuyuki; Ataka, Tatsuaki; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    An easy calibration method based on the Langmuir adsorption theory is proposed for a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (NTFET) biosensor. This method was applied to three NTFET biosensors that had approximately the same structure but exhibited different characteristics. After calibration, their experimentally determined characteristics exhibited a good agreement with the calibration curve. The reason why the observed characteristics of these NTFET biosensors differed among the devices was that the carbon nanotube (CNT) that formed the channel was not uniform. Although the controlled growth of a CNT is difficult, it is shown that an NTFET biosensor can be easy calibrated using the proposed calibration method, regardless of the CNT channel structures

  6. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube emitter on metal foil for medical X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Je Hwang; Kim, Wan Sun; Lee, Seung Ho; Eom, Young Ju; Park, Hun Kuk; Park, Kyu Chang

    2013-10-01

    A simple method is proposed for growing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on metal foil using the triode direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The carbon nanotube (CNT) electron emitter was fabricated using fewer process steps with an acid treated metal substrate. The CNT emitter was used for X-ray generation, and the X-ray image of mouse's joint was obtained with an anode current of 0.5 mA at an anode bias of 60 kV. The simple fabrication of a well-aligned CNT with a protection layer on metal foil, and its X-ray application, were studied.

  7. The impact of different multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the X-band microwave absorption of their epoxy nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Bien Dong; Nguyen, Bao Quoc; Nguyen, Le-Thu T; Nguyen, Ha Tran; Nguyen, Viet Quoc; Van Le, Thang; Nguyen, Nieu Huu

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) characteristics, besides the processing conditions, can change significantly the microwave absorption behavior of CNT/polymer composites. In this study, we investigated the influence of three commercial multi-walled CNT materials with various diameters and length-to-diameter aspect ratios on the X-band microwave absorption of epoxy nanocomposites with CNT contents from 0.125 to 2 wt%, prepared by two dispersion methods, i.e. in solution with surfactant-aiding and via ball-milling. The laser diffraction particle size and TEM analysis showed that both methods produced good dispersions at the microscopic level of CNTs. Both a high aspect ratio resulting in nanotube alignment trend and good infiltration of the matrix in the individual nanotubes, which was indicated by high Brookfield viscosities at low CNT contents of CNT/epoxy dispersions, are important factors to achieve composites with high microwave absorption characteristics. The multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) with the largest aspect ratio resulted in composites with the best X-band microwave absorption performance, which is considerably better than that of reported pristine CNT/polymer composites with similar or lower thicknesses and CNT loadings below 4 wt%. A high aspect ratio of CNTs resulting in microscopic alignment trend of nanotubes as well as a good level of micro-scale CNT dispersion resulting from good CNT-matrix interactions are crucial to obtain effective microwave absorption performance. This study demonstrated that effective radar absorbing MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites having small matching thicknesses of 2-3 mm and very low filler contents of 0.25-0.5 wt%, with microwave energy absorption in the X-band region above 90% and maximum absorption peak values above 97%, could be obtained via simple processing methods, which is promising for mass production in industrial applications. Graphical AbstractComparison of the X-band microwave reflection loss of epoxy composites of

  8. Kinetics of hydrogen adsorption on MgH{sub 2}/CNT composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rather, Sami ullah, E-mail: rathersami@gmail.com; Taimoor, Aqeel Ahmad; Muhammad, Ayyaz; Alhamed, Yahia Abobakor; Zaman, Sharif Fakhruz; Ali, Arshid Mahmood

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Hydrogen adsorption comparisons of commercial, milled, and MgH{sub 2} composite. • Hydrogen adsorption capacity and kinetics improves tremendously by CNT embedding. • Unsteady state modeling and simulation of adsorption kinetics. - Abstract: Magnesium hydride (MgH{sub 2})–carbon nanotubes (CNT) composite has been prepared by high-energy ball milling method and their experimental and kinetic hydrogen adsorption studies was assessed. Hydrogen adsorption studies were performed by Sievert’s volumetric apparatus and kinetic evaluation was conducted by surface chemistry and Langmuir–Hinshelwood–Hougen–Watson (LHHW) type mode. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) were performed. Hydrogen adsorption capacity of commercial MgH{sub 2}, milled MgH{sub 2}, and MgH{sub 2}/CNT composite are found to be 0.04, 0.057, and 0.059 g (H{sub 2})/g (MgH{sub 2}) at 673 K and hydrogen pressure of 4.6 MPa. Addition of 5 wt% of CNTs to MgH{sub 2} proved to be very critical to enhance hydrogen adsorption as well as to improve its kinetics. It was observed that hydrogen adsorption is not in quasi-state equilibrium and is modeled using kinetic rate laws.

  9. Development of superhydrophobic fabrics by surface fluorination and formation of CNT-induced roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myoung Hee Shim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Superhydrophobictextile material having self-cleaning function was developed by employing carbon nanotubes (CNTs and water-repellent agents.Hydrophobic fabrics were prepared on 100% polyester woven fabrics withvarious yarn diameters and yarn types. The wetting behavior of fabrics withdifferent treatments was compared for: siloxanerepellent, fluorocarbon repellent, and CNT added fluorocarbon repellent. Drawn textured yarn (DTY fabrics exhibited higher contactangle (CA than filament yarn fabrics due to the larger surface roughness contributed by the textured yarn. Fabrics treated with fluorocarbon presentedlarger CA and lower shedding angle than those treated with siloxane,because of the lower surface energy of fluorocarbon repellent. Specimens madeof 50 denier DTY and treated with CNT-Teflon AF® showed the mostsuperhydrophobic characteristics in the study, producing the static contactangle>150° and the shedding angle<15°. CNT on fabric surface contributedto the nano-scale surface roughness to hold the air traps like papillae oflotus leaf, giving superhydrophobic characteristics.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.1.5762

  10. Time-dependent contact behavior between diamond and a CNT turf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, A; Bahr, D F; Fowler, S P; Jiao, J; Kiener, D

    2011-01-01

    The elastic and adhesive properties of nominally vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) turfs have been measured using nanoindentation. The perceived stiffness of a CNT turf is dependent on the unloading rate, which decreases at slower unloading rates. Depth-controlled nanoindentation was used to examine adhesion effects. Adhesive loads between the turf and the probe tip increased as the time the tip is in contact with the turf increased. As these effects could be from either more tubes coming into contact with the tip due to relaxation and motion of CNTs relative to one another or each tube in contact increasing its adhesive behavior and sub-contact stiffness due to tube-tube interactions within the turf, electrical resistance measurements during nanoindentation were carried out. When the tip is held at a fixed nominal depth, the current remains constant while the contact load decreases, suggesting the number of tubes in contact with the tip stays constant with time while the relaxation mechanisms in the turf occur at positions lower than the contact surface. These observations, in conjunction with in situ TEM compression test of CNT arrays, are used to describe the relative effects the various length and time scales may have on the perceived properties measured during experiments, including elastic modulus and adhesion for gecko-like dry adhesives.

  11. Time-dependent contact behavior between diamond and a CNT turf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, A; Bahr, D F [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, 99164-2920 WA (United States); Fowler, S P; Jiao, J [Department of Physics, Portland State University, Portland, 97207-0751 OR (United States); Kiener, D, E-mail: anqi_qiu@wsu.edu, E-mail: dbahr@wsu.edu [Department of Materials Physics, University of Leoben, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2011-07-22

    The elastic and adhesive properties of nominally vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) turfs have been measured using nanoindentation. The perceived stiffness of a CNT turf is dependent on the unloading rate, which decreases at slower unloading rates. Depth-controlled nanoindentation was used to examine adhesion effects. Adhesive loads between the turf and the probe tip increased as the time the tip is in contact with the turf increased. As these effects could be from either more tubes coming into contact with the tip due to relaxation and motion of CNTs relative to one another or each tube in contact increasing its adhesive behavior and sub-contact stiffness due to tube-tube interactions within the turf, electrical resistance measurements during nanoindentation were carried out. When the tip is held at a fixed nominal depth, the current remains constant while the contact load decreases, suggesting the number of tubes in contact with the tip stays constant with time while the relaxation mechanisms in the turf occur at positions lower than the contact surface. These observations, in conjunction with in situ TEM compression test of CNT arrays, are used to describe the relative effects the various length and time scales may have on the perceived properties measured during experiments, including elastic modulus and adhesion for gecko-like dry adhesives.

  12. CNT/PDMS composite flexible dry electrodes for long-term ECG monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ha-Chul; Moon, Jin-Hee; Baek, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Hee; Choi, Yoon-Young; Hong, Joung-Sook; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2012-05-01

    We fabricated a carbon nanotube (CNT)/ polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composite-based dry ECG electrode that can be readily connected to conventional ECG devices, and showed its long-term wearable monitoring capability and robustness to motion and sweat. While the dispersion of CNTs in PDMS is challenging, we optimized the process to disperse untreated CNTs within PDMS by mechanical force only. The electrical and mechanical characteristics of the CNT/PDMS electrode were tested according to the concentration of CNTs and its thickness. The performances of ECG electrodes were evaluated by using 36 types of electrodes which were fabricated with different concentrations of CNTs, and with a differing diameter and thickness. The ECG signals were obtained by using electrodes of diverse sizes to observe the effects of motion and sweat, and the proposed electrode was shown to be robust to both factors. The CNT concentration and diameter of the electrodes were critical parameters in obtaining high-quality ECG signals. The electrode was shown to be biocompatible from the cytotoxicity test. A seven-day continuous wearability test showed that the quality of the ECG signal did not degrade over time, and skin reactions such as itching or erythema were not observed. This electrode could be used for the long-term measurement of other electrical biosignals for ubiquitous health monitoring including EMG, EEG, and ERG.

  13. Highly sensitive lactate biosensor by engineering chitosan/PVI-Os/CNT/LOD network nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaoqiang; Li, Chang Ming; Zang, Jianfeng; Yu, Shucong

    2007-06-15

    A novel chitosan/PVI-Os(polyvinylimidazole-Os)/CNT(carbon nanotube)/LOD (lactate oxidase) network nanocomposite was constructed on gold electrode for detection of lactate. The composite was nanoengineered by selected matched material components and optimized composition ratio to produce a superior lactate sensor. Positively charged chitosan and PVI-Os were used as the matrix and the mediator to immobilize the negatively charged LOD and to enhance the electron transfer, respectively. CNTs were introduced as the essential component in the composite for the network nanostructure. FESEM (field emission scan electron microscopy) and electrochemical characterization demonstrated that CNT behaved as a cross-linker to network PVI and chitosan due to its nanoscaled and negative charged nature. This significantly improved the conductivity, stability and electroactivity for detection of lactate. The standard deviation of the sensor without CNT in the composite was greatly reduced from 19.6 to 4.9% by addition of CNTs. With optimized conditions the sensitivity and detection limit of the lactate sensor was 19.7 microA mM(-1)cm(-2) and 5 microM, respectively. The sensitivity was remarkably improved in comparison to the newly reported values of 0.15-3.85 microA mM(-1)cm(-2). This novel nanoengineering approach for selecting matched components to form a network nanostructure could be extended to other enzyme biosensors, and to have broad potential applications in diagnostics, life science and food analysis.

  14. Tough and flexible CNT-polymeric hybrid scaffolds for engineering cardiac constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaziha, Mahshid; Shin, Su Ryon; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Topkaya, Seda Nur; Masoumi, Nafiseh; Annabi, Nasim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-08-01

    In the past few years, a considerable amount of effort has been devoted toward the development of biomimetic scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. However, most of the previous scaffolds have been electrically insulating or lacked the structural and mechanical robustness to engineer cardiac tissue constructs with suitable electrophysiological functions. Here, we developed tough and flexible hybrid scaffolds with enhanced electrical properties composed of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) embedded aligned poly(glycerol sebacate):gelatin (PG) electrospun nanofibers. Incorporation of varying concentrations of CNTs from 0 to 1.5% within the PG nanofibrous scaffolds (CNT-PG scaffolds) notably enhanced fiber alignment and improved the electrical conductivity and toughness of the scaffolds while maintaining the viability, retention, alignment, and contractile activities of cardiomyocytes (CMs) seeded on the scaffolds. The resulting CNT-PG scaffolds resulted in stronger spontaneous and synchronous beating behavior (3.5-fold lower excitation threshold and 2.8-fold higher maximum capture rate) compared to those cultured on PG scaffold. Overall, our findings demonstrated that aligned CNT-PG scaffold exhibited superior mechanical properties with enhanced CM beating properties. It is envisioned that the proposed hybrid scaffolds can be useful for generating cardiac tissue constructs with improved organization and maturation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Realization, characterization and functionalization of lipidic wrapped carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciofani, Gianni; Obata, Yosuke; Sato, Izumi; Okamura, Yosuke; Raffa, Vittoria; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo; Takeda, Naoya; Takeoka, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Mass-produced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are strongly aggregated and highly hydrophobic, and processes to make them water soluble are required for biological applications. Both covalent and non-covalent strategies are pursued for obtaining stable, highly concentrated CNT aqueous dispersions. Covalent functionalization has the great disadvantage of producing an irreversible chemical modification of nanotubes, thus alterating their mechanical, chemical and electric properties. On the other hand, non-covalent functionalization is often obtained by employing surfactants that sensibly affect cell viability. Moreover, derivatization with biological moieties is often impossible through non-covalent CNT dispersion. This paper proposes a non-covalent dispersion of multi-wall CNT based on a lipidic mixture that can guarantee high concentration and high stability as well as high cytocompatibility. Moreover, CNTs wrapped with a lipid membrane are realized to demonstrate that the proposed CNTs can be functionalised with a dodecapeptide that specifically recognizes activated platelets without chemical modification of the nanotube itself.

  16. Evolution of carbon nanotube dispersion in preparation of epoxy-based composites: From a masterbatch to a nanocomposite

    OpenAIRE

    Aravand, Mohammadali; Lomov, Stepan Vladimirovitch; Verpoest, Ignace; Gorbatikh, Larissa

    2014-01-01

    The state of carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersion in epoxy is likely to change in the process of composite production. In the present work CNT dispersion is characterized at different stages of nanocomposite preparation: in the original masterbatch with high CNT concentration, after masterbatch dilution, in the process of curing and in the final nanocomposite. The evaluation techniques included dynamic rheological analysis of the liquid phases, optical, environmental and charge contrast scanning ...

  17. Two-component spin-coated Ag/CNT composite films based on a silver heterogeneous nucleation mechanism adhesion-enhanced by mechanical interlocking and chemical grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Kang, Zhixin; Bessho, Takeshi

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a new method for the synthesis of silver carbon nanotube (Ag/CNT) composite films as conductive connection units for flexible electronic devices is presented. This method is about a two-component solution process by spin coating with an after-treatment annealing process. In this method, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) act as the core of silver heterogeneous nucleation, which can be observed and analyzed by a field-emission scanning electron microscope. With the effects of mechanical interlocking, chemical grafting, and annealing, the interfacial adhesive strength between films and PET sheets was enhanced to 12 N cm-1. The tensile strength of the Ag/CNT composite films was observed to increase by 38% by adding 5 g l-1 MWCNTs. In the four-probe method, the resistivity of Ag/CNT-5 declined by 78.2% compared with pristine Ag films. The anti-fatigue performance of the Ag/CNT composite films was monitored by cyclic bending deformation and the results revealed that the growth rate of electrical resistance during the deformation was obviously retarded. As for industrial application, this method provides an efficient low-cost way to prepare Ag/CNT composite films and can be further applied to other coating systems.

  18. UVO radiation effects on carbon nanotube/PMMA composites and their neutron reflectivity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najafi, Ebi; Koo, J. S.; Shin, K. W.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotube(CNT)-Poly(methyl methacrylate)(PMMA) nanocomposite thin films have been studied. By irradiation of short wavelength ultraviolet(UV) light with ozone, the surface modification and stripping effects on their CNT/PMMA thin films was studied as a function of weight % of CNT in PMMA matrices. The experimental evidence indicates that the presence of CNT in PMMA matrix lowers significantly the stripping rate of the composites. In addition, changes of the rheological properties (i.e. diffusion coefficient) of PMMA molecules due to the presence of CNTs were also studied, in order to determine the microscopic interaction between diffusion coefficients of PMMA with and without CNTs was minimal

  19. Selective optical switching of interface-coupled relaxation dynamics in carbon nanotube-Si heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Ponzoni, Stefano

    2014-10-16

    By properly tuning the photon energy of a femtosecond laser pump, we disentangle, in carbon nanotube-Si (CNT/Si) heterojunctions, the fast relaxation dynamics occurring in CNT from the slow repopulation dynamics due to hole charge transfer at the junction. In this way we are able to track the transfer of the photogenerated holes from the Si depletion layer to the CNT layer, under the action of the built-in heterojunction potential. This also clarifies that CNT play an active role in the junction and do not act only as channels for charge collection and transport.

  20. Selective optical switching of interface-coupled relaxation dynamics in carbon nanotube-Si heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Ponzoni, Stefano; Galimberti, Gianluca; Sangaletti, L.; Castrucci, Paola; Del Gobbo, Silvano; Morbidoni, Maurizio; Scarselli, Manuela A.; Pagliara, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    By properly tuning the photon energy of a femtosecond laser pump, we disentangle, in carbon nanotube-Si (CNT/Si) heterojunctions, the fast relaxation dynamics occurring in CNT from the slow repopulation dynamics due to hole charge transfer at the junction. In this way we are able to track the transfer of the photogenerated holes from the Si depletion layer to the CNT layer, under the action of the built-in heterojunction potential. This also clarifies that CNT play an active role in the junction and do not act only as channels for charge collection and transport.

  1. The effect of barrier layer-mediated catalytic deactivation in vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patole, S P; Yu, Seong-Man; Shin, Dong-Wook; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Kim, Ha-Jin; Han, In-Taek; Kwon, Kee-Won

    2010-01-01

    The effect of Al-barrier layer-mediated Fe-catalytic deactivation in vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) growth was studied. The substrate surface morphology, catalytic diffusion and barrier layer oxidation were found to be dependent on the annealing temperature of the barrier layer, which ultimately affects CNT growth. The annealed barrier layer without complete oxidation was found to be suitable for top to bottom super aligned CNT arrays. The highest average CNT growth rate of up to 3.88 μm s -1 was observed using this simple approach. Details of the analysis are also presented.

  2. Electric Double-Layer Capacitor Fabricated with Addition of Carbon Nanotube to Polarizable Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Show

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical double-layer capacitor (EDLC was fabricated with addition of carbon nanotube (CNT to polarization electrodes as a conducting material. The CNT addition reduced the series resistance of the EDLC by one-twentieth, while the capacitance was not increased by the CNT addition. The low series resistance leaded to the high electrical energy stored in the EDLC. In this paper, the dependence of the series resistance, the specific capacitance, the energy, and the energy efficiencies on the CNT addition is discussed.

  3. Covalent functionalization of carbon nanotube forests grown in situ on a metal-silicon chip

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Johan R.

    2012-03-12

    We report on the successful covalent functionalization of carbon nanotube (CNT) forests, in situ grown on a silicon chip with thin metal contact film as the buffer layer between the CNT forests and the substrate. The CNT forests were successfully functionalized with active amine and azide groups, which can be used for further chemical reactions. The morphology of the CNT forests was maintained after the functionalization. We thus provide a promising foundation for a miniaturized biosensor arrays system that can be easily integrated with Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology.

  4. Covalent functionalization of carbon nanotube forests grown in situ on a metal-silicon chip

    KAUST Repository

    Johansson, Johan R.; Bosaeus, Niklas; Kann, Nina; Å kerman, Bjö rn; Nordé n, Bengt; Khalid, Waqas

    2012-01-01

    We report on the successful covalent functionalization of carbon nanotube (CNT) forests, in situ grown on a silicon chip with thin metal contact film as the buffer layer between the CNT forests and the substrate. The CNT forests were successfully functionalized with active amine and azide groups, which can be used for further chemical reactions. The morphology of the CNT forests was maintained after the functionalization. We thus provide a promising foundation for a miniaturized biosensor arrays system that can be easily integrated with Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology.

  5. Photophysics of Carbon Nanotubes Interfaced with Organic and Inorganic Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Levitsky, Igor A; Karachevtsev, Victor A

    2012-01-01

    Photophysics of Carbon Nanotubes Interfaced with Organic and Inorganic Materials describes physical, optical and spectroscopic properties of the emerging class of nanocomposites formed from carbon nanotubes (CNTs)  interfacing with organic and inorganic materials. The three main chapters detail novel trends in  photophysics related to the interaction of  light with various carbon nanotube composites from relatively simple CNT/small molecule assemblies to complex hybrids such as CNT/Si and CNT/DNA nanostructures.   The latest experimental results are followed up with detailed discussions and scientific and technological perspectives to provide a through coverage of major topics including: ·   Light harvesting, energy conversion, photoinduced charge separation  and transport  in CNT based nanohybrids · CNT/polymer composites exhibiting photoactuation; and ·         Optical  spectroscopy  and structure of CNT/DNA complexes. Including original data and a short review of recent research, Phot...

  6. Improvement in electrical, thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy by filling carbon nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, electrical, thermal and mechanical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs reinforced Epon 862 epoxy have been evaluated. Firstly, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 wt% CNT were infused into epoxy through a high intensity ultrasonic liquid processor and then mixed with EpiCure curing agent W using a high speed mechanical agitator. Electric conductivity, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA, three point bending tests and fracture tests were then performed on unfilled, CNT-filled epoxy to identify the loading effect on the properties of materials. Experimental results show significant improvement in electric conductivity. The resistivity of epoxy decreased from 1014 Ω•m of neat epoxy to 10 Ω•m with 0.4% CNT. The experimental results also indicate that the frequency dependent behavior of CNT/epoxy nanocomposite can be modeled by R-C circuit, permittivity of material increase with increasing of CNT content. DMA studies revealed that filling the carbon nanotube into epoxy can produce a 90% enhancement in storage modulus and a 17°C increase in Tg. Mechanical test results showed that modulus increased with higher CNT loading percentages, but the 0.3 wt% CNT-infusion system showed the maximum strength and fracture toughness enhancement. The decrease in strength and fracture toughness in 0.4% CNT/epoxy was attributed to poor dispersions of nanotubes in the composite.

  7. Improving Single-Carbon-Nanotube-Electrode Contacts Using Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krittayavathananon, Atiweena; Ngamchuea, Kamonwad; Li, Xiuting; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Kätelhön, Enno; Chaisiwamongkhol, Korbua; Sawangphruk, Montree; Compton, Richard G

    2017-08-17

    We report the use of an electroactive species, acetaminophen, to modify the electrical connection between a carbon nanotube (CNT) and an electrode. By applying a potential across two electrodes, some of the CNTs in solution occasionally contact the electrified interface and bridge between two electrodes. By observing a single CNT contact between two microbands of an interdigitated Au electrode in the presence and absence of acetaminophen, the role of the molecular species at the electronic junction is revealed. As compared with the pure CNT, the current magnitude of the acetaminophen-modified CNTs significantly increases with the applied potentials, indicating that the molecule species improves the junction properties probably via redox shuttling.

  8. Performance of a carbon nanotube field emission electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; King, Todd T.; Bis, Rachael A.; Jones, Hollis H.; Herrero, Federico; Lynch, Bernard A.; Roman, Patrick; Mahaffy, Paul

    2007-04-01

    A cold cathode field emission electron gun (e-gun) based on a patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) film has been fabricated for use in a miniaturized reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOF MS), with future applications in other charged particle spectrometers, and performance of the CNT e-gun has been evaluated. A thermionic electron gun has also been fabricated and evaluated in parallel and its performance is used as a benchmark in the evaluation of our CNT e-gun. Implications for future improvements and integration into the RTOF MS are discussed.

  9. Manipulation and soldering of carbon nanotubes using atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwase, Yuta; Ikeda, Takayuki; Oya, Takahide; Ogino, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    Manipulation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by an atomic force microscope (AFM) and soldering of CNTs using Fe oxide nanoparticles are described. We succeeded to separate a CNT bundle into two CNTs or CNT bundles, to move the separated CNT to a desirable position, and to bind it to another bundle. For the accurate manipulation, load of the AFM cantilever and frequency of the scan were carefully selected. We soldered two CNTs using an Fe oxide nanoparticle prepared from a ferritin molecule. The adhesion forces between the soldered CNTs were examined by an AFM and it was found that the CNTs were bound, though the binding force was not strong

  10. The Carbon Nanotube Fibers for Optoelectric Conversion and Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes recent studies on carbon nanotube (CNT fibers for weavable device of optoelectric conversion and energy storage. The intrinsic properties of individual CNTs make the CNT fibers ideal candidates for optoelectric conversion and energy storage. Many potential applications such as solar cell, supercapacitor, and lithium ion battery have been envisaged. The recent advancement in CNT fibers for optoelectric conversion and energy storage and the current challenge including low energy conversion efficiency and low stability and future direction of the energy fiber have been finally summarized in this paper.

  11. Nanoparticle fractionation using an aligned carbon nanotube array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim Xiaodai [NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering (NGS), Centre for Life Sciences (CeLS), 05-01, 28 Medical Drive, 117456 (Singapore); Xu Hairuo; Chin, Wee Shong [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 (Singapore); Nicole Chew, Yi Hui; Phua, Yi Hui [Dunman High School, 10 Tanjong Rhu Road, 436895 (Singapore); Sie, Edbert Jarvis; Sum, Tze Chien [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637371 (Singapore); Chia, Guo Hao; Sow, Chorng-Haur, E-mail: chmcws@nus.edu.sg, E-mail: physowch@nus.edu.sg [Department of Physics, Blk S12, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 (Singapore)

    2010-07-23

    A technique utilizing the capillary assisted sieving capability of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to achieve fractionation of nanoparticles of small size distribution is presented. By dipping aligned CNT arrays into a solution comprising different sized quantum dots (QDs), size-selective gradient decoration of QDs onto CNTs is achieved. The fractionating capability of CNTs is also demonstrated for poly-dispersed manganese doped zinc sulfide nanoparticles and QDs of varying sizes and chemical compositions, which we attribute to the size-selective sieving effect of CNTs. By controlling the terminating point for the flow of QDs across the CNT array, a QD size specific CNT/QD hybrid structure is achieved.

  12. A novel methodology for self-healing at the nanoscale in CNT/epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, E.; Datta, S.; Chattopadhyay, A.

    2016-04-01

    Self-healing materials have the potential to repair induced damage and extend the service life of aerospace or civil components as well as prevent catastrophic failure. A novel technique to provide self-healing capabilities at the nanoscale in carbon nanotube/epoxy nanocomposites is presented in this paper. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized with the healing agent (dicyclopentadiene) were used to fabricate self-healing CNT/epoxy nanocomposite films. The structure of CNTs was considered suitable for this application since they are nanosized, hollow, and provide a more consistent size distribution than polymeric nanocapsules. Specimens with different weight fractions of the functionalized CNTs were fabricated to explore the effect of weight fraction of functionalized CNTs on the extent of healing. Optical micrographs with different fluorescent filters showed partial or complete healing of damage approximately two to three weeks after damage was induced. Results indicate that by using CNTs to encapsulate a healing agent, crack growth in self-healing CNT/epoxy nanocomposites can be retarded, leading to safer materials that can autonomously repair itself.

  13. Dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in biocompatible dispersants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piret, J.-P.; Detriche, S.; Vigneron, R.; Vankoningsloo, S.; Rolin, S.; Mejia Mendoza, J. H.; Masereel, B.; Lucas, S.; Delhalle, J.; Luizi, F.; Saout, C.; Toussaint, O.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to their phenomenal electrical and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been an area of intense research since their discovery in 1991. Different applications for these nanoparticles have been proposed, among others, in electronics and optics but also in the medical field. In parallel, emerging studies have suggested potential toxic effects of CNT while others did not, generating some conflicting outcomes. These discrepancies could be, in part, due to different suspension approaches used and to the agglomeration state of CNT in solution. In this study, we described a standardized protocol to obtain stable CNT suspensions, using two biocompatible dispersants (Pluronic F108 and hydroxypropylcellulose) and to estimate the concentration of CNT in solution. CNT appear to be greatly individualized in these two dispersants with no detection of remaining bundles or agglomerates after sonication and centrifugation. Moreover, CNT remained perfectly dispersed when added to culture medium used for in vitro cell experiments. We also showed that Pluronic F108 is a better dispersant than hydroxypropylcellulose. In conclusion, we have developed a standardized protocol using biocompatible surfactants to obtain reproducible and stable multi-walled carbon nanotubes suspensions which can be used for in vitro or in vivo toxicological studies.

  14. Gecko-Inspired Carbon Nanotube-Based Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Liehui; Sethi, Sunny; Goyal, Anubha; Ci, Lijie; Ajayan, Pulickel; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2009-03-01

    Nature has developed hierarchical hairy structure on the wall-climbing gecko's foot, consisting of microscopic hairs called setae, which further split into hundreds of smaller structures called spatulas. In the last five years, numerous attempts to mimic gecko foot-hair using polymer soft molding and photolithography methods have been reported. However, most of these polymer-based synthetic gecko hairs fall short of the clinging ability of geckos. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) have shown strong adhesion at nanometer scale. Here, we present our work on developing CNT-based macroscopic flexible tape mimicking the hierarchical structure found on gecko's foot. The synthetic gecko tape is made by transferring aligned CNT array onto flexible polymer tape. The unpatterned CNT-gecko tape can support a shear force stress similar to gecko foot (10 N/cm^2). The supported shear stress increase by a factor of four, when we use micro-patterned CNT patches (50 to 500 μm). We find that both setae (replicated by CNT bundles) and spatulas (individual CNT) are necessary to achieve large macroscopic shear adhesion. The carbon nanotube-based tape offers an excellent synthetic option as a dry conductive reversible adhesive in microelectronics, robotics, and space applications.

  15. DFT study of cyanide oxidation on surface of Ge-embedded carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Milad Abrishamifar, Seyyed; Ebrahimzadeh Rajaei, Gholamreza; Razavi, Razieh; Najafi, Meysam

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, the discovery of suitable catalyst to oxidation of the cyanide (CN) has high importance in the industry. In present study, in the first step, the carbon nanotube (CNT) with the Ge atom embedded and the surface of Ge-CNT via the O2 molecule activated. In second step, the oxidation of CN on surface of the Ge-CNT via the Langmuir Hinshelwood (LH) and the Eley Rideal (ER) mechanisms was investigated. Results show that O2-Ge-CNT oxidized the CN molecule via the Ge-CNT-O-O∗ + CN → Ge-CNT-O-O∗-CN → Ge-CNT-O∗ + OCN and the Ge-CNT-O∗ + CN → Ge-CNT + OCN reactions. Results show that oxidation of CN on surface of Ge-CNT via the LH mechanism has lower energy barrier than ER mechanism. Finally, calculated parameters reveal that Ge-CNT is acceptable catalyst with high performance for CN oxidation, form theoretical point of view.

  16. Reductive dehalogenation of haloacetic acids by hemoglobin-loaded carbon nanotube electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Ping; Cao, Hong-Bin; Zhang, Yi

    2007-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) was immobilized on carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode to catalyze the dehalogenation of haloacetic acids (HAAs). FTIR and UV measurements were performed to investigate the activity-keep of Hb after immobilization on CNT. The electrocatalytic behaviors of the Hb-loaded electrode for the dehalogenation of HAAs were studied by cyclic voltammmetry and constant-potential electrolysis technique. An Hb-loaded packed-bed flow reactor was also constructed for bioelectrocatalytic dehalogenation of HAAs. The results showed that Hb retained its nature, the essential features of its native secondary structure, and its biocatalytic activity after immobilization on CNT. Chloroacetic acids and bromoacetic acids could be dehalogenated completely with Hb catalysis through a stepwise dehalogenation process at -0.400V (vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE)) and -0.200V (vs. SCE), respectively. The removal of 10.5mM trichloroacetic acid and dichloroacetic acid is ca. 97% and 63%, respectively, with electrolysis for 300min at -0.400V (vs. SCE) using the Hb-loaded packed-bed flow reactor, and almost 100% of tribromoacetic acid and dibromoacetic acid was removed with electrolysis for 40min at -0.200V (vs. SCE). The average current efficiency of Hb-catalytic dehalogenation almost reaches 100%.

  17. Graphene Carbon Nanotube Carpets Grown Using Binary Catalysts for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatierra, Rodrigo Villegas; Zakhidov, Dante; Sha, Junwei; Kim, Nam Dong; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Raji, Abdul-Rahman O; Zhao, Naiqin; Tour, James M

    2017-03-28

    Here we show that a versatile binary catalyst solution of Fe 3 O 4 /AlO x nanoparticles enables homogeneous growth of single to few-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets from three-dimensional carbon-based substrates, moving past existing two-dimensional limited growth methods. The binary catalyst is composed of amorphous AlO x nanoclusters over Fe 3 O 4 crystalline nanoparticles, facilitating the creation of seamless junctions between the CNTs and the underlying carbon platform. The resulting graphene-CNT (GCNT) structure is a high-density CNT carpet ohmically connected to the carbon substrate, an important feature for advanced carbon electronics. As a demonstration of the utility of this approach, we use GCNTs as anodes and cathodes in binder-free lithium-ion capacitors, producing stable devices with high-energy densities (∼120 Wh kg -1 ), high-power density capabilities (∼20,500 W kg -1 at 29 Wh kg -1 ), and a large operating voltage window (4.3 to 0.01 V).

  18. Nanostructures study of CNT nanofluids transport with temperature-dependent variable viscosity in a muscular tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Abid, Syed Ali; Tripathi, Dharmendra; Mir, Nazir Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    The transport of single-wall carbon nanotube (CNT) nanofluids with temperature-dependent variable viscosity is analyzed by peristaltically driven flow. The main flow problem has been modeled using cylindrical coordinates and flow equations are simplified to ordinary differential equations using long wavelength and low Reynolds' number approximation. Analytical solutions have been obtained for axial velocity, pressure gradient and temperature. Results acquired are discussed graphically for better understanding. It is observed that with an increment in the Grashof number the velocity of the governing fluids starts to decrease significantly and the pressure gradient is higher for pure water as compared to single-walled carbon nanotubes due to low density. As the specific heat is very high for pure water as compared to the multi-wall carbon nanotubes, it raises temperature of the muscles, in the case of pure water, as compared to the multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, it is noticed that the trapped bolus starts decreasing in size as the buoyancy forces are dominant as compared to viscous forces. This model may be applicable in biomedical engineering and nanotechnology to design the biomedical devices.

  19. Field emission properties of the graphenated carbon nanotube electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanin, H., E-mail: hudson.zanin@bristol.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Faculdade de Engenharia Elétrica e Computação, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotônica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N. 400, CEP 13 083-852 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Ceragioli, H.J.; Peterlevitz, A.C.; Baranauskas, Vitor [Faculdade de Engenharia Elétrica e Computação, Departamento de Semicondutores, Instrumentos e Fotônica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein N. 400, CEP 13 083-852 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Marciano, F.R.; Lobo, A.O. [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology/Institute of Research and Development at UNIVAP, Av. Shishima Hifumi, 2911, CEP 12244-000 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Facile method to prepare graphenated carbon nanotubes (g-CNTs). • The electric field emission behaviour of g-CNTs was studied. • g-CNTs show better emission current stability than non-graphenated CNTs. - Abstract: Reduced graphene oxide-coated carbon nanotubes (RGO-CNT) electrodes have been prepared by hot filament chemical vapour deposition system in one-step growth process. We studied RGO-CNT electrodes behaviour as cold cathode in field emission test. Our results show that RGO-CNT retain the low threshold voltage typical of CNTs, but with greatly improved emission current stability. The field emission enhancement value is significantly higher than that expected being caused by geometric effect (height divided by the radius of nanotube). This suggested that the field emission of this hybrid structure is not only from a single tip, but eventually it is from several tips with contribution of graphene nanosheets at CNT's walls. This phenomenon explains why the graphenated carbon nanotubes do not burn out as quickly as CNT does until emission ceases completely. These preliminaries results make nanocarbon materials good candidates for applications as electron sources for several devices.

  20. Self-assembly of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets–carbon nanotube composite for electrochemical simultaneous determination of catechol and hydroquinone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hanqiang; Huang, Yihong; Hu, Shirong; Huang, Qitong; Wei, Chan; Zhang, Wuxiang; Yang, Weize; Dong, Peihui; Hao, Aiyou

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic diagram of hydrothermal synthesis graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-carbon nanotube composite and theirs application for electrochemical sensing catechol and hydroquinone. - Highlights: • Self-assembly of graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-carbon nanotube composite. • CNNS-CNT show more stronger conductivity than CNNS and CNT. • CNNS-CNT has been performed for detection of catechol and hydroquinone. • The probe was applied to detect practical samples with satisfactory results. - Abstract: In this paper, three-dimensional (3D) graphitic carbon nitride nanosheets-carbon nanotube (CNNS-CNT) composite was synthesized via hydrothermal reaction of 2D CNNS and 1D CNT-COOH by π-π stacking and electrostatic interactions. This CNNS-CNT composite was characterized by transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscope, x-ray diffraction and fourier-transform infrared. In addition, the CNNS-CNT composite displayed excellent conductivity comparing with CNNS and CNT-COOH monomer. This composite was applied for electrochemical simultaneous determination of catechol (CC) and hydroquinone (HQ) with good sensitivity, wide linear range and low detection limit. In addition, this CNNS-CNT composite modified electrode was also applied to detect practical samples with satisfactory results

  1. The precise self-assembly of individual carbon nanotubes using magnetic capturing and fluidic alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Joon S; Rust, Michael J; Do, Jaephil; Ahn, Chong H [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microsystems and BioMEMS Laboratory, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Yun, Yeo-Heung; Schulz, Mark J [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cincinnati, 45221 (United States); Shanov, Vesselin, E-mail: chong.ahn@uc.ed [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Cincinnati, 45221 (United States)

    2009-08-12

    A new method for the self-assembly of a carbon nanotube (CNT) using magnetic capturing and fluidic alignment has been developed and characterized in this work. In this new method, the residual iron (Fe) catalyst positioned at one end of the CNT was utilized as a self-assembly driver to attract and position the CNT, while the assembled CNT was aligned by the shear force induced from the fluid flow through the assembly channel. The self-assembly procedures were successfully developed and the electrical properties of the assembled multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) were fully characterized. The new assembly method developed in this work shows its feasibility for the precise self-assembly of parallel CNTs for electronic devices and nanobiosensors.

  2. Graphene as an atomically thin interface for growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rahul; Chen, Gugang; Arava, Leela Mohana Reddy; Kalaga, Kaushik; Ishigami, Masahiro; Heinz, Tony F; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Harutyunyan, Avetik R

    2013-01-01

    Growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests is highly sensitive to the nature of the substrate. This constraint narrows the range of available materials to just a few oxide-based dielectrics and presents a major obstacle for applications. Using a suspended monolayer, we show here that graphene is an excellent conductive substrate for CNT forest growth. Furthermore, graphene is shown to intermediate growth on key substrates, such as Cu, Pt, and diamond, which had not previously been compatible with nanotube forest growth. We find that growth depends on the degree of crystallinity of graphene and is best on mono- or few-layer graphene. The synergistic effects of graphene are revealed by its endurance after CNT growth and low contact resistances between the nanotubes and Cu. Our results establish graphene as a unique interface that extends the class of substrate materials for CNT growth and opens up important new prospects for applications.

  3. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of structural and electronic properties of silicon carbide nanotube bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Rostam; Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad

    2008-10-01

    By using ab initio density functional theory the structural and electronic properties of isolated and bundled (8,0) and (6,6) silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) are investigated. Our results show that for such small diameter nanotubes the inter-tube interaction causes a very small radial deformation, while band splitting and reduction of the semiconducting energy band gap are significant. We compared the equilibrium interaction energy and inter-tube separation distance of (8,0) SiCNT bundle with (10,0) carbon nanotube (CNT) bundle where they have the same radius. We found that there is a larger inter-tube separation and weaker inter-tube interaction in the (8,0) SiCNT bundle with respect to (10,0) CNT bundle, although they have the same radius.

  4. Ab initio density functional theory investigation of structural and electronic properties of silicon carbide nanotube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradian, Rostam; Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad

    2008-01-01

    By using ab initio density functional theory the structural and electronic properties of isolated and bundled (8,0) and (6,6) silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) are investigated. Our results show that for such small diameter nanotubes the inter-tube interaction causes a very small radial deformation, while band splitting and reduction of the semiconducting energy band gap are significant. We compared the equilibrium interaction energy and inter-tube separation distance of (8,0) SiCNT bundle with (10,0) carbon nanotube (CNT) bundle where they have the same radius. We found that there is a larger inter-tube separation and weaker inter-tube interaction in the (8,0) SiCNT bundle with respect to (10,0) CNT bundle, although they have the same radius

  5. Surface analysis and mechanical behaviour mapping of vertically aligned CNT forest array through nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koumoulos, Elias P.; Charitidis, C.A., E-mail: charitidis@chemeng.ntua.gr

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Structure and wall numbers are identified through TEM. • Static contact angle measurements revealed a super-hydrophobic behavior. • Hysteresis was observed (loading–unloading) due to the local stress distribution. • Hardness and modulus mapping for a grid of 70 μm{sup 2} is conducted. • Resistance is clearly divided in 2 regions (MWCNT and MWCNT – MWCNT) interface. - Abstract: Carbon nanotube (CNT) based architectures have increased the scientific interest owning to their exceptional performance rendering them promising candidates for advanced industrial applications in the nanotechnology field. Despite individual CNTs being considered as one of the most known strong materials, much less is known about other CNT forms, such as CNT arrays, in terms of their mechanical performance (integrity). In this work, thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method is employed to produce vertically aligned multiwall (VA-MW) CNT carpets. Their structural properties were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy, while their hydrophobic behavior was investigated via contact angle measurements. The resistance to indentation deformation of VA-MWCNT carpets was investigated through nanoindentation technique. The synthesized VA-MWCNTs carpets consisted of well-aligned MWCNTs. Static contact angle measurements were performed with water and glycerol, revealing a rather super-hydrophobic behavior. The structural analysis, hydrophobic behavior and indentation response of VA-MWCNTs carpets synthesized via CVD method are clearly demonstrated. Additionally, cycle indentation load-depth curve was applied and hysteresis loops were observed in the indenter loading–unloading cycle due to the local stress distribution. Hardness (as resistance to applied load) and modulus mapping, at 200 nm of displacement for a grid of 70 μm{sup 2} is presented. Through trajection, the resistance is clearly divided in 2

  6. Fabricating and strengthening the carbon nanotube/copper composite fibers with high strength and high electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Baoshuai; Guo, Enyu; Xue, Xiang; Zhao, Zhiyong; Li, Tiejun; Xu, Yanjin; Luo, Liangshun; Hou, Hongliang

    2018-05-01

    Combining the excellent properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) and copper, CNT/Cu composite fibers were fabricated by physical vapor deposition (PVD) and rolling treatment. Dense and continuous copper film (∼2 μm) was coated on the surface of the CNT fibers by PVD, and rolling treatment was adopt to strengthen the CNT/Cu composite fibers. After the rolling treatment, the defects between the Cu grains and the CNT bundles were eliminated, and the structure of both the copper film and the core CNT fibers were optimized. The rolled CNT/Cu composite fibers possess high tensile effective strength (1.01 ± 0.13 GPa) and high electrical conductivity ((2.6 ± 0.3) × 107 S/m), and thus, this material may become a promising wire material.

  7. Evolution of carbon nanotube dispersion in preparation of epoxy-based composites: From a masterbatch to a nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aravand

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The state of carbon nanotube (CNT dispersion in epoxy is likely to change in the process of composite production. In the present work CNT dispersion is characterized at different stages of nanocomposite preparation: in the original masterbatch with high CNT concentration, after masterbatch dilution, in the process of curing and in the final nanocomposite. The evaluation techniques included dynamic rheological analysis of the liquid phases, optical, environmental and charge contrast scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis. The evolution of the CNT dispersion was assessed for two CNT/epoxy systems with distinctly different dispersion states induced by different storage time. Strong interactions between CNT clusters were revealed in the masterbatch with a longer storage time. Upon curing CNT clusters in this material formed a network-like structure. This network enhanced the elastic behaviour and specific conductivity of the resulting nanocomposite, leading to a partial electrical percolation after curing.

  8. Carbon nanotube computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulaker, Max M; Hills, Gage; Patil, Nishant; Wei, Hai; Chen, Hong-Yu; Wong, H-S Philip; Mitra, Subhasish

    2013-09-26

    The miniaturization of electronic devices has been the principal driving force behind the semiconductor industry, and has brought about major improvements in computational power and energy efficiency. Although advances with silicon-based electronics continue to be made, alternative technologies are being explored. Digital circuits based on transistors fabricated from carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to outperform silicon by improving the energy-delay product, a metric of energy efficiency, by more than an order of magnitude. Hence, CNTs are an exciting complement to existing semiconductor technologies. Owing to substantial fundamental imperfections inherent in CNTs, however, only very basic circuit blocks have been demonstrated. Here we show how these imperfections can be overcome, and demonstrate the first computer built entirely using CNT-based transistors. The CNT computer runs an operating system that is capable of multitasking: as a demonstration, we perform counting and integer-sorting simultaneously. In addition, we implement 20 different instructions from the commercial MIPS instruction set to demonstrate the generality of our CNT computer. This experimental demonstration is the most complex carbon-based electronic system yet realized. It is a considerable advance because CNTs are prominent among a variety of emerging technologies that are being considered for the next generation of highly energy-efficient electronic systems.

  9. Characterization of SiCf/SiC and CNT/SiC composite materials produced by liquid phase sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.K.; Lee, S.P.; Cho, K.S.; Byun, J.H.; Bae, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper dealt with the microstructure and mechanical properties of SiC based composites reinforced with different reinforcing materials. The composites were fabricated using reinforcing materials of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and Tyranno Lox-M SiC chopped fibers. The volume fraction of carbon nanotubes was also varied in this composite system. An Al 2 O 3 -Y 2 O 3 powder mixture was used as a sintering additive in the consolidation of the SiC matrix. The characterization of the composites was investigated by means of SEM and three point bending tests. These composites showed a dense morphology of the matrix region, by the creation of a secondary phase. The composites reinforced with SiC chopped fibers possessed a flexural strength of about 400 MPa at room temperature. The flexural strength of the carbon nanotubes composites had a tendency to decrease with increased volume fraction of the reinforcing material.

  10. Mechanical and Magnetic Properties of YBCO Superconductor with Bi/CNT Composite and Resin/CNT Impregnation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, W. S.; Jang, G. E.; Han, Y. H.; Sung, T. H.

    2007-01-01

    Bi/CNT composite and resin/CNT were chosen to improve the mechanical properties of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 (YBCO) superconductor. In order to elucidate the effects of Bi/CNT composite and resin/CNT in YBCO superconductors, melt texture superconductor were impregnated by mixed compound of Bi and CNT into the artificial holes parallel to the c-axis, which were drilled on the YBCO superconductor. Various amount of Bi/CNT and resin/CNT were impregnated to YBCO superconductor with different holes diameters. Typical artificial holes diameters were 0.5, 0.7, and 1.0 mm respectively. Result of three-point bending test measurement, the bending strength with resin/CNT impregnation was improved up to 59.64 MPa as compared with 50.79 MPa of resin/CNT free bulk. Resin/CNT impregnation has been found to be one of the effective ways in improving the mechanical properties of bulk superconductor.

  11. Investigation of Chirality Selection Mechanism of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-17

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01-June-2014 to 31-May-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Investigation of Chirality Selection Mechanism of...of two significant mechanistic aspects of carbon nanotube (CNT) array growth under chemical vapor deposition conditions: chirality selectivity and...affected by the morphological evolution of catalyst particles. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Carbon Nanotubes, Chirality , Processing, Catalysis

  12. Copper-decorated carbon nanotubes-based composite electrodes for nonenzymatic detection of glucose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pop, A.; Manea, F.; Orha, C.; Motoc, S.; Llinoiu, E.; Vaszilcsin, N.; Schoonman, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare three types of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNT)-based composite electrodes and to modify their surface by copper electrodeposition for nonenzymatic oxidation and determination of glucose from aqueous solution. Copper-decorated multiwall carbon nanotubes composite

  13. Net energy benefits of carbon nanotube applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Pei; Isaacs, Jacqueline A.; Eckelman, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Life cycle net energy benefits are examined. • CNT-enabled and the conventional technologies are compared. • Flash memory with CNT switches show significant positive net energy benefit. • Lithium-ion batteries with MWCNT cathodes show positive net energy benefit. • Lithium-ion batteries with SWCNT anodes tend to exhibit negative net energy benefit. - Abstract: Implementation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in various applications can reduce material and energy requirements of products, resulting in energy savings. However, processes for the production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are energy-intensive and can require extensive purification. In this study, we investigate the net energy benefits of three CNT-enabled technologies: multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) reinforced cement used as highway construction material, single-walled CNT (SWCNT) flash memory switches used in cell phones and CNT anodes and cathodes used in lithium-ion batteries used in electric vehicles. We explore the avoided or additional energy requirement in the manufacturing and use phases and estimate the life cycle net energy benefits for each application. Additional scenario analysis and Monte Carlo simulation of parameter uncertainties resulted in probability distributions of net energy benefits, indicating that net energy benefits are dependent on the application with confidence intervals straddling the breakeven line in some cases. Analysis of simulation results reveals that SWCNT switch flash memory and MWCNT Li-ion battery cathodes have statistically significant positive net energy benefits (α = 0.05) and SWCNT Li-ion battery anodes tend to have negative net energy benefits, while positive results for MWCNT-reinforced cement were significant only under an efficient CNT production scenario and a lower confidence level (α = 0.1).

  14. O2 Plasma Etching and Antistatic Gun Surface Modifications for CNT Yarn Microelectrode Improve Sensitivity and Antifouling Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Wang, Ying; Jacobs, Christopher B; Ivanov, Ilia N; Venton, B Jill

    2017-05-16

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based microelectrodes exhibit rapid and selective detection of neurotransmitters. While different fabrication strategies and geometries of CNT microelectrodes have been characterized, relatively little research has investigated ways to selectively enhance their electrochemical properties. In this work, we introduce two simple, reproducible, low-cost, and efficient surface modification methods for carbon nanotube yarn microelectrodes (CNTYMEs): O 2 plasma etching and antistatic gun treatment. O 2 plasma etching was performed by a microwave plasma system with oxygen gas flow and the optimized time for treatment was 1 min. The antistatic gun treatment flows ions by the electrode surface; two triggers of the antistatic gun was the optimized number on the CNTYME surface. Current for dopamine at CNTYMEs increased 3-fold after O 2 plasma etching and 4-fold after antistatic gun treatment. When the two treatments were combined, the current increased 12-fold, showing the two effects are due to independent mechanisms that tune the surface properties. O 2 plasma etching increased the sensitivity due to increased surface oxygen content but did not affect surface roughness while the antistatic gun treatment increased surface roughness but not oxygen content. The effect of tissue fouling on CNT yarns was studied for the first time, and the relatively hydrophilic surface after O 2 plasma etching provided better resistance to fouling than unmodified or antistatic gun treated CNTYMEs. Overall, O 2 plasma etching and antistatic gun treatment improve the sensitivity of CNTYMEs by different mechanisms, providing the possibility to tune the CNTYME surface and enhance sensitivity.

  15. Controllable synthesis of spongy carbon nanotube blocks with tunable macro- and microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui Xuchun; Lin Zhiqiang; Zeng Zhiping; Tang Zikang; Wang Kunlin; Wu Dehai

    2013-01-01

    Macroscopic carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with uniform structures are in great demand for use in composites and environmental materials. Here we demonstrate the controlled synthesis of spongy CNT blocks with isotropic properties and flexible, freestanding structures. The formation mechanism of the isotropic CNT sponges is discussed, based on its open-ended structure and initial formation in the vapor phase. The microstructure of the CNT sponges can be tuned by changing the flow rate of the carrier gas, resulting in CNT sponges with diameters ranging from 30.2 to 47.8 nm and wall thicknesses from 7 to 16 nm. The bulk density (5–25 mg cm −3 ), mechanical strength of the CNT sponges, and filling rate of ferromagnetic catalyst in the CNT sponges can also be modulated by controlling the supply rate of the carbon source, suggesting potential applications in mechanical energy absorption and environmental materials. (paper)

  16. Fracture Toughness of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Metal- and Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.L.; Liu, B.; Hwang, K.C.; Chen, Y.L.; Huang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Hierarchical analysis of the fracture toughness enhancement of carbon nanotube- (CNT-) reinforced hard matrix composites is carried out on the basis of shear-lag theory and fracture mechanics. It is found that stronger CNT/matrix interfaces cannot definitely lead to the better fracture toughness of these composites, and the optimal interfacial chemical bond density is that making the failure mode just in the transition from CNT pull-out to CNT break. For hard matrix composites, the fracture toughness of composites with weak interfaces can be improved effectively by increasing the CNT length. However, for soft matrix composite, the fracture toughness improvement due to the reinforcing CNTs quickly becomes saturated with an increase in CNT length. The proposed theoretical model is also applicable to short fiber-reinforced composites.

  17. Fracture Toughness of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Metal- and Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical analysis of the fracture toughness enhancement of carbon nanotube- (CNT- reinforced hard matrix composites is carried out on the basis of shear-lag theory and facture mechanics. It is found that stronger CNT/matrix interfaces cannot definitely lead to the better fracture toughness of these composites, and the optimal interfacial chemical bond density is that making the failure mode just in the transition from CNT pull-out to CNT break. For hard matrix composites, the fracture toughness of composites with weak interfaces can be improved effectively by increasing the CNT length. However, for soft matrix composite, the fracture toughness improvement due to the reinforcing CNTs quickly becomes saturated with an increase in CNT length. The proposed theoretical model is also applicable to short fiber-reinforced composites.

  18. DNA-mediated self-assembly of carbon nanotubes on gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Pomales, Germarie; Rivera-Velez, Nelson E; Cabrera, Carlos R

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the use of disulfide-modified single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to form DNA self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and mixed DNA-carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrids SAMs on gold substrates. Mixed DNA-CNT SAMs are composed of DNA, mercaptohexanol (MCH) and DNA-CNT aggregates. Both, DNA-CNT and DNA areas of the mixed SAMs were analyzed and compared to traditional DNA SAMs. The results suggest the formation of a more compact and densely packed monolayer of DNA-CNT in comparison with DNA. The use of DNA-CNT hybrids to form SAMs on gold substrates might represent a new approach to improve the immobilization of DNA strands on gold, and might therefore help with the development of enhanced DNA sensors

  19. Detection of Individual Molecules and Ions by Carbon Nanotube-Based Differential Resistive Pulse Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ran; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Li, Dongqing

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a new method of sensing single molecules and cations by a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based differential resistive pulse sensing (RPS) technique on a nanofluidic chip. A mathematical model for multichannel RPS systems is developed to evaluate the CNT-based RPS signals. Individual cations, rhodamine B dye molecules, and ssDNAs are detected successfully with high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. Differentiating ssDNAs with 15 and 30 nucleotides are achieved. The experimental results also show that translocation of negatively charged ssDNAs through a CNT decreases the electrical resistance of the CNT channel, while translocation of positively charged cations and rhodamine B molecules increases the electrical resistance of the CNT. The CNT-based nanofluidic device developed in this work provides a new avenue for single-molecule/ion detection and offers a potential strategy for DNA sequencing. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Platinum catalyst formed on carbon nanotube by the in-liquid plasma method for fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Show, Yoshiyuki; Hirai, Akira; Almowarai, Anas; Ueno, Yutaro

    2015-12-01

    In-liquid plasma was generated in the carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersion fluid using platinum electrodes. The generated plasma spattered the surface of the platinum electrodes and dispersed platinum particles into the CNT dispersion. Therefore, the platinum nanoparticles were successfully formed on the CNT surface in the dispersion. The platinum nanoparticles were applied to the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) as a catalyst. The electrical power of 108 mW/cm{sup 2} was observed from the fuel cell which was assembled with the platinum catalyst formed on the CNT by the in-liquid plasma method. - Highlights: • The platinum catalyst was successfully formed on the CNT surface in the dispersion by the in-liquid plasma method. • The electrical power of 108 mW/cm{sup 2} was observed from the fuel cell which was assembled with the platinum catalyst formed on the CNT by the in-liquid plasma method.

  1. CNT-embedded hollow TiO{sub 2} nanofibers with high adsorption and photocatalytic activity under UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin-Young; Lee, Dayoung; Lee, Young-Seak, E-mail: youngslee@cnu.ac.kr

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • CNT-embedded hollow TiO{sub 2} nanofibers were successfully fabricated via electrospinning, impregnation, and calcination. • The highest degradation ratio achieved using the CNT-embedded hollow TiO{sub 2} nanofibers. • Incorporation of embedded CNTs both increased the adsorption capability and enhanced the photodegradation activity. - Abstract: Hollow TiO{sub 2} nanofibers with embedded carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared for use as photocatalysts through electrospinning, impregnation, and calcination using multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) with various ratios of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP), and further characterized by SEM, TGA, BET and XRD. The results demonstrated the successful fabrication of hollow TiO{sub 2} nanofibers with embedded CNTs. The CNT-embedded hollow TiO{sub 2} nanofibers prepared in this study exhibited improved photocatalytic activity compared to plain hollow TiO{sub 2} nanofibers based on the conversion of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution under UV irradiation. The highest degradation ratio produced by the CNT-embedded hollow TiO{sub 2} nanofibers was approximately 62% after 70 min, which represented an increase of more than 80% over that of TiO{sub 2}. It was found that the enhanced efficiency of MB removal could be attributed not only to the adsorption capability of the CNTs but also to electron transfer between the CNTs and the TiO{sub 2}.

  2. A review on the removal of antibiotics by carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Qiao; Yuan, Xing; Qu, Jiao

    2013-01-01

    Increasing concerns have been raised regarding the potential risks of antibiotics to human and ecological health due to their extensive use. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have drawn special research attention because of their unique properties and potential applications as a kind of adsorbents. This review summarizes the currently available research on the adsorption of antibiotics on CNTs, and will provide useful information for CNT application and risk assessment. Four different models, the Freundlich model (FM), Langmuir model (LM), Polanyi-Mane model (PMM), and Dubinin-Ashtakhov model (DAM), are often used to fit the adsorption isotherms. Because different mechanisms may act simultaneously, including electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, π-π bonds, and hydrogen bonds, the prediction of organic chemical adsorption on CNTs is not straightforward. Properties of CNTs, such as specific surface area, adsorption sites, and oxygen content, may influence the adsorption of antibiotics on CNTs. Adsorption heterogeneity and hysteresis are two features of antibiotic-CNT interactions. In addition, CNTs with adsorbed antibiotics may have potential risks for human health. So, further research examining how to reduce such risks is needed.

  3. Controllable pt nanoparticle deposition on carbon nanotubes as an anode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yongyan; Liang, Hanpu; Hu, Jinsong; Jiang, Li; Wan, Lijun

    2005-12-01

    We report a novel process to prepare well-dispersed Pt nanoparticles on CNTs. Pt nanoparticles, which were modified by the organic molecule triphenylphosphine, were deposited on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by the organic molecule, which acts as a cross linker. By manipulating the relative ratio of Pt nanoparticles and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in solution, Pt/CNT composites with different Pt content were achieved. The so-prepared Pt/CNT composite materials show higher electrocatalytic activity and better tolerance to poisoning species in methanol oxidation than the commercial E-TEK catalyst, which can be ascribed to the high dispersion of Pt nanoparticles on the multiwalled carbon nanotube surface.

  4. Fabrication of carbon microcapsules containing silicon nanoparticles-carbon nanotubes nanocomposite by sol-gel method for anode in lithium ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Joonwon

    2011-07-01

    Carbon microcapsules containing silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs)-carbon nanotubes (CNTs) nanocomposite (Si-CNT@C) have been fabricated by a surfactant mediated sol-gel method followed by a carbonization process. Silicon nanoparticles-carbon nanotubes (Si-CNT) nanohybrids were produced by a wet-type beadsmill method. To obtain Si-CNT nanocomposites with spherical morphologies, a silica precursor (tetraethylorthosilicate, TEOS) and polymer (PMMA) mixture was employed as a structure-directing medium. Thus the Si-CNT/Silica-Polymer microspheres were prepared by an acid catalyzed sol-gel method. Then a carbon precursor such as polypyrrole (PPy) was incorporated onto the surfaces of pre-existing Si-CNT/silica-polymer to generate Si-CNT/Silica-Polymer@PPy microspheres. Subsequent thermal treatment of the precursor followed by wet etching of silica produced Si-CNT@C microcapsules. The intermediate silica/polymer must disappear during the carbonization and etching process resulting in the formation of an internal free space. The carbon precursor polymer should transform to carbon shell to encapsulate remaining Si-CNT nanocomposites. Therefore, hollow carbon microcapsules containing Si-CNT nanocomposites could be obtained (Si-CNT@C). The successful fabrication was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). These final materials were employed for anode performance improvement in lithium ion battery. The cyclic performances of these Si-CNT@C microcapsules were measured with a lithium battery half cell tests.

  5. Synthesis of Cd doped ZnO/CNT nanocomposite by using microwave method: Photocatalytic behavior, adsorption and kinetic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Ahmadi Azqhandi

    Full Text Available The Cd-doped ZnO/CNT nanocomposites (Cd@ZnO/CNT-NCs were synthesized by the microwave assisted hydrothermal method. The as-synthesized Cd@ZnO/CNT-NCs was characterized in detail in term of their structural, morphological, chemical and optical properties using XRD; SEM, FE-TEM, BET and UV–Vis methods. The band gap energy measurements confirmed that the addition of Cd ions causes a decrease in the band gap energy of the nanocomposites. The photocatalytic properties of the synthesized nanocomposites were investigated by the measurements of methyl orange (MO degradation under UV irradiation.The equilibrium adsorption data of all three nanocomposites (i.e. ZnO/CNT, CZC-1, CZC-0.25 were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, respectively. The best fit to the data was obtained from the Langmuir model. The decrease in MO dye concentration was examined by UV–Visible spectroscopy at different time intervals under ultraviolet light irradiation, until the dye was completely degraded to colorless end product. Rapid MO dye decomposition was observed with a degradation rate of ∼93, 70 and 44% on the CZC-1, CZC-0.25 and ZnO/CNT within the initial 110 min, respectively. The fast degradation rate and high degradation efficiency of CZC-1 and CZC-0.25 is attributed to the porous nature, large specific surface area (162.5 and 136.1 m2 g−1, narrow pore size distribution (7.46 and 12.98 nm evaluated from N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms analysis and excellent electron accepting features of the engineered porous Cd@ZnO/CNT-NCs. The kinetic results revealed that the degradation rate of MO on the CZC-1 (i.e. Cd0.5Zn0.5O/CNT and CZC-0.25 (i.e. Cd0.25Zn0.75O/CNT is approximately 2- and 4-folds larger than the CNT/ZnO that can be explained by the replacement of Cd ions in the ZnO structure. The degradation of the model dyes was observed to follow pseudo first order degradation kinetics. Keywords: Adsorption, CNTs, CNT/ZnO nanocomposites, CNT

  6. Microinjection moulding of polymeric composites with functionalized carbon nanotubes =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Tania Sofia Araujo Figueiras

    Microinjection moulding of polymeric composites with functionalized carbon nanotubes The unique electronic, mechanical, and structural properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) make them suitable for applications in the fields of electronics, sensors, medical devices, aerospace and automotive industries. The preparation of CNT/polymer nanocomposites presents particular interest among the various possible applications. However, the long entangled nanotubes form agglomerates that poses serious obstacles to further development of nanocomposites with the target properties. One of the approaches to overcome the CNT chemical inertness, enhance the compatibility with the matrix and improve homogeneous dispersion through the matrix is through its covalent functionalization. This is expected to improve the CNT interface with the polymer matrix, thus improving the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites at very low content. One of the purposes of this thesis was to implement the covalent modification of the CNT surface using a simple functionalization method, to increase the CNT surface reactivity and possibly help their dispersion into the polyamide matrix without inducing structural damage on the CNT. The functionalization of CNT was carried out through the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azomethine ylides using a solvent-free reaction route. CNT were successful functionalized with pyrrolidine groups through a simple and fast procedure that was scaled up, and may be compatible with current industrial processes. Another objective was to disperse the CNT in polyamide 6 (PA6) using melt mixing, and to produce PA6/CNT nanocomposites by microinjection molding (plM). Finally, the morphological and physical properties of the mouldings produced were evaluated. The plM process is becoming of greater importance for the manufacturing of polymeric micro- components considering its low cost and short cycle times, useful for mass production. The as-received and functionalized CNT

  7. Application of Carbon Nanotubes for Plant Genetic Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaka, Olga M.; Pirko, Yaroslav V.; Yemets, Alla I.; Blume, Yaroslav B.

    In this chapter, the current state of using carbon nanotubes (CNTs; single- and multi-walled) that have attracted great interdisciplinary interest in recent decades due to their peculiar properties for genetic transformation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells will be enlightened. The covalent and non-covalent surface chemistry for the CNT functionalization with focus on the potential applications of surface modifications in design of biocompatible CNTs will be discussed. The properties of CNTs that are favorable for biotechnological use and current status of technical approaches that allow the increase in biocompatibility and lower nanotoxicity of engineered CNTs will be described. Decisions proposed by non-covalent surface modification of CNTs will be discussed. Existing data concerning mechanisms of CNT cell entry and factors governing toxicity, cellular uptake, intracellular traffic, and biodegradation of CNTs along with bioavailability of molecular cargoes of loaded CNTs will be discussed. Eco-friendly production of water dispersions of biologically functionalized multi-walled and single-walled CNTs for use as nano-vehicles for the DNA delivery in plant genetic transformation of plants will be described. The background, advantages, and problems of using CNTs in developing of novel methods of genetic transformation, including plant genetic transformation, will be highlighted. Special attention will be paid to the limitations of conventional gene transfer techniques and promising features of CNT-based strategies having improved efficacy, reproducibility, and accuracy along with less time consumption. Issues impeding manipulation of CNTs such as entangled bundle formation, low water solubility, inert properties of pristine CNTs, etc., and ways to solve arising tasks will be overviewed.

  8. Tribological behavior of dual-layer electroless-plated Ag–carbon nanotube coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun-Dai; Penkov, Oleksiy V.; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2013-01-01

    The tribological behavior of electroless Ag-plated carbon nanotube (CNT) dual-layer coatings was assessed and compared to that of the pure CNT coating. The motivation was to protect the surface of CNT coatings from wear by depositing a thin, soft Ag coating. The methods used for coating CNTs and Ag were spin coating and electroless plating, respectively. These coating methods were selected based on their simplicity and cost effectiveness. Wear tests were conducted by sliding the coatings against a stainless steel ball under a 10–30 mN applied load. Results showed that the wear rate of the dual-layer coating was strongly dependent on the thickness of the Ag layer as well as the applied load. At a 10 mN load and an Ag thickness of 65 nm, the wear rate of the dual-layer coating was about 10 times less than that of the pure CNT coating. However, when the thickness of the Ag was decreased to 11.5 nm, the wear rate was significantly higher. Also, the steady-state friction coefficients of the CNT and the dual-layer Ag–CNT coatings were in the range of 0.65–0.73 for all loads. A model of the wear reduction mechanism of the dual-layer Ag–CNT coating was proposed. - Highlights: ► Dual-layer Ag–carbon nanotube (CNT) coatings were deposited on silicon wafer. ► Friction coefficient of the Ag–CNT coatings was about 0.65. ► Wear of Ag–CNT coatings depended on the thickness of Ag layer and the applied load. ► Wear rate of the Ag–CNT coating was 10-fold less than that of the pure CNT coating

  9. Electrostatically Induced Carbon Nanotube Alignment for Polymer Composite Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapkin, Wesley Aaron

    We have developed a non-invasive technique utilizing polarized Raman spectroscopy to measure changes in carbon nanotube (CNT) alignment in situ and in real time in a polymer matrix. With this technique, we have confirmed the prediction of faster alignment for CNTs in higher electric fields. Real-time polarized Raman spectroscopy also allows us to demonstrate the loss of CNT alignment that occurs after the electric field is removed, which reveals the need for fast polymerization steps or the continued application of the aligning force during polymerization to lock in CNT alignment. Through a study on the effect of polymer viscosity on the rate of CNT alignment, we have determined that shear viscosity serves as the controlling mechanism for CNT rotation. This finding matches literature modeling of rigid rod mobility in a polymer melt and demonstrates that the rotational mobility of CNTs can be explained by a continuum model even though the diameters of single-walled CNTs are 1-2 nm. The viscosity dependence indicates that the manipulation of temperature (and indirectly viscosity) will have a direct effect on the rate of CNT alignment, which could prove useful in expediting the manufacturing of CNT-reinforced composites cured at elevated temperatures. Using real-time polarized Raman spectroscopy, we also demonstrate that electric fields of various strengths lead not only to different speeds of CNT rotation but also to different degrees of alignment. We hypothesize that this difference in achievable alignment results from discrete populations of nanotubes based on their length. The results are then explained by balancing the alignment energy for a given electric field strength with the randomizing thermal energy of the system. By studying the alignment dynamics of different CNT length distributions, we show that different degrees of alignment achieved as a function of the applied electric field strength are directly related to the square of the nanotube length. This

  10. Calculations of the resonant response of carbon nanotubes to binding of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Meng; Ke Changhong; Eom, Kilho

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically study the dynamical response of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to the binding of DNA in an aqueous environment by considering two major interactions in DNA helical binding to the CNT side surface: adhesion between DNA nucleobases and CNT surfaces and electrostatic interactions between negative charges on DNA backbones. The equilibrium DNA helical wrapping angle is obtained using the minimum potential energy method. Our results show that the preferred DNA wrapping angle in the equilibrium binding to CNT is dependent on both DNA length and DNA base. The equilibrium wrapping angle for a poly(dT) chain is larger than a comparable poly(dA) chain as a result of dT in a homopolymer chain having a higher effective binding energy to CNT than dA. Our results also interestingly reveal a sharp transition in the wrapping angle-DNA length profile for both homopolymers, implying that the equilibrium helical wrapping configuration does not exist for a certain range of wrapping angles. Furthermore, the resonant response of the DNA-CNT complex is analysed based on the variational method with a Hamiltonian which takes into account the CNT bending energy as well as DNA-CNT interactions. The closed-form analytical solution for predicting the resonant frequency of the DNA-CNT complex is presented. Our results show that the hydrodynamic loading on the oscillating CNT in aqueous environments has profound impacts on the resonance behaviour of DNA-CNT complexes. Our results suggest that detection of DNA molecules using CNT resonators based on DNA-CNT interactions through frequency measurements should be conducted in media with low hydrodynamic loading on CNTs. Our theoretical framework provides a fundamental principle for label-free detection using CNT resonators based on DNA-CNT interactions.

  11. Colloidal stability of suspended and agglomerate structures of settled carbon nanotubes in different aqueous matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwyzer, Irène; Kaegi, Ralf; Sigg, Laura; Nowack, Bernd

    2013-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are often processed in suspended form and therefore a release of CNT-suspensions into the aquatic environment is plausible. In this study, the behaviour of two physico-chemically very different CNT types in the presence of varying, environmentally relevant calcium-containing media was investigated, including the long-term colloidal stability and the sedimentary structures of settled CNTs. Calcium induced CNT flocculation, however, the stability of the CNTs in the medium did not monotonously decrease with increasing calcium concentration. At intermediate calcium concentrations (0.5-1.5 mM Ca) pre-dispersed CNTs were stabilized in humic acid medium to similar, temporarily even to higher degree than in the absence of calcium. Between pH 5 and 8 only at the highest pH an influence on CNT stability was observed by either promoting flocculation or stabilisation depending on the CNT type. Humic acid stabilized CNTs much better than fulvic acid. Generally, the colloidal stability of the long, thick CNTs with higher surface oxygen content was less affected by the media composition. An investigation of the settled CNT material using analytical electron microscopy revealed the presence of spheroidal, bundle-like and net like CNT-agglomerate structures. Calcium possibly acted as bridging agent linking CNTs in a network like manner, temporarily increasing the CNT concentrations stabilized in the supernatants due to the low density of these structures. With increasing settling time the CNTs formed a fluffy sediment layer at the bottom of the reaction vessels. Bundle-like CNT agglomerates were also observed within that layer of settled CNTs, possibly caused by calcium neutralizing the surface charges. Furthermore, the CNT suspensions contained spheroidal CNT agglomerates, most likely residues from the original dry powder that were not disaggregated. The analysis of settled CNT material is a novelty and illustrates CNT agglomerate structures possibly

  12. Carbon nanotubes on carbon fibers: Synthesis, structures and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuhong

    The interface between carbon fibers (CFs) and the resin matrix in traditional high performance composites is characterized by a large discontinuity in mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties which can cause inefficient energy transfer. Due to the exceptional properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), their growth at the surface of carbon fibers is a promising approach to controlling interfacial interactions and achieving the enhanced bulk properties. However, the reactive conditions used to grow carbon nanotubes also have the potential to introduce defects that can degrade the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber (CF) substrate. In this study, using thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, high density multi-wall carbon nanotubes have been successfully synthesized directly on PAN-based CF surface without significantly compromising tensile properties. The influence of CVD growth conditions on the single CF tensile properties and carbon nanotube (CNT) morphology was investigated. The experimental results revealed that under high temperature growth conditions, the tensile strength of CF was greatly decreased at the beginning of CNT growth process with the largest decrease observed for sized CFs. However, the tensile strength of unsized CFs with CNT was approximately the same as the initial CF at lower growth temperature. The interfacial shear strength of CNT coated CF (CNT/CF) in epoxy was studied by means of the single-fiber fragmentation test. Results of the test indicate an improvement in interfacial shear strength with the addition of a CNT coating. This improvement can most likely be attributed to an increase in the interphase yield strength as well as an improvement in interfacial adhesion due to the presence of the nanotubes. CNT/CF also offers promise as stress and strain sensors in CF reinforced composite materials. This study investigates fundamental mechanical and electrical properties of CNT/CF using nanoindentation method by designed

  13. The correlation between structural properties, geometrical features, and photoactivity of freestanding TiO2 nanotubes in comparative degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol and methylene blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabzadeh Pasikhani, Javad; Gilani, Neda; Ebrahimian Pirbazari, Azadeh

    2018-02-01

    Freestanding TiO2 nanotubes (FSNTs) with various physical dimensions were fabricated by two-step anodization process with different voltages and anodization times. The detachment method employed in this study involved voltage reduction at the end of the second step and ultrasonic chemical treatment. The results demonstrated that this detachment method is a beneficial technique to create thin open-mouthed and closed-end FSNTs (with lengths of 6-14 μm). Moreover, the influences of anodization conditions on photocatalytic activity, structural properties and geometrical features of FSNTs in comparative degradation of two non-colored (2,4-dichlorophenol) and colored (methylene blue) pollutants were investigated. Findings revealed that the quantity of the photocatalyst utilized is an effective parameter and using the optimum weight (10 mg/100 ml of 2,4-dichlorophenol) could increase the efficiency of the process up to 21%. Further, the results demonstrated that if equal optimum weights of FSNTs are chosen, decreases in voltage and anodization time significantly influence the structural properties, geometrical features, and photodegradation efficiency. The enhancement achieved in the degradation of both 2,4-dichlorophenol and methylene blue using the nanotubes with the shortest diameter (54 nm) and length (6.5 μm), which possess the lowest porosity (0.5) and also the highest surface area (0.53 m2 g-1), nanotubes’ density (19 cm2 cm-2) and wall thickness to length ratio (2). In addition, the results obtained indicated that the degradation reactions follow first-order kinetics in the degradation of the both pollutants. The apparent degradation rate constant of methylene blue was approximately 1.2 times greater than of the 2,4-dichlorophenol due to the negative charge of the nanotubes’ surface and electrostatic adsorptions.

  14. Patterned carbon nanotubes as a new three-dimensional scaffold for mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitirim, Verda Ceylan [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Bilkent University, 06800, Ankara (Turkey); Kucukayan-Dogu, Gokce [Institute of Engineering and Science, Material Science and Nanotechnology Graduate Program, Bilkent University, 06800, Ankara (Turkey); Bengu, Erman [Department of Chemistry, Bilkent University, 06800, Ankara (Turkey); Akcali, Kamil Can, E-mail: akcali@fen.bilkent.edu.tr [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Bilkent University, 06800, Ankara (Turkey); Bilgen, Bilkent University Genetics and Biotechnology Research Center, 06800, Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the cellular adhesive features of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on non-coated and collagen coated patterned and vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures mimicking the natural extra cellular matrix (ECM). Patterning was achieved using the elasto-capillary induced by water treatment on the CNT arrays. After confirmation with specific markers both at transcript and protein levels, MSCs from different passages were seeded on either collagen coated or non-coated patterned CNTs. Adhesion and growth of MSCs on the patterned CNT arrays were examined using scanning electron microscopy image analysis and 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. The highest MSC count was observed on the non-coated patterned CNTs at passage zero, while decreasing numbers of MSCs were found at the later passages. Similarly, MTT assay results also revealed a decrease in the viability of the MSCs for the later passages. Overall, the cell count and viability experiments indicated that MSCs were able to better attach to non-coated patterned CNTs compared to those coated with collagen. Therefore, the patterned CNT surfaces can be potentially used as a scaffold mimicking the ECM environment for MSC growth which presents an alternative approach to MSC-based transplantation therapy applications. - Highlights: • Synthesized vertically aligned CNTs were patterned to be used as scaffold. • The growth of mesenchymal stem cells was achieved on the patterned CNTs. • The cell number was counted higher on the patterned CNTs than collagen coated CNTs. • The MTT assay results revealed the cell viability on the patterned CNTs.

  15. Patterned carbon nanotubes as a new three-dimensional scaffold for mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitirim, Verda Ceylan; Kucukayan-Dogu, Gokce; Bengu, Erman; Akcali, Kamil Can

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the cellular adhesive features of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on non-coated and collagen coated patterned and vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures mimicking the natural extra cellular matrix (ECM). Patterning was achieved using the elasto-capillary induced by water treatment on the CNT arrays. After confirmation with specific markers both at transcript and protein levels, MSCs from different passages were seeded on either collagen coated or non-coated patterned CNTs. Adhesion and growth of MSCs on the patterned CNT arrays were examined using scanning electron microscopy image analysis and 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. The highest MSC count was observed on the non-coated patterned CNTs at passage zero, while decreasing numbers of MSCs were found at the later passages. Similarly, MTT assay results also revealed a decrease in the viability of the MSCs for the later passages. Overall, the cell count and viability experiments indicated that MSCs were able to better attach to non-coated patterned CNTs compared to those coated with collagen. Therefore, the patterned CNT surfaces can be potentially used as a scaffold mimicking the ECM environment for MSC growth which presents an alternative approach to MSC-based transplantation therapy applications. - Highlights: • Synthesized vertically aligned CNTs were patterned to be used as scaffold. • The growth of mesenchymal stem cells was achieved on the patterned CNTs. • The cell number was counted higher on the patterned CNTs than collagen coated CNTs. • The MTT assay results revealed the cell viability on the patterned CNTs

  16. Electrochemical characteristics of Shewanella loihica on carbon nanotubes-modified graphite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Epifanio, Monica; Marsili, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We deposited CNT coatings on graphite electrode by electrophoretic deposition. • CNT coating increased extracellular electron transfer in Shewanella loihica biofilms. • Thick electroactive biofilms hinder the electroactivity of CNT coatings. -- Abstract: High specific surface and electrocatalytic activity of the electrode surface favour extracellular electron transfer from electrochemically active biofilms to polarized electrodes. We coated layer-by-layer carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on graphite electrodes through electrophoretic deposition, thus increasing the electrocatalytic activity. After determining the optimal number of CNT layers through electrochemical methods, we grew Shewanella loihica PV-4 biofilms on the CNT-coated electrodes to quantify the increase in extracellular electron transfer rate compared with unmodified electrodes. Current density on CNT-modified electrodes was 1.7 times higher than that observed on unmodified electrodes after 48 h from inoculation. Rapid microbial cells attachment on CNT-coated electrodes, as determined from scanning electronic microscopy, explained the rapid increase of the current. Also, the CNT reduced the charge transfer resistance of the graphite electrodes, as measured by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. However, the electrocatalytic activity of the CNT-coated electrode decreased as the biofilm grew thicker and covered the CNT-coating. These result confirmed that surface-modified electrodes improve the electron transfer rate in thin biofilms (<5 μm), but are not feasible for power production in microbial fuel cells, where the biofilm thickness is much higher

  17. A multi-axis MEMS sensor with integrated carbon nanotube-based piezoresistors for nanonewton level force metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullinan, Michael A; Panas, Robert M; Culpepper, Martin L

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the design and fabrication of a multi-axis microelectromechanical system (MEMS) force sensor with integrated carbon nanotube (CNT)-based piezoresistive sensors. Through the use of proper CNT selection and sensor fabrication techniques, the performance of the CNT-based MEMS force sensor was increased by approximately two orders of magnitude as compared to current CNT-based sensor systems. The range and resolution of the force sensor were determined as 84 μN and 5.6 nN, respectively. The accuracy of the force sensor was measured to be better than 1% over the device’s full range. (paper)

  18. Photonic density of states in the vicinity of a single-wall finite-length carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemilentsau, A; Ya Slepyan, G; Maksimenko, S A

    2009-01-01

    Photonic density of states in the vicinity of a single-wall finite-length carbon nanotube (CNT) is investigated theoretically in this paper. The analysis is based on the fluctuation-dissipative theorem in the Callen-Welton form. The Dyson equation for the Green dyadic of the electromagnetic field in the presence of CNT is formulated and a method for its numerical solution is elaborated. We show that the photonic density of states spectrum has a nontrivial resonant structure in the terahertz range in the vicinity of the metallic single-wall CNT. The origin of these resonances is the surface plasmon resonances on the CNT's edges.

  19. A vertically aligned carbon nanotube-based impedance sensing biosensor for rapid and high sensitive detection of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolahad, Mohammad; Taghinejad, Mohammad; Taghinejad, Hossein; Janmaleki, Mohsen; Mohajerzadeh, Shams

    2012-03-21

    A novel vertically aligned carbon nanotube based electrical cell impedance sensing biosensor (CNT-ECIS) was demonstrated for the first time as a more rapid, sensitive and specific device for the detection of cancer cells. This biosensor is based on the fast entrapment of cancer cells on vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays and leads to mechanical and electrical interactions between CNT tips and entrapped cell membranes, changing the impedance of the biosensor. CNT-ECIS was fabricated through a photolithography process on Ni/SiO(2)/Si layers. Carbon nanotube arrays have been grown on 9 nm thick patterned Ni microelectrodes by DC-PECVD. SW48 colon cancer cells were passed over the surface of CNT covered electrodes to be specifically entrapped on elastic nanotube beams. CNT arrays act as both adhesive and conductive agents and impedance changes occurred as fast as 30 s (for whole entrapment and signaling processes). CNT-ECIS detected the cancer cells with the concentration as low as 4000 cells cm(-2) on its surface and a sensitivity of 1.7 × 10(-3)Ω cm(2). Time and cell efficiency factor (TEF and CEF) parameters were defined which describe the sensor's rapidness and resolution, respectively. TEF and CEF of CNT-ECIS were much higher than other cell based electrical biosensors which are compared in this paper.

  20. Facile synthesis of MnO{sub 2}/CNT nanocomposite and its electrochemical performance for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hongjuan, E-mail: cehjwang@scut.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemcial Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Peng Cheng [School of Chemistry and Chemcial Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Peng Feng, E-mail: cefpeng@scut.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemcial Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China); Yu Hao; Yang Jian [School of Chemistry and Chemcial Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640 (China)

    2011-08-25

    Highlights: > MnO{sub 2}/CNTs are prepared by direct redox reaction between KMnO{sub 4} and carbon nanotubes. > This preparation method is a simple and green without any other additives. > MnO{sub 2}/CNTs show specific capacitance of 162.2 F g{sup -1} at the current density of 0.2 A g{sup -1}. > MnO{sub 2}/CNTs exhibit excellent charge-discharge property. - Abstract: A nanocomposite of manganese dioxide coated on the carbon nanotubes (MnO{sub 2}/CNTs) was synthesized by a facile direct redox reaction between potassium permanganate and carbon nanotubes without any other oxidant or reductant addition. The morphology, microstructure and crystalline form of this MnO{sub 2}/CNT nanocomposite were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transition electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical properties are characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic charge/discharge (GCD). The results show that the facile prepared MnO{sub 2}/CNTs nanocomposite shows specific capacitance of 162.2 F g{sup -1} at the current density of 0.2 A g{sup -1} and excellent charge/discharge property with 90% of its specific capacitance kept after 2000 cycles at the current density of 5 A g{sup -1}.

  1. Improving the wettability of aluminum on carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Kang Pyo; Lee, Il Ha; Duong, Dinh Loc; Kim, Tae Hyung; Lim, Seong Chu; An, Kay Hyeok; Lee, Young Hee

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The wettability of CNT in Al metal was improved by electroplating method. → This involves two steps: (i) Al electroplating and (ii) additional Al wetting. → The large surface tension difference was overcome by forming Al-C covalent bonds. → Al-C covalent bond was verified by Raman spectroscopy and XPS. → Density functional calculations confirmed structural model of CNT-vacancy-O-Al. - Abstract: The wetting of a metal on carbon nanotubes is fundamentally difficult due to the unusually large difference between their surface tensions and is a bottleneck for making metal-carbon nanotube (CNT) composites. Here, we report a simple method to enhance the wettability of metal particles on the CNT surface by applying aluminum, which is the material with the largest surface tension. This method involves two steps: (i) Al nanoparticles are decorated on multiwalled carbon nanotubes by electroplating and (ii) Al powder is further spread on Al-electroplated CNTs, followed by high-temperature annealing to accommodate complete wetting of the aluminum. The large surface tension difference is overcome by forming strong Al-C covalent bonds initiated by defects of the CNTs. The decrease in the D-band intensity, the G-band shift in the Raman spectroscopy and the formation of Al-C covalent bonds, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, were in agreement with our structural model of CNT-vacancy-O-Al determined by density functional calculations.

  2. Enhanced sorption of mercury from compact fluorescent bulbs and contaminated water streams using functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Avinash; Vidyarthi, S.R.; Sankararamakrishnan, Nalini

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxidized (CNT-OX), CNT-I, CNT-S were prepared. • Capacity of CNT-S (151.5 mg/g) was higher than other CNTs. • Applied to the removal of Hg(II) from spiked and natural coal wash waters. • Applied to the removal of Hg(0) from compact fluorescent lamps. - Abstract: Three different functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes were prepared, namely, oxidized CNTs (CNT-OX), iodide incorporated MWCNT (CNT-I) and sulfur incorporated MWCNT (CNT-S). The as prepared adsorbents were structurally characterized by various spectral techniques like scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX), Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Loading of iodide and sulfur was evident from the EDAX graphs. The adsorption properties of Hg 2+ as a function of pH, contact time and initial metal concentration were characterized by Cold vapor AAS. The adsorption kinetics fitted the Pseudo second order kinetics and equilibrium was reached within 90 min. The experimental data were modeled with Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Redushkevich and Temkin isotherms and various isotherm parameters were evaluated. It was found that the mercury adsorption capacity for the prepared adsorbents were in the order of CNT-S > CNT-I > CNT-OX > CNT. Studies have been conducted to demonstrate the applicability of the sorbent toward the removal of Hg(0) from broken compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs and Hg(II) from contaminated water streams

  3. Fabrication of carbon microcapsules containing silicon nanoparticles-carbon nanotubes nanocomposite by sol-gel method for anode in lithium ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Joonwon

    2011-01-01

    Carbon microcapsules containing silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs)-carbon nanotubes (CNTs) nanocomposite (Si-CNT-C) have been fabricated by a surfactant mediated sol-gel method followed by a carbonization process. Silicon nanoparticles-carbon nanotubes (Si-CNT) nanohybrids were produced by a wet-type beadsmill method. To obtain Si-CNT nanocomposites with spherical morphologies, a silica precursor (tetraethylorthosilicate, TEOS) and polymer (PMMA) mixture was employed as a structure-directing medium. Thus the Si-CNT/Silica-Polymer microspheres were prepared by an acid catalyzed sol-gel method. Then a carbon precursor such as polypyrrole (PPy) was incorporated onto the surfaces of pre-existing Si-CNT/silica-polymer to generate Si-CNT/Silica-Polymer-PPy microspheres. Subsequent thermal treatment of the precursor followed by wet etching of silica produced Si-CNT-C microcapsules. The intermediate silica/polymer must disappear during the carbonization and etching process resulting in the formation of an internal free space. The carbon precursor polymer should transform to carbon shell to encapsulate remaining Si-CNT nanocomposites. Therefore, hollow carbon microcapsules containing Si-CNT nanocomposites could be obtained (Si-CNT-C). The successful fabrication was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). These final materials were employed for anode performance improvement in lithium ion battery. The cyclic performances of these Si-CNT-C microcapsules were measured with a lithium battery half cell tests. - Graphical Abstract: Carbon microcapsules containing silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs)-carbon nanotubes (CNTs) nanocomposite (Si-CNT-C) have been fabricated by a surfactant mediated sol-gel method. Highlights: → Polymeric microcapsules containing Si-CNT transformed to carbon microcapsules. → Accommodate volume changes of Si NPs during Li ion charge/discharge. → Sizes of microcapsules were controlled by experimental parameters.

  4. An update on carbon nanotube-enabled X-ray sources for biomedical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puett, Connor; Inscoe, Christina; Hartman, Allison; Calliste, Jabari; Franceschi, Dora K; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Lee, Yueh Z

    2018-01-01

    A new imaging technology has emerged that uses carbon nanotubes (CNT) as the electron emitter (cathode) for the X-ray tube. Since the performance of the CNT cathode is controlled by simple voltage manipulation, CNT-enabled X-ray sources are ideal for the repetitive imaging steps needed to capture three-dimensional information. As such, they have allowed the development of a gated micro-computed tomography (CT) scanner for small animal research as well as stationary tomosynthesis, an experimental technology for large field-of-view human imaging. The small animal CT can acquire images at specific points in the respiratory and cardiac cycles. Longitudinal imaging therefore becomes possible and has been applied to many research questions, ranging from tumor response to the noninvasive assessment of cardiac output. Digital tomosynthesis (DT) is a low-dose and low-cost human imaging tool that captures some depth information. Known as three-dimensional mammography, DT is now used clinically for breast imaging. However, the resolution of currently-approved DT is limited by the need to swing the X-ray source through space to collect a series of projection views. An array of fixed and distributed CNT-enabled sources provides the solution and has been used to construct stationary DT devices for breast, lung, and dental imaging. To date, over 100 patients have been imaged on Institutional Review Board-approved study protocols. Early experience is promising, showing an excellent conspicuity of soft-tissue features, while also highlighting technical and post-acquisition processing limitations that are guiding continued research and development. Additionally, CNT-enabled sources are being tested in miniature X-ray tubes that are capable of generating adequate photon energies and tube currents for clinical imaging. Although there are many potential applications for these small field-of-view devices, initial experience has been with an X-ray source that can be inserted into the

  5. Interaction of cholesterol with carbon nanotubes: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Anthony J.; Gupta, Bikash C.; Batra, Inder P.

    2008-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are being presented as medical devices at an increasing rate. To date, they have been suggested as targets for the thermal ablation of cancers, as delivery systems for pharmaceuticals, and as bio-sensors. A common thread amongst these applications is that CNTs are used as a delivery vector for some pharmaceutical into the body. We consider here the possibility that CNTs might be used as a device to trap and remove chemicals, particularly cholesterol, from a living organism. We have performed ab-initio calculations to determine how cholesterol might interact with CNTs placed inside the body. We have found that cholesterol exhibits no particular affinity for or effect on a bare CNT; however, its binding energy can be increased by functionalizing the CNT with a Ca adatom. We found that a Ca adatom on the wall of a CNT increases the binding energy of cholesterol to a CNT by around 1.5 eV, regardless of the nanotube's diameter. The presence of the cholesterol does not affect the band structure of the CNT, but the Ca atom does have an effect near the Fermi level. This indicates that a CNT based detector could function by detecting the alteration to the electronic structure caused by the induced adsorption of an adatom in the trinary system of CNT + cholesterol + adatom.

  6. The computational design of junctions by carbon nanotube insertion into a graphene matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Yuliang; Zhong Jianxin

    2009-01-01

    Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, two types of junction models constructed from armchair and zigzag carbon nanotube (CNT) insertion into a graphene matrix have been envisioned. It has been found that the insertion of the CNT into the graphene matrix leads to the formation of C-C covalent bonds between graphene and the CNT that distort the CNT geometry. However, the hydrogenation of the suspended carbon bonds on the graphene resumes the graphene-like structure of the pristine tube. The calculated band structure of armchair CNT insertion into graphene or hydrogenation graphene opens up a band gap and converts the metallic CNT into a semiconductor. For the zigzag CNT, the sp 3 hybridization between the graphene and nanotube alters the band structure of the tube significantly, whereas saturating the dangling bonds of terminal carbon atoms of graphene makes the CNT almost keep the same character of the bands as that in the pristine tube. The synthesis of our designed hybrid structures must be increasingly driven by an interest in molecules that not only have intriguing structures but also have special functions such as hydrogen storage.

  7. Negative to positive magnetoresistance transition in functionalization of carbon nanotube and polyaniline composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad Maity, Krishna; Tanty, Narendra; Patra, Ananya; Prasad, V.

    2018-03-01

    Electrical resistivity and magnetoresistance(MR) in polyaniline(PANI) with carbon nanotube(CNT) and functionalized carbon nanotube(fCNT) composites have been studied for different weight percentages down to the temperature 4.2 K and up to magnetic field 5 T. Resistivity increases significantly in composite at low temperature due to functionalization of CNT compared to only CNT. Interestingly a transition from negative to positive magnetoresistance has been observed when the filler is changed from pure CNT to functionalized CNT after a certain percentage (10wt%) as the effect of more disorder in fCNT/PANI composite. This result depicts that the MR has strong dependency on disorder in the composite system. The transition of MR has been explained on the basis of polaron-bipolaron model. The long range Coulomb interaction between two polarons screened by disorder in the composite of fCNT/PANI, increases the effective on-site Coulomb repulsion energy to form bipolaron which leads to change the sign of MR from negative to positive.

  8. Thermal transport of carbon nanotubes and graphene under optical and electrical heating measured by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, I.-Kai

    This thesis presents systematic studies of thermal transport in individual single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and graphene by optical and electrical approaches using Raman spectroscopy. In the work presented from Chapter 2 to Chapter 6, individual suspended CNTs are preferentially measured in order to explore their intrinsic thermal properties. Moreover, the Raman thermometry is developed to detect the temperature of the carbon nanotube (CNT). A parabolic temperature profile is observed in the suspended region of the CNT while a heating laser scans across it, providing a direct evidence of diffusive thermal transport in an individual suspended CNT. Based on the curvature of the temperature profile, we can solve for the ratio of thermal contact resistance to the thermal resistance of the CNT, which spans the range from 0.02 to 17. The influence of thermal contact resistance on the thermal transport in an individual suspended CNT is also studied. The Raman thermometry is carried out in the center of a CNT, while its contact length is successively shortened by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip cutting technique. By investigating the dependence of the CNT temperature on its thermal contact length, the temperature of a CNT is found to increase dramatically as the contact length is made shorter. This work reveals the importance of manipulating the CNT thermal contact length when adopting CNT as a thermal management material. In using a focused laser to induce heating in a suspended CNT, one open question that remains unanswered is how many of the incident photons are absorbed by the CNT of interest. To address this question, micro-fabricated platinum thermometers, together with micro-Raman spectroscopy are used to quantify the optical absorption of an individual CNT. The absorbed power in the CNT is equal to the power detected by two thermometers at the end of the CNT. Our result shows that the optical absorption lies in the range between 0.03 to 0.44%. In

  9. Detection of CO{sub 2} using CNT-based sensors: Role of Fe catalyst on sensitivity and selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tit, Nacir, E-mail: ntit@uaeu.ac.ae [Physics Department, UAE University, P.O. Box 15551, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates); Ezzi, Mohammed M. Al; Abdullah, Hasan M. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1690, Dhahran, 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Yusupov, Maksudbek [Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, BE-2610, Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium); Kouser, Summayya [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Center for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur, Bangalore (India); Bahlouli, Hocine [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1690, Dhahran, 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Yamani, Zain H. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1690, Dhahran, 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Center for Research Excellence in Nanotechnology, KFUPM, P.O. Box 5040, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-01-15

    The adsorption of CO{sub 2} on surfaces of graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), decorated with Fe atoms, are investigated using the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding (SCC-DFTB) method, neglecting the heat effects. Fe ad-atoms are more stable when they are dispersed on hollow sites. They introduce a large density of states at the Fermi level (N{sub F}); where keeping such density low would help in gas sensing. Furthermore, the Fe ad-atom can weaken the C=O double bonds of the chemisorbed CO{sub 2} molecule, paving the way for oxygen atoms to drain more charges from Fe. Consequently, chemisorption of CO{sub 2} molecules reduces both N{sub F} and the conductance while it enhances the sensitivity with the increasing gas dose. Conducting armchair CNTs (ac-CNTs) have higher sensitivity than graphene and semiconducting zigzag CNTs (zz-CNTs). Comparative study of sensitivity of ac-CNT-Fe composite towards various gases (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO and CO{sub 2}) has shown high sensitivity and selectivity towards CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O gases. - Highlights: • DFTB is used to study Adsorptions of CO{sub 2} molecule on pG and CNT, with Fe catalyst. • Armchair CNT-Fe has higher sensitivity to detect CO{sub 2} than zigzag CNT-Fe and pG-Fe. • Ac-CNT-Fe is highly sensitive and selective towards CO, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O gases. • Keeping Fe ad-atoms dispersed and with low density enhances sensitivity. • Our theoretical results corroborate the experimental findings of Ref. .

  10. Preparation and Performance of TiO2-ZnO/CNT Hetero-Nanostructures Applied to Photodegradation of Organic Dye

    OpenAIRE

    Da Dalt,Silvana; Alves,Annelise Kopp; Bergmann,Carlos Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Water pollution by organic compounds is one of the major challenges faced by industries that use dyeing processes. Thus, some methods were developed for degrading dyes in wastewaters, including heterogeneous photocatalysis by semiconductor oxides. However, these oxides have limited photocatalytic activity due to the fast recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. The aim of this study is the use of a carbon nanotube (CNT) and TiO2-ZnO oxide junction from modified sol-gel method to p...

  11. New 'chimie douce' approach to the synthesis of hybrid nanosheets of MoS2 on CNT and their anti-friction and anti-wear properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altavilla, Claudia; Sarno, Maria; Ciambelli, Paolo; Senatore, Adolfo; Petrone, Vincenzo

    2013-03-29

    Hybrid organic-inorganic oleylamine@MoS2-CNT nanocomposites with different compositions were obtained by thermal decomposition of tetrathiomolybdate in the presence of oleylamine and high quality multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) previously prepared by the CCVD technique. The nanocomposite samples were characterized by the TEM, SEM TG-MS, Raman and XRD techniques and successfully tested as anti-friction and anti-wear additives for grease lubricants.

  12. Effect of Length, Diameter, Chirality, Deformation, and Strain on Contact Thermal Conductance between Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Vikas; Lee, Jonghoon; Brown, Joshua S.; Farmer, Barry L.; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2018-04-01

    Thermal energy transfer across physically interacting single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) interconnects has been investigated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The role of various geometrical and structural (length, diameter, chirality) as well as external (deformation and strain) carbon nanotube (CNT) parameters has been explored to estimate total as well as area-normalized thermal conductance across cross-contact interconnects. It is shown that the CNT aspect ratio and degree of lateral as well as tensile deformation play a significant role in determining the extent of thermal energy exchange across CNT contacts, while CNT chirality has a negligible influence on thermal transport. Depending on the CNT diameter, aspect ratio, and degree of deformation at the contact interface, the thermal conductance values can vary significantly –by more than an order of magnitude for total conductance and a factor of 3 to 4 for area-normalized conductance. The observed trends are discussed from the perspective of modulation in number of low frequency out-of-plane (transverse, flexural, and radial) phonons that transmit thermal energy across the contact and govern the conductance across the interface. The established general dependencies for phonon governed thermal transport at CNT contacts are anticipated to help design and performance prediction of CNT-based flexible nanoelectronic devices, where CNT-CNT contact deformation and strain are routinely encountered during device operations.

  13. Supercapacitor electrodes by direct growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on Al: a study of performance versus layer growth evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Fu; Vicenzo, Antonello; Hashempour, Mazdak; Bestetti, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Supercapacitor electrodes were fabricated by direct growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Al current collectors via a chemical vapor deposition process in the presence of a spin-coated Co-Mo catalyst. A detailed study of the dependence of the CNT layer structure and thickness on growth time set the basis for the assessment of supercapacitors assembled with the CNTs/Al electrodes. As the main features of the layer growth evolution, an increase in the population of finer CNTs and a shift from a random entanglement to a rough vertical alignment of nanotubes were noted with proceeding growth. The growth time influence on the performance of supercapacitors was in fact apparent. Particularly, the specific capacitance of CNTs/Al electrodes in 0.5 M K 2 SO 4 aqueous electrolyte increased from 35 to 80 F g −1 as the CNT layer thickness varied from 20 to 60 μm, with a concurrent loss in rate capability (knee frequency from 1 kHz to 60 Hz). The latter was excellent in general, arguably due to both a fast ion transport through the interconnected CNT network and a negligible contribution of the active layer/current collector contact to the equivalent series resistance (0.15–0.22 mΩ g), a distinct advantage of the direct growth fabrication method. Overall, a relatively simple process of direct growth of CNTs on Al foils is shown to be an effective method to fabricate supercapacitor electrodes, notably in the absence of special measures and processing steps finalized to a tight control of nanotubes growth and organization

  14. Carbon nanotubes shynthesis in fluidized bed reactor equipped with a cyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyopratomo, P.; Sudibandriyo, M.; Wulan, P. P. D. K.

    2018-03-01

    This work aimed to observe the performance of a fluidized bed reactor which was equipped with a cyclone in the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNT) by chemical vapor deposition. Liquefied petroleum gas with a constant volumetric flow rate of 1940 cm3/minutes was fed to the reactor as a carbon source, while a combination of metal components of Fe-Co-Mo supported on MgO was used as catalyst. The CNT synthesis was carried out at a reaction temperature which was maintained at around 800 – 850 °C for 1 hour. The CNT yield was decreased sharply when the catalyst feed was increased. The carbon efficiency is directly proportional to the mass of catalyst fed. It was found from the experiment that the mass of as-grown CNT increased in proportion to the increase of the catalyst mass fed. A sharp increase of the mass percentage of carbon nanotubes entrainment happened when the catalyst feed was raised from 3 to 7 grams. Agglomerates of carbon nanotubes have been formed. The agglomerates composed of mutually entangled carbon nanotubes which have an outer diameter range 8 – 14 nm and an inner diameter range 4 – 10 nm, which confirmed that the multi-walled carbon nanotubes were formed in this synthesis. It was found that the mesopores dominate the pore structure of the CNT product and contribute more than 90 % of the total pore volume.

  15. High Volume Fraction Carbon Nanotube Composites for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochi, E. J.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Cano, R. J.; Wincheski, R. A.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Czabaj, M.

    2016-01-01

    Reported mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at the nanoscale suggest their potential to enable significantly lighter structures of interest for space applications. However, their utility depends on the retention of these properties in bulk material formats that permit practical fabrication of large structures. This presentation summarizes recent progress made to produce carbon nanotube composites with specific tensile properties that begin to rival those of carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites. CNT content in these nanocomposites was greater than 70% by weight. Tested nanocomposite specimens were fabricated from kilometers or tens of square meters of CNT, depending on the starting material format. Processing methods to yield these results, and characterization and testing to evaluate the performance of these composites will be discussed. The final objective is the demonstration of a CNT composite overwrapped pressure vessel to be flight tested in the Fall of 2016.

  16. Application of aromatization catalyst in synthesis of carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In a typical chemical vapour deposition (CVD) process for synthesizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs), it was found that the aromatization catalysts could promote effectively the formation of CNT. The essence of this phenomenon was attributed to the fact that the aromatization catalyst can accelerate the ...

  17. Monitoring structural defects and crystallinity of carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report the influence of catalyst formulation and reaction temperature on the formation of carbon nanotube (CNT) thin films by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method. Thin films of CNTs were grown on Fe–Mo/Al2O3-coated silicon wafer by thermal decomposition of methane at different temperatures ranging from ...

  18. Platinum and palladium on carbon nanotubes : Experimental and theoretical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adjizian, J. J.; De Marco, P.; Suarez-Martinez, I.; El Mel, A. A.; Snyders, R.; Gengler, R. Y. N.; Rudolf, P.; Ke, X.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Bittencourt, C.; Ewels, C. P.

    2013-01-01

    Pristine and oxygen plasma functionalised carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were studied after the evaporation of Pt and Pd atoms. High resolution transmission electron microscopy shows the formation of metal nanoparticles at the CNT surface. Oxygen functional groups grafted by the plasma functionalization

  19. Potential release scenarios for carbon nanotubes used in composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    The expected widespread use of carbon nanotube (CNT)-composites in consumer products calls for an assessment of the possible release and exposure to workers, consumers and the environment. Release of CNTs may occur at all steps in the life cycle of products, but to date only limi...

  20. On Young's modulus of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    load transfer in nanocomposites. In the present work, CNT/Al ... calculations. The theoretical modulus of the graphene sheet is supposed to be 1060 GPa (Harris 2004). The reason why multi-walled nanotubes have a modulus > 1060 GPa (that of graphene sheet) is currently not understood. However, in the present paper, ...

  1. Potential release scenarios for carbon nanotubes used in composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nowack, B.; David, R.M.; Fissan, H.; Morris, H.; Shatkin, J.A.; Stintz, M.; Zepp, R.; Brouwer, D.

    2013-01-01

    The expected widespread use of carbon nanotube (CNT)-composites in consumer products calls for an assessment of the possible release and exposure to workers, consumers and the environment. Release of CNTs may occur at all steps in the life cycle of products, but to date only limited information is

  2. Electrical Insulation Of Carbon Nanotube Separation Columns For Microchip Electrochromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Chen, Miaoxiang Max; Mølhave, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been grown in microfluidic glass channels for chemical analysis based on electrokinetic separations. A limitation of CNTs for this type of application is their high conductivity, which prevent them from being used for electroosmotic pumping with electrical field streng...

  3. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes and Nanospheres from Coconut Fibre and the Role of Synthesis Temperature on Their Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewumi, Gloria A.; Inambao, Freddie; Eloka-Eboka, Andrew; Revaprasadu, Neerish

    2018-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanospheres were successfully synthesized from coconut fibre-activated carbon. The biomass was first carbonized then physically activated, followed by treatment using ethanol vapor at 700°C to 1100°C at 100°C intervals. The effect of synthesis temperature on the formation of the nanomaterials was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared microscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis. SEM analysis revealed that nanospheres were formed at higher temperatures of 1000°C and 1100°C, while lower temperatures of 800°C and 900°C favored the growth of CNT. At 700°C, however, no tubes or spheres were formed. TEM and FTIR were used to observe spectral features, such as the peak positions, intensity and bandwidth, which are linked to some structural properties of the samples investigated. All these observations provided facts on the nanosphere and nanotube dimensions, vibrational modes and the degree of purity of the obtained samples. The TEM results show spheres of diameter in the range 50 nm to 250 nm while the tubes had diameters between 50 nm to 100 nm. XRD analysis reveals the materials synthesized are amorphous in nature with a hexagonal graphite structure.

  4. Simulation of CNT-AFM tip based on finite element analysis for targeted probe of the biological cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefi, Amin Termeh, E-mail: at.tyousefi@gmail.com; Miyake, Mikio, E-mail: miyakejaist@gmail.com; Ikeda, Shoichiro, E-mail: sho16.ikeda@gmail.com [ChECA IKohza, Dept. Environmental & Green Technology (EGT), Malaysia, Japan International Institute of Technology (MJIIT), University Technology Malaysia - UTM, Kualalumpur (Malaysia); Mahmood, Mohamad Rusop, E-mail: nano@uitm.gmail.com [NANO-SciTech Centre, Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-07-06

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are potentially ideal tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) due to the robust mechanical properties, nano scale diameter and also their ability to be functionalized by chemical and biological components at the tip ends. This contribution develops the idea of using CNTs as an AFM tip in computational analysis of the biological cell’s. Finite element analysis employed for each section and displacement of the nodes located in the contact area was monitored by using an output database (ODB). This reliable integration of CNT-AFM tip process provides a new class of high performance nanoprobes for single biological cell analysis.

  5. Tensile strength of glass fibres with carbon nanotube–epoxy nanocomposite coating: Effects of CNT morphology and dispersion state

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Naveed A.; Li, Erin L.; Sham, Man-Lung; Tang, Ben Zhong; Gao, Shang Lin; Mäder, Edith; Kim, Jang-Kyo

    2010-01-01

    A study has been made of a concept of 'healing' coatings applied onto the brittle fibre surface to reduce the stress concentrations and thus to improve the reinforcing efficiency in a composite. Coatings made from neat epoxy and carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced epoxy nanocomposite were applied onto the individual glass fibres as well as rovings. It is shown that the 0.3 wt.% CNT–epoxy nanocomposite coating gave rise to a significant increase in tensile strength of the single fibre for all gau...

  6. Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifeng F [Newton, MA; Tu, Yi [Belmont, MA

    2008-12-16

    CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

  7. Carbon Nanotube-Based Ion Selective Sensors for Wearable Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Soumyendu; David-Pur, Moshe; Hanein, Yael

    2017-10-11

    Wearable electronics offer new opportunities in a wide range of applications, especially sweat analysis using skin sensors. A fundamental challenge in these applications is the formation of sensitive and stable electrodes. In this article we report the development of a wearable sensor based on carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode arrays for sweat sensing. Solid-state ion selective electrodes (ISEs), sensitive to Na + ions, were prepared by drop coating plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) doped with ionophore and ion exchanger on CNT electrodes. The ion selective membrane (ISM) filled the intertubular spaces of the highly porous CNT film and formed an attachment that was stronger than that achieved with flat Au, Pt, or carbon electrodes. Concentration of the ISM solution used influenced the attachment to the CNT film, the ISM surface morphology, and the overall performance of the sensor. Sensitivity of 56 ± 3 mV/decade to Na + ions was achieved. Optimized solid-state reference electrodes (REs), suitable for wearable applications, were prepared by coating CNT electrodes with colloidal dispersion of Ag/AgCl, agarose hydrogel with 0.5 M NaCl, and a passivation layer of PVC doped with NaCl. The CNT-based REs had low sensitivity (-1.7 ± 1.2 mV/decade) toward the NaCl solution and high repeatability and were superior to bare Ag/AgCl, metals, carbon, and CNT films, reported previously as REs. CNT-based ISEs were calibrated against CNT-based REs, and the short-term stability of the system was tested. We demonstrate that CNT-based devices implemented on a flexible support are a very attractive platform for future wearable technology devices.

  8. Catalytic oxidation of 1,2-DCBz over V2O5/TiO2-CNTs: effect of CNT diameter and surface functional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Cuicui; Wang, Qiulin; Peng, Yaqi; Lu, Shengyong; Ji, Longjie; Ni, Mingjiang

    2017-02-01

    A series of V 2 O 5 /TiO 2 -carbon nanotube (CNT) catalysts were prepared and tested to decompose gaseous 1,2-dichlorobenzene (1,2-DCBz). Several physicochemical methods, including nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and H 2 temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) were employed to characterise their physicochemical properties. To better understand the effect of CNT properties on the reactivity of V 2 O 5 /TiO 2 -CNT catalysts, the 1,2-DCBz residue remaining in the off-gas and on the catalyst surface were both collected and analysed. The results indicate that the outer diameter and the surface functional groups (hydroxide radical and carboxyl) of CNTs significantly influence upon the catalytic activity of CNT-containing V 2 O 5 /TiO 2 catalysts: the CNT outer diameter mainly affects the aggregation of CNTs and the π-π interaction between the benzene ring and CNTs, while the introduction of -OH and -COOH groups by acid treatment can further enlarge specific surface area (SSA) and contribute to a higher average oxidation state of vanadium (V aos ) and supplemental surface chemisorbed oxygen (O ads ). In addition, the enhanced mobility of lattice oxygen (O latt) also improves the oxidation ability of the catalysts.

  9. Construction of Hierarchical CNT/rGO-Supported MnMoO4 Nanosheets on Ni Foam for High-Performance Aqueous Hybrid Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xuemei; Du, Jingwei; Zhang, Yaxiong; Liang, Zhilin; Wang, Huan; Huang, Baoyu; Zhou, Jinyuan; Pan, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhenxing; Xie, Erqing

    2017-10-18

    Rationally designed conductive hierarchical nanostructures are highly desirable for supporting pseudocapacitive materials to achieve high-performance electrodes for supercapacitors. Herein, manganese molybdate nanosheets were hydrothermally grown with graphene oxide (GO) on three-dimensional nickel foam-supported carbon nanotube structures. Under the optimal graphene oxide concentration, the obtained carbon nanotubes/reduced graphene oxide/MnMoO 4 composites (CNT/rGO/MnMoO 4 ) as binder-free supercapacitor cathodes perform with a high specific capacitance of 2374.9 F g -1 at the scan rate of 2 mV s -1 and good long-term stability (97.1% of the initial specific capacitance can be maintained after 3000 charge/discharge cycles). The asymmetric device with CNT/rGO/MnMoO 4 as the cathode electrode and the carbon nanotubes/activated carbon on nickel foam (CNT-AC) as the anode electrode can deliver an energy density of 59.4 Wh kg -1 at the power density of 1367.9 W kg -1 . These superior performances can be attributed to the synergistic effects from each component of the composite electrodes: highly pseudocapacitive MnMoO 4 nanosheets and three-dimensional conductive Ni foam/CNTs/rGO networks. These results suggest that the fabricated asymmetric supercapacitor can be a promising candidate for energy storage devices.

  10. Atomic Layer Deposition on Carbon Nanotubes and their Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stano, Kelly Lynn

    Global issues related to energy and the environment have motivated development of advanced material solutions outside of traditional metals ceramics, and polymers. Taking inspiration from composites, where the combination of two or more materials often yields superior properties, the field of organic-inorganic hybrids has recently emerged. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-inorganic hybrids have drawn widespread and increasing interest in recent years due to their multifunctionality and potential impact across several technologically important application areas. Before the impacts of CNT-inorganic hybrids can be realized however, processing techniques must be developed for their scalable production. Optimization in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods for synthesis of CNTs and vertically aligned CNT arrays has created production routes both high throughput and economically feasible. Additionally, control of CVD parameters has allowed for growth of CNT arrays that are able to be drawn into aligned sheets and further processed to form a variety of aligned 1, 2, and 3-dimensional bulk assemblies including ribbons, yarns, and foams. To date, there have only been a few studies on utilizing these bulk assemblies for the production of CNT-inorganic hybrids. Wet chemical methods traditionally used for fabricating CNT-inorganic hybrids are largely incompatible with CNT assemblies, since wetting and drying the delicate structures with solvents can destroy their structure. It is therefore necessary to investigate alternative processing strategies in order to advance the field of CNT-inorganic hybrids. In this dissertation, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is evaluated as a synthetic route for the production of large-scale CNT-metal oxide hybrids as well as pure metal oxide architectures utilizing CNT arrays, ribbons, and ultralow density foams as deposition templates. Nucleation and growth behavior of alumina was evaluated as a function of CNT surface chemistry. While highly graphitic

  11. A spiking neuron circuit based on a carbon nanotube transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C-L; Kim, K; Truong, Q; Shen, A; Li, Z; Chen, Y

    2012-01-01

    A spiking neuron circuit based on a carbon nanotube (CNT) transistor is presented in this paper. The spiking neuron circuit has a crossbar architecture in which the transistor gates are connected to its row electrodes and the transistor sources are connected to its column electrodes. An electrochemical cell is incorporated in the gate of the transistor by sandwiching a hydrogen-doped poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether (PEG) electrolyte between the CNT channel and the top gate electrode. An input spike applied to the gate triggers a dynamic drift of the hydrogen ions in the PEG electrolyte, resulting in a post-synaptic current (PSC) through the CNT channel. Spikes input into the rows trigger PSCs through multiple CNT transistors, and PSCs cumulate in the columns and integrate into a ‘soma’ circuit to trigger output spikes based on an integrate-and-fire mechanism. The spiking neuron circuit can potentially emulate biological neuron networks and their intelligent functions. (paper)

  12. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes for Lithium Ion Battery Anodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung-Joon Jin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have displayed great potential as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs due to their unique structural, mechanical, and electrical properties. The measured reversible lithium ion capacities of CNT-based anodes are considerably improved compared to the conventional graphite-based anodes. Additionally, the opened structure and enriched chirality of CNTs can help to improve the capacity and electrical transport in CNT-based LIBs. Therefore, the modification of CNTs and design of CNT structure provide strategies for improving the performance of CNT-based anodes. CNTs could also be assembled into free-standing electrodes without any binder or current collector, which will lead to increased specific energy density for the overall battery design. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of lithium ion intercalation and diffusion in CNTs, and the influence of different structures and morphologies on their performance as anode materials for LIBs.

  13. A molybdenum disulfide/carbon nanotube heterogeneous complementary inverter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Busnaina, Ahmed

    2012-08-24

    We report a simple, bottom-up/top-down approach for integrating drastically different nanoscale building blocks to form a heterogeneous complementary inverter circuit based on layered molybdenum disulfide and carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles. The fabricated CNT/MoS(2) inverter is composed of n-type molybdenum disulfide (MOS(2)) and p-type CNT transistors, with a high voltage gain of 1.3. The CNT channels are fabricated using directed assembly while the layered molybdenum disulfide channels are fabricated by mechanical exfoliation. This bottom-up fabrication approach for integrating various nanoscale elements with unique characteristics provides an alternative cost-effective methodology to complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors, laying the foundation for the realization of high performance logic circuits.

  14. Thermal conductive epoxy enhanced by nanodiamond-coated carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Jiang, Guohua

    2017-11-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) particles were coated on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by chemical reactions. Reliable bonding was formed by the combination of acyl chloride on NDs and amine group on CNTs. ND coated CNTs (CNT-ND) were dispersed into epoxy to fabricate thermal conductive resins. The results show that the surface energy of CNTs is decreased by the coated NDs, which is contributed to the excellent dispersion of CNT-NDs in the epoxy matrix. The heat-transfer channels were built by the venous CNTs cooperating with the coated NDs, which not only plays an effective role of heat conduction for CNTs and NDs, but also avoids the electrical leakage by the protection of NDs surrounding outside of CNTs. Electrical and thermal conductance measurements demonstrate that the influence of the CNT-ND incorporation on the electrical conductance is minor, however, the thermal conductivity is improved significantly for the epoxy filled with CNT-ND.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Electronic Transport Parameter of Carbon Nanotube Metal-Semiconductor On-Tube Heterojunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukirno

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon Nanotubes research is one of the top five hot research topics in physics since 2006 because of its unique properties and functionalities, which leads to wide-range applications. One of the most interesting potential applications is in term of nanoelectronic device. It has been modeled carbon nanotubes heterojunction, which was built from two different carbon nanotubes, that one is metallic and the other one is semiconducting. There are two different carbon nanotubes metal-semiconductor heterojunction. The first one is built from CNT(10,10 as metallic carbon nanotube and CNT (17,0 as semiconductor carbon nanotube. The other one is built from CNT (5,5 as metallic carbon nanotube and CNT (8,0. All of the semiconducting carbon nanotubes are assumed to be a pyridine-like N-doped. Those two heterojunctions are different in term of their structural shape and diameter. It has been calculated their charge distribution and potential profile, which would be useful for the simulation of their electronic transport properties. The calculations are performed by using self-consistent method to solve Non-Homogeneous Poisson’s Equation with aid of Universal Density of States calculation method for Carbon Nanotubes. The calculations are done by varying the doping fraction of the semiconductor carbon nanotubes The electron tunneling transmission coefficient, for low energy region, also has been calculated by using Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB approximation. From the calculation results, it is obtained that the charge distribution as well as the potential profile of this device is doping fraction dependent. It is also inferred that the WKB method is fail to be used to calculate whole of the electron tunneling coefficient in this system. It is expected that further calculation for electron tunneling coefficient in higher energy region as well as current-voltage characteristic of this system will become an interesting issue for this carbon nanotube based

  16. Hydrodynamic studies of CNT nanofluids in helical coil heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babita; Sharma, S. K.; Mital Gupta, Shipra; Kumar, Arinjay

    2017-12-01

    Helical coils are extensively used in several industrial processes such as refrigeration systems, chemical reactors, recovery processes etc to accommodate a large heat transfer area within a smaller space. Nanofluids are getting great attention due to their enhanced heat transfer capability. In heat transfer equipments, pressure drop is one of the major factors of consideration for pumping power calculations. So, the present work is aimed to study hydrodynamics of CNT nanofluids in helical coils. In this study, pressure drop characteristics of CNT nanofluid flowing inside horizontal helical coils are investigated experimentally. The helical coil to tube diameter was varied from 11.71 to 27.34 keeping pitch of the helical coil constant. Double distilled water was used as basefluid. SDBS and GA surfactants were added to stablilize CNT nanofluids. The volumetric fraction of CNT nanofluid was varied from 0.003 vol% to 0.051 vol%. From the experimental data, it was analyzed that the friction factor in helical coils is greater than that of straight tubes. Concentration of CNT in nanofluids also has a significant influence on the pressure drop/friction factor of helical coils. At a constant concentration of CNT, decreasing helical coil to tube diameter from 27.24 to 11.71, fanning friction factor of helical coil; f c increases for a constant value of p/d t. This increase in the value of fanning friction factor can be attributed to the secondary flow of CNT nanofluid in helical coils.

  17. Enhancing the efficiency of lithium intercalation in carbon nanotube bundles using surface functional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shiyan; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Lei; Chen, Liping; Liang, Haojun

    2014-08-14

    The effect of surface functionalization on the ability and kinetics of lithium intercalation in carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles has been studied by comparing the dynamical behaviors of lithium (Li) ions in pristine and -NH2 functionalized CNTs via ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. It was observed that lithium intercalation has been achieved quickly for both the pristine and surface functionalized CNT bundle. Our calculations demonstrated for the first time that CNT functionalization improved the efficiency of lithium intercalation significantly at both low and high Li ion density. Moreover, we found that keeping the nanotubes apart with an appropriate distance and charging the battery at a rational rate were beneficial to achieve a high rate of lithium intercalation. Besides, the calculated adsorption energy curves indicated that the potential wells in the system of -NH2 functionalized CNT were deeper than that of the pristine CNT bundle by 0.74 eV, and a third energy minimum with a value of 2.64 eV existed at the midpoint of the central axis of the nanotube. Thus, it would be more difficult to remove Li ions from the nanotube interior after surface functionalization. The barrier for lithium diffusion in the interior of the nanotube is greatly decreased because of the surface functional groups. Based on these results, we would suggest to "damage" the nanotube by introducing defects at its sidewall in order to improve not only the capacity of surface functionalized CNTs but also the efficiency of lithium intercalation and deintercalation processes. Our results presented here are helpful in understanding the mechanism of lithium intercalation into nanotube bundles, which may potentially be applied in the development of CNT based electrodes.

  18. Photothermal therapy of melanoma tumor using multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Zahra; Behnam, Mohammad Ali; Emami, Farzin; Dehghanian, Amirreza; Jamhiri, Iman

    2017-01-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a therapeutic method in which photon energy is transformed into heat rapidly via different operations to extirpate cancer. Nanoparticles, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have exceptional optical absorbance in visible and near infrared spectra. Therefore, they could be a good converter to induce hyperthermia in PTT technique. In our study, for improving the dispersibility of multiwalled CNTs in water, the CNTs were oxidized (O-CNTs) and then polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used for wrapping the surface of nanotubes. The formation of a thin layer of PEG around the nanotubes was confirmed through Fourier transform infrared, thermogravimetric analysis, and field emission scanning electron microscopy techniques. Results of thermogravimetric analysis showed that the amount of PEG component in the O-CNT-PEG was approximately 80% (w/w). Cell cytotoxicity study showed that O-CNT was less cytotoxic than pristine multiwalled nanotubes, and O-CNT-PEG had the lowest toxicity against HeLa and HepG2 cell lines. The effect of O-CNT-PEG in reduction of melanoma tumor size after PTT was evaluated. Cancerous mice were exposed to a continuous-wave near infrared laser diode (λ=808 nm, P =2 W and I =8 W/cm 2 ) for 10 minutes once in the period of the treatment. The average size of tumor in mice receiving O-CNT-PEG decreased sharply in comparison with those that received laser therapy alone. Results of animal studies indicate that O-CNT-PEG is a powerful candidate for eradicating solid tumors in PTT technique.

  19. Enhanced conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells using a CNT-incorporated TiO2 slurry-based photoanode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaoping Cai

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A new titanium dioxide (TiO2 slurry formulation is herein reported for the fabrication of TiO2 photoanode for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs. The prepared TiO2 photoanode featured a highly uniform mesoporous structure with well-dispersed TiO2 nanoparticles. The energy conversion efficiency of the resulting TiO2 slurry-based DSSC was ∼63% higher than that achieved by a DSSC prepared using a commercial TiO2 slurry. Subsequently, the incorporation of acid-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs into the TiO2 slurry was examined. More specifically, the effect of varying the concentration of the CNTs in this slurry on the performance of the resulting DSSCs was studied. The chemical state of the CNTs-incorporated TiO2 photoanode was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A high energy conversion efficiency of 6.23% was obtained at an optimum CNT concentration of ∼0.06 wt.%. The obtained efficiency corresponds to a 63% enhancement when compared with that obtained from a DSSC based on a commercial TiO2 slurry. The higher efficiency was attributed to the improvement in the collection and transport of excited electrons in the presence of the CNTs.

  20. Enhanced conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells using a CNT-incorporated TiO2 slurry-based photoanode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiaoping; Chen, Zexiang; Li, Jun; Wang, Yan; Xiang, Dong; Zhang, Jijun; Li, Hai

    2015-02-01

    A new titanium dioxide (TiO2) slurry formulation is herein reported for the fabrication of TiO2 photoanode for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The prepared TiO2 photoanode featured a highly uniform mesoporous structure with well-dispersed TiO2 nanoparticles. The energy conversion efficiency of the resulting TiO2 slurry-based DSSC was ˜63% higher than that achieved by a DSSC prepared using a commercial TiO2 slurry. Subsequently, the incorporation of acid-treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into the TiO2 slurry was examined. More specifically, the effect of varying the concentration of the CNTs in this slurry on the performance of the resulting DSSCs was studied. The chemical state of the CNTs-incorporated TiO2 photoanode was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A high energy conversion efficiency of 6.23% was obtained at an optimum CNT concentration of ˜0.06 wt.%. The obtained efficiency corresponds to a 63% enhancement when compared with that obtained from a DSSC based on a commercial TiO2 slurry. The higher efficiency was attributed to the improvement in the collection and transport of excited electrons in the presence of the CNTs.

  1. Material Evaluation and Process Optimization of CNT-Coated Polymer Powders for Selective Laser Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangqin Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs as nano-reinforcements were introduced to facilitate the laser sintering process and enhance the thermal and mechanical properties of polymeric composites. A dual experimental-theoretical method was proposed to evaluate the processability and predict the process parameters of newly developed CNT-coated polyamide 12 (CNTs/PA12 powders. The thermal conductivity, melt viscosity, phase transition and temperature-dependent density and heat capacity of PA12 and CNTs/PA12 powders were characterized for material evaluation. The composite powders exhibited improved heat conduction and heat absorption compared with virgin polymer powders, and the stable sintering range of composite powders was extended and found to be favourable for the sintering process. The microstructures of sintered composites revealed that the CNTs remained at the powder boundaries and formed network architectures, which instantaneously induced the significant enhancements in tensile strength, elongation at break and toughness without sacrificing tensile modulus.

  2. Optimum Design of FGX-CNT-Reinforced Reddy Pipes Conveying Fluid Subjected to Moving Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Vakili Tahami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The harmony search algorithm is applied to the optimum designs of functionally graded (FG-carbon nanotubes (CNTs-reinforced pipes conveying fluid which are subjected to a moving load. The structure is modeled by the Reddy cylindrical shell theory, and the motion equations are derived by Hamilton's principle. The dynamic displacement of the system is derived based on the differential quadrature method (DQM. Moreover, the length, thickness, diameter, velocity, and acceleration of the load, the temperature and velocity of the fluid, and the volume fraction of CNT are considered for the design variables. The results illustrate that the optimum diameter of the pipe is decreased by increasing the volume percentage of CNTs. In addition, by increasing the moving load velocity and acceleration, the FS is decreased.

  3. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotube/Graphite Felts as Advanced Electrode Materials for Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuangyin; Zhao, Xinsheng; Cochell, Thomas; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2012-08-16

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes have been grown, for the first time, on graphite felt (N-CNT/GF) by a chemical vapor deposition approach and examined as an advanced electrode for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). The unique porous structure and nitrogen doping of N-CNT/GF with increased surface area enhances the battery performance significantly. The enriched porous structure of N-CNTs on graphite felt could potentially facilitate the diffusion of electrolyte, while the N-doping could significantly contribute to the enhanced electrode performance. Specifically, the N-doping (i) modifies the electronic properties of CNT and thereby alters the chemisorption characteristics of the vanadium ions, (ii) generates defect sites that are electrochemically more active, (iii) increases the oxygen species on CNT surface, which is a key factor influencing the VRFB performance, and (iv) makes the N-CNT electrochemically more accessible than the CNT.

  4. Hybrid membrane using polyethersulfone-modification of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with silane agent to enhance high performance oxygen separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutuk Djoko Kusworo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mixed matrix membrane comprising carbon nanotubes embedded in polymer matrix have become one of the emerging technologies. This study was investigated in order to study the effect of silane agent modification towards carbon nanotubes (CNT surface at different concentration on oxygen enrichment performances of asymmetric mixed matrix membrane. The modified carbon nanotubes were prepared by treating the carbon nanotubes with chemical modification using Dynasylan Ameo (DA silane agent to allow PES chains to be grafted on carbon nanotubes surface. The results from the FESEM, DSC and FTIR analysis confirmed that chemical modification on carbon nanotubes surface had taken place. Sieve-in-a-cage’ morphology observed shows the poor adhesion between polymer and unmodified CNT. The gas separation performance of the asymmetric flat sheet mixed matrix membranes with modified CNT were relatively higher compared to the unmodified CNT. Hence, coated hollow fiber mixed matrix membrane with chemical modification on CNT surface using (3-aminopropyl-triethoxy methyl silane agent can potentially enhance the gas separation performance of O2 and N2.

  5. A Bio-Electro-Fenton System Employing the Composite FePc/CNT/SS316 Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ta Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bio-electro-Fenton microbial fuel cells generate energy through the decomposition of organic matter by microorganisms. The generated electricity drives a Fenton reaction in a cathode chamber, which can be used for the decolorization of dye wastewater. Most of the previous works added expensive platinum catalyst to improve the electrical property of the system. In this research, aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs were generated on the surface of SS316 stainless steel by chemical vapor deposition, and an iron phthalocyanine (FePc catalyst was added to fabricate a compound (FePc/CNT/SS316 that was applied to the cathode electrode of the fuel cell system. This was expected to improve the overall electricity generation efficiency and extent of decolorization of the system. The results showed that the maximum current density of the system with the modified electrode was 3206.30 mA/m2, and the maximum power was 726.55 mW/m2, which were increased by 937 and 2594 times, respectively, compared to the current and power densities of a system where only the SS316 stainless steel electrode was used. In addition, the decolorization of RB5 dye reached 84.6% within 12 h. Measurements of the electrical properties of bio-electro-Fenton microbial fuel cells and dye decolorization experiments with the FePc/CNT/SS316 electrode showed good results.

  6. The effect of temperature deposited on the performance of ZnO-CNT-graphite for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darari, Alfin; Hakim, Istajib S.; Priyono; Subagio, Agus; Pardoyo; Subhan, Achmad

    2017-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphite are now widely studied as the electrodes of supercapacitor, owing to their high conductivity, large surface area, chemical stability, etc. A lot of research has been focused on Carbon/metal oxide nanocomposite electrode for Electrode supercapacitor because it will increase the total capacitance. In this research, ZnO nanoparticles were deposited onto substrate CNT:Graphite in different temperatures such as 300°, 350°, and 400°C. The characterization of the crystal size using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns showed ZnO material peak was detected a ZnO crystallite. The size of ZnO crystallite in 300°, 350°, and 400°C consecutively is 101.1; 103.4; and 116.7 nm. The test results are Electrochemical impedance spectrometry (EIS) high electrical conductivity values obtained on the composition of ZnO-CNT-graphite with a temperature of 350°C 4.6 (S/m); and (2) the highest value of capacitance in 300°C is 1.23 F/g.

  7. Sintering Behavior of CNT Reinforced Al6061 and Al2124 Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouari Saheb

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ball milling and spark plasma sintering were successfully used to produce carbon nanotube reinforced Al6061 and Al2124 nanocomposites which have potential applications in the fields of aerospace, automotive, electronics, and high precision instrumentation. Al2124 and Al6061 nanocomposite powders containing 0.5 to 2 wt.% CNTs prepared through sonication and wet ball milling were spark plasma sintered at 400, 450, and 500°C for 20 minutes under a pressure of 35 MPa. CNTs were better dispersed, and less agglomerated and had good adhesion to the matrix in composites containing 1 wt.% CNTs. The increase of CNT content to 2 wt.% led to the formation of CNT clusters which resulted in less uniform and homogenous composite powders. Almost full densification of Al6061 reinforced with CNTs was achieved at 500°C. Also, CNTs reinforced Al2124 nanocomposites reached very high densities at 500°C. Composites reinforced with 1 wt.% CNTs displayed better densification compared to composites containing 2 wt.% CNTs. The increase of CNTs content from 0.5 to 1 wt.% increased the hardness of the Al6061 and Al2124 alloys to maximum values. Further increase of CNTs content to 2 wt.% decreased the hardness to values lower than that of the monolithic alloys.

  8. Vertically aligned CNT-Cu nano-composite material for stacked through-silicon-via interconnects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuangxi; Mu, Wei; Edwards, Michael; Mencarelli, Davide; Pierantoni, Luca; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Liu, Johan

    2016-08-19

    For future miniaturization of electronic systems using 3D chip stacking, new fine-pitch materials for through-silicon-via (TSV) applications are likely required. In this paper, we propose a novel carbon nanotube (CNT)/copper nanocomposite material consisting of high aspect ratio, vertically aligned CNT bundles coated with copper. These bundles, consisting of hundreds of tiny CNTs, were uniformly coated by copper through electroplating, and aspect ratios as high as 300:1 were obtained. The resistivity of this nanomaterial was found to be as low as ∼10(-8) Ω m, which is of the same order of magnitude as the resistivity of copper, and its temperature coefficient was found to be only half of that of pure copper. The main advantage of the composite TSV nanomaterial is that its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is similar to that of silicon, a key reliability factor. A finite element model was set up to demonstrate the reliability of this composite material and thermal cycle simulations predicted very promising results. In conclusion, this composite nanomaterial appears to be a very promising material for future 3D TSV applications offering both a low resistivity and a low CTE similar to that of silicon.

  9. Electrical Characteristics of A1/CNT/NiPc/PEPC/Ag Surface-Type Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Mutabar; Karimov, Kh. S.; Ahmad, Zubair; Sayyad, M. H.

    2010-01-01

    The blend of nickel phthalocyanine (NiPc) (2 wt. %) poly-N-epoxypropylcarbazole (PEPC), (1 wt. %) and carbon nano-tube (CNT) powder (2 wt. %) in benzole is deposited by drop-casting on glass substrates with pre-deposited metallic electrodes to fabricate Ag/CNT/NiPc/PEPC/A1 surface type cell. It is assumed that the high nonlinearity of the I — V characteristics is related to deep traps in the nano-scale depletion region in NiPc that is observed experimentally. The values of ideality factor and barrier height are determined from the I — V curve and they are found to be 8.4 and 1.05eV, respectively. The values of mobility and conductivity are calculated to be 7.94 × 10 −8 cm/Vs and 3.5 × 10 −6 Ω −1 cm −1 . The values of ideality factor and series resistance are also calculated by using Cheung's functions, which are in good agreement with the values calculated from the I — V curve

  10. CarbonNanoTubes (CNT) in bipolar plates for PEM fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundler, M.; Derieth, T.; Beckhaus, P.; Heinzel, A. [centre for fuel cell technology ZBT GmbH (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Using standard mass production techniques for the fabrication of fuel cell components, such as bipolar plates, is a main issue for the commercialisation of PEM fuel cell systems. Bipolar plates contribute significantly to the cost structure of PEM stacks. In an upcoming fuel cell market a large number of bipolar plates with specific high-quality standards will be needed. At the Centre for Fuel Cell Technology (ZBT) together with the University of Duisburg-Essen fuel cell stacks based on injection moulded bipolar plates have been developed and demonstrated successfully [1]. This paper focuses on the interactions between carbon filling materials (graphite, carbon black and carbon nanotubes (CNT)) in compound based bipolar plates and especially the potential of CNTs, which were used in bipolar plates for the first time. The entire value added chain based on the feedstock, the compounding and injection moulding process, the component bipolar plate, up to the operation of a PEM single fuel cell stack with CNT-based bipolar plates is disclosed. (orig.)

  11. Carbon Nanotube Thread Electrochemical Cell: Detection of Heavy Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Daoli; Siebold, David; Alvarez, Noe T; Shanov, Vesselin N; Heineman, William R

    2017-09-19

    In this work, all three electrodes in an electrochemical cell were fabricated based on carbon nanotube (CNT) thread. CNT thread partially insulated with a thin polystyrene coating to define the microelectrode area was used as the working electrode; bare CNT thread was used as the auxiliary electrode; and a micro quasi-reference electrode was fabricated by electroplating CNT thread with Ag and then anodizing it in chloride solution to form a layer of AgCl. The Ag|AgCl coated CNT thread electrode provided a stable potential comparable to the conventional liquid-junction type Ag|AgCl reference electrode. The CNT thread auxiliary electrode provided a stable current, which is comparable to a Pt wire auxiliary electrode. This all-CNT thread three electrode cell has been evaluated as a microsensor for the simultaneous determination of trace levels of heavy metal ions by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Hg 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Pb 2+ were used as a representative system for this study. The calculated detection limits (based on the 3σ method) with a 120 s deposition time are 1.05, 0.53, and 0.57 nM for Hg 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Pb 2+ , respectively. These electrodes significantly reduce the dimensions of the conventional three electrode electrochemical cell to the microscale.

  12. Thermal Transport Properties of Dry Spun Carbon Nanotube Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath E. Misak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal properties of carbon nanotube- (CNT- sheet were explored and compared to copper in this study. The CNT-sheet was made from dry spinning CNTs into a nonwoven sheet. This nonwoven CNT-sheet has anisotropic properties in in-plane and out-of-plane directions. The in-plane direction has much higher thermal conductivity than the out-of-plane direction. The in-plane thermal conductivity was found by thermal flash analysis, and the out-of-plane thermal conductivity was found by a hot disk method. The thermal irradiative properties were examined and compared to thermal transport theory. The CNT-sheet was heated in the vacuum and the temperature was measured with an IR Camera. The heat flux of CNT-sheet was compared to that of copper, and it was found that the CNT-sheet has significantly higher specific heat transfer properties compared to those of copper. CNT-sheet is a potential candidate to replace copper in thermal transport applications where weight is a primary concern such as in the automobile, aircraft, and space industries.

  13. Polyaniline/Carbon nanotube Electrochromic Films: Electrochemical Polymerization and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Xia; Zhao, Liang; Ma, De-Yue; Zeng, Yu-Run

    2018-02-01

    Polyaniline/Carbon nanotube (PANI/CNT) composite films doped with dodecyl-benzene sulfonic acid were synthesized by cyclic voltammetry on an ITO-coated glass substrate. FTIR, XRD and electrochemical analyzer were used to characterize the micro-morphology, chemical structure, crystallinity and electrochromic behavior of the films, respectively. The effect of CNT content on the properties of the films was investigated. Results show that the introducing CNTs make aniline polymerize easier than before. Within a range, the conductivity and crystallinity of PANI/CNT composites improves with CNT content increasing. The electrochromic device made from the PAN/CNT film with a CNT content of 2.5wt% presents a reflectance contrast of 38.8%, a mean response time of 2.3s and a coloration efficiency of 386.4cm2/C at 540nm. The PAN/CNT film shows better electrochromic behaviors due to some interaction between CNTs and the PANI backbones than PANI film.

  14. A self-sensing carbon nanotube/cement composite for traffic monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Baoguo; Yu Xun; Kwon, Eil

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a self-sensing carbon nanotube (CNT)/cement composite is investigated for traffic monitoring. The cement composite is filled with multi-walled carbon nanotubes whose piezoresistive properties enable the detection of mechanical stresses induced by traffic flow. The sensing capability of the self-sensing CNT/cement composite is explored in laboratory tests and road tests. Experimental results show that the fabricated self-sensing CNT/cement composite presents sensitive and stable responses to repeated compressive loadings and impulsive loadings, and has remarkable responses to vehicular loadings. These findings indicate that the self-sensing CNT/cement composite has great potential for traffic monitoring use, such as in traffic flow detection, weigh-in-motion measurement and vehicle speed detection.

  15. PT AND PT/NI "NEEDLE" ELETROCATALYSTS ON CARBON NANOTUBES WITH HIGH ACTIVITY FOR THE ORR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H.

    2011-11-10

    Platinum and platinum/nickel alloy electrocatalysts supported on graphitized (gCNT) or nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes (nCNT) are prepared and characterized. Pt deposition onto carbon nanotubes results in Pt 'needle' formations that are 3.5 nm in diameter and {approx}100 nm in length. Subsequent Ni deposition and heat treatment results in PtNi 'needles' with an increased diameter. All Pt and Pt/Ni materials were tested as electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The Pt and Pt/Ni catalysts showed excellent performance for the ORR, with the heat treated PtNi/gCNT (1.06 mA/cm{sup 2}) and PtNi/nCNT (0.664 mA/cm{sup 2}) showing the highest activity.

  16. Theoretical analysis of hydrogen spillover mechanism on carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalba eJuarez Mosqueda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The spillover mechanism of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotubes in the presence of catalytically active platinum clusters was critically and systematically investigated by using density-functional theory. Our simulation model includes a Pt4 cluster for the catalyst nanoparticle and curved and planar circumcoronene for two exemplary single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT, the (10,10 CNT and one of large diameter, respectively. Our results show that the H2 molecule dissociates spontaneously on the Pt4 cluster. However, the dissociated H atoms have to overcome a barrier of more than 2 eV to migrate from the catalyst to the CNT, even if the Pt4 cluster is at full saturation with six adsorbed and dissociated hydrogen molecules. Previous investigations have shown that the mobility of hydrogen atoms on the CNT surface is hindered by a barrier. We find that instead the Pt4 catalyst may move along the outer surface of the CNT with activation energy of only 0.16 eV, and that this effect offers the possibility of full hydrogenation of the CNT. Thus, although we have not found a low-energy pathway to spillover onto the CNT, we suggest, based on our calculations and calculated data reported in the literature, that in the hydrogen-spillover process the observed saturation of the CNT at hydrogen background pressure occurs through mobile Pt nanoclusters, which move on the substrate more easily than the substrate-chemisorbed hydrogens, and deposit or reattach hydrogens in the process. Initial hydrogenation of the carbon substrate, however, is thermodynamically unfavoured, suggesting that defects should play a significant role.

  17. Reinforced carbon nanotubes as electrically conducting and flexible films for space applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atar, Nurit; Grossman, Eitan; Gouzman, Irina; Bolker, Asaf; Hanein, Yael

    2014-11-26

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown entangled carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets are characterized by high electrical conductivity and durability to bending and folding. However, since freestanding CNT sheets are mechanically weak, they cannot be used as stand-alone flexible films. In this work, polyimide (PI) infiltration into entangled cup-stacked CNT (CSCNT) sheets was studied to form electrically conducting, robust, and flexible films for space applications. The infiltration process preserved CNTs' advantageous properties (i.e., conductivity and flexibility), prevented CNT agglomeration, and enabled CNT patterning. In particular, the CNT-PI films exhibited ohmic electrical conductance in both the lateral and vertical directions, with a sheet resistivity as low as 122 Ω/□, similar to that of as-grown CNT sheets, with minimal effect of the insulating matrix. Moreover, this high conductivity was preserved under mechanical and thermal manipulations. These properties make the reported CNT-PI films excellent candidates for applications where flexibility, thermal stability, and electrical conductivity are required. Particularly, the developed CNT-PI films were found to be durable in space environment hazards such as high vacuum, thermal cycling, and ionizing radiation, and hence they are suggested as an alternative for the electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection layer in spacecraft thermal blankets.

  18. Study of adhesion of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes to a substrate by atomic-force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageev, O. A.; Blinov, Yu. F.; Il'ina, M. V.; Il'in, O. I.; Smirnov, V. A.; Tsukanova, O. G.

    2016-02-01

    The adhesion to a substrate of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA CNT) produced by plasmaenhanced chemical vapor deposition has been experimentally studied by atomic-force microscopy in the current spectroscopy mode. The longitudinal deformation of VA CNT by applying an external electric field has been simulated. Based on the results, a technique of determining VA CNT adhesion to a substrate has been developed that is used to measure the adhesion strength of connecting VA CNT to a substrate. The adhesion to a substrate of VA CNT 70-120 nm in diameter varies from 0.55 to 1.19 mJ/m2, and the adhesion force from 92.5 to 226.1 nN. When applying a mechanical load, the adhesion strength of the connecting VA CNT to a substrate is 714.1 ± 138.4 MPa, and the corresponding detachment force increases from 1.93 to 10.33 μN with an increase in the VA CNT diameter. As an external electric field is applied, the adhesion strength is almost doubled and is 1.43 ± 0.29 GPa, and the corresponding detachment force is changed from 3.83 to 20.02 μN. The results can be used in the design of technological processes of formation of emission structures, VA CNT-based elements for vacuum microelectronics and micro- and nanosystem engineering, and also the methods of probe nanodiagnostics of VA CNT.

  19. Thermal conductivity of high performance carbon nanotube yarn-like fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayhew, Eric; Prakash, Vikas, E-mail: vikas.prakash@case.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-7222 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    In the present paper, we present results of thermal conductivity measurements in free standing carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn-like fibers. The measurements are made using a T-type experimental configuration utilizing a Wollaston-wire hot probe inside a scanning electron microscope. In this technique, a suspended platinum wire is used both as a heater and a thermal sensor. A low frequency alternating current source is used to heat the probe wire while the third harmonic voltage across the wire is measured by a lock-in amplifier. The conductivity is deduced from an analytical model that relates the drop in the spatially averaged temperature of the wire to that of the sample. The average thermal conductivity of the neat CNT fibers and the CNT –polymer composite fibers is found to be 448 W/m-K and 225 W/m-K, respectively. These values for conductivity are amongst the highest measured for CNT yarn-like fibers fabricated using a dry spinning process from vertically aligned CNT arrays. The enhancement in thermal conductivity is understood to be due to an increase in the CNT fiber elastic stiffness during the draw and twist operations, lower CNT thermal contact resistance due to increase in CNT contact area, and better alignment of the CNT fibrils along the length of the fiber.

  20. Toxicity of Carbon Nanotubes and its Implications for Occupational and Environmental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chiu-wing; James, John T.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the sources of Nano particles in the environment, the structure and properties of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs), the physical characteristics of CNT materials, pulmonary and other health concerns of exposure to CNTs. The toxicity of CNT in rodents is summarized and some natural, and man-made sources of CNTs are shown. CNTs are electrically and thermally conductive, fibrous, biopersistent and very complicated in structures. The factors affecting toxicity of CNTs are more than size and surface area.

  1. Method for covering a spme fibre with carbon nanotubes and resulting spme fibre

    OpenAIRE

    Bertrán, Enric; Jover Comas, Eric; García Céspedes, Jordi; Bayona Termens, Josep María

    2010-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a method for covering solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibres with carbon nanotubes (CNT), comprising the following operations: (i) depositing a layer of a metal material on the SPME fibre; (ii) applying a heat treatment in order to form catalytic metal nanoparticles in a reducing atmosphere; and (iii) applying carbon using chemical deposition techniques, thereby forming CNT on top ofthe metal nanoparticles. The invention also relates to a fibre obtain...

  2. Effects of carbon nanotube coating on flow boiling in a micro-channel

    OpenAIRE

    Khanikar, Vikash; Mudawar, Issam; Fisher, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were performed to assess the heat transfer enhancement benefits of coating the bottom wall of a shallow rectangular micro-channel with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Using water as working fluid, tests were performed with a bare copper surface and three separate, yet identical CNT-coated surfaces. Each of the CNT-coated surfaces was tested repeatedly at the same mass velocity to explore any time dependence of heat transfer performance parameters, especially critical heat flux (CHIF). Ap...

  3. Acoustical characterisation of carbon nanotube-loaded polydimethylsiloxane used for optical ultrasound generation

    OpenAIRE

    Alles, E. J.; Heo, J.; Noimark, S.; Colchester, R.; Parkin, I.; Baac, H. W.; Desjardins, A.

    2017-01-01

    An optical ultrasound generator was used to perform broadband (2-35 MHz) acoustical characterisation measurements of a nanocomposite comprising carbon nanotubes (CNT) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a composite that is commonly used as optical ultrasound generator. Samples consisting of either pure PDMS or CNT-loaded PDMS were characterised to determine the influence of CNTs on the speed of sound and power-law acoustic attenuation parameters. A small weight fraction (

  4. Encapsulating Reactive Nanoparticles in Carbon Nanotubes Using Flame-Based Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-22

    Nanoparticles, Nanotubes, and Nanowires,” Corning /Rutgers Research Symposium, Corning , NY, Feb 25, 2008. Zak, A., D’Esposito, C., and Tse, S.D., Premixed...configuration, there is excellent control of pyrolysis effects. By mounting a substrate probe to a linear translation stage, CNT growth and...are largely comprised of pyrolysis vapors that have not passed through the oxidation zone. As such, soot formation processes, which compete with CNT

  5. A nanotube-based field emission x-ray source for microcomputed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.; Cheng, Y.; Lee, Y.Z.; Gao, B.; Qiu, Q.; Lin, W.L.; Lalush, D.; Lu, J.P.; Zhou, O.

    2005-01-01

    Microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) is a noninvasive imaging tool commonly used to probe the internal structures of small animals for biomedical research and for the inspection of microelectronics. Here we report the development of a micro-CT scanner with a carbon nanotube- (CNT-) based microfocus x-ray source. The performance of the CNT x-ray source and the imaging capability of the micro-CT scanner were characterized

  6. Ferromagnetic resonance of cobalt nanoparticles used as a catalyst for the carbon nanotubes synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duraia, El-Shazly M. [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt); Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Institute of Physics and Technology, Almaty (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: duraia_physics@yahoo.com; Abdullin, Kh.A. [Institute of Physics and Technology, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2009-12-15

    Catalyst is considered to be the most crucial parameter for the growth of carbon nanotubes. In this work we study the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra of the catalyst nanoclusters. Moreover we report for the first time the angle FMR studies of catalyst particles with and without CNT layer. The dependencies of the FMR spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, Raman spectra and morphology of the CNT layers on the growth conditions are discussed.

  7. Investigation on carbon nanomaterials: Coaxial CNT-cylinders and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    carbon cylinders of CNT stacks have been formed directly inside the quartz tube. Another study is ... producing CNTs have been devised including electric arc evaporation ... process of coaxial carbon cylinder have already been de- scribed by ...

  8. Factoring-in agglomeration of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for better prediction of their toxicity versus asbestos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Ashley R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbon nanotubes (CNT and carbon nanofibers (CNF are allotropes of carbon featuring fibrous morphology. The dimensions and high aspect ratio of CNT and CNF have prompted the comparison with naturally occurring asbestos fibers which are known to be extremely pathogenic. While the toxicity and hazardous outcomes elicited by airborne exposure to single-walled CNT or asbestos have been widely reported, very limited data are currently available describing adverse effects of respirable CNF. Results Here, we assessed pulmonary inflammation, fibrosis, oxidative stress markers and systemic immune responses to respirable CNF in comparison to single-walled CNT (SWCNT and asbestos. Pulmonary inflammatory and fibrogenic responses to CNF, SWCNT and asbestos varied depending upon the agglomeration state of the particles/fibers. Foci of granulomatous lesions and collagen deposition were associated with dense particle-like SWCNT agglomerates, while no granuloma formation was found following exposure to fiber-like CNF or asbestos. The average thickness of the alveolar connective tissue - a marker of interstitial fibrosis - was increased 28 days post SWCNT, CNF or asbestos exposure. Exposure to SWCNT, CNF or asbestos resulted in oxidative stress evidenced by accumulations of 4-HNE and carbonylated proteins in the lung tissues. Additionally, local inflammatory and fibrogenic responses were accompanied by modified systemic immunity, as documented by decreased proliferation of splenic T cells ex vivo on day 28 post exposure. The accuracies of assessments of effective surface area for asbestos, SWCNT and CNF (based on geometrical analysis of their agglomeration versus estimates of mass dose and number of particles were compared as predictors of toxicological outcomes. Conclusions We provide evidence that effective surface area along with mass dose rather than specific surface area or particle number are significantly correlated with toxicological

  9. Factoring-in agglomeration of carbon nanotubes and nanofibers for better prediction of their toxicity versus asbestos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Ashley R; Kisin, Elena R; Tkach, Alexey V; Yanamala, Naveena; Mercer, Robert; Young, Shih-Houng; Fadeel, Bengt; Kagan, Valerian E; Shvedova, Anna A

    2012-04-10

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and carbon nanofibers (CNF) are allotropes of carbon featuring fibrous morphology. The dimensions and high aspect ratio of CNT and CNF have prompted the comparison with naturally occurring asbestos fibers which are known to be extremely pathogenic. While the toxicity and hazardous outcomes elicited by airborne exposure to single-walled CNT or asbestos have been widely reported, very limited data are currently available describing adverse effects of respirable CNF. Here, we assessed pulmonary inflammation, fibrosis, oxidative stress markers and systemic immune responses to respirable CNF in comparison to single-walled CNT (SWCNT) and asbestos. Pulmonary inflammatory and fibrogenic responses to CNF, SWCNT and asbestos varied depending upon the agglomeration state of the particles/fibers. Foci of granulomatous lesions and collagen deposition were associated with dense particle-like SWCNT agglomerates, while no granuloma formation was found following exposure to fiber-like CNF or asbestos. The average thickness of the alveolar connective tissue--a marker of interstitial fibrosis--was increased 28 days post SWCNT, CNF or asbestos exposure. Exposure to SWCNT, CNF or asbestos resulted in oxidative stress evidenced by accumulations of 4-HNE and carbonylated proteins in the lung tissues. Additionally, local inflammatory and fibrogenic responses were accompanied by modified systemic immunity, as documented by decreased proliferation of splenic T cells ex vivo on day 28 post exposure. The accuracies of assessments of effective surface area for asbestos, SWCNT and CNF (based on geometrical analysis of their agglomeration) versus estimates of mass dose and number of particles were compared as predictors of toxicological outcomes. We provide evidence that effective surface area along with mass dose rather than specific surface area or particle number are significantly correlated with toxicological responses to carbonaceous fibrous nanoparticles. Therefore

  10. Preparation and characterization of iridium dioxide-carbon nanotube nanocomposites for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. M.; Cai, J. H.; Huang, Y. S.; Lee, K. Y.; Tsai, D. S.

    2011-03-01

    A thin film of novel hierarchical structure, suitable for supercapacitor applications, has been developed through combining conductive multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and square IrO2 nanotubes (IrO2NT) of nanometer size. Synthesis of this hierarchical structure with open porosity is performed by depositing IrO2 short tubes densely along the long wires of carbon nanotube on a substrate of stainless steel. A IrO2 tube of rutile structure grows in the [001] direction, with an opening at its top, surrounded by very thin walls. The IrO2 addition on the MWCNT template increases the capacitance of the CNT thin film effectively, because of pseudocapacitance of the IrO2 surface. For this particular composite, featured with two tubular nanostructures, the specific capacitance increases from 15 F g - 1 (MWCNT) to 69 F g - 1 (IrO2NT/MWCNT), measured using the galvanostatic discharge experiment. Its property of fast retrieval of the stored charge is assured in the impedance measurement, showing that the internal resistance of the IrO2NT/MWCNT nanocomposite electrode is lower than that of the bare MWCNTs.

  11. Preparation and characterization of iridium dioxide-carbon nanotube nanocomposites for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y M; Cai, J H; Huang, Y S; Lee, K Y [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 43 Keelung Road, Section 4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Tsai, D S, E-mail: ysh@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, 43 Keelung Road, Section 4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2011-03-18

    A thin film of novel hierarchical structure, suitable for supercapacitor applications, has been developed through combining conductive multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and square IrO{sub 2} nanotubes (IrO{sub 2}NT) of nanometer size. Synthesis of this hierarchical structure with open porosity is performed by depositing IrO{sub 2} short tubes densely along the long wires of carbon nanotube on a substrate of stainless steel. A IrO{sub 2} tube of rutile structure grows in the [001] direction, with an opening at its top, surrounded by very thin walls. The IrO{sub 2} addition on the MWCNT template increases the capacitance of the CNT thin film effectively, because of pseudocapacitance of the IrO{sub 2} surface. For this particular composite, featured with two tubular nanostructures, the specific capacitance increases from 15 F g{sup -1} (MWCNT) to 69 F g{sup -1} (IrO{sub 2}NT/MWCNT), measured using the galvanostatic discharge experiment. Its property of fast retrieval of the stored charge is assured in the impedance measurement, showing that the internal resistance of the IrO{sub 2}NT/MWCNT nanocomposite electrode is lower than that of the bare MWCNTs.

  12. An immersion calorimetric study of the interactions between some organic molecules and functionalized carbon nanotube surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillejos-López, E.; Bachiller-Baeza, B.; Guerrero-Ruiz, A.; Rodriguez-Ramos, I.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The interaction of organic chemicals with the surface of modified CNTs was studied. ► Specific π–π interactions between graphitic CNTs and toluene have been considered. ► Confinement effects in CNTs increase the adsorption strength of aromatic compounds. ► Methanol molecules form H-bonds with the oxygen functional groups on CNT surfaces. - Abstract: The interaction of organic chemicals with the surface of carbon nanotubes has been studied by immersion calorimetry revealing significant differences in the properties when these materials are modified thermally or chemically. Therefore, multiwall carbon nanotubes have been synthesized using a chemical vapour deposition procedure and subsequently aliquots were treated with HNO 3 at reflux, maintaining the reaction during different times, in order to incorporate oxygen surface groups, or were treated at 2873 K under inert atmosphere. The aim of this thermal treatment is to eliminate structural defects of the carbon nanostructures and to graphitize the amorphous carbon phases. These features were confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The immersion in organic compounds, including toluene, methanol and methylcyclohexane, of all these carbon nanotubes samples reveals that the surface properties are remarkably modified. Thus, the formation of different types of interaction, depending on the surface, gives place to changes in the immersion enthalpies

  13. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  14. Carbon nanotube/metal-sulfide composite flexible electrodes for high-performance quantum dot-sensitized solar cells and supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralee Gopi, Chandu V V; Ravi, Seenu; Rao, S Srinivasa; Eswar Reddy, Araveeti; Kim, Hee-Je

    2017-04-19

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and metal sulfides have attracted considerable attention owing to their outstanding properties and multiple application areas, such as electrochemical energy conversion and energy storage. Here we describes a cost-effective and facile solution approach to the preparation of metal sulfides (PbS, CuS, CoS, and NiS) grown directly on CNTs, such as CNT/PbS, CNT/CuS, CNT/CoS, and CNT/NiS flexible electrodes for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) and supercapacitors (SCs). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the CNT network was covered with high-purity metal sulfide compounds. QDSSCs equipped with the CNT/NiS counter electrode (CE) showed an impressive energy conversion efficiency (η) of 6.41% and remarkable stability. Interestingly, the assembled symmetric CNT/NiS-based polysulfide SC device exhibited a maximal energy density of 35.39 W h kg -1 and superior cycling durability with 98.39% retention after 1,000 cycles compared to the other CNT/metal-sulfides. The elevated performance of the composites was attributed mainly to the good conductivity, high surface area with mesoporous structures and stability of the CNTs and the high electrocatalytic activity of the metal sulfides. Overall, the designed composite CNT/metal-sulfide electrodes offer an important guideline for the development of next level energy conversion and energy storage devices.

  15. Carbon nanotube epoxy nanocomposites: the effects of interfacial modifications on the dynamic mechanical properties of the nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoonessi, Mitra; Lebrón-Colón, Marisabel; Scheiman, Daniel; Meador, Michael A

    2014-10-08

    Surface functionalization of pretreated carbon nanotubes (CNT) using aromatic, aliphatic, and aliphatic ether diamines was performed. The pretreatment of the CNT consisted of either acid- or photo-oxidation. The acid treated CNT had a higher initial oxygen content compared to the photo-oxidized CNT and this resulted in a higher density of functionalization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to verify the presence of the oxygenated and amine moieties on the CNT surfaces. Epoxy/0.1 wt % CNT nanocomposites were prepared using the functionalized CNT and the bulk properties of the nanocomposites were examined. Macroscale correlations between the interfacial modification and bulk dynamic mechanical and thermal properties were observed. The amine modified epoxy/CNT nanocomposites exhibited up to a 1.9-fold improvement in storage modulus (G') below the glass transition (Tg) and up to an almost 4-fold increase above the Tg. They also exhibited a 3-10 °C increase in the glass transition temperature. The aromatic diamine surface modified epoxy/CNT nanocomposites resulted in the largest increase in shear moduli below and above the Tg and the largest increase in the Tg. Surface examination of the nanocomposites with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed indications of a greater adhesion of the epoxy resin matrix to the CNT, most likely due to the covalent bonding.

  16. Heterojunction Solar Cells Based on Silicon and Composite Films of Graphene Oxide and Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, LePing; Tune, Daniel; Shearer, Cameron; Shapter, Joseph

    2015-09-07

    Graphene oxide (GO) sheets have been used as the surfactant to disperse single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) in water to prepare GO/CNT electrodes that are applied to silicon to form a heterojunction that can be used in solar cells. GO/CNT films with different ratios of the two components and with various thicknesses have been used as semitransparent electrodes, and the influence of both factors on the performance of the solar cell has been studied. The degradation rate of the GO/CNT-silicon devices under ambient conditions has also been explored. The influence of the film thickness on the device performance is related to the interplay of two competing factors, namely, sheet resistance and transmittance. CNTs help to improve the conductivity of the GO/CNT film, and GO is able to protect the silicon from oxidation in the atmosphere. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Heat Transfer between an Individual Carbon Nanotube and Gas Environment in a Wide Knudsen Number Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Dong Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Applications of carbon nanotube (CNT and graphene in thermal management have recently attracted significant attention. However, the lack of efficient prediction formula for heat transfer coefficient between nanomaterials and gas environment limits the further development of this technique. In this work, a kinetic model has been established to predict the heat transfer coefficient of an individual CNT in gas environment. The heat dissipation around the CNT is governed by molecular collisions, and outside the collision layer, the heat conduction is dominant. At nanoscales, the natural convection can be neglected. In order to describe the intermolecular collisions around the CNT quantitatively, a correction factor 1/24 is introduced and agrees well with the experimental observation. The prediction of the present model is in good agreement with our experimental results in free molecular regime. Further, a maximum heat transfer coefficient occurs at a critical diameter of several nanometers, providing guidelines on the practical design of CNT-based heat spreaders.

  18. Mechanical, Rheological and Thermal Properties of Polystyrene/1-Octadecanol Modified Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Amr, Issam Thaher

    2014-09-04

    The results of the studies on the functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with 1-octadecanol and its usage as reinforcing filler in the bulk polymerization of styrene are reported in this article. Both unmodified and modified CNTs were utilized in different loadings, however, without any initiator. The resulting composites were characterized by using mechanical testing, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis and melt rheology. The tensile tests show the addition of 0.5wt% of CNT-C18 results in 19.5% increment of Young\\'s modulus. The DSC study shows a decrease in T-g values of prepared PS/CNT nanocomposite. The rheological study was conducted at 190 degrees C and shows that addition of pure CNT increased the viscoelastic behavior of the PS matrices, while the CNT-C18 act as plasticizer. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the incorporation of CNT into PS enhanced the thermal properties significantly.

  19. Light radiation through a transparent cathode plate with single-walled carbon nanotube field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, E.S.; Goak, J.C.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, S.H.; Han, J.H.; Lee, C.S.; Sok, J.H.; Seo, Y.H.; Park, K.S.; Lee, N.S.

    2010-01-01

    In the conventional carbon nanotube backlight units (CNT-BLUs), light passes through the phosphor-coated anode glass plate, which thus faces closely the thin film transistor (TFT) backplate of a liquid crystal display panel. This configuration makes heat dissipation structurally difficult because light emission and heat generation occur simultaneously at the anode. We propose a novel configuration of a CNT-BLU where the cathode rather than the anode faces the TFT backplate by turning it upside down. In this design, light passes through the transparent cathode glass plate while heating occurs at the anode. We demonstrated a novel design of CNT-BLU by fabricating transparent single-walled CNT field emitters on the cathode and by coating a reflecting metal layer on the anode. This study hopefully provides a clue to solve the anode-heating problem which would be inevitably confronted for high-luminance and large-area CNT-BLUs.

  20. Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes over vertically aligned silicon nanowire bundles for achieving uniform field emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yung-Jr; Huang, Yung-Jui; Chang, Hsuan-Chen; Lee, Kuei-Yi; Lee, San-Liang

    2014-01-01

    A fabrication strategy is proposed to enable precise coverage of as-grown carbon nanotube (CNT) mats atop vertically aligned silicon nanowire (VA-SiNW) bundles in order to realize a uniform bundle array of CNT-SiNW heterojunctions over a large sample area. No obvious electrical degradation of as-fabricated SiNWs is observed according to the measured current-voltage characteristic of a two-terminal single-nanowire device. Bundle arrangement of CNT-SiNW heterojunctions is optimized to relax the electrostatic screening effect and to maximize the field enhancement factor. As a result, superior field emission performance and relatively stable emission current over 12 h is obtained. A bright and uniform fluorescent radiation is observed from CNT-SiNW-based field emitters regardless of its bundle periodicity, verifying the existence of high-density and efficient field emitters on the proposed CNT-SiNW bundle arrays.

  1. Development of end-selective functionalized carbon nanotubes for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Ho; Kim, Wan Sun; Lee, Ha Rim; Park, Kyu Chang; Lee, Chang Hoon; Park, Hun Kuk; Kim, Kyung Sook

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a type of carbon allotrope with excellent physical and electrical properties, including high thermal conductivity, mechanical strength, and thermal stability. Therefore, applications of CNT have been considered for a variety of fields, including biosensors, molecular electronics, X-ray, and fuel cells. However, the application of CNT to biomedicine is limited because this material is cytotoxic and inhomogeneous. In particular, the irregularity in the structural properties of paste or bundle-type CNTs causes an uncontrolled modification in biomolecules. Therefore, using CNT as biosensors to obtain quantitative analyses is difficult. In this study, we developed a new method to perform end-selective functionalization of CNT in order to enable quantitative analysis for biomedical applications. The process was as follows: (1) etching the tip of vertically-aligned CNTs under optimum conditions, (2) oxidation of exposed CNTs, and (3) end-selective linkage of functionalized CNTs with biomolecules (dsDNA).

  2. Preparation of graphene nanosheet/carbon nanotube/polyaniline composite as electrode material for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jun; Wei, Tong; Fan, Zhuangjun; Zhang, Milin; Shen, Xiande [Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Material Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Qian, Weizhong; Wei, Fei [Beijing Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Reaction Engineering and Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-05-01

    Graphene nanosheet/carbon nanotube/polyaniline (GNS/CNT/PANI) composite is synthesized via in situ polymerization. GNS/CNT/PANI composite exhibits the specific capacitance of 1035 F g{sup -1} (1 mV s{sup -1}) in 6 M of KOH, which is a little lower than GNS/PANI composite (1046 F g{sup -1}), but much higher than pure PANI (115 F g{sup -1}) and CNT/PANI composite (780 F g{sup -1}). Though a small amount of CNTs (1 wt.%) is added into GNS, the cycle stability of GNS/CNT/PANI composite is greatly improved due to the maintenance of highly conductive path as well as mechanical strength of the electrode during doping/dedoping processes. After 1000 cycles, the capacitance decreases only 6% of initial capacitance compared to 52% and 67% for GNS/PANI and CNT/PANI composites. (author)

  3. Enhanced adhesion between carbon nanotubes and substrate surfaces by low-temperature annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Chi Woong; Byun, Young Tae; Woo, Deok Ha; Lee, Seok; Jhon, Young Min

    2012-01-01

    We enhanced the adhesion forces between carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the substrate surface by using a low-temperature annealing process at 180 .deg. C for 300 s to protect the CNTs throughout the processes in photolithography for fabricating CNT-based devices, especially ion and bio sensors which are always exposed to liquids. The adhesion force was tested by using the adhesion durability test of soaking the fabricated CNT field effect transistors (CNT-FETs) in de-ionized water at room temperature for 300 s, and the adsorption quantities of CNTs were analyzed by using I - V measurements on the CNT-FETs before and after each adhesion durability test. The conductance change of the CNT-FETs fabricated with the annealing process was considerably decreased by more than a factor of 10 5 compared to that without the annealing process, implying that CNTs adhere much more strongly to the substrate after the annealing process.

  4. Improvement of carbon nanotubes films conductivity for use in biomedical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybowska-Sarapuk, Łucja; Janczak, Daniel; Krzemiński, Jakub; Lepak, Sandra; Łekawa-Raus, Agnieszka; MłoŻniak, Anna; Jakubowska, Małgorzata

    2017-08-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns and sheets due to their biocompatibility, very good mechanical strength and flexibility can find wide range of applications in nanomedicine, inter alia as mechanical actuators for artificial muscles or electrodes used for deep brain stimulation. However, because of CNT film behavior in liquid environment, before their using in biological applications, they should be coated with a special protective layer. The purpose of created coatings is not only to protect the films, but also to increase their conductivity. The aim of the research was to test various methods of achieving such coatings on CNT films and to evaluate quality and flexibility of coated CNT films. The coatings were made using various suspensions containing polymer materials such methyl polymethacrylate and conductive silver flakes. The methods tested in this study were: dipping, painting and flooding of the CNT yarns.

  5. Continuous adjustment of threshold voltage in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors through gate engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Donglai; Zhao, Chenyi; Liu, Lijun; Zhang, Zhiyong; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2018-04-01

    In this letter, we report a gate engineering method to adjust threshold voltage of carbon nanotube (CNT) based field-effect transistors (FETs) continuously in a wide range, which makes the application of CNT FETs especially in digital integrated circuits (ICs) easier. Top-gated FETs are fabricated using solution-processed CNT network films with stacking Pd and Sc films as gate electrodes. By decreasing the thickness of the lower layer metal (Pd) from 20 nm to zero, the effective work function of the gate decreases, thus tuning the threshold voltage (Vt) of CNT FETs from -1.0 V to 0.2 V. The continuous adjustment of threshold voltage through gate engineering lays a solid foundation for multi-threshold technology in CNT based ICs, which then can simultaneously provide high performance and low power circuit modules on one chip.

  6. Immobilised carbon nanotubes as carrier for Co-Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiessen, J.; Rose, A.; Kiendl, I.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Curulla-Ferre, D. [Total S.A., Gas and Power, Paris La Defense (France)

    2011-07-01

    A possibility to immobilise carbon nanotubes (CNT) to make them applicable in a technical scale fixed bed reactor is studied. The approach to fabricate millimetre scale composites containing CNT presented in this work is to confine the nano-carbon in macro porous ceramic particles. Thus CNT were grown on the inner surface of silica and alumina pellets and spheres, respectively. Cobalt nano particles were successfully deposited on the carbon surface inside the two types of ceramic carriers and the systems were tested in Fischer - Tropsch synthesis (FTS). The cobalt mass related activity of these novel catalysts is similar to a conventional system. The selectivities of the Co/CNT/ceramic composites were compared with non supported CNT and carbon nanofibres (CNF). (orig.)

  7. Large-current-controllable carbon nanotube field-effect transistor in electrolyte solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myodo, Miho; Inaba, Masafumi; Ohara, Kazuyoshi; Kato, Ryogo; Kobayashi, Mikinori; Hirano, Yu; Suzuki, Kazuma; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Large-current-controllable carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs) were fabricated with mm-long CNT sheets. The sheets, synthesized by remote-plasma-enhanced CVD, contained both single- and double-walled CNTs. Titanium was deposited on the sheet as source and drain electrodes, and an electrolyte solution was used as a gate electrode (solution gate) to apply a gate voltage to the CNTs through electric double layers formed around the CNTs. The drain current came to be well modulated as electrolyte solution penetrated into the sheets, and one of the solution gate CNT-FETs was able to control a large current of over 2.5 A. In addition, we determined the transconductance parameter per tube and compared it with values for other CNT-FETs. The potential of CNT sheets for applications requiring the control of large current is exhibited in this study.

  8. Compatibilizing role of carbon nanotubes in poly(vinyl alcohol)/starch blend

    KAUST Repository

    Jose, Jobin Vinodh

    2014-10-03

    Polymer nanocomposites based on poly(vinyl alcohol)/starch blend and carbon nanotubes (CNT) were prepared by solution mixing, followed by casting. Glycerol was used as a plasticizer and added in the starch dispersion. The uniform dispersion of CNT in water before mixing with PVA/starch blend, was achieved by using an Ultrasonicator probe. The composites were characterized by measurement of tensile properties, thermal analysis, FE-SEM, TEM, XRD studies, and water uptake. It was observed that the decrease in tensile strength, modulus, and elongation at break on addition of starch into PVA can be arrested by incorporation of CNT. The strong physical bonding such as hydrogen bonding among the hydroxyl groups of polymer components and oxygen containing groups on CNT surface resulted in a more tortuous path for the water to follow, lowering of water uptake. Thermal analysis and spectroscopic images showed an increase in blend homogeneity in the presence of CNT.

  9. Initiation of vacuum breakdown and failure mechanism of the carbon nanotube during thermal field emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Cai; Lie, Liu; Jin-Chuan, Ju; Xue-Long, Zhao; Hong-Yu, Zhou; Xiao, Wang

    2016-04-01

    The carbon nanotube (CNT)-based materials can be used as vacuum device cathodes. Owing to the excellent field emission properties of CNT, it has great potentials in the applications of an explosive field emission cathode. The falling off of CNT from the substrate, which frequently appears in experiments, restricts its application. In addition, the onset time of vacuum breakdown limits the performance of the high-power explosive-emission-cathode-based diode. In this paper, the characteristics of the CNT, electric field strength, contact resistance and the kind of substrate material are varied to study the parameter effects on the onset time of vacuum breakdown and failure mechanism of the CNT by using the finite element method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11305263 and 61401484).

  10. Interaction between fullerene halves C{sub n} (n ≤ 40) and single wall carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Amrish, E-mail: amrish99@gmail.com; Kaur, Sandeep, E-mail: sipusukhn@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala (India); Mudahar, Isha, E-mail: isha@pbi.ac.in [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences, Punjabi University, Patiala (India)

    2016-05-06

    We have investigated the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube with small fullerene halves C{sub n} (n ≤ 40) which are covalently bonded to the side wall of an armchair single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) using first principle method based on density functional theory. The fullerene size results in weak bonding between fullerene halves and carbon nanotube (CNT). Further, it was found that the C-C bond distance that attaches the fullerene half and CNT is of the order of 1.60 Å. The calculated binding energies indicate the stability of the complexes formed. The HOMO-LUMO gaps and electron density of state plots points towards the metallicity of the complex formed. Our calculations on charge transfer reveal that very small amount of charge is transferred from CNT to fullerene halves.

  11. Interaction between fullerene halves C_n (n ≤ 40) and single wall carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Amrish; Kaur, Sandeep; Mudahar, Isha

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube with small fullerene halves C_n (n ≤ 40) which are covalently bonded to the side wall of an armchair single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) using first principle method based on density functional theory. The fullerene size results in weak bonding between fullerene halves and carbon nanotube (CNT). Further, it was found that the C-C bond distance that attaches the fullerene half and CNT is of the order of 1.60 Å. The calculated binding energies indicate the stability of the complexes formed. The HOMO-LUMO gaps and electron density of state plots points towards the metallicity of the complex formed. Our calculations on charge transfer reveal that very small amount of charge is transferred from CNT to fullerene halves.

  12. In-situ hydrothermal synthesis of three-dimensional MnO2-CNT nanocomposites and their electrochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Fei; Santhanagopalan, Sunand; Wang, Ying; Meng, Dennis Desheng

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) MnO 2 -carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposites were prepared by a simple one-pot hydrothermal method. An electrode was then prepared with these nanocomposites. For comparative investigation, MnO 2 microspheres were also hydrothermally prepared without adding CNTs. The as-synthesized MnO 2 microspheres were then mechanically mixed with CNTs to prepare a subsequent electrode. The samples were characterized by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical methods. It has been revealed that a 3-D conductive network of CNTs was formed with microspheres of MnO 2 nanorods interwoven with and connected by CNTs. As a result, the hydrothermally mixed MnO 2 -CNT electrode showed a higher specific capacitance than the mechanically mixed electrode. It has therefore been concluded that the hydrothermal mixing method yields a more homogeneous product that is better suited to take full advantages of both the high capacitance of MnO 2 and the high electrical conductivity of CNTs. The 3-D MnO 2 -CNT nanocomposites reported herein have provided a promising electrode material for supercapacitors and other electrochemical energy storage/conversion devices.

  13. In-situ hydrothermal synthesis of three-dimensional MnO{sub 2}-CNT nanocomposites and their electrochemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Fei; Santhanagopalan, Sunand [Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Wang, Ying [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Meng, Dennis Desheng, E-mail: dmeng@mtu.ed [Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

    2010-06-11

    Three-dimensional (3-D) MnO{sub 2}-carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposites were prepared by a simple one-pot hydrothermal method. An electrode was then prepared with these nanocomposites. For comparative investigation, MnO{sub 2} microspheres were also hydrothermally prepared without adding CNTs. The as-synthesized MnO{sub 2} microspheres were then mechanically mixed with CNTs to prepare a subsequent electrode. The samples were characterized by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical methods. It has been revealed that a 3-D conductive network of CNTs was formed with microspheres of MnO{sub 2} nanorods interwoven with and connected by CNTs. As a result, the hydrothermally mixed MnO{sub 2}-CNT electrode showed a higher specific capacitance than the mechanically mixed electrode. It has therefore been concluded that the hydrothermal mixing method yields a more homogeneous product that is better suited to take full advantages of both the high capacitance of MnO{sub 2} and the high electrical conductivity of CNTs. The 3-D MnO{sub 2}-CNT nanocomposites reported herein have provided a promising electrode material for supercapacitors and other electrochemical energy storage/conversion devices.

  14. The quest for highly sensitive QCM humidity sensors: the coating of CNT/MOF composite sensing films as case study

    KAUST Repository

    Chappanda, Karumbaiah. N.

    2017-11-01

    The application of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as a sensing layer has been attracting great interest over the last decade, due to their uniform properties in terms of high porosity and tunability, which provides a large surface area and/or centers for trapping/binding a targeted analyte. Here we report the fabrication of a highly sensitive humidity sensor that is based on composite thin films of HKUST-1 MOF and carbon nanotubes (CNT). The composite sensing films were fabricated by spin coating technique on a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) and a comparison of their shift in resonance frequencies to adsorbed water vapor (5 to 75% relative humidity) is presented. Through optimization of the CNT and HKUST-1 composition, we could demonstrate a 230% increase in sensitivity compared to plain HKUST-1 film. The optimized CNT-HKUST-1 composite thin films are stable, reliable, and have an average sensitivity of about 2.5×10−5 (Δf/f) per percent of relative humidity, which is up to ten times better than previously reported QCM-based humidity sensors. The approach presented here is facile and paves a promising path towards enhancing the sensitivity of MOF-based sensors.

  15. Facile Synthesis of Pt Nanoparticle and Graphene Composite Materials: Comparison of Electrocatalytic Activity with Analogous CNT Composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jihye; Jang, Ho Young; Jung, Insub; Yoon, Yeoheung; Jang, Heejeong; Lee, Hyoyoung; Park, Sungho [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Here, we present a facile method to synthesize Pt nanoparticles (NPs) and graphene composite materials (Pt/G) via vacuum filtration. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates were used to separate Pt/G composite and liquid phase. This method can be used to easily tune the mass ratio of Pt NPs and graphene. Pt NPs, graphene, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as building blocks were characterized by a variety of techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. We compared the electrocatalytic activities of Pt/G with Pt NP and CNT films (Pt/CNT) by cyclic voltammetry (CV), CO oxidation, and methanol oxidation. Pt/G was much more stable than pure Pt films. Also, Pt/G had better electrochemical activity, CO tolerance and methanol oxidation than Pt/CNT loaded with the same amount of Pt NPs due to the better dispersion of Pt NPs on graphene flakes without aggregation. We further synthesized Au Pt disk/G and Pt nanorods/G to determine if our synthetic method can be applied to other NP shapes such as nanodisks and nanorods, for further electrocatalysis studies.

  16. MnO2/CNT supported Pt and PtRu nanocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunmei; Wang, Hongjuan; Peng, Feng; Liang, Jiahua; Yu, Hao; Yang, Jian

    2009-07-07

    Pt/MnO2/carbon nanotube (CNT) and PtRu/MnO2/CNT nanocomposites were synthesized by successively loading hydrous MnO2 and Pt (or PtRu alloy) nanoparticles on CNTs and were used as anodic catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The existence of MnO2 on the surface of CNTs effectively increases the proton conductivity of the catalyst, which then could remarkably improve the performance of the catalyst in methanol electro-oxidation. As a result, Pt/MnO2/CNTs show higher electrochemical active surface area and better methanol electro-oxidation activity, compared with Pt/CNTs. As PtRu alloy nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of MnO2/CNTs instead of Pt, the PtRu/MnO2/CNT catalyst shows not only excellent electro-oxidation activity to methanol with forward anodic peak current density of 901 A/gPt but also good CO oxidation ability with lower preadsorbed CO oxidation onset potential (0.33 V vs Ag/AgCl) and peak potential (0.49 V vs Ag/AgCl) at room temperature.

  17. Performance of the Chemical and Electrochemical Composites of PPy/CNT as Electrodes in Type I Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Canobre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polypyrrole (PPy is one of the most studied conducting polymers and a very promising material for various applications such as lithium-ion secondary batteries, light-emitting devices, capacitors, and supercapacitors, owing to its many advantages, including good processability, easy handling, and high electronic conductivity. In this work, PPy films were chemically and electrochemically synthesized, both in and around carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The cyclic voltammograms of the device, composed of the electrochemically synthesized PPy/CNT composites as working and counter electrodes (Type I supercapacitor with p-type doping, showed a predominantly capacitive profile with low impedance values and good electrochemical stability, with the anodic charge remaining almost constant (11.38 mC, a specific capacitance value of 530 F g−1 after 50 charge and discharge cycles, and a coulombic efficiency of 99.2%. The electrochemically synthesized PPy/CNT composite exhibited better electrochemical properties compared to those obtained for the chemically synthesized composite. Thus, the electrochemically synthesized PPy/CNT composite is a promising material to be used as electrodes in Type I supercapacitors.

  18. Effect of Co crystallinity on Co/CNT catalytic activity in CO/CO{sub 2} hydrogenation and CO disproportionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyak, Sergei A., E-mail: chernyak.msu@gmail.com [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskiye Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Department of Physical Chemistry, Leninsky Avenue 31, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Suslova, Evgeniya V.; Egorov, Alexander V.; Maslakov, Konstantin I. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskiye Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Savilov, Serguei V.; Lunin, Valery V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskiye Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Department of Physical Chemistry, Leninsky Avenue 31, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-30

    Highlights: • Amorphous and crystalline Co supported on CNTs were obtained by tuning of CNT surface. • CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation does not occur on amorphous Co particles. • Thermal activation of amorphous Co led to crystallization of metal. • Amorphous Co promotes CO disproportionation. • Carbon shells around the amorphous metal particles after the CO hydrogenation. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different degree of surface oxidation were used as supports for 5 wt.% Co catalysts. CNTs and Co/CNT catalysts were analyzed by XPS, nitrogen adsorption, TEM and electron diffraction to reveal their structure. High oxidation degree of CNT surface (8.6 at.% of O) and low Co loading led to predominantly amorphous Co species. This resulted in the absence of catalytic activity in both CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation in opposite to the catalyst supported on less oxidized CNTs (5.4 at.% of O) where Co species were found to be crystalline. Thermal treatment of inactive catalyst in H{sub 2} and He led to the formation of Co crystal phase which was active in catalysis. Co particle size in catalyst supported on strongly oxidized CNTs was unchanged during CO hydrogenation in opposite to Co supported on less oxidized CNTs. Carbon shell formation on the surface of amorphous Co particles during CO hydrogenation was revealed, which testified CO disproportionation. Qualitative mechanism of CO hydrogenation on small Co particles was proposed.

  19. Highly enhanced vapor sensing of multi-walled carbon nanotube network sensors by n-butylamine functionalization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slobodian, P.; Říha, Pavel; Cavallo, P.; Barbero, C.A.; Cvelbar, U.; Benlikaya, R.; Petras, D.; Sáha, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2014, August (2014), Article ID 589627 ISSN 1687-4110 Grant - others:UTB Zlín(CZ) IGA/FT/2014/013; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0111; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB13AR019 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : carbon nanotube (CNT) * multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) * nanotube networks * volatile organic compounds (VOC) Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 1.644, year: 2014

  20. Increased Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotube Yarns and Sheets through Chemical Modification and Electron Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Baker, James S.; Sola, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of carbon nanotube (CNT) forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading; and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated to macro-scale CNT forms where bulk material strength is limited by inter-tube electrostatic attraction and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess post processing of CNT sheet and yarn to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small molecule functionalization and e-beam irradiation was evaluated as a means to enhance tensile strength and Youngs modulus of the bulk CNT material. Mechanical testing results revealed a tensile strength increase in CNT sheets by 57 when functionalized, while an additional 48 increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated; compared to unfunctionalized sheets. Similarly, small molecule functionalization increased yarn tensile strength up to 25, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88 beyond that of the baseline yarn.

  1. Porous honeycomb structures formed from interconnected MnO2 sheets on CNT-coated substrates for flexible all-solid-state supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wen-Yin; Chen, You-Feng; Lu, Ke-Ming; Lin, Kuan-Jiuh

    2016-01-01

    The use of lightweight and easily-fabricated MnO2/carbon nanotube (CNT)-based flexible networks as binder-free electrodes and a polyvinyl alcohol/H2SO4 electrolyte for the formation of stretchable solid-state supercapacitors was examined. The active electrodes were fabricated from 3D honeycomb porous MnO2 assembled from cross-walled and interconnected sheet-architectural MnO2 on CNT-based plastic substrates (denoted as honeycomb MnO2/CNT textiles).These substrates were fabricated through a simple two-step procedure involving the coating of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) onto commercial textiles by a dipping-drying process and subsequent electrodeposition of the interconnected MnO2 sheets onto the MWCNT-coated textile. With such unique MnO2 architectures integrated onto CNT flexible films, good performance was achieved with a specific capacitance of 324 F/g at 0.5 A/g. A maximum energy density of 7.2 Wh/kg and a power density as high as 3.3 kW/kg were exhibited by the honeycomb MnO2/CNT network device, which is comparable to the performance of other carbon-based and metal oxide/carbon-based solid-state supercapacitor devices. Specifically, the long-term cycling stability of this material is excellent, with almost no loss of its initial capacitance and good Coulombic efficiency of 82% after 5000 cycles. These impressive results identify these materials as a promising candidate for use in environmentally friendly, low-cost, and high-performance flexible energy-storage devices. PMID:26726724

  2. Oriented nanotube electrodes for lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Arthur J.; Zhu, Kai; Wang, Qing

    2013-03-05

    An electrode having an oriented array of multiple nanotubes is disclosed. Individual nanotubes have a lengthwise inner pore defined by interior tube walls which extends at least partially through the length of the nanotube. The nanotubes of the array may be oriented according to any identifiable pattern. Also disclosed is a device featuring an electrode and methods of fabrication.

  3. Electrochemical capacitance characteristics of patterned ruthenium dioxide-carbon nanotube nanocomposites grown onto graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, Yi-Ting [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Lee, Kuei-Yi, E-mail: kylee@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Huang, Ying-Sheng [Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, No. 43, Section 4, Keelung Road, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Graphene was grown on Cu foil by mobile thermal chemical vapor deposition system. • CNT was synthesized on graphene for RuO{sub 2} nanostructure growth by thermal chemical vapor deposition system. • The CNT growth location was fixed through the use of photolithography technique, thereby increasing the specific area. • RuO{sub 2} nanostructures were coated onto CNT bundle arrays through metal organic chemical vapor deposition, in order to utilize its pseudo capacitive property. - Abstract: In this study, graphene was used as a conductive substrate for vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundle arrays growth, to be used as an electrode for electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC), as graphene and CNT exhibit good conductivity and excellent chemical stability. Both of them are composed of carbon, therefore making a superior adhesion between them. The configuration of bundle arrays provided a relatively higher specific surface area in contact with electrolyte, thereby resulting in demonstratively higher capacitance. Moreover, as the RuO{sub 2} nanostructures have good pseudocapacitance characteristics, they were coated onto vertically aligned CNT bundle arrays in order to effectively enhance the EDLC performances. The characteristics of CNT/graphene, CNT bundle/graphene, and RuO{sub 2}/CNT bundle/graphene electrodes were examined with the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, their electrochemical properties were investigated by an electrochemical analyzer. The specific capacitances of CNT/graphene, CNT bundle/graphene, and RuO{sub 2}/CNT bundle/graphene were 4.64, 6.65, and 128.40 F/g at the scan rate of 0.01 V/s, respectively.

  4. Electrochemical capacitance characteristics of patterned ruthenium dioxide-carbon nanotube nanocomposites grown onto graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, Yi-Ting; Lee, Kuei-Yi; Huang, Ying-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphene was grown on Cu foil by mobile thermal chemical vapor deposition system. • CNT was synthesized on graphene for RuO 2 nanostructure growth by thermal chemical vapor deposition system. • The CNT growth location was fixed through the use of photolithography technique, thereby increasing the specific area. • RuO 2 nanostructures were coated onto CNT bundle arrays through metal organic chemical vapor deposition, in order to utilize its pseudo capacitive property. - Abstract: In this study, graphene was used as a conductive substrate for vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundle arrays growth, to be used as an electrode for electrochemical double layer capacitor (EDLC), as graphene and CNT exhibit good conductivity and excellent chemical stability. Both of them are composed of carbon, therefore making a superior adhesion between them. The configuration of bundle arrays provided a relatively higher specific surface area in contact with electrolyte, thereby resulting in demonstratively higher capacitance. Moreover, as the RuO 2 nanostructures have good pseudocapacitance characteristics, they were coated onto vertically aligned CNT bundle arrays in order to effectively enhance the EDLC performances. The characteristics of CNT/graphene, CNT bundle/graphene, and RuO 2 /CNT bundle/graphene electrodes were examined with the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, their electrochemical properties were investigated by an electrochemical analyzer. The specific capacitances of CNT/graphene, CNT bundle/graphene, and RuO 2 /CNT bundle/graphene were 4.64, 6.65, and 128.40 F/g at the scan rate of 0.01 V/s, respectively

  5. Growth of linear Ni-filled carbon nanotubes by local arc discharge in liquid ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagara, Takuya [Department of Electric Engineering, Graduated School of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Surugadai Kanda, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Kurumi, Satoshi [Department of Electric Engineering, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Surugadai Kanda, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Suzuki, Kaoru, E-mail: kaoru@ele.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp [Department of Electric Engineering, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Surugadai Kanda, Chiyoda, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    The cylindrical geometry of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) allows them to be filled with metal catalysts; the resulting metal-filled CNTs possess different properties depending on the filler metal. Here we report the synthesis of Ni-filled CNTs in which Ni is situated linearly and homogeneously by local arc discharge in liquid ethanol. The structural characteristics of synthesized Ni-filled CNTs were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the relationship between pyrolysis conditions and the length and diameter of Ni-filled CNTs was examined. The encapsulated Ni was identified by a TEM-equipped energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscope and found to have a single-crystal fcc structure by nano-beam diffraction. The features of linear Ni-filled CNT are expected to be applicable to probes for magnetic force microscopy.

  6. Investigation of the influence of geometric parameters of carbon nanotube arrays on their adhesion properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il’ina, M. V.; Konshin, A. A.; Il’in, O. I.; Rudyk, N. N.; Fedotov, A. A.; Ageev, O. A.

    2018-03-01

    The results of experimental studies of adhesion of carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays with different geometric parameters and orientations using atomic-force microscopy are presented. The adhesion values of CNT arrays were determined, which were from 82 to 1315 nN depending on the parameters of the array. As a result, it was established that the adhesion of a CNT array increases with an increase in branching and disorientation of the array, as well as with the growth of the aspect ratio of CNTs in the array.

  7. Metal-phthalocyanine functionalized carbon nanotubes as catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction: A theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Walter

    2012-07-01

    The covalent functionalization of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with transition metal phthalocyanines (MPc, with M = Mn, Fe and Co) are addressed by density functional calculations. The CNT-MPc catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is investigated through the O2 stretching frequency adsorbed on the phthalocyanine metal center. We find better reduction abilities when the CNT functionalization occurs through sp2-like bonds. Multiple stable-spin states for the M-O2 adduct are also found for M = Mn and Fe, suggesting higher ORR rates. The CNT-MPc complexes show metallic characteristics, suggesting favorable conditions to work as ORR cathode catalysts in fuel cells.

  8. Recent Developments in Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Water Purification and Gas Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Kallista; Dumée, Ludovic; Schütz, Jürg; She, Mary; Huynh, Chi; Hawkins, Stephen; Duke, Mikel; Gray, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are nanoscale cylinders of graphene with exceptional properties such as high mechanical strength, high aspect ratio and large specific surface area. To exploit these properties for membranes, macroscopic structures need to be designed with controlled porosity and pore size. This manuscript reviews recent progress on two such structures: (i) CNT Bucky-papers, a non-woven, paper like structure of randomly entangled CNTs, and (ii) isoporous CNT membranes, where the hollow CNT interior acts as a membrane pore. The construction of these two types of membranes will be discussed, characterization and permeance results compared, and some promising applications presented.

  9. Recent Developments in Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Water Purification and Gas Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Gray

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are nanoscale cylinders of graphene with exceptional properties such as high mechanical strength, high aspect ratio and large specific surface area. To exploit these properties for membranes, macroscopic structures need to be designed with controlled porosity and pore size. This manuscript reviews recent progress on two such structures: (i CNT Bucky-papers, a non-woven, paper like structure of randomly entangled CNTs, and (ii isoporous CNT membranes, where the hollow CNT interior acts as a membrane pore. The construction of these two types of membranes will be discussed, characterization and permeance results compared, and some promising applications presented.

  10. Prediction of energy absorption characteristics of aligned carbon nanotube/epoxy nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidt, D; Figiel, Ł; Buggy, M

    2012-01-01

    This research aims ultimately at improving the impact performance of laminates by applying a coating of epoxy containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Here, 2D and 3D computational modelling was carried out to predict energy absorption characteristics of aligned CNT/epoxy nanocomposites subjected to macroscopic compression under different strain rates (quasi-static and impact rates). The influence of the rate-dependent matrix behaviour, CNT aspect ratio and CNT volume fraction on the energy absorption characteristics of the nanocomposites was evaluated. A strong correlation between those parameters was found, which provides an insight into a rate-dependent behaviour of the nanocomposites, and can help to tune their energy absorption characteristics.

  11. Multifunctional Material Structures Based on Laser-Etched Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Emplit

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available High-power electronics in the transportation and aerospace sectors need size and weight reduction. Multifunctional and multistructured materials are currently being developed to couple electromagnetic (EM and thermal properties, i.e., shielding against electromagnetic impulsions, and thermal management across the thermal interface material (TIM. In this work, we investigate laser-machined patterned carbon nanotube (CNT micro-brushes as an alternative to metallic structures for driving simultaneously EM and heat propagation. The thermal and electromagnetic response of the CNT array is expected to be sensitive to the micro-structured pattern etched in the CNT brush.

  12. Improved tensile and buckling behavior of defected carbon nanotubes utilizing boron nitride coating – A molecular dynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badjian, H.; Setoodeh, A.R., E-mail: setoodeh@sutech.ac.ir

    2017-02-15

    Synthesizing inorganic nanostructures such as boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have led to immense studies due to their many interesting functional features such as piezoelectricity, high temperature resistance to oxygen, electrical insulation, high thermal conductivity and very long lengths as physical features. In order to utilize the superior properties of pristine and defected carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a hybrid nanotube is proposed in this study by forming BNNTs surface coating on the CNTs. The benefits of such coating on the tensile and buckling behavior of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are illustrated through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the resulted nanostructures during the deformation. The AIREBO and Tersoff-Brenner potentials are employed to model the interatomic forces between the carbon and boron nitride atoms, respectively. The effects of chiral indices, aspect ratio, presence of mono-vacancy defects and coating dimension on coated/non-coated CNTs are examined. It is demonstrated that the coated defective CNTs exhibit remarkably enhanced ultimate strength, buckling load capacity and Young's modulus. The proposed coating not only enhances the mechanical properties of the resulted nanostructure, but also conceals it from few external factors impacting the behavior of the CNT such as humidity and high temperature.

  13. Preparation and Application of Conductive Textile Coatings Filled with Honeycomb Structured Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Govaert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical conductive textile coatings with variable amounts of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are presented. Formulations of textile coatings were prepared with up to 15 wt % of CNT, based on the solid weight of the binder. The binders are water based polyacrylate dispersions. The CNTs were mixed into the binder dispersion starting from a commercially available aqueous CNT dispersion that is compatible with the binder dispersion. Coating formulations with variable CNT concentrations were applied on polyester and cotton woven and knitted fabrics by different textile coating techniques: direct coating, transfer coating, and screen printing. The coatings showed increasing electrical conductivity with increasing CNT concentration. The coatings can be regarded to be electrically conductive (sheet resistivity<103 Ohm/sq starting at 3 wt% CNT. The degree of dispersion of the carbon nanotubes particles inside the coating was visualized by scanning electron microscopy. The CNT particles form honeycomb structured networks in the coatings, proving a high degree of dispersion. This honeycomb structure of CNT particles is forming a conductive network in the coating leading to low resistivity values.

  14. In situ carbon nanotube reinforcements in a plasma-sprayed aluminum oxide nanocomposite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balani, K.; Zhang, T.; Karakoti, A.; Li, W.Z.; Seal, S.; Agarwal, A.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are potential reinforcements for toughening the ceramic matrix. The critical issue of avoiding CNT agglomeration and introducing CNT-matrix anchoring has challenged many researchers to improve the mechanical properties of the CNT reinforced nanocomposite. In the current work, dispersed CNTs are grown on Al 2 O 3 powder particles in situ by the catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) technique. Consequently, 0.5 wt.% CNT-reinforced Al 2 O 3 particles were successfully plasma sprayed to obtain a 400 μm thick coating on the steel substrate. In situ CNTs grown on Al 2 O 3 shows a promising enhancement in hardness and fracture toughness of the plasma-sprayed coating attributed to the existence of strong metallurgical bonding between Al 2 O 3 particles and CNTs. In addition, CNT tentacles have imparted multi-directional reinforcement in securing the Al 2 O 3 splats. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy shows interfacial fusion between Al 2 O 3 and CNT and the formation of Y-junction nanotubes

  15. The synthesis and characterization of tributyl phosphate grafted carbon nano-tubes by the floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition method and their sorption behavior towards uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shruti Mishra; Jaya Dwivedi; Amar Kumar; Nalini Sankararamakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nano-tubes (CNTs) were synthesized by the floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique using ferrocene in benzene as the hydrocarbon source. The functionalization of CNTs was carried out by oxidation (CNT-OX) and grafting with a tributyl phosphate (TBP) ligand (CNT-TBP). Various spectroscopic techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infra Red Spectroscopy (FTIR), BET surface area and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the adsorbents. FTIR and XPS studies revealed the efficient grafting of the TBP ligand on the CNT surface. The effect of the initial pH and the contact time for the maximum adsorption of U(VI) with CNT-plain, CNT-OX and CNT-TBP was studied. The spontaneity of the sorption was confirmed by thermodynamic data. A pseudo second order model with a regression coefficient of ≥0.978 was obtained for CNT-TBP and equilibrium was reached within 3 h. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity of U(VI) at pH 5 for CNT, CNT-OX and CNT-TBP was found to be 66.6, 100.0 and 166.6 mg.g -1 respectively. Using 0.1 M HCl as a de-sorbent, recyclability studies were carried out for three cycles. The probable mechanism of adsorption between U(VI) and CNT-TBP could be understood through FTIR and XPS techniques. (authors)

  16. Nano-yarn carbon nanotube fiber based enzymatic glucose biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhigang; Burugapalli, Krishna; Moussy, Francis; Song, Wenhui; Li Yali; Zhong Xiaohua

    2010-01-01

    A novel brush-like electrode based on carbon nanotube (CNT) nano-yarn fiber has been designed for electrochemical biosensor applications and its efficacy as an enzymatic glucose biosensor demonstrated. The CNT nano-yarn fiber was spun directly from a chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) gas flow reaction using a mixture of ethanol and acetone as the carbon source and an iron nano-catalyst. The fiber, 28 μm in diameter, was made of bundles of double walled CNTs (DWNTs) concentrically compacted into multiple layers forming a nano-porous network structure. Cyclic voltammetry study revealed a superior electrocatalytic activity for CNT fiber compared to the traditional Pt-Ir coil electrode. The electrode end tip of the CNT fiber was freeze-fractured to obtain a unique brush-like nano-structure resembling a scale-down electrical 'flex', where glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme was immobilized using glutaraldehyde crosslinking in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). An outer epoxy-polyurethane (EPU) layer was used as semi-permeable membrane. The sensor function was tested against a standard reference electrode. The sensitivities, linear detection range and linearity for detecting glucose for the miniature CNT fiber electrode were better than that reported for a Pt-Ir coil electrode. Thermal annealing of the CNT fiber at 250 deg. C for 30 min prior to fabrication of the sensor resulted in a 7.5 fold increase in glucose sensitivity. The as-spun CNT fiber based glucose biosensor was shown to be stable for up to 70 days. In addition, gold coating of the electrode connecting end of the CNT fiber resulted in extending the glucose detection limit to 25 μM. To conclude, superior efficiency of CNT fiber for glucose biosensing was demonstrated compared to a traditional Pt-Ir sensor.

  17. Nano-yarn carbon nanotube fiber based enzymatic glucose biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhigang; Song, Wenhui; Burugapalli, Krishna; Moussy, Francis; Li, Ya-Li; Zhong, Xiao-Hua

    2010-04-01

    A novel brush-like electrode based on carbon nanotube (CNT) nano-yarn fiber has been designed for electrochemical biosensor applications and its efficacy as an enzymatic glucose biosensor demonstrated. The CNT nano-yarn fiber was spun directly from a chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) gas flow reaction using a mixture of ethanol and acetone as the carbon source and an iron nano-catalyst. The fiber, 28 µm in diameter, was made of bundles of double walled CNTs (DWNTs) concentrically compacted into multiple layers forming a nano-porous network structure. Cyclic voltammetry study revealed a superior electrocatalytic activity for CNT fiber compared to the traditional Pt-Ir coil electrode. The electrode end tip of the CNT fiber was freeze-fractured to obtain a unique brush-like nano-structure resembling a scale-down electrical 'flex', where glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme was immobilized using glutaraldehyde crosslinking in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). An outer epoxy-polyurethane (EPU) layer was used as semi-permeable membrane. The sensor function was tested against a standard reference electrode. The sensitivities, linear detection range and linearity for detecting glucose for the miniature CNT fiber electrode were better than that reported for a Pt-Ir coil electrode. Thermal annealing of the CNT fiber at 250 °C for 30 min prior to fabrication of the sensor resulted in a 7.5 fold increase in glucose sensitivity. The as-spun CNT fiber based glucose biosensor was shown to be stable for up to 70 days. In addition, gold coating of the electrode connecting end of the CNT fiber resulted in extending the glucose detection limit to 25 µM. To conclude, superior efficiency of CNT fiber for glucose biosensing was demonstrated compared to a traditional Pt-Ir sensor.

  18. Mechanical characterization of epoxy composite with multiscale reinforcements: Carbon nanotubes and short carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmanian, S.; Suraya, A.R.; Shazed, M.A.; Zahari, R.; Zainudin, E.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Multiscale composite was prepared by incorporation of carbon nanotubes and fibers. • Carbon nanotubes were also grown on short carbon fibers to enhance stress transfer. • Significant improvements were achieved in mechanical properties of composites. • Synergic effect of carbon nanotubes and fibers was demonstrated. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and short carbon fibers were incorporated into an epoxy matrix to fabricate a high performance multiscale composite. To improve the stress transfer between epoxy and carbon fibers, CNT were also grown on fibers through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method to produce CNT grown short carbon fibers (CSCF). Mechanical characterization of composites was performed to investigate the synergy effects of CNT and CSCF in the epoxy matrix. The multiscale composites revealed significant improvement in elastic and storage modulus, strength as well as impact resistance in comparison to CNT–epoxy or CSCF–epoxy composites. An optimum content of CNT was found which provided the maximum stiffness and strength. The synergic reinforcing effects of combined fillers were analyzed on the fracture surface of composites through optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  19. Facile and large-scale synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotube/silver nanocrystal nanohybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Chao; Li Wenwen; Jin Yizheng; Kong Hao

    2006-01-01

    A facile and efficient aqueous phase-based strategy to synthesize carbon nanotube (CNT)/silver nanocrystal nanohybrids at room temperature is reported. In the presence of carboxyl group functionalized or poly(acrylic acid)- (PAA-) grafted CNTs, silver nanoparticles were in situ generated from AgNO 3 aqueous solution, without any additional reducing agent or irradiation treatment, and readily attached to the CNT convex surfaces, leading to the CNT/Ag nanohybrids. The produced silver nanoparticles were determined to be face-centred cubic silver nanocrystals by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), electron diffraction (ED) and x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analyses. Detailed experiments showed that this strategy can also be applied to different CNTs, including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs), multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), and polymer-functionalized CNTs. The nanoparticle sizes can be controlled from 2 nm to 10-20 nm and the amount of metal deposited on CNT surfaces can be as high as 82 wt%. Furthermore, large-scale (10 g or more) CNT/Ag nanohybrids can be prepared via this approach without the decrease of efficiency and quality. This approach can also be extended to prepare Au single crystals by CNTs. The facile, efficient and large-scale availability of the nanohybrids makes their tremendous potential realizable and developable

  20. Carbon nanotubes in blends of polycaprolactone/thermoplastic starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Ata; Favis, Basil D

    2013-10-15

    Despite the importance of polymer-polymer multiphase systems, very little work has been carried out on the preferred localization of solid inclusions in such multiphase systems. In this work, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are dispersed with polycaprolactone (PCL) and thermoplastic starch (TPS) at several CNT contents via a combined solution/twin-screw extrusion melt mixing method. A PCL/CNT masterbatch was first prepared and then blended with 20 wt% TPS. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy images reveal a CNT localization principally in the TPS phase and partly at the PCL/TPS interface, with no further change by annealing. This indicates a strong driving force for the CNTs toward TPS. Young's model predicts that the nanotubes should be located at the interface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of extracted CNTs quantitatively confirms an encapsulation by TPS and reveals a covalent bonding of CNTs with thermoplastic starch. It appears likely that the nanotubes migrate to the interface, react with TPS and then are subsequently drawn into the low viscosity TPS phase. In a low shear rate/low shear stress internal mixer the nanotubes are found both in the PCL phase and at the PCL/TPS interface and have not completed the transit to the TPS phase. This latter result indicates the importance of choosing appropriate processing conditions in order to minimize kinetic effects. The addition of CNTs to PCL results in an increase in the crystallization temperature and a decrease in the percent crystallinity confirming the heterogeneous nucleating effect of the nanotubes. Finally, DMA analysis reveals a dramatic decrease in the starch rich phase transition temperature (~26 °C), for the system with nanotubes located in the TPS phase. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.